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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 36 FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013

TAK EE E ON E! ROTUNDA 7

POT PROPOSALS Idaho Legislature moves to lock down anti-marijuana stance FEATURE 11

WHAT IFS U of I student’s death highlights trail of missed opportunities NOISE 20

PREACHING THE GOSPEL Reverend Horton Heat spreads the good word in Boise FOOD 24

BEER FRIENDLY New legislation looks to make business easier for craft brewers

“We, as sheriffs, have to decide upon ourselves if laws are unconstitutional.”

NEWS 7

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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagdone ZHagadone@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Sultan of Events: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editors: Amy Atkins, Jay Vail Interns: Sam Alderman, Morgan Barnhart, Lauren Bergeson, Jessica Johnson Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Jo Faulkner, David Kirkpatrick, Christina Marfice, Ted Rall, Christine Ritchie Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Brad Hoyt, Brad@boiseweekly.com Zach Ritchie, Zach@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Elijah Jensen, Julia Green, Jeremy Lanningham, James Lloyd, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow, Garry Trudeau Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2013 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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NOTE KEEP YOUR FRIENDS CLOSE, AND YOUR TEXTS CLOSER This week’s feature is an emotionally difficult one to read, but it’s an important piece. The story of Joseph Wiederrick, a freshman at University of Idaho who died after spending a frigid night beneath a bridge in January, serves as much more than the usual cautionary tale about youth and its perceived invincibility. Wiederrick’s death wasn’t a freak occurrence. He didn’t get killed in a car wreck, or fall out of a window or die in a brawl. His death relied on a breakdown of something so simple we increasingly take it for granted: communication. It is still possible, even in our hyper-connected world, for a person to simply fall through the cracks. A missed phone call, an ignored text message, an unanswered knock at the door can mean the difference between life and death, and Wiederrick’s life could have been saved by any number of the people he encountered along his tragic, mysterious latenight wander through the wilds of Moscow. Yet the lines of communication he tried to open failed. The piece in this week’s paper, written by Jacob Jones of the Pacific Northwest Inlander, in Spokane, Wash., is a finely wrought examination of just how Wiederrick was allowed simply to walk out into the darkness and never return. It’s also a powerful reminder that our “social safety net” starts at the most basic level: people looking out for each other. Elsewhere in this week’s Boise Weekly, George Prentice braves the wilds of rural western Idaho/eastern Oregon, where some county sheriffs are telling their constituents they won’t comply with federal efforts to regulate firearms. He also gets a little legal insight on whether the sheriffs can actually back up their rhetoric: Turns out they’re shooting from the hip—mostly. Finally, you might have noticed (if you read the Idaho Statesman Feb. 24), that the paper has come to its senses and brought back Doonesbury. Boise Weekly never lost its senses—we picked it up when the daily dropped it—so we’re keeping the comic anyway. Trudeau fans rejoice. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Susan Valiquette TITLE: Boise Winter MEDIUM: Digital photo shot with iPhone/Instagram. ARTIST STATEMENT: Winter scenes are often hard to come by in the valley. Always glad to see the snow, but not heartbroken when it’s gone.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

SHEEP, NOT GOATS A proposed measure in the Idaho Legislature would penalize sheepherders for walking off the job—a problem that bill supporters allege costs Idaho ranchers thousands of dollars and swells the ranks of undocumented workers. Get the full story on Citydesk.

THE SEQUESTER’S STING What would the sequester package of federal spending cuts mean to Idaho? A loss of $2.9 million in education funding for children with disabilities, $857,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection and a furlough of approximately 2,000 civilian Department of Defense employees, to start. See a full list on Citydesk.

DIGITALLY INDIGENOUS Boise Art Museum’s latest show, Origins, is a threepart exhibit that draws from Native American, Papuan (New Guinea) and Malian cultures from the pre-European contact period to the present day. Learn more about it on Cobweb.

WANT TO BE A CYBORG? Google is looking for people to beta test its new Google Glass visor doodad. Find out how to put your name in the hat and what it might be like to use one on Cobweb.

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NOTE

3

BILL COPE

5

TED RALL

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NEWS Western Idaho sheriffs weigh in on gun control, even if it might not be completely legal

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ROTUNDA

7

CITIZEN

9

FEATURE Trail of Questions

11

BW PICKS

14

FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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DOONESBURY

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NOISE Reverend Horton Heat preaches the good word in Boise

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Eastern Oregon Film Festival readies for its first showing

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FOOD New legislation may make life easier for craft brewers

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WINE SIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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HOBO JARGON

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

REAL G.A.G.

Cope baby takes corporate media up on offer To: tobillornottobill@elsinore.urp Subject : Are you in? Mr. Cope, we here at the G.A.G. Media Group are currently engaged in the development of new reality-based programming, a table to which we have been late in coming. I’m afraid my predecessor misjudged the market for “infonewstertainment”—as we insiders call it—and he overextended our programming down other avenues of televisable content, such as an emphasis on peppy doctor shows (e.g., Doctor Don’s Poop Hour), second-tier talent spectacles (e.g., So You Think You Can Scrapbook), and vintage collections from the Golden Age of broadcasting (The Munsters, weekend marathons of Mr. Ed, etc.). However, owing to a dismal market share for the past 37 quarters, my predecessor has been reassigned to the Scenic Calendar Division and I have been tasked to build an entirely new vision for our Television Division. After witnessing the popularity of series centered on the lives of people previously considered too vacuous, too unstable or too icky for even 15 minutes of fame, I am determined to take G.A.G. further into this genre than any broadcast organization has gone before. This brings me to you, Mr. Cope. I see from our records that you have been approached on several occasions in regards to other G.A.G. projects. Your assignment, should you choose to take it, is to conceptualize a cast of people who, by virtue of their unusual personalities, unusual occupations or unusual lifestyles, are camera-worthy. They could be a family, involved in some specific occupation choice, or drawn together by a common interest—we don’t care. Not as long as they have that magical quality which brings an audience back, week after week, to see what they are up to. We would prefer that whatever reality-based concept you come up with be set in Idaho as we are committed to the idea that Idaho can compete with places like New Jersey, Louisiana and Florida when it comes to repulsive people we can watch endlessly, even if it makes us feel queasy and disgusted with ourselves to do it. I should also mention that when I say “reality-based television,” you are free to interpret that to whatever degree you feel is compatible with “ratings-based television.” Thank you for considering this proposal, Matt Schlurrie, Dir. of Programming, G.A.G. Media Group

ON PAGE 32

Re: Are you in? You bet your bippy I’m in, Matt baby! I’ve been conceptualizing about just this sort of crap for a long time. At least since season one of Hoarders. But then Honey Boo Boo showed up, and I thought, “Bill baby, you absolutely have to get a piece of this!” So I put a prospectus together that’ll knock your jockeys off. Get comfortable, dude, and let your mind float ... Picture the Flart family, immigrants to Boise (better yet ... Eagle) from Mississippi. Maybe Alabama. You know what I mean. From someplace where just to hear them talk is gut-busting hilarious, no matter what they say. (Suggestion: Whatever family we pick to cast in this, they should change their name legally to “Flart.” They’ll be glad they did when that money starts rolling in.) Heading the clan is Bart Flart. He’s tried alligator wrangling, catfish grabbing, working in a pawn shop, tracking Sasquatch, bidding on the contents of abandoned storage sheds, catching rattlesnakes in gunny sacks and pimping out Harleys. But somehow, those career choices did not satisfy his soul. (Suggestion: We fill out Bart’s character with flashbacks to his earlier days and have him reminisce about not being able to put his whole heart into bellowing “Wahoo!” like the other guys. It could be sadly touching, don’t you think, Matt baby?) So Bart has moved his family to a tent on the hill above the Ada County dump, where they fight over, laugh over, cry over and do their family love thing over crud that you and I throw away. Get it? The Flarts are trash pickers. Ergo, the name of the series: The Lords of the Landfill. Tell me that isn’t catchy. There’s his wife, Alma, and the seven little Flarts: Jenny June, Burp, Elvis, the twins Flopsy and Mopsy, that pudgy little firecracker Elvisina, and of course, the baby… Pisser. Jenny June is the oldest at 14, so Bart and Alma don’t mind so much that she brought her boyfriend Curly along to (as J.J. puts it) “keep me all worm and coozy at night”—which, when said with that mushy Southern drawl, will be just a hoot. (Suggestion: I can see a running gag where family members stumble across J.J. and Curly, hiding out behind discarded kitchen appliances and under torn-up sofas, in one state of carnal entanglement or another. Is that funny, or what?) For dramatic tension, we can introduce other families to compete with the Flarts over the junk of Hidden Hollow. Like, I see one bunch imported from the refuse dumps of Mumbai and another from the mountains of garbage around Rio in Brazil. Just thinking about the inevitable language bloopers breaks me up, how about you? Let me know when we can get started, Matt baby. We need to get going on this before those guys from the Arts and Entertainment channel get wind of it and steal the idea. Chow—Bill baby WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | 5

OPINION/TED RALL

STUCK

Why can’t the United States move forward? “Your dearest wish is for our state structure and ideological system never to change, to remain as they are for centuries. But history is not like that. Every system either finds a way to develop or else collapses.” Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn wrote that in 1974, in his famous “Letter to the Soviet Leaders.” It could just as easily be addressed to President Barack Obama, Congress, the media, corporate chiefs and others who maintain the power structure in the United States. The United States is as ossified as the USSR was before its collapse. Shortly after the start of the financial meltdown, polls found Americans disgusted with the capitalist system. Tens of millions said they would prefer socialism. When the Occupy Wall Street movement took off, mainstream pundits began using the “R” word, revolution—but only to ask a question with a predetermined answer. Regime change, they said, was neither desirable nor possible. Too bad. We used to be a growing country. Not any more. It’s been 53 years since we added a star to Old Glory. We used to amend the Constitution to suit changing mores. The last major amendment, granting the vote to 18-year-olds, was ratified in 1971. Apparently equal rights for women is too much to ask. We don’t build anymore. Think about infrastructure. The last major public works project in U.S. history was the Interstate Highway System, built in the 1950s—not coincidentally when the economy was booming. Our political system is ossified too. The massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut prompted calls for tighter gun control. But nobody—not even liberals, the

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traditional enemies of gun rights—argued for getting rid of the Second Amendment which, depending on your interpretation of the prefatory comma, allows us to join a militia or carry guns in our waistbands. “I have no intention of taking away folks’ guns,” Obama said. Why not? Personally, I’m against gun control and I’m glad that little is going to change. Yet I find it disturbing that the Second Amendment is considered sacrosanct. Pointing out that the country is very different now than it was in 1789 seems reasonable. A smart country, one willing to weigh the alternatives when trying to solve a problem, should be able to discuss the possibility of repealing the Second Amendment. Look at our national political dialogue, which ranges from center-right to right. Whole strains of ideology are off the table. We pretend most of the ideological spectrum doesn’t exist. Not smart. Our national unwillingness and/or inability to have a wide-ranging debate reminds me of New York City, where I live. There are no public restrooms. Restaurants and businesses post “Restrooms for Customers Only” signs on their doors. Yet peeing outside is against the law; in fact, it’s public exposure, a sex offense that can land you on a pervert registry. A child could tell you this is insane. We New Yorkers don’t even talk about it. Like Germans on their way to work in the early 1940s, wondering what that funny smell coming from the camp down the road might be coming from, we pretend that this is all perfectly normal. 10 As a recent New York Times article

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NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

SCR-112 claims Idaho is ‘targeted for a 2014 medical marijuana initiative.’

SENATE PUSHES ANTI-POT MEASURE

(Left to right) Malheur County, Ore. Sheriff Brian Wolfe, Adams County Sheriff Ryan Zollman, Washington County Sheriff Matt Thomas and Payette County Sheriff Chad Huff.

GUNNING FOR A FIGHT “We, as sheriffs, have to decide upon ourselves if laws are unconstitutional.” GEORGE PRENTICE Including plenty of diatribes against the U.S. government, prayer to remember those who have given their lives to defend the Constitution, and a liberal dose of conservative politics, three west Idaho lawmen—and a counterpart from eastern Oregon to round out the armed quartet—told a Payette town hall meeting Feb. 20 that they would try to “keep the peace” at the standing-roomonly event. But before the evening was over, the sheriffs representing Adams, Malheur, Payette and Washington counties had riled up the crowd by declaring they would deny federal access to gun registrations, decide for themselves which laws were constitutional or unconstitutional, and even talked about creating an armed “posse”—a formal list of citizens that lawmen could turn to when things took a turn for the worse. “Yes, I’ve had a posse proposal sitting on my desk for a while,” said Payette County Sheriff Chad Huff. “I was waiting for this meeting to see what the pulse was.” Pulses and tempers ran high for two solid hours as Huff, Adams County Sheriff Ryan Zollman, Washington County Sheriff Matt Thomas and Malheur County, Ore., Sheriff Brian Wolfe each took the stage at the packedto-the-gills Payette High School Auditorium. “Have you seen this bill from Feen-steen (sic),” said Huff, butchering the last name of California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein (pronounced FINE-stine), the lawmaker who wants to prohibit certain semi-automatic weapons and ammunition magazines that carry more than 10 rounds. “That’s absolutely crazy,” he said. In spite of repeated attempts by audience members to correct Huff’s mispronunciation, he continued to call the senator WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

“Feensteen” on four more occasions. In fact, Huff struggled with a few more words through the evening, finding it impossible to pronounce “prohibition” and “parochial,” without some help. But Huff laughed off his difficulties with the language, instead zeroing in on President Barack Obama’s “Now Is the Time” executive orders, issued Jan. 16: a 23-point plan to curb gun violence, including one recommendation that would allow doctors to talk to their patients about guns in their homes. “I think that’s absolutely ridiculous,” said Huff. Another of Obama’s executive orders that would make “relevant data available to the federal background check system,” took another verbal beating from each of the sheriffs. “My name would be on that list that they would want because I have a lot of guns and I’m not giving them up,” said Zollman, the newly elected sheriff of mostly rural Adams County. “I can tell you all here tonight that I will not allow any information to be shared regarding weapons possessed or held by my office.” Washington County Sheriff Thomas echoed Zollman’s pushback. “I would tell [federal agents] quite simply that that’s not happening today, and it would be best if they left our county,” he said to cheers from the 500-plus crowd. Malheur County Sheriff Wolfe took the federal pushback one step further, saying he had gone as far as tossing federal agents out of his jurisdiction. “Yes, there have been times when we asked federal authorities to leave our county,” he said. “They performed an illegal entry once, and I told them to get out. Since

then, we’ve worked things out.” Wolfe told the gathering that as he was preparing his remarks for the Feb. 20 town hall, his daughter approached him to remind him that her current seventh-grade U.S. history studies might make her better prepared to offer constitutional insight. “She said, ‘If you’re talking about the U.S. Constitution, I should be the one going. Not you. I know more than you do,’” said Wolfe. “Perhaps she’s right.” Indeed, her father and his fellow lawmen continually invoked the Constitution, though their references to it changed throughout the evening. At the beginning of the town hall presentation, the sheriffs used the phrase “as our Constitutional rights guarantee,” but by the end, that line had morphed into “as our God-given rights guarantee.” Huff tossed some more verbal red meat to the crowd when he said that he knew better than the president, governor or most other lawmakers when it came to interpreting the Constitution. “We, as sheriffs, have to decide upon ourselves if laws are unconstitutional,” he said. While Huff’s remarks may have been strong rhetoric, David Leroy—former Idaho attorney general, former lieutenant governor and current Boise attorney—told Boise Weekly that the comments may have missed the mark on how our nation makes, interprets and enforces the law. “We require public officials to take an oath to be faithful to state and federal constitutions when they’re sworn into office,” said Leroy. “The impact of that is that even a sheriff must obey the laws as interpreted.” Huff also told the Feb. 20 gather8 ing that he answered only to his

