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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 45 MAY 1–7, 2013

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GIVE A LITTLE BIT Idaho Gives Day offers new model for fundraising FEATURE 11

ONE MAN’S LIFE The twisting tale and eventual redemption of Mark Seeley FIRST THURSDAY 19

MAP AND GUIDE INSIDE How to make your way through First Thursday SCREEN 31

REDRUM Taking a shining to Room 237

“I think it just totally unleashes some people.” FIRST THURSDAY 19


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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone ZHagadone@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Sultan of Events: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editors: Amy Atkins, Jay Vail Interns: Sam Alderman, Morgan Barnhart, Lauren Bergeson, Jessica Johnson Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Brad Hoyt, Brad@boiseweekly.com Zach Ritchie, Zach@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Elijah Jensen, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow, Garry Trudeau Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE HAND-SOME GIFTS Everybody needs a helping hand now and again; whether you’ve been laid off, suffered an accident or disaster, been ditched, snubbed, unappreciated, accosted, maligned—you name it, there are a million reasons why a little help from your friends (or really nice strangers) can make all the difference in the world. Take this week’s feature, for instance. Mark Seeley, whom many may remember as a quirky Boise City Council candidate, advocate for veterans and the homeless, and sometime Boise Weekly contributor (long before my time), was a man on a dark path. Suffering undiagnosed mental illness and haunted by the death of his father in the Vietnam War, Seeley waged a one-man offensive against the Boise Police Department. That battle could easily have ended with Seeley spending many angry years butting heads with authorities. But, instead, police extended a hand—and that made all the difference. Read the full, remarkable story, by BW News Editor George Prentice, on Page 11. It also happens that this week marks the inaugural Idaho Gives campaign, carving out 24 hours— starting at midnight on Thursday, May 2—when anyone and everyone from around the state is invited to log on to idahogives.org and donate the amount of their choosing to a slate of Gem State nonprofits. Read more about it on Page 7 and Page 16. Finally, while we’re all in the giving mood, Boise Weekly is taking the opportunity to ask you all for a little help. For the past 12 years, BW has hosted local artists on its covers—paying not only for the artwork, but compiling all those pieces into a blow-out cover auction and plowing the proceeds into a grant program that goes right back into the arts community. We’re still doing the cover auction and the grant program—don’t fret—but this year, BW needs a little piece of the pie. Money raised from sales at the auction, starting with the cover of this issue and ending at the auction in October, will go to help support Boise Weekly. Auction proceeds from covers that appeared before May 1 will, as always, go to support the grants. Of course, we would much rather continue devoting the entirety of the funds to our cover auction grant, but, like I said, everybody needs a helping hand sometimes—even if it’s your own. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Tomas Montano TITLE: she always wears flowers in her hair MEDIUM: Mixed media on particle board

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2013 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

ARTIST STATEMENT: My new series, skulhed uk, is a group of 11 paintings inspired by a decades-old piece of clip-art I stumbled upon. Once I saw it, I knew it had to be the basis of works dedicated to the Modern Art event. Come see the unveiling at the Modern Hotel and Bar, Room 103, Thursday, May 2, 5-9 p.m. Visit tomas. bz for my latest news and a look at my new gallery.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

SUBMIT

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Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

SOON TO BE A MOVIE WITH JOE PESCI Idaho potato growers were named in a suit alleging “a potato cartel” was fixing prices on Idaho’s signature crop, adding up to $25 billion a year. Get the full story on Citydesk.

MAKE SURE TO GO BEFOREHAND Planning to celebrate the special grad in your life at this year’s commencement at the University of Idaho Post Falls campus? Get your men’s room joke ready, because former Idaho Sen. Larry Craig is the commencement speaker. Read all about it on Citydesk.

FOOD IN THE AIR Several new restaurants have been announced for the Eighth Street Tower. What are they? Find out on Cobweb.

SCHOOL BUSES OF THE FUTURE Kids in several eastern Washington school districts are now riding to school on buses outfitted with Wi-Fi, while Idaho kids are still stuck shouting out the window like suckers. Get the details on Citydesk.

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NOTE BILL COPE TED RALL NEWS Idaho Gives Day offers a new model for nonprofit fundraising CITYDESK CITIZEN FEATURE Citizen Mark BW PICKS FIND FIRST THURSDAY Modern Art checks in for its annual visit FIRST THURSDAY LISTINGS Plan your evening with a full map and guide. 8 DAYS OUT SUDOKU DOONESBURY MUSIC GUIDE ARTS Corinna Button opens new show at Brumfield’s Gallery SCREEN Room 237 FOOD REVIEW Burgerlicious BEER GUZZLER CLASSIFIEDS NYT CROSSWORD HOBO JARGON FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

I GOT IT COVERED This should make you feel better

Ada County officials report that in the first quarter of this year, the number of applications for concealed handgun permits tripled the figures from the same period in recent years. They’re on a pace to add more than 7,000 such permits to the thousands already out there. This remarkable surge in the collective desire of so many of our neighbors to strap on a Colt or a Glock, a .38 or a .45, a snubnose or an automatic—or in the spirit of Travis Bickle in Taxi Driver, all of them at once—has me curious. Are we experiencing a corresponding rise in violent crime that I’m not aware of? Is somebody not telling us that the people of Boise and Meridian and Columbia Village are being murdered at an alarming rate? Or raped? Or mugged or car-jacked or kidnapped? Are the citizens of Kuna and Garden City being assaulted on the street? At their work? On their way to rent a movie or to get their tires rotated? Have our city parks and strip malls and Moxie Javas become such crime-ridden hell holes that these concealed weapons people dare not leave the house without that great equalizer stashed away under their clothing? It must be, I realize now, as there would be no need for a concealed handgun permit at home. As far as I know, you can openly display as many handguns as you want at home. You can keep one on the kitchen counter, or on the toilet. On the coffee table, the knickknack shelf, the piano, the clothes hamper. Why, a fellow can keep a handgun on every flat surface in the whole damn house, if he can afford it. And that’s the thing, isn’t it? You don’t need a concealed weapons permit back at the castle, where most of the time, we keep our valuables, our beloved pets and our families. So it’s got to be outside that has become so fearful. Out in public. Out where those !#%&@*!$ people are! Bars! Bowling alleys! Convenience stores where I go for Slim Jims and Red Bull! How can I have been so stupid to have gone there without a gun? What in hell was I thinking? I guess the only thing that saved my dumb ass was the fact that I was likely surrounded by smarter people than me. People smart enough to never, ever, go anywhere without a rod in their armpit. A gat in their pants. A heater under their hoodie. I shudder just to think about it. Like that guy last night. He looked a little like Ted Kaczynski, hanging around about 30 feet downwind from my ATM. He had me nervous, no kidding. But now that I know there are thousands and thousands of concealed handgun permits—old, new and pending— out there among the people I live around, it’s more likely he and his hidden gun saved me from a horrible incident, isn’t it, rather than involving me in one? It’s like the gun WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

proponents always argue: It’s all those guns you didn’t see that saved us from all those criminal acts that didn’t happen. Anyway, whew! I dodged a bullet, probably. Maybe hundreds of bullets, all thanks to those vigilant folks who, with their secret magnums and Dirty Harry dreams, protect us from all the worst possible scenarios that stalk our streets. But... hold on. I just thought of something. What if all those guys with concealed gun permits don’t actually have a gun concealed on them? What if they just want the permits because they’re worried somebody’s going to come along some day and take away their ability to get such permits? What if it’s not a matter of so much crime going on... or any prospect of so much crime ever going on, not as long as we have modern conveniences like policemen and car doors that lock... or the absence of any tangible reason for so many Idahoans to be hiding firearms in their clothing... but what if it’s nothing more than those people wanting to get hold of something they don’t need because they heard somewhere that something which has never been proposed—never even been suggested and certainly never been legislated—might happen anyway. And wouldn’t that mean this frantic scramble for concealed weapons permits is bringing out the most gullible, most panicprone, scaredy-pants, illogically fearful men and women? Men and women who are once more being terrified into buying things they don’t need to fend off attacks that won’t happen by criminals that don’t exist? Or just as bad, what if this has absolutely nothing to do with personal safety or self protection, keeping one’s car from being jacked or purse from being snatched, but is really just several thousand of our neighbors throwing a little pissy fit because they think somebody, some day, might tell them they can’t get everything they want? And now they’re out there. Among us. Thousands of them. Spoiled, gullible, fraidy cats maybe with guns tucked away under their duds, or maybe not. Out there where you and I might inadvertently cut them off in traffic. Accidentally step on their toes in a crowd. Let slip a perceived insult in a bar or approach them too quickly in a parking garage. Or simply tell them something they don’t want to hear on the job. And we already know how well they take disappointment, don’t we? Whether it’s real or imagined. Crap! Now I’m scared. Maybe I should get a concealed gun permit, what do you think? Like, what if one of these petulant, panicky assholes pulls a gun on me? I’ve been told I look a little like Ted Kaczynski, but I still have a right to protect myself, don’t I? And if you think I’m gonna sit there like a dummy, waiting to see who fires first, you’re !#%&@*!$ nuts!

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OPINION/TED RALL

IF WE LEARN GEOGRAPHY The terrorists have won

Why would anybody want to kill innocent people? That’s what Americans ask after every terrorist attack, particularly those carried out by foreigners. Our national cluelessness begs the question: Why do people blow up our embassies, bomb our ships, fly planes into our buildings, (try to) blow up their shoes and their underwear? They do it (partly) because we can’t imagine why anyone would do such a thing. Studies point to a number of factors. Some of these may help trigger the kind of violent “self-radicalization” that reports indicate may have led Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, Kyrgyzstani brothers of Chechen descent, to detonate bombs at the Boston Marathon. Was it psychological alienation? “I don’t have a single American friend,” Tamerlan, 26, supposedly the instigator of the attack, said. Some studies find that some self-radicalized terrorists are made after they suffer a disappointment, causing a person to graduate to violent direct action. Some even blame the involvement of Dzhokhar, 19, on reports that he was a pothead. It’s pretty safe to say we’ll never be able to point to one, or two discrete factors as the “causes” for the choice to kill another person. Like the drone war, the Boston Marathon bombings were a political act. At this point, my best guess is that this was an attempt to strike back at the United States in its post-9/11 “great war of civilizations,” or Christian “crusade,” as George W. Bush called it. Authorities who questioned Dzhokhar in his hospital bed say that he and Tamerlan wanted to defend Islam from attack. You can argue that the brothers’ politics

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were wrong. That their tactics were counterproductive. But we can’t understand why unless we dig into those politics. Which is something that the American media refuses to do. Which increases the odds of future attacks. Terrorism is not prima facie the act of a nut. Terrorists don’t terrorize for fun. “Terrorism is the tool of the weak, used by disaffected groups or minorities to oppose the rule and (as they see it) the oppression of an established and militarily superior power,” wrote former diplomat Marc Nicholson in ���An Essay on Terrorism” in 2003. “Because it is resistance on the cheap, terrorism often emerges out of civil society rather than state sponsorship, because oppressed civilian groups, lacking control over governmental machinery, can summon little or no regular military force able to confront their ‘oppressor’ in conventional military terms.” We like terrorists. Some of them, anyway. During World War II, German occupation forces characterized the leaders of the Warsaw ghetto uprising as “terrorists.” We view these doomed Jews, who fought to the death, as noble. The Afghan mujahedeen who struggled against the Soviets during the 1980s were terrorists to the USSR, “freedom fighters” to Ronald Reagan. This, of course, is how radical Islamists see themselves: as heroic fighters in a resistance movement against a cruel oppressor. They’re principled, willing to sacrifice everything for their cause. Since 9/11, our leaders have repeatedly told us that “they” “hate our freedoms,” but of course, this is nonsense. 10 Self-styled Islamist resistance

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NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS

‘We’ve seen the power of what $10 can turn into. It brings out the best of what we’ve always been about.’

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

GIVE IT UP

CSHQA Executive: ‘I think this is one of the most important things to happen downtown.’

NOW IS THE SUMMER OF OUR CONTENT

GEORGE PRENTICE At the stroke of midnight Thursday, May 2, Idaho embarks on a unique 24-hour statewide exercise—albeit voluntary—and with the possible exception of an election, the campaign that will be Idaho Gives could become a statewide test of how Idahoans see nonprofits as a solution to many of the state’s biggest challenges, including education, health care and a robust workforce. Simply put, the give-a-thon will ask donors to financially support those charitable organizations that they see as integral to Idaho. But organizers, even facing a recession-ravaged donor base, are anything but nervous; in fact, they have reason to believe their initiative is a success right out of the gate. “It’s a bit like an old-fashioned barn-raising. We’re all going to come together this Thursday,” said Jim Everett. Everett has raised more than a few roofs in his day—over gymnasiums, pools and campgrounds—as executive director of the Treasure Valley Family YMCA. Familiar to wealthy benefactors and the neediest of his neighbors, Everett’s soft-spoken demeanor is matched only by his fiery passion for nonprofits. “Think of the issues our nation is facing. They will be solved, quite often, by the nonprofit sector,” he said. “Education has always been our ticket to the American dream, and fixing our education systems will be solved with nonprofit partnerships. We have a health care crisis in this country, and 80 percent of most disease relates backs to obesity. That’s probably not going to be solved exclusively within the health care system.” But fundamental change crafted and managed by nonprofits—the kind of change that steers clear of politics—doesn’t come for free. “I’ll take Jim’s analogy and offer another from this century. May 2 is more like crowdfunding,” said Lynn Hoffmann, executive director of the Idaho Nonprofit Center. Borrowing a new and, so-far, wildly successful idea used in a few states (Minnesota, Alabama) and communities (King County, Wash.; Park City, Utah), more than 500 Idaho nonprofits will share a one-time cyber platform, idahogives.org, from midnight to 11:59 p.m. on May 2. “Idahoans will be asked to walk through, so to speak, an online door,” said Laura Schultz, assistant vice president of development for Easter Seals-Goodwill’s Northern Rocky Mountain Region, which includes Idaho. “I’ve been talking to nonprofits all across the state and a number of them said they really have had no way for people to contribute online.” WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Jim Everett, of the Treasure Valley Family YMCA (left); Lynn Hoffmann, of the Idaho Nonprofit Center (center); and Laura Schultz, of Easter Seals-Goodwill Northern Rocky Mountain Region (right).

And, Hoffmann said, walking through an “online door” to meet a nonprofit will probably be a new experience for many, adding that similar give-a-thons saw more than 60 percent of donors making first-time contributions. “Think about that for a moment,” said Everett. “This is going to be a very special 24 hours. A lot of people will be making the first donation they ever made.” Everett added that it’s not about nonprofits receiving a check with a lot of zeros on May 2; instead, the greater emphasis will be on smallor medium-sized donations. “Ten dollars will mean so much to these nonprofits. We’ve seen the power of what that $10 can turn into,” he said. “It brings out the best of what we’ve always been about.” Hoffmann said the overwhelming majority of nonprofit charitable organizations, totaling more than 5,000 in Idaho, are small, usually staffed by one, perhaps two individuals. “I can’t emphasize the grassroots nature of this enough,” she said. “The Idaho Nonprofit Center is providing the tools, platform—idahogives.org—and the cheerleading. But we’re telling the nonprofits, ‘This is up to you.’” To gin up interest, a number of nonprofits throughout the state will hold public events to spread their message and mission. For example, in the Treasure Valley, the city of Boise’s Sesqui-Shop will play host to a revolving door of charitable organizations throughout the day. More nonprofits will be on display at the Boise Grove, and a daylong block party, featuring music and food trucks, is scheduled for Boise’s Fourth and Front streets. “The great thing about Idaho Gives is that we’re coming together for one day,” said Schultz. “And we all have something we’re passionate about.” Schultz’s passion, through Easter SealsGoodwill, takes form in her organization’s workforce development and disabilities services, which help more than 7,000 clients.

