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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 49 MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 7

SUSTAINABLE CITY Boise looks for long-term solutions FEATURE 9

FORM AND FUNCTION BAM exhibit looks at artistry of everyday objects PICKS 14

TO DO LIST Fill out your social calendar SCREEN 23

LONG VOYAGE Literary classic Kon-Tiki comes to theaters

“We’ll spend a lot of time talking about blood.”

ARTS 22


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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone ZHagadone@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Sultan of Events: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editors: Amy Atkins, Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall, Christopher Schnoor Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Brad Hoyt, Brad@boiseweekly.com Zach Ritchie, Zach@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Elijah Jensen, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Adam Rosenlund, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow, Garry Trudeau Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2013 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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NOTE THE OFFICE OF GOOD INTENTIONS Sustainability seems burdened with a phantom set of air quotes. Just what defines “sustainability” is a tricky conversation, made trickier by how much civic leaders and campaigning politicians love to trot it out. There’s an unfortunate whiff of sloganeering to the term, and when government starts talking about it, bureaucracy seems to be waiting just offstage. Now the city of Boise is partnering with the Idaho Conservation League and Conservation Voters for Idaho to put its money where its mouth is when it comes to those twin municipal obsessions: sustainability and “livability.” As Boise Weekly News Editor George Prentice reports on Page 7, those efforts—in their infancy—will almost certainly include some kind of city department to steer various projects to further “green” in the City of Trees. It’s a noble concept and other cities have taken this route—notably Austin, Texas, which set up its own Office of Sustainability in 2010. Armed with a budget of $1.38 million, the office was launched with, as the Austin Chronicle reported April 5, “a pile of good intentions” and a slate of projects already under way by various other departments. Nonetheless, after three years, Austin’s Chief Sustainability Officer Lucia Athens is still in the unenviable position of justifying her job with little to show a skeptical City Council—except, of course, an amorphous feeling that Austin’s image of sustainability is “a key attractor for businesses that are coming here,” as she was quoted saying by the Chronicle. The problem—and peril with these kinds of initiatives—is that Austin’s sustainability office isn’t big enough or powerful enough to wrap its arms around the whole of city government to guide (much less push) its programs to fruition. What sets Boise’s plan apart from Austin’s reality, however, is the partnership between the city and conservation groups. In Austin, buy-in from the area’s environmental community has not been forthcoming and the city’s support has been lukewarm. That may well be the saving grace for a Boise “office of sustainability,” rescuing it from becoming a clearinghouse for eco-platitudes. If it’s true what Boise Mayor Dave Bieter says—that sustainability is “part of our city’s marrow”—the public would do well to remind its leaders that strong bones are important for the heavy lifting needed to make these efforts worthwhile. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Veiko Valencia TITLE: Process of Conflict MEDIUM: Oil and ink on strathmore paper. ARTIST STATEMENT: Come and visit my first solo exhibition, Silent Protest, at The Gallery at The Linen Building on First Thursday, June 6. You can also visit veikovvv.com.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. B AR RYM ANILOW.C OM

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS City of Boise considers new department of sustainability

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CITYDESK

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Art and the Material World

BW DOT MANILOW Barry “‘Mandy’-Slayer” Manilow has rescheduled his upcoming Boise concert. Manilow maniacs can get all the deets on Cobweb.

BW DOT WASHINGTON The recent bridge collapse in northern Washington state was caught on video thanks to security cameras at a nearby car dealership. See that video on Citydesk.

BW DOT OREGON An Oregon teen who was arrested for a Columbinestyle plot against his high school will be charged as an adult. Get the full story on Citydesk.

BW DOT IDAHO After the Boy Scouts of America voted to allow gay scouts, the sheriff of Kootenai County in north Idaho made claims that gay scouts would break state law. Read about it on Citydesk.

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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DOONESBURY

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EYESPY

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS Idaho Shakespeare Festival readies to open 2013 season

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SCREEN Kon-Tiki

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FOOD REVIEW Sakana Sushi

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WINE SIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

GHOST AND GO TOWN

Meridian? Meridian? Wherefore art thou, Meridian? For the life of me, I cannot remember when I last wrote about my hometown. That being, Meridian. I once wrote a feature article about it, but that was almost 18 years ago. I remember the piece quite clearly, mostly for the title—”Gawd, I Hate This Town!” However, between then and now, I’m drawing a blank—which I consider odd. Basically, I write two kinds of opinions—No. 1: about things I like very much, and No. 2: about things I very much don’t like. And when you’re nudging up to 1,000 separate opinions, believe me, you are in a constant search mode for either one. So you would think, wouldn’t you, that the subject of Meridian would have turned up in one or two of the intervening columns between “Gawd, I Hate This Town!” and whatever I end up titling this one? But no, if there’s another one (or two, or three) over the years, I don’t remember them. All of which says to me that either No. 1: I don’t like Meridian enough to write about it, or No. 2: I don’t dislike Meridian enough to write about it. And that seems pretty impossible, when you think about it, seeing as the conditions that prompted me to declare my disdain for Meridian as it was 18 years ago have, if anything, just gotten worse. (I should tell you that the title “Gawd, I Hate This Town!” was a tad exaggerated. Were I a less hyperbolic writer, I might have called that article “Gawd, I Hate This Traffic!” or maybe “Jeez-us, Where Did All These Gawd-Damn People Come From?!” But as you’ve probably noticed, I prefer to paint my pictures with the broadest of strokes.) I’ve been thinking a lot about this lately because I’ve been thinking a lot about Meridian lately. Specifically, I’ve been thinking about whether Meridian is the place in which I want to grow old and die. It was a fine place in which to be born and grow up. Ask any old Meridian native 50 years old or older. He or she will tell you, I’m confident, that the worst thing about growing up in Meridian in the ’30s, ’40, ’50s and even the ’60s was that it could be a bit boring. But “boring” isn’t such a bad thing to be for a place you’re growing up in, is it? Sure beats, say, “tectonically hyper-active.” Or “rich in pedophile-related opportunities.” Trouble is, it’s not so boring any more. Not to say it’s now competing with New York City (or even Boise) in the scintillation department. But compared to Meridian circa 1955, it’s like living in the middle of a mall food court. And I don’t mean that like it’s a good thing. It’s particularly crappy right now, as the Ada County Highway District (everybody’s favorite construction management team) has opened up the old town center and spread her innards out like a roadkill raccoon. But look, I don’t hold ACHD responsible WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

for turning my town into a pestilence of clogged arteries, open road sores and shifting detours. They’re only doing what they have always done, which is to try to figure out how to move a burgeoning body of drivers— at least half of whom insist on driving bigger and ever bigger vehicles—into, out of and around town without someone inadvertently careening their Tahoe into a yawning pit or a road crew. (It must be a bit like making plans to get an increasingly obese crowd out the same exits that were perfectly sufficient back when people weren’t eating themselves to death.) Nor can I blame the city’s administration. Sure, we have a mayor who seems to administer the city on the principle If it means that another picture of me appears in another newspaper article, on another television interview or on another public building wall, then it’s just gotta be good for Meridian. (Mayor Tammy de Weerd contributes a regular column for another weekly newspaper. She calls it “Tammy’s Musings.” That alone should tell us all we need to know about Mayor de Weerd.) We also have a city council that, first, approved a new, $20 million city hall big enough to throw a rodeo in, then botched a lawsuit against the company that built it to the tune of an additional $4 million, and then claimed they were only trying to save taxpayers money. But we mustn’t hold de Weerd and her posse responsible for what Meridian has become, either. Were more citizens to vote in municipal elections, we might get better municipal leaders. (Ms. de Weerd was re-elected—in 2011, well after the city hall fiasco became known—with less than one-tenth of the 50,000 eligible voters in Meridian. And with voter turnout being what it is, all the other city council members need to do is remember to vote for themselves, and it’s likely they’ll remain in office in perpetuity.) No, there’s no one thing to blame for Meridian being what it has become. In just over a generation, we have gone from a place with a character of its own, a personality (even if it was a boring personality), to an amorphous blob of a squat where even the city limits seem to fluctuate and flow like the membrane of some undulating California amoeba creature. I can’t love Meridian, I can’t hate it. I don’t even know what it is anymore—a long-gone cow-town memory, represented by some century-old sepia photos no one pays attention to anymore on a sterile city hall wall? Or just a meaningless smear on the map? (Incidentally, a “meridian” is a full or half circle that transects both poles. It is an entirely imaginary invention, existing only in the imagination of surveyors and map makers. Meridian’s meridian is just over 116 degrees west, for whatever that’s worth.)

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OPINION/TED RALL

WHY TO IMPEACH OBAMA Why is the FBI helping a monstrous dictator?

Forget the IRS, AP and Benghazi. The real scandal is President Barack Obama’s decision to support one of the world’s most evil dictators. In a little-noticed move, Obama’s FBI has arrested Fazliddin Kurbanov, a 30-year-old Uzbekistani political dissident who, were this 1983, would be dubbed a “freedom fighter.” Kurbanov, who came to Boise as a refugee in 2009, faces the catchall charges used by the feds: conspiracy to provide material support to a foreign terrorist organization—in this case, the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan—and conspiracy to provide material support to terrorists. The indictment alleges that he researched and made videos about how to make IEDs to use in Uzbekistan. Major plot point: Kurbanov’s “terror plot” did not target the United States. Originally based in rural Tajikistan and southern Kyrgyzstan, the IMU’s goal is to overthrow Uzbekistani President Islam Karimov, the most brutal dictator in Central Asia since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Karimov’s regime brooks no dissent: Torture and murder of political opponents is widespread. Karimov is best known for boiling dissidents such as Muzafar Avazov and Khuzniddin Alimov to death and for orchestrating the 2005 Andijan Massacre, in which at least 400 civilians were slaughtered. After Andijan, even the ethics-deficient Bush administration decided that enough was enough, pulling U.S. forces out of KarshiKhanabad airbase, which it had leased since 2001, and slashing military aid. Even by the cynical standards of international realpolitik, Karimov is radioactive— the kind of over-the-top despot Americans

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normally consider targets of “regime change,” or at least trade sanctions. “Radioactive” is an unfortunate choice of words, since Uzbekistan’s uranium is part of why the United States is sucking up to him. Rather than targeting Karimov with drones or cruise missiles, Obama has the butcher of Andijan on speed dial, reaching out in 2011 to ask the Uzbek leader for permission to ship war materiel through his benighted country into U.S.-occupied Afghanistan. In 2012, despite a Human Rights Watch report that found that life under Karimov had gotten worse since Andijan, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton and Obama agreed to restore Karimov’s billion-dollar aid package. To further ingratiate the United States to Karimov, the White House targeted the IMU. But the IMU has never attacked America. The IMU’s misfortune has been to fall on the wrong side of the “enemy of our friend is our enemy” equation. No doubt, the IMU is a violent insurgent group. During one of its summer offenses, it kidnapped four American climbers in 2000. But the fact that the climbers were American appears to be unrelated to their capture. IMU fighters have clashed with U.S. forces in Waziristan and Afghanistan. But the IMU has shown no sign of bringing the fight to the United States. IMU ideology is local and regional, limited to spreading Sharia-based governments first and foremost in Uzbekistan. The U.S. government is at war with radical Islam. The question is: In a conflict between a dictator and a small group of would-be revolutionaries, should we take sides—especially the side of the dictator?

