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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 39 MARCH 20–26, 2013

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TAK EE E ON E! INSIDE

TREEFORT A-Z Daily rundown of where to go and what bands to see

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PAY TO PLAY Should musicians be expected to work for free?

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MUSICAL ESCAPE Take a break and recreate

FOOD 28

RAISE A GLASS Alefort gets a revamp

“People who are charged with crimes don’t win popularity contests.”

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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone ZHagadone@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Sultan of Events: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editors: Amy Atkins, Jay Vail Interns: Sam Alderman, Morgan Barnhart, Lauren Bergeson, Jessica Johnson Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Dave Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall, Carissa Wolf Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Brad Hoyt, Brad@boiseweekly.com Zach Ritchie, Zach@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Ed Glazar, Elijah Jensen, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow, Garry Trudeau Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2013 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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NOTE FESTIVALIA If you’ve been following boiseweekly.com for the past 10 days or so, you might have noticed that we’ve been blogging the bejesus out of every festival we can get our hands on: BW New Media Czar Josh Gross, with an assist from freelancer Marcia Franklin, was trying his best to be omnipresent at SXSW in Austin, Texas, from March 11-March 17; and News Editor George Prentice spent the weekend of March 15-March 17 taking in the flicks at the Sun Valley Film Festival. This week, all of our roaming reporters have returned home, and we’re cranking it up a couple of notches for Boise’s own Treefort Music Fest, which kicks off Thursday, March 21, and runs through Sunday, March 24. In this week’s print edition you’ll find a special info tab with pages of BW picks and recommendations, but the real action is going to be online, where we’ll stretch our digital tentacles across the sea of social media to cover as many facets of the fest as humanly possible. Find all the pertinent information in the special section at the middle of the paper. Beyond that, and since this week’s extravaganza is the high point of Boise’s live music calendar, be sure to delve into Josh Gross’ feature piece, starting on Page 11. While practically everyone enjoys live music of some kind, practically everyone also seems to take it for granted that performers are poor, struggling vagabonds whose art relies on starvation for its sincerity. The reality is that working musicians—whether they’re gigging in the bars or performing in a symphony orchestra—are enmeshed in a shadow economy that demands their total commitment but offers them few to no assurances. Catch-22s abound, and with no real regulation, the legal landscape for small-time musicians would look familiar to the troubadours of the Middle Ages. It’s a fascinating read and ought to give a little perspective for audiences as they enjoy the fruits of their local music scene’s labors this week. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: George Poindexter TITLE: Fire at Robie Creek MEDIUM: Broadloom carpet handcut, inlaid and sculpted. ARTIST STATEMENT: All you parents, you parents out there give your kids lots of love and don’t let them play with fire. See more of my rugs and wall hangings at rugbindery.com.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

SXSW Boise Weekly spent a week checking out new acts and trends in the music industry at South by Southwest in Austin, Texas. We also swung by some flicks that debuted at the SXSW Film Festival. Find our complete coverage on Cobweb.

ONE LESS SCHOOL The Nampa School District is considering closing one of its elementary schools to save money. Get the full story on Citydesk.

NO EXERGY TOUR THIS YEAR Financially troubled Exergy has canceled this year’s mega-sized bike race. Get the full story on Citydesk.

SUN VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL The Sun Valley Film Festival also went down over the weekend. See BW’s complete coverage on Cobweb.

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NOTE BILL COPE TED RALL NEWS Getting a public defense in Idaho isn’t as easy as it sounds. ROTUNDA CITIZEN FEATURE To Pay or Not to Pay BW PICKS FIND 8 DAYS OUT SUDOKU REVIEW Sun Valley Film Festival Wrap Up DOONESBURY NOISE Youth Lagoon MUSIC GUIDE ARTS Sesqui-Shop chronicles Boise’s music scene REC Taking a break from Treefort FOOD Alefort, take two WINE SIPPER CLASSIFIEDS NYT CROSSWORD HOBO JARGON FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

ASK BILL ABOUT IT An anonymous BFF intervenes

Hi Bill, It is me, Anonymous, from the Cope’s-Latest-Column Discussion Group. Remember? I do not imagine you get many letters from people who call themselves “Anonymous,” so who else could this one be but from me? Ha ha. I forget how long it has been since I wrote you. At least a big bunch of months ago. You should know that I have quit trying to pick up clues to your thinking by parking down the street from your house and looking through your window with my grandson’s Pirates of the Caribbean spy glass that he got from either Burger King or Pizza Hut, I don’t remember which, as my grandson is now 14 and recently got caught spray painting swastikas and naughty words on a neighbor’s Labradoodle, but that doesn’t mean I don’t still keep up with what you are getting yourself up to. Our discussion group has done some transforming, too. Especially since old Mr. Philbert died. He always had a pithy thing or two to say, like when he said, “Sometimes I wonder if that Cope ain’t some kind of convict, and the reason he writes this stuff is because he’s trying to get a new trial that’ll get him out of prison for being as crazy as a goat chewing loco weed.” We all laughed at that one. Mr. Philbert was a retired cowboy poet and his favorite saying was, “Well now I’ve heard everything.” At our Thursday meetings, he would say it over and over—“Well now I’ve heard everything!” After he died, we discovered our meetings took about half as long to get done with. Anywho, Mr. Philbert isn’t the only one who doesn’t come anymore. Ron and Dawn Mabley stopped coming last fall because they thought you were being too mean on Mitt Romney, and my friend Ethel’s daughter Brenda had a baby which Ethel is babysitting during Brenda’s bowling league. Which is Thursday night, wouldn’t you know. A couple of others got too old to drive at night and another couple of others started the Downton Abbey-Season-Three Discussion Group and claim they don’t have time for the Cope’s-Latest-Column Discussion Group anymore. With all this coming and going, mostly going, we are now down to three people including me, and I’m pretty sure one of the others only comes for the cookies and punch. Which is why I am writing. As your BFF (Bestest Fan Forever) and founder of the Cope’sLatest-Column Discussion Group, I feel you need to get some newer things to write in your columns about. Anymore, all you write about are those darn gun nuts. Gun nuts, gun nuts, gun nuts! You need to remember there is more in life than mass murders. For example, there is the new pope who was just being elected. I think Ron and Dawn Mabley would start coming again if you wrote more about popes and less about gun nuts, since they are Catholics. Like me. I am Catholic, too. Except for those years I put crystals all over the house and slept under a Styrofoam pyramid. But that is over now and I am back to being Catholic. There are other things. You have hardly said a peep about the Idaho Legislature. And also, what about Paul Ryan’s latest budget? Don’t you have any opinions on that? All I am saying is that maybe if you would go back to the ways of writing when we did not know what you might say next, I could get the discussion group up to a membership number that is worth cleaning the house for before they come over. As it is now, it seems hardly worth it to drag out the Dirt Devil for just the three of us. —Your BFF Always, No Matter How Boring You Get To Be, Anonymous My dear Anony, I am so sorry to hear about Mr. Philbert. It sounds like he was one tough old nut. And thanks for sticking with me, but I must warn you. I suspect I have come nowhere near to reaching my potential to be boring. You are right. Perhaps I have allowed the gun issue to occupy too much of my attention. It’s just that I am convinced the only thing that will stop a bad man with a gun is a good man who stops the bastard from getting hold of a damn gun in the first place. And again you are right in how little I’ve said about the Legislature. You see, I was so encouraged over the election in November, and how Idaho citizens so thoroughly thrashed Tom Luna’s scheme, that I felt confident nothing like that could ever happen again. But since the Republicans are now attempting to castrate the initiative process, thereby neutering what little recourse we citizens have, I can see not only will it probably happen again, but also how badly I underestimated their willingness to strip the democracy part out of our democracy. The same can be said about Paul Ryan and his budget redux. It would seem that to him and his entire party, election results are the least significant factor in their concept of how America should function. Now, about that pope of yours. Not to offend, dear, but I care less about popes than I do Prince William and Duchess what’s-’er-name, his preggers princess. Which is to say, not much. I try to understand how a pope might be a big deal to you Catholics, but honestly, when I watch coverage of all those cardinals and Swiss Guards and funny hats and ritual scooby-doobery, all I can think is Game of Thrones, only without any women, any young people or anything even remotely interesting. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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OPINION/TED RALL

CASH IN

Why Sheryl Sandberg is evil Sheryl Sandberg is the author of a new book that you’ve heard of if you’re connected enough to be reading this, promoted by one of those PR tsunamis that publishers inflict on the public every year or two in hopes of recouping six- or seven-figure advances: Lean In: Women, Work and the Will to Lead. She is also the COO of Facebook. Lean In, we are told, is more than just a book. It is a social movement. A way of life. A happening. “She is someone who works at Facebook,” moons Garance Franke-Ruta in The Atlantic. “Who leads Facebook. Who helped invent the Facebook we know today. Hers is a Facebook feminism.” Comparing herself to Betty “The Feminine Mystique” Friedan, Sandberg wants her book to inspire Lean In Circles where women meet to plot their climbs up the corporate ladder and achieve gender parity in the boardroom. At their creepy gatherings, women will learn how to act more boldly, aggressively—more like men. Her idea of how men act, anyway. Franke-Ruta again: “Sandberg is an unapologetic capitalist and senior manager who began her career in Washington, D.C. She says she’s interested in seeing more women in leadership posts in corporate America and in the highest ranks of government. That means more women at the top, more women in positions of power and more women who have the training and experience to lead within institutions actually getting a shot at doing— or daring to do—it.” I think Sandberg is one of the most insufferable fools in the world of business. Which is saying something. But I don’t hate her for the same reasons as people like Maureen Dowd.

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In The New York Times, columnist Dowd sums up Sandberg as a “PowerPoint Pied Piper in Prada ankle boots.” Such Dowdian snark, though cruel, is fair. Sandberg, after all, uttered a comment whose revealing immodesty would make Donald Trump blush: “I always thought I would run a social movement.” The Paper of Record asks the six- or seven-figure question: “Even her advisers acknowledge the awkwardness of a woman with double Harvard degrees, dual stock riches (from Facebook and Google, where she also worked), a 9,000-square-foot house and a small army of household help urging less fortunate women to look inward and work harder. Will more earthbound women, struggling with cash flow and child care, embrace the advice of a Silicon Valley executive whose book acknowledgments include thanks to her wealth adviser and Oprah Winfrey?” Still, Dowd et al’s argument that Sandberg’s wealth denies her the standing to issue advice to working women leaves me cold. It doesn’t matter who or what she is; either her ideas are smart and/or good for society or they’re not. A doctor who tells you to diet and exercise is giving you good advice even if she’s fat and smokes. Hell, I’m a dude yet I think I know better than Sandberg what’s better for women. For all I know, and many women agree, she gives good advice to ambitious women trying to climb the corporate ladder. What grates about Sandberg, I think, is less the fact that a person born at mile 25 thinks she won the marathon because she worked so hard, than her failed attempt to elevate a self-help book to the 10 level of politics.

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NEWS/ROTUNDA NEWS PATR IC K S W EENEY

JUSTICE FOR ALL? Fifty years after landmark case, Idaho still struggles to provide adequate indigent defense CARISSA WOLF

If you’re arrested, you can expect certain things to happen: You’ll likely feel handcuffs clinch around your wrists, you’ll get booked, and there’s a good chance you’ll see the inside of a jail cell. According to the Miranda Rights that your arresting officer is required to recite, you will have the right to an attorney; if you can’t afford an attorney, one will be provided Boise Democratic Rep. Grant Burgoyne: “People who are charged with crimes don’t win popularity contests and people don’t like to spend money on them, but the House recognized that this was important.” for you. In the landmark 1963 Gideon v. Wainwright decision, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled lions of dollars if we were sued, and perhaps “The [Idaho] Constitution and the [U.S.] that, “Any person haled into court, who is too people’s convictions could be overturned, we Supreme Court for 50 years have been clear poor to hire a lawyer, cannot be assured a fair thought we should fix this system,” said atthat [public defense] is not a county responsitrial unless counsel is provided for him.” torney and Boise Democratic Rep. Grant Burbility under the Constitution,” said Hopkins. But justice for all may not be the order of goyne, who has sponsored a series of bills that “It is a state responsibility under the Constituthe day in Idaho as court watchdogs claim— he said represents the beginning of indigent tion.” and studies confirm—that the Gem State is defense reform in Idaho. According to the 2010, 135-page study by rife with inconsistency, at best, and probable The measures have already won overcivil-liberties violations, at worst. In fact, Idaho NLADA: “By delegating to each county the whelming bipartisan support at the Statehouse. responsibility to provide counsel at the trial ranks near the bottom in the nation for indiHouse Bill 147 more uniformly defines level without any state funding or oversight, gent defense system costs, while some public the criteria in which a judge will determine if Idaho has sewn a patchwork quilt of underdefenders continue to handle the equivalent of someone is provided a public defender. House funded, inconsistent systems that vary greatly four attorneys’ workloads. Bill 148 clarifies that a juvenile defense lawyer in defining who qualifies for those services. … “We have some really talented, really wonderful, dedicated people who want to help None of the public defender systems evaluated may not serve in dual capacities as an attorney and guardian ad litem, and House Bill 149 detheir clients. And they can’t. We have a broken are constitutionally adequate.” fines when a juvenile can be appointed a public “We have scores of people who are being system that allows counties to engage in flat fee damaged through a criminal justice system be- defender and limits the circumstances when a contracts with public defenders with growjuvenile can waive the right to counsel. cause they don’t have counsel and their liveliing caseloads that exceed the American Bar “Juveniles facing delinquency proceedhood is being taken away, their liberty is being Association guidelines,” said Monica Hoptaken away,” said Hopkins “At ings are an afterthought to the troubled adult kins, executive director of the system … When they are brought to court and some point, there needs to be a American Civil Liberties Union connection that real lives are at given a public defender who has no resources of Idaho. LEARN MORE: Gideon v. and a caseload that dictates he dispose of cases stake here.” “It is the legislators in our Wainwright 50th Anniversary, as quickly as possible, the message of neglect The NLADA study found state and the key stakeholders Friday, March 29, City Club and worthlessness continues,” said David Carthat Idaho’s county-based indiand the entire justice system of Boise Luncheon, Grove gent defense system costs $7.83 roll, NLADA’s director of research. that need to stand up to say, Hotel, Boise, 11:45 a.m.1:15 p.m. Hopkins added that even if the bills do per capita—$3 less than the na‘We think that the ideals within become law, the state’s indigent defense tional average—ranking Idaho the Constitution are worth GUESTS: Sara Thomas, disystem still wouldn’t align with constitutional 42nd in the country in public preserving and we want a conrector of the State Appellate Public Defender’s Office, requirements. But a recently introduced House defense spending. The study stitutional system,’” Hopkins and Dawn Porter, director Resolution would task lawmakers to create also found caseloads in Idaho said. and producer of the film a committee to explore the problems that counties fall below par, with A trio of bills that passed the Gideon’s Army. some public defenders handling NLADA notes are “more a result of the evoluIdaho House are designed to tion of a system begun decades ago and not the workload of four attoraddress some of the complaints an affirmative attempt on the part of state and neys and dedicating as little as outlined in a 2010 study—The local policymakers to deny anyone’s constituGuarantee to Counsel: Advocacy and Due Pro- one hour and 10 minutes to single cases. The tional rights.” report found that in Ada County alone, the cess in Idaho’s Trial Courts, by the National “People who are charged with crimes don’t unprecedented number of first-degree murder Legal Aid and Defender Association—that win popularity contests,” said Burgoyne, “and cases in 2007 left the public defender’s office found Idaho fails to provide defendants who people don’t like to spend money on them, cannot afford attorneys with the level of repre- “unable to ensure the workloads are limited but the House recognized that this is sentation guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution. to a level that enables counsel to provide each important.” client with high quality legal representation.” The study indicates that the competency of Watchdogs say Idaho’s county-based “Recognizing that we were vulnerable in county-based indigent defense systems varied 8 system leaves some defendants in the Idaho and that it could cost us perhaps milgreatly. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

CHARTER FUNDING BILL SIDELINED FOR AMENDMENTS House Bill 206—already passed by the Idaho House—has appeared, been yanked and reappeared before the Senate Education Committee over a two-week stretch, but Boise Democratic Sen. Branden Durst says he doesn’t understand why the bill’s proponents are in such a hurry. “It seems to me that we should let the summer play out and work on this instead of rushing this through,” Durst told his committee colleagues March 18. But HB 206 is likely to return before the body sooner than later. “We’ve been working on this diligently and I believe we have a solution that works,” said Idaho Falls Republican Sen. Dean Mortimer, who has been shepherding the measure. “But I think it needs a bit of work right now.” HB 206, as it’s currently written, would earmark a percentage of public schools facility levy funds for public charter schools. Simply put, charters say they need more money for construction and repair of their facilities. If approved, in its first year, 2014, public charters could receive approximately $114 per student; in 2015, public charters could receive approximately $171 per student. “I should note that some of the stakeholders and I have been meeting with the Attorney General’s Office on this,” said Coeur d’Alene Republican Sen. John Goedde, the committee’s chairman. Goedde attempted to assuage Durst’s concerns. “Maybe the makers of any amendments to this bill might share them with you early so that you could gain some comfort,” Goedde said to Durst. But both lawmakers knew full well that they would renew their debate over the controversial measure when it returns—sooner than later. —George Prentice

EDITOR’S NOTE In our recent story regarding public charter schools in Idaho (BW, News, “Eyes on the Prize,” March 6, 2013), Don Keller, chief administrator of Boise’s Sage International Middle School, said, “We’re the only International Baccalaureate School in Idaho,” explaining that the curriculum encourages students to become “compassionate and lifelong learners.” But a check with International Baccalaureate—headquartered in The Netherlands—indicates that Sage is one of six Idaho schools that offer one or more programs affiliated with IB. Sage is unique in that it is Idaho’s only public charter to offer IB’s Primary Years Programme (ages 3 to 12), but Boise’s Riverstone International—a private charter—also offers the PYP. Additionally, Riverstone offers IB’s Middle Year Programme (ages 11 to 16) and its Diploma Programme (ages 16 to 19). Eagle’s North Star Charter—a public charter school—also offers IB’s Diploma Programme. Also, three traditional Idaho public schools, Meridian’s Renaissance High School (DP), Coeur d’Alene’s Lake City High School (DP) and Hayden Meadows Elementary (PYP) offer IB programs as part of their curriculums.

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NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

HEALTHY EXCHANGE OF IDEAS Caregivers, providers say ‘you may not like’ getting automated health care reminders in the future, ‘but that’s the reality.’ ANDREW CRISP While Idaho lawmakers wrangle over implementation of the Affordable Care Act, health care industry officials say they’re ready to move past politics and onto revamping systems of care. In a March 15 forum at St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center, members of Leadership Boise—a subset of the Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce that includes local nonprofit, government and business professionals— weighed in with a group of industry experts about the future of healing America. “It’s long overdue that we have this dialogue in our nation. What we’ve created is the most expensive ‘wealth care’ system, not health care system,” said Dr. Ted Epperly, program director and CEO of the Family Medicine Residency of Idaho. With more than 30 years as a health care provider, Epperly counseled President Barack Obama’s administration in the days leading up to congressional approval of the ACA. He described the nation’s current model as unsustainable: Both the health industry and patients themselves need to get used to the idea of accessing care early and often, not delaying a visit to the doctor’s office until something is seriously wrong. “The future doctor’s office is going to be empty, not full, and the reason is that people are proactively being helped to stay healthy in the community, not reactively coming into my office,” Epperly said. “We’re already behind the eight ball if that happens.”

Speaking at Leadership Boise’s “Excellence in Health Care” discussion were (right to left) Doug Hetherington, Steven Weeg, Dr. Ted Epperly and Jim Walker.

