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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 32 JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013

TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 9

GIVE US A BREAK Lawmakers consider mandatory work break FEATURE 13

RAUL’S WORLD Raul Labrador could make or break the GOP ARTS 24

MASTER OF PUPPETS BCT’s new show looks for the monsters in the closet FOOD 29

BARRELS OF BOOZE Barrel-aging comes to Boise

“A win isn’t necessarily a check mark. A win is also speaking the truth.”

CITIZEN 11


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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Sultan of Events: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editors: Amy Atkins, Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick, Damon Hunzaker, Randy King, Christina Marfice, Ted Rall, Trevor Villagrana Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Brad Hoyt, Brad@boiseweekly.com Zach Ritchie, Zach@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Elijah Jensen, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow, Garry Trudeau, Ben WIlson Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE BW GRANT DEADLINE LOOMS It ain’t easy being an artist. Trying to make a living while being devoted to creating art has been a goal of artists since the first humans started painting the walls of caves. (We imagine a scene where Og tries to convince Bog that his excellently rendered image of a bull entitles him to a share of the mammoth.) In the old days, artists had to find a wealthy patron. Now, there is the almighty grant, and it just so happens that the deadline for Boise Weekly’s Cover Auction Grant is fast approaching. Artists and arts organizations have until 3 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 8, to submit their applications for the chance to be awarded a share of the proceeds from the annual auction. Where does the money come from? All the original artwork printed on the cover of Boise Weekly is auctioned off once a year, with the money going to support the valley’s arts community. This year, BW teamed with Idaho Shakespeare Festival, which received 20 percent of the funds from the auction. The rest will be doled out by a panel of judges to deserving grant applicants. Both arts organizations and individual artists are eligible to apply, and at least two individual artists will be awarded $1,000 grants named in the memory of frequent BW cover artists P.J. Dean and Surel Mitchell. You can get more specific details on the grant program, as well as how to apply and what is expected of you should you be given a grant, by clicking on the “Cover Auction Grant” button at boiseweekly.com or go straight to we.boiseweekly.com. Since we’re all about art in its many forms, you’ll also find a guide to all sorts of movie viewing at Boise’s own art house movie theater, The Flicks. The pullout guide in the center of this issue is designed for readers to save, so they make sure not to miss any of the films BW’s own cinemaphile, George Prentice, is sure to review in the coming months. —Deanna Darr Note is being written on a rotating basis by the Editorial staff of Boise Weekly.

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Sue Latta TITLE: Thank You Walt Whitman MEDIUM: Resin and wood

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2013 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

ARTIST STATEMENT: I work in the serendipitous relationships between image and object, text and texture. I strive to produce a thought or cause a gut reaction and, most importantly, to exist beyond the surface. Join me for the opening of my show “Best Worst Case Scenario” at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 8 at Visual Arts Collective. The show runs through March.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

SUBMIT

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Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

MONSTER PUPPETS BW went behind the scenes at Boise Contemporary Theater’s new production, A Nighttime Survival Guide, to get the skinny on the giant-sized puppets used in the production. See the video on Cobweb.

BULLYING GOES VIRAL A video of a Pocatello student being beaten in a middle school locker room went viral this week. Get the full story on Citydesk.

A LOVELESS LOVE STORY Green Zoo Theatre debuted Signal-to-Noise, a new play from Boise writer Thomas Newby Jan. 24. Should you go see it? Find out on Cobweb.

BAZOOKA BUYBACK Authorities say a surface-to-air missile launcher turned in at a Seattle gun buyback event was probably obtained illegally. Probably. Get the full story on Citydesk.

INSIDE NOTE

3

BILL COPE

7

TED RALL

8

NEWS Legislature considers mandatory work breaks

9

CITYDESK

9

CITIZEN

11

FEATURE Raul’s Rules

13

BW PICKS

16

FIND

17

8 DAYS OUT

18

DOONESBURY

19

SUDOKU

20

MUSIC GUIDE

22

ARTS Boise Contemporary Theater turns to puppets to tell its latest original story 24

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SCREEN Oscar-nominated short films come to Boise

25

REC Life with the elusive cougar

27

FOOD Barrel-aged cocktails

29

WINESIPPER

29

CLASSIFIEDS

30

NYT CROSSWORD

32

HOBO JARGON

33

FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

34

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MAIL DAIRY DISCRETION Boise Weekly’s story on the agreement between the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and the Idaho Dairymen’s Association (BW, News, “Dairy Kings,” Jan. 23, 2013) raised some concerns among readers. Here’s what some online commenters had to say. Wow, those letters are incredible. Who does the representative of the cattle industry think he is questioning the DEQ on their ability to monitor air quality properly? I’m all for open lines of communication where the sharing of scientific research is concerned, but the tone of those letters makes it pretty obvious that the cattle industry thinks they’ll be doing the talking and the DEQ will be doing the listening. The MOU is a complete conflict of interest and I, as a citizen of Idaho, am extremely concerned about the precedent this sets. —Idaho Citizen Idaho, if you think this letter is upsetting, this is only the very tip of the iceberg. In our audit of the Idaho State Department of Agriculture Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation files, we found letters from Mr. Marv Patten, bureau chief with ISDA to producers alerting them to the fact that their (ISDA) inspectors had found violations that they (ISDA) did not consider Clean Water Act violations, But that [the Environmental Protection Agency] did. At the time, SDA was under an MOU with EPA and should have shared that information with them—they did not. In addition, there are extremely close ties between regulators and industry. For example, Mr. Lloyd Knight,

past president of the Idaho Cattleman’s Association and author of those 2003 emails in his official capacity at that time, is now working for the Idaho State Department of Agriculture as the administrator of the Plant Industries Division of the ISDA. There is documented groundwater contamination in multiple areas across the state, mostly due to these CAFOs and their waste “management” practices. Instead of our regulators actually doing anything to correct these issues, industry gets the legislature to make those waste “management” practices secret. I could go on ‘til the cows come home, but I think you get the point. By the way, if you think these ties are suspect, just wait ‘til you see what the oil and gas industry will get away with with the regulators. They are already turning a blind eye to what the natural gas companies are doing. Scary? Here’s something even scarier: Just this past Wednesday [Jan. 23], both the House and Senate Resource committees passed rules that will now allow Class 2 injection wells, too. If the thought of the gas and oil industry being allowed to inject toxic, carcinogenlaced, possibly radioactive “produced”—water at high pressure—through our aquifers is concerning to you (and it damn well should be), you need to be involved. And don’t even get me started about the earthquakes that are induced by these injections. Care to know more, or get involved? Contact me at idahocare@yahoo.com or visit our Facebook page: Idaho Residents Against Gas Extraction. —Alma Hasse

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6 | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

MORE GUN BROUHAHA Whenever Bill Cope takes on gun control, there’s a lot of feedback, as was the case after his recent column (BW, Opinion, “The Mad Monkey Flu,” Jan. 23, 2013). Just want to compliment you on your recent writing style. You’ve obviously taken some of the techniques that have been so successful for the geniuses at Fox and (hopefully) you’re playing the part of someone who is ignorant and unaware in order to stimulate some interest and discussion in some otherwise pretty uninteresting subjects. Here’s to keeping the spice in it. Have some fun! —George Tirebiter Oh, please. If politicians were trying to pass any laws trying to restrict the First Amendment, Cope would be the first one balled up in a fetal position, crying in the corner, complaining about how his rights were being taken away. When the anti-gun crowd starts talking about guns, they positively make Glenn Beck look perfectly sane. —LOL Hasn’t anyone put Badger out of his misery yet? —Capt. Spaulding

PLAY NICE When BW posted a blog about musicians’ accidents, (Boiseweekly.com, Cobweb, “Boise Musicians Jason ‘Bug’ Burke and Bill Parsons Need Your Help,” Jan. 18, 2013) some comments got nasty. In reaction, some offered etiquette reminders. Accidents cannot be prevented. They happen. Being a dick, though. That can surely be prevented. —Blake Green It’s always good to teach people how to be better humans ... if they want to know and, conversely, to listen, when others try to teach us how to be better ourselves. I say never kick someone when they’re down. —Mary Jeanne Toutloff WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BILL COPE/OPINION

DEAR PRESIDENT OBAMA 2C is tweet talk for ‘Too Crazy’

How-de-doo, Mr. President. It’s me again. Bill, from out in Idaho. Just wanted you to know I heard your lovely speech Jan. 21. Wonderful. Absolutely wonderful. And as a citizen living in perhaps the most Republican of states, I want to say once again what a pleasure it is to listen to a political leader who has something other than stale conservative caca between his ears. I also wanted to tell you not to worry too much about this dicky little sheriff from over in Canyon County. But maybe you haven’t heard. See, after this talk of new gun laws had been bouncing around for a few days, Sheriff Kieran Donahue announced (as though anyone had asked him) that he would refuse to enforce anything you might come up with to control those one-man WMDs. Of course, he wasn’t the first. Conservatives in Idaho are never the first at anything. Whatever the issue, they sit around like unplugged appliances, waiting for word to come from some higher power to tell them what to think. And, of course, to idle minds such as these, the NRA would be among the highest of powers. Anyway, it appears to me that Sheriff Donahue waited until he was confident there was a trend developing before adding his contribution to the flow of sludge draining out of the Gun Nut Swamp. And surely, Mr. President, you’re aware there has arisen a distracting howl among a smattering of sheriffs in objection to any reasonable approach or interpretation to the Second Amendment—or as I call it, “The right to inflate one’s flagging masculinity by owning a shooter-upper that looks like the neato guns they use in those cool movies like Sylvester Stallone makes.” Generally, this sheriffical rebellion is coming from the more hillbilly-ish provinces— Mississippi, Texas, Idaho—but there has even been one from Oregon, though it happened to be that part of Oregon with no people in it. To my knowledge, Donahue is the only Idaho sheriff to hop on this bozo bandwagon, but it wouldn’t surprise me if a few more joined the pusillanimous posse. After all, sheriffs are the only law enforcement personnel who have to run for election at regular intervals, so it comes as no shock that they go groveling for voter approval, which in conservative environs means their groveling takes the form of mouthing the stupidest, most blow-hardy, ignorant, lowest common denominator crap they can think of to mouth. And oh my goodness, is Canyon County a conservative environ. In this most Republican of states, Canyon County has been for decades the most Republican of Idaho’s 44 shires. Seriously, the dopiest politicians imaginable gather in that otherwise dull and trashy expanse like flies on fresh cow pies, then all too often, they spread their “loonytarian” germs to state governance and beyond. I think of it as the WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