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NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS PATR IC K S W EENEY

A SUSTAINABLE BOISE ‘It’s part of our city’s marrow’ GEORGE PRENTICE Lauren McLean fills notebooks the way others fill gas tanks. The difference is that the Boise City Council member uses what appears to be an inexhaustible collection of quotes, statistics and thoughts to fuel ideas, conversations and, on occasion, public policy or practice. Quite appropriately, her most recent volume relates to sustainability. “This?” McLean pointed to an already dogeared notebook. “This is my latest. I started this one on April 30.” Years from now, McLean and her City Hall colleagues may look back on April 30 as a critical crossroads on the path to making Boise more sustainable. Boise Weekly has learned that on that date, McLean and every other member of the Boise City Council sat down with Mayor Dave Bieter, officials from city departments of economic development and public works, and representatives from the Idaho Conservation League and the Conservation Voters for Idaho to create a new system of measuring sustainability. And if more than one elected official has his or her own way, that would include the creation of a new city office of sustainability. Bieter told BW that his administration is channeling more efforts “to integrate sustainability into everything we do as a city.” “Sustainability is part of our city’s marrow,” said Bieter. “It’s at the core of our efforts to make Boise the most livable city in the country.” But Boise simply calling itself “the most livable” city in the nation is more than a warm-and-fuzzy moniker destined for chamber of commerce brochures. Instead, McLean said, livability—and sustainability—is key to economic resilience. “It’s a big piece of the puzzle,” said McLean. “Being the most livable city means having a strong economy with equal opportunity for everyone. It’s about having a place where we love to live, clean air and a clean river, walking the hills with our families, and building strong neighborhoods.” And that vision for Boise, McLean added, needs to include strong stewardship to protect the city’s resources while ensuring efficient use of tax dollars. “We’re talking about a Boise that focuses on protection of our pristine and unique environment while saving money through strategic thinking about our energy decisions,” she said. “Equally important is that the city of Boise should be providing its citizens with the tools to do the same. And when we remind ourselves what a great place this is WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Boise City Councilwoman Lauren McLean (left): “This is how we’ll prepare for the next 150 years.” Sara Arkle, community conservation associate with ICL (right): “We’re talking about creating a roadmap”

to live, we’re telling the world the same and it ultimately impacts our ability to attract and retain the best and the brightest.” The city of Boise, primarily through its Public Works Department, has already instituted or proposed dozens of sustainability initiatives, including conversion of nearly 2,100 streetlights to LED technology, saving $65,000 annually; retrofitting public buildings with low-flow or automatic water fixtures; introducing solar technology to trigger an irrigation controller in Ann Morrison Park; implementing an anti-idling program; and, perhaps most successfully, initiating Curb It, the city’s curbside recycling program. McLean envisions a permanent city department or office that would serve as an administrative umbrella for sustainability efforts, which cross over into almost every current department at City Hall. “I’d like to see an office of sustainability that integrates the community, the economy and the environment, something that works with all the existing departments,” she said. McLean was quick to point out that other cities—including Austin, Baltimore, Seattle and even Hailey, Idaho—have created offices of sustainability. “I’m a big fan of the plan that Baltimore implemented,” said McLean, who added that a city plan—with tangible benchmarks on sustainability—was more important than the creation of a new office. “We can talk about all the ideas in the world, but unless we have a plan that we can measure up against, we can’t really prove that there has been any progress,” said McLean. That’s music to the ears of Sara Arkle, community conservation associate with the Idaho Conservation League. “Absolutely; we’re talking about creating a roadmap,” said Arkle. “Lauren and I have been talking about this for years, but now we’re talking about taking this to

another level.” Arkle said the biggest—and most pleasant—surprise was how energetically the city’s elected officials engaged on the issue at the April 30 meeting. “At the beginning of the meeting, the question was posed to everyone: ‘What does sustainability mean to each of you, and how does that interface with Boise’s current theme of livability?’ Everyone talked about commitment, respect and collaboration and how each of those are all a part of the city’s definition of livability. But when Councilman David Eberle said, ‘I think the only missing thing in that equation right now is the environment,’ everybody nodded and then they really dove into the issue.” Bieter told BW that he’s more than ready. “I’m looking forward to expanding our efforts to take Boise’s sustainability profile to an even higher level,” he said. And Arkle said ICL will help gather public comment on the effort. As BW was going to press, ICL was launching a special website—idahoconservation.org/keepboisegreat—that will send public input to the mayor and City Council. The timing couldn’t be better, said McLean. “This is our sesquicentennial year and we’re spending the year talking about our history. So, it’s a perfect time to start talking about our future,” she said. “I’ve already expressed my desire to see this start to move this summer and into this fall; by the end of this year, we can say, ‘We had a great 150 years, but this is how we’ll prepare for the next 150.’” McLean has already pulled out more than a few of her already-full notebooks to help collect ideas. “I used to be anxious about this, but now I’m confident that we’re really moving forward,” she said. “I think we’re hearing, loud and clear, from the Council and mayor that now is the time.”

WHERE THE HELL IS MEDIMONT? Marty Peterson, during a November 2011 City Club of Boise event, leaned over to friend and former colleague Chris Carlson (BW, Citizen, “Chris Carlson,” Nov. 2, 2011) and asked, “Just where the hell is Medimont?” Carlson, former newspaper reporter, press secretary to four-term Gov. Cecil Andrus, director of public affairs at the Department of Interior and founder of Gallatin Public Affairs, told Peterson that Medimont was a blink-andyou’ll-miss-it town in Kootenai County. But two years later, Carlson describes his home more poetically. “It’s a state of mind that one comes to terms with as they move through life,” he said, adding that “Medimont” literally means, “middle mountain. “At this balancing point—this medimont—we are at last at peace with our own mortality.” Carlson, who penned 2011’s Cecil Andrus: Idaho’s Greatest Governor, is set to unveil his second book in three years: Medimont Reflections; but this latest effort gives historical perspective to a number of contemporary issues: protection of natural Medimont Reflections hits resources, bookshelves in June. the Second Amendment, the right to life and respect for end-of-life wishes. Andrus says his former aide is still a firecracker—even though Carlson is battling both Parkinson’s disease and a rare form of cancer. “He especially loves giving the Republicans in Idaho hell for their systematic dismantling of the legacy he helped me to build,” said the former governor. “He pleads guilty to being biased, if not outright selfrighteous at times.” Carlson’s Medimont Reflections, which will hit bookstore shelves in June, takes aim at the GOP and even the Northwest Power Planning Council, to which Carlson was one of the first appointees. “The [council] has lost whatever usefulness it once had, is no longer coming close to the purpose its proponents originally envisioned, and it should be abolished,” writes Carlson. His book also includes some juicy political gossip, including how the late Frank Church won a 1956 Democratic primary (and ultimate election to the U.S. Senate), when an Elmore County ballot box went missing —Church won the primary by 200 votes. Carlson even writes, “There were more Democratic votes in a key precinct than there were registered voters.” “Some things are best left unsaid, undefined and outside the political arena,” writes Carlson. But Medimont Reflections is almost certain to be Idaho’s political read of the summer. —George Prentice

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CITIZEN

SAMANTHA WEST 18-year-old award winner on yesterdays, tomorrows and Mary Sues GEORGE PRENTICE

When you were younger, what did you dream of becoming? A waitress or scientist. But now that I’ve taken some real science classes, I can say that science is definitely out. May I presume that you’ve also moved on from waitressing? Now, more than anything, I really want to write screenplays. What type of movie or television program would you write? I love really good science fiction novels: Ender’s Game, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and anything by Neil Gaiman. When did you fall in love with writing? When I got to Capital High School. That’s where I took my first creative writing class in my sophomore year. Did you have a particular teacher who inspired you? Absolutely, Paula Uriarte [CHS Language Arts teacher]. I should also mention my A.P. English teacher, Carla Zumwalt, who really encouraged me to enter the Scholastic Art and Writing Awards. She said if I didn’t enter,

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I would regret it for the rest of my life. What did you choose for your portfolio entry? Two short stories, two nonfiction narratives and two poems. Give me a sense of what some of them are about. One of the narratives was about my vague memories of a first trip to New York when I was 3. I wrote another narrative about my mom, who is Palestinian, and the rumors being spread that she was Muslim. I remembered that from when I was 8. I called that story “Habibi.” It means “my love” in Arabic. That’s pretty powerful. I also used that theme for my college essay. How did you choose where you wanted to go to college? I visited Linfield College in McMinnville, Ore., in February and I entered a creative writing scholarship competition. I got a second-prize $16,000 scholarship. So obviously, that’s where I’ll be going.

ADAM R OS ENLU ND

Samantha West has quite a week ahead of her. As Boise Weekly is going to press, West is flying to New York, where she’ll be honored on the stage of Carnegie Hall as one of a select number of teens with a Portfolio Gold Award from the Alliance for Young Artists and Writers (previous winners include Truman Capote and Sylvia Plath). She’ll pick up a $10,000 cash scholarship just before winging back to Boise to join more than 400 of her fellow high-school seniors graduating Saturday, June 1. In between all of the congratulations and farewells, BW sat down with West and her family (including dad Jim, mom Sawsan, brother Jake, Moonlight the cat and six chickens in the yard).

Does the thought of going away to college excite or scare you? It’s terrifying. When will you need to pack up to leave? Sometime in August. I’m really too scared to look at the date. I wish you could testdrive a college like you test-drive a car. Why do semesters have to last a full three months? And do you think you’ll miss your younger brother when you move away? Probably more than I think I will. When did you find out that you had won the big scholarship that you’ll be picking up at Carnegie Hall? That was in March, the best month of my life. They said congratulations and I don’t remember much beyond that. If you had a chance to talk to your younger self, let’s say Samantha at the age of 13, what you would you tell her? I would tell her to stop putting too much effort into physics. It’s not going to pay off; you’re a writer. I would also tell her to stop writing about Mary Sues. What’s a Mary Sue? It’s a perfect character. You always need to give your characters some flaws. They’re a lot more interesting.

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Boise Art Museum m explo explores o the way we were CHRISTOPHER SCHNOOR

This is an era of instant access to new ideas and d perspe perspectives from around the g globe, in infusing and influencing the mainstream an nd inf nflu flu thought, behavior and creativity. cre difficult relate to It is sometimes diffic cult to rre e a time when forms forms, s, pattern patterns attern and manifestation of designs were the m anifesta festa esta cultural conventionss that ha e evolved years. over hundreds of yea ars.

JON NY FUE GO

Female Dan mask; Dan people; Liberia; 20th century; wood, country cloth, burlap, shell headband. From the collection of Kellie Cosho.

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In its exhibit Or Origins: rigins: ns: s: Objects O of Material Culture,, the e Bo Boise B Art Museum demonstra demonstrates tes tha that crosscultural fertilization hass influenced iinflu lu how materials are us sed and nd a used artistry between contrast contrasting ing so societies o Discovery. since before the Age e of Disco BOISEweekly | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | 9


JON NY FUE GO

Guardian figure on tripod legs; Guere/Wobe people; Liberia; 20th century; wood, cloth, fibers, shells, mud, bone. From the collection of Kellie Cosho.

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BAM has been celebrating its 75th anniversary with a series of three compelling exhibitions, all of which have a common thread: the multicultural, multi-formal aspects that connect today’s art to that from the past. The well-received Nick Cave show Meet Me at the t Center of the Earth, in 2012, combined found-object art, performance, fashion and th sculpture, sc drawing from various urban and tribal cultures, as well as shamanistic traditions. tr The yearlong exhibit Eastern Traditions-Western Expressions presented h historic and contemporary Asian and Asian-American artworks, demonstrating their t mutual influences in different media. Origins (which opened Feb. 23 and hangs through Jan. 12, 2014) is ano other yearlong project in this vein, albeit much broader and comprehensive iin scope. It underscores a spirit of invention that historic cultures share with modernism. w It’s quite an achievement for an isolated, regional art museum to pull off a production like Origins, which fills four galleries and intercono necting spaces with art and artifacts from four distinct indigenous n ccultures. Previously, BAM shows of this type have been smaller in scale, s focusing on individual collections. Here, Origins examines d diverse cultures ranging from Native American tribes of the SSouthwest (Arizona and New Mexico), Plains, Pacific Northwest aand Arctic to Melanesian (specifically Papua New Guinea) tribes iin the Pacific and Africa. The time frame extends from before fi first contact with Europeans to our own era. Funded to a large extent by the Institute of Museum and L Library Services, the exhibit presents a view of the crossc cultural similarities in materials, methods and aesthetics. B Based primarily on works in BAM’s permanent collection, t there are also significant contributions from the Orma JJ. Smith Museum of Natural History at the College of I Idaho, the Idaho State Historical Museum and local p private collectors. With more than 250 objects on display, the works d demonstrate how crucial the artists and craftsmen were iin establishing a sense of identity and place for these vvarious cultures, through the materials they obtained ffrom their natural environment to the rituals they symbolized and the art forms that predominated. With m material dexterity and a communal sensibility, they were aable to define and perpetuate a living culture. Yet, there is a universal quality to the objects created by such widely separated peoples—the most obvious ccommonality being the limited resources available before the arrival of Europeans. This meant artists had to rely on plant fibers, animal hides and bones, feathers, hair, s shells, etc.—basically, materials dictated by geograp phy. The ingenuity it required allowed for a wonderful serendipity in the show, an aptitude for making appealing discoveries by accident. This characteristic leads to another universal element: the pride these artists and artisans took in making utilitarian objects visually appealing. Spiritual and ritualistic considerations were factors as well, but underlying even the most mundane works is a remarkable inventiveness. BAM Curator Sandy Harthorn, who organized the show, pointed out that by showing the older objects alongside more recent ones demonstrates the “growing importance of the idea” in the making of artifacts, overriding functional considerations and, later, monetary value. What viewers are witnessing, in other words, is the evolution of aesthetics in each of these cultures. Particularly striking is how comfortable these artists and artisans were with the use of abstract form, not only in design work, but in figurative renderings. Considering how the American public had to be dragged kicking and screaming from reassuring realism to the world of nonobjective art, it’s amazing how abstract forms were practically second nature from very early on. This ultimately impacted Western culture in the early 20th century, when African and Oceanic artifacts were sent home, forming the basis of ethnographic collections that would influence Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Fauve painters, German expressionists and other pioneers of modern art. In fact, an argument could be made that the origin of BAM’s Origins was the groundbreaking exhibit at the Museum of Modern Art in 1984. Primitivism in 20th Century Art was the first comprehensive consideration of the subject. Harthorn attended that show in New York and has long been interested in how European