Coeur d’Alene Republican Rep. Luke Malek already knows how he’s going to vote on Senate Concurrent Resolution 112—a toothless bill that states Idaho should never legalize marijuana for any purpose. “Having been a prosecutor, I know what a farce medical marijuana is,” Malek said in a wide-ranging conversation for this week’s Citizen feature (Page 9). Malek will have his chance soon enough, after the Idaho Senate voted 29-5 to send the measure to the House. “[Marijuana] is a significant problem,” said the resolution’s sponsor, Boise Republican Sen. Chuck Winder. “There is a national effort to legalize marijuana; not only for medical purposes, but for recreational purposes.” Winder pointed to November 2012 decisions by Washington and Colorado voters to legalize recreational use of marijuana, as well as Oregon’s continued acceptance of medical marijuana. “Idaho is a targeted state,” said Winder. “Idaho continues to see increased marijuana busts on our interstates and it’s impacting our communities, our citizens and our children.” While Winder’s measure claims that Idaho has been “targeted for a 2014 medical marijuana initiative” and that pot legalization has led to “social, economic and legal chaos,” it does nothing more than assert that the Legislature “takes this opportunity to state its opposition” to the legal use of marijuana for any purpose. Ketchum Democratic Sen. Michelle Stennett told Winder that his resolution was “chasing ghosts that haven’t appeared yet.” “The part that disturbs me with this resolution is its overreach,” Stennett said, arguing on behalf of cancer patients who turn to marijuana for relief from chemotherapy treatments. “Please don’t dismiss this.” Boise Democratic Sen. Branden Durst echoed Stennett’s plea, asking, “Is this the right fight to pick?” But in his final argument, Winder asked, “How far do you lower the bar?” Ultimately Winder won out, with 28 senators from both parties supporting his resolution and only five Democrats—Moscow Sen. Dan Schmidt and Boise Sens. Cherie Buckner-Webb and Elliot Werk—joining Durst and Stennett in voting no. Meanwhile, Malek anxiously awaits his opportunity to weigh in on SCR 112. The Coeur d’Alene Republican is a member of the House State Affairs Committee, which will first consider the measure when it surfaces on the House side of the Idaho Legislature. —George Prentice

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NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

SAME NAME, NEW FACE Idaho Dems change Larrys: from Grant to Kenck GEORGE PRENTICE It’s not every day that an Idaho Democrat wins a statewide office in a landslide. Of course, it helps if he’s the only nominee. “The vote was by acclamation,” said Larry Kenck, the new Idaho Democratic Party chairman. “I had great support.” Minutes after the Feb. 23 vote of the Democratic Party State Central Committee, Kenck sat down with predecessor Larry Grant to talk to Boise Weekly about his plans for the party and how he was reluctant to take on the task at hand until a phone call from “the other Larry.” “A group from the central committee came to me and told me Larry [Grant] was resigning,” said Kenck. “I was pretty sad about that part.” But shortly after his December 2012 decision to step aside, Grant said Kenck—a Post Falls native and former Teamsters Union official—quickly came to the top of a very short list of possible successors. Kenck quickly added, “Nobody suggested that Grant step down.” “Larry [Grant] exited on his own and he did so gallantly,” said Kenck. “I had been in touch with a lot of Democratic movers and shakers about the possibility of me stepping in, but when Larry called me, that was the tipping point.” Grant told BW that he was more than

Larry Kenck, 64, (left) took the reins from Larry Grant, 67, (right) Feb. 23 when the Idaho Democratic Party State Central Committee unanimously elected Kenck its new party chairman.

ready to retire after accomplishing many of his objectives for the party. “One of the past problems in the Idaho Democratic Party was that they usually tried to find the richest white guy they could to run for office,” said Grant. “When I came on board as chair in early 2011, we had lost three seats in the Legislature and lost a congressional seat. We were not a very happy bunch and, frankly, not well organized. I knew what we needed to do to get back in the game.” Grant said by the time he tossed the keys to Kenck, his executive staff was “solid,” the party was financially in the black, and Idaho Democrats had recruited more candidates for the 2012 election than they had for any other contest in more than a decade.

constituents, “Not the governor; not the president.” “The sheriff is on stronger ground there,” said Leroy. “Federal executive orders are indeed mandates to federal executive officers and not local officials.” When asked his opinion about proposals to limit ammunition magazines on assault weapons, Huff said, “In my world, the more rounds the better. The less I have to reload the better.” Wolfe grabbed the microphone to also rail against President Obama’s calls for magazine restrictions. That’s about the time that New Plymouth Republican Sen. Monty Pearce took to the stage to chime in. “Obama has defied and walked all over the Constitution,” said Pearce. Pearce was joined by his fellow District 9 legislator, Republican Rep. Judy Boyle. “I sure didn’t vote for Obama and I’m pretty sure you didn’t either,” she said to cheers, which erupted into a standing ovation. Boyle then introduced yet another legislator who’d made the trek to Payette County: Republican Rep. Mark Patterson, who represents Boise’s District 15. Patterson, who up until recently was best known for stretching the truth—neither his claim to be a graduate of the University of Southern California nor a professional road-racing cyclist 7

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Kenck said Democrats—while still a slim minority at the Statehouse—stopped losing political turf in 2012. “We received more votes and closed margins in some important counties,” said Kenck. “We’re gaining our relevancy back. And now we’re understood not as a party of change but as a party of progression.” Grant added that he has reason for optimism in the 2014 elections, because minority parties tend to make gains during mid-term elections. “And I’ll tell you what we’re going to be driving home: education, the economy and ethics, that’s our focus now,” said Grant. “We’re not talking about guns. We’re not talking about abortion. It’s all about the three ‘E’s.’”

is true (BW, Citydesk, Dec. 18, 2012, “Mark Patterson: Stretching the Truth, Inaccuracies and Falsehoods”)—told the Payette gathering that he knew he was “on the right side of right” when it came to the right to bear arms. “And that’s why I’m personally working on some new legislation that will protect everyone here,” said Patterson. “And when you see my gun bills come up before the Legislature, I need you to travel to Boise to support me.” Huff said he was “constantly being approached” by his constituents, saying their “inherent rights were being threatened” by the Obama administration. “And that’s why I’ve been approached by many of those citizens to adopt a posse program,” he said. “I’m seriously looking at keeping a list of armed citizens if the need arises.” Huff will be able to build up his support at his next big public event, a so-called “Patriots Night,” where he’ll share the microphone with Larry Pratt, executive director of Gun Owners of America. The $10 admission to the Saturday, March 23, event at McCain Middle School in Payette will also include a unique drawing: four guns will be raffled through the evening. Tickets are $10; three for $20. Magazines not included.

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CITIZEN

LUKE MALEK Freshman lawmaker on health care exchange, personal freedom and Garth Brooks GEORGE PRENTICE

You’re the oldest of four boys? I am. I have a 26-year-old brother in the Air Force, another brother who just turned 23 and my youngest brother is a junior in high school. We’re named Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. What? Yeah. We’re Catholic. What was the big dream for you as a young man? I wanted to be a singer. I saw Garth Brooks in concert and thought I could do that. Did you pursue that dream? I did. I got a scholarship to study music at the College of Idaho but it turned out that music theory wasn’t for me. What was the fork in the road that set you on another path? I ran for student government and became the student body president in 2002-2003. Those were some pretty controversial times at the College of Idaho. How close did you get to the conversations about how financially tenuous things were? I was the first student to know that we had an $11 million shortfall. The president pulled me into his office and said, “We may

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have to shut our doors.” What could a student do about any of that? We were either going to turn into a professional-technical college or I proposed a plan to undergo a strategic breakdown to return to the roots of the college. And that’s what we did. What did you decide to do after graduation? I was pretty tired so I decided to work construction. Plus, I shooed horses. I did that all the way through high school and college. Do you have a family of your own? I’m engaged. How did you meet your fiancée? When we were in law school at the University of Idaho. We’ve been dating four years this month. Do you have a wedding date? Sunday, September 1. When did you first decide to run for the Idaho Legislature? When Marge Chadderdon, the person who held this seat before me, decided to retire. She was extremely encouraging.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Singer, prosecutor, construction worker, lawmaker. And he’s only 31. A freshman in the Idaho House, Coeur d’Alene Republican Rep. Luke Malek dove into the political deep end when he was tasked with membership on the House Health and Welfare, State Affairs and Judiciary and Rules committees. “I love this,” said Malek, but added: “Having said that, I knew it would be difficult, but it is far more difficult than anything I imagined.” Between committee sessions, floor votes and a constant stream of meetings, Boise Weekly sat down with Malek to talk about his family (both parents are physicians), his music and and a search for political harmony.

What was the foundation of your campaign? I had already shared some pretty strong opinions in op-ed pieces that I had written for the Coeur d’Alene Press. Did any of those columns stir up more controversy than the rest? My columns about marijuana really struck some chords. What do you believe are the risks of legalizing recreational use of marijuana or opening the doors to medical marijuana? Having been a prosecutor, I know what a farce medical marijuana is. This campaign to legalize medical marijuana is a predatory campaign by the drug cartels. Do you think there is particular risk to Idaho with Washington’s decision to legalize recreational use of marijuana? Once you legalize it you will have no ability to regulate it and it will be opening the floodgates for drug distribution. You sit on the House Health and Welfare Committee and you came out on record, along with a number of other legislative freshmen, in support of Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter’s proposal for a state-run health insurance exchange. To be clear, we said we would not 10 support the governor’s bill without

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CITIZEN specific parameters. What needs to be included is a provision that says we’ll be watching this at every step. If we choose to dissolve this six months or six years from now, it would be the federal government’s responsibility to come in and pick this up. We’ve been told that this is better for small businesses and our constituents. If that turns out not to be the case, we’ll dissolve the exchange.

conservative values up to that point.

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At the age of 31 most people are hitting their professional stride but you’re the second youngest member of the Idaho House. What’s the advantage, or disadvantage, of being so young in the Idaho Legislature? The negative, I would say, is that there is a large number of people with a tremendous amount of experience that I can’t begin to touch. The converse of that is I bring a unique perspective from my generation to the table. I should note that you have several pictures in your office of Idaho congressmen, past and present. I interned for Senators [Larry] Craig and [Mike] Crapo. Plus, I worked for Jim Risch when he was governor. How have they influenced you? Jim Risch’s question is always, “Why?” You need to always be asking that question. I think about him on a daily basis. Who do you think are the faces of the Republican Party’s future? I’m very intrigued by [Florida Sen.] Marco Rubio. I have a U.S. Constitution signed by [Louisiana Gov.] Bobby Jindal. I was very sad to see [Former South Carolina Gov.] Mark Sanford fall from grace the way he did. He was really carrying the mantle for

What’s the chance of you holding a different elected office in the next 10 years? I’m sure I’ll hold another office. I don’t know whether that will be at the local, state or federal level. How would you describe your politics? Nothing is more sacred to a human being than his own sense of self-worth. We need to have rules to play by, but they need to be in the context of empowering the individual. And sometimes that means choosing consequences over safety. I don’t believe in a reactionary government. I believe in a government that is centered on promoting individual freedoms. Do you think the U.S. government has gone too far in its attempt to balance protections versus infringements on personal rights? Absolutely. If I could bring anything to the table, it would be me questioning if what we’re giving up is worth it for an appearance of safety. Do you have a sense that there is some looming or pending threat to the right to bear arms? I do. There’s a clear and present public sentiment that guns are not necessary and that it should be the government’s role to protect us, rather than our own responsibility to protect ourselves. How often do you get back home to Coeur d’Alene? I try to get back every weekend. It’s important. Nothing bothers me more than politicians who feel they have ownership of their offices. We need to be in constant contact with the people.

RALL by Louis Seidman pointed out, we have foolishly elevated the Constitution to the status of a sacred text, fetishizing a supposedly “living document” that in truth has been dead for years. The result, Seidman argues, is endless petty bickering about what the meaning of “is” is—and what that stupid comma was supposed to be for. The question for any society is not how to figure out how to conform ourselves to rules and assumptions laid down by our forebears, but to come up with the smartest solutions and the best systems to make things run smoothly. If we were revolutionaries, inventing the United States from scratch, would we create the Electoral College? Doubtful. The people of the United States are changing all the time, but the U.S. government and power structure are stuck. The political “culture wars” date to the 1960s and 1980s. Our military thinks the Cold War is still going on. Once a “land of opportunity,” the United 6

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States is anything but. If you’re born into a poor family, your chances of elevating yourself into the middle or upper class are lower than in other industrialized countries. “It’s becoming conventional wisdom that the United States does not have as much mobility as most other advanced countries,” said economist Isabel Sawhill of the Brookings Institution. “I don’t think you’ll find too many people who will argue with that.” Aside from the unfairness and the instability caused by inequality and lack of social mobility, we’re losing the talents of tens of millions of Americans who will never be able to live up to their potential and contribute to the making of a more perfect union. We haven’t had a major social or political revolution since the 1960s. Like the Soviet Union, we must develop—scrapping long-held assumptions and reconsidering everything from scratch—or collapse. I think we’re headed toward collapse. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WA N D ER S H O FR ES H M A N A ID F O Y IT S URNS A U N IV ER A N D N EV ER R ET N W TO F O T U O

JA C O B JO N E S O TIE D ER RI CK ’S FO W PH SE JO , D N EA R TH E EN E SN O W CI RC LE S IN TH SS LE IM A T CU PR IN TS ty of Idaho freshA popular Universi S. D EL FI ED CO V ER straying walked all night, ond hair, he had man with wavy bl out into the Moscow, Idaho, of t ar he e th m nt several miles fro y against the dista . With a starry sk open hills beyond til elds un cold e endless stubblefi th d re de an w he mountains, . ught up with him and exhaustion ca

all bridge, rest beneath a sm to e m ca ly al tu Alone, he even ns. d a trail of questio life unfinished an leaving a bright loved ones have l authorities and ca lo , ce sin ys da In the m out into the un nd what drove hi ta rs de un to ed thought struggl inking, but others dr as w he y sa s known. Witnesse his path, ue to reconstruct in nt co rs to ga sti him lucid. Inve unters and his e calls, brief enco on ph ll ce er th piecing toge final footsteps.