“Smear of Smead Syndrome”—a local reference that you wouldn’t possibly understand, Mr. President—but the lingering effects of this sour and noxious influence is a raging incompetence on a level that would embarrass Adam Sandler. If that’s even possible. Sir, I am not kidding. What Florida does for the nation as a whole, Canyon County does for Idaho—if you know what I mean. Their school administrators can’t seem to figure out how much money is in their budgets; they have prisoners walking away from work details and a contract prosecutor being prosecuted for pilfering county funds; they send a legislator to the State Capitol who proceeds to get drunk and go crashing around in a stolen vehicle; they have drive-by shootings it seems like every weekend, and they have either the worst drivers’ education programs ever or a shamefully high rate of people who flunked out; those of us living downwind of them had to suffer their floating effluvium for decades until they finally got civilized enough to put emissions standards on their vehicles. The list goes on. Seriously, it’s ‘Toon Town over there. Among their more remarkable gifts to the state of Idaho as been a superintendent of public instruction with no education himself and a governor who would rather be out roping baby cows than doing anything useful. And now they have a sheriff, huffing and puffing in as public a way as possible, that he’s a better judge of what’s constitutional than you are, Mr. President. Thankfully, I am given to understand that Canyon County compliance with any new gun laws won’t be left up to Sheriff Spud ... er, Donahue. (Excuse me. That slip alluded to another local legend that I don’t imagine you would have heard of.) As has been reported from several sources, the enforcement of federal laws is done for the most part by federal lawmen. So it appears this horse’s patoot either doesn’t know much about who does what in the world of law enforcement or he is just blowing smoke out of his ... (Oh dear, I’m sorry. Let me rephrase that, should this letter fall into Sasha’s or Malia’s hands.) ... or he is just grandstanding. But I don’t have to tell you about conservatives grandstanding, do I, Mr. President? As your second inauguration proves, their bluster, their blabbery and their bull is nothing you can’t handle, even when it’s coming from somebody significant and not from some tag-along Barney from out hayseed way. So like I said, Sir, don’t lose any sleep over Sheriff Donahue’s “Me-one-big-toughhombre” moment. People like him pop up in Canyon County far too often, but they never last long, and in the end, they never really accomplish much. Like … remember Steve Symms? No? That’s OK. Neither does anyone else.

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OPINION/TED RALL

WEIRD TIMES

In politics, it’s a wild wild weird world Hunter S. Thompson said: “When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.” But what do you do when things go from weird to completely psychedelic? The political landscape at the beginning of the second term of America’s first biracial—in the usual historical sense, calling him black kind of requires an asterisk—is a messed-up, topsy-turvy, bass-ackwards place. There is the president’s newfound liberal rhetoric, even going so far as to namecheck gays and lesbians in his inaugural address. Did anyone tell him or members of the media that Stonewall was an actual riot, that endorsing this landmark of liberation is to endorse violent revolutionary change? He came off as something of a peacenik, implying that he would be willing to talk to, say, Iran. How does that square with his onslaught of drones, a campaign that increasingly looks like a grim Vietnam-style war of attrition? But it’s his timing I can’t figure. Back in 2009, when he came into the White House with an overwhelming mandate for radical change in the midst of the worst economic crisis since the Great Depression, when he enjoyed Democratic control of both houses of Congress, when the Republicans were so whipped that opinion writers for the Wall Street Journal wondered aloud whether there was a future for the GOP, he tacked right. Now that obstructionist Republicans control the House, ordinary citizens have settled into a grouchy state of permanent discontent, when there’s absolutely no reason to expect to get anything big or bold accomplished, the dude is breaking out as some sort of crazy progressive?

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Then there’s the bizarre realignment of the two major parties. Leading Republicans are freaking out in the weirdest possible way. Something has to be done! But not if it requires compromising on our core values. Um, guys ... white guys ... old white guys ... the problem is that the voters don’t like Republican core values. Or you personally. So what is to be done? Something! You almost have to feel sorry for Republicans. Sure, they started a bunch of crazy wars and they rolled back 800 years of cherished civil liberties, but it’s sad to watch the mighty crash. Not only is a sorta-black man in the White House, all the GOP’s classic election-stealing tricks—corrupting the Supreme Court, bullying recount officials with paid thugs, moving voting booths out of minority neighborhoods—aren’t enough to close the growing gap between their obsolete stances. Now they’re so desperate that they’re even flirting with rejiggering the Electoral College in order to suck out two or three more terms with them in control of the House before fading away into Whig-like oblivion. Not to say that the Democrats are walking the straight and narrow road of sanity. There’s one issue that consumes Americans most. Happily, it’s something that the government not only can do something about, but has been able to address many times in the past. I am talking about, obviously, the economy. Americans have been remarkably consistent about this. It would be hard to think of another time when people told pollsters for four years in a row 12 that the same issue was the No. 1 issue

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NEWS/CITYDESK B OIS E W EEK LY

NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

GIVE ME A BREAK ‘Sandwich Bill’ to be served before Idaho Legislature

A neighborhood market operated on Eighth Street from 1901 until 2011.