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goods made an impact on tribal cultures, which in turn influenced Western aesthetics. For example, the glass beads that became a signature element in Native American art were manufactured in Italy and made their way through trade routes in Africa and Asia, eventually arriving in North America as trading goods. This phenomenon of cultural cross-seeding despite contrasts in style intrigued Harthorn and helps to explain the unique approach of the Origins exhibit. The Americas are a cultural universe unto themselves, with North America alone providing a treasure trove of cultural objects for the show. Examples from Arizona and New Mexico have a large gallery all to themselves and boast some of the highest quality exhibits, thanks in part to the large number of objects in the museum’s own collection, as well as those on loan from institutional and private collectors. The plethora of baskets, ceramics, dyed wool works and wickerwork from this one corner of the country indicates the level of productivity from the tribes in the area, which has made it the focus of collectors for decades. One of those collectors is Idaho artist Kerry Moosman, who donated many pieces to the show. A renowned ceramic artist in his own right, Moosman was influenced by what he has acquired from the region, with artifacts dating back to pre-European contact days. The direct simplicity of Southwest Native American artifacts inspired him the most— the inventiveness with what was at hand, and the influence of seasonal changes. The time-consuming process of gathering and preparing the material, hand-building the work by coiling the clay, then applying finishing touches like pinching the soft clay to create corrugated surfaces, all resonated with him. Some of his favorite pieces include large Acoma pottery, fired in pits to create thin, lightweight pots, beautifully painted with brushes made from yucca plants. The arrival of the Spanish changed everything, introducing new materials like wool—indigenous artisans previously used cotton—and new purposes for objects, including cotton and wool serapes that became dyed wool blankets for covering walls and floors. Ceramic pieces like Acoma and Zuni pottery became more decorative and intricately designed, their surfaces finely finished and painted to make them more attractive to collectors and traders, a process that accelerated with the arrival of the railroad and trading posts in the late 19th century. Inter-tribal marriage and trading brought variations in themes that impacted the work of different regional groups. During the 20th century, Native American innovators like Pueblo artist Maria Montoya Martinez (see her Art Deco-esque black burnished clay pot circled with repeating abstract feather forms) and Hopi artist Iris Nampeyo (see her

The second Native American section covers the Great Plains and the West Coast from Northern California through British Columbia to the Arctic. Especially intriguing are the intricate, exquisitely detailed and defined basketry from peoples like the Haida, Tlingit, Pomo and Maidu on the Pacific Coast. The Pomo artistry is considered “the highest evolution of basketry,” according to Moosman. Imported beadwork on hide has been used for almost five centuries, and the level of artistry achieved is impressive. The Sioux, Nez Perce and other tribes set the standard, and their work had a far-reaching impact. The mix in this section of the exhibit is filled with the unexpected: Carved, brightly painted wood masks with exaggerated features from the Pacific Northwest grab viewers’ attention, along with an ingenious dual-purpose peace pipe/tomahawk of metal, wood, wire and hide—perfect for any eventuality that might arise during negotiations. Particularly beautiful are the argillite (a rare black slate) sculptures by Haida artists. Initially a gray stone, argillite transforms into a lush black high sheen when carved. Then there is the half-deflated, crumpled Eskimo baby garment made from weatherproof dried seal intestine, the consistency of onionskin paper. Such cuteness is not a trait one finds in Papua New Guinea. For

Art Thompson; Nuuchah-nulth (Ditidaht) Transformation Mask; Nitinat Lake, British Columbia; 1999; wood, paint, cedar, horse hair, feathers, cotton cord. From the collection of Drew and Katie Gibson.

JAN B OLES

The Origins exhibit at Boise Art Museum includes art of Papua New Guinea and Oceania.

painted bowl with its avant-garde bird image) spearheaded movements to revitalize and modernize traditional art forms. Yet the most startling objects in this section are the large Navajo wool blankets, rugs and serapes lining the gallery walls. Dating mostly from the early 20th century, they have a jazzy, dynamic energy that echoes the culture of the time. Many are complex in composition, with complete or fragmented forms and an array of imagery. Together, their large-scale and vigorous abstract patterning in bold contrasting colors seems to vibrate or jab like bolts of lightning, playing off triangular border motifs, providing an electric contemporary aura.

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much of its history, warfare was endemic, and fearsome helmet masks and costumes made of raffia, clay, shells and feathers were the order of the day, along with shields and other implements of war. Objects of adornment made from shell, bone, teeth and boar tusks have an aggressive demeanor, as well as great beauty. Boise collector Kellie Cosho collects both Melanesian and African artifacts and points out the prevalence of alternating beautiful and beastly subjects occurring in New Guinea culture. Penis sheaths made from gourds and studded with animal teeth reside beside statuesque plumes of lovely Bird of Paradise feathers. A carved, slithering crocodile on the

BOISEweekly | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | 11


JONNY FUEGO

prowl gazes hungrily at us sideways with its cowrie shell eyes. The Papua New Guineans are also a culture with a flair for nonobjective art. An elaborately carved ceremonial shield from 1950 painted in reds, oranges and black is a web of complicated, symbolic abstractions that leaps from the wall, as do abstract paintings on grounds of soaked and pounded inner tree bark called tapa cloth. The dried, stiff tapa paintings are comprised of complicated abstract compositions rendered in earthy pigments, some divided into separate panels by subtle changes in design, others with a single composition of repeating forms or patterns. Unique, mesmerizing and donated anonymously, these paintings are reminiscent of 1970s postmodern paintings on tarp and other mundane supports. Cosho has also been an avid collector of African art, and donated a number of objects she acquired there in the 1980s to the show. Much of it is invaluable since such pieces are no longer available due to political and social upheaval of the 1990s. Surprisingly, despite the fact they are half a world apart, there are similarities between Melanesian and African artifacts. Africa’s Bamana Chi Wara dance mask (tall Kuba cloth abstractions have a striking male antelope); Northern region of Mali; 20th century; wood, shells, fiber. Part of resemblance to the Papua tapa paintings, the Boise Art Museum Collection, a gift and cowrie shells play a conspicuous role from Kellie Cosho. in the art of both cultures. In Africa, where the female subject and feminine beauty are more prominent than in the other cultures under consideration, the themes of rites-ofpassage rituals often involve cowrie shell highlighting and decoration, whereas in Papua New Guinea, it has a more male/warrior connotation. Likewise, the dual “beauty and the beast” aesthetic is just as intense in Africa as in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. In Liberia and other African countries, the female mask with shells and accessories comprises a seductive aesthetic that influenced Western culture, while male masks and head pieces can be terrifying. In 1959, Edward Steichen curated a famous photography exhibition called The Family of Man, which toured extensively. It had its critics, like Roland Barthes, who faulted the project for positing an “ambiguous myth of the human community” based merely on “human morphologies.” Be that as it may, Origins deepens viewers’ understanding of the “family of man” by identifying a cultural correspondence and kindred aesthetics underlying the obvious diversities.

JONNY FUEGO

Woven Helmet Mask; Tambanum Village, Middle Sepik River, Papua New Guinea; 20th century; plant fibers, clay and pigments. From the collection of Beth Sellars.

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Iris Nampeyo (1860-1942); Hopi Pueblo bowl with bird symbol; Arizona; early 20th century; clay, pigment. From the collection of Kerry Moosman.

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events B OIS E R OC K S C HOOL

Drink a beer and save some animals.

SATURDAY JUNE 1 Rockin’ knows no age limit.

singin’ the brews BLUES, BREWS AND BARBECUE

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY MAY 29-30 rockers BOISE ROCK SCHOOL END OF SESSION GIG Boise Rock School’s up-and-coming punk, prog and roots rockers—all manner of rockers, really—have spent the past three months writing original songs and mastering their modern music prowess. After all that work, the pint-sized musicians plan to celebrate with a special end of session gig at Boise’s Linen Building Wednesday, May 29, and Thursday, May 30. Over two nights, 45 bands made up of more than 100 Rock School students ages 6 to 16 will lay down beats representing the culmination of weeks of hard work. Parents, friends and the public are invited to rock out with them. According to Rock School co-founder Ryan Peck, each student bounding on stage is showing off not only how to play music, but his or her belief in themselves as they play before a large audience. “We’re not necessarily trying to build rockstars as [much as] we are trying to create a generation that’s more creative and confident,” said Peck. “And whether or not they continue to create music is ancillary.” The concerts kick off at 4 p.m. both evenings, with a suggested donation of $5 at the door. Inside, hungry music fans can purchase Pie Hole pizza, as well as cookies and treats from Bleubird. Those of legal imbibing age can visit the full bar. Bringing the event to a close, the Boise Rock School adult class will play a set at the end of the evening on Thursday, May 30. Wednesday, May 29, and Thursday, May 30, 4-9 p.m. By donation. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-559-0065, boiserockschool.com.

SATURDAY JUNE 1 meow ALLEY CAT BIKE CHALLENGE AND RAFFLE Bike races are a big deal—just look at the Tour

de France—but for some, the Spandex riding shorts, brightly colored jerseys and the pack mentality of the peloton are more distractions than selling points. Still, people love their bikes, love to compete on them and rightly see them as vehicles for adventure. It’s this sense of adventure that drives bike-based

14 | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | BOISEweekly

competitions like the Alley Cat Bike Challenge and Raffle on Saturday, June 1. Alley cats are urban treasure hunts in which riders—in teams or individually—follow maps and clues to puzzles, keys, tickets and items that help them solve larger problems or complete grand challenges, hopefully ahead of the other racers.

For some, summer doesn’t really start until baseball season opens. Baseball is a catalyst for such summer staples as beer sloshing in translucent plastic cups and hot dogs wrapped in that uncategorizable foil/paper hybrid. In Boise, the baseball team of choice is Chicago Cubs affiliate the Boise Hawks, and the team’s season opener is Monday, June 17. For those who can’t wait to plant their tushes in those folding Hawks Memorial Stadium seats, there’s Blues, Brews and Barbecue, which takes at the stadium Saturday, June 1. The name says it all: Expect some sultry cusp-of-summer tunes, more beer than you can shake a bat at and more meat than an Atkins Diet convention. The party lasts from 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m., so there’s plenty of time to listen, guzzle and nosh. Bands performing include Next in Line, The Marshall Poole Band, Lori B! & the Dudes Deluxe and more. The thirsty can take their picks of brews from some of Idaho’s finest breweries, including Payette Brewing Co., Grand Teton and Highlands Hollow. ’Cue masters are Idaho BBQ, Rolling Hawg Smokers and Brown Shuga Soul Food. Blues, Brews and Barbecue benefits the Idaho Humane Society and the Pet Food Pantry, so bring a bag of cat litter or pet food and exchange it for two extra beer tickets. Sometimes it seems like summer can’t come to Boise quickly enough, but this is a chance to ease the transition with a full-on party. 11:30 a.m.-9 p.m. $10. Boise Hawks Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, milb.com.

The idea is to throw on a pair of shorts and a T-shirt you don’t mind getting a little dirty, hop in the proverbial saddle and set out on a quest for treasure, glory...all that stuff. The second annual race entails riding to 15 locations across Boise, competing against other riders to complete challenges. Registration begins at 10:30 a.m. at Joe’s Crab Shack in Garden City and costs $25 for adults but free for anyone younger than 18. Racers will be given a manifest before the race begins at 11:30

a.m. Competitors inclined to make the most of a Saturday afternoon can hang around and tap the afterparty until 5:30 p.m. All this racing, adventuring and partying goes down for a good cause: The alley cat benefits the Idaho Internet Crimes Against Children Coalition, which seeks protections for children against sexual predators on the Internet. 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. FREE-$25. Joe’s Crab Shack, 2288 N. Garden St., Garden City, icacfoundation.org.