Steven Weeg, retired executive director of Health West and executive member of Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s Idaho Health Care Council, agreed with Epperly that the trend toward preventative health measures will require the industry to change how it provides care. “I think the role of the medical community may be to help guide you and your health, and how to live, and how to make those decisions intelligently,” said Weeg. That could mean fewer cheeseburgers and more exercise to avoid higher insurance premiums. More employers, regular purchasers of big and small coverage plans for their colleagues, may ask employees for health evaluations, according to Doug Hetherington, employee benefits consultant with Leavitt Group Benefit Services of Boise. “It could be a biometric screening, it could be a health-risk assessment,” he said. “It’s basically a report card on your life. It’s not just your life today, it’s your lifestyle as well.” In the future, Hetherington added, patients may be automatically reminded with a phone call if they fail to refill a prescription of, for example, blood pressure medication.

same position as Clarence Gideon, who in 1961 was found by Panama City, Fla., police near a burglarized pool room with a few coins and a pint of wine in his pocket. Hopkins said its not unusual for some Idahoans to find themselves in Gideon’s shoes: accused, broke and without a lawyer. “Some of the stories that we have heard [are] like: ‘I never even saw my public defender,’ or, ‘The judge told me to work out a deal with the prosecutor and if I couldn’t work out a deal with the prosecutor then I’d be appointed counsel,’” said Hopkins. “We received a letter that said, ‘My public defender told me I should plead guilty because no fucking Mexican would get a fair trial in the state of Idaho.’” In 1961, Gideon asked for a lawyer but a judge refused, telling 7

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“You may not like that, but that’s the reality of things,” he said. Part of making Obamacare work might require patients to visit the doctor before they have a problem. Most important, the panel members agreed, was that most Americans have some level of coverage—a central tenet of the Affordable Care Act. As a result, they said, fewer uninsured Americans may end up being treated for trauma in the nation’s emergency rooms, often leading to massive hospital bills and the possibility of bankruptcy. “Every one of us at some point in our lives, before we die, will have a health care cost greater than we could ever afford individually,” said Weeg. “The sooner we’re all in it together, the better. Let’s cover everybody.” Epperly concluded his remarks with a quote from Michael Pollan’s book The Omnivore’s Dilemma: “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants,” wrote Pollan. Epperly took some liberties by offering his own directive: “Get health care. Not too much. Mostly primary care.”

Gideon he had to pay for counsel. Following a trial where Gideon was forced to defend himself, he was convicted and sent to a Florida state prison, where he studied law and reaffirmed his belief that his Sixth Amendment rights had been violated. In a handwritten petition, Gideon asked the U.S. Supreme Court to hear his case. The justices listened and ruled that the U.S. Constitution requires states to provide effective legal counsel to criminal defendants that cannot afford an attorney. “We don’t want a system where just because you’re poor, you’re vulnerable. It’s really a matter of civil liberties and ensuring that the government doesn’t overstep them,” Burgoyne said. “These bills that we’re introducing at the Statehouse this year are probably the beginning and not the end.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


CITIZEN

MAT ERPELDING Freshman Boise lawmaker on taxing cookies, being ‘primaried’ and relationships GEORGE PRENTICE

Your degree is in psychology. How did you see that manifesting professionally? There’s something to be said for understanding the human dynamic. I was already in Northern Arizona University with a research assistantship in sensation and perception psychology. Particularly, I was interested in cognitive psychology: how the brain works and how we retain information. So what happened with that? I called the university from a mountaintop in Sandpoint, Idaho, to drop out of the program. What was going on in your mind at the time? I was working for a bicycle adventure company. I think I rode 3,000 miles that summer, and when you’re on a bike that much, you have a lot of time to reflect about where you want to go. I realized I wanted to travel the road of outdoor education. Looking back, I probably could have easily finished off my master’s in psychology, but I chose a different path. But do you look at the Idaho Legislature as a laboratory for a study in psychology? Human behavior? I sure do. To walk up to somebody who has a completely different

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ideology or belief system and still be able to enjoy their company requires, I think, a skill. The other piece of that is from a cognitive perspective—there is an interesting trust that you have to develop. If you’re not sure where you should place your vote, you turn to those few people. Is that list evolving or are you pretty sure of that right now? Oh, it’s definitely evolving. I’m only three months into this. I need to ask you about a recent debate on the House floor involving a nonbinding memorial declaring the Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness a “natural resources disaster area.” We were arguing whether Idaho should define a wilderness area as a disaster area due to wildfire problems. Was it your sense that the measure was a slap in the face to the U.S. Forest Service? That bill was directed at the wrong agency: the Forest Service. To hold the Forest Service accountable for budget problems is similar to when the Legislature cut $35 million out of the Health and Welfare budget, leading to further cuts in federal funding, and then telling con-

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Mat Erpelding was always running. The freshman Democratic legislator—representing Boise’s District 19—was a competitive gymnast but acknowledges that it became increasingly dangerous. He says that when he sat around the house at the age of 12, his parents told him to lace up his sneakers to run track. “I was a pretty high-energy kid,” said Erpelding. “And my folks were always looking for a good way to manage my energy.” Erpelding hasn’t stopped running since. He hits the pre-dawn streets of Boise most days before heading to the Statehouse to run the marathon that is the Idaho Legislature. He sat still long enough for Boise Weekly to talk to him about running for office, hiking some of North America’s most challenging peaks, and negotiating the treacherous wilderness of Idaho politics.

stituents that they needed to go talk to Health and Welfare and hold them accountable. You sit on the House Revenue and Taxation Committee, so I need to ask you about the Girl Scout cookie tax bill. There is a page-full of entities that are exempt from sales taxes. And each year, there is a slew of 501(c)3s who want to be added to that list. That doesn’t work for me. That’s a really weird way of handling tax policy and the Girl Scouts are a good example. It’s pretty hard to tell them “no” because of $140,000 when we’re talking about giving $141 million away if we repeal personal property tax in Idaho. How long did you have to think about running for political office? In addition to my business as a wilderness guide and outdoor educator, I had been teaching a couple of years ago, both at Boise State and the College of Western Idaho. And that’s when the Legislature was pushing through the Students Come First initiatives. That’s when I decided to get involved politically. I didn’t think I would run for office, but I thought that I might help [Former Boise Democratic Rep.] Brian Cronin with his 2012 re-election campaign. But he decided not to run. Is that when you decided to run for his seat? I told him, “I’m not running unless you’re not running.”

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CITIZEN Did you like campaigning? I didn’t particularly like campaigning in the primary. In fact, two people I ran against in the Democratic Party were people I absolutely enjoy. It became a battle of who had the biggest and best ground game, but my team was able to knock on 7,000 doors in two months. It’s kind of like climbing a mountain. You don’t get to base camp and not go for the top of the mountain. 9

And sooner than later, you’ll need to start thinking about running for re-election in 2014. That’s what makes a second session—and that will be next year’s legislative session— the most uncomfortable session. This year, I believe every person in this building is working on the best possible policy they can. But when they’re concerned about being “primaried” in an election year and they’re on the right, they usually move further to the right. That’s when you see more conservative or Tea Party-based legislation come through. On the Democratic side, I don’t think we have that same consideration. I don’t think it benefits me at all to move to the left. Would I be surprised if you were holding a different political office 10 years from now? It’s funny that you would ask it that way. I’m single, although I wasn’t when I started this process.

Did politics cause you to lose a girlfriend? It did. She’s still a great friend. The truth is, campaigning is fairly intensive. One of the conversations we had was her asking me, “Where do you think you’ll be in 10 years?” And I said, “I don’t know.” I couldn’t even think about the next few months, let alone 10 years. Let’s just say there was a line in the sand there. So whom do you bounce your life up against? Whom do you trust outside of this building? I was a full-time instructor at Boise State for a few years, so I have a pretty significant network of friends there. And I have a fairly significant group of friends that I run with. Running is where you can debrief, reflect or vent. I even sometimes run with the husband of [Boise Democratic Rep.] Holli High Woodings. Holli and I ran our legislative campaigns together. On a scale of one to 10, how much do you love your work in the Legislature? You know, sometimes I receive an email or letter from a constituent that bad-mouths members of this body. I was even known to do that myself in the past. But once you’re in here, you realize that everyone here has a head and a heart. On the ideology front, it’s a 10. On the relationship front, sometimes it’s a seven.

RALL Politics is hard. Very few people undertake the lifetime of thinking and research or possess the inspiration it takes to come up with a transformative vision for an alternative future. Then there’s identity politics. Identity politics, the struggle by women, gays, ethnic minorities and so on against their privileged rivals in the economy and society, is a dead end. At best, movements based on identity politics grant special privileges to a tiny subset of traditionally oppressed demographic groups. Meanwhile, the overall hierarchical class structure remains intact. What Sandberg advocates is even less worthwhile than identity politics. She wants rat-race politics. “When a man is successful, he is liked by both men and women,” writes Sandberg. “When a woman is successful, people of both genders like her less … The solution is making sure everyone is aware of the penalty women pay for success. Recently at Facebook, a manager received feedback that a woman who reported to him was ‘too aggressive.’ Before including this in her review, he decided to dig deeper. He went back to the people who gave the feedback and asked what aggressive actions she had taken. After they answered, 6

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he asked point-blank, ‘If a man had done those same things, would you have considered him too aggressive?’ They each said no. By showing both men and women how female colleagues are held to different standards, we can start changing attitudes today.” Lean In fails because Sandberg wants to accelerate the “race to the bottom” behavior that has become standard in American business and politics. What we need to do is create a society in which everyone enjoys equal access to the good things in life. She is the virtual antithesis of Google’s “don’t be evil,” the company where she works has become one of the most culturally and economically destructive businesses in America by monetizing the death of a nation’s right to privacy. Facebook is so unaccountable that it doesn’t even provide a phone number for customer service. Facebook is the face of the New Economy. It sucks $5 billion a year out of the economy, yet it puts almost nothing back in. It employs fewer than 4,000 Americans. Even if Sandberg is successful with her Lean In Circles, she will have accomplished the same thing as Facebook. She will have made a tiny privileged group of elites richer— and 99 percent of America poorer. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


A FAIRLY ROBUST ONLINE CONVERSATION REGARDING LOCAL MUSIC VENUE THE SHREDDER BROKE OUT MAY 5, 2012. “We are starting an official boycott of The Shredder,” Bruce DeVino Jr., drummer in local band Killing for Peace, posted on Facebook. “The last thing Boise needs is another bar that refuses to pay local bands and charges local bands full price for a beer. … Who’s with us? Let’s shut him down.” DeVino then wrote that he was in the process of starting his own rival venue, one that not only would compensate all performers, but also offer assistance loading gear. The ensuing conversation ran to nearly 100 comments and included several ethnic slurs. But despite his personally motivated gripe, DeVino raised a consistent and relevant question venues face when booking performers: to pay or not to pay? WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

SURVEY SAYS: WE’RE BROKE

The average is also heavily skewed by the few performers who pull decent pay. An online survey by Boise Weekly of 40 More than two-thirds of respondents to local musicians and comedians found that 90 percent of them performed weekly or monthly, BW’s survey said they are paid less than $50 for a performance, with 35 percent reporting but only 30 percent of them were paid conless than $25 per performance. Only 9 percent sistently. Another 17.5 percent reported being reported making more than $200 at a gig. paid “most times,” and 52.5 percent reported And it isn’t just a local issue. Amanda Palmbeing paid only “sometimes” or “rarely.” er, singer for Boston band The Dresden Dolls, BW’s survey also found that the average ran head on into the controversy after placing amount performers earn from a gig is $81.58. an ad on her website searching for musicians to That may not sound so bad for what might be play in an orchestra at various tour stops. The seen as an hour of work, but that one hour of catch: Artists had to be willing to be paid in stage time can require several hours of equipbeer, hugs and high fives. ment loading time, thousands of dollars in When the ad received heavy criticism, equipment costs and hundreds of hours of she wrote a roughly 3,000-word practice time. blog post in her own defense. She Then it needs to be split detailed her financial history among the number of as a musician, including free performers on the bill, and “It’s sometimes messy, shows on beaches, richly often only after paying out sometimes not. Sometimes rewarding performances in whoever is working sound. symphony halls and how Then there is the possibilislightly risky and therefore, much money her band lost ty of a radius clause in perin my opinion, fun.” on tour opening for Nine formance contracts stating Inch Nails. a performer cannot book -Amanda Palmer, The Dresden Dolls “Good lord, were we other gigs within certain grateful to lose that money,” time frames or geographical she wrote. “It won us a huge distances. bunch of fans.” The bigger the gig, the bigger Palmer discussed paying her opening the clause. Though they generally pay acts by passing a hat, paying David Byrne of better, for large-scale festivals, performers can Talking Heads with beer—though she didn’t find themselves banned from stages across even know if he drank—and once rehearsing multiple states for months. and performing a guest spot gratis with the Performers used to be able to make up the band opening for her at a college show. difference selling merchandise but as digital “You don’t have to play for free,” she media has decimated record companies, so has wrote, “but I hope you won’t criticize me for it decimated the ability of independent acts to get by on the pay they receive for performances. wanting to.” Palmer then discussed how every

member of her band is paid differently, and how in larger markets, there wasn’t a supply of orchestra musicians who could fill the bill without payment. That’s why some would be paid high fives instead of fivers. She also pointed out how her tour opener was being paid to open, but not for the slots they were filling in the orchestra, and how they were traveling in her tour bus so as to avoid having to follow in a van and so on and so on. “Does the math all work out?” she wrote. “Who knows. But we’re all happy with the situation.” More than just a way to stretch a tour budget, Palmer envisioned it as a fun way to involve her audience more in her music, an idea she further fleshed out in a TED Talk called, “The Art of Asking.” “It’s sometimes messy, sometimes not. Sometimes slightly risky and therefore, in my opinion, fun,” Palmer wrote. After the incident was written about in everything from Spin to The New York Times, the Pitchfork-reading masses gathered at her gates. Palmer eventually backed down, made agreements to pay the musicians and pulled down her blog post. But Palmer’s management of a PR crisis didn’t change the underlying facts: Even at the highest levels, musicians and performers work in an industry in which there is no shortage of money being made, but there are few guarantees they will see any of it. Were other laborers in clubs such as servers and bartenders paid so randomly, the outrage might run red in the streets. But the underlying Bohemian ethos of working musicians keeps much of it in check. And then there is the spurious allegation of

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SOURCE: BOISE WEEKLY SURVEY

acts, one thing remains consistent: They’re mostly outside the traditional employer-employee model of bookkeeping. The result is what economists refer to as a shadow economy, a largely unregulated industry whose employers and laborers’ adherence to tax and labor law is as solid as Swiss cheese. Some do, some don’t. Either way, it’s less than ideal. Strange as it may sound, being an independent contractor is actually better for performers than being a time-card puncher. Burgoyne told BW that hiring artists as employees not only involves enough paperwork to discourage most clubs from ever having live performances, but performers would only be guaranteed minimum wage for the time they’re on stage. If they hit 40 hours a week, then they could be eligible for health care and SHADOW ECONOMY overtime, but performance jobs like that are Scraping by gig to gig—often ending up about as common as sasquatches. with nothing to show for it—is not ideal, but “I don’t think it’s unfair or exploitative for it’s all kosher from a legal perspective. people to give away their services to give it a Grant Burgoyne, employment attorney, try,” Burgoyne said. “I’m also not trying to Boise Democratic representative in the Idaho make it as a guitarist,” he added. Legislature and amateur guitarist, said Burgoyne compared it to the old that—to massively simplify complex adage that the best way to get a labor laws—pretty much the job is to volunteer. But he also moment a performer brands made his feelings explicit. him or herself with some“If there’s a cover charge, thing like a website or a “Local bands who think they it’s sure going to raise my Facebook page, he or she alarm if the performer is considered an indedeserve to get paid don’t isn’t getting paid. Performpendent contractor, not a deserve a crowd. ” ers deserve to be paid. standard employee. Especially when the people That means clubs can -Billie Joe Serio, local conertgoer hiring are making money off offer as much or as little as their services.” they like and performers can In many larger markets, take it or leave it—and it is clubs actually go one step further all perfectly legal. If the amount and reverse the process altogether, agreed upon happens to be a pitmaking performers pay for stage time through tance, or the numbers don’t work out quite as stage rental fees or “pay to play,” pre-sale planned. There isn’t much a lawyer or courts ticket schemes. In that respect, Boise percan or will do about it. formers can be better off than those in larger “There are certain things about the law markets. that are impractical to enforce,” Burgoyne Many performers turn to busking—street told Boise Weekly. Many lawyers aren’t likely to take on cases performing for tips—to make money. Howevin which less than $3,000 is in dispute and the er, the patchwork of regulations on everything from amplified sound to the legality of putting constant crossing of state lines that is part of out a hat—some cities consider this panhanworking as a performer means the law and dling—can make busking as much a challenge those practicing it differ from place to place. as performing in a venue. Though performers are paid in as many The most common forms of payment ways as there are types of club owners and “sellout” thrown at a performer who dares to sign a record or management contract. A panel at this year’s SXSW conference on constructive and disruptive technology in the music industry addressed that ethos fairly directly. “There’s a stigma musicians have about being on top of their shit,” said panelist Brooke Parrott, a musician and artist ambassador for touring website SongKick.com. She felt that stigma was holding back musicians’ ability to take control of their careers from an industry that has historically exploited them. The panels’ moderator, Jim Carroll, a journalist for the Irish Times, agreed. “That thing about not being a suit,” he said. “You have to get over that.”

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SOURCE: BOISE WEEKLY SURVEY

reported in BW’s survey were flat fees, cuts of the door and percentages of bar sales. Asked if they thought there was a better system, local performers gave BW a range of answers, from improved labor laws to promoters working harder to promote shows rather than relying on performers to do all the work. One respondent simply said “socialism.” It’s not as glib as it sounds. Some Scandinavian countries provide large cash subsidies to performers and venues, making it one of the most lucrative places to be a performer and an affordable place to be a music fan. “I think the door take and percentage of bar sales should both be tabulated and the performer should get whichever total is higher,” one survey respondent wrote. “I’d just be happy to get health insurance,” wrote another. But some also thought things were fine as they stand. “Every artist has the opportunity to negotiate fair compensation and can reject or accept every offer,” reported yet another survey taker.

THE BOTTOM LINE While the lack of data defining shadow economies makes them difficult to study, significant data has been gathered on the spike in the number of unpaid internships since the financial crisis in 2008. And on those, economists are quite clear: The ability to not pay people decreases the likelihood that employers will pay anyone. And it isn’t just employers taking advantage of people, it’s that non-paying jobs undermine job market stability. A recent article in The New York Times got to the heart of the issue when it delved into the business model of a Manhattan comedy club, The Upright Citizens Brigade. “How did the comedy juggernaut solve the intractable problem of live theater today, the inexorable rise of ticket prices? Simple: don’t pay performers for their work onstage,” read the article. By not paying performers, the very profitable for-profit club was able to undercut other venues on ticket prices and provide packed houses for performers. That sold performers on free appearances for self-promotional purposes. But it also left other Manhattan clubs that do pay struggling to fill more expensive seats to make the money required to pay perWWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

formers, thereby further restricting the number of paid opportunities. Unsurprisingly, it is a contentious model; but since all performers who take part in it do so by choice, even if grudgingly, it is completely legal. The effects of that case study are also reflected in a speech given by Recording Industry Association of America CEO Cary Sherman at the Personal Democracy Forum in June 2012. In the talk, Sherman cited a report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics that showed a 41 percent decline in the number of professional musicians since 1999. That statistic was challenged, however, by some tech folks as being not reflective of the changing revenue and professional definition models birthed by the Internet. Justin Cantrell, owner and booker at The Shredder, the venue at the center of the 2012 local controversy, generally pays bands from the cover charge at the door. The great hazard of that model, of course, is that there is no guarantee anyone will come through the door—especially on the off nights that bands often come through Boise. The Facebook post that began this article came from just such a night. “It was a Sunday night, they [Killing for Peace] didn’t bring a person through the door and it was a Portland [Ore.] band [headlining],” Cantrell said. And even when there are people coming through the door, Cantrell said his goal is to make sure the touring band gets enough cash to fill its gas tank. One of the best ways to do that is to keep the door price low; but that also means less money for the band. On the nights when he pays a flat fee for a band—which he does several times a month—it can run anywhere from $200 to $500. Most nights, Cantrell said a touring band can pull around $100 from the door and selling merch, but if he had to pay every band that played on his stage $100, “I wouldn’t be in business,” he said. Cantrell told BW the economics might be different if he sold liquor at The Shredder, but the expense of getting a liquor license in Boise makes that extremely difficult. A liquor license recently went up for auction in Garden City with a starting bid of $75,000. In

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Boise, licenses can reportedly cost more than $100,000 and require years of waiting. For Cantrell, who lives in a small rented house on a noisy downtown street and who built most of the interior of The Shredder by hand over the course of more than a year, that’s not a justifiable expense. Still, he is emphatic that The Shredder’s business model is not exploitative. “It helps them [bands] out in the long run,” he said. “If you’re a local musician and you’re not planning on touring at all, then the next best thing is to open up for touring bands. That’s the only way you’re going to get your name out there, other than pushing yourself online.” Billy Thornock, guitarist and singer for local thrash-metal band Krystos, agrees wholeheartedly. “Paying local bands is not a part of the business model for The Shredder,” he wrote on the Facebook thread that followed the controversy. “The Shredder is designed to support and pay the touring bands. Just how it should be. … As a local band playing at The Shredder, the opportunity is not in the pay, but in networking with signed and touring bands, developing a relationship with them, and they will support your Boise band on tour.” Thornock also gave several examples of how its policy of playing many an unpaid gig at The Shredder had helped Krystos on the road. “People do talk on tours,” Cantrell said. “A touring band meets up with another touring band and asks, ‘Hey, do you know any bands to play with in Boise, or a cool spot to play?’ If you’ve played with that band and you kind of sparked their interest, of course, they’re going to say something.” Cantrell is also quite clear that he has nothing against local pros who do demand a paycheck to play—even the ones who won’t play his club. “That’s fine,” he said. “That’s not what I’m trying to do.” Since he started out booking shows in his basement, Cantrell said that his primary goal is to push music and performers whose work he likes. “Even doing house shows, I’d get all these

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bands that are huge now,” he said. “I’m not trying to be some big rock club. I just enjoy good music.”