Easter Seals-Goodwill counts more than 368 employees. Everett’s Treasure Valley YMCA includes more than 1,000 full- and part-time employees. “We’re probably the first employer for a great number of Idaho kids. I love that fact,” said Everett. To that end, Gem State nonprofits are significant employers and powerful forces in Idaho’s economic recovery. “It’s so critical for everybody to understand that nonprofit employees make up 10 percent of Idaho’s workforce,” said Hoffmann. “Thirty-thousand people work in the charitable sector. Add in the nonprofit hospitals and health care and it’s more than 50,000. And we certainly contribute to the gross state product: almost 6 percent.” For all of the daunting numbers and statistics, Everett said nonprofits are “all about the individual.” “We were about to close up the Y the other weeknight; it was about 8 p.m.” he said. “And a young woman walked in our door, looking for some help with a membership. She’s 18 years old. She’s an honor student at Vallivue High School and, get a load of this, she’s raising her four siblings. She had to drop out of school to take care of them.” Everett said the young woman’s story was only the latest in an ever-increasing number of Idahoans who turn to the YMCA and thousands of other nonprofits for help. ‘You see these stories all the time. You better believe that we’re going to help that young woman, and we’re going to start connecting her with services to help her family,” he said. “There isn’t a day that goes by without a story like that.” Idaho Gives Day, Everett said, is more about the awareness of nonprofits’ missions than the dollars: “If we didn’t raise a penny on 8 this—and by the way, we will raise

In just a few months, hard hats will be as common as ball caps in downtown Boise. With the JUMP project going full tilt, the Eighth and Main Tower topping off at 18 floors, the iconic Owyhee Plaza being transformed into apartments, and a Trader Joe’s to sprout from an empty lot at Capitol Boulevard and Front Street, yet another high-profile construction project is inching toward reality. “I think this is one of the most important things to happen downtown,” Jeff Schneider, principal emeritus with CSHQA, told Boise Weekly. CSHQA is working on plans to turn the former Macy’s building at 10th and Idaho streets into approximately 62 individual apartments, ranging in size from 518 to 1,000 square feet on the second through fifth floors. But what would go into the ground floor and mezzanine has a lot of people talking. Boise Weekly first told you in November 2012 about the Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s desire to move its headquarters, administrative, education and rehearsal space into the former Macy’s building (BW, News, “Much Ado About Macy’s,” Nov. 14, 2012). If all goes as planned, ISF would also create a new downtown performance venue at the location. ISF is currently negotiating with as many as three regional nonprofits that could also take over some of the space, which has sat empty since March 2010, when Macy’s pulled up stakes. “If we can get everybody on line, this will be good not only for the owners, but for that whole area,” Schneider told BW. “This would give the Shakespeare Festival a permanent home and they have a huge education program during the day, which would bring a lot of people into that area every day.” When BW spoke with officials with ISF in November 2012 about the project, they were cautious but optimistic. “The project is very exciting,” said Charlie Fee, ISF’s producing artistic director. “To be able to combine [workforce housing] with a performance space would be an exciting, visionary project for the city.” City of Boise officials tell Citydesk that a permit to begin construction on the housing expires approximately May 19, but an extension could be considered after that date. “We wouldn’t want to be knocking down pillars for the Shakespeare project downstairs with people living upstairs,” said Schneider. “We would prefer to do all of the construction at the same time.” —George Prentice

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NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

Treasure Valley Racing executives estimate that their Les Bois race track operation pumps approximately $32 million into the local economy per year and generates more than 200 full- and part-time jobs during the summer months.

ON TRACK Les Bois Kicks Off New Racing Season LAUREN BERGESON Duayne Didericksen has returned to Les Bois Park after more than a decade’s absence to help put the venue that gave him his start back on track. The former Les Bois jockey, trainer and racing secretary has taken the reins of the race track, which kicks off 31 days of thoroughbred racing on Wednesday, May 1, running through Saturday, Aug. 10. “If this wasn’t special to me, I wouldn’t be here,” Didericksen said. “The owners just want to break even, and pour the profits back into the business. They want to create jobs and save a good industry.” Owners said Les Bois should generate more than 200 full- and part-time jobs during the next four months, with live meets and simulcast wagering pushing approximately $32 million into the local economic engine per year. “All the people that are in this now are long-term Idahoans,” said Larry Williams. Williams was part of a successful effort to bring life back to Les Bois in 2011, after the track sat empty for two years. Along with industry insiders Harry Bettis, James Grigsby

and Linda Yanke, Williams created Treasure Valley Racing two years ago, partnering with an Alabama group to kick-start the race track operation with a limited 2011 schedule. TVR ultimately bought out its Alabama partners, making 2012 its first 100 percent local season, paying out an average $56,000 per race day. “[The local owners] have a vested interest in not only the horses, but the people,” said Williams. Les Bois owners said they were bringing back “theme days” in 2013, beginning with Derby Day, Saturday, May 4—running concurrently with the 139th Kentucky Derby. As a feather in their Derby bonnets, local owners announced that three-time Kentucky Derby-winning jockey (and Les Bois veteran) Gary Stevens will return to the track to race on Derby Day. “Gary Stevens hasn’t forgotten where he came from,” said Didericksen. “He always gives Boise a big hug.” Officials were quick to add that a newer breed of jockey, similar to Nikeela Black,

featured as this week’s Boise Weekly Citizen (see Page 9), are an important element for the track’s success. “New jockeys are always important. They’re like getting a new ball player,” said Didericksen, who added that fans would see some new faces from Canada and Mexico as well. “We have a great partnership with the new owners, but we also want to stay out of the way,” said Jim Tibbs, a member of the Ada County Board of Commissioners, which acts as TVR’s landlord. “We want the owners to be as successful as they can be.” Expecting to host more than 120,000 patrons and 800 horses through the season, Les Bois expanded its seating capacity to include new trackside patio seating. Diderickson, who worked in various capacities at the track from 1975-2003, said he witnessed Les Bois “during good times and bad.” “But with the commitment I’ve seen from ownership … I see big things,” he said.

some money and that will be great—it’s all about learning a little something. The dollars are really the frosting on the cake. But believe me, none of the nonprofits are putting any potential donations into their current budgets. Whatever they raise … well, that’s cool.” And some Idahoans may choose to donate their time on Idaho Gives Day. “When you total up all of the hours that Idahoans have given to nonprofit organiza-

tions, it’s 60 million,” said Hoffmann, repeating the number. “Sixty million hours. We’re third in the entire nation for that statistic.” Everett said once upon a time in Idaho, he and other nonprofit executives could pick up a phone and call one of a handful of wealthy benefactors. “It was fundraising heaven. We had a few wonderful contributors: the Joe Albertsons, the Jack Simplots,” said Everett. “In the old days, you could literally make one call when

you needed financial support. But that has all changed.” Everett, Schultz and thousands of other Idaho nonprofit officials now say it’s all about the $10 or $20 from a greater number of citizens. “Idaho Gives is a nonprofit—big, medium or small—and a virtual way of making a call to 1.5 million people across the state,” said Everett. He’s anxious to see if anyone answers.

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CITIZEN

NIKEELA BLACK Don’t ever ask her to apologize for winning GEORGE PRENTICE

It sounds as if your high-school schedule was pretty intense. That doesn’t even include my 4-H, which I was in from the age of 9-18. Did you ever count your ribbons? I think my record was 350 entries. In total? No, just in one year at the Benton-Franklin Fair. I did everything; we had detailed schedules and carried walkie-talkies. Plus, you were a rodeo queen. I had to participate in a different county fair every weekend from March to September. I would ride in a parade in the morning, head off to the track to race horses, put my rodeo stuff over my racing silks, participate in a rodeo and then run back to the track for the rest of the races. But that all had to eventually come to end. I’m rather spontaneous. I packed up and drove to a race track in Portland [Ore.].

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Did you know anyone there? No, I just showed up. Looking back, that was not a smart move without any connections. I’m sorry if you like Portland, but Portland was miserable. Can the racing world be cruel or exploitive to a young woman? I didn’t know who the good guys were and I was very naive. Also, being a female, rumors started immediately; but I didn’t hear about them until long after I left. Was heading back home to Washington an option? No. I packed up my truck and drove to Phoenix, Ariz., to race at Turf Paradise. The weather was better but, again, I didn’t know anybody and I was pawned off to an agent who turned out to be a drunk. I’m trying to picture a young woman doing all of this. How tough are you? I think I had to be tough. But I began running into weight issues. I was bulking up and getting muscular, and I couldn’t make the

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Don’t bet against Nikeela Black—at the track, in court or just about anywhere else. Those who underestimate the 27-year-old Boise attorney and jockey usually end up on the sidelines, watching Black in the winner’s circle. Black grew up on a 10-acre farm in Kennewick, Wash., training Arabian horses by the age of 14 and galloping thoroughbreds by the time she was 16. “I was taking high-school classes in the morning, galloping race horses at midday and taking classes at the community college in the afternoon,” she said. “Then, I would train the show horses in the late afternoon.” Black has cleared more than a few of life’s hurdles along the way—including sexism and significant health issues. She’s a University of Idaho law school grad, studied mediation in Europe and the Far East, and when she’s not taking a thoroughbred through its paces, Black is practicing law at Arkoosh Legal Offices, specializing in custody, divorce and child support. Prior to her first mount at the Wednesday, May 1, opening at Les Bois Park, she spoke with Boise Weekly about her passions for jockeying and justice.

required weights. I started hitting the sauna, wearing plastic gear. What weight did you need to be at? I needed to be 110 pounds stripped, and I’m five foot six. It wasn’t healthy. I was flipping. What’s that? Basically, it’s bulimia. Then there was Lasix. Hold it. Lasix is for horses [Lasix is used to curb nose bleeds in race horses]. Veterinarians prescribe bottles of Lasix for horses, but it’s an extreme diuretic. This sounds miserable. Were you masking this from the people who cared about you? My sister figured it out. I don’t think much of my family knows about that to this day. I never really have gone into detail about what was going on down there. And my guess is that your story isn’t terribly unique for a jockey. Unfortunately, no. I had it better than a lot of guys, constantly trying to make weight. Where was the light at the end of that tunnel? I was cramping up a lot. I passed out once in a hot-box, and I had a bloody nose. Later that day, a trainer gave me a bunch of shit about being two pounds 10 over. I thought, ‘Forget this.’ I never had

BOISEweekly | MAY 1–7, 2013 | 9


CITIZEN 9

body images before in my life. I raced that day, but I packed up my stuff and came back to Washington. It took about a year for my body to recover.

Did you find your love for racing again? Washington had higher weights and I got a lot of mounts. I won all the riding titles in the summer of 2005. At the same time, I went to Eastern Washington University and got a degree in psychology [she graduated magna cum laude]. I also got married in 2007 to my best friend of six years. And how did the law come into your life? Someone came by the farm one day and offered me a job as a paralegal. I would gallop in the morning and work in the law office in the afternoon. Experiencing my family’s painful divorces, I was interested in studying alternative dispute resolution. Ultimately, you graduated from the University of Idaho law school. And I got a chance to study negotiation and mediation in London and Geneva one year and in Hong Kong and Beijing the next year. When I was back home, I would continue to race all summer. But by 2010, I was home for only 10 days. Was that on purpose? My husband and I had agreed to separate by then. You were studying mediation. Do you see the terrible irony in that? It was what it was. On the day of my law school graduation in 2011, I attended the ceremony but had to race in Pocatello the next day. I rode horses for a Jerome farm that whole summer—in Boise, Pocatello, Salt Lake

City and in Nevada and Wyoming. I took a job at a law office, balancing that with working the horses and racing on weekends. Why did you take the job at Arkoosh Law here in Boise. Because I can race here. I just got a home on 13 acres in Greenleaf—40 minutes to the [downtown Boise] law office and 30 minutes to the [Les Bois] racetrack. I get up at 5 in the morning, gallop at Les Bois until 11 a.m., shower, change and head to the law office. I’m here some evenings until 8 p.m., go home and work a bit more. And your personal life? I met a really great guy last May. He sent me a message saying he had watched me beat his race horses that he owned. I said it was nice to meet him, but I wasn’t going to apologize for winning. He lives in Price, Utah. But long distance is a struggle. Is he moving here? That’s the plan. My 13 acres are next to 10 acres that he owns. Are there horses out there? Not yet. But there will be. What’s the worst injury you ever suffered? I’ve been incredibly lucky. My joints have been torn up pretty bad, though. You’re very slight. How strong are you? I don’t know [Black immediately flexed an impressive muscle and gave a handshake usually reserved for a man twice her size]. How much do you love all of this? If you’re not passionate about it, it will break your heart.

RALL organizations like al Qaida haven’t garnered widespread support because terrorism against civilians is counterproductive. As Che Guevara wrote, “terrorism [is] a measure that is generally ineffective and indiscriminate in its results, since it often makes victims of innocent people and destroys a large number of lives that would be valuable to the revolution.” However, as Guevara continued, terrorism directed against government or military officials can be legitimate: “Terrorism should be considered a valuable tactic when it is used to put to death some noted leader of the oppressing forces well known for his cruelty, his efficiency in repression, or other quality that makes his elimination useful.” After 9/11, even some Americans viewed the Pentagon as a legitimate military target. Conversely, arguments that the World Trade Center, as a hub of a “technocratic corps at the very heart of America’s global financial 6

10 | MAY 1–7, 2013 | BOISEweekly

empire,” was an acceptable target, were rejected. The WTC victims enjoy an exalted sainthood in popular culture. No would-be revolutionary who knows history would have targeted the Boston Marathon. So, let’s agree that the brothers’ tactics sucked. That what they did was evil. But what of their political motivations? One would have to be blind not to understand why Muslims are enraged at the United States: Gitmo, drones, propping up dictators, Palestine, Afghanistan, Iraq, the list goes on. And yes, Chechnya—where the Russians slaughtered thousands of innocents while their American allies silently cheered them on. But few of us know about that. Which gets us back to: Why’d the Boston bombers do it? To get us to pay attention. So we’ll force “our” government to stop what they’re doing in Muslim countries. But that’ll never happen until we know what “we’re” doing. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


Even at age 11, Mark Seeley wanted to be a newspaper reporter.

CHRISTMAS WAS IN THE AIR, BUT THERE WAS LITTLE PEACE ON EARTH FOR MARK SEELEY. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

The call to 911 from a downtown Boise merchant stated that a man—Seeley—was causing a disturbance in a woman’s clothing store, and owners wanted him out. Seeley later told police that he went into the store to offer to wash some windows, but the store owner thought he was panhandling. In either case, things weren’t going well. “I remember Mark being really loud, almost incoherent,” said Boise Police Lt.

Tony Plott, recalling the Dec. 15, 1994, incident, which attracted more than its share of Christmas shoppers. To de-escalate the conflict, Plott said his primary objective was to have Seeley voluntarily leave the store, otherwise, the merchant could press charges. But Seeley was having none of it. “I came up behind him,” Plott said. “The easiest hold for me was to grab him around

the chest and shoulder area. Otherwise, he could have taken a swing and I could have caught a punch.” Things went downhill: Seeley was put into a headlock, handcuffed and transported to the Ada County lockup, where he was booked on a charge of disturbing the peace. Christmas defined much of Seeley’s tumultuous life, starting with being born on Dec. 26, 1960. Some Christmases were

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better than others—he asked the love of his life to marry him on Christmas Eve 2006—but as a young man, he spent most of his holidays haunted by the loss of his father, John, killed in a 1966 helicopter crash in Vietnam. In between the ugliness of his 1994 arrest—just one in a string of run-ins with Boise police—and when he passed away a few days after Christmas 2012, Seeley’s widow, community leaders and even Boise police all agreed that they had come to know and love a man whose life would not soon be forgotten. In spite of his diagnosis of severe bipolar disorder, Seeley became an author, advocate for the disabled, homeless and veterans, and even a candidate for the Boise City Council. Many citizens say they knew something about the man, but most didn’t know it all.