SATURDAY JUNE 1 line judge FREE TENNIS 101 Tennis is the second most popular sport in the world. There are probably a lot of reasons for this, and it certainly can’t hurt that the sport boasts a unique combination of strategy, one-on-one competition, and elegant style and technique. It’s one of those sports in which one competes against one’s self and an opponent. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FIND

HOODIEPILLOW

A rose by any other name. Howdy pardner.

SUNDAY JUNE 2

SATURDAY JUNE 1

every rose has its thorn

buckaroo

ART AND ROSES FINE ART SALE

HANDS-ON HISTORY DAY: GIDDY-UP Sure, Boise isn’t as removed from the toils of the farm life as, say, Manhattan. But for folks in Idaho’s capital city—save for our backyard gardens and upstart heirloom tomato plants— it’s easy to forget our state’s ranchland pedigree. But Boise might not be the bustling regional metropolis it has grown into without the help of farmers. To bring Idaho’s agricultural roots to life, the Idaho State Historical Museum is hosting another iteration of its regular Hands-On History event, offering visitors the chance to experience the state’s past with fun, interactive activities. Giddy-Up: Ranching in Idaho takes place Saturday, June 1, from noon to 3 p.m. at the Idaho State Historical Museum in Julia Davis Park, where families are invited to try their hands at cowpoke living. Kids are invited to create, apply and care for their own snazzy cowboy mustache, and create their own bandana to ward off flies and the sun. Visitors can design their own cattle brands, take up a lasso and learn to wrangle a fake cow before learning proper milking techniques on a separate mock-up. After all that work, they’ll need a little chocolate milk to cool off—we’re assuming it’s not the product of the milking mock-up. Activities are designed for children ages 4 to 12, according to organizers, but Idahoans of all ages are welcome to join in. Giddy-up is free with the cost of museum admission: $5 for adults, $4 for seniors age 60 and older, $3 for students with ID and children ages 6-12, and free for children age 6 and younger. Noon-3 p.m. FREE-$5. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov.

The uninitiated can try it out for free from 9-10:30 a.m. Saturday, June 1, when the Idaho Tennis Association offers Tennis 101 clinics at parks and schools across the Treasure Valley to introduce kids and adults alike to the sport. First-time players will

S U B M I T

learn the basic concepts, like scoring and gameplay, as well as the strokes of the game. (Precocious students might learn drop shots.) Students are broken up by age group and afterwards, they’ll have time to play among themselves. Participants are encour-

Since its dedication in 1939, visitors have stopped to smell the bright buds attached to rows of bushes in the Julia Davis Park Rose Garden. The garden has survived its 60plus years in part due to the efforts of numerous benefactors and volunteers. One of the biggest contributors is the annual Art and Roses Fine Art Sale Sunday, June 2, sponsored by the Idaho Centennial Art Group and Boise Parks and Recreation Department. The event ensures the continued longevity with a portion of all art sales from the daylong fair going directly to the Rose Garden’s support. Between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m., art lovers can check out hundreds of original works of art from 65 local artists. Each artist will be on hand to discuss his or her work, which ranges from paintings to framed photography and sculpture, including the fluted petals of Lisa Bower’s floral portraits, and Jack Hiatt’s street scene, with buildings the color of coffee. Live music from musicians the JB Duo, Nancy Kelly, Beth Wilson and Rochelle Smith will permeate the park throughout the event. Since all that art is bound to make visitors hungry, food and beverages are available from Bonaminio’s Italian Sausage Co., Boise Fry Company, Abe’s Kettle Corn, Say Latte and TCBY yogurt. This year, the art sale may be more important than ever. Bacterial Cane Blight of Roses, an aggressive disease afflicting the thorned plants, recently jolted the Rose Garden’s stock, requiring extensive pruning to save the plants. The bushes might not be entirely out of the woods yet, but Boise Parks and Rec reports the roses are expected to send out new canes this summer. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Julia Davis Park Rose Garden, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4240, parks.cityofboise.org.

aged to RSVP online and bring water, sunscreen and their own racquets—although the idTA will have a few racquets available to borrow for those who don’t have one of their own.

The hoodie is the ultimate in slacker comfort clothing. The nubby interior shields pale skin from the infrequently encountered sun, while the zip-up conceals rumpled T-shirts and the hood helps mask even the gnarliest case of bedhead. But for those looking to yawn up to the next level of lethhoodiepillow.com argy, there’s a new kid on the $19.95-$24.95 cozy block: the HoodiePillow. “Only the HoodiePillow Hooded Pillowcase can provide ultimate cocoonification™, helping you tuck away the stresses of your day,” claims hoodiepillow.com. “It supplies warmth, quiet, focus and a healthy sleep environment.” Setting aside the fact that the company has trademarked the word “cocoonification,” the idea is pretty legit: A pillowcase is crafted from sweatshirt material with a drawstring hood to pull closed over your weary eyes. The HoodiePillow even features a pocket to hold your phone, remote or wallet, and a headphone porthole for tangle-free listening. “Whether you’re browsing the Interwebs, curling up with a good book, dozing on the couch, watching TV, gearing up for some concentrated study or simply looking to get some uninterrupted shut-eye, the HoodiePillow pillowcase is the perfect accessory to enhance your lounging experience,” reads the website. The HoodiePillow is available in black, white, heather gray, ocean blue and fire red. It also comes in a travel-sized version ideal for business-class slackers. —Tara Morgan

9-10:30 a.m. FREE. Fort Boise tennis courts, 700 Robbins Road, Boise; Meridian High School, 1900 W. Pine Ave., Meridian; 208322-5150, idtennis.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | 15


8 DAYS OUT

What if a degree

8 DAYS EXTRA ANDR EW C R IS P

doesn’t mean debt?

WEDNESDAY MAY 29 On Stage BOISE ROCK SCHOOL END OF SESSION GIG—Join the Boise Rock School for its final performance of the spring session. See Picks, Page 14. 4-9 p.m. By donation. Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-559-0065, boiserockschool. com.

Art

College Just Got Real! the

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Hear from real students in our community about overcoming the “What Ifs.”

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Green ENERGY EDUCATION—Learn the pros and cons of different energy-saving solutions. Key topics will include solar power options and LED lighting. Featuring light appetizers and hands-on demonstrations of energy management technologies. Email vincent@evengreentechnology. com for more info or to RSVP. 5:30 p.m. FREE. EvenGreen Technology, 423 N. Ancestor Place, Ste. 100, Boise, 208-7955170, evengreentechnology.com.

Farmers Markets

Jessica Bain

CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—Stop by Indian Creek Park for live music, local beer and wine, produce, baked goods and crafts. 4-7:30 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell.

“Caregiver”

THURSDAY MAY 30

0:00

VISIT

DIFFUSION: IDAHO LANDSCAPES BY JENNY WU—Final exhibition and reception for Jenny Wu, the Surel’s Place artist-inresident for April and May. Meet Wu, see her Idaho landscape series and enjoy refreshments at a unique art space along the Boise River. 6-8:30 p.m. FREE. Surel’s Place, 212 E. 33rd St., Garden City, 208-407-7529, surelsplace.org.

On Stage

www.CollegeJustGotReal.com

LIQUID LAUGHS: DAVE LANDAU—Featuring Chad Heft. Two-for-one tickets. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Odds & Ends

Apply NOW for fall.

208.562.3000 16 | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | BOISEweekly

LADIES’ LOUNGE—Toss back some cocktails with the ladies of Boise Weekly and enjoy prize giveaways, drink specials and oh so much more. Visit BW’s promo page to get the 4-1-1. 5 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3315666, willibs.com.

Roboticist Dan Ray put his electronic creations on display during the Boise Mini Maker Faire, May 26.

BOISE MINI MAKER FAIRE DRAWS OUT LOCAL CREATORS A year ago, a group of local tinkerers laid out plans to bring the popular Mini Maker Faire movement to Boise. The group’s dreams came to fruition May 25-26—albeit on a much smaller scale than planners originally envisioned. The inaugural Boise Mini Maker Faire featured displays from more than 100 local makers—including robots, 3-D printers and a 196-square-foot home. The first day of programming was centered on TED-style talks at the Boise Public Library, while day two offered more hands-on workshops and demos in a science fair format at the Discovery Center of Idaho. Before noon May 26, visitors flitted about the Discovery Center’s regular array of hands-on exhibits, stopping to visit booths set up by local makers. Children were quickly drawn to a table staffed by Nick Grove of the Meridian Library District and Erica Compton, Idaho Commission for Libraries project coordinator. The pair are part of an initiative to create “maker spaces” in Idaho’s public libraries. “A maker space is really a place where community members can come together and have access to resources, as well as collaboration,” said Compton. Spaces have been created at five libraries across Idaho—including the Meridian Library District, Ada Community Libraries and in northern Idaho—each providing teens tools to build simple robots and other creations. According to Compton, 3-D printers are also headed to the project’s pilot libraries. Open Lab Idaho offers similar opportunities at its “community hackerspace and makerspace,” located next to the Reuseum in Garden City. On Sunday, Open Lab members doled out freshly printed plastic octopi to attendees, revealing how 3-D printers can be used to create a variety of objects. Dan Ray’s duck-like robot walked with a pair of 3-D printed plastic feet. Ray, a software developer for Healthwise, Inc., showed off a table full of robots, whose eye-like sensors and distance finders created life-like movements. In fact, many of the Mini Maker Faire exhibits focused on tech creations—robots, quadcopters and circuit boards. Randy Geile of Handy Chairs—which is helping to foster user-created, DIY wheelchairs—showed remarkable thrift. His chairs incorporate simple plywood, used bicycle components and plastic water bottles to create remarkably robust handmade wheelchairs. Meanwhile, Debbie Hayzlett used colorful wool fibers with soap and water to create three-dimensional fabric vessels. Hayzlett and Geile added a more traditional, craft focus in contrast to the Faire’s other high-tech creations. While children made up much of the audience at the second day of Boise’s inaugural Mini Maker Faire, just as many adults asked presenters questions ranging from, “How does that work?” to “Can I try that?” That level of all-ages interest suggests Boise’s Mini Maker Faire has legs. —Andrew Crisp WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT Sports & Fitness

FRIDAY MAY 31 On Stage BACK ALLEY NIGHT OF CLASS— Enjoy an evening of burlesque with Dapper Doyle and the Revelry Revue, along with DJ Brady Green and catering. 6-11 p.m. FREE. Beside Bardenay, 612 Grove St., Boise, 208-426-0538, bardenay.com. IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL PREVIEW: BLITHE SPIRIT—Kick off Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s 2013 season with this Noel Coward comedy about a novelist who invites a medium to conjure a spirit to provide fodder for a book, but it brings back his late wife who tries to prevent him from remarrying. See Arts, Page 22. 8 p.m. $30$66. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. LIQUID LAUGHS: DAVE LANDAU—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Food & Drink GREEK FOOD FESTIVAL—Some of the best Greek food in the Treasure Valley and live music. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. St. Seraphim of Sarov Russian Orthodox Church, 872 N. 29th St., Boise, 208-3451553, boisegreekfoodfestival.com.

CAPITOL CLASSIC CHILDRENS RACE REGISTRATION DEADLINE—Kids ages 6-16 run in a one-mile race benefitting children’s health programs at St. Alphonsus. Registration due by 5 p.m. 5 p.m. $20. Boise Depot, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, 208-367-3997, saintalphonsus.org.

Art CASS FINE—Check out Cass Fine’s Views of London, photographs and her Inner Soul mixed-media pieces. Also silver and mixed metal jewelry by Susan Shaffer. Noon-6 p.m. FREE. Weekend Gallery, 148 Meffan Ave., Nampa, 208-467-3606.