TWO ICONIC BOISE MARKETS SEE BIG CHANGES

GEORGE PRENTICE Idaho lawmakers were taking a break. Filling the Capitol Dining Room alongside lobbyists, reporters and the general public on Jan. 24. Most customers opted for a Reuben sandwich ($6.99) or the pot roast special ($7.99), while others nursed a cup of coffee ($1.50 with free refills). Meanwhile, some state workers working across the Capitol Mall complex couldn’t enjoy the same privilege. In fact, public and Daniel Wolf, representative of the Idaho Association of Government Employees and Marty Durand, attorney with Herzfeld & Piotrowski, sit in the Idaho Statehouse Capitol Dining Room, open to the public. private employees across the Gem State don’t have a right to one of the most basic tenets of an American workplace: an opportunity paid for, nothing like that. This would be an grounded,” said Durand. to step away from their stations to eat a optional 30-minute break.” Daniel Wolf, spokesman for the Idaho Asmeal, make a phone call or take care of some The 2013 version of the legislation–dubbed sociation of Government Employees, said state personal business. the “sandwich bill” by its advocates–is expectagencies were notorious for inequity in who “It’s true,” said Marty Durand, labor ated to surface when King introduces the meatorney with Herzfeld & Piotrowski, LLP. “The gets a break and who doesn’t. “At some of those agencies–even in the same sure before the House Commerce and Human Fair Labor Standards Act sets the minimum Resources Committee in the next several days. building–you’ll see some people getting onewage and says that if you work more than 40 King and Woodings are the sole Democrats on hour breaks every day and then, in that same hours a week, you get overtime. But that’s it. building, some people aren’t getting any kind of the committee, which is chaired by Twin Falls There’s nothing about a break.” Republican Rep. Stephen Hartgen. a break,” said Wolf. “In a number of agencies, That’s why 20 states have enacted laws The new bill would require an employer allowing workers to have a 30-minute unpaid we have employees who work through their to offer a 30-minute unpaid break to any lunch breaks without saying anything because break without fear of being punished. And employee working seven and a half hours or they think they can’t speak up.” that’s why Durand, a 21-year Idaho attorney more. But there would be exemptions, includKing has a simple theory as to why a state and former executive director of the Idaho ing any employer who employs two or fewer Women’s Network, approached Boise Demo- worker would be fearful to ask for the privilege of getting a break: benefits. employees at one location at any one time. cratic Rep. Phyllis King about Corrections officers and anyone covered by “It’s because they need the the issue two years ago. a collective bargaining agreement would also insurance. Those workers stay “Rep. King is a great advoTHE ‘SANDWICH BILL’ be exempt. with a lousy job and with a cate for workers and middleThe proposed measure “This bill does nothing to benefit union lousy boss,” she said. “And class families,” said Durand. would have private and public employers offer a 30-minit’s almost always because they workers,” said Durand. “Some people have “When I brought this to her ute unpaid break to any very strong anti-union sentiments here; some need the health insurance.” attention and told her there employee who works more people are very strong pro-union. The big King said she heard from was no law that says you have than seven and one-half conchunk is in the middle.” a number of those employees to offer a break, her reaction secutive hours per day. The change would not apply to Durand adds that the benefits outweigh any but, to the person, they wished was shock. I said, ‘A simple any employer who employs perceived inconveniences. to remain anonymous. piece of legislation could take two or fewer employees at a “Fatigue leads to workplace injuries. Plus, “The ones who had the care of that.’” particular location at anyone you’re seeing more Idahoans in low-wage, worst complaints said, ‘Please House Bill 432 was introtime. Correction officers and employees who is covered high-pressure jobs. And that’s where you see don’t share this with anybody. duced by King in 2012, but she by a collective bargaining more people pressured to be more productive I’m afraid of losing my job,’” conceded to Boise Weekly that agreement would also not to make quotas. The more pressure placed said King. she “didn’t think it was going to be included. on workers, the easier it is to exploit them,” Another legislator, Boise go anywhere.” said Durand. “If you want a productive work Democratic Rep. Holli High “But I was amazed at how force, you have to treat them like human Woodings, said she has also many people wrote to me when heard of no-break workplaces from a relative. beings.” they got wind of this,” said King. “And the As for the political reality of securing a “My brother-in-law was working for calls. … I received so many poignant calls. hearing on her proposed legislation, King said a company in Rexburg and that company That’s when we knew something was up.” she’s been talking with her fellow members of wasn’t offering any type of a break,” said Though HB 432 didn’t receive a public the House Commerce and Human Resources Woodings. “I said, ‘That can’t be legal.’ But I hearing during the 2012 session, advocates Committee but response has been “noncomlooked at the Idaho statutes and federal laws, for the measure told BW that they learned of mittal.” and, sure enough, there was nothing there numerous instances of state employees who “But I’ll give it my all,” she said, then were afraid to say anything publicly about not that guarantees any type of a break. I couldn’t paused for a moment. “I don’t know. I’m an believe it. I think this is a no-brainer. It’s not getting any kind of a break. optimist.” like we’re trying to mandate that a break be “They’re scared and their fear is wellWWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Two historic neighborhood markets that helped define Boise’s East and North ends, are about to undergo big changes: One is still hoping to keep its door open while the other is transitioning to a yoga studio. When 95-year-old Margaret Lawrence died in June 2011 (BW, Feature, “Whatever Happened to Margaret?” July 6, 2011), neighbors worried that her Hollywood Market on Eighth Street would be closed forever. In fact, the location was a corner market since the dawn of the 20th century: the N.J. Davis and Company Grocers from 19011907, the Corner Grocery from 1914-1919, the C.E. Sharp Grocery in 1921, Your Grocery from 1923-1929, and the Hollywood Market from 1930 until May 8, 2011, six weeks before Lawrence died. The location was sold by Lawrence’s estate in 2012 to Sallie Herrold, who stood before the Boise Historic Preservation Commission Jan. 28 with her plans to turn the location into Hollywood Market Yoga. In fact, the remodel, which is already under way, includes 500 square feet for a yoga studio, a new exterior courtyard and a planned mural on the north side of the building, facing Resseguie Street. “Margaret Lawrence used to have a sign at the Hollywood Market that read, ‘Happiness is spoken here,’” said Cathy Sewell of Platform Architecture Design. “We want to carry on that sort of theme for the mural. It won’t be business signage.” Commissioners liked what they heard and saw. “I think this is a great re-use of this space,” said Commission Chairman Amy Pence-Brown. “And I really appreciate that.” Vice Chair Barbara Dawson agreed. “To have a historic business that held a lot of memories be repurposed to a business that will hold new memories is a commendable effort,” said Dawson. Ultimately, the Commission voted unanimously to grant a certificate of appropriateness for the project, which is expected to go before Boise’s Planning and Zoning Commission in early February. P & Z will need to take up the issue of available on-street parking for Hollywood Market Yoga. A number of Eighth Street property owners said they thought the new business would put a strain on available parking spots for residents. But Historic Preservation Commission members reminded them that parking was not “the purview” of their body and P & Z would need to consider their complaints. Meanwhile, another Boise land10 mark market’s future isn’t sure.

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CITYDESK/NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

NEWS

The Roosevelt Market was built around 1900.

Each weekday, scores of youngsters pouring out of East Boise’s 9 Roosevelt Elementary School stop in the Roosevelt Market, the iconic corner shop on North Elm Avenue off of Warm Springs Avenue, for what co-proprietor Susan Wilder calls the after school “sugar rush.” “For an hour, we close down our sandwich bar, and it’s only the kids,” said Wilder. “They’ll come over here and completely fill the store. We’ve only had a few people that have managed to come in here during the ‘sugar rush,’ and they don’t make that mistake again.” When not full of students purchasing snacks, the Roosevelt Market is a weekend brunch stop and summertime hangout. But earlier this month, owners of the property put the store, and a second floor apartment over the market, up for sale. “We need to consolidate our finances,” said Sheila Trounson, who shares ownership of the building with her mother, Gay Milligan. Mother and daughter purchased the property in 2003. Wilder and her business partner, Nicki Monroe, began operating the market six months later. Milligan and Trounson are looking for a buyer to purchase the 2,409-square-foot building, with an asking price of nearly $250,000. Listings indicate the structure was built in 1900. “We would love it if the buyer keeps the market,” said Trounson. “We’re not selling it for any reason other than consolidating. It’s such a fantastic community location; it’s not a money-maker, it’s an investment in the community is what it is.” Wilder said she was concerned the location would no longer a serve as a neighborhood market, and might go the way of the Hollywood Market. “Our concern would be that somebody wouldn’t want us here,” said Wilder. “And that they’d want to purchase this and then maybe start up their own business.” Trounson said they previously offered to sell the property to Wilder and Monroe before placing the building on the market. “They’re not in a situation to do that, that I know of,” said Trounson. “We really want it to stay a part of the neighborhood, but we couldn’t put it contingent on the sale because we need to sell it.” Wilder pointed to a newly launched blog, saverooseveltmarket.blogspot.com, which suggests East End residents could work together to purchase the building in a “community-owned” model and preserve its role “as a permanent historic, economic and cultural asset for the East End.”

Plans for a bike share program would include stations in Boise downtown core and the Boise State campus, with a total of 140 bikes at 14 stations.

FEWER WHEELS, MORE STUDENTS Bike, car-sharing programs slow to take off but here to stay ANDREW CRISP Boise State University occupies one of the busiest slices of real estate in the city. More than 20,000 people regularly descend upon the 170-acre campus, which includes more than 150 buildings and that massive blueturfed stadium. “We kind of think of ourselves as a mini city,” said J.C. Porter, assistant director of the Transportation Department at Boise State. Not unlike any metropolis, Boise State also has its own ideas about 21st century alternative transportation options--and they were all too happy to share their concepts at a Jan. 23 Urban Lunch, held at the university’s home away from home, Boise State Center on Main, tucked inside downtown’s Alaska Center. A panel including Porter and Drs. Susan Mason and Thomas Wuerzer, associate professors in the Boise State Department of Community and Regional Planning, focused on the university’s research on urban issues, with a particular focus on people movement. In fact, Mason and Wuerzer’s department worked alongside the Central District Health Department to craft a proposed bike-share program, using mapping systems to find the most active portions of the city.

“Our question wasn’t, ‘Does Boise need a bike-share or not?’” said Wuerzer. “Instead, our question was, ‘If we get a bike-share, where would the best locations be?’” Wuerzer and Mason pointed to a map showcasing active cores of Boise. Bright red areas showed zones active for residential, restaurant and retail use, locations better suited to feature one of 15 stations with 10 rentable bikes. “Keep your eye out for more research on cycling in Boise,” said Mason. “There will be more research on how we [cycle throughout the city] and when we do it.” Other urban initiatives, such as a carsharing program, also originated with the university. ZipCar debuted on the campus in 2010, with four cars, a project to free up sparse parking space by letting users rent cars permanently housed at the school. According to Porter, the few surface parking lots on campus are destined to serve as footprints for future buildings, “We have to come up with alternatives for people driving to campus,” said Porter, who added his department already runs a bike rental program for faculty and students.

Boise State’s density is, in large part, because the campus has “hard and fast boundaries” requiring multistory buildings for oncampus expansion, according to the scholars. “The only other place to expand is the residential area to the south,” said Porter. “And that gets expensive.” And while the panel unveiled a university survey that indicated 24 percent of students and teachers regularly rode a bicycle to campus, 10 percent walked and 48 percent drove alone in a vehicle, the experts are anxious to push down the number of cars on campus. “We want to promote to students, ‘Hey, you don’t need to bring a car to campus,’” said Porter. More than 2,600 students, many of whom bring a car, live in on-campus student housing, Porter said, and many of those students are reluctant to give up their own keys in favor of a shared ZipCar. The company’s target of 30 percent of the Zipcars being used each day hasn’t been consistently met, according to Porter, so the fleet was reduced to two vehicles. As of December, Boise State’s ZipCar program had 257 members, with 30 to 40 drivers making reservations per month.