LAURA

“We met when we were both students at Boise State; it was in the Morrison Hall dormitory,” said Laura Seeley. “I was Laura Aldous back then. It was the fall semester of 1982. I was studying information science and, of course, Mark was studying journalism. He eventually changed his major to political science.” Laura said she and Seeley just “clicked;” nothing romantic, but they were really good friends. They would sit in the lobby of their dormitory and talk the night away. “We were just pals,” Laura said. But their relationship was put on hold—for 22 years. “I left Boise State after that semester back in 1982 and didn’t come back,” Laura said. “We lost touch.” That is until 2004, when Laura walked into “My father’s voice went silent when I was 5 a Boise Walmart to buy some roof sealant. She stepped up to the hardware counter and saw a years old,” Seeley wrote in 2008. familiar face, albeit two decades older. Long before he began writing about his “I said, ‘You don’t remember me, do you?’ father—a practice he didn’t start until into his He said, ‘I sure do. Remember Morrison 40s—Seeley dreamed of being a newspaper Hall?’” Laura said. “It was quite a story. By writer, preferably writing about politics or then, I had been married and divorced and sports. He even claimed his own publication, Mark had never married.” The Seeley Tribune, at the age of 11. But in the 22 years between their first “I think this picture was taken when he encounter and their Walmart reunion, Seeley first began writing,” his widow, Laura Seeley, had drifted across the West, working as a ski told BW, pointing to a glossy black and lift operator, cashier, trash collector and room white photo of a bleach-blond kid wearing service waiter. He looked back on the years as a “PRESS” hat with a No. 2 pencil tucked what he called a “tsunami of bad luck, karma, behind his right ear. “Word got around to circumstance or just whatever-the-hell-it-is that the local little league that Mark was such a rules fate in people’s good writer so they lives.” asked him to write In early 1994, Seefor the Tri-City Scoop ley’s still-undiagnosed in Rockland, Calif. mental illness was He was paid $12 a raging, and even though week.” he sought out some But baseballs were personal counseling, he put up on the shelf had a major falling out one early summer with his mother. She morning when two went as far as placing a military officers came restraining order against to the door to tell her son. Alice Seeley that she “I was instantly was a widow; the homeless with $3.17 CH-47 her husband to my name,” he was co-piloting in wrote years later. Vietnam had crashed. “Why I remember that “Every few weeks exact amount, I do not I would close the know.” door to my room and Seeley slept on the wet my pillow with streets of Boise, spendmy tears, looking ing occasional nights in at a favorite photo shelters, including Comof him and crying,” munity House (now Seeley later rememthe River of Life men’s bered in a book he Mark Seeley turned his father’s wrote about his father. “The letters home and his own shelter), which had opened in memory of that final hug memories into a self- November 1994. published book. It was also in 1994 that goodbye would pierce its Seeley first walked into Boise way through my weakened Weekly. He began writing defenses and leave me sobletters to the editor about homelessness and bing uncontrollably.” editors encouraged him to become a semi-regSeeley grew up too fast. As a 17-year-old, ular columnist—which he did for the next 13 and still receiving a monthly payment from years—writing often about Boise’s homeless, the Veterans Administration, he spent a lot of time at a local Denny’s restaurant, hanging out and even more often about veterans. But his own demons continued to haunt with grown-ups, getting a taste for cigarettes him. Seeley later admitted that he often and coffee. Ultimately, Seeley’s mother moved her fam- thought of killing himself by jumping from an overpass onto a Boise freeway, “So I would ily back to Boise, her hometown. kiss a trucker’s windshield and die that way in-

A FATHER’S SON

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stead of splatting like a tomato on the freeway pavement.” He survived, hour to hour, day to day, by asking for odd jobs at downtown businesses. That’s when he walked into a woman’s clothing store at Boise’s Eighth and Main streets in December 1994, leading to a threeday stint at the Ada County Jail and triggering a bone-deep hatred for the Boise Police Department.

AN ARRESTING PERSONALITY “Yeah, that’s when I first met Mark,” Plott recalled of the arrest at the downtown store. “And from that day forward, I saw him quite often over the next several years, getting in trouble or having run-ins with other officers.” The worst of it occurred shortly thereafter. “I heard both sides of that story,” said Plott, referring to an incident that occurred just days following Seeley’s arrest at the clothing store. “But one thing was clear. After the incident at the Community House, he didn’t have any use for police.” There are conflicting reports of what exactly happened that December night at Community House, but all sides agreed that there was indeed a disturbance at the homeless shelter and again, Seeley was asked to leave the premises. In a scuffle between Seeley and police, one officer was knocked to the ground, suffering a knee injury that later required surgery. Throughout the melee, Seeley continued to refer to his father. “My father did not die in Vietnam so that you could call me a piece of shit,” Seeley said

he shouted at police. He also admitted to kicking out the plastic divider between the front and back seats of a police cruiser. Seeley’s recollection of the story was being arrested, being called “a piece of shit” and the memory of his father being disrespected by a police officer. The arresting officer has since died. “But there was some reason to believe that the officer—who was also a veteran—asked Seeley, ‘What do you think your father would have thought of you acting like this?’’” said Boise Chief of Police Mike Masterson, who joined the Boise Police Department 10 years after the incident. “But in retrospect, it really doesn’t matter. Mark perceived the police as his enemy and he was hostile to us for years after that.” Plott said he tried to develop a rapport with Seeley, but with little success. “Mark started making some threats to the department. He would say things like ‘I’d like to take one out,’ and believe me, he wasn’t talking about a date,” said Plott. “I wasn’t really sure which way to go with this. I just knew that something had happened to Mark and I was beginning to understand how much his dad meant to him.” A dangerous dance between agitator and law enforcement continued for more than a decade—some years were better than others—but Seeley’s relationship with the police department was rocky at best.

THE $18 GUY A ray of hope came back into Seeley’s life Nov. 6, 2004, the day Laura wandered into the

dollar there for his campaign, and that totaled State Street Walmart, where he had recently $18.43.” been hired as a hardware clerk. And in a losing effort—but one of the city’s “I remember it like it was yesterday. That most efficient campaign returns—Seeley spent night, we went to the Sockeye Grill, where $18 to secure 7,121 votes. Seeley said Bisteryou could still smoke at the time,” Laura said. feldt spent more than $5,000 on his winning “Mark smoked two packs a day, I still smoke about a pack a day. We went to a hockey game campaign, securing 24,611 votes. The following year, on Christmas Eve 2006, after that, and the next time it was a movie. We Seeley and Laura took a stroll across their old dated for about two years.” ccampus. But Laura was “It was cold. more than Seeley’s W We stood there at girlfriend. She M Morrison Hall, our became his advoo old dormitory at cate and partner. B Boise State,” she She also helped ssaid. “That’s when Seeley run one of M Mark asked me to the most unique Watch a m marry him. We got political campaignss video of Laura m married the next in Boise history. Seeley’s first F February.” Seeley decided to meeting with But love couldn’t challenge thenBoise Police. ccure Seeley of his incumbent Boise iillness, and 2008 City Councilman Mark Seeley’s widow, Laura Seeley reacts to was a particularly Vern Bisterfeldt in her first meeting with Boise Police Chief Mike bad year. the November 2005 Masterson and Lt. Tony Plott. “He was formally general election. diagnosed as bipolar. “I was his treasurer. I helped him manage the entire campaign And it completely changed his personality. He got very little sleep, combative, and his fund, which totaled $18.43,” Laura said. “Do you remember back then? Mark was known as language would become a bit vulgar. There was a full eight months when his meds stopped the $18 Guy.” working altogether. He talked about killing Seeley’s campaign platform had one big himself,” said Laura. “But he had enough plank: advocating for Boise’s homeless comlove and respect for me that he would try to munity. stay away. He would wander downtown and “He picked up a coffee mug one day and even sleep in his car. The downtown was his he looked at the saying, ‘Be the change you world.” want to see,’” Laura recalled. “And he said, But going downtown also meant that Seeley ‘I can’t sit here. I’ve got to do something.’ would have more run-ins with the police. People would hand him a few cents here, a

A don’t miss presentation for parents of pre-school age children.

Digital Frontiers for Littlest Learners with Mindy Brooks Director of Education and Research at Sesame Workshop

Tuesday, May 7, 2013 11:30am to 1:00pm The Linen Building 1402 West Grove St. Boise, Idaho $

18 per person

All proceeds benefit local education related non-profits.

Non-profit of the month:

Idaho Association for the Education of Young Children.

Register to attend at: www.theEDsessions.org

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MAY 1–7, 2013 | 13


A FRAMED PIECE OF PAPER

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The River of Life men’s mission dedicated a room within a wing for homeless veterans to Mark Seeley’s father, Capt. John Seeley.

special acknowledgement to his wife Laura and even Boise Weekly, which Seeley said “gave me a voice when I had none.” The Rev. Bill Roscoe, executive director of Boise Rescue Mission, told BW that the mission possesses the final 200 copies of A Most Fortunate Man, and any proceeds from the sale of the book go to the River of Life’s

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

“I would go to briefings each morning, and I kept hearing about someone named Mark Seeley,” Masterson told BW. “I would hear stories about him running around in his car, purportedly flipping the bird to attract the attention of officers so that they would pull him over. He was pretty agitated.” Masterson said he continually heard about Seeley and his occasional arrest or citation; Masterson said he also began to sense that Seeley might have been struggling with mental illness. “In a city of 210,000 people, we have thousands of people who suffer from mental illness,” Masterson said. “But instead of dealing with Mark tactically, we chose to deal with him strategically to determine what his needs were.” What came next was a strategy that can’t be found in any police manual. Plott reached out to Seeley, offering to sit down over a cup of coffee and asking to bring along a guest: Masterson. “Mark was pretty happy about that,” Plott remembered. “There was no way in the world that he was going to miss that meeting.” The three agreed to meet at the Starbucks on Franklin Road, not far from the Boise Towne Square. The weather was nice on March 26, 2008, so they sat outside. “Mark said, ‘Hi chief,’ but then he started right into it,” remembered Plott with a laugh. “Mark was a bit on the spicy side. He was ready to pick a bone. He said, ‘Listen, here are my concerns.’ The chief let him go for a bit. But after a while, the chief said, ‘Hey, Mark, this is why we’re here.’” Masterson smiled when BW asked him if he had to think twice before meeting with Seeley. “Only in that the chief of police had to meet with an angry man and the possibility of arresting him. Believe me, it would not have been the way I wanted to be welcomed to Boise,” he said with a laugh. “I think Mark was geared up and ready to fight. But then we told him we were there to apologize.” And that’s when Masterson revealed a framed certificate with the seal of the Boise Police Department above the words Certificate of Appreciation: “The Boise Police Department recognizes the sacrifice of your father, Captain John S. Seeley, on June 27, 1966, in the service and defense of his country while serving as a pilot in Vietnam. He is a true American hero to those of us in law enforcement who understand the dangerous work and risks inherent in our professions while protecting our great nation and city.” “Mark was speechless,” remembered Masterson. A healthy amount of silence marked the next few minutes. Eventually, Masterson and Plott said they had to return to their respective offices, said their goodbyes and shook Seeley’s hand. Almost 40 minutes later, Masterson and Plott separately drove by the Starbucks to see if Seeley had left. And there he was, at the same outside table, staring at the framed certificate. “My relationship as an individual with

Mark and the department’s relationship [with him] improved dramatically,” said Plott, who added that he began hearing from Seeley more than ever, but the conversations were pleasant and engaging. “He would talk about his marriage or a new job. And then there was his mom’s birthday.” Plott said that he received an invitation to

v veterans outreach attend a birthday p program. barbecue for Seeley’s “Mark asked me mother, a unique o once to place a copy request for an officer o his book at the of to step inside such a V Vietnam Memorial personal circle. W in Washington, Wall “That was a good D D.C., near where his day. Mark told me f father’s name is writhe thought he had t ten,” said Roscoe, his illness under h himself a Vietnam control on that day,” Boise B i Police P li D Department t t created t d a certificate tifi t of appreciation honoring Mark Seeley’s father, vet. “I told him I said Plott. “And I a gesture that changed Seeley’s relationship would be honored. know that my being with the police. Come to think of it, it there meant a lot to was Father’s Day when Mark’s mother, too.” I was at the wall. I had someone take a photo In 2008, Seeley sat down to write his of the book right next to John Seeley’s name.” ultimate tribute to his dad. A Most Fortunate Roscoe added that when the River of Life Man is a full chronicle of Seeley’s own journey, while featuring 55 letters his father wrote from designed a special wing to serve homeless vets, it dedicated a room to John Seeley. Hanging Vietnam. Seeley dedicated the book to the next to the door is a photo of the book at the memory of 2,207 helicopter pilots who gave Vietnam Memorial Wall. their lives during the Vietnam War, and gave

A SHORT GOODBYE Masterson told BW that he considered his ongoing relationship with Seeley as “tremendous,” and stayed in touch for the next four years. “And then one day, last December, I came into the office and my assistant tells me, ‘Mark Seeley called to say, you’re on his bucket list,’” said Masterson. “I said, ‘What? Bucket list?’” Laura said that her husband wasn’t feeling well that Thanksgiving, complaining of flu-like symptoms. “We kept going back to a family clinic, and finally one day, they gave him an IV and his ankles started swelling up,” she said. “They took a chest X Ray and immediately put him into St. Al’s on Dec. 19, 2012. His lungs were filled with cancer.” That same evening, an MRI revealed that the cancer had metastasized to his brain. “They estimated that he had over 30 tumors. He was in and out of the hospital twice. Mark had seen what chemotherapy had done to his stepdad and he didn’t want that.” Making matters worse was that the Seeley’s had no insurance. “But they were amazing. Medicaid picked up the bill. I think it was $89,000,” said Laura. On Dec. 27, one day after his 52nd birthday, Seeley called Plott and asked to go for a drive. Seeley crawled into the passenger side of the police vehicle when Plott pulled up at his doorstep. “And you know what? He lit up a cigarette… in a police car! I thought, ‘What the heck,’ and cracked a window open,” said Plott with a huge laugh, at the Boise State police substation. “We talked about everything that day, all that he had been through with the police department. Later, we came back to my office [at the Boise State police substation], and he was sitting right where you’re sitting and looked up on my wall.” And there, right next to Plott’s photos of his own family was a piece of stone-rubbed paper, with the name John Seeley. When Plott visited the Vietnam Memorial Wall the previous year, he used a pencil to rub John Seeley’s name onto a piece of paper, but he had never told Seeley. “His eyes caught that and a big old tear starting coming out of his eye,” said Plott, whose own voice cracked as he remembered the day. “Mark died three days later,” he said. Laura said her husband’s last wish took even her by surprise. Seeley, a lifelong agnostic, wanted to visit a local church. “By the time we got to the church, the service was over but he just sat there for a few minutes and said it was a great visit,” she said. “What?” Roscoe said with incredulity when BW told the reverend about Seeley’s final wish. “Mark and I would talk about faith quite often, and Mark was always inquisitive and respectful, but to the end, he contended that he was an agnostic. I always tried to assure him that at any point, he could invite God into his life. But now, you’re telling me he went to church? Oh man…” Roscoe said he needed a moment. “Oh, wow; he always had a way. Even when he’s gone, he still stirs me up.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events JON OR LANDO

Hey, your roots are showing.

Women and their connection to the earth join in Arise.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY MAY 3-5

WEDNESDAY, FRIDAY-SATURDAY MAY 1 AND MAY 3-4

green thumbs

silver screen

It’s springtime again, and you know what that means: the birds and the bees. They’re out in force because this is already turning out to be a gangbuster season of fragrant blooms, creeping vines and verdant Foothills. So, what’s preventing your own little patch of dirt from being just as full of life, vigor and productivity? Not much, as it turns out. From the popular Garden Plant Sale at Idaho Botanical Garden, featuring hundreds of decorative and fruiting plants, to the Tomato and Veggie Plant Sale at Peaceful Belly and its scores of ready-to-plant fruits and vegetables, the gardening events are sure to get your garden green and your pantry stocked with fresh-picked goodies. Be ready to do battle at the always popular Idaho Botanical Garden Plant Sale. For the first time in several years, the public will be able to join in on the race for veggies, herbs and landscaping plants. It’s IBG members only on Friday, May 3, from 4-8 p.m., but the general public can dive in on Saturday, May 4, from 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Just remember that general admission still applies: $5 for adults, $3 for seniors and youths ages 5-12, and free for children ages 4 and younger. But once in the gate, brace yourself for a huge selection of colorful, fragrant and attractive plants. On hand will be towering crimson columns of lupinus, dainty irises and broad ferns to fill the gaps in the loamy reaches of your yard. If going local is more your thing, pick up some penstemon, which comes in fairy blues, sharp purples and lipstick reds. Experts will be available to help you choose the perfect plants for your home. You can pick up even more grub to grow at Peaceful Belly’s Tomato and Veggie Plant Sale, running two weekends: Saturday, May 4-Sunday, May 5, and Saturday, May 11-Sunday, May 12. You’ll find more growing fruits and vegetables to transplant into your garden than you can shake a hoe at. This year’s sale features more than 140 types of tomatoes, 80 types of peppers, melons, squash, herbs and practically everything else edible that grows around the Treasure Valley. The sale runs from 9 a.m.-5 p.m. at the Peaceful Belly farm in the Dry Creek Valley near Hidden Springs. Idaho Botanical Garden Plant Sale, members only, Friday, May 3, 4-8 p.m.; public sale, Saturday, May 4, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE-$5. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. Peaceful Belly Tomato and Veggie Plant Sale, Saturday, May 4-Sunday, May 5, Saturday, May 11-Sunday, May 12, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Peaceful Belly Farm, corner of Dry Creek and Broken Horn roads, Hidden Springs, 208-345-8003, peacefulbelly.com.