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2 Highland Drive sighting He is reportedly found resting in a basement shortly before 3 am. Police do not know how he got there, but believe he then headed south.

Wiederrick attends a birthday party at a fraternity and leaves shortly after midnight Jan. 20.

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Wiederrick knocks on the door of a Mountain View Road home at about 4 am, and the resident directs him to the house across the street. He falls into Paradise Creek after circling the house. His body is found under a small bridge on Jan. 21 around 4 pm.

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“It’s been a tragic event,” Moscow Police Chief David Duke says. “It’s shocked the community.” On Jan. 20, Wiederrick slipped out of an on-campus party shortly after midnight. He likely joined hundreds of other students on the streets of the small college town, stumbling into the frigid morning for a short walk home. But while others staggered back to the warmth of their dorm rooms, he turned north and headed away from campus. No one knows why. Investigators say Wiederrick called two friends and stopped by at least two random homes, but never really asked for help. All night he drifted through the city of 23,800 people. He told others he was heading home, but never returned. His family lives with what could have been. What if he had stayed at the party? What if someone had called for help? What if he had been found sooner? His father, Bob Wiederrick, recounts his son’s many interactions along his route and sees missed chances. “It’s just a senseless tragedy,” he says. “He could have been saved at so many different times along the way.” Born and raised in Hailey, Idaho, Wiederrick grew up in the rugged backcountry of the Sun Valley region, east of Boise. His father says the 18-year-old enjoyed mountain biking, hiking, skiing and target shooting. He made friends easily. “He was just a great kid,” his father says. “He had a tremendous amount of friends. He was just very well liked and is very well missed.” Wiederrick, known as Joe, started at the University of Idaho in the fall. His father says

he planned to study architecture. Even as a young boy, he had sketched out floor plans for buildings, giving structure to his imagination. “He’s always been a good artist,” he says. “He was way more talented than I ever was.” When many of his friends headed to the University of Idaho, Wiederrick followed along, his father says. He shared a dorm room with a childhood friend in the Theophilus Tower residence hall on campus. Wiederrick had barely started his second semester when another friend from Hailey invited him to a birthday party at the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. The large brick fraternity house sits on Deakin Avenue near the eastern edge of campus, just a half-mile from Theophilus Tower. Police Chief Duke says witnesses estimate about 120 students attended the party that night. Students reported Wiederrick was seen drinking, but they could not say how much. Nobody remembers seeing him walk out, but investigators believe he left shortly after midnight. Police Chief David Duke says the toxicology tests measured Wiederrick’s blood-alcohol level at .17 percent at the time of his death. Factoring in his four hours of wandering, investigators estimate his blood-alcohol level could have started as high as 0.25 to 0.3 percent. Wearing a blue winter coat, a backpack and lightweight Vans shoes, Wiederrick disappeared into the night. His roommate returned to their dorm room around 2:30 a.m., Duke says, and no one was there. Wiederrick continued to wander the streets. “He was disoriented,” Duke says, “and he apparently was lost.” At about 3 a.m., Wiederrick called his

12 | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

LATAH COUNTY AREA OF DETAIL

In the early morning hours of Jan. 20, Joseph Wiederrick walked at least seven miles on a winding path from the University of Idaho campus to the northeast outskirts of Moscow. Investigators don’t know the exact route he took, but there are locations along the way where he was seen or left footprints. This map shows what is known at this point.

roommate. The roommate tells authorities Wiederrick did not say where he was or hint at any distress. Wiederrick just said he was on his way home. The roommate went to sleep. Standing alongside a large black-and-white map of Moscow, Duke says investigators do not know exactly where Wiederrick went after leaving the party. The chief points to a secluded residential neighborhood in the northeast part of town where Wiederrick showed up two and a half hours later. A woman living along the 1100 block of Highland Drive—about two and a half miles from campus—tells authorities she heard a door open just before 3 a.m. When she went to check, she found Wiederrick in her basement. “He had entered a house through an unlocked door and laid down on the floor,” Duke says. “The homeowner came down thinking it was her children and saw him laying there. … He said his name was Joe.” When the woman asked why he was there, Wiederrick reportedly said he thought he was still at the fraternity house. Duke says the woman saw Wiederrick was obviously confused, but he otherwise seemed fine. She asked if she could call anyone for him. “He said no and apologized,” Duke says. “[Then he] started walking out the door and apologized again.” Investigators believe this is when Wiederrick called his roommate as he walked south along Orchard Avenue back into the city. But instead of heading toward campus, Duke says, he appears to have turned east down D Street. D Street would carry Wiederrick out past several blocks of single-family homes, past schools and playgrounds, past leafless trees and chain-link fences. A yellow “Dead End” sign

stands at the far east end of the street, just shy of the city limits. Investigators say Wiederrick appears to have walked past the sign and out beyond the edge of the city, down to the end of the road where it runs into a steep pasture. Weather records show the temperature had dropped throughout the morning, nearing 24 degrees as Wiederrick struck out into the field, stomping through several inches of snow. As the body’s core temperature drops, people often become confused and lose coordination. Medical studies show hypothermia starts with shivering and mumbling. Decisionmaking becomes muddled. Fatigue sets in. Hypothermia is known to cause apathy or lack of concern about perilous conditions. “A person with hypothermia usually isn’t aware of his or her condition, because the symptoms often begin gradually and because the confused thinking associated with hypothermia prevents self-awareness,” a Mayo Clinic report states. Alcohol can intensify the effects of hypothermia. Studies show alcohol causes blood vessels to expand, speeding up heat loss through the skin. Drinking also impairs judgment, further undermining decision-making. Duke says deputies tracked Wiederrick’s footprints up and over a snowy hill as he crossed through several wide fields on the outskirts of Moscow. He continued east through ankle-deep snow, away from the city. “He walked quite a distance in snow,” Duke says. “If you consider that all he had were Vans [shoes] on, then they were probably frozen [early] into his walk because he covered several miles in anywhere from 4 to 6 inches of snow.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

the small bridge nearby, seeking shelter below Eventually, Wiederrick ran into Darby the road. Road, northeast of the city, and appears to Investigators believe Wiederrick tried to have returned to the pavement. Investigators found his footprints leading to a nearby house, call a second friend at about 4:30 a.m. The friend did not hear the phone, and Wiederrick but he either did not knock or no one heard did not leave a message. Tired and cold, he lay him. Signs indicate Wiederrick turned back west down. When Wiederrick’s roommate woke up toward town. He followed Darby Road until it ends in a T-intersection with Mountain View alone Sunday afternoon, he quickly reported Road. At this point, Wiederrick had wandered his childhood friend missing. Police launched a search that same afternoon. Officers and for nearly four hours. The temperature sat deputies scoured campus. News reports near 21 degrees. His shoes were frozen or broadcasted photos of the wavy-haired blond packed with snow. The cold was likely taking teen. hold of him. Authorities found Wiederrick’s footprints As Wiederrick came to the intersection, he in the snow late Sunday and followed them faced two distinct directions. To the south, to Darby Road. Early the next morning, the he should have been able to see the city lights Latah County Search and Rescue Council arof Moscow. To the north, nothing but empty rived with trackers, horse-mounted searchers fields and the jagged outline of black mounand a rescue helicopter out of Fairchild Air tains. Force Base. He turned north. Noticing the commotion, Ryan and her son Paradise Creek, a slow, decided to check their property, she says. Her twisting stream, flows from its headwaters on son soon found Wiederrick under the bridge Moscow Mountain down through the low, rolling pastureland outside the city. Little more just as searchers closed in on the location at about 4 pm on Jan. 21. than a weed-choked irrigation ditch in spots, “It’s so sad,” she says. “We’re grieving. the creek winds back and forth, We’re just devastated.” skirting Mountain View The Latah County CoroRoad, crossing the road ner later conducted under a small bridge an autopsy, conbefore continuing to cluding hypotherthe Snake River. mia contributed to Wiederrick Wiederrick’s death. appears to have “HE KNEW Duke says toxicolfollowed MounHE WAS ogy reports will tain View Road LOVED AND take another two for more than a HE HAD A or three weeks. mile before breakGOOD LIFE.” Wiederrick’s ing off to approach a parents rushed to farmhouse at about 4 -Bob Wiederrick , Moscow during the a.m. Investigators say his Joseph’s father search. They watched tracks indicate he walked around with hope as officers, the home, trying to get in or get horsemen and helicopsomeone’s attention. ters combed the fields. A woman answered the door Afterward, they stayed to and asked Wiederrick if he was collect his things, questionOK, Duke says. Since the woman ing how their son’s life slipped was alone, she asked him to seek through so many fingers. help from the family across the “He’d been in contact with other street. When contacted later by people that night and I don’t think they a reporter, the woman confirms did the right thing,” Bob Wiederrick says the encounter, but says the delater. “That’s been one of the distressing tails are too difficult to discuss. things for us. People need to watch out for She says she watched each other.” Wiederrick head across the street The University of Idaho issued a statetoward the neighbor’s house and ment of condolence. The national office of returned to bed. the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity pledged to Allison Ryan, who lives across look into the circumstances leading to Wiederthe street, says Wiederrick never rick’s disappearance. came to her door. His tracks circle His family takes some solace in the quick up around the back of the house, but resolution, a small measure of closure. They never approach the porch. The family dog hold tight to the memory of their outgoing son barked, she says, but they did not know anyand brother, a dreamer of skyscrapers. one might be in need of help. “We have no regrets,” the father says. “He “We never heard him,” Ryan says. “That’s knew he was loved and he had a good life.” what I’m devastated about. He would have He pauses. been welcome.” “Even though it was short.” Investigators say his footprints cross the In the fields along Mountain View Road, field behind their house and jump a fence. He footprints still stitch the snow. The banks of then crossed the frozen surface of Paradise Paradise Creek lie broken and trampled by Creek as he curved back toward the road. searchers. But a few fresh tracks have ap“The trail around the house he walked in peared by the roadside, leaving flowers at the circles,” Duke says. “They weren’t straight bridge over the frozen stream. tracks.” As he tried to cross the creek a second time, he slipped and fell, Duke says. He appears to Editor’s Note: A version of this story first have hit his head on the ice. Snow and water appeared in the Jan. 29 issue of the Pacific soaked his clothes. He pulled himself up under Northwest Inlander. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events R IC HAE S WANB EC K

Ghost Hunters’ Steve Gonsalves and Jason Hawes talk about their search for the paranormal in a very normal talk at the Morrison Center.

SATURDAY MARCH 1 spirit GHOST HUNTERS

As if we needed further proof that clowns are creepy.

FRIDAY AND SUNDAY MARCH 1 AND MARCH 3 clowning around

What started as a reality television show in 2009 has blossomed into a full-blown tour. Following America’s obsession with ghosts, The Atlantic Paranormal Society—office managers, plumbers, factory workers and teachers by day, investigators of all things haunted by night—is the subject of the SyFy Channel program Ghost Hunters, which has hit the road and is making a stop in Boise at the Morrison Center Saturday, March 1. APS members Jason Hawes and Steve Gonsalves will discuss the production of the show and close encounters of the spectral kind, as well as present unreleased footage and hold court for a question-and-answer session. Facing critics’ accusations, Hawes and Gonsalves will explain their method of searching for and recording paranormal activity in scientific terms— perhaps revealing that communication with the afterlife is more believable than it sounds. In an industry full of exploitation and staged events, Hawes and Gonsalves claim to stay true to their cause, but ghosts are controversial phenomena. Maybe you’re a believer, or maybe you’re a skeptic who needs a night of comic relief. Ghost Hunters’ straight-faced presentation of the search for ghosts and ghouls is entertaining for all audiences. At the end of the evening the floor will be opened to questions and stories from the audience. Will Hawes and Gonsalves be outed as charlatans looking to make a quick buck off American naivete, or will they defend their search for proof of life after death with compelling footage and sound defenses? 8 p.m., $27.50-$75. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, syfy.com/ghosthunters.

PAGLIACCI Clowns have feelings, too. That’s what makes them so terrifying. Beneath that wooden smile is a person whose passion, rage and despair are becoming as stiff and singular as the expression painted on their face. Such is the tragedy of Pagliacci, a clown who discovers his wife is having an affair. Unable to escape his stage persona, his feverish jealousy consumes him mid-performance. Pagliacci’s story comes to the Egyptian Theatre Friday, March 1, and Sunday, March 3, courtesy of Opera Idaho. Tickets are $15-$69. For your hard-earned dough you’ll also get to see Stravinsky’s Pulcinella Suite, performed by Ballet Idaho. Pagliacci, written by Ruggero Leoncavallo, has been widely produced since its debut in 1892. It’s a hit with audiences, who connect with the tragic Canio the clown and star-crossed lovers Nedda and Silvio. The opera is also moving because it explores the layers of human experience and the unspoken rules of passion and behavior. Canio, the man in the clown suit, finds himself onstage and unable to break character while dealing with the emotional effects of his wife’s infidelity. But mostly, people watch Pagliacci to confirm their worst fears about murderous clowns and their garish getups. Preceding Pagliacci is a Ballet Idaho production of the Pulcinella Suite—a taste of the full ballet of the same name by Igor Stravinsky. Seasoned operagoers will find Pagliacci and the Pulcinella Suite pair with intelligence and verve. For those attending an opera for the first time, these staples of the stage will invigorate and inspire. Friday, March 1, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, March 3, 2:30 p.m. $15-$69. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-3531, operaidaho.org.

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THURSDAY FEB. 28 poem BOISE POETRY NIGHT Roses are red, violets are blue. If you think all poems start like this, you might give poetry another chance. The dog-eared textbooks your high school teachers used to teach those dismal, nap-inducing poetry units barely illustrated why anyone would want to read—let alone write in—verse. But people are still writing poetry, which should be your first clue that there’s

more to the art form than counting syllables and forcing words into rhyme. In fact, Boise’s poetry community is thriving because there are still plenty of people interested in hearing ideas spoken aloud with precision and creativity. Join some of those people on Thursday, Feb. 28, at 8 p.m. for Boise Poetry Night at The Crux. It’s a small showcase of local wordsmiths, including Boise Poet Laureate Diane Raptosh, Boise State University Professor Janet Holmes, writing teachers Adrian Kien and Danny Stewart, and Megan Williams, curator of

Ghosts and Projectors. The event is part of the Read Me Treasure Valley series of literary events. Prior events have included book discussions of Dana Hand’s historical novel Deep Creek and Chris Crutcher’s memoir King of the Mild Frontier, a screening of Jeremiah Johnson (based on Vardis Fisher’s Mountain Man and starring Robert Redford) and other Idaho-themed literary events. Now it’s poetry’s turn in the spotlight. Expect personal, historical and distinctly Idaho themes delivered with humor and sensitivity. You won’t be hearing Milton WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

JOHN K ANE

FIND

PARTY RATS Pilobolus Dance Theatre has all the right moves.