KEEPING ON KEEPING ON To the outside observer, it may seem dubious to build a business model on the idea of not paying certain workers in the operation. But there isn’t a coordinated effort by clubs or promoters to defraud artists. Most promoters arise from local music scenes and genuinely feel for performers who leave their club with a handful of bar peanuts. But it is a complicated industry with tight profit margins, lots of moving parts and no shortage of emotional entanglements. In short, it’s something of a clusterfuck. However, one club that does things differently is Humpin’ Hannah’s. Its longtime soundtrack, The Rocci Johnson Band, is made up of salaried subcontractors with weekly paychecks that earn them around $20,000 a year. “Anyone that has ever worked for me has always been fairly paid,” said bandleader Rocci Johnson. “But I do work you. I’m a boss.” Johnson isn’t kidding. Her band rehearses regularly and performs three nights a week, 49 weeks a year, almost, gasp, like a real job. Before Johnson and company got to this point though, they were embroiled in the same complicated and inconsistent system of payment. “We used to be a road band,” Johnson said. “At that time, in the ’80s, people wanted to pay you with coke and stuff like that.” Unsurprisingly, Johnson likes this better. “I’m not just a musician,”she said. “I’m a business person. So for me, it was better to have it be more formal. I keep all my receipts.” Paying gigs like Johnson’s are often the result of performers operating more like tradesmen. Though no one in her band is a member of a musician’s union, and no one that responded to BW’s survey was, either, that is the sort of treatment unions demand for their members. There is however a tradeoff that comes with that switch from art to craft. “There are drawbacks to it,” said Johnson. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


SOURCE: BOISE WEEKLY SURVEY

sheer economics mean she won’t be able to “I have to play ‘Sweet Home Alabama’ every stay in Boise, even if she wants to. The only night of my life.” way Davidson says she can truly make a living A tragic fate indeed. is to score a gig with a major orchestra like Another group of performers who are paid those in Boston, New York or San Franconsistently—but without having to endcisco—jobs which rarely open and sometimes lessly channel the ghost of Ronnie Van Zandt have upwards of 1,000 applicants when they dissing Neil Young—are orchestral players; do. however, with a financial pinch affecting For now, she expects to start bartending orchestras around the country, those artists again once Bogus Basin closes for the season. are facing complications emblematic of the One place she could apply is The challenges faced by the performance High Note Cafe, the new venue industry as a whole. like the one DeVino proposed A recent article in Boise in his online comment last Weekly (BW, News, “Rhapyear. (DeVino has no actual sody in Red,” Feb. 20, “There are drawbacks to financial or organizational 2013) examined how the it. I have to play Sweet relationship to the cafe.) Boise Philharmonic found The small eatery on itself so deep in red ink Home Alabama every night Fifth Street in downtown that it couldn’t afford to of my life.” Boise isn’t quite that pay the musicians required utopic, though. It regularly to play several Wagner -Rocci Johnson, The Rocci features acoustic acts on pieces it had scheduled. Johnson Band weekends, and has, on a few Even in good times, it occasions, moved out the tables doesn’t pay that well. to bring in a full-band electric perTo cover the bills, Kyla Davidformance. The louder and larger touring son, a 25-year-old Boise Philharmonic bands that play The Shredder aren’t likely to cellist, trades her tuxedo for a parka four days be found on High Note’s calendar. a week to work at Bogus Basin Mountain Payment-wise, staff at The High Note told Recreation Area. She has also taught music BW that on one or two occasions, musicians lessons, played private gigs and tended bar. who performed at especially profitable nights But just to keep her part-time gig as a got a cut of the bar, their ideal system. But for member of the Philharmonic, Davidson must the most part, performers have been paid in spend up to five hours a day practicing and food and beer if they have been paid. Unlike reviewing recorded pieces of music—all of it Amanda Palmer, The High Note Cafe has not unpaid. And that non-paying work is impactoffered to pay in hugs or high fives. ing her health. For Cantrell, the nature of the shadow “I have thoracic outlet syndrome,” said economy is such that sharing the wealth is Davidson. “Sometimes my fingers go numb. made impossible simply because there isn’t It’s a repetitive stress injury from practicing so enough of it to go around. much.” “You’d have to have a pretty good amount To complicate matters, despite performing of people even at $5 [at the door] to be able with the Philharmonic for six years, Davidson to pay a touring band, and then each local is not eligible for health insurance because band as well,” said Cantrell. “And lately, it’s she is paid per-service—despite the fact that been kind of so slow that you have to have the wear of practicing has required physical three locals for each touring band just to get a therapy for years “I’m still lucky enough to be under my par- crowd out.” And that is the heart of the issue: to pay ent’s health insurance plan, which has made everyone simply means less music. And no the therapy possible,” she said. “But that goes one, not the venue owners, the fans or the away in April.” musicians want that. So everyone keeps on Like so many talented and underpaid keeping on the best they can. people in Idaho, Davidson knows that the WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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B OIS E S TATE U NIVER S ITY

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events LAU R IE PEAR M AN

The Boise State University Big Band is big in sound, if not in numbers.

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY MARCH 20-21 jazzy GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL Shhhh, Dishcrawl is a secret, but a little birdy told us you might end up at Boise Fry Co.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 20 foodie DISHCRAWL BOISE Your daily bread is no mere mystery. How carbohydrates and proteins add up to the texture of steamed broccoli, the tenderness of a grilled salmon steak or the smell of fresh-baked lasagna is a phenomenon verging on the indescribable. In the eyes of the food connoisseur, meals are miracles. If you’re looking for culinary miracles and mystery, head to the Boise Dishcrawl at Bown Crossing. Wednesday, March 20, food enthusiasts meet at 6:30 p.m. at the group’s secret meeting place and get a taste of some of the East Boise food nook’s finest eateries. Tickets cost $39, and include food and tip—drinks are separate—and you’ll find out where to meet once you buy your ticket on the event’s website. While Dishcrawl doesn’t officially announce participating eateries until 48 hours ahead of the event, crawlers may end up feasting on authentic Neapolitan-style pizza at Flatbread Neapolitan Pizzeria, pigging out on piles of fries at Boise Fry Co. or satisfying sweet teeth at Powell’s Candy Shoppe by the end of the evening. Meeting new people and finding new favorite restaurants can be a challenge, and the gastronomic adventure brings people and communities together with regular events. Dine at the restaurants that define Boise while enjoying spring weather. Those with food restrictions and sensibilities delight in vegetarian options, though Dishcrawl may not be able to accommodate other dietary restrictions like gluten intolerance. Dishcrawl is a rain-or-shine event. Spring has sprung, but that’s no protection against rain, wind or chilly breezes, so dress for the weather. 6:30 p.m. $39. Bown Crossing, Bown Way, Boise, dishcrawl.com/boise.

FRIDAY MARCH 22 gala CONNECT THE PIECES 2013 GALA Just about everybody takes pleasure in being somebody else for a night.

At the Connect the Pieces 2013 Gala Friday, March 22, you can do just that. Guests are encouraged to don their most inventive Roaring ’20s attire and join guest speaker Ada County Sheriff Gary Raney for an evening of live comedy, live jazz music and more to raise funds for the prevention of prescription drug abuse in Boise.

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Though the attire will come straight from the 20th century, the theme for the night is The Roaring 2020s: A Vision for the Future, so come prepared to look forward while dressing from the past. The party gets going at the Riverside Hotel in Garden City at 6:30 p.m., with live tomfoolery from Tom

Famed jazz pianist Gene Harris was a longtime leading figure among America’s jazz legends, known for his classic tune, “Ode to Billie Joe.” Though Harris died in 2000, the festival created in his name has secured his legacy by bringing great musicians to Boise. This week, jazz lovers and big band performers reunite once more at the Gene Harris Jazz Festival, now in its 16th year, Wednesday, March 20, and Thursday, March 21. Jazz education activities, clinics and a roster of live music fill out both days of the festival, centered on a big band theme. That includes performances by 30 big bands made up of Idaho students, playing from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. both days in the Jordan Ballroom of the Student Union Building at Boise State. The Boise State Big Band performs at 8 p.m. Wednesday and 4 p.m. Thursday in the university’s Special Events Center. Visiting performers include trombonist Scott Whitfield and saxophonist Mark Taylor, playing as part of the headlining Gene Harris Festival Superband. Whitfield hails from Los Angeles and has worked with big bands, including the Toshiko Akiyoshi Jazz Orchestra. Taylor, who lives in Seattle, has played for audiences across the United States and Japan. Both join other members of the Superband at 8 p.m. Thursday, performing rarely heard charts from the Gene Harris Superband library. Just $15 nets jazz fans a one-day all-event pass, available from the festival’s website. Parking in the nearby Lincoln Garage is free with festival tickets. Wednesday, March 20, 8 a.m.-10 p.m.; Thursday, March 21, 8 a.m.-10 p.m. $15. Boise State University Student Union Building, 910 University Drive, Boise, geneharris.org.

Willmorth and Joe Golden of The Fool Squad, tunes of the swing variety from Frim Fram Four, games, speechifying by Raney and an auction. The benefit helps fund programs aimed at preventing prescription drug abuse among children. From 2000 to 2009, 1,244 Idahoans died of drug-related causes, and many of those deaths were the result of misuse or abuse of medications prescribed by a doctor. But, hopefully, programs supported by Connect the Pieces can help cut that number down, and all you have to do is party it up at the gala. 6:30 p.m. $75. Riverside Hotel, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-407-0455, connectthepieces.org.

SATURDAY MARCH 23 multi-disciplinary RIVER WHISPERS Art can’t thrive in a vacuum. At a concert, the term “stage performance” means much more than just the notes being played; at a gallery, the appreciation of art is enhanced when it’s presented in an inspiring space. And since spring means that Boise’s best gallery is outside among the budding trees and blooming flowers, art is heading outdoors. Saturday, March 23, San Francisco-based artist Peter Max Lawrence presents an afternoon of avant-garde

performances, contemporary art videos and music on the Boise Greenbelt between Capitol Boulevard and Walnut Avenue, starting at noon. River Whispers offers welcome arboreal refuge and thoughtful arts displays within easy biking distance of Treefort Music Fest. The performance includes readings by LaRece Egli, who will offer a spoken-word performance about “something shocking and outrageous and most likely about gun control and/or Jesus and queers.” You can also catch an Amero-Korean pop video project by Laura Hyunjhee Kim; a dance choreographed by Macklin Kowal and Peter Max Lawrence called “In the Middle of the Meadow, a WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


S TORY S TORY NIGHT

FIND

FIND: TREEFORT.BOISEWEEKLY.COM

What? This is the last Story Story Night of the season?

MONDAY MARCH 25 die verwandlung STORY STORY NIGHT: METAMORPHOSIS The art of storytelling is a craft as old as language itself. With such a long history, it shouldn’t surprise anyone that there are great storytellers among us, even if nowadays most people opt for print and digital media to spin their yarns. Still, spoken word has its charm. That’s why there’s Story Story Night: to present live storytelling for those of us who prefer to hear our tales among friends and in real time. Monday, March 25, attendees at the Rose Room will hear three storytellers divulge crazy, real-life happenings on the theme Metamorphosis: Stories of One Thing After Another. Afterward, audience members can drop their names in the hat to be called upon to share their own five-minute stories. The reading will be the last show for Story Story Night’s fall-winter 2012-2013 season, giving aspiring storytellers a final opportunity to present stories before the summer hiatus. If you’re interested in sharing, be sure to follow the rules of Story Story Night: stories should be true, told without notes, topical, have a progression from beginning to end, and run less than five minutes. Doors open at 6 p.m. and stories begin at 7 p.m. All are welcome to celebrate the end of the season at the after-party, hosted at the Red Feather Lounge and Bittercreek Ale House, where ticket holders can look forward to themed drink specials and the opportunity to continue the Story Story party long into the night. 7 p.m. $8-$10. The Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, storystorynight.org.

Patch of Daisies,” about the economies of exchange and intimate experience. There will be still more dance from Elizabeth McSurdy—known in Boise for her work with Balance Dance Company. Other presenters include Argentina-born documentary photographer Michelle L. Morby, performance artist Maryam Rostami and San Francisco poet Nico Peck.

S U B M I T

Promising theoretical and avant-garde entertainment and set along the picturesque Boise River—in which McSurdy will likely set her dance performance— River Whispers will deliver an introspective and thoughtful respite from the action downtown. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Boise Greenbelt, between Capitol and Walnut, petermaxlawrence.com.

Break into a random musical interlude with West Side Story.

MONDAY-THURSDAY MARCH 25-28 sharks vs. jets

Whether you’re catching your breath at the back of the club waiting for the next band to blow your mind, or nursing a coffee and crafting your daily plan of attack, check out treefort.boiseweekly.com for your one-stop shop for breaking Treefort news, show reviews, photo slideshows, band intertreefort.boiseweekly.com views and video hooliganry. Video hooliganry, you ask? Boise Weekly will pump out on-the-ground interviews with some of Treefort’s top bands direct from our Modern Hotel Treefortress. In addition to compiling all of Boise Weekly’s coverage into one place, our nifty new interface, treefort.boiseweekly. com, will allow you to scroll through social media highlights from across the Treefort Twittersphere, stream Boise Weekly’s Soundcloud playlists highlighting the day’s top bands, and peruse Treefort-related Instagrams. So instead of idly combing Twitter and Facebook in your downtime, head to treefort.boiseweekly.com for all the Treefort coverage you can cram into your cranium. —Tara Morgan

WEST SIDE STORY Shakespeare’s classic macabre love story, Romeo and Juliet, is not the only thing to find a new home in Arthur Laurents’ West Side Story. A revamped production of the Broadway play directed by David Saint removes some of the comedy of musical theatre and gives Puerto Rican characters a broadened identity and rapport with the audience by writing Spanish lines into the dialogue, giving it a more realistic and serious tone. The newest incarnation of West Side Story—the musical story of two lovers separated by warring gangs, the Sharks and the Jets—will run at the Morrison Center Monday, March 25, through Thursday, March 28. Before coming to Boise, this production ran on Broadway for nearly two years—longer than any of the play’s previous productions, including the original, which premiered in 1957. This toughened-up telling of West Side Story introduces changes to dialogue that keep the show from feeling dated. And with the addition of songs and lines delivered in Spanish, New York City and the Latino culture the musical depicts are much better represented. It’s not a full bilingual production, but even a hint of Spanish empowers the characters and changes the dynamic between the Sharks and the Jets, adding a new twist to a familiar story. Monday, March 25, 8 p.m.; Tuesday, March 26-Thursday, March 28, 7:30 p.m. $35-$55. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | 17


WEEK IN REVIEW JOS H GR OS S

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY MARCH 20 Festivals & Events JAPANESE CHERRY BLOSSOM FESTIVAL—Enjoy activities, pictures, songs, crafts and treats in the theme of the Japanese cherry blossom. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, adalib.org.

Chicago band The Noise FM rocked SXSW.

NEAR AND FAR The Boise Weekly editorial department was a ghost town at the tail end of last week. While part of our team made the trek to Sun Valley for the second annual Sun Valley Film Festival (see Review, Page 20), others journeyed to Austin, Texas, for the South by Southwest film and music festivals. While BW’s Josh Gross was checking out panels and exploring emerging bands at SXSW (see Noise News, Page 22), BW freelancer Marcia Franklin was sitting through a range of films, including Spark: A Burning Man Story, and TINY, which examines the so-called “tiny house” movement. Franklin also caught up with Peter Sagal from NPR’s news quiz show Wait Wait… Don’t Tell Me!, who talked about his new PBS television series on the Constitution and admitted to embracing over-zealous adoration from his fans. “I want to be a piece of meat, frankly,” said Sagal. “My dream is to have some beautiful young woman say to me, ‘Shut up, stop talking; I just want to look at you.’” For more coverage of SXSW and the Sun Valley Film Festival, head to boiseweekly.com. While some BWers kicked it out of town, others held down the fort. BW Staff Writer Andrew Crisp swung by the opening of Bill Carman’s new solo exhibit at Brumfield’s Gallery March 16 in Hyde Park. “In a small anteroom, Carman greeted both his Boise State students and fans as they asked questions and peered at the numerous pieces hung on the white walls,” wrote Crisp. “The small room was cozy enough for visitors to circle through the items on display, then turn to Carman and ask a question.” Carman’s work remains on display through April 28. Later that evening, BW’s Harrison Berry stopped by Ballet Idaho’s Studio Series, a collection of four original dances choreographed by five Ballet Idaho dancers. According to Berry, Ballet Idaho Artistic Director Peter Anastos prefaced the evening with a warning against the word “experimental,” preferring to describe what the audience was about to see as “people at the beginning of their careers and positions of leadership.” “The evening ended with the epic-length The Hills in Orange and Black by James Brougham and Daniel Ojeda, with a beautiful score composed by Ben Kirby,” wrote Berry. “The Hills opened with white-clad dancers observing the setting sun and growing tired and closed with a hearty cast leaping, indulging and cavorting in an exquisitely conceived shared-dream sequence titled ‘Fires in the Hills of Mars.’” —Tara Morgan

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Food & Drink DISHCRAWL SPRINGTIME FOODIE FUN—Sample food from a new lineup of local restaurants. Follow Dishcrawl on Twitter @DishcrawlBoise, and like them on Facebook to get all the latest updates. Email elisia@ dishcrawl.com with questions. See Picks, Page 16. 6:30 p.m. $40. Bown Crossing, Bown Street, Boise, dishcrawl.com/ boise.

Talks & Lectures BOISE COMMUNITY FORESTRY: TREE SELECTION AND PLANTING—Boise City arborist Ryan Rogers speaks about soil and environmental considerations when planting trees, and ensuring their long-term health and beauty. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Green SEED STARTING AND GARDEN PLANNING—Learn how to start your own vegetable plants and grow your own food. Topics include plant growth maintenance and planting locations. Call to register. 7 p.m. FREE. North End Organic Nursery, 2350 Hill Road, Boise, 208-389-4769, northendnursery.com.

Concerts GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL—Join the Boise State University Big Band, Mark Taylor, Aaron Miller and more for two days of jazz at the Boise State University Special Events Center and Student Union Building. See Picks, Page 16. 8 a.m.-10 p.m. $15. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive; Boise State University Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, geneharris.org.

MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Young designers, inventors and engineers bring their creations to life with Legos. Bring your own or some will be provided for you. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib. org. TEEN LEADERSHIP OPPORTUNITY—Help plan events by becoming a member of the Teen Advisory Board. Gain experience in program planning and satisfy volunteer hours for school. 4 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900, boisepubliclibrary.com.

Odds & Ends

On Stage

LADIES’ LOUNGE—Toss back some cocktails with the ladies of Boise Weekly and enjoy prize giveaways, drink specials and oh-so-much more. Visit BW’s promo page to get the 4-1-1. 5 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs. com.