ARISE AND SPROUT FILM SCREENINGS It’s easy to brush off movies as mindless escapism—it’s especially easy to do when a film involves exploding robots. But sometimes films can make audiences not only feel, but think and act. Want to get more out of film than a bucket of popcorn? Two such opportunities are heading to Boise, ready to give audiences their fill of social awareness. Arise focuses on the connections and interactions that women around the world cultivate with planet Earth. Directed by former Boise resident Lori Joyce and narrated by actress Daryl Hannah, the film weaves together poetry, music, art and activism to highlight the relationship female farmers, human-rights advocates and peacemakers have formed with their communities, starting from the soil up. The film was selected for eight different film festivals in 2012 and received the Spirit of Activism award at the Colorado Environmental Film Festival. It will hit Boise on Wednesday, May 1, at The Flicks. Joyce will attend the screening and be available to answer questions after the film. Ten percent of proceeds will go to Amazon Watch, a group defending indigenous cultures and the Amazon Rainforest. Arc of Idaho also hosts an event that alludes to soil—the Sprout Film Festival, returning for its third year in Boise on Friday, May 3, and Saturday, May 4, at the Egyptian Theatre. Sprout is a series of films related to intellectual and developmental disabilities, and is intended to promote better understanding of individuals obscured by stereotypes. This year, the festival hosts a special screening for elementary through high-school students. A few of this year’s films include Outside Inside, about a mute and autistic young man who reveals his true voice through writing about the world around him for the camera; Deedah, a documentary from the point of view of a second-grade girl whose younger brother has Down syndrome; and WYSIWYG, which consists of three excerpts featuring adults with developmental disabilities in Anjali Dance Company live performances. Arise, Wednesday, May 1, 7 p.m. $13-$15. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3424222, theflicksboise.com; Sprout Film Festival, Friday, May 3, 10 a.m.; Saturday, May 4, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. $8-$10. The Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-387-1273, gosprout.org/film.

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SPRING PLANT SALES

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FIND ROCKET STOVE AT NORTH END ORGANIC NURSERY

Ever try a pick-up line while dressed as a Storm Trooper in a bar?

Stick your neck out for Zoo Boise.

SATURDAY MAY 4

SATURDAY MAY 4

dress like a jawa

preserve

STAR WARS COSTUME PARTY

ZOO BOISE WILDLIFE CONSERVATION EXPO

Cinco de Mayo is like the Mexican version of St. Patrick’s Day: Americans buy bottles of the national liquor—tequila, in this case—don ponchos and sombreros, and cause a ruckus. Many of us have already realized that these not-our-nationalholidays are a great excuse for getting a little silly, so why not channel the party vibe to Star Wars a day early? Saturday, May 4, Spacebar Arcade—which is responsible for Americana-steeped events like Donkey Kong and Galaga tournaments—throws the May the 4th Be With You party, a Star Wars-themed event running from 4 p.m.-2 a.m. The first thing you need to know is that this is a costume party. If you’re ungainly and tall, maybe that pelt hanging from your grandpa’s wall can turn you into a sufficiently hirsute Chewbacca. If your long hair can be curled into cinnamon buns on the sides of your head, a believable Princess Leia can be achieved with a white top sheet and a black belt. Get photos snapped at the photo booth, dance to live DJ music with Stardust Lounge from 10 p.m.-midnight and partake of drink specials of Snake River Brewing beers all night long. Finally, the event is free to attend, so bring enough cash to buy drinks, take some photos and play a few video games. Bring your best pal, your best friends—bring the whole Rebel Alliance. Luckily, a party this epic isn’t going down a long time ago in a galaxy far, far away. 4 p.m.-2 a.m. FREE. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-918-0597, spacebararcade.com.

Zoo Boise is a hot topic lately. Earlier this year, the zoo unveiled an ambitious and long-term goal for zoo improvements, including animatronic dinosaurs, a major influx of new animals and a $3 million expansion inspired by Gorongosa Park wildlife preserve in Africa. To add fuel to the expansion fire, Zoo Boise is hosting its first-ever Wildlife Conservation Expo at Boise State University’s Student Union Building Saturday, May 4. The expo will consist of individual 20-minute presentations by various conservation groups that have received financial support from the Zoo Boise Conservation Fund. Expo-goers can learn about each group’s projects and ask questions to continue the discussions after the presentations. Projects range from local efforts and explorations, like College of Idaho’s southern Idaho work with ground squirrels and the University of Idaho’s study of pygmy rabbits, to more specialized groups like the Mountain Gorilla Veterinary Project and the International Rhino Foundation. A video presentation about the enormous Gorongosa National Park in Mozambique is also part of the event. Ticket holders can attend eight of the 14 topics presented, so choose your favorites wisely. Students get in for $7, and general admission costs $9. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $7-$9. The Boise State University Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-3844260, zooboise.org.

THURSDAY MAY 2 spirit of giving IDAHO GIVES DAY Each day, nonprofits make contributions to communities and causes. But with shrinking state budgets, the help of charitable organizations and those who give is more important than ever. Thursday, May 2, the inaugural Idaho Gives campaign hopes to energize those causes by celebrat-

S U B M I T

ing Idaho’s nonprofits and donors with a statewide day of charitable giving. Hosted by the Idaho Nonprofit Center, the campaign takes place mostly online, offering donors a central place to connect with the Gem State’s 501(c)(3) nonprofits. The Idaho Gives platform allows donors to find their favorite nonprofits and info about new local causes. Participating nonprofits include the Discovery Center of Idaho, Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline, Agency for

New Americans and many, many more. Idaho Gives hopes to attract more than 5,000 donors, for a combined total of more than $500,000 donated to hundreds of participating nonprofits. But the program offers more than convenience—by donating on this date, gifts will be even bigger since a share of each dollar contributed will be matched by the Idaho Gives Award Pool. That’s right, more money to your favorite nonprofits thanks to a program whose sponsors include the George and Bev

Traditional camping stoves can be challenging. After fumbling to attach metal burners to drab cans of fuel, bargain cooking stoves produce a flame scarcely large enough to warm campsite eats. And should your group become stranded miles into the backcountry with only a meager supply of gas, cold beans and raw bacon soon become your only options. A rocket stove might be the key to your salvation in Gore’s rocket stove, $99, the event of a backwoods NORTH END ORGANIC NURSERY mishap, power outage or 2350 W. Hill Road, Boise even the end of times. Ray 208-389-4769 Gore, builder of a locally northendnursery.com made type of rocket stove, was featured on the National Geographic Channel’s Doomsday Preppers series, which revealed that his design is also helpful in the event of a worldwide calamity. Unlike other outdoor stoves, Gore’s version is fueled by any dry items found on the forest floor or in your trash bin, including newspaper, burger wrappers, old receipts, you name it. Fuel burned in the bottom chamber of the stove produces enough heat at the top to melt snow into potable drinking water or cook a meal. The tube-shaped stove, despite generating a lot of heat, remains cool to the touch, according to Gore. While the rocket stove concept is common, he said, what sets his model apart is its mild steel body, which creates an especially durable product. “That’s going to last for generations. It’s a really strong bulletproof model I make myself,” he said. —Andrew Crisp

Harad Family Foundation, Boise’s Riverside Hotel, Idaho Falls Steel Potatoes, A.J. and Susie Balukoff and the Edward F. and Vickie S. O’Gara Foundation. The top five nonprofits with the most individual donors will receive bonus grants ranging from $250 to $3,000. Even if you can’t contribute, you can still participate. Idaho Gives also offers resources for starting local fundraisers for their nonprofit of choice. Contributions will be taken beginning at midnight. idahogives.org

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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1ST THURSDAY W ILL JONES

Artists and attendees soaked in the Modern Art mayhem at last year’s pop-up event.

TEMPORARILY MODERN Sixth annual Modern Art unleashes surreal whirlwind ANDREW CRISP Herbold and Lauren McCleary-Herbold of For one night each year, artists replace Moscow will install three sculptures inspired vacationing families and business folk inside by John Trudell, Jane Goodall and Neil Young. the Modern Hotel’s minimalist rooms. Each Taking part in his second Modern Art, Herbriefly transforms his or her space, beckoning bold said the experience is far different from a thousands of wandering observers to confront traditional art opening. a hotel room stripped of its familiar bed-TV“Aesthetically, it was like other work that lamp-chair-desk composition and witness I’ve done,” he said. “But I definitely acknowltemporary performance art like the Five Hour edged the fact that I’m working with a hotel Church of Elvis. room, and not a gallery space. It’s this transient But the following morning, Modern Art space where all these experiences have hapvanishes almost as quickly as it appeared. pened there with much more variety than any Amy O’Brien and Kerry Tullis, who curate room in your house.” and organize the event, spend four months The Modern Art concept was a seed planted each year preparing for this single, hectic after Tullis and her husband visited a similar evening. event called The Affair, held annually at the “There’s nothing more temporary than this Jupiter Hotel in Portland, Ore. Like Modern event,” said O’Brien. Art, The Affair transformed the hotel into a “There’s so much that’s unexpected and series of open air, miniature galleries. spontaneous,” added Tullis. “Most hotels limit themselves because they The scene is also surreal the following day, think within the box—and the box, of course, as guests check into rooms that, the night bebeing the guest room. It’s for sleeping. Every fore, held massive mixed-media installations. room is a canvas, and every room has poten“All of a sudden, people, strangers, are tial. It’s a great use of space,” said Al Munguia, checking in again, and it’s almost as if it had Jupiter general manager. never happened,” said O’Brien. But unlike The Affair, which invited galThis year, more than 60 artists—including leries to occupy the rooms, Modern Art was Troy Passey in Room 225, Erika Sather-Smith created with the intention of highlighting in Room 108 and Noble Hardesty in Room individual members 239—will transform of the local arts scene. the hotel’s 33 rooms The event has taken during the sixth annuMODERN ART on a more collaboraal Modern Art, open Thursday, May 2, 5-10 p.m., FREE. tive, interactive form to First ThursdayMODERN HOTEL AND BAR in part because the artgoers from 5-10 p.m. 1314 W. Grove St. ists create the rooms Thursday, May 2. 208-424-8244 themodernhotel.com. themselves. Karyn Hatton’s “There just aren’t “urban hedgerow” that many galleries concept, comprised to take over the rooms anyway, even if we of bamboo and cut grasses, will span the wanted it to be that way,” said Tullis. “The perimeter of the hotel’s courtyard, while Black idea that there are only a handful of galleries— Hunger artists Eli Craven, Maria Chavez and that’s what played into the concept of Modern Elijah Jensen-Lindsey will display a collaboraArt here. It doesn’t mean that there aren’t a lot tive video project examining the physics of of great artists and art to be seen.” falling in the Modern’s Business Center and Meanwhile, the concept, tailored to fit the balcony. Down below, in the courtyard space, David Boise model, continues to endure—and has WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

even expanded. Modern Art now spills across the street to complementary events, including a Boise Bicycle Project showcase and live music at the Linen Building. Amanda Johnson, assistant professor at Boise State University’s Department of Community and Regional Planning, believes the growing success of Modern Art is part of a larger trend: the “pop-up cities” phenomenon. “[It] is, I think, a prime example about how you transform space for a different use than what that building might originally be used for,” Johnson said. “I think there’s something really powerful about that.” According to Johnson, visitors foster a stronger sense of community and local identity through temporary art installations that take place outside of the traditional gallery context. “Part of that is using public space, not necessarily in facilities where you have to pay to get into them,” Johnson said. “That, I think, is the real power of temporary art—this notion of reinvention through art and culture and identity—it’s an incredibly powerful way to express the intention, or the vision, or the message to a large group of people.” But just how long Modern Art will endure—at least with its two organizers at the helm—Tullis and O’Brien can’t say. “I think every year the Modern itself goes, ‘Oh, I don’t know. It’s a big event,’” said Tullis. “But part of it, too, is the idea that it is just that night, and the temporariness. There’s a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes for that five-hour event, and then a lot of work that goes into getting the hotel up and running again for the next night,” said Tullis. After six years, O’Brien and Tullis still see the value in Modern Art. They contend that it allows artists to try something new and “take a risk” with their work in a way that gallery openings and other events don’t. “It’s a risk because it’s seen by a lot of people, but it’s not that big of a risk, because it’s for five hours,” said Tullis. “I think it just totally unleashes some people.”

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS East Side BANDANNA RUNNING AND WALKING—Local runners present running stories. This month’s theme is All About Moms. 7-8 p.m. FREE. 504 W. Main St., Boise, 208-386-9017. BASQUE MARKET—Enjoy white wine sangria and a plate of paella on the patio. Paella is ready by 6 p.m. 4 p.m. 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208433-1208, thebasquemarket.com.

1

BASQUE MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER—Free gallery tours of An Enduring Culture: The Basques Past & Present. Guided tours of the Jacobs-Uberuaga House take place every half hour starting at 6:30 p.m. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. 611 Grove St., Boise, 208-343-2671, basquemuseum.com.

2

BOISE ART GLASS—Make your own float for $40 per 30-minute session while enjoying snacks. 5-11 p.m. FREE. 530 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com.

THE BRICKYARD—Check out Brickyard’s Home Grown Thursday with an American Revolution cocktail for $4, or Payette Outlaw IPA or Rodeo Rye Pale Ale for $3. 6 p.m. 601 Main St., Boise, 208-287-2121, brickyardboise. com.

3

BRICOLAGE—Join Amanda Hamilton for her post-modern yard sale. Original artwork at auction on Facebook and free refreshments available at the store. 5-10 p.m. FREE. 418 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-3718, bricoshoppe.com.

CELLAR 616—Try out the Cellar’s new tasting room and locally crafted wine. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 619 Grove St., Boise, 208-906-9590. DRAGONFLY—Sign up to win a gift certificate for Mother’s Day. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 414 W. Main St., Boise, 208338-9234. FLATBREAD NEAPOLITAN PIZZERIADOWNTOWN—Kids younger than 12 eat free with purchase. Happy hour goes until 6 p.m. and every bottle of wine is on sale, starting at $20. 615 W. Main St., Boise, 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com.

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FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE—Join Flying M for an art exhibition by James McKain and beer tasting with Sockeye Brewing. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com. GUIDO’S ORIGINAL NEW YORK STYLE PIZZADOWNTOWN—Serving pizza, stromboli, salad and beer. 11 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. 235 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-345-9011, guidosdowntown.com.

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HIGH NOTE CAFE—Enjoy live music and local art hanging on the walls. $4 local pints and $3 mimosas made with homemade seasonal juices. 6 p.m. FREE. 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208429-1911. MELTING POT—What goes better with art than wine and cheese? Enjoy all three with two glasses of wine and one cheese fondue for $22. 5-9 p.m. $22. 200 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-3438800, meltingpot.com. OLD SPAGHETTI FACTORY—Dine amid antiques collected from around the world. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 610 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-336-2900, osf.com. PENGILLY’S—Frim Fram 4 plays at 8 p.m. FREE. 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344. SAMMY’S—Stop by for a special edition of Keg Cup Night with music and games. 6 p.m. FREE. 509 W. Main St., Boise. SILLY BIRCH—Join a cribbage tournament hosted by Deschutes Brewery, with free Deschutes bratwurst barbecue during the tournament and drink specials. 5 p.m. $10. 507 Main St., Boise, 208-345-2505. WISEGUY PIZZA PIE-BOISE—$6 pitchers of Rainier, $1 off draft beers and $3 glasses of wine. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 106 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-336-7777, wiseguypizzapie.com.

South Side ATOMIC TREASURES—Peruse a mix of retro and found objects and art gifts. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-0811.