SATURDAY MARCH 2 phototropic fungus PILOBOLUS

How coordinated are you when it comes to beer?

Before the TED Talk, before the silhouetted Little Miss Sunshine homage at the Oscars, before the Hyundai commercials, Pilobolus Dance Theatre was just four male jocks and two female dancers in a small Dartmouth College classroom exploring the gymnastics, structures and physical syntax of human physiology. The year was 1971, and modern dance was becoming less of a fringe art, tiptoeing into the popular consciousness. On Saturday, March 2, Treasure Valley audiences will be assimilated into this ongoing exploration as Pilobolus 7, the troupe’s repertory arm, invades the Morrison Center for an evening-length concert. The show, which begins at 8 p.m., will feature six recent pieces, including Gnomen (1997)—a muscular representation of relational mitosis and coalescence—and the robotic Automaton (2012). Also included is Symbiosis (2001), familiar to many from its presentation at a 2005 TED conference. Now in its 41st year, Pilobolus is a worldwide phenomenon, collaborating with artists like graphic novelist Art Spiegelman—author of Maus—and parodied in Norwegian sushi commercials. Yet their work, shepherded by founding members Robby Barnett and Michael Tracy, remains rooted in exploring the foundations of existence through dance. Unlike many contemporary dance companies, which focus on a single luminary, Pilobolus grew sunward in a manner similar to the phototropic fungus after which the group is named. Choreography was often a cooperative process, and the company still refers to itself as a collective. Nowadays, Pilobolus is known less for its geeky examinations of biological processes and odes to sea organisms than it is for its rapturous shadow plays, cheeky television commercials and that OK Go music video, but it remains a benchmark for the type of work that defines modern dance. 8 p.m. $29.50-$39.50. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, pilobolus.com.

droning on about fallen angels or Shakespeare tapping out rhymes in a language that barely resembles English—you’ll be hearing live people rapping about things

S U B M I T

with some significance and immediacy. 8 p.m. FREE. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

SUNDAY MARCH 3 drink GELANDE QUAFFING DRINKING GAME TOURNAMENT Legend has it the sport of Gelande Quaffing began when skiers, bending an elbow, watched as a mug of beer sent sliding down the bar fell off the edge—where it was plucked out of mid-air and chugged by a drinking-game pioneer. Right then and there, a new sport was born. Owing to its ski culture roots, the game borrows its name from gelande ski jumping. Players “pitch” beer down a slippery bar, the glass vaults into the air much like a skier on a pair of skinnies and a “quaffer” at the opposite end catches and gulps it, scoring points for precision. Gelande Quaffing made its way to Boise thanks to Payette Brewing Company, which is hosting a tournament that kicks off Sunday, March 3, at Sammy’s. Novices and pros alike are invited to fill their bellies with beer while competing for first-, second- and third-place prizes. The object of the game is to successfully send as many full pints of beer across the table as possible. Players pitch beer to a quaffing teammate, then run to the opposite side of the bar to switch roles in a fast-paced game of stamina, dexterity and agility. Scores are assigned for skill, with zero points for a dropped glass, one point for a caught glass, two points for a glass caught by its handle and a bonus point for a trick, such as catching the beer under the leg or in a 360-degree spin. Players will be organized by teams of four, with a $40 registration fee per team. Register beforehand at Sammy’s or day-of at 1 p.m., but act fast—there’s a limit of 16 teams. And if that wasn’t enough, the calories burned while Gelande Quaffing far exceed those burned while playing beer pong. Time to try a new drinking game. 1 p.m. $40 registration. Sammy’s, 509 W. Main St., Boise, payettebrewing.com.

Novelty toy company Archie McPhee sells Party Rats— multicolored finger lasers inexplicably shaped like rats—to keep fingers cozy and free from the Bubonic Plague. The company claims Party Rats are “the mcphee.com/shop/party-rats.html best thing to happen to partying since the mirror ball.” They are sold in packages of five, which feature 1.75-inch colored rats that secure to your fingers with elastic bands and spew beams of light from their tiny mouths. The package claims Party Rats are “perfect for night blogging. (Every blogger’s dream? To have rats strapped to their fingers while laser beams bounce off the computer screen.) Mcphee.com also encourages consumers to use Party Rats for school or work presentations, insisting, “You’ll be sure to have everyone’s attention.” Japanese singer Yui Kameoka even wrote a fan song for Party Rats. Roughly translated, Kameoka sings: “Party Rat / Won’t you take up residence on my finger / Light the way for me to dance / It is dark in my heart except for the rat.” In addition to its utility in the school, work and night blogging departments, Party Rats are ideal for dance parties. As mcphee.com so artfully explains: “The beats are pumping, the bass is throbbing, and there you are ‘throwing shapes in the church of dance’ with bright little rats on each of your fingers.” —Lauren Bergeson

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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WEEK IN REVIEW R EB EC C A C U ELLAR

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY FEB. 27 Festivals & Events TOMATO INDEPENDENCE PROJECT—Learn how to grow tomatoes and get a TIP packet with seeds, directions, and great info on tomatoes. 6-7 p.m. FREE. North End Organic Nursery, 2350 Hill Road, Boise, 208-3894769, northendnursery.com.

Beer buffs got crooked at Crooked Fence’s first anniversary party.

CULTURE, CHILI AND CROOKED CELEBRATIONS Though downtown Boise’s cavernous clubs were mostly empty as sheets of snow blanketed the streets Feb. 22, things were heating up inside the Reef. By 11 p.m., Bay Area funk band Monophonics had dozens of fans grooving to its “mid-tempo funk beats, peppered with staccato wubs of bass and rhythmic stabs of organ,” noted Boise Weekly’s Josh Gross. “From the audience’s perspective, the songs are almost interchangeable: a funk groove with gravelly, southern-fried vocals focused on love and power gone wrong,” said Gross. “The goal, of course, is to get people to forget their problems for a bit and refocus on what really matters: booty shaking.” With the previous evening’s snow melted into slushy puddles, BW’s Harrison Berry made his way to the Boise Art Museum Feb. 23 for the opening of its newest exhibit, Origins: Objects of Material Culture. According to Berry, Origins is a three-part exhibit that draws from Native American, Papuan (New Guinea) and Malian (Africa) material cultures from the pre-European contact period to the present day. “Perhaps the most engaging of the display rooms is dedicated to African art,” explained Berry. “Here, beautiful metalworks and representational ceremonial masks mark the diversity and sophistication of Malian culture. An elaborately carved granary door attests to advanced agricultural practices, and iron and bronze currency items like anklets and necklaces suggest smelting techniques and trade with faraway cultures.” While Berry filled his brain with art, Gross filled his gut with chili Feb. 23 at the annual Hyde Park Chili Cook-Off. “This year’s rendition of the annual Cook-Off featured an expanded roster of chilies from last year—18 instead of 11— as well as a more adventurous series of recipes, everything from simple and traditional stews to daring uses of ingredients like elk, pumpkin ale and finely chopped Swiss chard, which soaked up the chili flavor magnificently.” The judges, who included Gross, ultimately gave top honors to Peak Restoration’s Summer Chili, made with ancho chilies and a variety of white beans topped with queso fresco. The money raised from the cook-off benefits Saint Luke’s Children’s Hospital. Speaking of full bellies, Crooked Fence Brewing celebrated its first anniversary by tapping a mess of kegs and inviting hundreds of guests to a party at the Powerhouse Event Center Feb. 23. “Outside the venue, visitors snagged grub from Boise Fry Company, P. Ditty’s Wrap Wagon and Saint Lawrence Gridiron food trucks, while at the door, they grabbed plastic cups filled with Rusty Nail Pale Ale and 3 Picket Porter,” noted BW’s Andrew Crisp. “Wall-to-wall crowds filled both levels of the venue, almost all with cup in hand.” —Tara Morgan

16 | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Young designers, inventors and engineers bring creations to life with Legos. Bring a shoebox full of your own. If you don’t have any, some will be provided. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib. org. PUPPET SHOW—All ages invited to puppet renditions of children’s stories. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib. org.

On Stage LIQUID LAUGHS: COSTAKI ECONOMOPOULOUS—8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. READING OF MCDONAGH’S A BEHANDING IN SPOKANE— Carmichael is on a mission to find his missing left hand. Two lovers have a hand to sell. They all meet at a hotel with a clerk frightened by gunfire. Comedy ensues in this reading of Martin McDonagh’s play. 6:30 p.m. FREE. NexStage Theatre, 120 S. Main St., Ketchum, 208-7262985.

Food & Drink DATE NIGHT AT CORKSCREWS—Enjoy live music and your date gets a free drink. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews Wine Shop and Pub, 729 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-888-4049, corkscrews1.com.

Workshops & Classes WATER-EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING CLASSES—Catherine Chertudi from the City of Boise teaches how to care for your water-wise landscape. To register call 208-362-7336 or visit unitedwater.com/idaho. 6-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Odds & Ends BIOTZETIK BASQUE CHOIR— There are no tryouts and you don’t have to speak Basque to sing. Please call 208-853-0678 or email averquiaga@hotmail. com for more info. 6 p.m. FREE, 208-853-0678. Bishop Kelly High School, 7009 W. Franklin Road, Boise, bk.org.

THURSDAY FEB. 28 On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: HUCK FLYN—7 p.m. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. EUGENE BALLET’S SWAN LAKE—Museum-quality costumes and classical choreography meet in this production. 7:30 p.m. $44. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. GREASE—Enjoy the look and sound of the 1950s in this story about star-crossed lovers. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208-498-0571. LIQUID LAUGHS: SEAN PEABODY—Featuring Ryan Noack. Two-for-one tickets. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Green

GHOST HUNTERS LIVE— Cast members of Ghost Hunters discuss their ghoulish adventures and unique methods for tracking the paranormal. See unreleased footage from the show and join a question and answer session. See Picks, Page 14. 8 p.m. $27.50-$32.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane., Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu.

WAKING UP YOUR GARDEN— Meg McCarthy discusses planning and opening your garden for spring. Preregistration required. 6:30 p.m. $15, $10 member. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Odds & Ends

GREASE—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208-498-0571.

LADIES’ LOUNGE—Toss back some cocktails with the ladies of Boise Weekly and enjoy prize giveaways, drink specials and oh-so-much more. Visit BW’s promo page to get the 4-1-1. 5 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs.com.

INHERIT THE WIND—A science teacher in a small middleAmerican town ignites a media frenzy when he is put on trial for teaching the theory of evolution to his students. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

FRIDAY MARCH 1

LIQUID LAUGHS: SEAN PEABODY—See Thursday. 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Festivals & Events

PAGLIACCI—Opera Idaho performs Ruggiero Leoncavallo’s dark tragedy with Igor Stravinsky’s Pulcinella Suite, danced by Ballet Idaho. See Picks, Page 14. 7:30 p.m. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, operaidaho.org.

HOKUM HOEDOWN SQUARE DANCE AND OLD-TIMEY MUSIC SERIES—Enjoy music from the Hokum Hi-Flyers while learning square-dance moves. Pie Hole pizza served and a full bar is available with ID. 7 p.m. $5, $15 per family. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

PAINTING CHURCHES—Celebrity Mags Church returns to her childhood home. 8:15 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: HUCK FLYN—7 p.m. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

Art OPENING DOORS: A GLIMPSE INTO THE ARTIST’S MIND OPENING RECEPTION—View two- and three-dimensional works in a variety of media courtesy of the Boise Open Studios Collective. 4:30-6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-4636, sub.boisestate. edu.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Literature

PIONEER TOASTMASTERS— Work on public speaking and leadership skills. For more info call 208-921-2480. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE. Elmer’s, 1385 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-343-5714.

BOISE POETRY NIGHT—A showcase featuring luminaries of the Boise poetry community, presented by The Cabin. See Picks, Page 14. 8 p.m. FREE. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3213.

Kids & Teens

Talks & Lectures

KIDS EXPERIENCE—A science and art program for children ages 6 and older held in The Secret Garden. 3 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

THE STATE OF THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY—Presidential scholars participate in lectures and panel discussions. Presented by the Andrus Center for Public Policy. Register at andruscenter.org. 8:30 a.m. $25, $10 students, FREE for teachers. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-4636, sub.boisestate.edu.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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8 DAYS OUT Concerts

Food & Drink

ALL KEYED UP—Join musicians from the Boise Philharmonic, Boise State University and Boise Baroque for an evening of piano, organ and glockenspiel music. 7:30 p.m. Suggested $10 donation. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-7511.

MURDER MYSTERY DINNER— Enjoy a four-course dinner paired with Woodriver Cellars wines while helping to solve the mystery surrounding the murder of one of the cast members. Reservations required. 7 p.m. $30-$35. Woodriver Cellars, 3705 N. Hwy. 16, Eagle, 208-286-9463, woodrivercellars.com.

BOISE CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES: CUARTETO LATINOAMERICANO— The two-time Grammy nominated Latin American string quartet performs. 7:30 p.m. $20-$25. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise State University, Boise, 208-426-1609, boisechambermusicseries.org. MERIDIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA—Presenting the Rachmaninoff Piano Concerto with special guest soloist Ran Duan, “Wedding March” from A Midsummer’s Night Dream, and Tchaikovsky’s Romeo and Juliet “Fantasia Overture.” 7:30 p.m. $10 adult, $8 senior/ student, $25 family. Middleton High School, 1538 Emmett Road, Middleton, 208-585-6657.

Art CHRIS BINION OPENING RECEPTION—Check out Cloud Collector, new work by Chris Binion, who presents works on paper, canvas and panel depicting ever-changing forms of clouds. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Enso Artspace, 120 E. 38th St., Ste. 105, Garden City, 208-991-0117, ensoartspace.com.

RENA VANDERWATER OPENING RECEPTION—Check out the colorful oil paintings of Rena Vanderwater in her solo exhibit, In the Land of Milk and Honey. Wine and good cheer served. 4-7 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208-888-9898, finerframes.com.

Literature LITERATURE FOR LUNCH: NORTH AND SOUTH—Discuss Elizabeth Gaskell’s novel about family tensions and the division between rural and industrial England. For more info contact Cheryl Hindrichs at cherylhindrichs@ boisestate.edu or Carol Martin at cmartin@boisestate.edu. 12:10-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Odds & Ends DISCOVERING FAMILY HISTORY: GENEALOGY WORKSHOP—Learn to use library resources to create a family history. Call to reserve a space. 9 a.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org.