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: ART KRUG—7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. KISS OR MAKE UP—This is a fast-moving comedy of mistaken identities, federal foolishness and desperate romance. Dinner at 6:15 p.m. Order dinner/show tickets at least one day in advance. 8 p.m. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

FRIDAY MARCH 22

LIQUID LAUGHS: KEITH BARANY—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Festivals & Events

THURSDAY MARCH 21 Festivals & Events PRESENTATION OF THE BOISE WIKI—Assistant Professor of History Leslie Madsen-Brooks unveils her public history project, the Boise Wiki. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-463, boise.localwiki.org.

On Stage BOISE: ITS HISTORY, PEOPLE AND PLACES—This children’s musical written by Marguerite Lawrence is performed by students from Morley Nelson Elementary, North Junior High, and West Junior High as a Boise 150 event. 7 p.m. FREE. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net.

BOISE FLOWER AND GARDEN SHOW—Shop for the latest in landscape design, garden art and decor, yard furniture, plants, decks, greenhouse and more while enjoying display gardens, educational and fun gardening seminars, orchid and bonsai displays, a silent auction of container gardens and more. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$8. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com.

Concerts BOISE PHILHARMONIC COPLAND AND PLANO—Featuring works by Aaron Copland, Bach and Schumann with guest pianist Robert Plano. See Listen Here, Page 24. 8 p.m. $23-$43. Northwest Nazarene University’s Brandt Center, 707 Fern St., Nampa, boisephilharmonic.org.

SECOND ANNUAL CONNECT THE PIECES GALA—Break out your zoot suits and flapper dresses and dance the night away. Featuring food and games. Entertainment by The Fool Squad and Frim Fram 4. Proceeds help educate Idaho children to prevent prescription drug abuse. See Picks, Page 16. 6:30 p.m. $75, $140 couples, $600 table of 10. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, connectthepieces.org.

WHITWORTH UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA—Enjoy a performace by the WUSO on its spring concert tour. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-3437511.

Food & Drink COMPLIMENTARY TASTINGS— Sample select wines and bistro menu options. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Pacific Rim, 2870 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-3375, pacificrimwinestop.com.

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: ART KRUG—7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: KEITH BARANY—Featuring Andrew Rivers. Two-for-one tickets. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Concerts GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL—See Wednesday. 8 a.m.-10 p.m. $15. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive; Boise State University Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, geneharris.org.

Kids & Teens Kids & Teens KIDS EXPERIENCE—A science and art program for children ages 6 and older held in The Secret Garden. 3 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org. K’NEX—Tackle projects with K’nex. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib. org.

RAM RESTAURANT KIDS NIGHT—Enjoy the magic, balloons, juggling and entertainment with Ty the Clown. $1 kids meals with purchase of an adult entree. 6-8 p.m. The Ram-Meridian, 3272 E. Pine, Meridian, 208-888-0314, theram.com. TEEN GAMING—Play tabletop games like Zombie Dice and Resistance, as well as games on the PS3 and Wii. 4 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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WELCOME

TREEFORT GUIDE As Treefort toddles into its second year, the young music festival has proved not only to be a unifying force for the local music community, but a legitimizing force outside Boise. As this issue hits stands, hundreds of bands will be winding their way to Boise from the South by Southwest music festival in Austin, Texas, and hundreds of local music fans will be restlessly counting down the hours until Treefort kicks off, Thursday, March 21. Last year, Treefort drew more than 130 bands and more than 3,000 people per day to eight venues clustered around downtown. This year, the festival has ballooned to include more than 270 bands and stretched its legs out into 13 venues, including the delightfully dated El Korah Shrine and the Sixth and Main nightclub China Blue. Treefort organizers will even shut down Grove

Street from 12th to 13th Street on Saturday, March 23, and Sunday, March 24, to accommodate the wandering hordes and 15 local and regional food trucks. Whereas last year’s festival buzzed with a bewildered, “we actually pulled this off” vibe, this year, Treefort has embraced its early success and is making confident strides forward. In addition to tacking on a film series at the Egyptian Theatre that runs Friday, March 22, and Sunday, March 24, and includes films like Dave Grohl’s Sound City (see Tab, Page 5), Treefort has greatly increased the offerings at its Alefort beer tent (see Food, Page 28), it has expanded its panel discussion series (see Tab, Page 7) and it will offer a sizeable merchant area called Bricofort (see Tab, Page 7) and even a food truck rally.

TREEFORT GUIDE

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VENUE MAP Last year, Boise Weekly reporters sweated it out at every venue for every show, making sure we were your comprehensive eyes and ears on the ground. This year, our coverage will be just as comprehensive, but a little more selective. In the following pull-out guide, you’ll find our staff picks for the bands we’re most psyched to see, along with our back-up plan for each day, should the top picks not pan out. And while you’re wrapped up in the thick of it, don’t miss BW’s blitz of on-the-ground multimedia coverage at treefort.boiseweekly.com. Our new, scrollable platform gives you easy access to videos, photo slideshows, social media updates and Instagram photos on your smartphone, tablet or laptop. —Tara Morgan

VENUE MAP

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THURSDAY

TOP TREEFORT

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LEARN

Welcome to Boise. The city has more than a few quirks, which you can soak in before the music fires up at the following five places, located in or near downtown. IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Idaho celebrates its territorial sesquicentennial (150th anniversary, that is) this year with an exhibit called Essential Idaho, filled with 150 unique artifacts. 610 E. Julia Davis Drive. BASQUE MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER: Boise is home to the largest Basque population in the United States, and there’s no better place to learn about their history than the Basque Museum. 611 W. Grove St. IDAHO STATE CAPITOL: One of Idaho’s most palatial buildings, the Statehouse stands at the terminus of Capitol Boulevard. 700 W. Jefferson St. THE SESQUI-SHOP: Take in the history of Boise’s music scene with an exhibit called Vibes: A Celebration of Music in Boise. 1008 W. Main St. IDAHO PENITENTIARY AND IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN: Boise’s 100-year-old penitentiary was a working prison up until the 1970s. Next door is a less spooky, expansive garden featuring native plants. 2355 and 2445 Old Penitentiary Road. —Andrew Crisp

BOISE WEEKLY’S DON’T MISS 6 P.M.

7 P.M.

SECOND CHOICE

THE LAST BISON THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 11-11:40 P.M. LINEN BUILDING, 1402 W. GROVE ST. Folk found a modern resurgence in bands like Mumford & Sons and Fleet Foxes, but seven-member acoustic outfit The Last Bison proves there’s still room for experimentation. Family and faith inform much of singer Benjamin Hardesty’s original songwriting, partly because his sister, Annah Hardesty, plays bells and percussion while the pair’s father Dan Hardesty (a former pastor) provides banjo, mandolin and guitar. Songs like “Switzerland” and “River Rhine” reveal a skilled repertoire on The Last Bison’s inaugural 2011 record, Quill. The band’s self-described “mountaintop chamber music” evokes comparisons to Southern peers Lost in the Trees, due to shared use of cellos, violins and organ. The band dropped its 2013 full-length album, Inheritance, March 5. While often ecclesiastical, the group’s real draw is its expertise. Violinist Teresa Totheroh, cellist Amos Housworth, drummer Jay Benfante and melodica player Andrew Benfante step in to add the final layers of the band’s rich sonic tapestry.

FINN RIGGINS

—Andrew Crisp

(6-6:40 P.M.)

(7-7:40 P.M.)

8 P.M.

8:30 P.M.

9 P.M.

KRIS DOTY

(8-8:40 P.M.)

(8-8:40 P.M.)

FOXYGEN

WOLVSE RPENT

(9-9:45 P.M.)

(9:10-10 P.M.)

10 P.M.

11 P.M.

MIDNIGHT

FOXYGEN THE LAST BISON (11-11:40 P.M.)

DEATH SONGS (11 P.M.-MIDNIGHT)

WHITE LUNG (MIDNIGHT-1 A.M.)

12:30 A.M.

SAGE FRANCIS (12:30-1:30 A.M.)

1 A.M.

VENUES

2 A.M.

3 A.M.

“White Lung is a punk band,” reads the band’s short bio. But the group isn’t so easily summed up. The mostly-female four-piece hammers out an angry flurry of quick guitars, fast drums and bass. Singer Mish Way’s abrasive yelling and commanding choruses lurch out of her with an in-your-face brashness. Bassist Grady Mackintosh and drummer Anne-Marie Vassiliou—who thrashes about with plenty of quick, two-four snare punk beats—also add energy to the quartet. Guitarist Kenneth William rounds out the group, who refer to themselves as “three wicked witches and a greedy miser.” White Lung inject so much venom in their music that all you can do is nod your head and succumb to an overwhelming urge to slam dance. —Jessica Johnson

SAGE FRANCIS THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 12:30-1:30 A.M. REEF, 105 S. SIXTH ST.

MT. ST. HELEN’S VIETNAM BAND

NEIGHBORS

WHITE LUNG THURSDAY, MARCH 21, MIDNIGHT-1 A.M. RED ROOM, 1519 W. MAIN ST.

EL KORAH SHRINE

RED ROOM

LINEN BUILDING

THE CRUX

NEUROLUX

REEF

PENGILLY’S SALOON

THURSDAY, MARCH 21, 9-9:45 P.M. EL KORAH SHRINE, 1118 W. IDAHO ST. Some say it was Sticky Fingers, some say it was Exile on Main Street and some say it was Some Girls. Regardless of the specific album, there’s little dispute that there was a point in the 1960s when The Rolling Stones forever defined the essence of rock ’n’ roll. That’s the point where indie rock band Foxygen still lives. More than just retro-sounding, Foxygen’s tunes are like a treasure trove of unreleased material from that era. The organs, reverb, simple drumming and dreamy pop structures lend Foxygen’s single “Shuggie” such a strong “As Tears Go By” vibe to it, it could almost pass for a B-side. Because the era and sound so defined “hip,” there will never be a time when there aren’t bands like Foxygen to mine—and cash in on—the material. The difference is that Foxygen truly nails the sound, instead of just being a sad imitation. —Josh Gross

Beneath Sage Francis’ brand of smart hiphop is a comedian’s timing and cultural literacy; but it’s his penchant for introspection that makes his raps sincere. Francis is a mix master who sets tracks to a studied variety of samples, from live jazz riffs to television shows to the sounds of industry. He opens songs with clips from pop culture rather than dropped beats. In the world of Sage Francis, he who makes the most references wins. The breadth of Francis’ engagement with music, film and literature is matched by the music’s vulnerability. Pleas for social justice, anxiety about 9/11 and satire about women’s status all appear next to examinations of infidelity, machismo and boredom. Francis is at his best when he’s being philosophical. Tracks like “Polterzeitgeist” and “Little Houdini” combine his abilities as a mixer and his natural wit. Francis’ latest album, Life (2012), is packed with sagacity, passion and a more polished tone than previous entries, while also expanding into new musical territory. Songs are recorded atop jazz, ambient noise and looped psychedelic sounds. —Harrison Berry

4 A.M.

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LOCALS NOT TO MISS Those who don’t spend every weekend in the local clubs, but were drawn to Treefort by the names with top billing, should know that Boise boasts a lot of lesser-known bands that shouldn’t be missed. Here are a few of Boise Weekly’s favorites appearing at Treefort this year.

SNEEZZBOLE FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 9-9:40 P.M. RED ROOM, 1519 W. MAIN ST.

LAKEFRIEND THURSDAY MARCH 21, 7-7:40 P.M. RED ROOM, 1519 W. MAIN ST.

There’s no competition for Boise’s weirdest act. Hands down, it’s the Sneezz. Unless, that is, there is another socially awkward, shirtless fat man who alternates between Primus-style slap bass and throwing his instrument to the stage to writhe atop it like a beached whale—all while singing punk-y songs about working at WalMart.

Lakefriend calls itself a party-rock band. Thankfully, that definition has nothing to do with LMFAO’s “Party Rock Anthem.” Imagine the turbocharged dual lead style of Iron Maiden played by jangly indierock guitars instead of overdriven full-stack monsters.

MAGIC SWORD SATURDAY, MARCH 23, 1111:50 P.M. CHINA BLUE MAIN ROOM, 100 S. SIXTH ST. Magic Sword make electronic music so epic and fantastical that it is best described as the soundtrack for unicorn jousting. If you don’t want to surf a rainbow wearing a loincloth by the end of Magic Sword’s set, you’re doing it wrong.

RED HANDS BLACK FEET FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 11-11:40 P.M. THE CRUX, 1022 W. MAIN ST.

HOLLOW-WOOD THURSDAY MARCH 21, 8-8:40 P.M. LINEN BUILDING, 1402 W. GROVE ST.

JAY SA EN Z

Acoustic folk music is often based on minimalism. But Boise’s Hollow-Wood takes things in another direction. The indie folk band’s material could get by just fine with frontman Adam Stip’s soft croon and tender lyrics. But Hollow-Wood packs in percussion, choir-like harmonies and a high school’s supply of team spirit until simple ballads become powerful, buoyant hymns.

Do you like epic instrumental postrock? Eight-minute builds of atmosphere and melody as layered as a cinematic plot that crescendo into a firestorm of guitar wizardry? If you don’t, give Red Hands Black Feet a shot and it might change your mind. Full disclosure: The band’s drummer is currently interning at BW, but we were writing about its epicness long before she applied.

GRANDMA KELSEY SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 4-4:40 P.M. THE CRUX, 1022 W. MAIN ST. With a siren’s voice and an intoxicating stage presence, folk singer Grandma Kelsey ranks alongside the foothills and geothermal power as one of Boise’s greatest natural treasures. Treefort is the last chance to see her for a while, as she’s hitting the dusty trail for an open-ended trip to see what’s out there in the world.

SUN BLOOD STORIES HEY V KAY FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 8-8:40 P.M. THE CRUX, 1022 W. MAIN ST. This band makes top-notch electropop with the dark synth tones and dance beats of The Knife beneath singer Karen Havey’s husky blues croon.

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SATURDAY MARCH 23, 1:15-2 P.M. MAIN STAGE, 1201 W. GROVE ST. Imagine Bobbie Gentry’s haunting vocals on the classic “Ode to Billie Joe,” but with the instrumental guts of The Black Keys. Then dress the whole thing up in face-paint and add percussion so vicious that it’s a rare tambourine that survives a whole gig. That’s Sun Blood Stories.

CUSTOMARY SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 8-8:40 P.M. NEUROLUX, 111 11TH ST. Boise’s Customary has made a name for himself in the local hiphop scene with catchy rhymes and well-made videos. For his performance at Treefort, he’s adding something new: a live band.

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FRIDAY

TOP

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COFFEE

K YLE JOHNS ON

TREEFORT

Need a jolt of caffeine to get you going before the Treefort tornado whirls through town again this evening? Here are Boise Weekly’s Top Five coffee spots in the downtown area. FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE: It’s all about the house-roasted espresso at this funky and friendly Boise favorite. 500 W. Idaho St. THE CRUX: Snag a cup of Stumptown or a cold beer at this all-ages hangout. 1022 W. Main St. ALIA’S COFFEEHOUSE: This quiet hideaway has plenty of comfy seating, Wi-Fi and savory snacks to recharge your batteries. 908 W. Main St. THE EDGE AT THE RECORD EXCHANGE: Sip a latte and browse the record store’s bargain shelves of used vinyl. 1105 W. Idaho St. DAWSON TAYLOR: Grab a mug and perch on the patio at this hip Eighth Street coffee house. 219 N. Eighth St. —Tara Morgan

BOISE WEEKLY’S DON’T MISS 4:45 P.M.

SECOND CHOICE

DEEP SEA DIVE R (4:45-5:30 P.M.)

5 P.M. 5:30 P.M.

PICKWICK 6 P.M.

8 P.M. 8:30 P.M.

JAPANTHE R FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 11-11:40 P.M. LINEN BUILDING, 1402 W. GROVE ST.

Pickwick’s star has been on a steady rise during the past year. And it’s not random. After tossing out all their material to reboot themselves in 2010, the Seattle indie rockers found themselves pulled into the burgeoning neo-soul movement. And it was a good move. Slap a beard and a set of hipster glasses on Wilson Pickett, then toss in a healthy dose of Northwest angst and you end up with Pickwick. The band keeps the humming organs, gritty vocal croons and jiggling tambourines, but it dabbles more in minor keys than the crew at Stax Records, adding a more complex, bluesy edge to its soul. Pickwick also bring high energy to their live shows—which often end with a stage full of volunteer percussionists, or frontman Galen Disston crowd surfing. Energized by their new sound, Pickwick released a series of 7-inch records, gaining enough buzz to turn the ear of Seattle taste-making radio station KEXP, which featured the band several times in its live performance series. This year marks the much-anticipated release of Pickwick’s debut full-length album, Can’t Talk Medicine.

Cavalierly tossed into genres like art rock, noise and punk by confused critics, Japanther is an art project formed by Ian Vanek and Matt Reilly, whose antics have not been exclusive to the stage. The duo has performed with synchronized swimmers, marionettes, shadow puppets and BMX bikes. From “First of All,” which sounds like an updated Ramones track, to jingly intros and deeply distorted guitar on “Lil Taste,” the group is as catchy as any pop-punk band. But from the simple, droning three-note songs to the stage act, Japanther is anything but. The group’s penchant for misleading and ironic intro samples preceding thunderous punk is a nod to Vanek and Reilly’s art school roots—they both attended the Pratt Institute in Brooklyn—without undercutting the band’s gritty garage punk, throaty pop and modish synth. Warm, driving guitar is possibly the only thing every song has in common. Japanther is defined by their fluency and playfulness in multiple genres; rather than avoiding categories, they fiddle and experiment with them.

(5:50-6:40 P.M.)

—Josh Gross

DELICATE STEVE (7-7:50 P.M.)

AAN (8-8:40 P.M.)

—Harrison Berry

ALISON SCAR PULLA

7 P.M.

PICKWICK FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 5:50-6:40 P.M. MAIN STAGE, 1201 W. GROVE ST.

WAX IDOLS (8-8:40 P.M.)

SHARON JONES (8:30-10 P.M.)

9 P.M.

BLASTED CANYONS

10 P.M.

ROSE WINDOWS

11 P.M.

JAPANTHE R

MIDNIGHT

(10-10:40 P.M.) (11-11:40 P.M.)

TYPHOON (11 P.M.-MIDNIGHT)

SLOW MAGIC (11:40-12:25)

THE THE RMALS (MIDNIGHT-1 A.M.)

12:30 A.M. 1 A.M.

(9-9:40 P.M.)

GOLD PANDA (1-1:55 A.M.)

VENUES

2 A.M. 3 A.M.

LINEN BUILDING

CHINA BLUE

NEUROLUX

MAIN STAGE

4 A.M.

4 | TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2013 | BOISEweekly

ROSE WINDOWS FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 10-10:40 P.M. NEUROLUX, 111 N. 11TH ST. Rose Windows’ debut album, The Sun Dogs, recalls verdant gardens and lazy afternoon naps. Tumbling flutes and slowly strummed guitars give the LP’s title track some hippie flavor, accentuated by Rabia Qazi’s deep, resonating vocals, but the aesthetic and mild tempo can’t hide the band’s tight vocal harmonies, instrumental competence and brilliant engineering. The brainchild of songwriter, maestro and guitarist Chris Cheveyo, Rose Windows formed in 2010 in Seattle when Cheveyo tired of the limitations of his heavy post-rock project. Rose Windows, which recently signed to Sub Pop, has an expansive sound that comes from seven members harmonizing and gracing songs with organ, flute and piano. On “Summertime”—a song worthy of a Wes Anderson soundtrack—church organ and synthesizer are the backbone of a prolonged intro that pivots into a drum-driven track featuring Qazi’s lyrics, drenched in Pacific Northwest lassitude.