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BOISE ART MUSEUM—Enjoy a Studio Art Exploration panel discussion with ecologists, artists, musicians and geologists as they share their perspectives on art and nature. 5 p.m. FREE. 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org. ESTHER SIMPLOT CENTER FOR THE 7 PERFORMING ARTS—Boise State University graphic design students present a portfolio show. 6:30 p.m. FREE. 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208345-9116. HAIRLINES—Stop in and talk to Lui the Hair Whisperer. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-383-9009.

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IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM—This is your chance to see the museum’s newest exhibit, Essential Idaho, for free. Also featuring artifacts from historic Sandpoint. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov. IDAPRO INDOOR GOLF—Play in the Golf With Mom Contest, a 9-hole, alternate shot format family competition. Teams must consist of a mother and child. 5 p.m. $20. 333 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-336-4653, idaproindoorgolf. com. LIQUID—Laugh with comedians Roy Haber and Ryan Denisco at 8 p.m. and drink up during happy hour from 2-7 p.m. Two-for-one tickets. 7 p.m. $10. 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. MACLIFE—Join Big Twin Motorcycles for a display of electric motorcycles and test rides. 4-8 p.m. FREE. 421 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3236721, maclifeboise.com. THE MONOGRAM SHOPPE—Stop in to check out gift ideas. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, themonogramshoppe.com. MERCANTILE BUILDING—View contempo9 rary abstract, fine and photographic art while enjoying beverages and light snacks in the lower level adjacent to Cafe Ole. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 404 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-5212, serenityartsbymary.com.

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LISTINGS/1ST THURSDAY MR. PEABODY’S OPTICAL SHOPPE—Presenting a Salt Optics trunk show. 1-8 p.m. FREE. 404 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-1390.

QUE PASA—Check out a selection of Mexican artwork, including wall fountains, silver, metal wall art and blown glass. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9018.

NFINIT ART GALLERY— 10 Featuring artists Mary Lantz, Jessi Campbell, Rosann

RENEWAL UNDER12 GROUND—Featuring work by Storie Grubb, Anne Boyles,

Nelson and more, as well as beer from The Ram and tapas. 5 p.m. FREE. 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 131, Boise, 208-371-0586.

Bruce Maurey, Tuong Anh Ens, and James McLeod. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 517 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-5444.

NORTHRUP BUILD11 ING—Displaying work from painter Kelly Thomas Rule,

R. GREY GALLERY JEW13 ELRY AND ART GLASS— See jewelry designs by Anne

photographer and printmaker Mike Landa and painter Joe Kimmel. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise.

Sportun, including bridal rings, gold, diamonds and gem stones. Wine tasting from Williamson Vineyard. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3859337, rgreygallery.com.

PROTO’S NEAPOLITAN PIZZERIA—Stop by for $5 pizzas and $1 off all beer, wine and cocktails. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 345 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3311400, protospizza.com.

SNAKE RIVER WINERY—20 percent off cases. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 786 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-345-9463.

ART WALK Locations featuring artists

JEFFERSON

BANNOCK

10-midnight, liquor tasting by Young’s Market. Art by Misty Benson. Free appetizers at 6 p.m. and Last Call Trivia at 8 p.m. 4 p.m.-midnight. FREE. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3456620, solidboise.com. VAN DYCK FRAME 15 DESIGN—Check out Geoffrey Krueger’s Daily Dose of Painting. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 733 Broad St., Boise, 208-336-3454.

Central Downtown ALL ABOUT GAMES—Join a board game challenge. The highest score at the end of the night wins a prize. 5 p.m. FREE. 120 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3450204, allaboutgamesboise.com. AMERICAN CLOTHING GALLERY—Check out the Old Gringo Boot trunk show. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 121A, Boise, 208-433-0872, americanclothinggallery.com. ARTISAN OPTICS—Check out the Mykita trunk show from noon-8 p.m. Live music by Robert James. Noon-8 p.m. 190 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3380500, artisanoptics.com. COSTA VIDA—Eat Mexican food on Grove Plaza. 5 p.m. FREE. 801 W. Main St., Boise, 208429-4109, costavida.net. GOLITE—Shop the winter clearance and get up to 75 percent off. Check out the new running apparel just in time for warmer weather. 6-9 p.m. FREE. 906 W. Main St., Boise, 208-258-2091, golite.com.

IDAHO

GRAEBER’S—Check out a pampering event, featuring chair massages, make-up styling and raffles. 5 p.m. FREE. 350 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-343-4915.

GROVE

5TH

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

GROVE

6TH

CAPITOL

MAIN

13TH

SOLID—Enjoy live music 14 from Kayleigh Jack, happy hour food from 4-6 p.m. and

FRONT BROAD MYRTLE

8TH B AT T E RY

1. Basque Museum

10. NfiniT Ar t Galler y

2. Boise Ar t Glass

11. Nor thrup Building

18. Wells Fargo Center Retail Building

3. Bricolage

12. Renewal Underground

19. The Alaska Center

5. High Note Cafe

13. R. Grey Galler y Jewelr y and Ar t Glass

20. Ar t Source Galler y

6. Boise Ar t Museum

14. Solid

21. Boise 150 Sesqui-Shop

7. Esther Simplot Center for the Per forming Ar ts

15. Van Dyck Frame Design

22. Galler y 601

16. Redheaded Finn

23. The Galler y at The Linen Building

4. Flying M Coffeehouse

8. Idaho State Historical Museum 9. Mercantile Building

17. The Ar t of Ward Hooper Galler y

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MIXED GREENS—Sample Steph’s Seriously Good Salsa and check out gifts and spring foods for Mother’s Day. 5 p.m. FREE. 237 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-344-1605. MIXING BOWL—Stop by for gift certificates, kitchen supplies and special orders. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 216 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3456025, themixingbowlboise.com.

F U LT O N

RIVER

GROVE PLAZA—Idaho Gives Celebration on Grove Plaza. Join contests, drawings, pictures, music and entertainment to celebrate First Thursday and Idaho Gives. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise.

24. Modern Hotel and Bar

OLD CHICAGO-DOWNTOWN— Two kids eat free with purchase of one adult entree. Karaoke begins at 9 p.m. 5 p.m. FREE. 730 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208363-0037, oldchicago.com. PRINCIPAL FINANCIAL GROUP—Mother’s Day gifts from local vendors, including jewelry, body and beauty products, and wine tasting. 5 p.m. FREE. 121 N. Ninth St., Ste. 303, Boise, 342-2765. REDHEADED FINN—View 16 graffiti and oil paintings by local artists. Snake River Brewing beers and Pakos and Tacos on the patio, featuring Pakos IPA. Special happy hour pricing. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 705 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208947-3111, redheadedfinnpub.com.

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS 1ST THURSDAY/NEWS AM ANDA HAM ILTON

REDISCOVERED BOOKS— Author Les Edgerton joins the Idaho Writer’s Guild Rendezvous to sign books. 6:30 p.m. FREE. 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208376-4229, rdbooks.org. TAJ MAHAL RESTAURANT— Stop by for dinner and drinks. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 222, Boise, 208-4737200, tajmahalofboise.com. THE ART OF WARD 17 HOOPER GALLERY— Unveiling three McCall-inspired pieces. Sign up for a chance to win an artist proof. 5-8:30 p.m. 745 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208866-4627, wardhooper.com. WELLS FARGO CENTER 18 RETAIL BUILDING—See works by artists in residence Erika Sather-Smith and Jose Angel Saenz. 5 p.m. FREE. 801 Main St., Boise.

West Side THE ALASKA CENTER— 19 See new works by Laurel Macdonald, Chi E Shenam Westin and Eric Obendorf along with Taste of Boise from 6-9 p.m. with food samples for $1, live music and an art display. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1020 W. Main St., Boise. ART SOURCE GAL20 LERY—Presenting A Celebration of Motherhood. Join gallery artists depicting motherly roles through art. Music by Johnny Shoes and wine from Indian Creek. 6-9 p.m. 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. BEN & JERRY’S SCOOP SHOP—Enjoy $1 scoops in cups or cones. 5 p.m. $1. 103 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-342-1992, benjerry.com. BOISE 150 SESQUI21 SHOP—Celebrating Idaho Gives, providing light refreshments and hosting live music by Douglas Cameron. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1008 Main St., Boise, 208-433-5671. GALLERY 601—Celebrat22 ing Mother’s Day with artists Steve Hanks, Cassandra Barney, The Artisan’s Corner and Cards by Jeanette. Wine tasting from Mouvance. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 211 N. 10th St., Boise, 208336-5899, gallery601.com. THE GALLERY AT THE 23 LINEN BUILDING—Modern Art hosts art, music, sports, Boise culture and the Bike Builder’s Gallery with the Boise Bike Project. 6-8 p.m. FREE. 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. MODERN HOTEL AND 24 BAR—40 rooms are turned into artworks as part of Modern Art 2013. 5 p.m. FREE. 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208424-8244, themodernhotel.com. OWYHEE PLAZA HOTEL—The Gamekeeper Lounge unveils its new logo, vendors display Mother’s Day gifts, entertainment, and food and drink. 5-8 p.m. FREE. 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-3434611, owyheeplaza.com. RADIO BOISE—Celebrate the Spring Radiothon with DJs, beer, wine and snacks. 5 p.m. FREE. 1020 W. Main St., Alaska Building, Ste. 200, Boise, 208-4248166, radioboise.org.

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Buy Amanda Hamilton’s “Drowning House” or her actual house at Bricolage First Thursday, May 2.

POSSESSIONS AND RECOLLECTIONS Reality shows might chronicle the obsessive accumulation of cats, broken coffee makers and old Barbie dolls, but the thoughtful dispersal of possessions makes for much less interesting TV. Luckily, it should make for a pretty sweet art show. Local artist Amanda Hamilton and her family are leaving Boise and moving across the country to Minneapolis. But before they go, they’re getting rid of their old books, records, glass, artwork, bicycles, curtains, china—even their car and house—in a gallery show/post-modern yard sale at Bricolage. “A friend insightfully described some of the items in question as ‘aspirational’ objects: something you keep or own because it would be nice someday to be a person who used it,” wrote Hamilton in a press release. “The problem is that every time I see those ‘aspirational’ objects I just feel guilty, like I’ve failed to use it or rise to the occasion.” As part of the sale, Bricolage will also host a one-day Facebook auction Thursday, May 2, when interested collectors can bid on Hamilton’s original artwork in the comment section. “Getting rid of so many objects (in the end maybe 30-40 percent of what we own) at first felt like losing my right arm, but now that it’s all out of the house and out of my mind I am so relieved,” wrote Hamilton. You can peruse some of the Hamilton family’s possessions at Bricolage from 5-10 p.m. First Thursday, May 2. Moving from fresh starts to remembrances, the Women’s and Children’s Alliance has teamed up with the Idaho Human Rights Education Center to present The World of Anne Frank: A Community Reading for Remembrance Thursday, May 2, at the Morrison Center. The event will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial with readings from Frank’s diary—and the play based on her diary, And Then They Came for Me: Remembering the World of Anne Frank—performed by students from Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s apprentice company and directed by ISF Director of Education Renee K. Vomocil. “Both the WCA and the IHREC hope that this special celebration in honor of human rights will inspire our community as we work to create and maintain a community of caring, happy and healthy individuals free from violence and fear,” wrote the WCA in a press release. The show starts at 7 p.m. and costs $10 to $25. There will also be a free morning performance for an audience of 1,300 eighth-graders from the Boise School District. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY MAY 1 Festivals & Events IDAHO WORLD TRADE DAY— The U.S. Commercial Service and the Idaho District Export Council host a half-day event to educate Idaho companies engaging in business abroad. Lunch features keynote address by Kevin Kolevar, senior director of international government affairs and public policy for Dow Chemical. Register online. 7:30 a.m.-2 p.m. $50. Boise State University Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-4264636, idahoworldtradeday.com.

THURSDAY MAY 2

Green WILDFLOWER WALKS—Join a celebration of Foothills wildflowers. Botanists lead participants on a two-hour walk on the trails behind the Old Penitentiary while identifying native and non-native species. Registration required. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Citizen IDAHO GIVES—Local nonprofit organizations solicit donations during a single day, with a portion of every dollar matched by the Idaho Gives award pool. See Picks, Page 17. Midnight-midnight, idahogives. razoo.com.

IDAHO GIVES CELEBRATION AT IDAHO CONSERVATION LEAGUE—A full day of festivities features Guru Donuts and Dawson Taylor Coffee, Saint Lawrence Gridiron food truck, kids activities and a porch party with live music and beer from Crooked Fence. 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Donations accepted. Idaho Conservation League, 710 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-6933, idahoconservation.org.

FRIDAY MAY 3 On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: WAYNE FRANCIS—7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: WAYNE FRANCIS—7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

Concerts SPRING JAZZ BASH—Featuring Boise State University vocal and instrumental jazz ensembles. 7:30 p.m. FREE-$5. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise State University campus, Boise, 208426-1609.

Art MURAL UNVEILING—Celebrate the addition of more public art at the MK Nature Center: the Alpine Lake mural, which was completed by local artist Marcus Pierce. Beverages and refreshments available. 5 p.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-334-2225, fishandgame.idaho.gov.

Literature DIARY OF ANNE FRANK: A COMMUNITY READING FOR REMEMBRANCE—This reading of the Holocaust literature classic commemorates the life and death of Anne Frank and the values for which she stood. 7 p.m. $10-$50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Talks & Lectures FETTUCCINI FORUM—Tully Gerlach presents a talk titled Boise Neighborhoods: A Short History of Place. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483, parklaneco.com/ roseroom.

24 | MAY 1–7, 2013 | BOISEweekly

ARTS/BOOK REVIEW CLOSE IS FINE BY ELIOT TREICHEL The closing lines of the Coen Brothers’ 2008 comedy Burn After Reading perfectly sum up Close is Fine, a collection of short stories from author Eliot Treichel recently published by Portland, Ore.’s Ooligan Press. “What did we learn, Palmer?” a military officer asks a subordinate. “I don’t know, sir,” he responds. “I don’t fucking know either,” he replies. Pick any story in Treichel’s book and it’s hard not to have a similar reaction upon reading its final lines—though in the best possible way. Rather than coming off as cynical or nihilistic, the stories Treichel crafts are vividly real, and they end without resolution as life itself often does. The characters simply have to carry on beyond the final page, no wealthier and no wiser for their suffering. Close is Fine is packed with lyrical, beautifully composed tales about the pecking order of lumberjacks, hopes for winning the lottery, and folks with empty resumes and emptier bank accounts. The characters’ lives are lived in grayscale that will one day be easily summarized with boilerplate epitaphs. While many authors use stories as an opportunity to force change or growth on characters, Treichel takes much the opposite tack, throwing his characters into a tailspin, then leaving them as cluelessly adrift as when the stories start. A little girl who attempts to save baby mice from her hungry dog sees her efforts fail when her father feeds them to the dog anyway after he thinks she is asleep. A high-school soccer team—so maligned that its members are assaulted in the halls—ends the season with its worst slaughter ever: 20-0. An attempt at an extramarital affair ends with impotence. The collection is the debut for Treichel, and shows an author exploring the existential frustration that comes with truly grasping how intensely everything matters, even when it adds up to nothing in the end. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


ALL KEYED UP—Join musicians from Boise Philharmonic, Boise State University and Boise Baroque for an evening of piano, organ and glockenspiel music. 7:30 p.m. Suggested $10 donation. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208343-7511.

IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN PLANT SALE—Purchase water-wise plants for your garden. The Friday evening sale is open to Idaho Botanical Garden members only. The public is invited on Saturday. See Picks, Page 16. 4-8 p.m. $3-$5. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Art FIRST FRIDAY ART IN EAGLE— Take a stroll through downtown Eagle and visit local merchants and galleries along the way. 4:30-8:30 p.m. Downtown Eagle, Old State Street and Eagle Road, Eagle, eaglechamber.com.