SATURDAY JUNE 1 Festivals & Events ART FOR HOPE AND HEALING—Chris Ayers discusses the relationship between healing and the arts. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

BLUES, BREWS & BARBECUE—Check out live music by Next in Line, The Marshall Poole Band, Lori B! & The Dudes Deluxe and more with local beer from Payette Brew Co., Grand Teton and others, as well as barbecue. See Picks, Page 14. 5 p.m. $10. Hawks Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks. com. BOISE 150 AND IDAHO 150 CELEBRATIONS—Activities for kids ages 4-12 include a basic introduction to archaeology, crafts, musical instruments, washboards, outdoor bowling and artifact recovery. For the adults, University of Idaho Archaeologist Stacey Camp talks about the pioneer Jacobs Family and the oldest surviving brick residence in Boise at noon. Call to RSVP for children’s activities. 10 a.m. FREE. Basque Museum and Cultural Center, 611 Grove St., Boise, 208-343-2671, basquemuseum.com. OUTPOST DAYS—5K fun run and walk, buckaroo breakfast, musical entertainment, an auction and Idaho cowboy poets performing at 7 p.m. 7:30 a.m. FREE. Owyhee County Historical Museum, 17085 Basey St., Murphy, 208-495-2319, owyheemuseum.org. THIRD SPACE SATURDAY—Join Spacebar Arcade, DJ I.G.A. the Independent Grocer and the Vinyl Preservation Society for video games, beer and community. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. FREE. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-918-0597, spacebararcade.com.

| SUDOKU On Stage CHICKS N’ GIGGLES IMPROV COMEDY—Put wacky ideas to use in short-form improvised comedy. 8 p.m. $10. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-514-2531, drinkfattys.com. BLITHE SPIRIT—See Friday. 8 p.m. $30-$66. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. LIQUID LAUGHS: DAVE LANDAU—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Food & Drink

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

CRANKIN’ DA PASTA PER LA FESTA DELLA REPUBLICA— Learn to prepare ravioli stuffed with potatoes, rosemary and bacon, chicken skewers marinated in white wine, fennel salad with lemon vinaigrette and strawberry mousse. 6:30-9 p.m. $55. Fuel for the Soul, LLC, 1941 N. 18th St., Boise, 208-342-7118, fuelforthesoulboise.com.

Literature SUMMER READING CAVE KICKOFF PARTY—Children start their summer with cookie decorating, face painting and registration for the Summer Reading Cave. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208562-4995, boisepubliclibrary. org.

7p: HEROES VS. VILLAINS 8:30p: BATTLE OF THE SEXES BOISEweekly | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | 17


8 DAYS OUT Talks & Lectures A STREET THROUGH THE SOUL OF BOISE—This talk uses video and photos to illustrate the history of Eighth Street and downtown Boise. 1-2:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Sports & Fitness ALLEY CAT BIKE CHALLENGE AND RAFFLE—Ride to 15 locations around Boise for challenges. Registration is $25, raffle tickets are $20. Afterparty begins at 2:30 p.m. at Joe’s Crab Shack. See Picks, Page 14. 10:30 a.m. $20-$25. Joe’s Crab Shack, 2288 N. Garden St., Garden City, 208-336-9370, icacfoundation.org.

CAPITOL CLASSIC CHILDRENS RACE—See Friday, May 31. 11 a.m. $20. Boise Depot, 2603 W. Eastover Terrace, Boise, 208367-3997, saintalphonsus.org. FREE TENNIS 101—The Idaho Tennis Association hosts a family friendly program open to anyone older than 5. Courts for both kids and adults. RSVP to aguerrero@ idtennis.com. See Picks, Page 14. 9-10:20 a.m. FREE. Heritage Middle School, 4990 N. Meridian Road, Meridian, 208-350-4130; West Junior High School, 8371 W. Salt Creek Court, Boise, 208-854-6450; Fort Boise Park, 600 W. Garrison St., Boise, idtennis.com.

Green LEARN ABOUT ORGANIC GARDENING—Laura Dale teaches crop selection, transplanting, dealing with pests and more. For more info or to register, visit parks.cityofboise.org. 9 a.m. $16-$25. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-514-3755, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

Farmers Markets THE BOISE FARMERS MARKET—Pick up fresh food from farmers, ranchers, food vendors, brewers and more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Farmers Market, 1080 W. Front St., Boise, 208345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com.

Check out the entire week’s worth of Doonesbury online at boiseweekly.com—select “Extras” then “Cartoons.”

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8 DAYS OUT CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—Peruse vendor booths, eat food and listen to music. 9 a.m.1:30 p.m. FREE. Corner of Eighth and Idaho streets, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET— Enjoy arts, crafts, foods, fresh produce, live music and more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. NAMPA FARMER’S MARKET—Find local bedding plants, produce, music, specialty foods, cooking demonstrations and local crafts. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square, intersection of 14th and Front streets., Nampa.

Kids & Teens

SUNDAY JUNE 2

MONDAY JUNE 3

Festivals & Events

Festivals & Events

IDAHO PATRIOT THUNDER RIDE—Fundraising ride of 600-1,000 motorcycles supports Idaho troops. Featuring music and food throughout the afternoon. Public is welcome to go watch the spectacle while viewing museum exhibits. 2 p.m. $10, $8 seniors/military, $4 kids 5-12. Warhawk Air Museum, Nampa Airport, 201 Municipal Drive, Nampa, 208-465-6446, warhawkairmuseum.org.

HEMP HISTORY WEEK OPEN HOUSE—Learn about the history and applications of hemp. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705.

OUTPOST DAYS—See Saturday. 8 a.m. FREE. Owyhee County Historical Museum, 17085 Basey St., Murphy, 208-495-2319.

HANDS-ON HISTORY DAY: GIDDY-UP—Kids learn to throw a lasso, make cattle brands and other ranching traditions as part of the Boise 150 Celebration. See Picks, Page 15. Noon-3 p.m. FREE-$5. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov.

On Stage BLITHE SPIRIT—See Friday. 7 p.m. $30-$66. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

KIDS SAFETY FAIR FINGERPRINTING—Take the kids out to see McGruff the crime-fighting dog and recieve a free child ID kit. Nampa police are on hand to do kids fingerpinting, and the fire department has a fire truck on display. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Peterson Stampede Dodge, 5801 E. Gate Blvd., Nampa, 208-922-6494, stampededodge.com.

LIQUID LAUGHS: DAVE LANDAU—See Thursday. Two-for-one tickets. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Art ART & ROSES FINE ART SALE—Buy art from about 65 Idaho artists, including painters, photographers and sculptors, to benefit the Rose Garden. Also featuring food and music. Sponsored by the Idaho Centennial Art Group and Boise Parks and Recreation. See Picks, Page 15. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise.

SHEEP IN THE FOOTHILLS— Kids learn about sheep trailing traditions, including shearing, herding dogs and wool spinning while enjoying live music with Gary and Cindy Braun. Park at Fort Boise Community Center for the shuttle service that starts at 10 a.m. and runs every half-hour. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208514-3755, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

TUESDAY JUNE 4 Festivals & Events HEMP HISTORY WEEK OPEN HOUSE—See Monday. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705.

Sports & Fitness EAGLE FOOTHILLS BMX RACE—Participate in one of the newest Olympic sports, BMX racing, or relax and enjoy the excitement and action for free as a spectator. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Eagle Foothills BMX, Eagle Sports Complex, 11800 Horseshoe Bend Way, Eagle, 208-870-6138, ef-bmx.com.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 5 Festivals & Events HEMP HISTORY WEEK OPEN HOUSE—See Monday. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705.

Talks & Lectures

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

IDAWRA: FROM WILD SAGE TO FARM—Jennifer Stevens provides an overview of the Boise River’s historic uses on valley lands from the 1860s to 1950. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Washington Group Plaza, 720 Park Blvd., Boise.

Citizen ALIVE AFTER FIVE TIPS 4 CHARITY BENEFIT—All tips made in the beer booth at Alive After Five go directly to the Children’s Home Society and Warm Springs Counseling Center’s Community Sponsorship Program. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise.

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—See Wednesday, May 29. 4-7:30 p.m. FREE. Indian Creek Park, corner of Seventh and Blaine streets, Caldwell. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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BOISEweekly | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | 19


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY MAY 29 THE BOURBON DOGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

OPHELIA—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

JACKALOPE SAINTS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

PATRICIA FOLKNER—6 p.m. FREE. Smoky Mountain PizzaState Street

KENNY CHESNEY—With Eli Young Band and Kacey Musgraves. 7 p.m. $39-$200. Taco Bell Arena

LOGAN CLYNE—With Kevin Hall and the Lack Thereof. 6 p.m. FREE. Artistblue Gallery

REBECCA SCOTT—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow SCHWERVON!—With James Plane Wreck and Iconoplasty. 8 p.m. FREE. Crux

MICHAEL GILL—7 p.m. FREE. Whole Foods Market PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

SHON SANDERS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

When Gold Panda phoned Treefort organizers at the last minute to cancel, Los Angeles producer Will Wiesenfeld booked a plane ticket to Boise within an hour to replace the band with his electro-pop project, Baths. Treefort-goers were treated to Wiesenfeld’s unique brand of electronic experimentation, which floats delicate falsetto vocals atop bubbly, bass-laden beats. As a classically trained musician, Wiesenfeld melds multiple layers of samples to create Baths’ soft, intricate sound. His first full-length, Cerulean, was released on Anticon, inspiring praise and comparisons to chillwave band Toro Y Moi. Wiesenfeld returned to Boise to open for electro-pop duo The Postal Service at its sold out May 28 performance at Knitting Factory, and the band will be back to headline a show Thursday, May 30, at Neurolux. —Andrew Crisp With Houses and D33J, 7 p.m., $10-$12. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

MYKE SANCHEZ—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s NAOMI PSALM TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Dave & Buster’s REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

SPEEDY GRAY—With Johnny Shoes. 6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

BATHS, MAY 30, NEUROLUX

MAGIC SWORD—With Shades. $7. 8 p.m. Neurolux

SATIN CHAPS—10 p.m. $5. Reef

STEADY RUSH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

SHON SANDERS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

TALLEST MAN ON EARTH—With Strand of Oaks. 8 p.m. $18-$35. Knitting Factory

SPUDMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars

Cutting Cages CUTTING CAGES—With Andrew Grey Hicks. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage DILUTED—With Exploding Head Trick, Astral Vapors and Bombs Over Rome. 8:30 p.m. By donation. Red Room JACK GISH—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe JEFF MOLL—7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

THURSDAY MAY 30 BATHS—With Houses and D33J. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s GIBRALTAR—With Baby Ghosts and Bat Manors. 8:30 p.m. $4. Red Room JEANNE AND SAM—7 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

Tambalka TAMBALKA—6 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel

FRIDAY MAY 31 BEN BURDICK TRIO—With Amy Rose. 8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye BILL COFFEY & HIS CASH MONEY COUSINS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SATURDAY JUNE 1 CARTER FREEMAN—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle COMMUNIST KAYTE—6 p.m. $5. Crux ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill ERIENNE WILLIAMS—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

JUNE 5

CURTIS SALGADO OPENING:

JAmes Coberly Smith WITH LeAnne Town

ALIVE AFTER FIVE PROUDLY SPONSORED BY the River

WEDNESDAYS

ON THE GROVE PLAZA

5 TO 8PM * Free!

BAD WEATHER VENUE

LOCAL BANDS SPONSORS

Visit downtownboise.org for A full schedule.

20 | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE BUKO

GUIDE LETA NEUSTAEDTER—With Meghan Kelly Watters. 7 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

TOM HOGARD, MITCH AND WILL SEVY—6 p.m. FREE. Artistblue Gallery

MONDAY JUNE 3

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: CURTIS SALGADO—With James Coberly Smith and LeAnne Town. See Listen Here, this page. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza

1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. $3. Liquid

FRIM FRAM FELLAS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

TUESDAY JUNE 4 Loverance Torres LOVERANCE—8 p.m. $25-$50. Knitting Factory OPHELIA—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

TORRES—With Lady Lamb the Beekeeper. 8 p.m. $7. Visual Arts Collective

SUNDAY

BOISE OLD TIME’S OLD TIME JAM—With The Country Club. 6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HEAVEN’S BASEMENT—7:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s OPHELIA—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

JUNE 2 JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s MIKE PINTO—8 p.m. $12-$25. Knitting Factory Sword of a Bad Speller SWORD OF A BAD SPELLER— With Hedtriip and WhiteCatPink. 8:30 p.m. $5. Red Room

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TERRY JONES—10:15 a.m. FREE. Berryhill

CURTIS SALGADO, JUNE 5, THE GROVE

WEDNESDAY JUNE 5 ’80S NIGHT—With DJ Grant Olsen, Popsicle and live karaoke. 9 p.m. $2. Red Room

V E N U E S

Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s PATRICIA FOLKNER—6 p.m. FREE. Smoky Mountain PizzaState Street RYAN BINGHAM—8:30 p.m. $25-$28. Egyptian Theatre SPUDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

John Belushi and Dan Aykroyd’s characters Jake and Elwood Blues are more than entertainers, they’re totems who have come to represent the lives of musicians. But the iconic black suits, fedoras, glasses and greasy Chicago wail didn’t come from the ether. When Belushi was in Eugene, Ore., for the filming of Animal House, he saw a performance by Portland, Ore.’s Curtis Salgado, then ran back to New York to ape Salgado’s style on Saturday Night Live. In addition to his solo work, Salgado has also collaborated with Robert Cray Band and the legendary Santana. Salgado will kick things off for this year’s Alive After Five series. And while the sun-baked bricks of The Grove may not seem an ideal setting to soak in the blues, the swingin’ beats and soulful vocals will set your feet on a dance mission from God. —Josh Gross With James Coberly Smith and LeAnne Town, 5 p.m., FREE. Alive After Five, Grove Plaza, downtownboise.org.