SLOW MAGIC FRIDAY, MARCH 22, 11:40 P.M.-12:25 A.M. CHINA BLUE LOUNGE ROOM, 100 S. SIXTH ST. It’s easy to picture a Slow Magic dance party like an underwater film sequence—languid, rubbery arms snake in slow motion as legs kick up watery currents. In fact, most tracks and remixes by the dreamwave electronic act, which describes itself as “music by your imaginary friend,” feel like they were recorded underwater. Slow Magic’s remix of Bon Iver’s “Hinnom, TX” gives Iver’s spooky, echoing lilt an upbeat-yet-still-molasses-slow makeover. Other tracks like “On Yr Side” feature a dreamy echo and thumping beats with ethereal, repetitive vocals. Slow Magic joins fellow electronic acts CC/NN, RUMTUM and qp Friday, March 22, on China Blue’s second story, bluelit dance floor, which might be the closest you’ll come to an underwater dance party at this year’s festival. —Tara Morgan

—Harrison Berry WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | 1


2 | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | 3


FULL SCHEDULE THURSDAY, MARCH 21

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4 | MARCH 20â&#x20AC;&#x201C;26, 2013 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


UNOFFICIAL GOINGS- ON In addition to the official Treefort events swarming downtown Boise Thursday, March 21-Sunday, March 24, a cluster of unofficial goings-on will buzz around the periphery of the fest, adding another dimension to the experience. The Record Exchange will once again host free, all-ages in-store performances each day of Treefort. The bands playing will only be revealed the day of the performance through the store’s website and social media. “If someone’s under 21, or there are two bands they want to see playing at the same time, in-stores are a way to see both bands,” marketing and promotions director Chad Dryden said. Boise Rock School will give the festival kid-friendly appeal with performances by BRS bands, along with educational seminars from Treefort acts at its facility at 1404 W. Idaho St. Sam Cooper & Friends, House of Light and Tea Cozies play Saturday, March 23, following a noon performance by BRS bands. On Sunday, March 24, Emily Wells will perform from 1:30-2:30 p.m. and discuss her use of looping guitars. “Our hope in doing these concerts is to expose more of our students to Treefort and touring musicians, in general,” said BRS co-owner Ryan Peck. What Boise Rock School is doing for children, Sammy’s, located at 509 W. Main St., is doing for Boise’s punk scene with Treehouse of Horrors (see Listen Here, Page 23). Treehouse is an independent festival running Thursday, March 21, through Saturday, March 23, featuring local hardcore and punk acts like Upinatem, Piranhas and Black Bolt. The doors open nightly at 9 p.m. and admission is free. “There’s a lot of bands out there that could use some attention,” Sammy’s bartender and booker Ryan Sampson said. —Harrison Berry

MUSIC AND MOVIES UNITE AT TREEFORT FILM SERIES

TOP TREEFORT

:

LATE NIGHT BITES While most restaurant kitchens in Boise yawn shut by 10 p.m., there are a few spots that sling fare into the wee hours. Here are five of BW’s favorites. BAR GERNIKA: This tiny Basque Block staple offers perfectly grilled tuna melts, heavenly pork solomo sandwiches and melt-in-your-mouth croquetas until 12 a.m. on Fridays and Saturdays. Wash it back with a brew from one of the rotating taps. 202 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-344-2175. AZTECA FOOD TRUCK: Get adventurous with a plate of lengua (beef tongue) tacos from this Mexican food truck, at the corner of Sixth and Grove streets until late on the weekends. SOLID: This BODO institution serves eats Sunday-Thursday until 12 a.m., and FridaySaturday until 4 a.m. It also offers a late-night happy hour with half-price beer, wine and wells from 10 p.m.-12 a.m. 405 Eighth St., 208-3456620. PIE HOLE: These eccentric dives toss slices to the staggering masses Sunday-Thursday until 3 a.m., and Friday-Saturday until 4 a.m. But beware: you will wait in line. 205 N. Eighth St., 208-344-7783; 1016 Broadway Ave., 208-4242225.

Clarke Howell is a double-threat at Treefort. In fact, a scant few minutes after his film Bands of 208 wraps at the Egyptian BITTERCREEK ALE HOUSE: This Theatre Sunday, March 24, he’ll hoof it over to The Crux, where gastropub offers a late night he’ll perform a solo gig as Clarke and the Himselfs. menu Fridays and Saturdays “I always had a fascination with film,” said the Boise native, from 10 p.m. to midnight, who splits his time between his second home of New Orleans. “I with items like poutine and really picked up film and music about the same time.” buffalo wings, along with rotating drink specials. 246 N. Bands of 208 is a North End-centric documentary, chronicling Eighth St., 208-345-1813. the house show scene at three locations: Grandma’s House, Baby Sale and the 208 House. The film features the music of La —Tara Morgan Knots, Vagerfly, Sword of a Bad Speller and a dozen more. “It was the summer of 2009 and I recognized there was something special happening,” Howell said. “Boise’s house music flourishes in waves; 2009 was not the first time that it ever happened. I’m sure it happened in the late ’80s and again in the ’90s, but it flourished again in 2009, incredibly so.” Howell said his doc’s inspiration transcends Boise. “It illustrates a moment of time, an explosion of creativity in a small town,” he said. “It’s sort of a time capsule.” Admission to the films is free to Bands of 208 is one of two films that Treefort pass holders and $5 for Howell will screen as part of the Treefort others at the Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St. Film Series—a slate of films and videos splashing the Egyptian Theatre’s big screen Friday, March 22, and Sunday, March 24. Howell’s most recent directorial effort, The Taxpayers Go To Florida, follows Portland, Ore.based band The Taxpayers on its escape from a Pacific Northwest winter to a 10-day crawl up and down the Sunshine State. “They’re a really genuine group and my goal was to capture them in the most entertaining documentary I could make,” said Howell. Other entries include director Zach Voss’ Road to Treefort series and Dave Grohl’s Sound City, which visits a dilapidated recording studio that once hosted Fleetwood Mac, Metallica, Tom Petty and others. —George Prentice WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2013 | 5


SATURDAY

BOISE WEEKLY’S DON’T MISS YOGAFORT

DANNY K R U G

9 A.M.

SECOND CHOICE

(9-10 A.M.)

10 A.M. 11 A.M. NOON 1 P.M. 2 P.M.

PANEL: TO KICKSTART OR NOT TO KICKSTART (11 A.M.-NOON)

SUN BLOOD STORIES (1:15-2 P.M.)

PE RFORMANCE: NO GOOD, SO GOOD (1-1:10 P.M.)

4 P.M. 4:30 P.M.

LIONSWEB (5-5:40 P.M.)

5:30 P.M.

EL TEN ELEVEN 6 P.M. 7 P.M. 8 P.M. 8:30 P.M.

(5:45-6:30 P.M.)

YACHT (7-7:50 P.M.)

SW/MM/NG (7-7:40 P.M.)

Y LA BAMBA

Y LA BAMBA

MAN CUB

11 P.M.

(11 P.M.-MIDNIGHT)

WIDOWSPEAK SHIGETO

MAGIC SWORD (11-11:50 P.M.)

SSSSSNAKE

(MIDNIGHT-12:50 A.M.)

(11:50 P.M.-12:15 A.M.)

K. FLAY

SHLOHMO

12:30 A.M.

VENUES

4 A.M.

—Josh Gross

(9-9:40 P.M.) (10-10:40 P.M.)

3 A.M.

—Andrew Crisp

THE WALKMEN

10 P.M.

2 A.M.

Kristian Dunn and Tim Fogarty, the guys behind El Ten Eleven, call themselves a power duo. But a better name might be a rocktopus, because the instrumental electrodance rock magic the two blast out requires perfect synchronization of all eight of their combined limbs. Dunn uses nearly a dozen effects pedals and a looper to lay down multiple layers of finger-tapping and rock riffs from his double-neck guitar while Fogarty moves back and forth between electronic and acoustic drums, syncing perfectly with Dunn’s live-loops, even when they stray into difficult time signatures. El Ten Eleven’s technical precision is only outdone by how catchy its songs end up sounding, and how much fun El Ten Eleven makes them on stage with its light show. The band recently had to cancel a string of dates after a skiing accident in Colorado in which Dunn broke several ribs and punctured a lung, but they’re now back at the top of their game and will be giving Treefort’s main stage a helluva treat.

Widowspeak craft dreamy folk ballads that evoke a sense of fleeting nostalgia that’s difficult to pin down. Channeling influences from Neil Young to Wings, Molly Hamilton’s haunting, distorted vocals and Robert Earl Thomas’ twanging guitar add elements that put a timeless spin on the duo’s songs. Hamilton and Thomas recorded their 2013 full-length album, Almanac, in a century-old barn in the Hudson River Valley, adding a New York mysticism to the group’s Pacific Northwest sounds. Hamilton told Brooklyn-based indie label Captured Tracks that the album “is like moving into a big old house in the woods with sheets covering all the furniture, and then taking all the sheets off.” A standout track on the new album is “Locusts,” which is fueled by an unrepentant bass line laced with glimmering bits of sitar. In a music video for the song, the pair play in black-and-white, opposite go-go dancers, on a set based on an M.C. Escher lithograph.

(8-8:20 P.M.)

(8:30-10 P.M.)

1 A.M.

EL TEN ELEVEN

PE RFORMACE: TMP SPURBAN

9 P.M.

MIDNIGHT

SATURDAY, MARCH 23, 11 P.M.-MIDNIGHT. NEUROLUX, 111 N. 11TH ST.

SATURDAY, MARCH 23, 5:45-6:30 P.M. MAIN STAGE, 1201 W. GROVE ST.

3 P.M.

5 P.M.

WIDOWSPEAK

(12:30-1:30 A.M.) EL KORAH SHRINE LINEN BUILDING NEUROLUX THE CRUX

(1-1:50 A.M.)

REEF CHINA BLUE MAIN STAGE

6 | TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2013 | BOISEweekly

SATURDAY, MARCH 23, 9-9:40 P.M. NEUROLUX, 111 N. 11TH ST. Portland, Ore.’s Y La Bamba has all the familiar indie folk flourishes that have become a staple of the genre—rattling tambourine, rousing multi-part harmonies, handclaps, even an airy accordion thrown in for good measure. But it’s Mexican-American singer Luz Elena Mendoza’s soaring vocals interwoven with Spanish lyrics that sets the group apart from its Northwest peers. On the band’s new album, Court the Storm, the group traipses further into the folk field on delicate, echoing tracks like “Hughson Boys,” before switching it up with lush Latininfluenced compositions like “Bendito” and “Como Ratones.” Produced by Grammy Award-winning Los Lobos member Steve Berlin, Court the Storm also features guest vocals from indie royalty Neko Case on the album’s title track. When the band makes its way back to Boise for Treefort Music Fest, don’t miss its haunting new track, “Idaho’s Genius,” a sparse, heart-wrenching tune that might just become a Treefort anthem, as it swells into a chorus of “we are armies of active minds.” —Tara Morgan

SHIGETO SUNDAY, MARCH 24, MIDNIGHT-12:50 A.M. CHINA BLUE MAIN ROOM, 100 S. SIXTH ST. Shigeto means “to grow bigger” in Japanese, and it’s both Zach Saginaw’s middle name and his grandfather’s name. Saginaw pays tribute to that side of his heritage with Japanese influences woven throughout his electronic compositions. After cutting his teeth on the drums, including a stint as drummer in the band School of Seven Bells, Saginaw turned his attention to electronic production. At universities in London and New York City, Saginaw perfected his unique brand of electronica, learning to loop original recordings of strings, acoustic guitar and other analog instruments. Found sounds—from people yelling on the street to falling rain to banging items in his kitchen—add an extra layer that is fused with a driving bass line and vocal recordings. On “Ann Arbor Part 3 & 4” from Shigeto’s 2012 release, Lineage, a piano gives way to tinkling wind chimes— it’s a complex track that feels as delicate as porcelain. During live performances, Shigeto flails at a drum set while simultaneously manipulating an array of synthesizers. What may be subdued or fragile on a recording grows large enough live to encompass the whole stage. —Andrew Crisp WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


TREEFORT PANELS EXPLORE INDUSTRY HOT TOPICS Aspiring musicians and interested fans can learn the fundamentals of making a music video, the ethical dilemmas of signing a contract and many other invaluable basics at this year’s Treefort Music Fest panel series. “For the panels, I envision a 20-year-old kid who likes to play in his or her band and doesn’t know where to go from there,” said Emily Walton, executive director at the Idaho Civic Engagement Project and a volunteer at Treefort. Walton collaborated with Saturday, March 23-Sunday, March 24, festival difree, various times. rector Eric Gilbert and THE WATERCOOLER IDEASTUDIO, 1401 W. Idaho St., responded treefortmusicfest.com/ to feedschedule/panels. back from last year’s panels to craft the lineup. Each panel will be about an hour long, with time after for an informal gathering and a Q&A. One of this year’s panels, To Kickstart or Not To Kickstart: Crowd-Source Funding, will explore the use of crowd-funding websites for music projects. “Kickstarter has been a really big thing in Boise. … The panelists will probably be a bit more biased toward what works, because it worked for them,” said Walton. “We are in the process of getting a panelist who doesn’t agree with it.” Another new panel, The Politics of Music, focuses on how musicians have influenced politics and what local musicians can do to get their voices heard at the state capitol. “It’s about what we can do as a local community to help our elected leaders know what we want from them,” said Walton. “We are working on getting a City Council member on this panel to talk about the value of Treefort and what it can bring, and what music in general does for a culture.” Other topics include music publishing and licensing, as well as tour management and how to build a local music scene that includes underage music lovers. “One of my big inspirations was that I wanted people in our community to see ways they can get involved or connect with other people that care about the things they care about,” said Walton. Admission is free and open to the public, although space is limited. —Sam Alderman

TOP TREEFORT

:

BRUNCH Nothing soaks up a night of sin like a stiff screwdriver and a couple eggs swimming in butter. Here are some of Boise Weekly’s favorite spots to shake off that raging headache and power through the morning like you raged through the night before. RED FEATHER LOUNGE: Snag a dark upstairs booth, where you can shed your sunglasses and add a few pounds with porky eggs rancheros and a haystack of truffled shoestring fries. 246 N. Eighth St., 208429-6340. GOLDY’S BREAKFAST BISTRO: Still in a hollandaze from last night? This beloved Boise breakfast spot ladles the yellow magic over its famous eggs benny, available in full or half orders. But beware of the line, which snakes out the door most days. 108 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-345-4100. LE CAFE DE PARIS: For brunch fare with a French flair, grab a spot at this downtown cafe. Don’t miss out on the $6 bottomless mimosas. 204 N. Capitol Blvd., 208-336-0889. THE CAPRI: Don’t expect anything fancy at this favorite greasy spoon. Gravy-smothered chicken fried steaks and cheesy American omelets abound. 2520 W. Fairview Ave., 208-342-1442. BERRYHILL AND CO./BACON: Whether you hit up the $16 Sunday brunch buffet at the classy Berryhill and Co., or snag a plate of pork at Berryhill’s sister joint, Bacon, either place is sure to scratch your brunch itch. Berryhill and Co., 121 N. Ninth St, Ste. 102, 208-387-3553; Bacon, 915 W. Idaho St., 208-3873553. —Tara Morgan

MERCHANTS SLING THEIR WARES AT BRICOFORT Downtown boutique Bricolage has curated a special pop-up mercantile for Treefort, which will highlight a rotating collection of art, craft and vintage vendors. The local lineup consists of Banana Ink’s screenprinted posters from shows put on by Duck Club Presents and Credenda Studios, Bella Grano’s handmade cycling and lifestyle accessories, Gypsy Lovers Designs’ leather This collective of creatives will accessories, Miss Courageous’ pop culture take over 12th and Grove streets jewelry and Burly Beard’s bearded beanies. near the Treefort Main Stage, Bricofort will give attendees the chance opposite from Alefort, Saturday, March 23, and Sunday, March to snag some out-of-state swag from a few 24, from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. different shops. Cairo, a retail and event space in Seattle, will offer vintage clothing and designer jewelry; the Community Closet of Livingston, Mont., will bring a collection of low-cost, pre-owned clothing and household items, with all proceeds going to charity. Denik, out of Salt Lake City, will be back selling custom notebooks, sales of which support both artists who design the covers and help build schools in Africa. —Jessica Johnson WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2013 | 7


SUNDAY TOP

TREEFORT KATHRYN ALBERTSON PARK: Boise has a lot of parks and a lot of geese. But only one of its parks is actually intended for geese. Just over the Boise River, you’ll find Kathryn Albertson Park, a lovely pond-laden nature reserve used as nesting grounds for migratory waterfowl. And March is right about when the eggs start hatching, making it full of painfully adorable baby ducks and geese. 1001 N. Americana Blvd.

:

GET AWAY

tacos or a beer, maybe go for a quick hike up the hump at Camel’s Back Park. Zen achieved. 13th and Brumback streets. BOISE GREENBELT: Southwestern Idaho may be heavy on the plains and desert, but you wouldn’t know it from the Boise Greenbelt. The 20-mile path that runs along the Boise River is lush with greenery and lined with cool, pleasant places to sit for a spell by the river.

HYDE PARK: Just a mile up 13th Street from downtown—right at the gateway to the Boise Foothills—you’ll find the Hyde Park neighborhood, a cluster of shops and cafes lined with trees. Grab a coffee, peruse the used book store, have some

ROSE GARDEN AT JULIA DAVIS PARK: Let’s be honest. After spending time cooking in a metal box on the freeway, touring bands don’t always have the opportunity to shower. If you want to smell a little nicer,

BOISE WEEKLY’S DON’T MISS

perhaps the rose garden in Julia Davis Park is the way to go. Located just behind Boise Art Museum, it’s got benches, a gazebo and a nearby thicket of trees where you can lounge in the shade. 700 S Capitol Blvd. TABLE ROCK: The best view in the city can be had from Table Rock, a scenic hike up the Foothills, just outside of downtown. If you need to stretch your legs, look out on the city and enjoy some nature, Table Rock is the way to go. Don’t mind the giant cross on top. That’s just our city-sized sundial. 2445 Old Penitentiary Road. —Josh Gross

PANEL: POLITICS OF MUSIC

NOON

PANEL: BUILDING A LOCAL MUSIC SCENE

(11 A.M.-NOON)

(12:30-1:30 P.M.)

2 P.M. 4 P.M. 4:30 P.M.

ALEFORT: FOOD & BEE R PAIRING (2 P.M..)

GRANDMA KELSEY

SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 6:45-7:35 P.M. MAIN STAGE, 1201 W GROVE ST.

YOUTH LAGOON (5:30-6:15 P.M.)

EDMOND DANTES

6 P.M. 7 P.M. 8 P.M. 8:30 P.M. 9 P.M. 10 P.M. 11 P.M.

DAN DEACON

(6-6:40 P.M.)

(6:45-7:35 P.M.)

SOLOMON’S HOLLOW (8-8:40 P.M.)

SHY GIRLS (9-9:40 P.M.)

EMILY WELLS (10-10:40 P.M.)

GRASS WIDOW

CAMPE R VAN BEETHOVEN (9-9:50 P.M.)

BUILT TO SPILL COVE RS

Over the last decade, Baltimore electronic virtuoso Dan Deacon has made a name for himself among the underground music set. Lauded for his 2009 release Bromst, Deacon launches headlong into crashing electro-pop sounds on his most recent album, America. Released by Domino Records in 2012, America lives up to its name as an exploration of the United States in its varied forms. Deacon describes rejecting his own label, citing dissatisfaction with American consumerism—a political view on display with his school bus-turned-vegetable-powered tour van. But it wasn’t until after traveling abroad that Deacon was forced to come to terms with his heritage and assign his own definitions to what “America” means. The album’s bounciest song stands out among Deacon’s other work. “True Thrush” features a bright, vibrant beat punctuated by bass to create an energetic track fit for getting down. Pair that with Deacon’s smartphone app, which turns audience members’ smartphones into flickering lights tied to the beat, and you get an unrivaled dance party. Deacon will not only play the Treefort Main Stage Sunday, March 24, but linger on for a DJ set at the Linen Building later that evening.

(10:10-11:30 P.M.)

—Andrew Crisp

(11-11:40 P.M.)

KARAOKE FROM HELL (MIDNIGHT-2 A.M.)

DAN DEACON DJ (12:30 -1:30 A.M.)

1 A.M. 2 A.M. 8 | TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2013 | BOISEweekly

VENUES

MIDNIGHT 12:30 A.M.

Emily Wells’ haunting, dark songs combine the sexuality of Lana Del Rey, the atmosphere of The XX and the pop sensibilities of a

—Josh Gross

DAN DEACON

(4-4:40 P.M.)

5 P.M. 5:30 P.M.

SUNDAY, MARCH 24, 10-10:40 P.M. NEUROLUX, 111 N. 11TH ST.

hip-hop or R&B producer. Wells uses synth, violins and looping over bump-worthy beats to weave the sorts of dangerously siren-like pop songs that can only come from one deeply skilled in the act of breaking hearts into a million little pieces. “Mama’s going to give you love,” she croons with the tone of a beckoning spider. “Dirty sneakers and underwear / lost myself in your dirty hair,” she laments. “You let your guard down,” she warns with a voice that sounds like it’s coming from the depths of an abyss. Intriguing, catchy and a little bit naughty, Wells makes the sort of pop tunes your mother warned you about. The only conceivable reason Wells isn’t ruling the pop charts is that no record label would dare to sign her for fear of her breaking their hearts, as well.