Literature LITERATURE FOR LUNCH: THE SUMMER BOOK—This short story cycle by Trove Jansson recalls a summer on a small island where a woman, her son and granddaughter live. The book meditates on youth, age, time and place. For more info, contact Cheryl Hindrichs at cherylhindrichs@boisestate.edu or Carol Martin at cmartin@boisestate. edu. 12:10-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

SATURDAY MAY 4 Festivals & Events CAR AND TRACTOR SHOW WITH STREET FAIR—Enjoy classic cars and antique tractors, shopping local vendors and artisans, while kids play in a bouncy house or on the playground. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Nampa Church of the Brethren, 11030 W. Orchard Ave., Nampa, 208466-3321, nampacob.org. ICMS MOTORCYCLE AWARENESS RALLY—The Idaho Coalition for Motorcycle Safety is hosting a ride to the Idaho State Capitol to promote safety during Motorcycle Awareness Month. Registration begins at 11 a.m. 11 a.m. FREE. Lucky Peak State Park, 9725 E. Hwy. 21, Boise, 208-3342432, idahobikerights.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU: STAR WARS COSTUME PARTY— Dress up as your favorite Star Wars character, listen to live music and partake of Snake River Brewing beer specials all night long. See Picks, Page 17. 4 p.m.-2 a.m. FREE. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-918-0597, spacebararcade.com. MAY THE FOURTH BE WITH YOU—The Idaho CORE team hosts a night of Star Warsthemed fun to raise funds for its next effigy art project selected for Burning Man 2013. Featuring local DJs, a silent auction, raffle items and a preview of the Burning Man project. For more info, email idahocore@gmail.com. 9 p.m. $5-$10. China Blue, 100 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-9515, chinabluenightclub.com. WILDLIFE CONSERVATION EXPO—Conservation groups deliver 20-minute presentations about their projects and answer questions. Partners include the Center for Ecosystem Survival, the College of Idaho, Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness and more. Presented by Zoo Boise. See Picks, Page 17. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $7-$9. zooboise.org. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-4636. WOMEN’S HEALTH AND FITNESS FAIRE—This day is dedicated to the ladies, their health, their fitness and their love of shopping. Seminars during the day, with a fashion show at 2 p.m. Take a pair of gently used shoes to donate to the Soles 4 Souls fundraiser to be refurbished and redistributed to needy people around the world. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com.

Sunday, May 12, 10-2pm

Green

Brunch Buffet

Concerts

Mother’s Day

8 DAYS OUT

121 North 9th Street, Downtown Boise

R e s e r v a t i o n s 387-3553 www.johnberryhillrestaurants.com

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: WAYNE FRANCIS—7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

Concerts BOISE PHILHARMONIC: RACHMANINOV—7:30 p.m. $12-$77. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, boisephilharmonic.org.

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

WHITNEY WOMEN’S CHORALE ON BROADWAY—Indulge in dessert while enjoying solos and ensembles of Broadway favorites, and a silent auction and prize drawings. 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. $14 adv., $15 door. Whitney United Methodist Church, 3315 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-343-2892, whitneywomenschorale.org.

Food & Drink QUARTO DE MAYO—Join the Treasure Valley Parrot Heads for a fundraiser to support the Idaho Humane Society. Wear your most gaudy tropical attire. Featuring door prizes, silent auction and a raffle. 6 p.m. FREE. Crescent No Lawyers Bar/Grill, 5500 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-3229856, no-lawyers.com.

BOISEweekly | MAY 1–7, 2013 | 25


8 DAYS OUT Workshops & Classes KILLER TOMATOES—Learn about the trials, tribulations and triumphs of the humble tomato and some of her garden compadres, and how a little of the right kind of love will help them triumph over poor soil, cold, heat and bad site selection. 2-3 p.m. FREE. North End Organic Nursery, 2350 Hill Road, Boise, 208-389-4769, northendnursery. com.

Sports & Fitness TREASURE VALLEY ROLLERGIRLS—The TVR All Stars take on Team Valkyries from California, followed by the TVR B Team (whose new team name will be revealed) vs. The World. Buy advance tickets at Thomas Hammer, The Record Exchange, Smart Art Crafts for Kids and Reggie’s Veggies. A portion of proceeds goes to the the Women’s and Children’s Alliance. 7 p.m. $10-$14. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com/home.aspx.

Green IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN PLANT SALE—Open to the general public. See Friday. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $3-$5. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. TOMATO AND VEGGIE PLANT SALE—Check out 170 types of heirloom and rare tomatoes, as well as peppers, melons, cucumbers, eggplants, herbs and squash. Plants cost $2-$5. See Picks, Page 16. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Peaceful Belly Farm, corner of Dry Creek and Broken Horn roads, Hidden Springs, 208-345-8003, peacefulbelly. com.

Citizen

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—Local artisans present their wares, including crafts, furniture and food. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Eighth St. between Bannock St. and the Grove, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

MONDAY MAY 6 Talks & Lectures PRAXIS LODGE PUBLIC DIALOGUES SERIES—A monthly meeting to engage in discussions pertaining to science, ethics, culture, philosophy, humanism and Free Masonry, hosted by Praxis Lodge. Each session features a presentation followed by open dialogue. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Papa Joe’s, 1301 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3447272, papajoesboise.com.

SUNDAY MAY 5 Festivals & Events BALLET IDAHO CELEBRATES CINCO DE MAYO—Join Ballet Idaho for dinner at a private home. Call for reservations or more info. 6:30 p.m. $100. Ballet Idaho, 501 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-0556, balletidaho.org.

Sports & Fitness KARATE KICKSTART PROGRAM—Earn your first karate belt. Classes offered for kids, teens and adults. Cost includes uniform and four passes to advanced classes. 5 p.m. $99. Idaho Martial Arts, 1580 E. State St., Ste. 102, Eagle, 208863-3673, idahomartialarts. com.

Art ARTISTIC TASTE OF GARDEN CITY—Celebrate art and the artistry of local wine, beer and food with tastings, local artists displaying their art, music, performance art, a silent auction and tours of Steve Fulton’s recording studio as part of a fundraiser for the Garden City Public Library. Check out the library’s mobile library van. Tickets are available online at notaquietlibrary.org/artistictaste. 2-5 p.m. $25-$30. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632, womanofsteelgallery.com.

TUESDAY MAY 7 Food & Drink ADVENTURE FUNDRAISER— A percentage of all meals purchased benefit AdVenture scholarships, which go to people with physical disabilities. 6-9 p.m. Boise Fry Company, 111 Broadway Ave., Ste. 111, Boise, 208-495-3858, boisefrycompany.com.

Green TOMATO AND VEGGIE PLANT SALE—See Saturday. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Peaceful Belly Farm, Corner of Dry Creek and Broken Horn roads, Hidden Springs, 208-345-8003, peacefulbelly. com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

TREASURE VALLEY WALK TO CURE DIABETES—Help raise funds and awareness for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation’s mission to find a cure for Type 1 diabetes. The event features a small breakfast, a 5K walk along the Boise Greenbelt, lunch and activities for the whole family. Register online. 9 a.m.-noon. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Blvd., Boise, walk.jdrf.org/boise.

Farmers Markets EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET— Enjoy arts, crafts, specialty foods, fresh produce, live music and more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. BOISE FARMERS MARKET— Pick up fresh food from farmers, ranchers, food vendors, brewers and more. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. 1080 W. Front St., Boise, 208345-9287, theboisefarmersmarket.com. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

26 | MAY 1–7, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT Talks & Lectures

Workshops & Classes

Talks & Lectures

HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY: THE SANDPOINT DIG—Join Marc Munch for Historical Archaeology: The Sandpoint Dig and the Cost of Preserving Idaho’s History. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

CONTAINER GARDENS—Grow a whole garden without digging up the ground. Dirt Diva, writer and nationally known speaker Mary Ann Newcomer presents the best plants for containers and how to best care for them. 6-7 p.m. FREE. North End Organic Nursery, 2350 Hill Road, Boise, 208-389-4769, northendnursery. com.

BATTLEFIELD IN THE NORTHERN GREAT BASIN—Join Ken Reid of the Idaho State Historical Society for a talk entitled Battlefield in the Northern Great Basin. 7 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov.

WEDNESDAY MAY 8 On Stage SOUTH PACIFIC—Boise Music Week presents Rogers and Hammerstein’s WWII musical. Free tickets required. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Green Art ORIENTALISM ART HISTORY—Courtney Gilbert and Kristin Poole present a lecture on how the arts reflect Western interpretations of the East, titled Orientalism from Eugene Delacroix to Arthur Wesley Dow. 5:30 p.m. $10-$15. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

GO BIRDING WITH AN EXPERT—Join Vicki Runnoe of the Idaho Fish and Game Department for education on binoculars, field guides and birding tips before a bird walk through Hulls Gulch Reserve. For more info, call 208-493-2530. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-514-3755, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

Check out the entire week’s worth of Doonesbury online at boiseweekly.com—select “Extras” then “Cartoons.”

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MAY 1–7, 2013 | 27


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE LIZ LINDER

GUIDE WEDNESDAY MAY 1

Crystal clear country crooner and Idaho native Eilen Jewell might look sweet in her signature black cowgirl boots, but the songwriter gravitates toward bad-girl ballads. On her 2007 album, Letters From Sinners and Strangers, Jewell sings about her ramblin’ ways, meeting the girls to “drink all that high-shelf booze,” and pulling up a seat at the bar on Heartache Boulevard. Her attraction to salty country songs continues on 2010’s Butcher Holler: A Tribute to Loretta Lynn, where Jewell covers “Fist City” and “You Ain’t Woman Enough to Take My Man.” But it’s Jewell’s 2011 album, Queen of the Minor Key, that captures her range, vacillating between boot-stompers like “Bang, Bang, Bang” and more weighty, emotional tracks. Jewell moved back to Boise from Boston with husband/ drummer Jason Beek and will perform at BCT Saturday, May 4.

28 | MAY 1–7, 2013 | BOISEweekly

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

A-N-D & FRIENDS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Blue Moose Cafe

JIM LEWIS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

BFD—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

LICH KING—With Krystos, Diluted and Villinous. 9 p.m. $8. Shredder OLD DEATH WHISPER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s SHAKY DAVE MANION—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

THURSDAY MAY 2 CANCER BATS—With Bone Dance, Dynasty, Blackcloud and Black Tusk. 6:30 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Venue FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

LIVE PARTY MUSIC BAND—6 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe

SPEEDY GRAY—With Johnny Shoes. 6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

BUCKLE RASH—With Ophelia. 10 p.m. $5. Reef CHICKEN DINNER ROAD—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s Idyltime SECOND CHANCE SQUARE DANCE—Featuring Idyltime. 7 p.m. $7. Linen Building TEXAS HIPPIE COALITION— With Karin Comes Killing, Mortal Enemy and Parallel Collision. 7:30 p.m. $15. Knitting Factory

PRODIGAL SUNN—With Ortega the Omega, Mezcal, Charles Engels and the Family Matters, Lost and Found, DJ Rukus and Art Maddox. 8 p.m. $7 adv., $10 door. Shredder WILLISON, ROOS AND CHARLIE BURRY—7:30 p.m. FREE. Reef ZV HOUSE—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

PIRANHAS—8 p.m. FREE. Crux

BRYAN STARS TOUR—With Late Nite Reading, Farewell My Love, Snow White’s Poison Bite, Her Bright Eyes, Catching Your Clouds, My Young Dreamer and Joel Favier. 6 p.m. $15. Venue

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

SOJA, ROOTZ UNDERGROUND AND LOS RAKAS—7 p.m. $20$35. Knitting Factory

—Tara Morgan 8 p.m., $25. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

TOUCHE—With Edmond Dantes. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

JOHNNY SHOES—With Kenny Saunders. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Co-op

FRIDAY MAY 3

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

KORY QUINN AND THE COMRADES—With Left Coast Country. 9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

EILEN JEWELL, MAY 4, BOISE CONTEMPORARY THEATER

TODD SNIDER—With Ashleigh Flynn. 8 p.m. $25-$28. Egyptian Theatre

WHITAKER & OLIVER—8 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe Damien Jurado

WILLISON ROOS—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

DAMIEN JURADO—With Hollow Wood. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

Todd Snider

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE LEIF PODHAJS K Y/ DAVID B ELIS LE

GUIDE LEADERS—With Altars, Rise of the Fallen and Scorch the Fallen. 9 p.m. $3. Shredder

SATURDAY MAY 4

LUKE CARTER—7 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars

ANDY CORTENS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill MIKE POSNER—With Aylen and The Good Husbands. 7 p.m. FREE Boise State students, $15 gen. Taco Bell Arena

BLACK TOOTH GRIN—With 57 Heavy and Pine Box Posse. 8 p.m. FREE. Darby’s CHICKEN DINNER ROAD—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s DEVIANT KIN—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s EILEN JEWELL—See Listen Here, Page 28. 8 p.m. $25. Boise Contemporary Theater

SUNDAY MAY 5

TUESDAY MAY 7

BLEEDING RAINBOW— Midnight. $5. Neurolux JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

BOISE OLD TIME’S OLD TIME JAM—With The Hokum Hi-Flyers and Reilly Coyote. 6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

TERRI EBERLEIN—10:15 a.m. FREE. Berryhill

OPHELIA—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

TYLER, THE CREATOR—With Earl Sweatshirt. 9 p.m. $20-$40. Knitting Factory

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: VIETNAM—With Gap Dream. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door, Neurolux SETH GRAHAM AND DISCO LEMONADE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

MONDAY MAY 6 1332 RECORDS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. $3. Liquid Pentatonix PENTATONIX—With Boise Rock School. 8 p.m. $25-$40. Knitting Factory

John Fullbright JOHN FULLBRIGHT—With Parker Milsap. 8:30 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux

C FA

BLEEDING RAINBOW—8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

BERNIE REILLY—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

STORM CIRCUS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

GLIMPSE TRIO—9 p.m. $5. Shredder

ROSA DOS VENTOS CINCO DE MAYO PARTY—10 p.m. $5. Reef

SHABAZZ PALACES—With Malitia Malimob. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $12 adv., $14 door, Neurolux

WENDY MATSON—8 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe

STONE SEED—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

Digable Planets alumnus Ishmael “Butterfly” Butler plays with a wide array of electronic sounds in his latest project, Shabazz Palaces. Butler and multi-instrumentalist Tendai “Baba” Maraire sample haunting, disembodied voices, electronic fuzz and driving percussion, creating a dark, brooding brand of rap. Disorienting, explorative beats are something of a theme with Shabazz Palaces. As is mystique. After anonymously self-releasing two lauded EPs, then ducking requests for interviews, the Seattle band achieved the unique honor of becoming one of the first hip-hop groups to ink deals with indie rock label Sub Pop. Since then, Butler and Maraire have dropped their first full-length, 2011’s Black Up. While the mystery behind the band is solved, the mists that shroud Shabazz Palaces remain. —Andrew Crisp

KIP ATTAWAY—8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Sapphire Room

M CO E C. IV SI OL U H EM A IV /ID OL OM H A C ID K. W. BOO W E W

WEDNESDAY MAY 8

SHABAZZ PALACES, MAY 8, NEUROLUX

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

TONIGHT!

THEY MIGHT BE GGIANTS IANTS

TODD SNIDER WITH ASHLEIGH FLYNN

W/ THE WILD FEATHERS

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

JUNE 5 @

EGYPTIAN THEATRE

TICKETS

SON VOLT

ONLINE AT EGYPTIANTHEATRE.NET CALL 208-387-1273 EGYPTIAN THEATRE BOX OFFICE TU-SA 11A-6P & AT RECORD EXCHANGE

Carrie Rodriguez g z

BINGHAM MAY 1 @

ON SALE MAY 4TH @ 10AM!

W/ GUEST TBA

WITH WI WITH TH VANDAVEER VVAN AANDA AN NDA DAVEE DAV EER R

RYAN

EGYPTIAN THEATRE

With Malitia Malimob. 7 p.m., $12 adv. $14 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

WITHH FULTON WI FUL FUL ULTO TOON SANDERS SAAND NDER ERSS ER WITH

JUNE 9 @

EGYPTIAN THEATRE

JUNE 25 @

VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE

JULY 21 @

VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE BOISEweekly | MAY 1–7, 2013 | 29


NEWS/ARTS ARTS/VISUAL

Go on a journey with artist Christine Raymond.