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NEWS/ARTS ICA ANNOUNCES NEW IDAHO WRITER IN RESIDENCE

22 | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | BOISEweekly

ARTS/STAGE R OGER M AS TR OIANNI

Fresh from being crowned Boise’s first official poet laureate, Diane Raptosh has just snagged another major Gem State literary award. Raptosh was recently named the state’s Writer in Residence by the Idaho Commission on the Arts. Raptosh, who received an Honorable Mention in Boise Weekly’s 2013 Fiction 101 competition, currently serves as the Eyck-Berringer Endowed Chair in English at the College of Idaho. Raptosh is also the author of four poetry publications: American Amnesiac, Parents from a Different Alphabet, Labor Songs and Just West of Now. The Writer in Residence award is handed out every three years and carries a $10,000 prize. Other local lit luminaries Brady Udall, Anthony Doerr and Kim Barnes have served in the position, which obliges recipients to share their work at four annual public readings scattered across the state. The ICA also announced its fiscal year 2014 fellowships, which will go to fiction writer Kimberly Frank Kirk of Sun Valley, poet Jim Richards of Rexburg, fiction writer Alvin Greenberg of Boise, poet Janet Holmes of Boise, and creative non-fiction writer Gary Gildner of Grangeville. ICA Fellowships recognize the outstanding work of Idaho artists and writers and come with a $5,000 award “intended to contribute to the recipient’s professional artistic growth and development.” Speaking of prestigious arts honors, Boise Art Museum Executive Director and CEO Melanie Fales has been accepted into the national Association of Art Museum Directors. AAMD is comprised of 200 art museum directors from across the United States, Mexico and Canada. According to its website, the organization serves as a “forum for the exchange of information and ideas, acting as an advocate for its member art museums, and being a leader in shaping public discourse about the arts community and the role of art in society.” And in other BAM news, the museum recently received a largescale sculpture from collectors Drew and Katie Have donkey, will travel. Gibson. Washington artist Brad Rude’s sculpture “A World Beyond” is the largest sculpture of his career and features an outsized donkey on a wheeled cart with precariously balanced toy-like animals arched above its back. The piece will be transported from Sun Valley to Boise, where it will reside in BAM’s Sculpture Garden. —Tara Morgan

WELL SEASONED Idaho Shakespeare Festival embraces pop culture classics ANDREW CRISP Sharing a dog-eared libretto, actors Tom Ford and Sara Bruner have spent lots of late spring afternoons singing about Mrs. Lovett’s pies, preparing for Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s big summer musical: Sweeney Todd, the Demon Barber of Fleet Street. “We have scheduled our own rehearsal time before we go into rehearsal,” said Bruner. “It’s abnormal, I think, to work as much as we’ve Laurie Birmingham (left), David McCann (center) and Betsy Mugavero (right), been working ahead of time.” perform in Great Lakes Theater’s Much Ado About Nothing. As the principal characters in Stephen Sondheim’s bloody thriller, Ford and Bruner and seance with a local clairvoyant named The set will also feature Victorian-era elepractice their performances two to three days Madame Arcati, hoping to gather material for ments with a steampunk flair. Windows and each week. Ford plays the maniacal murderer Charles’ latest book. But from the spirit world, walls at a slant will add what Herrmann calls Sweeney Todd, who, with the help of Bruner Arcati conjures up the ghost of Charles’ first an “impressionistic approach” to the stage as Mrs. Lovett, slices the throats of unwitting wife, Elvira, who is hell-bent on disrupting her design. And then, of course, there’s the blood. men expecting a simple barbershop shave. former husband’s new marriage. “We’ll spend a lot of time talking about “I love horror, it’s my total favorite genre. I “It’s a nightmare, but it’s hysterically blood, and how to make the blood look as love any scary movie; I love blood and guts; I funny,” said Fee. realistic as possible,” Herrmann said. love all that stuff,” said Bruner. Blithe Spirit will play in rep with ShakeWhile Tim Burton’s 2007 silver screen Songs like the macabre “A Little Priest,” speare’s Much Ado About Nothing, which adaptation of Sweeney Todd featured both about the human meats in Mrs. Lovett’s pies, Johnny Depp and buckets of gore, Fee stressed opens Saturday, June 8, and is set in an Italian require Ford and Bruner to sing in tandem. the ISF production can’t approach that level of villa during World War I. Sweeney Todd opens “It’s a style of theater that Stephen SondSaturday, July 6, and will boast the largest heim is hearkening back to, these penny dread- blood-soaked realism. number of performances. Given Sweeney “You’re in a live theater. It’s never going ful novels of the time; the gothic horror,” said Todd’s subject matter, ISF recommends ages 14 to be the kind of gore that you experience in ISF Producing Artistic Director Charles Fee. and up, “due to violence and mature themes.” “But they also have this over-the-top theatrical- a film because we can’t create that kind of “This is a very problematic thing—how you realism, nor do we even attempt to do that,” ity, so while the events are horrific, the music recommend ages for people in the theater. We said Fee. goes from both super dramatic and really never used to do it, but the fact is, audiences But Sweeney Todd isn’t the only ISF proemotionally moving to very funny.” over time asked for it, essentially,” said Fee. duction this season with contemporary ties. Fee acknowledged that Sweeney Todd will Richard III, Shakespeare’s play about the A chance discovery in 2012 of the remains be the season’s most complicated production, king’s duplicitous rise to power, features 21 requiring actors skilled in performing and sing- of British ruler Richard III buried beneath a actors and opens Saturday, Aug. 10. The parking lot brought new life to Shakespeare’s ing, an eight-piece orchestra and an elaborate production, directed by Joseph Hanreddy, will drama, Richard III, while the Bard’s comedy, stage design. boast more modern attire and take place in a Much Ado About Nothing, received a reprisal “We picked it this year because we feel contemporary setting. Richard III also has a in Joss Whedon’s modern, black-and-white we’ve got the company for it,” said Fee. 14-and-up age recommendation. film, set to hit theaters “We’ve been doing “It’ll look like contemporary military in in June. enough work in musiBlithe Spirit opens Saturday, June 1; some ways, but without being so specific that And kicking off cal theater that we feel Much Ado About Nothing opens Saturday, you feel like you’re located in Britain during ISF’s 2013 season we’ve got our arms June 8; Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber the Falklands War. It’s a way of saying to the Saturday, June 1, is around this stuff and of Fleet Street opens Saturday, July 6; audience, ‘Look these plays are just as immediNoel Coward’s Blithe we know Sondheim’s Richard III opens Saturday, Aug. 10; and The Foreigner opens Saturday, Sept. 7; Spirit, a comedic romp ate to us today as they were in Shakespeare’s work—and so it was various times, $12-$41. time,’” said Fee. directed by Fee that just the right moment,” IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Ending the season, Larry Shue’s madcap involves mystics and said Fee. 5657 Warm Springs Ave. comedy The Foreigner opens Saturday, Sept. 7. spectral visitors. To bring the story 208-336-9221 According to Fee, almost 60,000 visitors “Noel Coward to life, scenic designer idahoshakespeare.org attended Idaho Shakespeare Festival producis an iconic figure in Jeff Herrmann has entions in the summer of 2012, which represents theater,” said Fee. visioned Todd’s barber a 13 percent increase over the company’s 2011 “He wrote this play shop on a second level numbers. By comparison, the first season in in 1941, right in the middle of World War II. above the stage, allowing Ford to slice the 1977 drew only 3,000 attendees. throats of his victims before pulling a lever and In fact, he wrote the play having left London “We’ve had tremendous growth over the because his apartment was bombed.” dropping the body down to the bakery. years. We’re kind of bursting at the seams a In the play, novelist Charles Condomine “It’s an eight-foot drop from the chair to little bit,” said Fee. and his second wife Ruth arrange a dinner the room below,” said Herrmann. WWW. 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SCREEN/LISTINGS THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

Special Screenings

SAIL OF THE CENTURY Kon-Tiki chronicles 5,000-mile raft adventure GEORGE PRENTICE Six-year-old Thor Heyerdahl knew he could do it. But his childhood pals weren’t so certain. “Thor, don’t do it,” they shouted. “It’s dangerous.” The young Heyerdahl had his eye on a melting ice floe near his Norwegian home and was sure he could jump to it from shore. Heyerdahl took the leap, but lost his footing and slipped into the frigid waters. One of his friends rescued him from certain death. His father’s warning: “I hope you learned your lesson. Promise me you’ll never take a risk like that again. Kon-Tiki documents Thor Heyerdahl’s journey from Peru to Polynesia on a raft made of rope and balsa wood. Promise me. Thor? Promise me.” But the world now knows that Thor Foreign Film—but they used the exact same tures—Iron Man 3 and Star Trek Into Darkcouldn’t keep that promise. Three decades cast to shoot a simultaneous film entirely in ness—pale in comparison to Kon-Tiki’s aslater—with the same friend who pulled him English, thus making Kon-Tiki more accessible tonishment. This is one of those films where, from the icy water and a crew of four other to American audiences. Scandinavian scallywags—Heyerdahl made a 30-minutes in, you find yourself whispering Norwegian actor Pal Sverre Hagen portrays to your companion, “I different promise: that Heyerdahl as man, not a myth, struggling with love this movie.” he could sail 5,000 KON-TIKI (PG-13) inner demons (beginning with the fact that “We have a higher miles through the purpose than enabling he can’t swim), as well as demons of the deep South Pacific Ocean Directed by Joachim Ronning and Espen Sandberg (there is a shark scene that would make even men hell-bent on suifrom Peru to Polynesia cide,” huffs a National Steven Spielberg shudder). on a raft made only of Starring Pal Sverre Hagen, Anders Baasmo Christiansen, Gustaf Skarsgard Heyerdahl’s then-radical theory ultimately Geographic executive, rope and balsa wood proved to the world that our planet’s oceans turning down sponmodeled after ancient Opens Friday, May 31, at The Flicks sorship of Heyerdahl’s were roadways, not obstacles. Today, his work drawings from the Inis credited with bridging humankind’s desire to expedition. But we cas. Heyerdahl tried to explore uncharted worlds, from Columbus to disprove conventional wisdom that Polynesia know better, don’t we? History tells us that the Space Age. National Geographic, The New York Times had been populated by way of Asia. Instead, Kon-Tiki has an old-fashioned aura of and the world media would soon enough be he insisted that Polynesia’s first inhabitants adventure and bravery, and that’s reason had come, via raft, from South America, and thrilled to cover Heyerdahl’s expedition. enough to attract an audience’s attention. But Kon-Tiki’s co-directors, Joachim Ronning he would show how the Incas did just that. and Espen Sandberg, pull off quite an achieve- embedded deep in Heyerdahl’s amazing tale The journey, chronicled in the runaway is a story we all share: journeying into dark1948 bestseller The Kon-Tiki Expedition, has ment of their own. Not only did they film the ness, tempting fate and setting sail for a new now become a 21st century Oscar-nominated original 2012 Norwegian production—which horizon. was an Academy Award nominee for Best film. This summer’s other big screen adven-

EXTRA/SCREEN ARRESTED DEVELOPMENT, SEASON FOUR If you’re an Arrested Development junkie, you’ve probably already thrown back all 15 episodes of the new fourth season on Netflix like it was acting juice. Perhaps that’s how you consumed the first three seasons of Fox’s long-canceled cult comedy— through a stomach-clenching marathon of Bluth family antics, illusions, Lucilles and loose seals. Each episode in the new season centers on a single character’s path from where the show left them in 2006 to where they are now. While it’s a clever structural device—having each character’s narrative weave with a wink through plot lines established in previous WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

episodes—it doesn’t make for nearly as funny of a show. When the Bluth family isn’t squeezed into the model home swilling vodka before it goes bad, the characters’ quirks seem more one-dimensional. Michael Bluth, the show’s totem to normalcy, seems creepily pathetic, while Lindsay Bluth, who now looks like Nicole Ritchie, is even more wincingly insecure. But some new blood keeps the show hilarious: Kristen Wiig plays young Lucille Bluth with raised-eyebrow perfection, while Maria Bamford is amazing as the butter-faced DeBrie Bardeaux. If you haven’t already finished the series, I’d proscribe moderation. Just don’t stop after the third episode, it gets better. —Tara Morgan

THE DIRTY DOZEN—Twelve Army criminals seek redemption through a suicide mission behind Nazi lines. Starring Lee Marvin. Thursday, May 30, 6 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996, boisepubliclibrary. org. VERTIGO—James Stewart and Kim Novak star in this tale about a man who suffers from vertigo and covets his friend’s wife. Directed by Alfred Hitchcock. Thursday, May 30, 2 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208562-4996, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Opening

AFTER EARTH—When Kitai and his father Cypher crash into Earth 1,000 years after humanity fled the planet, Kitai must negotiate the abandoned planet in search of a rescue beacon. Starring Will Smith. (PG-13) Opens Friday, May 31. Edwards 9, 22.