CD REVIEW/NOISE MALACHI, MOURNING DAYS: VOLUME II Boise band Malachi is tailor-made for a snarky alt-weekly review. The level of non-ironic confidence it pours into a live performance of its epic cheese-rock is endearing in its selfdeception. The band, with its Kiss-like stacks of equipment, gets down with its bad self onstage while singer Jeffro Hoskins wails out the sort of lyrics that Jack Black sings satirically in Tenacious D. “If I was an equestrian / I’d ride on a mighty steed,” Hoskins sings on “The Canary and a Coal Mine.” “I’m locked in a cage with creepies and crawlies / and now I feel the pain,” he sings on “Summertime.” And those are only two of the 14 tracks on Malachi’s recently released second album, Mourning Days: Volume II. The rest of the record is no less comical. “I can feel my tears ’cause they’re wet,” he sings on “Trainwreck A Comin’.” These gems of insight are embedded among riffs that fall between fantasy film soundtracks and power ballads. Choir synth pads hum beneath phased guitar solos and Hoskins’ appeals to the forces of darkness. But Malachi is frighteningly sincere. The effort poured into Mourning Days: Volume II shows from the album’s first apocalyptic skit to the fading screams of “back on the narwhal I ride,” on the track “Narwhale,” which closes the record. Some bands struggle to bring their members’ visions to life. Malachi isn’t one of those bands. Its vision is fully realized in painfully vivid color. The question is why on Earth it ever set on that course in the first place. —Josh Gross WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

SATURDAY MARCH 2 Festivals & Events 59TH ANNUAL GEM AND MINERAL SHOW—Gems, jewelry, door prizes, dealers, demonstrations, showcases, a black light display, a silent auction and events for the kids. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE-$3. O’Connor Field House/Caldwell Events Center, 2207 Blaine St., Caldwell, 208-455-3004. DEER FLAT 104TH ANNIVERSARY—Check out The Beauty of Deer Flat Refuge, a slide presentation by Terrell Moffett, owner of Moffett Gallery in Nampa. Moffett signs copies of his photo book, followed by coffee, refreshments and info about refuge programs and volunteer opportunities. 2-5 p.m. FREE. Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor’s Center, 13751 Upper Embankment Road, Nampa, 208467-9278, fws.gov/deerflat.

On Stage 2013 MELODRAMA DOUBLE FEATURE—Enjoy the El Korah Shrine’s 50th annual melodrama double feature: Alias Smedley Pewtree, or The Villain of Glitter Gulch, and A Penny Saved, or The Widow Woodstock, Fully Loaded. Buffet dinner available before the show at 6 p.m. 8 p.m. $12.50, $90 for eight-person table, dinner $12.50. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, elkorah.org. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: HUCK FLYN—7 p.m. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. GREASE—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $10-$12. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208-498-0571.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | 17

8 DAYS OUT INHERIT THE WIND—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. LIQUID LAUGHS: SEAN PEABODY—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. PAINTING CHURCHES—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. PILOBOLUS—The visiting modern dance company draws inspiration from biology and wowed audiences with its 2007 Academy Awards performance and Grammy-nominated music video collaboration with OK Go. See Picks, Page 15. 8 p.m. $29.50 and $39.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Concerts THE BOISE CHORDSMEN—An a cappella group sings songs from musical theater’s golden age. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. FREE-$15. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

Kids & Teens

On Stage

EXPLORE WIND ENERGY—Design, build and test a wind turbine and compete with others to see who can generate the most electricity, lift the largest load and power a pump to raise water. 8 a.m.-noon. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-514-3755, boiseenvironmentaleducation.org.

LIQUID LAUGHS: SEAN PEABODY—See Thursday. Two-for-one tickets. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

SUNDAY MARCH 3

Concerts

Festivals & Events 59TH ANNUAL GEM AND MINERAL SHOW—See Saturday. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE-$3. O’Connor Field House/Caldwell Events Center, 2207 Blaine St., Caldwell, 208-455-3004. GELANDE QUAFFING II—Payettte Brewing Co. presents an afternoon of drinking games. Slide a beer across a polished table. You get points when your partner catches the beer at the other side of the table and slams it. See Picks, Page 15. 1 p.m. $40. Sammy’s, 509 Main St., Boise, 208-3457852.

MERIDIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $8-$25. Centennial High School Performing Arts Center, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-939-1404, chs.meridianschools.org.

Food & Drink

SUDOKU |

MONDAY MARCH 4 INTERNATIONAL STRING TRIO— The International String Trio has gained national recognition for the distinct sound and stylistic diversity of its repertoire, which includes classical, jazz, popular and world music. 7:30 p.m. $28. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

Food & Drink KEGS4KAUSE—Payette Brewing donates 50 percent of beer sales to The Arc Idaho. Join in on a silent auction, and Archies Place food truck will be on hand, plus music by the Matthew James Band, the Emily Tipton Band and Lee Penn Sky. 3-10 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing Company, 111 W. 33rd St., Garden City, 208-3440011, payettebrewing.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

BREAKFAST AT DAVE AND BUSTERS—Eat breakfast and score $10 in games. Proceeds benefit Wish Granters. 9-11 a.m. $5-$10. Dave & Buster’s, 546 N. Milwaukee St., Boise, wishgranters.org. SAVOR THE WORLD—Enjoy sweet and savory global foods, world music, artisan stories, local wine and beer, and a silent auction. Proceeds benefit Dunia Marketplace, a nonprofit fairtrade organization with a retail store located in Hyde Park. 7-10 p.m. $39. AGC Building, 1649 W. Shoreline Drive, Boise, 208344-2531, idahoagc.org.

Sports & Fitness WESTERN IDAHO ARM WRESTLING CHAMPIONSHIPS—Cash awards for first and second places in all men’s and women’s open classes. For more info email Shawn McEntire at smac94@gmail.com, Stan McEntire at monstermac31@ yahoo.com or Chris McEntire at macky64@yahoo.com. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE spectators, $15-$20 competitors. The Drink Bar and Waterfront Grill, 3000 N. Lakeharbor Lane, Boise, 208861-9094.

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

18 | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT PIONEER TOASTMASTERS— Work on public speaking skills. For more info call 208-9212480. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE. Elmer’s, 1385 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-343-5714.

TUESDAY MARCH 5

WEDNESDAY MARCH 6

Art

Food & Drink

CORNELIA AND THE HOBOHEMIANS—Featuring a Boise women’s artists group, presented by author Rita Rodriguez. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

DATE NIGHT AT CORKSCREWS—See Wednesday, Feb. 27. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews Wine Shop and Pub, 729 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-8884049, corkscrews1.com.

Kids & Teens

Odds & Ends

MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— See Wednesday, Feb. 27. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib. org.

BIOTZETIK BASQUE CHOIR— See Wednesday, Feb. 27. 6 p.m. FREE, 208-853-0678. Bishop Kelly High School, 7009 W. Franklin Road, Boise, bk.org.

KIDS EXPERIENCE—See Wednesday, Feb. 27. 3 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2941, notaquietlibrary.org.

Check out the entire week’s worth of Doonesbury online at boiseweekly.com—select “Extras” then “Cartoons.”

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BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | 19

NEWS/NOISE B R IAN TAM B OR ELLO

NOISE

ROCK AND (UNHOLY) ROLLER Reverend Horton Heat brings psychobilly gospel to Boise

The Postal Service plays a sold out Boise set.

THE TOUR THAW The frost is starting to thaw, and that means approximately a bazillion groups have just announced that they’ll be hitting the road and heading to Les Bois. Some highlights include: indie megastars The Postal Service, which will play a sold out show at the Knitting Factory Tuesday, May 28; indie rising stars Thao and the Get Down Stay Down, which will be at Neurolux Friday, March 8 with Sallie Ford and the Sound Outside; and not-yet-stars Gaytheist, which will be at The Shredder Saturday, March 9. In addition to having a great band name, Gaytheist is “the musical version of Shark Week,” according to the band’s press materials. Sounds like a party to us. Also in the shredding-like-Shark-Week category is Scott Kelly of Neurosis. Mr. Kelly will play an acoustic show at the Visual Arts Collective Wednesday, March 6, with his backup band, The Road Home, and it’s some spooky shit. Tickets for that show are $8 and now on sale. Another recent announcement is a new album from Boise’s swingingest swingers, Frim Fram 4. They of the white lapels and snappy beats are dropping I’m a Shy Guy at a special “dancing and martinis” party at the Linen Building Saturday, March 9 at 7 p.m. Tickets are $10, both in advance and at the door. But that’s all in the future. There’s plenty of music this week, especially in the louderthan-hell category. The Shredder will host a butt-ton of loudass rock from locals The Deadlight Effect, Mariana, Machine Machine and Obscured by the Sun Saturday, March 2, along with Seattle-based Serial Hawk. That show costs $5 and starts at 9 p.m. If you come back by The Shredder Tuesday, March 5—or just pass out behind it after the March 2 show and wake up a few days later—you can catch Boise thrashmetal mastahs Krystos, stars of the most recent episode of Boise Weekly’s Scenes From a Scene. They’ll be joined by touring shredmasters Fisthammer out of Pennsylvania; Sacrificial Slaughter out of California; and Master, which is on the road from the Czech Republic. That show costs $10 and gets going around 8 p.m. —Josh Gross

JO FAULKNER Reverend Horton Heat frontman Jim Heath is content with his career. After 28 years bringing an unabashed celebration of sex, booze and hard living to venues across the country, Heath and his band have cultivated a diverse and loyal fan base. Few rock ’n’ roll bands last a decade, let alone a quarter-century—especially with a rigorous tour schedule like Reverend Horton Heat’s. In the band’s early days, it Reverend Horton Heat will convert new fans at Boise’s Knitting Factory. wasn’t uncommon for them to play 300 gigs a year. Anymore, though, the group only and which he’s named the “hurricane.” the punk-y Twilight Room one night, and tours about one-third of the year. “I play a drum note on the low end while around the corner in a blues bar the next. “We were always a party band … in I am playing the strings on the top end—the Further along in their career, RHH opened every town, people were waiting there to for Johnny Cash and two weeks later played key to that is how I mute the strings,” said party with us. The next night would be with Nine Inch Nails and Marilyn Manson. Heath. really difficult to play music,” said Heath. But Heath’s aptitudes aren’t confined to Today, the trio serves up a hearty mix of “We knew if we kept this up, we were gothe technical realm. Lyrically, few topics rock swagger at a surf-rock speed, topped ing to die. So we had a band meeting and are taboo for RHH. For example, the song with a dash of blues and some countrified decided we are here to play music and we “One Time for Me” is about female masturmelodies. The band released the two-CD cut out the partying.” bation, while the track “Slow” reveals the Heath is feted by peers and loved by fans and DVD box set 25 to Life in 2012, and band’s familiarity with female physiology: recently announced it signed with Victory for his ability to make his guitar cry the “It took a long time but I learned what they Records and plans to release a new album blues and wail rock ’n’ roll with blisterlike / Once you’ve learned my lesson it’s like in 2013. ing, reckless abandon. He loves extremes: ridin’ a bike … Drivin’ real slow gets you The Rev swings by the Knitting Factory, sudden drops from loud to soft, or a sweet, home pretty fast / Keep a cool head gonna Wednesday, Feb. 27, flanked by upright sustained guitar riff followed by a jolt of make it last.” bassist Jimbo Wallace and drummer Paul speed. On “Cowboy Love,” a country tune in Simmons. Ultimately, though, it’s Heath’s Heath absorbed all kinds of music which Heath pines for the attentions of a original compositions and guitar skills that growing up and was influenced early on by tall, black, gay cowboy, he sings: “That’s Johnny Cash, The Cramps and The Blasters, drive the band. why each night by the campfire / I thank my “I’m an electric guitar player and I along with blues artists such as Howlin’ lucky stars above / For inter-racial cowboy hear all instruments Wolf, Freddie King homo kind of love.” And in the fast-tempo in a song.” Heath and Buddy Guy. explained. “So I come “Big Little Baby,” Heath pens a love song “I took a few lesReverend Horton Heat with Guttermouth and for his tall girlfriend, whose “heart is as big up with the whole sons, but what really David Jacobs-Strain, Wednesday, Feb. 27, as her feet are long”: “Well, I got a sweet arrangement before worked for me was 7:30 p.m. doors, 8:30 p.m. show, $15-$35. baby who’s six-foot-tall / Well, she’s a full I have a song for the just listening and KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE grown woman who’s got it all.” band to work up. I trying to copy what I 416 S. Ninth St., On stage, Heath has it all—mingling am very focused on heard,” Heath said. 208-367-1212, anarchy, virtuosity, deep blues and a hammy the beat.” bo.knittingfactory.com. “I dropped the needle guitar playing shtick that keep all eyes Heath also experiabout a million times focused on him. ments with a variety until I could imitate Whether he’s singing with gentle menace of guitar techniques. what I heard.” or bending new curves into a blues note, “One technique I worked on my whole When he started Reverend Horton Heat Heath is a master of tension and release. It’s career is mimicking pedal steel and steel in the mid 1980s, Heath didn’t want to be during a live show that bona fide Reverend guitar licks with my guitar—the way you pigeonholed into a specific musical genre. Horton Heat fans are born. And Heath says hold three notes, and then bending one of Instead, he used rockabilly as a foundation fans are everything to the band. them will give you a kind of pedal steel from which to build an original mix of surf “We party with the people who come to guitar swell effect,” Heath said. guitar, swing, country, blues and up-tempo Another signature move calls for Heath to see us at the show. … To me, music is an rock ’n’ roll. Spawned from the Deep Ellum neighbor- play lead and rhythm guitar simultaneously— art form that involves getting up there and a technique he uses to fill out the trio’s sound playing in front of people,” Heath said. hood of Dallas, the band would play in

20 | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE @M U NC HK INHEAD

GUIDE TUESDAY FEB. 26 CHRISTINA MARIE—3 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s FRANK MARRA—With Ben Burdick Duo. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

FRIM FRAM 4—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WEDNESDAY FEB. 27

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Berryhill THE LOST WEEKEND—With Hedtriip and Iconoplasty. 8 p.m. $3. Red Room

ALLURA—With Laid In Stone, Fault Paradox and Above the Dead. 7 p.m. $3. Shredder

Speedy Gray

TW OB IR DS S TU DIO.C OM

BARBARA LAING—With Kayleigh Jack. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

SPEEDY GRAY—With Johnny Shoes. 6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

ROCK AND WORSHIP ROADSHOW—With MercyMe, Jeremy Camp, Tedashii and more. 6 p.m. $10. Taco Bell Arena

DAN COSTELLO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

STONESEED—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

WAYNE COYLE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge WILLY DALLAS—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

DEJA BLUE DR. DREW—7 p.m. FREE. Crusty’s DJ ABILITIES—With Sadistik and Maulskull. 7 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