—Andrew Crisp and George Prentice

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CITIZEN

CHERIEPassion BUCKNER-WEBB and politics GEORGE PRENTICE

Do you find the 2013 Legislature dramatically different than the 2011 Legislature? I have the advantage of seeing how the House runs, which is so different than the Senate. Do you believe there is truth to the adage that the Senate is closer to the center of the political spectrum than the House? I will tell you that, in coming over to this body, the tone and timbre is much more collegial to me. I have been told by trusted colleagues of mine in the House that the House remains less centered, a little further right. Can you speak to the challenge of losing a vote today but winning a greater cause for tomorrow? A win isn’t necessarily a check mark. A win is also speaking the truth. Change comes even after I’m gone. I believe in living a legacy. Legacy is a tradition I heard my entire life. The reason I’m here is the legacy that others left for me, little by little. I have a granddaughter now and … (Buckner-Webb’s eyes welled up). And I can tell you … (Buckner-Webb began to cry). I’m sorry. I didn’t expect that. But what I wanted to say is that it really makes a

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difference what the political landscape will look like, what the Boise Valley will be like for her. I want her to be cradled in the bosom of this community so that she can be everything she wants to be. She’s the representation of children, known and unknown, to me. Do you see any of yourself in your granddaughter? I see my mother in her. She was a person who believed in possibilities and to have a responsibility to make sure those possibilities are available to many people. You’ve been a professional singer and still sing at a number of public events. What are your earliest memories of singing? My grandmother said I was singing before I was talking. She wanted me to study classical music. But when I was 12, The Supremes and Martha and the Vandellas were hot. What does your music collection look like? Very eclectic. What do you listen to in your car? NPR. That’s the truth. But when you want to dial down the

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Cherie Buckner-Webb happily shared two photographs with Boise Weekly that framed her life. “Let me show you this,” she said, reaching for a framed black and white Kodachrome from April 1968. “I was still in high school at Boise High. I was probably 15 or 16.” Buckner-Webb, 61, pointed to herself, singing with two other girls at a rally held outside the Idaho Statehouse, days after the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. Moments later, Buckner-Webb pointed to another photo, this one on her iPhone, of her 22-month-old granddaughter Zaida holding a program from the Jan. 21 MLK Day ceremony at the Statehouse. “She’s my heart,” said Buckner-Webb. In a wide-ranging conversation, BW spoke with the two-term legislator – her first in the Idaho Senate – about grandchildren, music and the nobility of politics.

world, what music do you listen to? It really depends. Music is illustrative of how I’m feeling or how I want to feel. I’m going to perform the role of Bloody Mary in South Pacific for Music Week in May, so we better get out of session on time. Let’s talk about legislation for the current session. There’s a rumor going around that you’ll be the sponsor of a 2013 version of Add the Words. People across the state have been working diligently to get the words “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” included in the human-rights legislation. Some folks assume it’s an agenda. It’s not. It’s about seeing that rights are approved for everyone. And where are you with introducing a proposed measure? We have legislation that has been reviewed by a number of stakeholders. Routing slips have been done, but the first step is to hear the will of the people. We want to open up those discussions with academics and business and religious leaders. During testimony in November 2012 before the Boise City Council, event proponents of the city’s new ordinance said they were overwhelmed by five hours of testimony on this issue. You know it. I think this is the 12 time.

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CITIZEN 11

That said, what is the chance of seeing statewide legislation? I’m hoping, I’m hoping, I’m hoping.

What was your reaction to the Republican trial balloon to wipe away Idaho’s business personal property tax? Having worked in rural communities in Idaho, I can tell you that the result of eliminating that tax without another opportunity to fill that void would be devastating. It’s a matter of safety, security and all of those infrastructures that personal property tax supports and fronts. The primary option seems to be a shift of the personal property tax burden over to homeowners. My email is full and my voicemail is full with homeowners who are saying, “Please, please think of us.” What was your takeaway from last November’s voter rejection of the so-called Luna Laws? People were very clear. It wasn’t just Republicans or Democrats. It was across the board. They voted no. I’m amazed when I hear some elements of those initiatives will be brought back. It’s incredulous to me. But Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna has told legislative budget writers and legislative committees that he heard something different. The voting box told me in very empirical terms that voters don’t want it. Perhaps he’s

hearing a different voice. Superintendent Luna has had a pretty low profile since the November election. I think that’s appropriate. There was a time, perhaps two generations ago, when politics was considered noble. Do you believe it can be again? There are so many people I work with that I have so much respect for, but I believe that people in our community aren’t sure about us. And as long as they’re not sure, we’ve got big work to do. Do you want to keep doing this? I think so. What’s the chance of you holding another political office within the next 10 years? I don’t think so. Right this minute I think I’m supposed to do very good work here. The following morning, Buckner-Webb called to make an addendum to her remarks regarding running for another public office. I had to call because I just had an unexpected two-and-a-half-hour phone call with a group of people who wanted to talk about a future campaign. Believe me, I’m as surprised as anyone. When BW asked Buckner-Webb about the specifics of the conversation, she laughed. I can’t tell you; We were just talking. But considering what I said in our conversation, I thought you should know first.

RALL in the country. Whatever his other challenges, President Barack Obama 8 certainly doesn’t have to wonder about what’s on our minds. So what is his second-term agenda? Given his laissez-faire approach to the economic collapse throughout his first term, you might think that he would focus in like a laser-guided drone on the economy this time around. But no, everyone’s telling us that Obama’s ambitious second-term agenda is gun control, immigration and climate change. Don’t get me wrong: One of the great tragedies of the last dozen years was that Al Gore, one of the few American politicians who understands the gravity and imminent threat of global warming, didn’t get to exercise the presidential powers he earned at the ballot box. Though I will be shocked if Obama’s proposals rise above the level of the usual too little/too late/too vested in corporate profits to curb industrialization, it’s nice to see the issue get lip service. Restoring sanity to America’s immigration system is long overdue. Though, again, I wouldn’t be surprised if we just end up with

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another Reagan-style amnesty that doesn’t open up the doors to more legal immigrants. Gun control of assault rifles and high-capacity magazines, of course, is just boilerplate postSandy Hook Elementary School massacre reactionism. Fortunately, at least one of these issues will probably resolve itself. Already there are fewer illegals trying to sneak into the United States across the border from Mexico because the economy here is so terrible. Who is going to want to come to an impoverished nation full of gun nuts shooting at each other underwater? Still, it’s disconcerting to watch smug Democrats lord it over clueless Republicans when the only difference between the two parties is one of tone. Republicans let you know that they hate you. Democrats talk nice and then let you down. Neither party gives a damn about the fact that you haven’t gotten a raise in 30 years. How can they? Their contributors are the top executives of the corporations who’ve been lining their pockets at your expense. One of these days, you’ve got to think that the people are going to notice. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


RAUL’S RULES DANIEL WALTERS IIdaho daho U.S. U.S. Rep. Rep. R Raul aul Labrador Labrador could could bring bring about about a revitalization revitalization of of the the Republican Republican Party Party — or or thwart thwart it it

As the 2013 congressional session began, rumblings of a coup against Republican Speaker of the House John Boehner started immediately. Boehner had just compromised with President Barack Obama, raising taxes on the very wealthy while delaying spending cuts. Conservative House Republicans—who had refused to support even Boehner’s original, more conservative proposal—responded by tarring the WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

speaker as a compromiser and promisebreaker. When Republicans moved to choose their speaker, a few saw a chance for new blood. The vote went alphabetically. The first two representatives voted Boehner. But next came the strongly libertarian Michigan Rep. Justin Amash. He didn’t vote for Boehner—who had kicked him off the House Budget Committee. Instead, he

shouted out the name of an Idahoan who has barely been in Congress two years: “Raul Labrador.” When it was Labrador’s turn to vote, Labrador just sat in silence—both times his name was called. “Labrador,” the clerk said, looking around. “Labrador.” No response. “I decided to speak with my silence,” Labrador told The Pacific Northwest Inlander after the vote. “There was nobody

at that moment I thought would be a good speaker.” The coup attempt failed and Boehner was re-elected speaker. But as the dust settled, reporting quickly exposed Labrador as one of the main forces trying to topple Boehner. It placed Labrador, who represents Idaho’s 1st Congressional District, in a pivotal position for the Republican future: On one hand, Labrador’s work to reform immigration