SECOND CHOICE

11 A.M.

EMILY WELLS

EL KORAH SHRINE

RED ROOM

LINEN BUILDING

THE CRUX

NEUROLUX

MAIN STAGE

KARAOKE FROM HELL SATURDAY, MARCH 23-MONDAY, MARCH 25, MIDNIGHT-2:30 A.M. EL KORAH SHRINE, 1118 W. IDAHO ST. You may think you can karaoke with the best of them, but the real test comes when you ditch the screen with the lyrics and step up to join a live band. That’s just what Portland, Ore.’s infamous Karaoke From Hell offers: They play, you sing. The band has more than 500 songs in its catalog, all classics—some of which aren’t even available in typical karaoke books because of licensing reasons or because they’re underground staples, not radio hits. At Karaoke From Hell, you can belt out everything from Janis Joplin and Black Sabbath, to songs from the cult hit musical Hedwig and the Angry Inch. If you’re worried about the lack of screen, don’t be. The band’s host also serves as a lyrical metronome, chiming in with the vocals to help you get back on track if you get lost. So when you’ve seen so many amazing bands that you’re filled with the urge to sing, don’t head home to your shower. Go directly to the El Korah Shrine and throw your name in the hat for Karaoke From Hell. —Josh Gross

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT Art ALEX SEPKUS AND SARAH GRAHAM JEWELRY TRUNK SHOW—This trunk show features more than 500 handmade pieces by Alex Sepkus and Sarah Graham. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. R. Grey Gallery Jewelry and Art Glass, 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, rgreygallery.com.

Odds & Ends IMPROVOLUTION AT THE SESQUI-SHOP—Explore the ways of musical improv via voice and character building at improvisational performance workshops. Contact Mike at mike@boiselaughs.com for more info. 7 p.m. Boise 150 SesquiShop, 1008 Main St., Boise, 208-433-5671.

THIRD SPACE SATURDAY—Join Spacebar Arcade, DJ I.G.A. the Independent Grocer and the Vinyl Preservation Society for video games, beer and community. 10 p.m.-1 a.m. FREE. Spacebar Arcade, 200 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-918-0597, spacebararcade.com.

LIQUID LAUGHS: KEITH BARANY—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

EASTER EGGSTRAVAGANZA— Zoo Boise hosts an Easter event featuring egg scambbles, face painting, an Easter egg toss and animal enrichment. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $4.25-$7. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208384-4125, zooboise.org.

BOISE PHILHARMONIC COPLAND AND PIANO—See Friday. 8 p.m. $25.50-$76.50. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, boisephilharmonic. org.

Food & Drink On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: ART KRUG—7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. COMEDYSPORTZ BOISE—Fastpaced, interactive and competitive improv comedy. 7 p.m. $5-$10. Boise Area Laugh-a-thon Arena, 3250 N. Lakeharbor Lane, Ste. 184A, Boise, 208991-4746, boisecomedy.com.

SATURDAY MARCH 23 Festivals & Events BOISE FLOWER AND GARDEN SHOW—See Friday. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE-$8. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, boisecentre.com.

Concerts

KISS OR MAKE UP—See Friday. 8 p.m. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

COMPLIMENTARY TASTINGS— See Friday. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Pacific Rim, 2870 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-3375, pacificrimwinestop.com. NAMPA FIRE DEPARTMENT CHARITY BARBECUE—The Idaho Cutting Horse Association hosts a charity barbecue for the Nampa Firefighters Charity Funds in conjunction with the ICHA weekend show. Featuring food by Brent Reynolds. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $10. Idaho Horse Park, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208442-3335, idahohorsepark.com. WINE 101: FOOD AND WINE PAIRING—Explore food and wine pairings. Learn what goes with what and why. Taste eight to 10 wines while eating snacks. RSVP by phone. 2-4 p.m. $20. Boise Co-op Wine Shop, 915 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-472-4519, boisecoopwineshop.com.

Art ALEX SEPKUS AND SARAH GRAHAM JEWELRY TRUNK SHOW—See Friday. 10 a.m.5:30 p.m. FREE. R. Grey Gallery Jewelry and Art Glass, 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3859337, rgreygallery.com. RIVER WHISPERS— Join Peter Max Lawrence, Elizabeth McSurdy and more for an afternoon of avant-garde performance, contemporary art and video, and more. See Picks, Page 16. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Greenbelt, Boise.

Literature

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

CONVERSATION WITH AUTHOR GAIL TSUKIYAMA—Join the Idaho Human Rights Education Center for a conversation with author Gail Tsukiyama about her featured work, The Street of a Thousand Blossoms. Tsukiyama, an American novelist from San Francisco, appeared at the first Library of Congress National Book Festival. 7:30-9 p.m. $25. Boise State Student Union Lookout Room, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-2468.

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Odds & Ends BECOME A TEACHER—See Wednesday. Noon, 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208562-4995, boisepubliclibrary. org.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | 19


IDAHO LIVE PRESENTS

TOUBAB KREWE

8 DAYS OUT

WITH MANTRA

W/ GUEST TBA

APRIL 3 @ VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE

TODD SNIDER WITH ASHLEIGH FLYNN

APRIL 12 @ VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE

RYAN B

INGHAM

W/ THE WILD FEATHERS

MAY 1 @ EGYPTIAN THEATRE WWW.IDAHOLIVEMUSIC.COM

FACEBOOK.COM/IDAHOLIVE

TICKETS ONLINE AT EGYPTIANTHEATRE.NET CALL 208-387-1273 EGYPTIAN THEATRE BOX OFFICE TU-SA 11A-6P & AT RECORD EXCHANGE

JUNE 5 @ EGYPTIAN THEATRE

THEY MIGHT BE GIANTS WITH WI WITH T MOON MOO OON O N HO HHOOCH HOOC OOC OCH CH

JUNE 9 @ EGYPTIAN THEATRE

SUNDAY MARCH 24 Festivals & Events BOISE FLOWER AND GARDEN SHOW—See Friday. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$8. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, boisecentre.com.

On Stage LIQUID LAUGHS: KEITH BARANY—See Thursday. Two-for-one tickets. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

MONDAY MARCH 25 On Stage STORY STORY NIGHT: METAMORPHOSIS— The bards of Story Story Night hold forth on the topic of metamorphosis. After-party at Red Feather Lounge and Bittercreek Ale House. See Picks, Page 17. 7 p.m. $8-$10. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483, storystorynight.org. WEST SIDE STORY— Watch the revival of this classic musical retelling of Romeo and Juliet exploring love, hate and intolerance. See Picks, Page 17. 8 p.m. $35-$55. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Kids & Teens SPRING BREAK MAKE-YOUROWN GLASS FOR KIDS—Fused glass projects for kids available all day. No registration needed. 10 a.m. $30. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-938-1055, fusions-idaho.com.

TUESDAY MARCH 26 On Stage COMEDY SHOW FOR MS—A benefit for multiple sclerosis featuring headlining comedy by Sean Peabody. 8 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. WEST SIDE STORY— See Monday. 7:30 p.m. $35-$55. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu.

20 | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | BOISEweekly

SCREEN/REVIEW S U N VALLEY FILM FES TIVAL

DIEGO’S UMBRELLA

Jodie Foster gets the key to Sun Valley from Mayor DeWayne Briscoe.

THE SWEET SMELL OF SUCCESS AT THE SUN VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL Jodie Foster gave a word of caution at her intimate coffee talk March 17, the penultimate event of the second annual Sun Valley Film Festival. “Remember how it is now,” she said, her words nearly drowned out by a standing ovation. Foster knows about the avalanche of success. The soft snowfall that defines the current SVFF is at risk of someday becoming a raging blizzard. “Years from now, the lines may be longer and you’ll think back on this year,” said Foster, “but it will always be about people who love the movies.” SVFF is currently more defined by what it doesn’t have: paparazzi, pretension and Paris (as in Hilton). “I must admit that when I came on board that I was a little nervous about moving Hollywood to my own private Idaho,” said Candice Pate, SVFF director. “We really want to grow this thing and I think we have found a sweet spot: a little bit of glitz but not a Sundance wannabe.” But Sun Valley has one big thing that Sundance doesn’t: Teddy Grennan, the tall, sandy-haired, always-smiling founder and executive director of SVFF, who must have a twin, because he was everywhere. “Teddy has such vision, he just put all the pieces into place and reminds everyone not to worry,” said Pate. Indeed, that vision played out over four days of film—long and short subjects, fiction and documentaries, big budget and small. Some films worked, some didn’t. Some movies shocked, while others offered soft-as-a-feather giggles. But the real showstoppers were SVFF’s coffee talks, which featured inside-the-velvet-rope stuff from Foster, screenwriter Stephen Gaghan (Traffic, Syriana) and directors who came to Sun Valley with their “works-in-progress,” films that weren’t quite ready for mass distribution but were nonetheless put before appreciative, but critical audiences. “I absolutely love being here,” said Foster. “I will continue to be part of the festival for years to come.” But SVFF’s pied piper is Foster’s friend Grennan, and his tune will no doubt continue to lure the best and the brightest to Sun Valley for years to come. Just be forewarned: A film festival’s growing success is as sweet as fresh powder on the mountain. Be prepared to wait in line for the chairlift next time around. —George Prentice WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT Food & Drink

Kids & Teens

TUESDAY NIGHT TASTE CLUB: THREE BLIND WHITES—Learn the basics about blind white wine sleuthing, including identifying the varietal, the region and the characteristics of what you taste. 6:30-7:30 p.m. $25. Wine Wise Labs, 104-1/2 E. 44th St., Garden City, 208-297-9463, winewiseidaho.com.

SPRING BREAK MAKE-YOUROWN GLASS FOR KIDS—See Monday. 10 a.m. $30. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-9381055, fusions-idaho.com.

Literature BLIP PLAY READING SERIES— Featuring video from Josh Gross, including his short film, Nobis. 7 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-429-8220, hydeparkbookstore.com.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 27

MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— See Wednesday, March 20. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib. org. SPRING BREAK MAKE-YOUROWN GLASS FOR KIDS—See Monday. 10 a.m. $30. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-9381055, fusions-idaho.com.

Kids & Teens KIDS EXPERIENCE—See Wednesday, March 20. 3 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

Check out the entire week’s worth of Doonesbury online at boiseweekly.com—select “Extras” then “Cartoons.”

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | 21


NEWS/NOISE

NOISE

SXSW RECAP To get prepped for Treefort Music Fest, Boise Weekly spent the last week in Austin, Texas, at the sprawling SXSW festival. We checked out acts that will be in Boise this week for Treefort and covered a series of emerging trends in the industry. High among them was Seattle’s Deep Sea Diver, which played an entrancing set of soul-influenced indie rock at the Central Presbyterian Church in downtown Austin. Another band BW checked out was Foxygen. The goal was to snag an interview, but that wasn’t in the stars as the band was in the midst of an unexpectedly epic meltdown at the Secretly Canadian/Jagjaguwar/Dead Oceans Showcase at Red 7. “My voice is fucked,” said singer Sam France, after his second song. “I’ve been singing every night for like two months.” That’s when a member of the audience yelled, “Shut up and play.” “Who said that?” asked France. “Get on the stage and say it to my face, you coward. I’m trying to express my feelings to you fucking people.” The band started its third song, but after a single verse, France said, “Thank you, good night,” and walked off stage, leaving the rest of the band looking extremely confused. He came back two minutes later to apologize, to thank various characters from Seinfeld, and then to “tell you all a thing or two about Pitchfork.” Then he realized he wasn’t at the Pitchfork showcase. BW also caught up with Portland, Ore., rockers The Thermals to ask about their expectations for Treefort. “The fact that it’s in Boise means it won’t be pretentious; it’s not jaded,” said the band’s singer and guitarist, Hutch Harris. “It’s not a city that has a festival, like, 10 times a year or every week, so I think that will make it special.” One of the best new acts BW ran across at SXSW was New York’s leading hip-hop classical quintet, Black Violin, which played before the keynote speech from lead Foo Fighter Dave Grohl. The band blasted beats and Bach from the same bow, and is a must-see for any fan of innovative crossgenre music. Speaking of Grohl, the central theme of his SXSW keynote speech was that what got him where he is wasn’t an excess of talent as much as it was having been left alone creatively to find his own voice. “The musician comes first,” Grohl said several times. Grohl also said that “Gangnam Style” was his favorite song of the last decade. Find our complete SXSW coverage at boiseweekly.com. —Josh Gross

22 | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | BOISEweekly

JOS H DAR R

Dive into Deep Sea Diver at Treefort.

TREEFORT 2013

YOUTH LAGOON ROLLS THE DICE Will fans find Wondrous Bughouse to be wondrous? JOSH GROSS Two years ago, Boise resident Trevor Powers won the musical lottery. And this month, he’s betting it all on black. After a handful of local gigs, his solo recording project, Youth Lagoon, got picked up by Oxford, Miss.-based Fat Possum Records. Boise’s Youth Lagoon wades into new waters with its second full-length album, Wondrous Bughouse. Powers and guitarist Logan Hyde hit the road as critics showered love on the band’s debut, The Year of Hibernation. many others—would prefer to leave the ghosts More than just happy, Powers is feeling “Lovely, sparse songs that capture the feelof high school behind him; it’s also because he ing of being confined and alone,” wrote NPR’s downright wondrous. doesn’t want those religious references to be “I really just wanted to create some kind Michael Katzif. misconstrued or taken too literally. of place, like sonically, just experiment to “Hibernation is a record for pulling up the “I’m a very spiritual person,” Powers said. covers and dreaming and then venturing out to create some kind of place I could see myself “But I feel like religion, as a whole, corrupts so living. Some kind of world that I could get the town to see the strange and magical world much stuff. Everyone already has their opinlost in and that I feel other people could get of encroaching adulthood,” wrote Pitchfork’s ions on what people should be and shouldn’t lost in,” he said. Mark Richardson. be. I still have a close relationship with God, Powers said that many of the songs began Fans reacted just as strongly, gushing over as stream of consciousness—a way to purge his but it’s not within certain boundaries. It’s just The Year of Hibernation and turning Powers endless love. It always plays a role in whatever system of whatever was clogging it. into an indie rock totem. I create.” “When you do things that way, it’s always And therein lies the gamble: Wondrous To bring the wonder of his new album onmessy,” Powers said. “So then you go back Bughouse, the sophomore disc that Powers stage, Powers hired bassist Jake Warnock from and clean it up.” and company released March 5, couldn’t be Boise band Atomic Mama and New Orleans The key to cleaning it up was Ben Allen, more different. drummer Eric Rogers as a rhythm section, and who has worked with bands like Animal ColHibernation’s earnest pop ballads are lective, Deerhunter and Washed added a multimedia light show to match the replaced with lengthy tracks of newfound psychedelia of his tunes. Out, and with whom Powers experimental noise. The toyThe band rehearsed six hours a day for recorded Wondrous Bughouse sounding electronic drums that Sunday, March 24, two months before debuting its new material in Georgia. Powers said he reinforced the previous album’s 5:30-6:15 p.m., with a secret show at Neurolux Feb. 25, then spent many evenings detailing $30 Main Stage ticket. sense of childlike wonder are his ideas for the album to Allen performing a small string of dates leading up replaced with a full backing TREEFORT MUSIC FEST on the phone before setting foot to SXSW and Treefort. band. And, whereas Youth MAIN STAGE Though Youth Lagoon’s new sound is bonein the studio or bringing in the Lagoon’s debut was intimate, 1201 W. Grove St. treefortmusicfest.com rattlingly massive live—and the light show session players who played the delicate and fragile, Wondrous finally makes Youth Lagoon’s onstage presence album’s backing tracks. Bughouse is like a synthesizer match its hype—it’s still a radical shift for Another way Wondrous product demo recording. the soft-spoken, moony kid who used to play Bughouse departs from The Year of HiberIn many ways, Powers tossed out everykeyboard for change on Eighth Street. nation is with a resurgence of some of the thing that people swooned over on The Year After playing a headlining spot at the religious themes that were a staple of Powers’ of Hibernation to do something completely Treefort Main Stage Sunday, March 24, Youth early work. different. Though early critics’ responses have “The devil tries to cloud my mind,” he sings Lagoon will hit the road hard to push Wonbeen generally positive, taking an artistic risk drous Bughouse. is something that critics have always embraced on “Mute.” “April is when the tour really kicks off,” Powers has been cagey about his faith since more than fans. Powers said. “And then it will be really conbreaking through in the secular music world Powers isn’t at all worried, though. stant for a long time.” and has refused interview requests from BW “If I had created something I wasn’t But what if fans don’t respond to it? excited about, it would have failed instantly,” regarding his involvement in the local Chris“If you judge success by who buys your tian music scene. His press agent even emailed he told Boise Weekly. “You just have to record, then most people will be sorely disapBW to say we weren’t allowed to mention the take a leap of faith creating something that pointed,” Powers said. “As long as I made the names of Powers’ former bands, My Paper you truly believe in. Then if it doesn’t come record I wanted to make, I’d be happy. And I Camera or Your Friend, Peter Giles. through, someone may not be happy, but at feel like I did.” But it isn’t just because Powers—like so least you will be happy.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE S HAE S TU LTS

GUIDE WILLISON ROOS—7 p.m. FREE. Whole Foods

WEDNESDAY MARCH 20

SENSI DREAD—7 p.m. FREE. Crusty’s

BARBARA LAING, KAYLEIGH JACK—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

WILSON ROBERTS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

FRIDAY MARCH 22

THURSDAY MARCH 21

BIG WOW—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

SPEEDY GRAY—With Johnny Shoes. 6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

THE DOWN RIVER BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

CONTINO BAND—7:30 p.m. $15-$30. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room DJ GROOVER—10 p.m. $5. Opa

FREUDIAN SLIP—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

DOUG CAMERON—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

FRIM FRAM 4—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ERIENNE WILLIAMS—6 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

BEN BURDICK—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

GAYLE CHAPMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars

BILL BARTON—7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub

MATTHEW GAMBRELL—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

DJ STEVE—8 p.m. FREE. Frontier Club

MICHAEL CARD—7 p.m. $15. Karcher Church of the Nazarene

P36—With Skittish Itz, Wilt Chamberlin’s Baby, The Jerkwadz and New Iron Front. 6:30 p.m. $8. Knitting Factory

Ben Burdick

LARRY KISER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement NEW TRANSIT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s OPHELIA—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

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SEVENDUST, LACUNA COIL AND CANDLELIGHT RED—7:30 p.m. $25-$65. Knitting Factory SLOW CHILDREN—With Social Antidote and Floral Approach. 9 p.m. $3. The Shredder

PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Frontier Club REILLY COYOTE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye RENEGADE—9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s

RICH KILLFOYLE—8 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe SOME PHEASANT PLUCKERS—4 p.m. FREE. Kilted Dragon Brewing SWEET BRIAR—8:30 p.m. FREE. Gone Rogue TEMPLE OF TECHNO—Featuring DJs Groove and Mixtress Morningstar. 10 p.m. FREE. Opa TREEHOUSE OF HORRORS—9 p.m. FREE. Sammy’s

TREEHOUSE OF HORRORS, MARCH 21-23, SAMMY’S

SATURDAY MARCH 23 DESTROY NATE ALLEN—With Sheep Among Wolves. 9 p.m. $3. The Shredder ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill GALEN LOUIS—7:30 p.m. FREE High Note Cafe GAYLE CHAPMAN—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub LORI B AND THE DUDES DELUXE—9 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

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TREEHOUSE OF HORRORS— See Listen Here, this page. 9 p.m. FREE. Sammy’s WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

V E N U E S

Marshall Poole Band

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

If you didn’t get a Treefort pass, fret not—Sammy’s is hosting the Treehouse of Horrors, offering three days of rocking bands, all for free. Catch live music from a dozen local acts starting each evening at 9 p.m. “No cover, no Gods, no managers,” as organizers describe it. On the first night, punkers The Alltheways, Upinatem and Stepbrothers play before funky classic rockers the Marshall Poole Band. Friday night starts with Professor Wrestler and Delores, followed by punk rock regulars Piranhas and Caulfield Alley. On Saturday, punk band Skittish Itz performs, followed by Sabado Gigante, Acrotomoans and heavy hitters Black Bolt. —Andrew Crisp Thursday, March 21, 9 p.m.; Friday, March 22, 9 p.m.; Saturday, March 23, 9 p.m. FREE. Sammy’s, 509 Main St.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | 23


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE Robert Plano

GUIDE 23

PAMELA DEMARCHE—7 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Frontier Club

RENEGADE—9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown SKITTISH ITZ—With Sabado Gigante, Acrotomoans and Black Bolt. 9 p.m. FREE. Sammy’s

BOISE PHILHARMONIC’S COPLAND AND PLANO, MARCH 22-23, NNU’S BRANDT CENTER AND MORRISON CENTER It’s hard to hear an Aaron Copland composition and not start thinking about steak. But long before the Cattlemen’s Beef Board adopted his “Hoe-Down” as its theme song, Copland was widely regarded as one of America’s best composers. Fans can soak in another of Copland’s musical odes to America when Boise Philharmonic, under guest conductor Daniel Hege, performs “Appalachian Spring.” Spring is the theme of the entire concert, which also features Bach’s Piano Concerto with guest pianist Robert Plano, and Robert Schumann’s Symphony No. 1 “Spring.” Tickets for the Boise show are selling fast, so don’t dally. —Deanna Darr Friday, March 22, 8 p.m., $23-$43. Northwest Nazarene University’s Brandt Center, 707 Fern St., Nampa; Saturday, March 23, $25.50-$76.50. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, boisephilharmonic.org.