OPENINGS AND THROWDOWNS Journey might have done it any way you wanted it in the early ’80s, but local artist Christine Raymond did things just the way she wanted with her latest exhibit, The Journey, which opened April 19 at Enso Artspace, located at 120 E. 38th St., Unit 105, in Garden City. Raymond’s large and small compositions utilize Lascaux acrylic and gold leaf, and feature soothing, evening summer sky palettes of red and purple. The pieces evoke a certain calmness, with titles like “Sanctuary,” “Stillness” and “Quiet Vitality.” The Journey will remain on display until May 31, with a special Soup-Talk-Art event, featuring Raymond and Boise Art Museum Executive Director Melanie Fales on Wednesday, May 8, from 6-8 p.m. Tickets cost $12.50, including soup and bread. Enso Artspace is open every Thursday from 3-8 p.m., or by appointment. For more info, visit ensoartspace.com. Speaking of recently opened exhibits, Boise State alum Goran Fazil was commissioned to create a permanent site-specific piece, “Hegelian Constructs,” for the Bay Window Project, located in the corridor west of the Simplot Ballroom in the Boise State Student Union Building. According to Boise State, the piece was developed from a series of paintings representing pyramid-esque constructions, and “aims to portray the development of our society through a continuous construction upwards.” Fazil’s piece is the last of four works commissioned for the project. The first was installed in the spring of 2010, and features two large canvasses by Matt Bodett, while the second was installed in the spring of 2011 and features work by Sue Latta. For more info, call 208-426-1242. And moving from art openings to art throwdowns, Visual Arts Collective and the Woman of Steel are hosting a fundraiser for the Garden City Library Foundation Sunday, May 5, from 2-5 p.m. The second annual An Artistic Taste of Garden City will feature local artists, live art-making, breweries, wineries, food, a silent auction and a musical performance from StoneSeed. Artists include Cate Brigden, Michael Cordell, Irene Deely, Liz Hilton, Sue Latta and Amy Westover, among many others. Food and drinks will be provided by City Peanut Shop, Coiled Wines, Crooked Fence, Kanack Attack Katering, Kilted Dragon, Sofia’s Greek Bistro, Syringa, Vale Winery and more. Attendees must be 21 or older to attend, and tickets are $25 in advance or $30 at the door and can be purchased at notaquietlibrary.org/artistictaste.

THE CURIOUS CORINNA BUTTON Artist debuts solo show at Brumfield’s Gallery JOSH GROSS As anyone who has traveled the world will tell you, everything is bigger in America—the food, the houses, even the country itself sprawls across an entire continent like it just finished its third trip through a buffet line. For artist Corinna Button—whose new solo exhibit opens at Brumfield’s Gallery Saturday, May 4—even the size of her paintings grew Unbutton the layered complexity of Corinna Button’s work at Brumfield’s Gallery. when she moved to America from the United Kingdom in 2010. “Since I’ve been in Chicago, I’ve been workthat sense of history. That’s why I really like to expressionists like Max Beckmann, or even ing on these giant pieces,” Button said. “That layer my work, to give it that sense of history.” Austrian artist Gustav Klimt. was a new experience for me because I’ve In many cases, those layers are an effect Button said that at the time she created the never had such a large studio. Being in Chicago Button achieves not by adding paint, but by Idols series, she was looking at a great deal of and getting this large studio in a warehouse taking it away—a process she demonstrates in sculpture heads in museums and found that building really allowed me to explore.” several videos on YouTube. they were generally displayed behind glass Before she snagged her studio, Button’s “The way I work is very much about excacases on pedestals. work had focused more on printmaking, spevating, even my process, scraping away at the “I liked the idea that they were isolated, cifically a technique called collagraphy, used to surface to reveal what’s beneath,” she said. that you couldn’t touch them,” she said. create complexly layered prints with textures Some of the Idols were created out of the The Idols series certainly seems untouchlike weathered stone. scraps left from Button’s printmaking process. able, as if they exist behind a fog of memory. But while showing her work at Chicago’s “The thing about collagraph is that it really Zhou B. Art Center in March 2012, Button re- Though Button said she found inspiration in embosses the paper and leaves some interestimages from pop culture, her execution feels alized the cavernous space dwarfed her prints. ing texture,” she said. “I didn’t want to get rid “I brought my largest prints, but they didn’t much more decayed—like a series of female of all these proofs, so I started to print over look very large in that space,” Button said. “So Dorian Grays. Button took inspiration for the project, and them.” I knew to make the show look good in that The Idols that Button printed over the her work as a whole, from the T.S. Eliot poem space, I had to make the show much bigger.” proofs brought a whole new dimension to “The Love-Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” The gallery owner suggested physically her work, something that caught the eye of “There will be time, there will be time / larger work and Button ran with it, producing Jane Brumfield, owner of Brumfield’s Gallery, To prepare a face to meet the faces that you her Idols series of haunting female portraits, formerly the Basement Gallery. meet,” the poem reads. some of which reach eight feet in height. “The subject matter appeals to me,” said “I feel like every day you think of a way “The whole idea of the Idol came about Brumfield. “But above that, I just think the you want to present yourself, so you ‘prepare when I saw an image on the front of a fashquality of her surface and the combination of ion magazine in the UK during London Fash- a face to meet the faces that you meet,’ to me the techniques actually creates something that that seems a very real thing,” Button said. ion Week,” Button said. “She presented an is quite unique and very, very beautiful.” “There’s often stuff idea of a superhuman, Brumfield first met the artist when they going on beneath the enchanted figure that Opening Saturday, May 4, 6-9 p.m. with a were both living in England. She has been exsurface.” seems to appear in the no-host bar provided by 13th Street Pub and hibiting Button’s printmaking work for years. But one of the media a lot. I wanted Grill. Show continues through Sunday, June 2. “This will be the first time I’ve had the features that best to do something with BRUMFIELD’S GALLERY opportunity to show her larger works, which imparts the emotional that.” 1513 N. 13th St. includes her original paintings,” said Brumundercurrents of the The piece “Idol,” 208-333-0309 field. “And the only reason I’m able to do that series are the textural a tentpole of the brumfieldllc.com. is because she’s moved here over the pond for printmaking elements. collection, depicts a The pieces maintain the a little while.” gracefully long-necked Brumfield said she hasn’t had much of an same weathered stone woman wearing a opportunity to show large works by anyone or water-damaged texture, making the Idols wing-like crownpiece with a cracked texture due to space constraints. But since Brumfield appear ghostly—another inspiration Button like a water-damaged wall. Several pieces in relocated her gallery to Hyde Park from its took from her Chicago studio. the series examine different angles of a figure former space in the basement of the Idanha “It’s this stony building and there’s loads named Grace, portrayed in grays and blues like Building, there is more room to grow. of residue and brick and worn out paint, and an animated nightmare sequence. There are How very American. I started to see faces in it,” said Button. “I like clear influences in Button’s work of German

—Tara Morgan

30 | MAY 1–7, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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SCREEN/LISTINGS THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

Special Screenings ARISE—This collage of portraits and stories of women from around the world features a message about women changing the world and healing injustice. See Picks, Page XX. Wednesday, May 1, 7 p.m. $13-$15. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

ROOM FOR ONE MORE? Room 237 is not to be missed GEORGE PRENTICE I’ve checked into Room 237 twice already and have walked away with an increasing sense of incredulity and an equal level of pure joy. I look forward to my third visit. This you-have-to-see-it-to-believe-it thesis of a film bundles the frolic of moviemaking, an attraction to the macabre and the sheer genius of Stanley Kubrick into 102 glorious minutes. Once upon a time, I thought I was a pretty big fan of Kubrick. That all changed Sept. 13, 2012, as I squeezed into a jewel box of a movie theater in Toronto for the world premiere of Room 237. I was wedged Room 237 explores the fanaticism surrounding Stanley Kubrick’s cult classic, The Shining. in with hundreds of folks who define fanaticism when it comes to the iconic director of 2001: A Space Odyssey, A Clockwork someone else insists that 237 refers to the than 100 hands stayed in the air. I had Orange and The Shining. 237,000-mile distance to the moon and that “OK, is there anyone here who has never clearly wandered into Kubrick’s personal Kubrick helped the U.S. government stage Twilight Zone. seen the The Shining?” a host from the the Apollo 11 moon landing mission using Rest assured, you Toronto International the old set from 2001: A Space Odyssey. need only have seen Film Festival asked. Don’t worry; none of these gems are spoilThe Shining once to The audience roared ROOM 237 (NR) er alerts. Room 237 is packed with wonder. step into the hall of with laughter and no Directed by Rodney Ascher “It’s not just a documentary,” director mirrors that is Room hands went up. Starring Bill Blakemore, Geoffrey Cocks, Rodney Ascher told me in Toronto. “This film 237—which refers “How many Juli Kearns is about an obsessive-compulsive director.” to the mysterious here have seen the Opens Friday, May 3, at The Flicks Is it ever. And the film is a hoot because room at the center movie more than five everyone involved takes himself or herself so of the cult film. This times?” Almost every seriously. new documentary hand went up (includ“For the last two years of my life, I subintroduces us to a number of people who ing my own). merged myself into an incredibly deep rabbit see something else when they watch The “How many have seen The Shining more hole to make this movie,” said Ascher. “But than 10 times?” The majority of hands stayed Shining. Some insist that it’s about the Hocome on inside the hole with me. There’s locaust. Others say it holds key indicators up. The audience began giggling again. plenty of room.” to the genocide of American Indians. And “Twenty times? Thirty times?” More

SAY WHAT?/SCREEN SAY WHAT? A ROUND-UP OF THE WEEK’S BEST QUOTES “A new report found that the worst job in the U.S. is being a newspaper reporter. They say it’s better for writers to just focus on fiction and become a CNN reporter.” —Jimmy Fallon

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“The Internet celebrated a major milestone. … It’s the eighth anniversary of the very first video uploaded to YouTube. YouTube was founded in 2005 by a small group of visionaries who asked the question, ‘What if nobody in America ever got anything done ever again?’”

OCCUPY LOVE—Join acclaimed director Velcrow Ripper (Scared Sacred, Fierce Light) for Occupy Love, which connects the dots in this era of rapidly evolving social change. Followed by community dialogue. Find out more about the film and watch the trailer online. Saturday, May 4, 12:30 p.m. $10. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208342-4222, occupylove.org. THE SEED BOISE PREMIERE—Join the filmmakers of The Seed for the Boise premiere of their film with special guests Soloman’s Hollow. Q&A to follow the screening. Produced and filmed in the Treasure Valley, The Seed premiered at the Sun Valley Film Festival in March 2013. Wednesday, May 1, 7 p.m. $8. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, allfoolsproductions.com. THIRD ANNUAL SPROUT FILM FESTIVAL—The Arc Idaho is proud to present a unique opportunity to experience films about or starring people with disabilities. The goal is an enjoyable and enlightening experience that will help break down stereotypes, promoting a greater acceptance of differences and awareness of similarities. See Picks, Page 16. Saturday, May 4, 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. $10, $8 students, seniors, people with disabilities. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Opening

IRON MAN 3—Billionaire industrialist Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) faces off against The Mandarin, a deadly foe who tries to rob Iron Man of everything in this third installment of the Iron Man franchise. (PG-13) Opens Thursday, May 2. Edwards 9, 22. ROOM 237—Director Rodney Ascher uses footage from the Stanley Kubrick classic The Shining to illustrate interpretations about the film ranging from Native Americans, the Holocaust and the Apollo moon landing. (NR) Opens Friday, May 3. The Flicks.

—Jimmy Kimmel

“Former Congressman Anthony Weiner is back on Twitter. It’s like giving Lindsay Lohan the keys to the mini bar.” —David Letterman

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BEERGUZZLER/DRINK

FOOD/REVIEW As vibrant and varied as the Treasure Valley craft brew scene is, it’s nice to welcome another highly regarded outsider into the ever-growing number of local labels. The award-winning, San Diego-based Green Flash Brewing Company was founded in 2002 by Mike and Lisa Hinkley, but it was when brewmaster Chuck Silva came on board two years later that things really began to click. This trio definitely supports the claim that they “specialize in brewing assertive and distinctive beers.” LE FREAK, 22 OUNCE, $9.19 Billed as a Belgian IPA, this brew is an iridescent, deep copper color, with a two-finger head that lingers leaving ample lacing. Belgian yeast aromatics dominate the nose, with sour peach, citrus and spice backed by subtle hops. That hop character pops out a bit more in the mouth, where lightly tart stone fruit and green banana work well together. PALATE WRECKER HAMILTON’S ALE, 12 OUNCE, $3.79 This beer pours an orange-tinged amber with a thin but persistent head, and a bright nose filled with citrus and pine-laced hops. This is definitely a hop-driven brew, but the bitterness is balanced a bit by decent malt backing. Given that big hop profile and the heady 9.5 percent alcohol by volume, this is an aptly named beer. Both characteristics strongly suggest savored sipping.

—David Kirkpatrick

32 | MAY 1–7, 2013 | BOISEweekly

BURGERLICIOUS Saucy burgers on wheels JOSH GROSS When the Burgerlicious food truck debuted in September 2012, co-owner Ingrid Bolen told Boise Weekly that the goal of the truck was to fill a niche in Boise. Though we would argue that Boise’s burger market isn’t a niche—or, if it is, it’s one of the biggest niches around—we also can’t deny that there are few foods more tasty than a hearty burger. But with so many options, how is a burger supposed to stand apart? For Burgerlicious, the answer is a two-parter. Act one is the beef. Burgerlicious sources You won’t be singing the blues after scarfing down the bleu cheese and bacon burger at Burgerlicious. its meat from K4D Family Farms in Weiser and Meats Royale in Boise. The quarter pound beef patty is juicy enough to erode the bun by The sauces also pair well with the fries lives up to its name, bringing the heat and burger’s end. ($2)—in fact, they’re almost necessary, as chili flavor of sriracha, but with a creamy But the big close is the dressing. Burgerlibase that isn’t just mayonnaise and hot sauce. the fries are overly starchy. It may be part of cious’ menu features several housemade the formula that fries go with burgers, but The zingy sauce is a thick sauces: Ingrid’s Idaho Fry considering Burgerlicious’ willingness to go horseradish cream sauce with Sauce, Bacon Bleu Cheese BURGERLICIOUS flecks of black pepper and that the extra mile with the patties and sauces, it’s Sauce, Creamy Fire Sauce or 208-954-2222 too bad they didn’t give the same care to the wonderful nasal sting that, Zingy Horseradish Sauce. The facebook.com/boisefoodtruck potatoes. in the words of John Cougar fry sauce is essentially the same In the end, Burgerlicious is another option Mellencamp, “hurts so good.” as all fry sauces, but the other in a town with more than a few burger joints. Which sauce you choose three are all a treat. The bleu But sometimes you get an itch that must be is really a matter of personal taste, but cheese sauce that came on the Blues Burger scratched, and with its locally sourced beef and paired with tomato, lightly grilled onions ($5.75) is thick with chunks of cheese and and chopped lettuce, all but the fry sauce are house sauces, you could do a whole lot worse paired with bacon for a perfect blend of than Burgerlicious. smoky and sour notes. The fire sauce actually good complements to the beef.

FOOD/NEWS selection of eats from its kitchen. “We’re going to do what I’d like to call an elevated pub style of Construction fences surrounding a much anticipated project in downfood—burgers, fries, all with very fresh ingredients. ... Also whatever town Boise have come down, signaling the opening of Bend, Ore.’s, 10 I can get that’s locally sourced, I want to get that as well,” said owner Barrel Brewing in its second location. Crews have worked since late 2012 to put together 10 Barrel’s Boise Don Galligan. Idaho Hop House will start with appetizers and slowly add a few restaurant and brewery, located at 830 W. Bannock St. The brewery ofmenu items at a time until the kitchen is completely up and running. For ficially opened for lunch April 22 and will be open from Monday-Sunday, the time being, the spot is hosting guest chefs, like Smokin Beyond, 11 a.m.-midnight. Co-owner Garrett Wales said the brewery has hired which recently served pulled pork sandwiches and brisket. For more approximately 115-120 employees. info, call 208-465-9971. “We’ll do a big party in six weeks or And in remodel news, sister spots so when we get our feet under us, and Red Feather Lounge and Bittercreek Ale get everything dialed in. For right now, we House closed their doors for a remodel want to roll open the doors and see what April 14 through Sunday, May 5. happens,” said Wales. According to its website, the Bit10 Barrel’s menu includes pub staples tercreek remodel will feature improved with some twists,such as a Nicoise-style mid-room seating, new artwork and new grilled steelhead sandwich, a house-cured lighting, while Red Feather will boast new corned beef reuben and a roasted caulifurniture, a new bar, improved seating on flower sandwich with olive tapenade. the main floor and in the front mezzaIn other brews news, the Idaho Hop nine, new artwork and new lighting. The House flung open its doors April 17 at restaurants will also feature a new kitchen 113 13th Ave. S. in Nampa. The craft beer with easier passage between restaurants, store and restaurant carries brands like an improved patio, refinished floors and Stone, Ninkasi, Selkirk Abbey, Laughing new, separate vestibules with double-entry Dog, Leffe and Widmer, and also offers a front doors. sizeable whiskey menu, with 24 bourbons and ryes. 10 Barrel’s taps are now pouring a variety of suds. —Andrew Crisp and Tara Morgan Idaho Hop House will eventually sling a

OPENINGS AND REMODELS

PATRICK SWE EN EY

WEST COAST IPA, 12 OUNCE, $2.99 In the glass, this brew is burnt orange, topped by a scant, tan froth. The robust aromas mix fresh-milled grain with smooth, resiny hops and tropical fruit. The front label proclaims this ale to be “extravagantly hopped” (with four different varieties), and it certainly lives up to the claim. It’s a bold offering with bitter grapefruit and a nice hop bite from start to finish. This beer is definitely a worthy example of the West Coast IPA style.