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as an attorney with negotiations, if you take anything off the table, you show a weak hand.” Democrats need to believe Republicans would go over the cliff, hit the debt ceiling and shut down the government. He says there’s nothing that’s non-negotiable, but he’d only A Rebel’s Causes support tax hikes if they come tied to immediate spending cuts. Born to a single mother in Puerto Rico, Labrador’s tactics recently created a rift Labrador’s voice still carries a whiff of a Spanbetween Idaho’s two representatives. Mike ish accent. Simpson, Idaho’s other Republican representa“Every day I look at the Capitol, I get tive, told the Idaho Statesman that Labrador’s goosebumps,” he said. refusal to vote for speaker was “irresponYet, he remains mostly a visitor: Labrador sible” and forever undermined his credibility. doesn’t own a home in Washington, D.C., or Labrador, in turn, called Simpson a rent an apartment. He sleeps on “bully.” an air mattress on the floor Some constituents of his office and showers praise Labrador’s strict at the Capitol gym. fiscal conservatism. He misses his wife “He’s probably and his five chilone of the best dren and flies congressmen back to Eagle that I’ve ever nearly every had,” says weekend. Pam Stout, He said a founder of he has seen the Sandpoint how hard -RAUL LABRADOR Tea Party. it is for “I honestly anything to can’t think get done— ““There Th he ere r w was as n as nobody obo od dy of a single there are 535 t that tha hat moment mom mo ome ment tI at vote where we members of th hou ough g t would woul wo uld ul d be be thought disagreed.” Congress, each a good good s peak pe ake er.” er.” er speaker.” But Tea Party with their perpower has weakened. sonal sacred cows. In 2010, 24 percent of “It’s one of the most voters told the Rasmussen frustrating things, seeing Reports survey they consider how slowly things get done themselves a part of the Tea Party. here,” Labrador said. Today, that figure has dwindled to only 8 Yet, lately, Labrador has defied his own percent. party leaders when they tried to compromise. “I don’t think he’s done a very good job of Labrador wasn’t the first choice of esrepresenting all of Idaho,” said Larry Grant, tablishment Republicans. His 2010 primary chairman of the Idaho Democratic Party. “I opponent, former John McCain campaign think he represents a very narrow group.” worker Vaughn Ward, was recruited by Yet Labrador is trying to widen the Repubnational Republicans and endorsed by Sarah lican Party to include an increasingly imporPalin. But Ward’s early double-digit lead tant demographic: Hispanics. collapsed in a string of embarrassing gaffes. Labrador, a former immigration attorney, overtook both Ward and incumbent Democrat Immigration Plans Walt Minnick. Liberal groups were alarmed. The People Hispanics either hated Mitt Romney or for the American Way named Labrador one loved Barack Obama: a scant 27 percent of of the “10 scariest Republicans heading for them supported the GOP nominee. Pundits Congress,” over his opposition to abortion, across the spectrum saw a big problem for the gay marriage and tax hikes. future of the GOP. Obama plans to make imLabrador wasn’t alone. The more-powmigration a key part of his State of the Union erful-than-ever Tea Party, preaching against address Tuesday, Feb. 12. deficits and bailouts, had fueled a surge of Immediately after the election, Democratic conservative victories in the House. Labrador Indiana Rep. Luis Gutierrez said he ran into caught the eye of Robert Draper, author of the failed vice presidential candidate Paul Ryan in in-depth profile of the House of Representathe Capitol gym, where Ryan mentioned there tives, Do Not Ask What Good We Do. were many conservative House Republicans According to Draper, Labrador said he serious about immigration reform. “didn’t come to Washington to be part of a Gutierrez said Ryan told him he “should team,” and told Boehner that his debt-ceiling talk to my friend Raul Labrador because plan was a “terrible bill” and accused him of House Republicans will be looking to him for “abandoning” conservatives. Early on, Labra- guidance.” dor even hinted at overthrowing the speaker While Labrador is against a “pathway to if conservative members were punished for citizenship” and says the first priority is securrebelling against leadership. ing the borders, Gutierrez and Labrador have Today, Labrador said he thinks Boehner is already met multiple times to find common a good man and his frustration is mostly over ground. Boehner’s strategy, which he sees as willing to “He understands the issues and realizes give up ground too early. immigration is more than just a political or “I think we need to be a little bit bolder labor-market issue,” Gutierrez said in an and stronger,” Labrador said. “What I learned email. “He sees the human side of immigracould help woo Hispanics, saving the GOP from demographic doom. But on the other, he has been touted as a rebel leader, a hurdle for any Republicans pushing for a more moderate party.

““II DECIDED DECIDED TO TO SPEAK WITH WITH SPEAK MY MY SILENCE.” SILENCE.”

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tion, the families that are being ripped apart by deportations or the decades it takes for some families to get visas.” It’s easy, here, to find similarities between Labrador and Marco Rubio, the junior senator from Florida seen as a major contender to grab the GOP’s 2016 presidential nomination for president. Both are Hispanic, both were uplifted by the Tea Party, both voted against the fiscal cliff deal, and both have a passion to fix the immigration system. Rubio told the Wall Street Journal recently that he wants to raise the limit on immigrants who bring investments and advanced skills, and wants to let current undocumented migrants earn a work permit and, eventually, citizenship. Labrador is more vague about his plans, but said he has been talking with Rubio, and they agree on a lot. One bill Labrador helped introduce, the STEM Jobs Act, would have given a higher percentage of visas to those studying math, science, technology and engineering. But Democrats wanted a much more comprehensive bill. Gutierrez voted against it, calling it a “slap in the face to the core values of the United States.” On talk shows like Meet the Press, Labrador has harshly criticized Democrats on immigration. “They’re using this as just a political tool— and they don’t really want to resolve anything. They were able to do something about health care reform, but they couldn’t do anything with immigration reform,” he told Geraldo Rivera on Fox, “and they want to keep continuing to blame Republicans for their failure of leadership.” Grant said he doesn’t want to take anything away from Labrador’s ethnicity, but it’s what’s put Labrador in the spotlight. “Right now, I think he’s having a good time putting on a show, going on the talk shows, using his ethnic background in the Republican Party in order to advance his career,” Grant said.

The Republicans of the Future Labrador says he wants a bolder Republican Party, one that’s not afraid of tackling tough issues. After the 2012 election, he lambasted the GOP’s big business ties on Meet the Press, saying he “didn’t become a Republican to defend the rich.” In the future, he said he wants the party to consider the effects of war and the cost of military spending. But all the speculation on what Labrador can bring to the party depends on how long he stays. He says he believes U.S. representatives should be limited to 12 years in office. “I get calls almost every day asking me to run for governor,” Labrador said. “I am definitely considering it, but I have not made a decision.” Tea Party activist Stout is one supporter, saying she’d love to see “somebody with a real spine and a true conservative in that office.” But even the Governor’s Office would eventually come with a self-imposed deadline. “Honestly, I don’t see myself doing this for a very long period of time,” Labrador said. “I do not want to make politics a career.” This story was first published in the Pacific Northwest Inlander on Jan. 15. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Boise Public Library offers some nautical fare for lunch.

FRIDAY FEB. 1 brain food LITERATURE FOR LUNCH There’s nothing worse than a ho-hum lunch spent idly browsing the Web while gumming a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. But there’s a better, more filling option offered to all those brown baggers out there. Boise State University’s Department of English hosts the regular Literature for Lunch series, a free-to-attend book club to spice up the lunch hour beginning at noon the first Friday of each month. Organizers create a list of books for participants to read through the series. Readers then meet at the Boise Public Library for a meal and discussion. According to organizers, this season’s offerings “capture Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s reflection in ‘Youth and Age’ that ‘Youth and I are housemates still’ and the interesting dynamics that intergenerational relationships create.” Books selected as part of the series can be bought at a 25 percent discount at the Boise State Bookstore, or for 10 percent off at Rediscovered Bookshop or Hyde Park Books. The program kicks off with Ernest Hemingway’s classic The Old Man and the Sea, scheduled for Friday, Feb. 1, from 12:10-1 p.m. The Nobel Prize-winning book’s principal character sails out to sea to grapple a massive marlin only to confront poor luck, ruination and despair— a novalla rife with opportunity for a robust discussion. In March, Literature for lunch will take up Elizabeth Gaskell’s North and South, followed in April by May Sarton’s Mrs. Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing, and in May by The Summer Book by Tove Jansson. 12:10 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org. After surviving the Holocaust, Marion Blumenthal Lazan has spent much of her life sharing lessons of overcoming hardships.

WEDNESDAY JAN. 30

SATURDAY FEB. 2

perfect pebbles

famished

MARION BLUMENTHAL LAZAN

FOURTH ANNUAL WILL ACT 4 FOOD

Marion Blumenthal Lazan’s family fled to Holland during Hitler’s rise to power, but the boats that would have taken them to safety in America were sunk by the Nazis, and Blumenthal Lazan spent the next six years in transit and concentration camps, including Bergen-Belsen in Germany. Though her entire family survived World War II, her father died of typhus soon after the family’s release. Since 1979, she has been sharing her insights and experiences in lecture halls and classrooms to raise awareness of the Holocaust. Wednesday, Jan. 30, at 7 p.m., she’ll share, along with plenty of anecdotes, her insights into perseverance, the power of creativity, the importance of being true to one’s self and the necessity of accepting others at the behest of the Eagle High School History Club through a grant from the Idaho Humanities Council. Blumenthal Lazan’s stor y of sur vival in Nazi-occupied Europe, which is the subject of her memoir Four Per fect Pebbles, PBS documentar y Marion’s Triumph and a two-act musical, is full of life lessons about overcoming hardship, and, according to the Eagle High School Histor y Club, shares it with children “so that they will recognize the horrors of this period in world histor y.” “We are the last generation given the honor of hearing first-hand from a survivor,” said the History Club in a press release. The presentation runs 45 minutes and concludes with a question and answer session. 7 p.m. FREE. Eagle High School auditorium, 574 Park Lane, Eagle, fourperfectpebbles.com.

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It takes a long time to put on a theater production. Think about the logistics: The play has to be written and edited. Dialogue must be added and cut. Someone casts the actors, who memorize lines and rehearse while stage managers create a set, organize props and design lighting. The amount of blood, sweat, tears and time it takes to give a play wings is enormous. Leave it to the folks at Boise Little Theater and Daisy’s Madhouse Theatre to take the hood off a stage play to show the public just

how the process works during the fourth annual Will Act 4 Food. Eight playwrights, directors and about 40 local actors gather at Boise Little Theater for a lottery that will divide them into teams and determine the genre, dialogue and props that will be used in original 10-minute plays. The following evening—Saturday, Feb. 2— the public is invited to watch and help a “celebrity judge” adjudicate the final products. Will Act 4 Food benefits the Idaho Foodbank, and this is the second year since the production has moved from the Danny Peterson Theatre at Boise State University to Boise Little Theater, nearly doubling the event’s audience capacity. The teams have 24 hours to write and rehearse their plays. Will the teams crash

and burn in fits of stress and artistic burnout, or will they sail to theatrical victory with funny, touching plays that pluck heartstrings and elicit belly laughter? There’s only one way to find out. 7:30 p.m. $15. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, willact4food.org.