24 | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | BOISEweekly

SPEEDY GRAY—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears SPUDMAN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

YER MAMA—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

SUNDAY MARCH 24 ALL THAT REMAINS—With In This Moment, Nonpoint and Sunflower Dead. 7 p.m. $23-$40. Knitting Factory DEATHFORT—Featuring Witchhaven, Exmortus, Mortal Ashes and Diluted. 8 p.m. $8. The Shredder FOREVER GROWING—7 p.m. FREE. Crusty’s REBECCA SCOTT TRIO—7 p.m. FREE. Crescent

Mixtress Morningstar TEMPLE OF TECHNO—Featuring DJs Groove and Mixtress Morningstar. 10 p.m. FREE. Opa

TUESDAY MARCH 26

COUNTRY CLUB—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DIRTY FEW—With Blind Driver. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

DJ STEVE—8 p.m. FREE. Frontier Club

EMILY TIPTON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

DONAVON FRANKENREITER— With Rayland Baxter and Eric Tollefson. 8 p.m. $16-$35. Knitting Factory

FOREVER GROWING—7:30 p.m. FREE. Sockeye GYPSYHAWK—With Mothership and Heibarger. 9 p.m. $5-$7. Red Room OLD TIME JAM SESSION WITH THE HOKUM HIGH FLYERS— With Ophelia. 6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s RADIO BOISE TUESDAY—Featuring Dirty Few and Blurred Vision. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

MONDAY MARCH 25

WEDNESDAY MARCH 27

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM— With John Bistline 8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

THE ALLTHEWAYS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

VELVET LOUNGE FROGS—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

PUNK MONDAYS: BREAK ANCHOR, THE OLD ONE TWO AND THE ALLTHEWAYS—9 p.m. $3. Liquid

WHITEWATER RAMBLE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

RED ROOM’S FAMILY JAM—5 p.m. FREE. Red Room

DJ MAXIM KLYMENKO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

HAVEN D. SNOW—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown THE HORDE AND THE HAREM—8 p.m. $3. Red Room JEFF MOLL—7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Vista KEN HARRIS AND CARMEL CROCK—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow MIKE RUTLEDGE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill SPEEDY GRAY—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

BARBARA LAING, KAYLEIGH JACK—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge BRANDON PRITCHETT—8 p.m. FREE. Reef CARMEL CROCK—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

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Boise’s Sesqui-Shop, set in a bright storefront at 1008 W. Main St., has quickly become a downtown fixture celebrating the city’s sesquicentennial with rotating exhibits. This month, due in part to Treefort Music Fest descending on the city, a new exhibit brings historical context to Boise’s growing music scene. “I try to include a little bit of history in everything we’re doing here,” said Sesqui-Shop manager Rachel Reichert. “I think it’s a good avenue to get into history, by having this more mass, pop culture appeal. Then you can really dive in and learn something.” Vibes: A Celebration of Music in Boise features a collection of ephemera on loan from community members. A pane of glass from the Visitors to the Sesqui-Shop traveled down memory lane by sharing their first concert experience. Blues Bouquet and black-and-white photos of early chamber orchestras greet visitors as they of foam, while Socia crocheted the arm and leg According to Reichert, many of the vintage walk through the doors. In one corner, near a pieces that make up the rest of the costume. wall dedicated to Built to Spill frontman Doug posters were crafted by Neurolux’s Ireland to advertise shows at his past and present venues. Black and brown shoelaces—picked up at a Martsch, stands a bright blue neon Neurolux “He had the original, so it was a lot of, like, North End garage sale—fill out the monster’s sign. Owner Allen Ireland even lent the shop a table and chairs from his iconic bar and venue. ripped paper pieces and ink drawings, all taped beard. During the exhibit’s opening First Thursday, together, and then the photocopied version of Those pieces pair with original artwork— March 7, visitors interacted with the galleryit,” Reichert said. “It was kind of cool to see like stripped-down show fliers from 1980s like space. A big draw was a large chalkboard how people were crafting their message back punk venues made with hand-drawn graphwall inviting visitors to share their first concert then.” ics and simple lettering—yellowing zines and experience. In the years since, technology has evolved, issues of the defunct 1970s culture rag Idaho “I realized when we were doing this, I was Renaissance, featuring black-and-white photos and thrifty artists can crank out bright, colorjust sort of asking everyone, ‘What was your ful posters in less time. Across the room, and big blocks of text. Big black letters on first concert?’ It was really more than a oneanother wall shows contemporary posters for pastel-colored paper advertise Dirt Fishermen, line conversation,” said Reichert. bands like Y La Bamba and Delicate Steve. the Descendents and NOFX shows at venues Within a few hours, the board was filled These days, of course, that work is done like the Crazy Horse, the Zoo and the Boise with band names and accompanying dates— almost entirely without scissors and glue. High School gymnasium. everything from Metallica in 1988 to the “I do quite a bit with digital,” said graphic For Todd Dunnigan, one of Reichert Beatles in 1964—scrawled out in white chalk. artist and poster designer James Lloyd. “I’ll sources as she sifted through the years of “People kind of huddled around it all night, usually sketch out a few drawings, and then Boise’s musical past, many of the posters have and were talking about their first concert, or when I find something I like, I’ll just ink over a personal connection. maybe reminiscing over concerts they wish “My story, at least with Boise music history, it with some sort of pen. Once the drawing’s done, I’ll just erase all the pencil lines and draw they had gone to,” Reichert said. is I played my first gig at the Fireside Inn on Reichert watched as visitors reacted to the State Street in 1979, when I was 15 years old,” it into Photoshop.” exhibit, many of them reliving shows. Lloyd said while digitally printed posters said Dunnigan. “And basically ever since then, “It’s cool to have people come in and concome out cleaner, the screenuntil the time I moved away nect with something that they had experienced printing process can create in 2001, I was out five nights VIBES: A Celebration of during their childhood, or during their 1980s more of a handmade feel. a week either playing, doing Music in Boise. Wednesday, punk phase, and really kind of take them “It makes a worse image, sound or seeing bands. It was March 20-Thursday, March back,” said Reichert. “They end up telling stobut every image is different just kind of what I did.” 21,noon-10 p.m.; Friday, ries they would never have shared with people so each poster is individual. It After moving back to Boise March 22-Saturday, March 23, noon-9 p.m.; Sunday, makes it more of an art piece,” around them.” last year, Dunnigan embedded March 24, 3:30-6:30 p.m.; But the space won’t remain static; the he said. himself in the music scene by FREE. Sesqui-Shop will also serve as a venue for Lloyd is also the official signing on to host the History SESQUI-SHOP illustrator for Treefort, and one performance art during Treefort. of Boise Rock on Radio Boise. 1008 W. Main St. “I’m looking for any way to activate the of his drawings served as inspi“I just always loved what 208-433-5670 space,” Reichert said. ration for a giant monster coswas going on in town and alboise150.org/sesqui-shop. She hopes to keep the space fresh with a rotume featured in the four-part ways wanted to be as part of it, tating lineup of exhibitions—a goal established Road to Treefort film series by as much as I could,” he said. with the previous Collect Boise exhibit. Retroscope Media. Daniel Fo and Willow SoDunnigan pointed to a poster advertising a “I think the more collaboration, the more cia collaborated on the costume, which is now gig for his band, Methods of Dance. successful this place will be,” she said. “I’m “It’s almost embarrassing,” he said. “It’s the on display as part of the Vibes exhibit. interested in having a constant sense of change “I would say I spent a month and a half, crappiest looking flier up there. ... But for us to here; every time you come here, there’s sometotal, on the project,” said Fo. do that, it was actually kind of difficult. There Fo sculpted the monster’s rock-like head out thing else going on.” wasn’t computers to print it out or anything.” WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Sunday, March 31, 9-2pm

ANDREW CRISP

Brunch Buffet

Sesqui-Shop chronicles Boise’s music scene

LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

GOOD VIBES

EASTER

CULTURE/ARTS

121 North 9th Street, Downtown Boise

R e s e r v a t i o n s 397-3553 www.johnberryhillrestaurants.com

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PLAY/REC JEN GR AB LE

REC

TREEFORT 2013 LAU R IE PEAR M AN

MINIBREAKS Fight the alien hordes with the power of Galaga.

Get some rec time in between concerts DEANNA DARR

GOT GAME On a recent evening at Boise’s Spacebar Arcade, a group huddled around a Galaga machine waiting for a chance to show their skills. The goal? To achieve the highest score and claim Galaga glory—and beer and assorted swag from tournament host Sockeye Brewing. Each player had a single quarter to drop into the machine, with an timekeeper limiting play to 10 minutes. Brightly colored enemies arrived in waves, flying close to my spaceship before falling into formation above. On my first run, I pulled up a barstool and went to work killing aliens, carefully pressing the fire button and jostling my spaceship to the left and right with the joystick, picking off space baddies slowly and deliberately—the only hope against never-ending waves of enemies. Even though the concept is simple, Galaga is primarily a strategy game, requiring the taming of patterns to surmount the alien hordes. In 1989, a world record score of 15,999,990 points was reached, and it hasn’t been upset yet. I came nowhere close. As I got a sixminute warning, I was clipped by an alien and “GAME OVER” flashed on the screen. My score was a pitiful 28,600. In each wave, slightly larger aliens swoop down, occasionally emitting a blue wave to “abduct” one of the player’s spaceships. According to Erin Nelson, who scored more than 150,000 on her first run, getting abducted is crucial to success. Once abducted, the alien tows the player’s spaceship up into the formation and, if killed, will release it to give the player two ships for use against the alien foes. Alas, I was never able to employ the technique. On my second run, I got rid of the barstool and stood—another technique suggested by the pros. Seconds into my second try, I failed to destroy a red alien zipping toward my ship and was destroyed by a missile. With my final life, I took out another wave of enemies, but fell prey to the swirling flight pattern of a fast alien. I ended with an even more shameful score of 7,600. In the end, my amateurish efforts paled in comparison to the evening’s victors. Ryan Cloud took first place with 157,420, while Nelson’s 153,780 points earned her second place, and Rockford “Rocky” Hinten took third with 139,740 points. If you missed out on competitive Galaga playing, fear not, there’s a Donkey Kong tourney scheduled for Thursday, March 28, which is sponsored by Ninkasi. Navigate on over to spacebararcade.com for details. As for me? I’ll stick to Lunar Lander. —Andrew Crisp

26 | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | BOISEweekly

It’s all fun and games until… well, there is no “until” during Treefort Music Fest, when music fans descend on the City of Trees for four days of nearly nonstop concerts and parties. But sometimes you just need a breather from all the high-volume fun. Thankfully, Boise is an outdoorsy kind of place, where there are plenty of ways to stretch your legs and get a breath of fresh air—other than by walking from venue to venue, that is. Here are a few tips on how and where to do some in-town recreating between concerts. Come on in, the water’s cold at the Boise River Recreation Park.

BIKING Boiseans love their bikes, and there are plenty of ways to get around on two wheels. The jewel of the city’s bike network is the Greenbelt, a 22-mile-long paved pathway along the Boise River connecting Lucky Peak Reservoir in the east to the edge of Garden City to the west. The path leads through or past some of the area’s favorite outdoor playgrounds, including Julia Davis Park and the Boise River Recreation Park, as well as providing connections to Boise State University and other local points of interest. Greenbelt maps and details can be found at parks.cityofboise.org. If you’re more interested in paths of the single-track, non-paved variety, Boise is also home to the extensive Ridge to Rivers trail system crisscrossing the Foothills. Spring can be a touchy time for the trail system since conditions can change so quickly and riders are asked to stay off wet or muddy trails. The recent dry weather, though, means that lower elevation trails are dry and ready to ride. Trails in the Table Rock area (that hill with the cross on top overlooking the Old Idaho State Penitentiary) are in great condition, as are trails in the Hulls Gulch and Camels Back area—all of which are just minutes from downtown. The folks who maintain the trails have made it easy to find not only maps, but daily updates on trail conditions online at ridgetorivers.org. If you didn’t think to bring a bike to a music festival (duh), you’re not completely out of luck. Several bike shops in or near downtown rent bikes for hourly or daily use. Idaho Mountain Touring, 1310 W. Main St., rents city bikes, road bikes and mountain bikes for between $15 and $35 (not counting demo bikes) for four hours or $25-$65 for a full day.

The IMT folks are offering a special deal for musicians in town for Treefort—any band member who comes in with a wristband and ID can rent a bike for free for two hours. The store ran a similar offer last year and was caught a little off guard with how quickly the bikes were claimed, said general manager Chris Haunold. This year, the system has been refined and time limits placed on rentals to give more people the chance to use a bike. Bikes 2 Boards, 3525 W. State St., also offers bikes for rent, starting at about $20 for a city bike. Would-be bikers can also pick up a rental at McU Sports, 822 W. Jefferson St., which rents both cruisers and mountain bikes for $25-$50, depending on the bike.

KAYAKING OK, so the Boise River is a little cold and running a bit low right now, but those with the right equipment can check out Boise’s intown whitewater park. The Boise River Recreation Park—located near where Pleasanton Avenue runs into the river—opened less than a year ago, but is already a favorite haunt for local kayakers. Get details and check out the live webcam at boiseriverpark.com.

CLIMBING Those in search of some vertical action can head to one of the area’s climbing walls. The Downtown YMCA, 1050 W. State St., boasts a respectable wall, but those without a membership can also head to Urban Ascent, 308 S. 25th St., where a day pass costs $15. Anyone in search of a bouldering wall can head to Asana Climbing Gym, 3235 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City. A day pass runs $12 and, as a bonus, Payette Brewing Company is next door.

SKATEPARKS Those who brought their boards with them can check out two skateparks in the downtown area. First up is Rhodes Skatepark, 1555 W. Front St., located beneath the I-184 overpass. The park boasts plenty of rails, ledges, ramps, a brick bank, pyramid and a half pipe. Farther to the east, hit Fort Boise Skatepark on the corner of Fort and Reserve streets. The concrete park includes bowls, a pyramid and a spine.

SKIING Want to hit the slopes for a little spring skiing? Boise’s hometown hill, Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area overlooking the city, is still open for the season, although night skiing has ended. A day pass runs $48, while a half-day pass costs $38. Gear rentals are available on the mountain, as well as at numerous area ski shops. Get more details online at bogusbasin. org.

GOLF If you’re the type of music fan who travels with his or her clubs, then spring is a magical time to visit Boise—when you can ski and golf in the same day. Boise even has its own city course on the eastern edge of downtown. Warm Springs Golf Course, 2495 Warm Springs Ave., offers 18 holes along the river—although goose droppings can be considered a hazard along certain holes. Green fees during the week run $21 for nine holes or $26 for 18, or $22 for nine and $30 for 18 on the weekend. For more info, visit wsgc.cityofboise.org.

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WINESIPPER/DRINK NORTHWEST CHARDONNAY: DIFFERENT STROKES

2011 AIRFIELD ESTATE UNOAKED CHARDONNAY, $12.99 Given a choice between a heavily oaked chardonnay (aka Chateau Two-by-Four) and one that sees no wood, I’ll always pick the latter. This unoaked entry from Yakima really lets the varietal character of the grape shine through. It opens with racy green apple and fig on the nose, while zesty citrus and tropical fruit fill the mouth. That’s backed by nuances of mineral and white pepper on the finish of this exceptional bargain. 2010 DOMAINE DROUHIN ARTHUR, $30 What do you get when you cross one of the top domains in Burgundy with Oregon’s Willamette Valley? A chardonnay with New World terroir wrapped around Old World style and structure. The creamy peach aromas in this wine are round and ripe with earthy touches of mineral and citrus. On the palate, it’s a mix of tangy lemon, lime, fresh bosc pear and sweet apple. Touches of herb and spring greens come through on the finish. 2011 MERCER CANYONS CHARDONNAY, $13.99 This is the new, value-priced label for Washington’s Mercer Estates, and this bottle definitely provides a lot of bang for the buck. The floral aromas combine crisp apple, mango and kiwi with a hint of ginger. This wine is big and bold, but balanced by just the right amount of acidity, offering lovely peach and blood orange flavors that persist nicely.

TREEFORT 2013 PATR IC K S W EENEY

With some 100,000 vineyard acres planted, California chardonnay is arguably the most popular white wine in America. The trend has been toward rich, buttery wines colored by extensive oak. At the same time, later harvesting has pushed up sugar levels, resulting in bigger, higher alcohol wines. That’s not typically an option in the cooler climate of the Northwest, where the emphasis is on creating fruit-forward, balanced wines, with food-friendly acidity. Viva la difference.