Hokum Hi-Flyers HOKUM HI-FLYERS—With Ned Evett. 5:30 p.m. Free. Pengilly’s JAMES MILLER—7:30 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe OPHELIA—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: INSOMNIAC FOLKLORE—With Fleet Street Klezmer Band. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux TYRONE WELLS—With Graham Colton and Brett Young. 6:30 p.m. $15-$35. Knitting Factory

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FRANK MARRA—With Steve Eaton and Phil Garonzik. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE GREEN—With New Kingston. 8:30 p.m. $12-$14. Reef HILLFOLK NOIR—8 p.m. Free. Pengilly’s KATIE MORELL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown LIVE HIP-HOP—8 p.m. FREE. Red Room REVEREND HORTON HEAT— With David Jacobs-Strain and Guttermouth. 7:30 p.m. $10$35. Knitting Factory REX MILLER—With Rico Weisman. 5:30 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadMeridian

THURSDAY FEB. 28 CAB 20—8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage THE CHURCH OF THE WILD ONES TOUR—$18-$40. Knitting Factory DAN COSTELLO—With John Jones Trio. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DUCK CLUB PRESENTS MASERATI—With Dark Swallows and Red Hands Black Feet. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux

V E N U E S

FRIDAY MARCH 1 ALABAMA SHAKES—With Michael Kiwanuka, Sam Doores and Riley Downing. 7 p.m. Sold out. Knitting Factory BOISE CREATIVE AND IMPROVISED MUSIC FESTIVAL 2013—See Listen Here, Page 22. 8 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective 22 BROCK BARTEL—6 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

MASERATI, FEB. 28, NEUROLUX Like the car, it’s hard to get sleeker than the band Maserati. The Athens, Ga., quartet has been churning out stylish space jams since 2001 and it shows no signs of slowing down with its most recent release, 2012’s Maserati VII. If anything, the band is revving things up. Maserati’s early material was rooted in atmospheric postrock with swells of guitar and trickles of drums. But over the decade the songs got faster and the beat harder on albums like 2009’s Passages and 2010’s Pyramid of the Sun. The pulsating electronic beats, throbs of synth bass and heavily echoed guitar riffs on Maserati VII fall somewhere between Swedish synth-pop wunderkinds The Knife and the soundtrack to an action-packed sci-fi film. It’s the perfect recipe for a dance party or a psychedelic freak-out. —Josh Gross With Dark Swallows and Red Hands Black Feet, 7 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | 21

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE KRISPENHARTUNG.COM

GUIDE 21

CHUCK SMITH—With Dan Costello Trio. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CUARTETO LATINOAMERICANO—10 a.m. FREE. Morrison Center

CUARTETO LATINOAMERICANO—7 p.m. $20-$25. Morrison

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

Center JOHN DENVER TRIBUTE—7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Kuna Performing Arts Center Kris Hartung, Brent Jensen and Jared Hallock

Artists trade rote for revolution during the 2013 Boise Creative and Improvised Music Festival. During the two-day event, artists create fresh works on the fly. Musicians, actors and dancers share the stage with visual artists creating artworks over two evenings—Friday, March 1, and Saturday, March 2—challenging audiences “intellectually and emotionally,” said festival founder and organizer Krispen Hartung. “You see people coming in with instruments, a lot of times they’re not playing them like you’d normally play an instrument,” Hartung said. Now in its eighth year, the B-CIMF includes performances by choreographer Yurek Hansen, writer and performer Heidi Kraay, musician Brent Jensen and more than a dozen other artists. —Andrew Crisp Friday, March 1, and Saturday, March 2, 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $5. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, b-cimf.com.

22 | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

AMERICA 40TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR—7:30 p.m. $35-$75. Morrison Center

FRANK MARRA—With Ben Burdick Trio and Amy Rose. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ADRIAN LEGG—6 p.m. $10. Rose Room

LEFTOVER SALMON—8 p.m. $21-$45. Knitting Factory MCDOUGALL—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

SLEEPY SEEDS—With With Child and Standing Stupid. 7:30 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage INVIS IB LE HOU R

BOISE CREATIVE AND IMPROVISED MUSIC FESTIVAL, MARCH 1-2, VAC

METAL NIGHT—Featuring Ripchain. 9 p.m. FREE. Frontier Club

SUNDAY MARCH 3

SYNRGY—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

SATURDAY MARCH 2 AUDIO MEDICS—8 p.m. FREE. Red Room BOISE CREATIVE AND IMPROVISED MUSIC FESTIVAL 2013—8 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective BRONCHO—With Night Beats. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux BUKKIT—With Black Tooth Grin, 57 Heavy and Final Underground. 7 p.m. $5-$15. Revolution Concert House CARTER FREEMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

MONDAY MARCH 4 1332 RECORDS PRESENTS PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. $3. Liquid INTERNATIONAL STRING TRIO—7:30 p.m. $28. Nampa Civic Center

Serial Hawk SERIAL HAWK—With The Deadlight Effect, Obscured By the Sun, Machine Machine and Mariana. 7:30 p.m. $5. Shredder SMOOTH AVENUE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge TITLE WAVE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s WILLISON ROOS—8 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: PSYCHIC ILLS—With Blues Control and Follakzoid. 7 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux REBECCA SCOTT—With Debbie Sager. 8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye STARLINGS MURMURATIONS—8:30 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe

WEDNESDAY MARCH 6 ANTIQUE SCREAM—With Sun Cat Brothers and Machine. 8 p.m. $3. Red Room DJ STEVE—8 p.m. FREE. Frontier Club HOLLYWOOD UNDEAD—With Dance Gavin Dance and All Hail the Yeti. 7 p.m. $25-$50. Knitting Factory

TUESDAY MARCH 5

JOHNNY SHOES—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

MASTER—With End Of All Flesh and Unto the Legions. 9 p.m. $10-$12. Red Room

SPEEDY GRAY— With Johnny Shoes. 6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

MASTER—With Sacrificial Slaughter, Fisthammer, Unto the Legions and End Of All Flesh. 8 p.m. $10. Shredder

MINNESOTA—With Protohype and Dcarls. 9:30 p.m. $7. Reef

STILL THE SKY’S LIMIT—7 p.m. FREE. The Crux

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SCREEN/LISTINGS THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

Special Screenings MACARIO—Based on a Mexican folk tale. The spirit of death offers Macario the power to cure illness on the condition that the Grim Reaper gets the last word about whom Macario can heal. Presented by the Consulate of Mexico in Boise. Wednesday, Feb. 27, 6 p.m. FREE. Washington Group Plaza, 720 E. Park Blvd., Boise. OUT OF AFRICA—In colonial Kenya, a big game hunter and a Danish landowner have a passionate affair. Thursday, Feb. 28, 6 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208562-4996, boisepubliclibrary.org. SINGIN’ IN THE RAIN—A silent film company makes the rough transition to talkies. Thursday, Feb. 28, 2 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996, boisepubliclibrary.org. WEIGHT OF THE NATION—Activate Treasure Valley presents the HBO series about obesity in America. Followed by a panel discussion. Tuesday, March 5, 6-8 p.m. and Wednesday, March 6, 6-8 p.m. FREE. Healthwise, 2601 N. Bogus Basin Road, Boise, 208-345-1161.

Opening

War Witch (left) and Only the Young (right) will both screen during the Eastern Oregon Film Festival.

21 AND OVER—Straight-laced college student Jeff Chang always does what’s expected of him, but when his best friends surprise him for his 21st birthday, he launches into an escapade of chaos and debauchery the night before a crucial medical school interview. (R) Opens Friday, March 1. Edwards 9, 22. 56 UP—In 1964, a group of 7-year-olds was selected to be interviewed and filmed every seven years. As the subjects near their 60s, they reflect on their lives and discuss who they were and who they have become. (NR) Opens Friday, March 1. The Flicks.

A LA GRANDE TIME Eastern Oregon Film Festival incorporates Treasure Valley artists CHRISTINE RITCHIE slacker movie theater employees. Typically, the marquee at the Granada “It was a more difficult process this year; Theatre casts its retro neon glow on La the fest is growing and getting more submisGrande, Ore.’s Adams Ave. advertising sions. Some good stuff slips between the first-run blockbusters. But from Thursday, cracks because we only go for three days,” Feb. 28, through Saturday, March 2, those said Clark. “I would say we’re interested titles—which often don’t make it to small in both emerging and established artists, in towns like La Grande until long after their really strong, challenging innovative work. premieres—will be replaced with indie movOtherwise, that kind of stuff would never ies that almost no one has heard of. It’s all play in La Grande.” part of the Eastern Oregon Film Festival. The festival has also branched out to “Almost everyone loves films. … The the Treasure Valley, incorporating the Boise problem with our community is that we scene and recruiting its bands to play at the don’t have exposure to those films you might festival. Bands like Hillfolk Noir, Finn Rigget in Portland, [Ore.] or Boise, which have independent films, too. We have theaters that gins and Grandma Kelsey will all perform show blockbuster stuff,” said Chris Jennings, during the festival. Travis Ward, a a native of Pendleton, singer, songwriter and Ore., who founded the EASTERN OREGON FILM FESTIVAL multi-instrumentalist film festival with Ian Thursday, Feb. 28-Saturday, March 2, for Hillfolk Noir, has Clark in 2009. various times, single tickets $5-$9, been involved with While EOFF isn’t all-access pass, $55. EOFF since its kickoff on the regional festival GRANADA 3 THEATRE in 2009. radar—like the Sun 1311 Adams Ave., La Grande, Ore.; “They liked our Valley Film Festival or STAGE DOOR THEATER, music, so they invited the Seattle Internation1010 Adams Ave., La Grande, Ore., us over,” said Ward. al Film Festival—orgaeofilmfest.com “After we played, I nizers say it’s building stayed for the whole up steam, growing attendance and attracting talent from around fest. I saw all but one film. I saw seven movies in one day. After, I couldn’t find the place the Northwest. I was staying at, so I just wandered around This year’s fest lineup includes Only the until 4 a.m.” Young, directed by Jason Tippet and ElizaMost might not guess the eastern Oregon beth Mims, a documentary following three burg of La Grande produces much in the small-town teenagers; War Witch by writerway of music and film. But while the scene director Kim Nguyen, the Oscar-nominated isn’t as developed as regional hubs like Boise tale of a child soldier in Africa; and Cinema and Spokane, those who are supportive are Six, directed by Mark Potts and Cole Selix, very supportive. an Office Space-esque look into the lives of WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

“La Grande has a lot to offer; people can see the value here,” said Jennings. “Everything is within walking distance in the town. We’re building up our downtown area, and we have this beautiful historic theater here.” One of Clark’s films, Searching for Yellow, will be screened during the festival. The film is a fictional retelling of a landscape painter who ventures out into the suburbs to delicately spray paint the foliage, grasses or rocks while trying to figure out his failing relationship. “He’s not a graffiti artist at all, he’s making marks and punctuating these really quiet moments,” said Clark. The screening of Clark’s film will be followed by a Q and A, and an actor will also make an appearance. In fact, a number of films shown at the EOFF will include a Q and A, either in person or via Skype. After the films show at the Granada Theatre and the Stage Door Theater, which is located at the back of the Liberty Theatre, attendees will congregate at the Art Center at the Old Library to partake in a beer garden. Afterparties will go down Thursday, Feb. 28, at Ten Depot Street, and Friday, March 1, at Mt. Emily Ale House, and there will also be a wrap-up Treefort Music Fest Showcase Saturday, March 2, featuring Boise’s Lionsweb and The Dirty Moogs, along with Portland, Ore.’s AND AND AND. “There will be beer gardens and perks for supporters and members of the festival,” said Jennings. “It has a fun social environment; after screenings or concerts, people can go back to the Arts Center and have a beer and talk about film.”

JACK THE GIANT SLAYER—When Jack opens a portal releasing a race of giants upon the Earth, he must fight for the future of the human race and the love of a brave princess. (PG-13) Opens Friday, March 1. Edwards 9, 22. THE LAST EXORCISM PART II—Continuing where the last film left off, Nell Sweetzer (Ashley Bell) is found alone in rural Louisiana with a case of amnesia. As she begins to start a new life after the horrific deaths of her family members, the evil that possessed her in the first film begins to reassert itself. (R) Opens Friday, March 1. Edwards 9, 22. PHANTOM—Ed Harris and David Duchovny star in this Cold War thriller about a submarine captain (Harris), who secretly suffers from seizures that alter his perception of reality. When he’s selected for a classified mission, he encounters a rogue KGB group bent on securing his sub’s nuclear missile and the realization that his superiors chose him for the mission presuming he would fail. (R) Opens Friday, March 1. Edwards 9, 22.

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code.

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | 23

WINESIPPER/DRINK YOU CAN’T ALWAYS GET WHAT YOU WANT

2009 OLIVIER DUMAINE CROZES-HERMITAGE LA CROIX DU VERRE, $29 This syrah is from one of the most affordable regions of the northern Rhone. While dark berry fruit dominates the nose, it’s backed by characteristic nuances of game, earth, tobacco and leather. It is a well-balanced wine with smooth, ripe berry flavors that play against crisp, food-friendly acidity. Ripe supple tannins come through on the wine’s long finish. 2011 CHATEAU DE SAINT COSME COTES DU RHONE, $14.99 This wine comes from one of the top producers in the region—Saint Cosme’s 2010 gigondas ranked No. 2 in the current Wine Spectator Top 100. Southern Rhones like this are typically grenache-dominant blends, but this one is 100 percent syrah. The aromas are a heady mix of crushed blueberries, fresh ground espresso, green tea, smoke and mint. With time in the glass, this wine opens up to reveal bright red fruit flavors with touches of licorice, mocha and leather that linger nicely. 2009 TARDIEU-LAURENT COTES DU RHONE VILLAGES, LES BECS FINS, $22 As the other entry from the southern Rhone, this wine is a blend that’s 60 percent syrah with the remainder grenache. Not surprisingly, that percentage of grenache helps make this the most fruit-forward and userfriendly of the trio. Cherry and raspberry jam on the nose segue into ripe cherry and berry on the palate. This is a delicious choice for current consumption.

DRINK LAU R IE PEAR M AN

France’s Rhone Valley is home to some of the world’s finest syrah—especially in the north, where that grape rules. So I was disappointed a few weeks back when no one submitted a French wine for our syrah tasting. This time around, I put in a request for northern Rhones, but it turns out that most local distributors don’t carry them because they tend to be rather expensive. With this tasting, we expanded the parameters a bit and the winning lineup includes one from the north and two from the south.