FRIDAY FEB. 1 book-mobile READ ME TREASURE VALLEY KICKOFF It’s not every day you raise a glass for a sesquicentennial, and even rarer still that someone knows what that word means. But for Boise Mayor Dave Bieter, this peculiar amalgaWWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


R IC HAE S WANB EC K

FIND S K U LLC ANDY

SKULLCANDY’S WRECKED METALS SERIES Feeling left out in the cold? Try the Winterreise Project. CASSANDRA WEYANDT

FRIDAY AND SUNDAY FEB. 1 AND FEB. 3 schubert THE WINTERREISE PROJECT Across the Treasure Valley, winter has blasted residents with snowfall, icy rain and frosty winds. Winter nights test not only warm clothing, but sometimes the soul itself. That’s a sentiment at the core of Franz Schubert’s Winterreise, a new Opera Idaho production debuting Friday, Feb. 1. “Winterreise” translates to “winter journey,” and while organized with operatic elements, The Winterreise Project isn’t technically an opera. Instead, it’s a song cycle penned by Schubert in the early 1800s as a setting for 24 poems written by Willhelm Muller. Through the lines of Muller’s poetry, the tale of a young musician begins with the discovery that his lover has been unfaithful, unfolding into a harrowing emotional journey through a dark winter night. Creators Jason Detwiler, a baritone with experience in a wide array of operas, and Lauren Edson, a dancer and choreographer formerly with Trey McIntyre Project, have added new elements to what is typically a two-person production comprised of pianist and singer. With The Winterreise Project, the pair incorporate dance and video to create a new interpretation. “This will be sung in its original German,” Detwiler reminds visitors on the Opera Idaho website, “But never fear, English supertitles are here! Just like Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon but without the fancy John Woo moves.” With this more modern take, organizers plan to incorporate vivid, fluid elements to reinvigorate the timeless production. Friday, Feb. 1, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, Feb. 3, 2:30 p.m. $15-$40. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3871273, operaidaho.org. mation of letters presents not only an opportunity to celebrate humankind’s bipedalism, but also a chance to kick off this year’s Read Me Treasure Valley, sponsored by Ada Community Library and Boise Public Library among other literacyloving entities. In the spirit of Boise turning 150 years old, Bieter, in conjunction with Walk150. org, has set out to walk 150 miles over the course of 2013, and he doesn’t intend to do it alone.

S U B M I T

“I hope to do as many of those miles as possible with residents committed to making Boise a better, healthier place to live,” Bieter said in an official message on the Walk150 website. Bieter, who will be strutting his stuff down one mile of the Oregon Trail Reserve Friday, Feb. 1, urges people to lace up their sneakers and share in the festivities beginning at 10 a.m. Prior to the walk, Bieter, Dan Popkey of the Idaho Statesman and Associate

This is what happens when musicians go reckless.

FRIDAY FEB. 1 texan RECKLESS KELLY Austin, Texas, rockers Reckless Kelly may not be a household name but after 15 years of playing shows across the United States and abroad, not to mention releasing nine critically acclaimed albums, the group is clearly making waves in the world of country music. Its latest record, released on its brand-spanking-new indie label No Big Deal Records, is a collection of 10 songs about the ins and outs of the band itself. Whether it’s the woes of being on the road or old-fashioned heartbreak, the boys capture the essence of what it means to be reckless and at the top of their game. Recorded in a farmhouse turned studio in Austin, Texas, Good Luck & True Love was tracked almost entirely live, with little extra production aside from a vocal harmony courtesy of Nashville, Tenn.’s own Dani Flowers. According to the band’s website, fiddle/mandolin player Cody Braun reflects on what the quintet wanted to accomplish with this most recent release: “We wanted to make a record that sounded like we sound live,” said Braun. “Keeping it all in the same space and making sure it was an album rather than just a collection of songs was the main goal, and I think we came pretty close to what we set out to do.” Boiseans can catch Reckless Kelly at the Morrison Center on Friday, Feb. 1. 8 p.m. $23.50 in advance, $28.50 day of show. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, recklesskelly.com.

State Librarian Marj Hooper will discuss the importance of reading. During the kickoff, students from Les Bois Junior High will receive books for their school library. Library representatives will be on-site throughout the event, recommending books on Boise’s rich heritage of environment, enterprise and community.

It’s not easy to find locally made headphones. Most electronics aren’t items forged in area workshops, and stereo headphones with cushioned ear pads aren’t stitched together by sweet old ladies in rocking chairs. Skullcandy’s Aviator series, however, includes a local tie-in: $149.95 a special model dedicated to at skullcandy.com Boise hot rod and chopper fabricators Wrecked Metals. Owner Matt Whitlock said the Wrecked Metals headphones began shipping internationally four months ago, though Skullcandy reached out to him more than a year ago. Skullcandy called him up after browsing his company’s work online, inspired by a unique blue color scheme applied to a hot rod project. Borrowing that gray-blue hue, Skullcandy created the special Wrecked Metal series of Aviator headphones, with each pair bearing the company’s red-and-black logo. “Just recently, I built a motorcycle for them to give away at a Zumiez party called the 100K party,” said Whitlock. “We tied that into the headphones, and the motorcycle that I built was the same color.” Like the iconic sunglasses of the same name, the Aviators are designed to serve both functional and aesthetic purposes. The headphones are described by Skullcandy as a “crossbreed of street-level swagger and sophisticated class” to create “the Porsche of the headphone arena.” —Andrew Crisp

Books presented range from the 1860s to today and cover topics including the history of the Treasure Valley’s Basque, Latino and Native American population and the ever controversial Boys of Boise. 10 a.m.-11 a.m. FREE. Oregon Trail Reserve, 4500 E. Lake Forest Drive, walk150.org, readmetv.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | 17


WEEK IN REVIEW ANDR EW M ENTZ ER

8 DAYS OUT

BW hit up opening weekend of the McCall Winter Carnival.

FROM THE SHORES OF SF TO PAULY SHORE Skidding over a thick sheet of ice, Boise Weekly publisher Sally Freeman and I made our way to the Boise Airport Jan. 24 to escape the frozen city for a digital conference in San Francisco. Hosted by the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, the three-day conference included lectures from digital librarian and activist Brewster Kahle and Mark Coatney of Tumblr, among many others. While we were talking tech with our national alt peers, other BWers were holding down the snow fort in the Gem State. Freelancer Andrew Mentzer chugged up to the opening weekend of the McCall Winter Carnival. “Despite dismal traffic and heavy snowfall, the mood was upbeat with thousands of patrons taking in dozens of elaborate snow sculptures,” wrote Mentzer. “Other events include snowshoe golf, tubing, a lobster feed and live tunes town-wide.” The carnival continues through Sunday, Feb. 3. Back in Boise, BW’s Harrison Berry stopped by Boise State University’s Special Events Center Jan. 24 for the preview of Idaho Dance Theatre’s Winter Performance. Berry was particularly impressed by choreographer Jessica Miller Tomlinson’s “Architecture: Splintered and Cracked.” “This piece was perhaps the evening’s most remarkable for the freshness and profundity of its physical statements,” wrote Berry. “The dancers mimed and synthesized the cracking of concrete and twisting of steel, simulating the decay of enormous, static structures as fog billowed from stage right.” The following evening, Jan. 25, BW’s Josh Gross got cozy at Liquid Laughs for a set by ’90s comedian Pauly Shore. “Shore’s acting career very much on hiatus, his fortune gone, his name a punchline, he could have shuffled out onstage like a washed-up has-been.” But, according to Gross, that wasn’t the case. “Shore’s lighthearted doofusness gave his lamentations a whimsical tone, a WTF for for the ages. … It could have been terrible. It wasn’t. Instead, it was hilarious.” Gross also swung by the debut play from local writer and director Thomas Newby, Signal-to-Noise. According to Gross, the plot follows a love story between an “awkward, overweight schlub who spends most of his time online” and a woman “carrying on an imaginary relationship with the government official she believes is monitoring her every move.” “Depicted as a time-fractured series of vignettes that constantly repeat and expand upon one and other, the story evolves from a 1,000-mile height, giving an overall impression of the relationship more than linear narrative,” wrote Gross. “It feels as convoluted and self-serving as memory, and eventually devolves into the characters’ meditations on that great eternal question: What is love?” Gross continued: “While not perfect, the production, the first from the newly launched Green Zoo Theatre, a collaborative project of Newby’s band The Green Zoo, is more than just a strong debut. It’s an unusual and compelling piece that is well worth the low price of admission.” The play continues Friday, Feb. 1, and Saturday, Feb. 2, at The Water Cooler, 1405 W Idaho St. in Boise. —Tara Morgan

18 | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

WEDNESDAY JAN. 30

THURSDAY JAN. 31

FRIDAY FEB. 1

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: SHARON LACEY—7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

Festivals & Events

Festivals & Events

Festivals & Events

MCCALL WINTER CARNIVAL—Check out the ice sculptures, the beer garden, live music and activities going on as part of the town’s annual celebration. FREE-$20. McCall, mccallchamber.org.

MCCALL WINTER CARNIVAL—See Wednesday. FREE-$20. McCall, mccallchamber.org.