FOOD

A CURE FOR WHAT ALES YOU Treefort tweaks Alefort experience this year JESSICA JOHNSON Under the dome at last year’s rowdy Alefort, ticket holders poured unlimited samples of local brews down their gullets. But this year, Treefort Music Fest decided to rethink Alefort. “Some of the kegs last year were blown after an hour,” said David Roberts, Treefort beer curator and former Brewforia staffer. “To me, the interest of the event is sampling beer, not becoming over-intoxicated. It’s to highlight … Boise’s beer culture.” David Roberts is helping highlight Boise’s beer culture at Treefort Music Fest’s Alefort. Brewforia, a chain of local beer markets and restaurants, oversaw Alefort last year. Francis, director of marketing and events at financially viable.” It invited a handful of local breweries, Payette Brewing Company. But Alefort will be resurrected this year, including Crooked Fence Brewing, Payette Payette will also offer its specialty brew, with more than 40 craft and specialty beers, Brewing Company and Sockeye Brewery, to Imaginary Friend Pale Wheat, throughout craft specialty brews and hand out unlimited a live music stage, a limited tasting table and the festival. Growlers for Gold—a silent auction of eight samples in a tent on Grove Street. Tickets “It straddles the line between a wheat growlers painted and decorated by local artcost $25 and granted revelers Alefort access beer and a pale ale. … We used a lot more ists to benefit Camp Rainbow Gold. for three days. hops than would be in your typical wheat The tent will be located next to the Main According to Treefort festival director Eric Stage at 13th and Grove streets, and will only beer,” said Francis. “It even has its own Gilbert, officials expressed concern about tap handles, co-branded with Treefort and Alefort’s security at a debriefing on last year’s be open Saturday, March 23, and Sunday, Payette Brewing.” March 24. This hideaway for music-festers festival at City Hall. In addition to Imaginary Friend Wheat, fires up at 11 a.m. each day, so folks can grab “Alefort was the only thing we had secuPayette has even created two spirit-infused a few tasters without missing any tunes. rity issues with,” said Gilbert. “We were not beers: The Bandito, an IPA with agave nectar Participating breweries have once again overseeing it, so we decided to tweak some crafted specialty, limited-run beers. On Satur- and tequila-soaked spires, and Mutton Buster things about it.” Brown with Fernet-soaked peaches. day, along with its original Dagger Falls IPA, Though neither the city nor Boise police Things will also get ritzier at this year’s Sockeye will sample a Belgian Dagger Falls would comment on last year’s Alefort secuand a Whiskey Cask Dagger Falls; Highlands Alefort with The Hot Beer Spot, which will rity issues, Adam Park, spokesman for Boise rotate through specialty beers from local Hollow will offer a cask-conditioned ThunMayor Dave Bieter, said the city’s job is to retailers. der Monkey Strong Bitter; Crooked Fence make sure the festival is safe. Organizers recommend you show up will have a Scotch Ale and a Potato Porter; “Every time we do a special event, we do and Tablerock will show off its Double Choc- early, or miss out on the limited tastings, a debriefing. … We always try to find every which on Saturday include Bier:Thirty’s olate Porter three different ways: standard, way to improve,” said Park. “We don’t have bourbon- and cinnamon-infused Union chili-infused and port barrel-aged. any control over what vendors are used by Jack IPA from Firestone Walker; Bittercreek “For Valentine’s Day, we wanted to do events. Our role within Treefort is to make Ale House’s Aecht Schlenkerla Rauchbier a beer that was an aphrodisure they’re all permitted and Urbock and BFM Square Root Sour Saison; siac, so we added treatments have proper security.” Saturday, March 23, and post-fermentation,” said Kerry and Bar Gernika’s 10 Barrel Apricot Crush According to Gilbert, Sunday, March 24, 11 a.m.-8 Caldwell, brewer at Tablerock and Ichtegem’s Grand Cru Flemish Red. On Treefort’s decision to handle p.m., $2 per tasting token. Sunday, the Boise Co-op will pour a MilleBrewpub. “It’s really amazbeer sales in-house this year nium Vintage Chimay Grand Reserve quad, ing what you can do with a ALEFORT was more about the financial 13th and Grove streets Vintage Stone Double Bastard Ale and an chocolate beer.” potential. treefortmusicfest.com/ Anchor Christmas vertical; while The Front Sunday, March 24, will “We’re trying to make this schedule/alefort. Door will pair small bites with beers from 10 include appearances from a sustainable event and we Barrel Brewing. the Ram, New Belgium and decided it’s smarter to sell the “Scheduled [keg] tappings are at least 40, Salmon River Brewing. Payette alcohol ourselves,” he said. maybe more,” said Roberts. Brewing will also bust out its Cucumber “Last year, we did not break even.” Patrons can purchase the advance $30 Cardamom Pilsner and a beer dubbed the But Rick Boyd, the owner of Brewforia, Alefort package, which comes with 15 beer Tropical Bunghole IPA. says he didn’t see much financial gain from tokens and a ticket to the Main Stage Friday, “The Tropical Bunghole is an Outlaw the popular beer tent last year. March 22 (which costs $30 on its own). At IPA that we dry-hopped with Citra hops. It’s “For us, it was primarily a financial the event, you can purchase beer tokens for amazing to see what a difference adding a decision [to leave],” said Boyd. “There redifferent hop can do to the brew,” said Sheila $2 and 5-ounce tasting cups for $1. ally wasn’t a way for us to make that event

—David Kirkpatrick

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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 8662759. FULL BODY MASSAGE Experienced Certified Massage Therapist. Full body massage, $40 for 60 mins. & $60 for 90 mins. Call or text Richard at 208695-9492 to schedule your massage.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE PETS

LILLY: 5-year-old female domestic shorthair. Sweet, sensitive, mature cat. Enjoys gentle attention and a relaxed home. (Kennel 14- #19380212)

POLLY: 2-year-old, petite, female with extra toes on her front paws. Cute, happy, purrs when you talk to her. (Kennel 19#19276462)

CRICKET: 1-year-old, male domestic shorthair. Warms up with calm attention. Loves to cuddle wrapped up in your arms. (Kennel 16- #19277930)

PRINGLES: 8-yearold male pitbull mix. Energetic, playful, better with older kids. Gets along with other dogs. (Kennel 419#18770084)

RADAR: 2-year-old, male Labrador retriever. Very playful, loves toys, likes walks. Needs some direction and training. (Kennel 319#19206017)

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These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

SYLVIA: I’m a quiet ASPEN: Do you like little thing, but BOY can petite kitties? My body I cuddle! is small but my personality is BIG!

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CADBURY: Just in time for Easter—this Cadbury is better than any egg!

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BW SPIRITUAL Visit: MiraclesInYourLife.com

BW YOGA BECOME A CERTIFIED YOGA INSTRUCTOR. Shanti Yoga. Ongoing Registration, call 208-634-9711, or email deb@shantiyogastudio.org FOUNDATIONS Svaroopa Yoga. Teach or deepen your personal practice. 5 day immersion program. March 21-25. 426-0670 or marlene@boiserivertimeyoga.com MEDIATION WEEKEND Swami Nimalananda Saraswati, is coming to Boise in May for a meditation weekend. Don’t miss this opportunity contact Carolyn at Park Centered Yoga, 571-5235 or parkcenteredyoga.com for details.

MUUV Yoga in an incredible setting on the Boise River: Vinyasa Flow is a fun, challenging class to build strength, body, mind, spirit. Visit MUUV.com to sign up! NORTH END IN BOISE Workshops & new classes for beginners & experienced. YogaTreeBoise.com or call 631-4727. NOW OPEN Hollywood Market Yoga. Hot, Healthy, Happy Yoga. 8th St. in Boise. 440-6344. PRANA FLOW With Marcy Midnight, Mon. 5:30 7 pm; Weds 7 - 8 am. This is an energetic, creative, full-spectrum approach to embodying the flow of yoga cultivated by Shiva Rea. Students are empowered to experience prana as the navigating source of yoga practice and vital living. All Levels, new students welcome! sageyogaboise.com TEACHER TRAINING Treasure Valley yoga teacher training in June 2013. Call for details & registration. 208-340-4771. RetreatsForRestoration.com

NYT CROSSWORD | CONDENSATION BY FINN VIGELAND / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Direct descendant of the Mayflower Pilgrims, e.g.

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5 Way up a mountain 9 Dutch flower 14 Humorist Bombeck

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21 Lancaster County folk 22 Kings of ___ (“Use Somebody” band) 23 Claw 24 Puccini piece 25 Prop in many an action film 27 Subject of big 1970s headlines 30 Elliptical 31 Adriatic resort 32 Western nickname

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33 Exchange 35 The second AfricanAmerican, after Hattie McDaniel, to be nominated for an Oscar 37 Completes at the request of 39 Old TV’s ___ Club 40 Hero of a Hindu epic 42 Zip 43 Papal court 45 Ape 46 ___ Bo 47 Enjoy 50 Seltzer 53 Many altar paintings of the Middle Ages 56 Long-distance letters 57 Onetime art glass manufacturer 61 Rock subgenre 62 Not loco 63 Some college dorm rooms 65 Pickle juice 66 Bud 67 Best Picture inspired by a Pulitzer-winning series of newspaper articles 71 Sporty cars 72 In other words 75 Book after II Timothy 76 Sitcom diner 78 Quipster 79 Femme fatale of cartoons 82 Director Van Sant 83 Ignite 85 Necklace decoration that’s not from the sea 88 Pressed upon 89 20-20, e.g. 91 Places to eat a late breakfast, maybe 92 Nitpick 95 Sound at a checkup 96 Means of inheritance 97 Unilever soap brand 98 Auto-shop offerings 102 Coastal structures countering erosion 104 Tale written in runes, perhaps 106 Unconvincing reason, informally 107 ___ Islands

108 Pong maker 109 Historic event on June 18, 1815 112 Like many Playboy Playmate photos 117 Certain nest eggs, for short 118 Actress Eleniak 119 Greek war goddess 120 SeaWorld resident 121 Irish county 122 Up to 123 Snookums 124 Leaves used in Mediterranean cuisine 125 Chop ___ 126 Hens and vixens

DOWN 1 Refuse to hand over 2 Slowly 3 ___ niçoise 4 Software for touch-up artists 5 Gothic window ornamentation 6 Cleansing agent 7 Bygone Ugandan tyrant 8 MG, e.g. 9 Marvin Gaye’s record label 10 Actress Thurman 11 D.M.V. issue 12 Relative of -esque 13 Symbol of the golden ratio 14 Last possible moment 15 Robes, scepters and such 16 Ski-mask feature 17 Queen ___ lace 19 20/20 26 Japanese drama 28 Adaptable aircraft, for short 29 Cobbler’s tool 34 HP product 35 Gives off 36 “Be quiet,” on scores 38 Line of defense? 39 Pasta primavera ingredients 41 Doc grp. 44 Marge who owned the Cincinnati Reds 45 Recurring ideas 47 Intervene

48 Fleet 49 N.Y.U. athlete 51 Where people are always changing? 52 One coming out 54 N.B.A. star Ming 55 “AC360” channel 58 Nabob 59 Unabridged 60 Like matryoshka dolls 63 Frame jobs 64 Horn of Africa resident 68 What an optimist has 69 Kind of income 70 Antique restorer’s “touch,” in brief 73 Sanctuary 74 Old Dungeons & Dragons co. 77 Coach Don with two Super Bowl victories 80 “Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs” song 81 Word on either side of “to” 83 Pivotal point 84 Prominent features of the theme from “Star Wars” 86 Cupcake 87 Swimming, diving, etc.

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89 Open-faced sandwich topped with a fancy spread 90 “Amen to that!” 93 It’s clear 94 Dolt 97 N.Y.C. airport 99 Early stone tool 100 First-year 101 Toasts 102 Responded sheepishly? 103 Wine aperitif 105 Former “American Idol” judge 106 Irish county 110 Drop ___ 111 Coup de ___ (gunshot: Fr.) 113 Kind of connection from a mobile device to a PC 114 Doo-wop syllable 115 Suffers from 116 U.K. record co. Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S M O I N E S T E X T H O R N S H I A

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I S R E A N I O N D N G O F J S T O U D O R S T R U C T K A T E O N H S O F J A I L L I M E O F T A R E R I G H N S O C A P O E S S O F A L O T T E N O E W A R F R I N E S Y S T A T

D S I P O Y R E G E I O N R A I O S E C K A N I C A F R T S O L O B P R I H O G R A L A R E S A E D

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GETTING PAROLE IN IDAHO IS NOT EASY

If you have a family member or friend who is trying, there are things they can & must do to help their cause. Contact Maloney Law on our 24 hr. line 208-392-5366 for a free consultation. Assistance available in parole & probation violations also.

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NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES

Kolding, Brenda Rebecca Kolding and Gannon Viktor Kolding, respectively. The reason for the change in names is: aesthetic and personal reasons. A hearing on the Petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on April 11, 2013 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the Court a good reason against the

name change. Date: FEB 15 2013 Christopher D. Rich By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk Pub. Feb. 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2013.

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Kaj Peter Fogdall Brenda Rebecca Fogdall Gannon Viktor Fogdall Case No. CV NC 1302386 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Family) A Petition to change the names of Kaj Peter Fogdall (an adult), Brenda Rebecca Fogdall (an adult) and Gannon Viktor Fogdall (a minor), all now residing in the city of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court of Ada County, Idaho. The names will change to Kaj Peter

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COMMUNITY BW VOLUNTEERS PAID RESEARCH OPPORTUNITY In-person interviews for pre-testing the National Highway Traffic

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Nourish beginnings, let us nourish beginnings,” wrote poet Muriel Rukeyser in her poem “Elegy in Joy.” “Not all things are blest,” she continued, “but the seeds of all things are blest. The blessing is in the seed.” I urge you to adopt this perspective in the coming weeks, Aries. Be extra sweet and tender and reverent toward anything that is just sprouting, awakening or that invokes the sacredness of right now. “This moment,” sang Rukeyser, “this seed, this wave of the sea, this look, this instant of love.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): As you seek more insight on your situation, consider the possibility that the bad guys may not be as bad as they seem. They might simply be so deeply under the spell of their own pain that they can’t see straight. And as for the good guys: I wonder if they are as purely good as they would like you to imagine. It might be the case that they are at least partially serving their own self-interest, while pretending to be utterly altruistic. If there’s any truth to these speculations, Taurus, you’d be wise to stay uncommitted and undecided for now. Don’t get emotionally riled up, embroiled in conflict and don’t burn any bridges. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Here’s your mantra: “I get fresher under pressure.” Say it 10 times right now and then repeat it in 10-repetition bursts whenever you need a tune-up. What it means is that you stay cool when the contradictions mount and the ambiguities multiply. And more than that: You actually thrive on the commotion. You get smarter amidst the agitation. You become more perceptive and more creative as the shifts swirl faster and harder. Tattoo these words of power on your imagination: “I get fresher under pressure.” CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Stories happen to those who tell them,” said the ancient Greek historian Thucydides. Modern radio journalist Ira Glass goes even further. “Great stories happen to those who can tell them,” he has said. Let’s make this strategy a centerpiece of your life plan in the weeks ahead, Cancerian. I have a suspicion that you will need firsthand experience of novel, interesting stories. They will provide the precise nourishment necessary to inspire the blooming of your most soulful ambitions. One way to help ensure that the best stories will flow your way is to regale receptive people with transformative tales from your past. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Dear Rob: I’m spreading the word about Beer Week in your town, and I’d love to see you and your beer-loving readers at some of the events. Any chance you can include some

34 | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

coverage of Beer Week celebrations in your upcoming column? Cheers, Patricia.” Dear Patricia: I don’t do product placement or other forms of secret advertising in my horoscopes. To allow it would violate the sacred trust I have with my readers, who rely on me to translate the meaning of the cosmic signs without injecting any hidden agendas. It is true that Leos might be prone to imbibing great quantities of beer in the coming week, simply because they’d benefit from lowering their inhibitions, getting in touch with their buried feelings and expanding their consciousness. But to be frank, I’d rather see them do that without the aid of drugs and alcohol. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Hoping to stir up some fun trouble, I posted the following message on my Facebook page: “Don’t judge someone just because they sin differently than you.” A torrent of readers left comments in response. My favorite was from Sue Sims, who said, “Yeah, they might be better at your kind of sin and you might learn something!” That advice is just the kind of healing mischief you need right now, Virgo. It’s a bit ironic, true, but still: Take it and run with it. Study the people who have mad skills at pulling off the rousing adventures, daring pleasures and interesting “sins” that you’d like to call your own. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The French verb “renverser” can be translated as “to turn upsidedown” or “to reverse the flow.” The adjectival form is renversant, which means “stunning” or “astonishing.” I think you may soon have experiences that could be described by those words. There’s a good chance that a dry, impoverished part of your life will get a juicy, fertile infusion. A deficiency you have worried about might get at least half-filled. An inadequacy that makes you feel sad may be bolstered by reinforcements. Alas, there could also be a slight reversal that’s not so gratifying. One of your assets may temporarily become irrelevant. But the trade-off is worth it, Libra. Your gains will outstrip your loss. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Professor Martyn Poliakoff creates short Youtube videos to help teach the public about chemistry. In one video, he explained why an explanation he gave in a previous video was completely mistaken. “It’s always good for a scientist to be proved wrong,” he confesses cheerfully. Then he moves on to speculate about what the right answer might be. I love humility like that. It’s admirable. It’s also the best way to find out the truth about reality. I hope you will summon a similar attitude in the coming weeks, Scorpio: a generous curiosity that makes you eager to

learn something new about stuff you thought you had all figured out. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): On the one hand, menopausal women are no longer able to bear children. On the other hand, they often overflow with fresh possibilities and creative ideas. More time is available to them because their children have moved out of the house or don’t require as much care. They can begin new careers, focus on their own development and devote more attention to their personal needs. So in one way, their fertility dries up; in another way, it may awaken and expand. I suspect that whether or not you are menopausal, you are on the cusp of a comparable shift in your fecundity: one door closing, another door swinging open. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The TV reality show Freaky Eaters profiled a woman named Kelly, who had eaten nothing but cheesy potatoes for 30 years. Her average intake: 8 pounds of potatoes and 4 cups of cheese per day. “I love cheesy potatoes,” she testified. “They’re stewy, gooey and just yum-yum-yummy. They’re like crack to me.” I’m a bit concerned that you’re flirting with behavior comparable to hers. Not in regards to cheesy potatoes, of course, but to some other fetish. I will ask you to make sure that you’re not starting to over-specialize. It would be wise to avoid obsessing on a single type of anything. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the 17th century, polite people referred to mountains as “warts” and “boils on the Earth’s complexion.” So says Robert Macfarlane in his book Mountains of the Mind. Annie Dillard describes the peculiar behavior of educated European tourists in the 18th century. When they visited the Alps, she writes in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek, “they deliberately blindfolded their eyes to shield themselves from the evidence of the Earth’s horrid irregularity.” Don’t be anything like those dumb sophisticates, Aquarius. When you spy irregularities in the coming weeks, consider the possibility that they are natural and healthy. This will allow you to perceive their useful beauty. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You are not for sale. Remember? Your scruples and ideals and talents cannot be bought off for any amount of money. You will not be cheated out of your birthright and you will not allow your dreams to be stolen. Although it’s true that you may have to temporarily rent out your soul from time to time, you will never auction it off for good. I’m sure you know these things, Pisces, but I suspect it’s time to renew your fiery commitment to them.

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Christopher Lee Green Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1303205 NOTICE OF NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Christopher Lee Green, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Christyna Lynn Green. The reason for the change in name is: Transition from male to female and gender reassignment. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on April 18, 2013 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: FEB 26, 2013 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Tiffany Lynn McKinney Case No. CV NC 1303023 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Tiffany Lynn McKinney, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Tiffany Lynn Davis. The reason for the change in name is: to share the same last name as my domestic partner. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on April 23, 2013 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Feb 25 2013 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. March 6, 13, 20, 27, 2013. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Kya Nichole Garcia Legal name of child Case No. CV NC 1223597 ANOTHER NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor)) A Petition to change the name of Kya Garcia, a minor, now residing in the city of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Kya Nichole Fivecoat. The reason for the change in name is: So Kya has the same last name as her parent. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on April 9, 2013 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change.

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A Petition to change the name of Johnny Mineko Minnis, now residing in the City of Boise, Ada County, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court of Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Johnny Mineko Jeglum. The reason for the name change is so that the child will have the same last name as her mother. A hearing for the Petition is scheduled for 25 of April, 2013 at 130 p.m. at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. DATED this 26th day of February, 2013. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH DEIRDRE PRICE Clerk of the Court Fourth Judicial District March 13, 20, 27, April 3, 2013. LEGAL NOTICE SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION CASE NO. CV OC 201203642, IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA, Rivers End Neighborhood Association, Plaintiff, v. Shelle Allen, Defendant. TO: SHELLE ALLEN You have been sued by Rivers End Neighborhood Association, the Plaintiff, in the District Court of the Fourth Judicial District in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 201203642. The nature of the claim against you is for unpaid homeowner association assessments, more particularly described in the Complaint. Any

time after twenty (20) days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have filed a written response in the proper form, including the Case No., and paid any required filing fee to the Clerk of the Court at: Clerk of the Court Ada County Courthouse 200 W. Front Street Boise, Idaho 83702-7300 Telephone: (208) 287-6900 and served a copy of your response on the Plaintiff’s attorney at: Sarah Anderson of VIAL FOTHERINGHAM LLP, 12828 LaSalle Dr Ste 101, Boise, ID 83702, Telephone 208-629-4567, Facsimile 208-3921400. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter.

DATE: Feb 27 2012. BY: CHRISTOPHER D. RICH, CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: /s/ LUTOLEDO, Deputy Clerk Pub. Mar. 20, 27, April 3, & 10, 2013. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Robert Moroni Lazenby Case No. CV NC 1301015 Another NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Robert Moroni Lazenby, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Bobbie Angel. The reason for the change in name is : to reflect the change in my gender identity-Female. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on May 9, 2013 at the Ada County

Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: MAR 14 2013 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. March 20, 27, April 3, & 10, 2013

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Date: FEB 25 2013 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk March 13, 20, 27 & April 3, 2013. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of: JOHNNY MINEKO MINNIS Child(ren) Under the Age of Eighteen Years. Case No.: CV NC 1303019

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MARCH 20–26, 2013 | 35


Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 39  

To Pay or Not to Pay: That is the Question. Local performers and the shadow economy.

Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 39  

To Pay or Not to Pay: That is the Question. Local performers and the shadow economy.