CRAFTING LEGISLATION Craft breweries fight to change outdated laws CHRISTINA MARFICE When craft beer brewers and supporters gather in Washington, D.C. next month, Payette Brewing Company’s Sheila Francis will be Idaho’s sole representative. But she’ll be far from alone. Joining more than 230 Brewers Association members from 215 breweries in 46 states, Francis will climb the Hill on Monday, March 25, in support of the Small Brewer Reinvestment and Expanding Workforce Act, or the Small BREW Act. The mission is simple: lobby for legislation that could change the way small breweries are taxed. “We’ve contacted everybody’s senators’ and representatives’ offices to arrange for meetings to start the conversation about what the bill is and tell our stories about who we are as small brewers in different states,” Francis said. As Payette Brewing’s director of marketing and events—and the president and founder of Idaho Brewers United—Francis will meet with lawmakers about all of the Gem State’s craft and microbrew interests. Most important, though, is garnering support for the Small BREW Act, which would reduce federal excise taxes on beer brewed at small craft breweries by half— from $7 to $3.50—on the first 60,000 barrels produced. What’s more, the measure would lower the current $18 rate to $16 per barrel on production between 60,000 and 2 million barrels. Only breweries producing fewer than 6 million barrels annually would qualify for these lowered rates. For Francis, and other Small BREW Act supporters, it’s high time those rates were brought down—excise taxes on beer were implemented during the Civil War and haven’t been revised since 1976. “When the beer tax was enacted, it was essentially a luxury tax,” she said. “It was grouped in with a lot of taxes that were for large-ticket items that only the super-rich could afford, but beer is not a rich person’s drink. It’s an everyperson’s drink. The tax is kind of antiquated in that sense.” Craft beer sales amount to just less than 6 percent of the nation’s beer sales by volume, but lowering excise taxes for small breweries could help change that. Francis thinks lowering the rates will allow small brewers to better compete in a market that is dominated by large producers. “I don’t want to say it’s about leveling the playing field, but we’re just getting the opportunity to have our businesses grow, and when there’s a lot of tax involved, it’s really hard to do that,” she said. “It creates a friendly business environment for the smaller guys.”

Payette Brewing’s Sheila Francis takes a (keg) stand for small brewers.

According to the Craft Brewers Association, small breweries provide more than 100,000 jobs in the United States. And while overall beer sales in the United States were down 1.3 percent by volume in 2011, sales of craft beers increased by about 1 percent—nearly 1 million barrels. The craft beer industry is especially booming in Idaho; the Treasure Valley alone now boasts nine craft breweries. “In spite of having a significant tax burden put on us, brewers have kind of overcome that,” Francis said. “We’re still growing and reinvesting, even though it’s a burden to pay those taxes and still produce as we are. Essentially, a new brewery opened up every day last year somewhere in the country, which is incredible growth.” The Small BREW Act was introduced in the 2011 Congress and gained the support of 174 U.S. representatives before it died in committee. A Senate measure was also introduced in 2011 that contained identical tax recalibration provisions and was co-sponsored by Republican Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo. This year’s reintroduced Small BREW Act is identical to the previous version and has bipartisan co-sponsor support. While no similar bill has been reintroduced in the Senate this year, Crapo’s office confirmed that the measure would still have his full support (despite the Mormon lawmaker’s recent DUI). “He’s always been a big supporter because of the effect on small business and the effect on agriculture,” said Lindsay Nothern, Crapo’s Idaho press secretary. “It’s a great thing for Idaho.” Idaho is also revising its own legislation

to better allow craft breweries to thrive in the Gem State. During the 2012 legislative session, Fred Colby, co-founder and co-owner of Laughing Dog Brewing Company, lobbied the Legislature to change a law that limited his ability to work with other breweries around the state. Colby, whose brewery is located in the small town of Ponderay, in north Idaho, wanted to invest in a Post Falls brewery but it was against the law to have separate wholesale and retail licenses on different breweries. With the help of a handful of Idaho legislators, Colby revised the law. It now allows Idaho microbrewers an interest in up to two breweries. And the current legislative session is taking further steps to help out the state’s microbrewers. Many craft brewers operate in small quantities, like one-sixth kegs, which contain about 40 pints of beer. But small kegs, long sold by Treasure Valley distributors, are actually illegal in Idaho. This outdated law prompted Twin Falls Republican Sen. Jim Patrick to sponsor a measure to revise the law, allowing small kegs to be legally sold in Idaho. “The practice has been to sell the stuff at five gallons, but since it was found to be illegal, we’re trying to tweak the law,” Patrick said. “This is for tasty beer. It’s not a volume thing. It’s not for alcohol; it’s for the flavors.” Patrick’s Senate Bill 1058 received a unanimous vote to move from the Senate State Affairs Committee to the Senate floor Feb. 21. Sen. Patrick sees no reason he won’t be able to get the bill passed this session. 25 Francis has been cutting her

—David Kirkpatrick

24 | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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DRINK NEWS/FOOD LAU R IE PEAR M AN

Kana and Keoni Tyler are back on the Hawaiian wagon.

JAMES BEARD HONORS IDAHO CHEFS AND KANA GIRL’S REOPENS After the heated dismissal of longtime Capital City Public Market founder and executive director Karen Ellis in September 2012, the CCPM executive board has finally named a replacement. Lisa Duplessie has worked with the market for eight years, previously serving as market manager. The CCPM board called the move to hire Duplessie a “significant step” toward building a world-class public market, one that supports local food growers, producers and artisans. CCPM will reopen Saturday, April 20, and run through Saturday, Dec. 21, from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Ellis is now working with a new downtown Saturday market, the Boise Farmers Market, which will open Saturday, April 6, in a parking lot at the corner of 11th and Front streets. The Boise Farmers Market will run from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., every Saturday through October, and will offer local produce and goods from Homestead Natural Foods, The Jelly Lady, Triangle C Ranch, Rice Family Farms and others. Moving from local food to local laurels, the James Beard Foundation just announced its list of 2013 Restaurant and Chef Award semifinalists, and two Idahoans made the Northwest’s Best Chef list: chef Gary Kucy at Rupert’s in the Hotel McCall, and Taite Pearson at Della Mano in Ketchum. The James Beard Awards will take place Friday, May 3, and Monday, May 6, in New York City. In opening news, husband-and-wife team Keoni and Kana Tyler are heading back into the kitchen this spring to reopen Kana Girl’s Hawai’ian BBQ on State Street. After closing more than two years ago, Kana said the restaurant plans to reopen at the site of the former Smoke Inn, 3912 W. State St., Saturday, April 13, with a menu similar to one offered at its original location on Franklin Road in Meridian. “Our standard menu will be pretty much the same,” Kana said. “We have specific gluten-free and vegetarian menus, and he’s working on a low-sodium menu. The gluten-free is pretty substantial; the soy sauce base that he uses to make the teriyaki sauces is gluten-free, which is unusual. Most folks who have issues with gluten can’t eat teriyaki.” According to Kana, the pair is excited to reopen the restaurant after having to close the previous location for personal reasons. “The short story is that he and I are both recovering alcoholics, and we relapsed, and we both threw it away,” she said. Kana Girl’s will be open Tuesday through Saturday, from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m.

legislative teeth lobbying on behalf of Senate Bill 1058, but she’s eager for her trip to Washington to lobby for a national initiative that will benefit craft breweries like Payette. It won’t be easy, though. According to Francis, proponents of the Small BREW Act will face their biggest challenge in convincing Congress to enact a tax cut during a time of such fiscal uncertainty. “It is a tax cut, so that’s always an issue,” Francis said. “Where’s the money going to go that we were paying, since that source of revenue will be cut in half? We are a growing industry that’s thriving, so there may be some that question as to why we’d need lower taxes for an industry that’s doing really, really well across the country.” But Francis is optimistic Congress will recognize that craft breweries have become an integral and celebrated part of the national beer industry, deserving of legislation that promotes further growth “I think what’s really cool is craft brewers are being viewed a little bit differently and gaining a lot of recognition as important parts of the industry,” she said. “We’re still on a really small scale. There is still a far more significant influence from the really large producers. A lot of breweries have great stories behind them and they’re really relatable and personable, so they’re like a mom and pop store you can find, [they] just have a different kind of product.” Like mom and pop stores, though, they need all the help they can get. “Paying a little less in taxes means more opportunity to reinvest those extra funds into brewing and building our own breweries and getting our products out there,” Francis said. “If you’re paying less in taxes, I guess you’d say we’re more inclined—and there’s better opportunity—to invest in ourselves and our businesses.” 24

—Andrew Crisp and Tara Morgan WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | 25

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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill HELP WANTED!!! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingcentral.net $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay. com LIVE, WORK AND PLAY IN IDAHO’S SAWTOOTH MOUNTAINS Stanley Baking Co. and Café, in Stanley Idaho, is now accepting applications for summer employment. We are seeking people who are hard-working and possess a high level of hospitality skills. Positions include breakfast/lunch line cooks, prep cooks, and servers. For more, see www. stanleybakingco.com. If interested, please provide a cover letter, resume, and 3 references to info@stanleybakingco.com LIVE,WORK, AND PLAY IN IDAHO’S SAWTOOTH MOUNTAINS Sawtooth Hotel, in Stanley, Idaho, is now accepting applications for summer employment. We are seeking people who are hard-working, and possess a high level of hospitality skills. Positions include chef, souschefs, prep cook, and waitstaff. For more info, see www.sawtoothhotel.com. If interested, please provide a cover letter, resume, and 3 references to info@sawtoothhotel.com TEMPORARY FARM LABOR Stoner & Sons, Havre, MT, has 2 positions for grain & oilseed crops; 1 mos. experience required for job duties listed with references; must be able to obtain driver’s license within 30 days ; tools, equipment, housing and daily trans provided for employees who can’t return home daily; trans & subsistence expenses reimb.; $9.99/hr; threefourths work period guaranteed from 3/26/13 – 11/1/13. Apply at nearest ID Workforce Office with Job Order 1520004 or call 208332-3570.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - YOGA

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SERVICES - HOME

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

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BW CAREER TRAINING AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualiďŹ ed – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualiďŹ ed. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-4819472 www.CenturaOnline.com

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B OISE W E E KLY

BW COUNSELING

BW HEALING ARTS RECONNECTED SELF Reconnected Self, reconnecting your inner self after loss, low selfesteem, making life changes, events that have left you feeling disconnected. We will guide you using Life Coaching skills or Hypnosis. We are located at 4346 Rose Hill in Boise. Schedule your ďŹ rst session at no charge for thirty minutes. Renee 794-0716.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW CLASSES PAIN FREE LIFE BEGINS HERE Say goodbye to chronic pain. Weekly classes on Sundays & monthly pain clinics. Simply Somatics by Tami Brown, 861-6073, simplysomatics.com. Register at sageyogaboise.com

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

FULL ROOM MASSAGE

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio. FULL BODY MASSAGE Experienced CertiďŹ ed Massage Therapist. Full body massage, $40 for 60 mins. & $60 for 90 mins. Call or text Richard at 208-6959492 to schedule your massage. Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Tom. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. Mystic Moon Massage. 322 Lake Lowell Ave., Nampa. New hours: Mon.-Sat., 1-10pm. By appt. only. Betty 283-7830. ULM 340-8377.

Deep tissue Swedish. Full body: $50/hr., $40/half hr. Foot Massage: $25/hr., $20/half hr. 7 days a week. 9am-10pm. 626-3454266. 320 N. Orchard St.

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FREE Head & Should Massage with 1 hr. Chinese Reexology Foot Massage at VIP Massage. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

BW MASSAGE

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759.

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

PETS

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE BEAUTIFUL: 3-year-old female Lab. Needs an active family. Has basic training and is crate-trained. Best with older kids. (Kennel 315 - #19169850)

COOPER: 6 -year-old male pit bull mix. Knows basic commands, house- and cratetrained. Good with dogs and older kids. (Kennel 416 - #4584698)

LOLA: 3-year-old female German shepherd mix. Good with older kids. House- and crate-trained. Needs to be only dog in the house. (Kennel 417 #19120027)

NOS: 1-year-old male Lab mix. Friendly, playful indoor dog. Good with dogs, cats and older kids. House- and crate-trained. (Kennel 411 - #14035011)

PEACH: 8-year-old female cat. Outgoing, social and mellow indoor cat. Declawed in front. Litterbox-trained. (Cage 20 - #19166975)

DONNER: 7-month-old male kitten. Charming personality who shows how much he loves you as soon as you talk to him. (Cat Colony #18751047)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

DAZZLE: Let me “dazzle� you with my youthful personality.

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FEDORA: Try this Fedora on, you might discover she’s the perfect ďŹ t.

SERENITY: Hearing is overrated—this deaf beauty is ready for a loving home.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | 27

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B O I S E W E E K LY BW YOGA

BW INSTURMENTS

BW HOME A CLEAN ABOVE THE BEST I offer a detailed clean & looking to add a few clients to my daily routine. Reasonable rates & a flexible afternoon schedule. All cleaning products supplied, unless you prefer special cleaners. Questions? I am offering a 3 hr. special for $60. Erica 208-570-2595.

BW LIVE MUSIC

MUSIC

BOISE JAZZ NIGHT

BW MUSICAL INSTRUCTION DRUM & MARIMBA LESSONS All ages & all styles of music. Two locations - Idaho Music Academy & ArtsWest. For registration, available times or more info please call Frank Mastropaolo 573-1020 or visit mastromusic.com

FOR SALE

Celebrating a Legacy of Musical Excellence at Boise High School. Featuring Kings of Swing, Boise High Big Red Symphonic Band, Jazz Band & more. N’Orleans themed Creole Cuisine, Desserts & Mocktails at the Mardi Gras, 615 9th St. April 5th, doors open 6pm, music 7pm. Table Sales: 941-2402, Tickets: 345-5354.

BW FOR SALE

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BW 4 WHEELS

BW SHOP HERE CONSIGNMENTS NEEDED We are looking for new consignments for our store. Especially, bedroom furniture, sofa sets, TV consoles & home decor. Stop by & shop or consign. Found Furnishing, 4644 W. Chinden, 968-1288. NIGHTLIFE CLOTHING 4MAN ARMANINO. Hand-picked innovative fashion available. armaninoclothing.com 343-7333. 150 N. 8th St., Boise.

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS 11TH ANNUAL SAWTOOTH SKI FESTIVAL Join your friends and family in supporting cross-country skiing in the Stanley Basin and Sawtooth Valley. March 2nd – 3rd at Park Creek. For further information, call David or Karen 208-7743487.