NOW YOU SEE ME—The world’s greatest prestidigitationists face off against an elite FBI unit as they attempt to pull off a series of daring robberies against corrupt businessmen. (PG-13) Opens Friday, May 31. Edwards 9, 22. KON TIKI—A team of anthropologists led by Thor Heyerdahl construct a balsa wood raft to illustrate how the inhabitants of Polynesia originated in South America and not Asia. (Not Rated) Opens Friday, May 31. The Flicks.

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. BOISEweekly | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | 23


WINESIPPER/FOOD A IS FOR ALBARINO

2011 BURGANS ALBARINO, $16.99 The aromas are a bit reserved in this elegantly structured wine, but you get charming nuances of green apple, soft peach, pineapple, mango and mineral, along with a light hit of white pepper. The palate is broad and bright with ripe lemon, lime, mandarin orange and honeydew melon flavors. This wine finishes with creamy citrus that’s completely refreshing and marked by an intriguing touch of soy sauce. 2011 COLUMNA ALBARINO, $14.99 The nose on this wine is a floral mix of crisp lime, tangerine and green apple that’s as fresh and clean as a soft breeze after a spring shower. Sweet citrus fruit fills the mouth and blends well with the notes of clover, herb and spring greens. The finish is long and lively with a pleasant minerality and a kiss of food-friendly, cleansing acidity. This wine is an excellent value.

—David Kirkpatrick

24 | MAY 29 – JUNE 4, 2013 | BOISEweekly

SAKANA SUSHI Puts the ‘meh’ in minutia TARA MORGAN The minutia matters when it comes to Treasure Valley sushi eateries. Most source their frozen fish from the same few purveyors, and even the accoutrements are variations on a theme: ghostly piles of decorative daikon (short shreds or long curlies), mounds of pickled ginger (plain or stained pink), cloudy miso (gradations of light or dark with cubes of tofu and wisps of seaweed) and that mealy, bright orange dressing ladled over shards of iceberg (eerily similar from place to place). Sakana Japanese Sushi Bar and Grill doesn’t break this mold. The Meridian restaurant’s second location took over the dated Din Fung Buffet at 925 Vista Ave. in Boise. Though I salty) and an iceberg salad (sad and small, with wasn’t drawn to dine at the building’s previhalf a tomato, a couple cuke coins, a single ous occupant, Sakana’s burnt orange ceilings, sliver of red cabbage and some shreds of dry golden yellow walls and cream booths edged carrot topped with that ineswith brown have a throwback capable dressing). A mound of feel that likely would’ve been at lightly sticky rice, three lonely home there. But Sakana has also SAKANA JAPANESE SUSHI cubes of melon and a loosely added a few modern touches— BAR AND GRILL assembled California roll with a line of beaded curtains with 925 Vista Ave. stringy Krab and fresh avocado purple orbs separates the dark 208-367-1688 sakanajapanesesushi.com rounded out the meal. wood bar from the double row My opinion was equally of Vista Village-facing booths split on a side order of pork with crystal light fixtures. gyoza and shrimp dumplings ($4.50), both The inexpensive lunchtime sashimi bento pre-made. While the pork potstickers glistened box ($8.99) came with three slabs of salmon with a light oily sheen and paired well with a (great), three hunks each of ahi and red snapper (passable), shredded daikon (short), ginger slightly vinegary soy dip, the circular dumplings enclosed a too-small sliver of shrimp atop (plain), a bowl of miso (delightfully light and

Sakana’s sashimi bento box is a hit and miss mix.

a too-pungent mound of onions and cabbage. A happy hour stop at Sakana was more memorable, if only because the bill was small and the spread was ample. An order of salmon and tuna mixed poke ($5) was fantastic, with huge cubes of shimmering tuna and salmon in a spicy glaze, while the spicy tuna roll was low-grade standard ($3.50) and a couple side orders of sushi—yellowtail ($5) and super white tuna ($4.50)—were satisfying with a wasabi kick. It also didn’t hurt that all beers and house wine are $2.50 during happy hour, Saturday-Thursday, 2-5:30 p.m. If you want to score some relatively inexpensive sushi in a pleasant atmosphere, Sakana isn’t a bad choice. If you want a spot that nails all of the minutiae, head somewhere else.

FOOD/NEWS TableRock and Salmon River, along with regional faves like Utah’s Uinta Brewing Company, Montana’s Big Sky Brewing, Oregon’s Ninkasi, and Watch out, Los Betos. There’s another bambino-sized breakfast California’s Stone Brewing Co. burrito on the block. Kelly Nichols opened Kurly Jo’s That’s a Wrap midThe fest will draw approximately 6,500 attendees to sample hunMarch at 3940 Overland Road between Roosevelt and Latah streets. dreds of brews. There will also be a selection of food carts and live “We do pretty much everything in tortillas, they’re 12 ½-inch so they music. Tickets are $25 in advance or $30 at the gate. all come out to be at least a pound,” said Nichols. Before the beer fest, the North American Brewers Association will Breakfast wraps include the Pig Out, with eggs, hash browns and hand out its prestigious North American Beer Awards Friday, May 31. In cheese; and the Eggs Benny, with ham, eggs and hollandaise. 2012, the competition received more than And Nichols does more than breakfast. 1,400 commercially produced entries and “We have a full lunch menu, as well, gave out gold, silver and bronze medalwhere we do things like a Philly and a lions in around 80 categories. For more fajita to a Caesar, occasionally a turkey info, visit northamericanbrewers.org. avocado, a French dip,” said Nichols. Moving from mountain beers to field Kurly Jo’s is open from 6:30 a.m.-6:30 food, Peaceful Belly has announced its p.m. Monday-Saturday, and 7 a.m.-4 p.m. 2013 Farm to Fork dinners, featuring fiveon Sunday. For more info, visit facebook. course meals with local wines, prepared com/kurlyjosthatsawrap. by chef Abby Carlson. The dinners are Moving from giant wraps to huge served at Dry Creek Farm and cost $125 amounts of beer, the North American per person. Dates are Thursday, Aug. 22, Brewers Association’s 19th annual and Saturday, Aug. 24, at 7 p.m.; and Mountain Brewers Beer Fest is taking Thursday, Sept. 19, Friday, Sept. 20, and over Sandy Downs in Idaho Falls Saturday, Saturday, Sept. 21, at 6:30 p.m. For more June 1, from noon to 5 p.m. Breweries info, visit peacefulbelly.com. represented include Idaho staples like Fill your belly with peaceful fare at a Farm to Fork dinner. —Tara Morgan Grand Teton, Laughing Dog, Payette,

WRAPS, BREWS, FARMS AND FORKS

GUY H A ND

2011 VALMINOR ALBARINO, $23 This wine opens with big, bold aromas of creamy lime, kiwi and quince fruit, backed by soft herb, mineral and a surprising touch of bacon. It’s equally rich on the palate with vivid peach, honeyed melon and ripe apple, all balanced by racy citrus. The finish is bright and brisk with round fruit flavors of spicy baked apple that linger nicely.

Restaurants get one chance to hit BW with their best shot. LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

One of the few Spanish wines labeled as a varietal, albarino accounts for 90 percent of all vineyard plantings of the Rias Baixas in the northwest wine region of Galicia. Albarino was once mistakenly thought to be a clone of the riesling grape brought by German pilgrims. It is also found in Portugal, where it is known as alvarinho, but it’s the Spanish version of this low-yielding grape that has achieved something of a cult status and is priced accordingly. Offering the intense fruit flavors of viognier, with the bracing acidity to balance, it works equally well with food or as an aperitif.

FOOD/REVIEW

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ACROSS 1 Canine woe 6 Decorates nicely

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22 Some bookmarks, for short 23 Ana Ivanovic and Novak Djokovic? 25 Hyperbolically large 27 Like steppes 28 Tour guide’s comment at the primate house? 30 Done, in Verdun 31 Twiggy’s look in ’60s fashion 32 Wintry temps

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33 Sign for tourists visiting the Bolshoi? 40 Construction support 42 Swimming pool shade 43 M.I.T.’s ___ School of Management 44 Operator 45 Cry before “Open up!” 48 Yak 51 Tropical paradise for Barbie and Ken? 55 ’60s White House name 56 Smear 58 The Indians, on scoreboards 59 Dickens’s Uriah ___ 60 Common potluck dish 62 On the button 64 Pops 65 Let Justin take care of everything? 70 Hands out hands 73 Some horns 74 Like Nasser’s vision 78 Prefix with phobia 79 Vientiane native 80 Response to “Look over there!” 83 What often follows you 84 Passed security at the troubadours’ convention? 89 Like “South Park” vis-àvis “The Simpsons” 91 Mortar trough 92 NASA spacewalks, in brief 93 One of three Canadian aboriginal groups 95 German article 96 Detroit pioneer 97 Prepare to go canoeing? 101 Place for a massage 104 Ghostbuster Spengler 106 Seniors’ org. 107 Stadium binge? 111 Displayed an “Oh, my God” reaction 115 Judge 116 Fortunetellers’ protest demand?

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Fields Banned orchard spray Close call Sweet, once Wood strip Lunch counter orders Something hilarious ___ Park

DOWN 1 Drudge of the Drudge Report 2 Woodchopper, say 3 Near-perfect rating 4 No longer fizzy 5 One of the Dionne quints 6 Tongue waggers 7 Steams 8 Paper size: Abbr. 9 It’s indicated in red 10 Band for a “Miss” 11 Motley 12 “Who goes there?” reply 13 Salad ingredient 14 Wide-eyed and openmouthed 15 Trudge (along) 16 Certain NASA launch 17 Binding elementary particle 18 They often have organs: Abbr. 24 E-mail folder 26 Slowing down, musically: Abbr. 29 Plant bristle 33 Ho-hum 34 Jordanian port 35 Plucked instruments 36 Goya’s “The Duchess of ___” 37 Go hither and yon 38 Leafy green 39 Ristorante menu suffix 41 Comb filler 44 Early development centers 45 Ran 46 Ran 47 Children’s game with letters 49 Noses

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Soap actress Sofer ___ Rios, Jamaica Workout target “BUtterfield 8” novelist Kind of bean Let happen Urban grid: Abbr. José, to friends Al ___ Greek name for Greece Font option: Abbr. Plane, e.g. Something it’s against the law to jump 70 Little bit 71 Imitate 72 Longtime Yankee nickname 75 It has buttons but no buttonholes 76 Big concert site 77 Top of the military? 80 Logical beginning? 81 In ___ (archaeologist’s phrase) 82 Cut a column, say 85 Fish trap 86 Rental item 87 Game of tag? 88 Gal., e.g. L A S T

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Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A M A N A

K N O E I E R E R S U D E D P E X I T N G T I O N P O L E T R S S T D S H

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90 Google hit units 94 Up-and-coming actress 96 Getting up there 97 Doomed ones 98 Wrap up 99 Locks 100 Royal robe trim 101 Definitely will 102 Chick of jazz 103 Up, in 87-Down 105 Suggest 108 Take in a hurry 109 She, in Salerno 110 Laughable 111 Taverna offering 112 Converse 113 Suffix with luncheon 114 British mil. decorations 117 Chinese steamed bun

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B P A O T E R H S E Q U S E L T S I O T S E S S H O E U K A T O T H S S E C T L A R O M E P E E E L T

A S S G N E C A G R A D E R G E N C E W E E T A N O N E P E N P E E D U L D B R S Y E S E T I M E B A T P E T U A T E M S S I N T D I O E X P

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CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. May 15, 22, 29, & June 5, 2013. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Nikki Renae Sexton Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1307577 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Nikki Renae Sexton, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Nikki Renae Jones. The reason for the change in name is: I want my birth name back. I don’t want the same name as Porn Star Nikki Sexton. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) June 20, 2013 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: May 01 2013 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT CHRISTOPHER D. RICH By: Ric Nelson Deputy Clerk Pub. May 15, 22, 29, June 5, 2013. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Julian Oscar Sprute Legal name of child Case No. CV NC 1307515 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Julian Oscar Sprute, a minor, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Julian Oscar Valenzuela. The reason for the change in name is All of Julian’s siblings

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have their fathers last name except Julian, I was was under the age of 18 when I had him. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) JUN 27 2013 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: May 06 2013 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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If you have a family member or friend who is trying, there are things they can & must do to help their cause. Contact Maloney Law on our 24 hr. line 208-392-5366 for a free consultation. Assistance available in parole & probation violations also.

BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publica-

tion. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. Why lie.. SWM, 27, 6’2”, 190 lbs., shaved head, tatts/piercings. Took exe’s charge and she bailed with he mail man. In for theft. See pics on my Facebook page. Lance Tyrell Taylor #636136 C/O Ada County Jail 7210 Barrister Dr. Boise, ID 83704. 33 yr. old SWF looking for male friendship. 25-45 yrs of age. Julie Broadway #85480 ECDC 2255 E. 8th St. Mountain Home, ID 83647. Incarcerated SBM, 49, 5’11”, 198 lbs. Never been married and have no children. Seeking correspondence with lively open minded and understanding women for genuine friendship. Charles Russell #726548 CBCC 1830 Eagle Crest Way Clallam Bay, WA 98326. Some girls sit and talk that trash. I do time for kicking butt. Lately I’ve been thinking well, it’d sure be nice to get some mail. Just turned 30. I’m 5’6”, blue eyes. Can you handle this? Nikki Robinson #79315 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Where is the girl of your dreams? Perhaps she wound up in jail. It’s not too late to contact her. Blonde, 30 yrs. Old. Maybe I’ll change my ways but, I like it dirty. Lynnsey Cummings 200 Courthouse Way Rigby, ID 83442. 35 yr. old F state inmate with few months left in prison. Seeking M or F pen pals. Christine Bapties 1451 Albion Ave. Burley, ID 83318. Hello my name is Paula. I originally lived in Vegas but I am temporarily held up in a place I’d rather not be. So, you can’t blame me for wanting to find good conversation out there or some one to get to know. I am cool, I think. So hurry and write to Paula Davis #70946 PWCC 2-27B 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204.

Jesus Christ is Lord. SWM looking for F for friendship/relationship. Write Thomas Chew #99212 ISCI Unit 24 PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. My name is Daunar, I’m 37 yrs. Old. I have naturally curly auburn hair and a sweet smile to die for. I’m 5’4”, 140 lbs. I am looking for someone who loves life, music and is not afraid to show it. I’m a book worm and enjoy old movies. Sweet and spicy are my specialty! If you love animals the outdoors and the spice of life, write me. Dauna Miller 2255 E. 8th North Mountain Home, ID 83647. Hey boys my name is Roxie. 26 yrs. Young, Native American, long brown hair, brown eyes, 5’2”, 130 lbs. I am looking for a honest goofball but could hold an intelligent conversation and that also can handle someone in my situation. I am a happy sweet girl that likes to dance and loves music that just living life to the fullest. If your interested and willing to get to know one another send me a letter. Roxana Beck #94656 2255 E. 8th St. Mountain Home, ID 83647. I am 34 yrs. Old, 5’7”, have hazel eyes, brown/reddish hair. I’ve been incarcerated for roughly two and a half years and have 10 months till parole is available. Currently I am in Southern Idaho in one of the women’s centers. I love animals, the outdoors in all weather. Enjoy reading. Interested in meeting new people and building new friendships. Believe honesty is the best! Abigail Swindle #86905 Unit 2, T2, 22D SBWCC 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83634. I’m 5’5”, 140 lbs., brown eyes, brown hair, 26 yrs. Old. I’m looking for fun interesting people to write that can keep a conversation going and willing to exchange pictures. Jacquelyn Dobra #89173 SBWCC 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83534.

5’5”, blonde with blue eyes, 150 lbs. Seeking pen pal or more. 30 yrs. Old. Desiree Naylor #96382 200 Courthouse way Rigby, ID 83442. SF seeking SM. Hi my name is Ester and I’m 33 yrs. Old. I have brown hair and eyes. I’m seeking a pen pal/friendship. I’m outgoing, spontaneous, I love to always be doing something, dancing. I’m fun loving and up for anything. Listening to music. If you want to know more write me and we’ll get to know each other. Ester Ibarra #85708 SBWCC U-2 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83634. SWF seeking SM. Hi my name is Kylie. I’m 25 yrs. Old. I have brown hair and eyes. I’m fun loving, outgoing, adventurous. I love the outdoors, sorts, UFC, bowling, pools, music and movies. I’m seeking friendship and M pen pals. Any and all mail appreciated. Kylie Kauffman #90439 SBWCC 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83634. 5’5”, blonde hair with blue eyes. Twin Falls Facebook. Seeking sugar daddy/pen pals. Desiree Naylor #96382 200 Courthouse Way Rigby, ID 83442. Beautiful Latin woman seeking pen pals age 31, brown hair and eyes. Romantic by heart, good personality, strong willed. Write to Tamarra Livingston MCCJC 1415 Albion Rd. Burley, ID 83318. Sexy Italian Vixen seeking pen pals. Long brown hair w/ brown eyes. 135lbs., 5’6”. Funny, outgoing and sweet. Alicia Joslin 1415 Albion Ave. Burley, ID 83318. Sexy Latina seeking pen pals. Charismatic, funny and light hearted. 5’2”, brown on brown. 135 lbs., 26 yrs. Old. Erica Saenz C/O MCCJC 1451 Albion Ave. Burley, ID 83318.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Back in the 1920s, the governor of Texas was determined to forbid the teaching of foreign languages in public schools. To bolster her case, she called on the Bible. “If English was good enough for Jesus Christ,” she said, “it’s good enough for us.” She was dead serious. I suspect you may soon have to deal with that kind of garbled thinking, Aries. And it may be impossible to simply ignore it, since the people wielding it may have some influence on your life. So what’s the best way to deal with it? Here’s what I advise: Be amused. Quell your rage. Stay calm. And methodically gather the cool, clear evidence about what is really true.

Spring Radiothon was a SUCCESS!!!!

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TAURUS (April 20-May 20): A few weeks ago, the principal at a school in Bellingham, Wash., announced that classes would be canceled the next day. What was his rationale? A big storm, a bomb threat or an outbreak of sickness? None of the above. He decided to give students and teachers the day off so they could enjoy the beautiful weather that had arrived. I encourage you to make a similar move in the coming days, Taurus. Take an extended Joy Break—maybe several of them. Grant yourself permission to sneak away and indulge in spontaneous celebrations. Be creative as you capitalize profoundly on the gifts that life is offering you. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In Japan, it’s not rude to slurp while you eat your ramen noodles out of a bowl. That’s what the Lonely Planet travel guide told me. In fact, some Japanese hosts expect you to make sounds with your mouth; they take it as a sign that you’re enjoying your meal. In that spirit, Gemini, and in accordance with the astrological omens, I encourage you to be as uninhibited as you dare this week in every situation where you’ve got to express yourself uninhibitedly in order to experience the full potential of the pleasurable opportunities. As one noodle-slurper testified: “How can you possibly get the full flavor if you don’t slurp?” CANCER (June 21-July 22): Here’s a thought from philosopher Ludwig Wittgenstein: “A person will be imprisoned in a room with a door that’s unlocked and opens inwards as long as it does not occur to him to pull rather than push that door.” I’d like to suggest that his description fits you right now, Cancerian. What are you going to do about it? Tell me I’m wrong? Reflexively agree with me? I’ve got a better idea. Without either accepting or rejecting my proposal, simply adopt a neutral, open-minded attitude and experiment with the possibility. See what happens if you try to pull the door open.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): If you have been waiting for the right moment to perfect your party skills, I suspect this might be it. Is there anything you can do to lower your inhibitions? Would you at least temporarily consider slipping into a chronic state of fun? Are you prepared to commit yourself to extra amounts of exuberant dancing, ebullient storytelling and unpredictable playtime? According to my reading of the astrological omens, the cosmos is nudging you in the direction of rabblerousing revelry. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Where exactly are your power spots, Virgo? Your bed, perhaps, where you rejuvenate and reinvent yourself every night? A place in nature where you feel at peace and at home in the world? A certain building where you consistently make good decisions and initiate effective action? Wherever your power spots are, I advise you to give them extra focus. They are on the verge of serving you even better than they usually do, and you should take steps to ensure that happens. I also advise you to be on the lookout for a new power spot. It’s available. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Reverence is one of the most useful emotions. When you respectfully acknowledge the sublime beauty of something greater than yourself, you do yourself a big favor. You generate authentic humility and sincere gratitude, which are healthy for your body as well as your soul. Please note that reverence is not solely the province of religious people. A biologist may venerate the scientific method. An atheist might experience a devout sense of awe toward geniuses who have bequeathed to us their brilliant ideas. What about you, Libra? What excites your reverence? Now is an excellent time to explore the deeper mysteries of this altered state of consciousness. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When explorer Ernest Shackleton was planning his expedition to Antarctica in 1914, he placed this ad in London newspapers: “Wanted: For hazardous journey. Small wages, bitter cold, long months of complete darkness, constant danger, return doubtful. Honor and recognition in case of success.” Would you respond to a come-on like that if you saw it today? I hope not. It’s true that your sense of adventure is ratcheting up. And I suspect you’re itching for intense engagement with the good kind of darkness that in the past has inspired so much smoldering wisdom. But I believe you can satisfy those yearnings without putting yourself at risk or suffering severe deprivation.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I’d rather not sing than sing quiet,” said the vivacious chanteuse Janis Joplin. Her attitude reminds me a little of Salvador Dali’s. He said, “It is never difficult to paint. It is either easy or impossible.” I suspect you Sagittarians may soon be in either-or states like those. You will want to give everything you’ve got, or else nothing at all. You will either be in the zone, flowing along in a smooth and natural groove, or else totally stuck. Luckily, I suspect that giving it all and being in the zone will predominate. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1948, Nelson Mandela began his fight to end the system of apartheid in his native South Africa. Eventually he was arrested for dissident activities and sentenced to life imprisonment. He remained in jail until 1990, when his government bowed to international pressure and freed him. By 1994, apartheid collapsed. Mandela was elected president of his country and won the Nobel Peace Prize. Fast-forward to 2008. Mandela was still considered a terrorist by the United States, and had to get special permission to enter the country. You probably don’t have an antiquated rule or obsolescent habit that’s as horrendous as that, Capricorn. But it’s past time for you to dissolve your attachment to any outdated attachments, even if they’re only mildly repressive and harmful. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): As a renowned artist, photographer and fashion designer, Karl Lagerfeld has overflowed with creative expression for 50 years. His imagination is weird and fantastic, yet highly practical. He has produced a profusion of flamboyant stuff. “I’m very down to earth,” he has said, “just not this earth.” Let’s make that your mantra for the coming weeks, Aquarius: You, too, will be very down to earth in your own unique way. You’ll follow your quirky intuition, but always with the intent of channeling it constructively. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the following passage, French novelist Georges Perec invites us to renew the way we look upon things that are familiar to us. “What we need to question,” he says, “is bricks, concrete, glass, our table manners, our utensils, our tools, the way we spend our time, our rhythms. To question that which seems to have ceased forever to astonish us.” A meditation like this could nourish and even thrill you, Pisces. I suggest you boost your ability to be sincerely amazed by the small wonders and obvious marvels that you sometimes take for granted.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 49