CHOCOLATE AND DIAMONDS— Join Discovery Center of Idaho for its annual fundraiser to support its efforts to inspire lifelong interest in math, science, technology and engineering. Guests bid on silent and live auction items, cast votes for best chocolatier and get a chance to win a diamond. For more info call Jane Ahl at 208-287-4231. 6:30 p.m. $75. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, scidaho.org.

GREEN ZOO THEATRE PRESENTS SIGNAL-TO-NOISE—Playwright Thomas Newby presents a love story set in the digital age for those who are checking their phones and browsing the Web at the same time. Reserve tickets by email at greenzootheatre@gmail. com or by calling 208-230-4001. 8 p.m. $6.50. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise, greenzooarts.squarespace.com.

On Stage A NIGHTTIME SURVIVAL GUIDE—11-year-old Verne of Arco, and Aki, who lives in rural Japan, are united by a shared mystery and fear of what comes out when the sun goes down in this story about friendship, hope and imagination. See Arts, Page 24. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Food & Drink

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: SHARON LACEY—7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: ROBERT DUCHAINE—Featuring Pete Hall. Two-for-one tickets. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. A NIGHTTIME SURVIVAL GUIDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

DATE NIGHT AT CORKSCREWS—Enjoy live music and your date gets a free drink. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews Wine Shop and Pub, 729 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-888-4049, corkscrews1.com.

ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST—Rebellious Randale McMurphy fakes insanity to serve out his prison sentence in a mental hospital. 7 p.m. $10-$18. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Workshops & Classes

Concerts

WEST COAST SWING AT THE MARDI GRAS—Boise West Coast swing instructors Jennifer Babione and Joel Hunter offer classes, early bird specials, open dancing and full bar. For more info email heirloomstudio@ gmail.com. 7-11 p.m. $5-$10. Mardi Gras Ballroom, 615 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-342-5553.

CLARINET STUDIO RECITAL— The students of Leslie Moreau perform on clarinet. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609.

Talks & Lectures MARION BLUMENTHAL LAZAN—Join author and Holocaust survivor Marion Blumenthal Lazan as she tells stories about her experiences and discusses the value of tolerance, overcoming hardship and positive thinking. Hosted by the Eagle High School History Club in the Eagle High School auditorium. See Picks, Page 16. 7 p.m. FREE. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208-939-2189, ehsmeridianschools.org.

Kids & Teens PUPPET SHOW—Check out puppet renditions of popular children’s stories. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org.

Odds & Ends BIOTZETIK BASQUE CHOIR— You don’t have to speak Basque, just sing. Call 208-853-0678 or email averquiaga@hotmail. com for more info. 6 p.m. FREE. Bishop Kelly High School, 7009 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208853-0678, biotzetikbasquechoir. org.

Art 20TH ANNUAL VALENTINE FOR AIDS—View valentines by 250 local artists. Bidding ends Sunday, Feb. 10, and proceeds go to Safety Net for AIDS Program. Flying M Coffeehouse, 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com.

LIQUID LAUGHS: ROBERT DUCHAINE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

HOKUM HOEDOWN SQUARE DANCE AND OLD-TIMEY MUSIC SERIES—Enjoy music from the Hokum Hi-Flyers while learning square-dance moves. 7 p.m. $5, $15 per family. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding. com.

A NIGHTTIME SURVIVAL GUIDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST—See Thursday. Dinner at 6:15 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Dinner and show: $39, show only: $20. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

MAGIC OF BROADWAY ICE SHOW—The McCall Starz on Ice features local amateur and professional skaters and nationally and internationally acclaimed guest stars. 8 p.m. $12-$15. Manchester Ice and Event Centre, 200 Lake St., McCall, 208-6343570, manchester-icecentre.com.

THE WINTERREISE PROJECT—Opera Idaho baritone Jason Detwiler and dancer Lauren Edson collaborate in this depiction of Schubert’s timeless song cycle. Visit operaidaho.org or call 208-387-1273 for more info and tickets. See Picks, Page 17. 7:30 p.m. $15-$40. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net.

MCCALL WINTER CARNIVAL—See Wednesday. FREE-$20. McCall, mccallchamber.org.

On Stage BIG BAD ASS BELLY DANCE SHOW—The third annual Big Bad Ass Belly Dance Show features Flamenco, West African dance, live music and performances by belly dance artists. 8-11 p.m. $8 advance, $10 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Literature ANITA DIFFLEY READS—Author Anita Diffley reads from her book, Turn Here Sweet Corn, a memoir and how-to guide that follows her becoming an organic farmer. 6 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks. org.

Odds & Ends LADIES’ LOUNGE—Toss back some cocktails with the ladies of Boise Weekly and enjoy prize giveaways, drink specials and much more. Visit BW’s promo page to get the 4-1-1. 5 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs.com.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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BOISEweekly | FLICKS MARCH - MAY 2013 FILM SCHEDULE | 1


Bicycle Dreams Sponsored by Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance -!2#(!4 Join us for the single screening of this award winning documentary about the Race Across America (RAAM). Directed by 3TEPHEN!UERBACH, it captures the grueling 3,000 mile race from the Pacific to the Atlantic. $10 tickets (plus a $1 handling fee) are available in advance at www.imathlete. com/events/bicycledreams; tickets at the door are $15.

Designer Labels for Less 2498 E. Fairview #108 Meridian, Idaho (208) 895-8079

Fighting Fraud— A Free Event Sponsored by the Better Business Bureau !02),!4 Don’t be Fooled! Before you write that check for a too good to be true investment, ask one simple question: “What’s in it for them?â€? A new documentary from FINRA and WQED shows you how to keep fraudsters from taking your money. Hear from the victims, witness the psychology of the scam, see the red warning flag, identify the victim types. Above all, learn to protect yourself.

Lunafest Saturday !02),!4 Soroptimist International of Boise is partnering with LUNAFEST to showcase nine short films by, for, and about women. The films are united by a common thread of exceptional storytelling; this season’s program will compel discussion, make you laugh and tug at your heartstrings. Join us at LUNAFEST Boise to experience this traveling film festival while supporting important local,

national, and international causes with a common mission to improve the lives of women and girls; a discussion will follow directly after the screening. Proceeds benefit local projects to benefit women and girls and The Breast Cancer Fund. Tickets are $15 and are available in advance and at the door. For more information, please visit www.lunafest.org/boise

Idaho Human Rights Center Presents Inside Hana’s Suitcase !02),!4&/2(/,/#!534 2%-%-"2!.#%$!9 Based on the internationally acclaimed book Hana’s Suitcase which has been translated into 40 languages, the film is an effective blend of documentary and dramatic techniques. A Holocaust story unlike others, it provides a contemporary global perspective and lessons to be learned for a better future.

education and to foster individual responsibility to work for justice and peace.� Founded in 1996 to construct a memorial to human rights, that vision became a reality when the Idaho Anne Frank Human Rights Memorial opened to the public in 2002. Today, thousands of school children and adults tour the Memorial and participate in the Center’s human rights and civic leadership programs. Tickets are $10 and can be purchased in advance at The Flicks and The Idaho Human Rights Center.

Berryhill & Co. Plan b Lounge

BACON Catering & Banquets

John Berryhill Restaurants w w w. j o h n b e r r y h i l l r e s t a u r a n t s . c om downtown boise 387-3553

The mission of the Idaho Human Rights Education Center is to “promote respect for human dignity and diversity through Forget what you thought was possible. It’s time to fly.

Pagliacci

& Pulcinella suite

IN COLLABORATION WITH BALLET IDAHO MARCH 1, 7:30PM ¡ MARCH 3, 2:30PM

SUSANNAH

Where everyone can shop and anyone can join. Located in Boise’s Historic North End 888 W. Fort St. Boise 208.472.4500 www.boise.coop Open Daily 7am - 10pm

MAY 17, 7:30PM ¡ MAY 19, 2:30PM

TICKETS: 387-1273, OPERAIDAHO.ORG *EBIP%BODF5IFBUSFPSHt

From Our Family toYours... Idaho Public Television educates our youth, informs and enlightens our viewers, and brings laughter and entertainment into our homes. BECOME A MEMBER TODAY! Visit us at idahoptv.org or call (800) 543-6868.

TICKETS GIFT & CERTIFICATES ONLINE

GET YOUR

Season Packages & Student Packages now available!