BY IAN LIVENGOOD AND J.A.S.A. CROSSWORD CLASS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

19 Body of water on the Uzbek border 21 Post-1968 tennis 22 Silly 23 Magic, once 24 Rear guard? 25 CVS competitor 27 What a faker may put on 28 Gotham-bound luggage letters 30 Estuary, e.g. 31 Like a walk in the park

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TRANSPORTATION

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/ Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

NYT CROSSWORD | MARK MY WORDS ACROSS

WASHER AND DRYER MAYTAG Kenmore W/D Heavy Duty Set,white color, only $250/set. Matching set paid $499 for each new. Used for a couple years do not need. Super capacity, they work great. Call Brett 353-1943

SERVICES

BECOME A CERTIFIED YOGA INSTRUCTOR. Shanti Yoga. Ongoing Registration, call 208-634-9711, or email deb@shantiyogastudio.org HAVE A STUDIO? Let us know. Boise Weekly wants to spread the word. Email: classifieds@boiseweekly.com

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

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32 Group with the monster 1994 album “Monster” 34 Like the dish kimchi 36 Followers of 1-Acrosses 38 “Aida” figure 41 Preserve, as fodder 43 It’s good for what ails you 45 Cool people 48 Sugar suffix 49 What a raised hand may signal 50 Nuts 51 Show tune with the lyric “Here am I, your special island” 53 Cosine reciprocal 55 1960s-’70s drama set in San Francisco 58 Allow 60 Egg choice 61 Go up against 62 Heart 64 Bitmap image 65 Thor’s domain 67 1968 movie directed by Paul Newman 70 Forerun 74 Chaney of “Of Mice and Men” 75 Beast that killed Adonis 76 Way off 80 Actor Quinn 81 “Heavens to Betsy!” 84 What many opart designs appear to do 86 Fictional Indiana town where “Parks and Recreation” is set 88 Upside-down container 90 Space effect, for short 91 Word from Hamlet while holding a skull 92 Pince-___ 94 Tony-nominated play made into an Oscarnominated movie 97 Paper size: Abbr. 98 Dance in 3/4 time 100 China and environs 101 It might come out in the wash 103 Lacking scruples 105 B&O and others 106 Silent interval

110 1945 Pacific battle site, informally 111 Catch 112 Abe 114 Relatively inexpensive wrap 116 Had a senior moment 119 Work from a folder 122 Island SW of Majorca 123 Some paneling 124 Old North State native 125 Piece of the past 126 Co-founder of Death Row Records 127 Some ocean debris 128 Pastime for Barack Obama at Camp David

DOWN 1 English division 2 Coastal Anatolian region 3 Barbecue annoyances 4 Miss at the movies? 5 Region 6 Twaddle 7 Tax law subj. 8 Big do 9 There’s no escaping this 10 Request that one attend 11 Certain joint 12 Apple core, briefly 13 Unruffled 14 Prefix with red 15 One of the usual suspects? 16 Org. with an eagle in its logo 17 Piehole 20 “Blues in the Night” composer Harold 21 Certain sultan’s subjects 26 Country with a supreme leader 29 Petroleum distillate 33 Source of the line “What’s done is done” 35 Ginger feature 37 Drunkard 39 Angry cat’s sound 40 1/24 of un giorno 42 “___ Miz” 44 Better suited 45 Careered

85 Yom Kippur War weaponry 87 Record producer Brian 89 Gray shade 93 Twisty-horned creatures 95 “Halloween,” e.g. 96 Opportunity creator 98 Go-between 99 Sci-fi staple 102 Partner of operated 104 Blazing 107 Submit an online return 108 “___ Q” (Creedence Clearwater Revival hit) 109 Plot 113 Dundee denials 115 Cocktails with crème de cassis 116 Letters on briefs 117 Celtic water deity 118 Poet’s “before” 120 Post-1858 rule 121 “Give ___ break!”

46 Split part of a reindeer 47 Rank below group captain 49 Car radio button 50 Top 52 ’90s-’00s Britcom 54 Month after Av 56 Microsoft Surface competitor 57 Uncertain 59 Tom Cruise’s character in “Mission: Impossible” 63 Hägar’s wife in the funnies 66 Round up 67 ___ Laënnec, inventor of the stethoscope 68 Pursue 69 Certain bid, informally 70 Kind of court or cross 71 Bridge dividing the San Marco and San Polo districts 72 Early 20th century, in British history 73 Pink-slips 76 Answer man? 77 Old West casino game 78 Oceans 79 Pump option: Abbr. 82 Itch cause 83 It brightens up a performance L A S T

S M I T A U D E G R E E K A T H C S I R I N G E X T R S T R O S H O U T S O B T H E M A N N A G O T L L O F F O B A U M I T S A T H E R A S S

E N N I U S A L T H E A O O F M E T

Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

P O E M E N V Y G R E E N E L A N G R Y H T E I N S E N O E X T R A L O W P I E E W I L D A R N S T I C S H O R S T H E O G I N F B R O A I I I L A D M A D E L M O N Y C

G N U E L L S W O R T H

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B A T A B E A S S O O T T G R Y H E B E A B R R G E E L L B O O E L D W E I E G S H O R T B O A H E E S A Y S H N E D M A D E A P L O P

J U S T I N T E F H O M A M P I P P O S P O I L E E A V E R B E D S N S T E R U P L I C E S T O R E N D H N U O W T H O S W O R L A S C I R E A M

L E S S R E E L T R Y S T

D I S

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BW CLASSES ASSERTIVENESS CLASS Join a communications consultant to determine your communication style and learn healthy verbal and nonverbal assertive skills. Class will be held Thursday, Feb 7th; 6:30-8pm at Timberline High School. This class is offered by Boise Schools Community Education Program, offering lifetime learning opportunities to residents of the Treasure Valley. Register for this class online boiselearns.org or call 854-4047 for more information.

BW VOLUNTEERS HOST AN EXCHANGE STUDENT! Experience of a lifetime! For one school year your family will embark on an unforgettable cultural adventure. World Heritage is a long established organization which works with over 31 countries to bring high school students to America & send American high school students abroad. Contact your Area Representative, Caitlin Donnelly, caitdonn@gmail.com to learn more about the program.

BW FOUND MONEY Found on North End Sidewalk. Write to claim: Aubergine57@ hotmail.com

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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

ADULT BW ADULT

GETTING PAROLE IN IDAHO IS NOT EASY

If you have a family member or friend who is trying, there are things they can & must do to help their cause. Contact Maloney Law on our 24 hr. line 208-392-5366 for a free consultation. Assistance available in parole & probation violations also.

BW CHAT LINES FUN LOCAL SINGLES Browse & Reply FREE! 208345-8855. Use FREE Code 7887, 18+. MEET GAY & BI SINGLES Listen to Ads & Reply FREE! 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 5988, 18+. RAW UNCENSORED PHONE SEX V/MC/AmEx/Dsc,18+,$1/min. Call Jolene! 800-573-2995. REAL DISCREET, LOCAL CONNECTIONS Call FREE! 208-287-0343 or 800-210-1010. www.livelinks. com 18+. WILD LOCAL CHATLINE Send Messages FREE! Straight 208-345-8855. Gay/Bi 208472-2200. Use FREE Code 7886, 18+.

B OISE W E E KLY NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: KILEY MARIE WILSON 04-03-1987 Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1301076 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Kiley Marie Wilson, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Kyler James Wilson. The reason for the change in name is: personal reasons. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on March 14, 2013 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: JAN 28, 2013 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT BY:DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA RANDY LEE JENKINS, Plaintiff, v. MARCHETA E. JENKINS, deceased and JOHN DOES I through X. Defendants. Case No. CV-OC-2013-00624 SUMMONS

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NOTICE: MARCHETA E. JENKINS, YOU HAVE BEEN SUED BY THE ABOVE NAMED PLAINTIFF. THE COURT MAY ENTER JUDGMENT AGAINST YOU WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN TWENTY (20) DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. You are hereby notified that in order to defend this lawsuit, an appropriate written response must be filed with the above designated court within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons on you. If you fail to so respond, the Court may enter judgment against you as demanded by the Plaintiff in the Verified Complaint to Quiet Title. A copy of the Verified Complaint to Quiet Title is served with this Summons. If you wish to seek the advice of or representation by an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be filed in time and other legal rights protected. An appropriate written response requires compliance with Rule 10(a)(1) and other Idaho Rules of Civil Procedure and shall also include: 1. The title and number of this case. 2. If your response is an Answer to the Verified Complaint to Quiet Title, it must contain admissions or denials of the separate allegations of the Verified Complaint to Quiet Title and other defenses you may claim. 3. Your signature, mailing address and telephone number, or the signature, mailing address and telephone number of your attorney. 4. Proof of mailing or delivery of a copy of your response to Plaintiff’s attorney, as designated above. To determine

whether you must pay a filing fee with your response, contact the Clerk of the abovenamed Court. DATED this 4 day of February, 2013.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

CHRISTOPHER D. RICH Clerk of the Court HOLMES

By:ELYSHIA

Deputy Clerk Pub. Feb. 13, 20 & 27, 2013. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Kaj Peter Fogdall Brenda Rebecca Fogdall Gannon Viktor Fogdall Case No. CV NC 1302386 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Family) A Petition to change the names of Kaj Peter Fogdall (an adult), Brenda Rebecca Fogdall (an adult) and Gannon Viktor Fogdall (a minor), all now residing in the city of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court of Ada County, Idaho. The names will change to Kaj Peter Kolding, Brenda Rebecca Kolding and Gannon Viktor Kolding, respectively. The reason for the change in names is: aesthetic and personal reasons. A hearing on the Petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on April 11, 2013 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the Court a good reason against the name change. Date: FEB 15 2013 Christopher D. Rich By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk Pub. Feb. 27, March 6, 13, 20, 2013.

ADULT

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | 29

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

BEAUTY

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): In 1993, Frenchman Emile Leray was on a solo trip through the Sahara Desert. In the middle of nowhere, his car suffered a major breakdown. It was unfixable. But he didn’t panic. Instead, he used a few basic tools he had on hand to dismantle the vehicle and convert its parts into a makeshift motorcycle. He was able to ride it back to civilization. I foresee the possibility of a metaphorically similar development in your future, Aries. You will get the opportunity to be very resourceful as you turn an apparent setback into a successful twist of fate.

COMMUNITY

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Your power animal is not the soaring eagle, the shrewd wolf or the brave bear. No, Taurus, it’s the rubber chicken. With the rubber chicken as your guardian spirit you might be inspired to commit random acts of goofiness and surrealism. That would reduce tension in the people around you. It could motivate you to play jokes and harmless pranks that influence everyone to take themselves less seriously. Are you willing to risk losing your dignity if it helps make the mood looser and more generous? Nothing could be better for group solidarity, which is crucial these days. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the language of the Huron Indians, “orenda” is a word that refers to the spiritual power that resides in all creatures and things. If you’ve got enough of it, you may be able to declare at least partial independence from your own past. You can better shape the life you want for yourself rather than being so thoroughly subject to the limitations of your karma and conditioning. I happen to believe that your current supply of orenda is unusually abundant, Gemini. What’s the best use you can make of it? CANCER (June 21-July 22): When I lived in Santa Cruz, Calif., years ago, some of my writings were illustrated by a cartoonist named Karl Vidstrand. His work was funny, outrageous and often offensive in the most entertaining ways. Eventually he wandered away from our colorful, creative community and moved to a small town at the edge of California’s Mojave Desert. He liked living at the fringes of space, he told journalist R.D. Pickle. It gave him the sense of “being out of bounds at all times.” I suggest you adopt some of the spirit in the next three weeks, Cancerian. Being on the fringes and out of bounds are exactly where you belong. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The history of your pain is entering a new phase. Gradually, almost imperceptibly at first, an emotional ache that has been sapping your vitality will begin to diminish.

30 | FEBRUARY 27 – MARCH 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

You will free yourself of its power to define you. You will learn to live without its oddly seductive glamour. More and more, as the weeks go by, you will find yourself less interested in it, less attracted to the maddening mystery it has foisted on you. No later than mid-April, I’m guessing that you will be ready to conduct a ritual of completion; you’ll be able to give it a formal send-off as you squeeze one last lesson out of it. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “When looking for a book, you may discover that you were in fact looking for the book next to it.” Italian writer Roberto Calasso told that to The Paris Review, and now I’m passing it on to you. But I’d like you to expand upon its meaning, and regard it as a metaphor that applies to your whole life right now. Every time you go searching for a specific something—a learning experience, an invigorating pleasure, a helpful influence—consider the possibility that what you really want and need is a different one that’s nearby. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): At least once a day, a cell in your body mutates in a way that makes it potentially cancerous. Just as often, your immune system hunts down that dangerous cell and kills it, preserving your health. Do you understand how amazing this is? You have a vigilant protector that’s always on duty, operating below the level of your awareness. What if I told you that this physical aspect of your organism has an equivalent psychic component? What if, in other words, you have within you a higher intelligence whose function it is to steer you away from useless trouble and dumb risks? I say there is such a thing. I say this other protector works best if you maintain a conscious relationship with it, asking it to guide you and instruct you. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to deepen your connection. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Some rules in the game of life don’t apply to you and can therefore be safely ignored. Do you know which ones they are? On the other hand, do you understand which of the rules in the game of life are crucial to observe if you want to translate your fondest dreams into real experiences? To recognize the difference is a high art. I’m thinking that now would be an excellent time to solidify your mastery of this distinction. I suggest that you formally renounce your investment in the irrelevant rules and polish your skills at playing by the applicable rules. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Don’t think the garden loses its ecstasy in winter,” wrote the Persian mystic poet Rumi. “It’s

quiet, but the roots are down there riotous.” I think you’re like that winter garden right now, Sagittarius. Outwardly, there’s not much heat and flash. Bright ideas and strong opinions are not pouring out of you at their usual rates. You’re not even prone to talking too loud or accidentally knocking things over. This may in fact be as close as you can get to being a wallflower. And yet deep beneath the surface, out of sight from casual observers, you are charging up your psychic battery. The action down there is vibrant and vigorous. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “When you come right down to it,” says religion writer Rabbi Marc Gellman, “there are only four basic prayers. Gimme! Thanks! Oops! and Wow!” Personally, I would add a fifth type of prayer to Gellman’s list: “Do you need any assistance?” The Creator always needs collaborators to help implement the gritty details of the latest divine schemes. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you would be an excellent choice to volunteer for that role right now—especially in tasks that involve blending beautiful fragments, healing sad schisms, furthering peace negotiations and overcoming seemingly irreconcilable differences. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the movie Fight Club, there is an animated scene at the very end that required an inordinate amount of time to produce. Each frame in this scene took the editors eight hours to process. Since there are 24 frames in each second, their work went on for three weeks. That’s the kind of attention to detail I recommend you summon as you devote yourself to your labor of love in the coming days, Aquarius. I think you know which specific parts of your creation need such intense focus. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “I have decided to rename the constellations that have domineered our skies too long,” writes an Internet denizen named Hasheeshee St. Frank. He gives only one example. The Big Dipper, he says, shall forevermore be known as The Star-Spangled Gas Can. I invite you to come up with additional substitutes, Pisces. It’s an excellent time for you to reshape and redefine the high and mighty things to which you have given away too much of your power. It’s a perfect moment to reconfigure your relationship with impersonal, overarching forces that have wielded a disproportionately large influence over your thoughts and feelings. How about if you call the constellation Orion by the new title of ThreeEyed Orangutan? Or instead of Pegasus, use the name Sexy Dolphin? Other ideas?

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Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 36