Restaurants get one chance to hit BW with their best shot. LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

GREEN FLASH BREWING COMPANY

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20 Dramatic response to “Who’s there?” 21 Neighboring bunkers? 23 Biting 24 Tammany Hall corruption, e.g.? 26 Patisserie offerings 28 Sunflower State capital 29 Starting stake 30 Bona fide 31 Poetic pause 33 Sign that means “Do not disturb”

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34 Try to see what you’re getting for Christmas? 38 Something a model should be in 39 Up, as an anchor 40 Piazza parts? 41 Way to go 42 What much can follow 43 Is in the works 45 Academy for criminals? 51 Journey from the nest to the kitchen, say? 53 “Arrested Development” character Fünke 54 “Harry Potter” librarian Pince 55 Itty-bitty battery 56 Cactus features 58 Had an appetite 60 Take in or take on 64 Hidden drug habit, maybe? 67 Torture 68 Accidentally reveal 70 Psychologist Jean known for his theory of cognitive development 71 Laugh syllable 73 Prefix with -plasm 74 Pitchers to publishers 76 Drink greedily? 81 Playground apparatus of the Apocalypse? 83 Game for players with steady hands 85 ___ deck (part of a cruise ship) 86 Plasma constituents 87 Vibe 88 Cooler, to LL Cool J 89 Comes to 91 Be a lenient judge? 96 Hayride seats 97 Some tennis play 98 All that and ___ of chips 99 Top Qatari 100 Lifeguard’s act 101 It might be right under your nose 105 Maligned merchandise? 109 Cartoon boy with an antenna on his cap 110 Lover of Lancelot

111 Actor Hirsch of “Speed Racer” 112 “Victory is yours” 113 Wolfgang Puck restaurant 114 Part of a reactor 115 One of the Ephrons 116 Like some blood and articles

DOWN 1 2 3 4

Librarian’s urging “When I was young …” A lot of binary code Memorable romantic moment 5 Regain clarity, say 6 Got rid of the waist? 7 Relatives of dune buggies, for short 8 Something to connect to a TV 9 U.S. alien’s subj. 10 They’re shaken in kitchens 11 Support 12 Actress Suzanne 13 Hasbro brand 14 Affiliate of the A.F.L.C.I.O. 15 1989 John Cusack romantic comedy 16 Like some noise music 17 “___ the Dinosaur” (pioneering cartoon short) 18 Gravelly ridge 22 ___ culpa 25 Sub ___ 27 Series 31 Captain’s command 32 Stupefies 33 Ear-related 34 Two threes, for one 35 Site of Cyclops’s smithy 36 “It was,” in Latin 37 O.T. book 38 Pert 41 No. between 0 and 4 43 Support provider 44 Gather 45 Puerto Rican city that shares its name with an explorer 46 “Awake in the Dark” writer 47 Increase 48 Yes ___

49 You might see one in an eclipse 50 Margaret Thatcher, e.g. 52 “Catch ya later!” 53 Supermodel Cheryl 56 Police setup 57 Exams for would-be Natl. Merit Scholars 59 Family name in the Old West 60 Undercover? 61 Some ’30s design 62 Good name for a car mechanic? 63 Commitment signifier 65 Amenable (to) 66 Tough 69 Reflexes said to be contagious 72 Like 75 They’re not vets yet 76 Bother, with “at” 77 Under the table, maybe 78 Work the land 79 “What’s the big ___?” 80 Land on the Arctic Cir. 82 Dipsos 83 Title fellow in a Beatles song 84 Figure with arrows 87 Supposed L A S T E A R L O B E

C L A U D I A

C D R O M

I N A N E

H O T F O R T E A C H E R

B I G O H O N O T P R B E E I S A T O L

O U S T T T H E R N O W N M I L K L T O H O I S T A L L E T

B I T T E R S W E E T S Y M P H O N Y

O N E I D A

L O U I E

P U L L S

88 “Eww, no!” 89 Was mentioned 90 Lover of Cesario in “Twelfth Night” 91 Set of software components packaged for release, briefly 92 Moved like a caterpillar 93 Possible flu symptom 94 Possible flu symptom 95 “Conan” channel 96 Arctic Circle sights 97 Annual dinner 100 Excite, with “up” 101 Roman 1551 102 Wheat or corn 103 It might fill a kiddie pool 104 Carefully saw? 106 Rex of the jungle 107 Kipling’s “Follow Me ___” 108 It can be refined Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

I N G N I E S N A N T S O U T G A B R T E A E N S I G E X O T I D R I C W T S S H S I S N W T R E E E E R I S C A L R A U E N S E A D G E R S O R S K E I E M S A E

B E L G I A N C O N G O

A D O R E S

T O I

O E R D S Y O S J E I I L S T

S T O S O W L I S S F T A A M G I O L N Y R O U B R I A N N S I O A N

E D S O Y A N N E R O C K O O S P U P H E R O A R T E D O C H W H A S O H E C A X O S I A L T T A W E T T E D E N E D D A R I R O N L P G

N I K R E O S T O P S A R C A D I A

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NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA */3&+FTTJDB.BSJF#FFSZ

Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1305204 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME $)"/(& "EVMU

A Petition to change the name of +FTTJDB.BSJF#FFSZ OPXSFTJEJOH in the City of Garden City, State of Idaho, has been ďŹ led in the District Court in Ada Country, Idaho. The name will change to Natazja Rain-Marie Moore. The reason for the change in name is: to honor religious preference and family. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. PO EBUF .BZ BUUIF"EB County Courthouse. Objections may be ďŹ led by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: MAR 26 2013 By: CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. April 10, 17, 24 & May 1, 2013. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Abby Lynn Garden Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1305174 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME $)"/(& "EVMU

A Petition to change the name of Abby Lynn Garden, now residing in the City of Kuna, State of Idaho, has been ďŹ led in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Abby Lynn Hoskisson. The reason for the change in name is: divorce. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. PO EBUF .BZ BUUIF"EB County Courthouse. Objections may be ďŹ led by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: March 21, 2013 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. April 10, 17, 24 & May 10, 2013.

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA */3&1IZMMJT+PZDF4FBNBOT Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1305732 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME $)"/(& "EVMU

A Petition to change the name PG 1IZMMJT +PZDF 4FBNBOT  OPX residing in the City of Boise, State

of Idaho, has been ďŹ led in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. 5IF OBNF XJMM DIBOHF UP +PZDF Seamans. The reason for the DIBOHFJOOBNFJT*HPCZ+PZDF Seamans & have for 40 years. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. PO EBUF  .BZ    BU UIF Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be ďŹ led by any person

who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: APR 01 2013 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. April 10, 17, 24 & May 1, 2013.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - COMMERCIAL

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Are you afraid that you lack a crucial skill or aptitude? Do you have a goal that you’re worried might be impossible to achieve because of this inadequacy? If so, now is a good time to make plans to fill in the gap. If you formulate such an intention, you will attract a benevolent push from the cosmos. Why spend another minute fretting about the consequences of your ignorance when you have more power than usual to correct that ignorance? TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Imagine you’re in a large room full of costumes. It’s like a masquerade store at Halloween plus a storage area where a theater troupe keeps the apparel its actors use to stage a wide variety of historical plays. You have free rein here. You can try on different masks and wigs and disguises and get-ups. You can envision yourself living in different eras as various characters. If you like, you can even go out into the world wearing your alternate identities. Try this exercise, Taurus. It’ll stimulate good ideas about some new self-images you might want to play with in real life. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Ray LaMontagne sings these lyrics in his tune “Empty�: “I looked my demons in the eyes / Laid bare my chest and said / ‘Do your best to destroy me. / I’ve been to hell and back so many times, / I must admit you kind of bore me.’� I wouldn’t be opposed to you delivering a message like that to your own demons, Gemini—with one caveat: Leave out the “Do your best to destroy me� part. Simply peer into the glazed gaze of those shabby demons and say, “You bore me and I’m done with you. Bye-bye.� And then walk away from them for good. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I know a devotee of Tibetan Buddhism who got an unexpected message from her teacher. He told her she has made such exemplary progress in her quest for enlightenment that she has earned the ultimate reward. When she dies many years from now, the teacher said, she will enter nirvana. She will have no further karmic obligation to reincarnate into a new body in the future and will be forever excused from the struggle of living in the material world. Although her teacher meant this to be good news, she was heartbroken. She wants to keep reincarnating. Her joyous passion is to help relieve the suffering of her fellow humans. Can you guess what sign she is? Yes: a Cancerian. Like her, many of you are flirting with an odd and challenging choice between selfishness and selflessness. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A lawyer named John Keogh filed an

38 | MAY 1–7, 2013 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

application with the Australian Patent Office. It was for a “circular transportation facilitation device.� His claim was approved. He thus became the owner of the world’s first and only patent for the wheel. So far, he has not tried to collect royalties from anyone who’s using wheels. I nominate him to be your role model, Leo. May he inspire you to stamp your personal mark on a universal archetype or put your unique spin on something everyone knows and loves. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This may be the best week in a long time to practice crazy wisdom. What’s crazy wisdom? Here’s how novelist Tom Robbins described it to Shambhala Sun: It’s “a philosophical worldview that recommends swimming against the tide, cheerfully seizing the short end of the stick, embracing insecurity, honoring paradox, courting the unexpected, celebrating the unfamiliar, shunning orthodoxy, volunteering for tasks nobody else wants or dares to do, and breaking taboos in order to destroy their power. It’s the wisdom of those who turn the tables on despair by lampooning it, and who neither seek authority nor submit to it.� And why should you do any of that weird stuff? Robbins: “To enlarge the soul, light up the brain, and liberate the spirit.� LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Why should we honor those that die upon the field of battle?� asked Irish poet William Butler Yeats. “A man may show as reckless a courage in entering into the abyss of himself.� A woman may show similar bravery, of course. In my astrological opinion, that’s the noble adventure beckoning to you, Libra: a dive into the depths of your inner workings. I hope that’s the direction you go; I hope you don’t take your stouthearted struggle out into the world around you. All the best action will be happening in that fertile hub known as your “soul.� SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Historical records suggest that ancient Greek philosopher Democritus went blind late in his life. There are different stories about why. According to one, he intentionally did it to himself by gazing too long into the sun. That was his perverse way of solving a vexing problem: It freed him from the torment of having to look upon gorgeous women who were no longer interested in or available to him because of his advanced age. I hope you won’t do anything like that, Scorpio. In fact, I suggest you take the opposite approach: Keep your attention focused on things that stir your deep attraction, even if you think you can’t have them for your own. Valuable lessons and unexpected rewards will emerge from such efforts.

Search your memory, Sagittarius, and recall a time when you pushed yourself to your limits as you labored over a task you cared about very much. At that time, you worked with extreme focus and intensity. You were rarely bored and never resentful about the enormous effort you had to expend. You loved throwing yourself into this test of willpower, which stretched your resourcefulness and compelled you to grow new capacities. What was that epic breakthrough in your past? Once you know, move on to your next exercise: Imagine a new assignment that fits this description, and make plans to bring it into your life in the near future. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Nairobi is Kenya’s capital and home of more than 3 million urbanites. A few minutes’ drive from the city center, there’s a 45-square-mile national park teeming with wildlife. Against a backdrop of skyscrapers, rhinos and giraffes graze. Lions and cheetahs pounce. Wildebeests roam and hyenas skulk. I suggest you borrow the spirit of that arrangement and invoke it in your own life. In other words, be highly civilized and smartly sophisticated part of the time; be wild and free the rest of the time. And be ready to go back and forth between the two modes with grace and ease. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the wild, a tiger’s diet consists entirely of meat. The big cat loves to feast on deer and wild boar, and eats a variety of other animals, too. The hunt is always solitary, never done in collaborative groups. That’s why the creature’s success rate is so low. A tiger snags the prey it’s seeking only about 5 percent of the time. It sometimes has to wait two weeks between meals. Nevertheless, a tiger rarely starves. When it gets what it’s after, it can devour 75 pounds of food in one sitting. According to my astrological analysis, Aquarius, you’re like a tiger these days. You haven’t had a lot of lucky strikes lately, but I suspect you will soon hit the jackpot. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The French word “flaneur� is a meme that refers to a person who strolls around the city at a leisurely pace, exploring whatever captivates her imagination. To the casual observer, the flaneur may seem to be a lazy time-waster with nothing important to do. But she is in fact motivated by one of the noblest emotions—pure curiosity—and is engaged in a quest to attract novel experiences, arouse fresh insights and seek new meaning. Sound fun? Well, congratulations, Pisces, because you have been selected as the Flaming Flaneur of the Zodiac for the next two weeks. Get out there and meander.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21):

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Sonia Kay Wright Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1305549 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME $)"/(& "EVMU

A petition to change the name of Sonia Kay Wright, now residing in the City of Eagle, State of Idaho, has been ďŹ led in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Sonia ,BZ+PIOTPO5IFSFBTPOGPSUIF name change is: I wish to remove married name Wright & resume NZNBJEFOOBNF+PIOTPO A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. PO EBUF  .BZ    BU UIF Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be ďŹ led by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: APR 01 2013 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT BY: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. April 17, 24, May 1 & 8, 2013. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Hannah Mae Cutbirth Philip Christopher Cutbirth Legal names of children Case No. CVNC 1305235 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME $)"/(& .JOPST

A Petition to change the name PG   1IJMJQ $ $VUCJSUI  BOE UIF OBNF PG   )BOOBI .BF $VUbirth, all minors, now residing in the City of MEridian, State of Idaho, has been ďŹ led in the District Court of Ada County, Idaho. The

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OBNFT XJMM DIBOHF UP   1IJMJQ $ISJTUPQIFS $VUMFS   )BOOBI Mae Cutler. The reason for the change in names is: to prevent further tauntaing and jokes about the spelling of their last name from their peers. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. PO EBUF +VOF BUUIF"EB County Courthouse. Objections may be ďŹ led by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: APR 01 2013 CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT

By: DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 2013. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Scott Lawrence Meadors Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1305917 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME $)"/(& "EVMU

A Petition to change the name of Scott Lawrence Meadors, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been ďŹ led in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to

Sara Lauren Fawkes. The reason for the change in name is: gender reassignment. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. PO EBUF  .BZ    BU UIF Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be ďŹ led by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: April 4, 2013 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. April 17, 24, May 1, 8, 2013.

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2013 YMCA RACE EVENTS OFF ROAD SPRINT TRIATHLON May 3 & 4

CAMEL’S BACK DUATHLON May 25

FAMOUS IDAHO POTATO MARATHON May 17 & 18

SPUDMAN TRIATHLON July 13

Y-NOT TRIATHLON August 1

HIDDEN SPRINGS DUATHLON September 13 & 14

HARRISON CLASSIC October 13

FALL SPRINT TRIATHLON October 18 & 19

HALLOWEEN RUN October 26

YMCA CHRISTMAS RUN December 21

YMCA races are family friendly events with both short and long course options to meet the needs of all ages and ability levels. For more information or to register online, please visit

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Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 45