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WWW.IDAHOSHAKESPEARE.ORG or 336-9221

18k rings

R. Grey Gallery 415 S. 8th St. (BoDo) 41 www.rgreygallery.com

385-9337

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DAT E N I G H T,

Every Night 'ALLERYs#LASSES 3UPPLIESs%QUIPMENT 14 Varieties of Take-n-Bake Lasagnes Gourmet EntrĂŠes & Desserts U Dine-In or Take Out 1504 Vista Ave. U Boise U (208) 345-7150 www.cucinadipaolo.com

%LLEN3T"OISE'ARDEN#ITY %LLEN3TISACROSS#HINDENFROMTH

 

(RS4UES &RI 3AT 

Opens March 1 $IRECTORMichael Apted CONCEIVEDTHIS INTERESTINGDOCUMENTARYPROJECTIN WHEN HECHOSEAGROUPOF YEAR OLDSTOSTUDYONFILM EVERYSEVENYEARS!STHESUBJECTSNEARTHEIR SIXTIES THEYREFLECTONTHEIRLIVESˆWHOTHEY WEREANDWHOTHEYHAVEBECOME#LIPSOFTHE SUBJECTSOVERTHE PASTDECADESARE INTERSPERSEDWITH PRESENTDAY INTERVIEWS%VEN IFYOUHAVENOT SEENTHEPRIOR DOCUMENTARIES THISISFASCINATING .OT2ATED “It’s hard not to think of your own mortality as you see these lives changing before you.�

RES:

(208) 472-1463

ICINO.COM W W W. C A F E V T STREET R O F . 808 W

Now open Sunday

Opens March 8 Tommy Lee JonesPLAYS 'ENERAL $OUGLAS -AC!RTHUR ANDMatthew FoxIS'ENERAL "ONNER&ELLERS THEOFFICER INCHARGEOF INVESTIGATING *APANS%MPEROR (IROHITOFORWAR CRIMESATTHEENDOF7ORLD7AR))!TTHESAME TIME THEGENERALISTRYINGTOLOCATEAYOUNG WOMANEriko Hatsune WITHWHOMHEFELL INLOVEDURINGCOLLEGEPeter WebberDIRECTS

Opens March 15 -ARCIA'AY(ARDEN (Academy Award Nominee for Pollock) stars in this delightful comedy about a woman who secretly befriends her husband’s young and ditzy mistress. Keeping both the blonde and the cheating husband in the dark proves to be both exhilarating and exhausting. !IDAN1UINN and ,EONOR7ATLING co-star for writer-director *OAN#ARR 7IGGIN.

“My favorite movie at Palm Springs International Film Festival 2012.�

$!.)%,%!'!. FILM JOURNAL INTERNATIONAL

Opens March 22

)N Damien Echols ANDTWOOTHERTEENAGERS Jason Baldwin ANDJessie Misskelley Jr.WEREARRESTEDFORTHE MURDERSOFTHREE YEAR OLDBOYS4HEOTHER DEFENDANTS MINORS WERESENTENCEDTOLIFEIN PRISON%CHOLS THEN WASSENTENCEDTODEATH ANDSPENTYEARSONDEATHROW7ITHHELPFROM Johnny Depp, Eddie Vedder ANDPeter JacksonWHO PRODUCED THEFILM DIRECTOR Amy BergBROUGHT NEWEVIDENCETOLIGHT THATHELPEDRECTIFY THISSHOCKING INJUSTICE Join DNA expert Greg Hampikian for a Q & A after the 7:00 show on Friday, March 22. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Opens March 29 Mia Wasikowska, Nicole Kidman, Jacki Goode, Matthew Weaver, Dermot Mulroney ANDLucas Till STARINTHISMYSTERYABOUT)NDIA ATEEN AGEDGIRLWHOSEFATHERHASDIED(ER UNSTABLEMOTHERWELCOMESHERUNCLEINTOTHEIR HOMESOONAFTER BUT)NDIABECOMESSUSPICIOUS OFTHEATTRACTIVEANDCHARMINGNEW FOUND RELATIVEPark Chan-wook DIRECTSFROMASCRIPT BYWentworth Miller

Like someone in love Opens April 5

!CCLAIMEDINTERNATIONAL DIRECTORAbbas KiarostamiSETTHISUNUSUAL LOVESTORYIN4OKYO!YOUNGWOMANPUTTING HERSELFTHROUGHCOLLEGEASACALLGIRLISSENTTOTHE HOMEOFALONELYOLDERMAN/VERTIME ADEEP FRIENDSHIPDEVELOPS)N*APANESEWITH%NGLISH SUBTITLES “A WONDROUS FILM. Surpasses even the visual enticements of his previous feature, ‘Certified Copy.’� 2)#(!2$"2/$9 THE NEW YORKER BOISEweekly | FLICKS MARCH - MAY 2013 FILM SCHEDULE | 3


Women’s Health

PMS, PCOS, Fertility, Menopause, Osteoporosis

Diana R. Crumrine, N.D. - Naturopathic Doctor 1416 West Washington St. Boise - 208-906-1485

www.myfoothillsfamilymed.com

Opens April 12

Opens April 19

4HISISTHESECONDFEATUREFILMBYDerek CianfranceWHOMAYSHOWUPHEREFOROUR )DAHO0REMIERE Ryan Gosling, Rose Byrne, Bradley Cooper, Eva Mendes, Ray LiottaAND Bruce GreenwoodSTARINTHISTAUTDRAMAABOUT ATRAVELINGMOTORCYCLESTUNTDRIVERWHOLEARNS HEHASASONBYAFORMERLOVER!SINHISFIRST FILM Blue Valentine,THEWRITERDIRECTORTACKLES BIGTHEMESANDTHEPLOTTWISTS WILLSURPRISEYOU

*ACK+EROUAC continues to hold our fascination; and his novel, published in 1957, defined the beat generation. Oscar-winning writer *OSE2IVERAadapted his book for the screen. Executive producer &RANCIS&ORD#OPPOLAchose 7ALTER3ALLES to direct after watching his multiaward winning, The Motorcycle Diaries. 3AM2ILEY stars as Kerouac’s alter ego, Sal Paradise. 'ARRETT (EADLUND +RISTEN3TEWART +IRSTEN$UNST !MY!DAMS and 6IGGO-ORTENSEN co-star. The cinematography by %RIC'AUTIER is spectacular. “Pulses with youthful energy.�

THE PLACE BEYOND THE PINES

Opens May 3 $OCUMENTARYFILMMAKERRodney AscherUSES EXTENSIVEFOOTAGEFROMThe Shining ANDOTHER Stanley KubrickFILMSTOEXPLOREVARIOUS CONSPIRACYTHEORIESABOUT.ATIVE!MERICANS THE (OLOCAUSTANDTHE!POLLO-OON,ANDING%VEN NUMEROLOGYISCONTEMPLATEDINTHISENGAGING PLAYFULANDUNIQUEFILMTHATISBOUNDTOBECOME ACULTCLASSIC “One of the great movies about movies.� 2/".%,3/. VARIETY

JUSTIN CHANG, VARIETY

ROOM 237

WATCH FOR THESE FILMS COMING SOON 'AEL'ARCIA"ERNALshines as 2ENE 3AAVEDRA, a young advertising executive who engineered a successful campaign against the dictator Pinochet of Chile in 1988. *ANE&ONDA #HRISTOPHER2EEVE, and 2ICHARD$REYFUSS appear in archival footage, this is an inspiring, true tale about resisting tyranny. !#!$%-9!7!2$./-).%% "%34&/2%)'.,!.'5!'%&),-

4 | FLICKS MARCH - MAY 2013 FILM SCHEDULE | BOISEweekly

4HIS!CADEMY!WARD.OMINEEFOR Best Foreign Language Film CAPTURES THEGRIPPINGTRUELIFEADVENTURE OFSCIENTISTThor HeyerdahlWHO PROVEDWITHHIS DAYVOYAGE ONARAFTFROM0ERUTO0OLYNESIAIN THATTHEISLANDPEOPLECAME FROM3OUTH!MERICAANDNOT!SIA !NAMAZINGANDBEAUTIFULFILMIN .ORWEGIANWITH%NGLISHSUBTITLES

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8 DAYS OUT Concerts

Art

Literature

ALL KEYED UP—Join musicians from Boise Philharmonic, Boise State University and Boise Baroque for an evening of piano, organ and glockenspiel music. 7:30 p.m. Suggested $10 donation. Cathedral of the Rockies, First United Methodist Church, 717 N. 11th St., Boise, 208-343-7511.

PHOTOGRAPHER ROB HART OPENING RECEPTION—Awardwinning photographer Rob Hart takes you on a photographic journey around the world. The exhibit is held in conjunction with The Eagle Prayer Flag Project. Twenty percent of gallery sales will be donated to the charity Stop Girl Trafficking. 4-7 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at Finer Frames, 164 E. State St., Ste. B, Eagle, 208888-9898, finerframes.com.

KICKOFF: READ ME TREASURE VALLEY— Join Boise Mayor Dave Bieter, the Boise Public Library and the Ada Community Library for a morning of literature about Boise and Idaho’s history and walk a mile with the mayor as part of his commitment to walk 150 miles in 2013 for Boise’s 150th birthday. See Picks, Page 16. 10-11 a.m. FREE, boisepubliclibrary.org. Oregon Trail Reserve, 4500 E. Lake Forest Drive, Boise.

BOISE HIGH SCHOOL BENEFIT CONCERT—The Boise High Chamber Orchestra presents its 14th annual benefit concert in the Boise High auditorium. The program includes a range of orchestral music from Dvorak and Shostakovich to contemporary classical and pop. Buy advance tickets through the BHS orchestra office at 208-8544318 or at the door. 7:30 p.m. $10 adults, $5 students/seniors. Boise High School, 1010 Washington St., Boise, 208-854-4270.

CD REVIEW/NOISE HUMMINGBIRD OF DEATH, SKULLVALANCHE Local thrash-lads Hummingbird of Death don’t go half in—not on names and not on jams. The seven tracks on the band’s new release, Skullvalanche, feature walls of sludge with thick guitars and the sort of vocal growl one generally only hears in nightmares featuring sharp-toothed beasts. Though HOD has released many a split 7-inch since its inception in 2005, Skullvalanche is the group’s second dedicated fulllength LP. It was released by Deep Six Records in December and the album marks a bit of a shift. The band’s earlier material largely takes after its name: short and high-strung. In fact, the songs are so short and fast that Hummingbird of Death packs in the same amount of songs onto a 7-inch that some bands barely fit on a double-LP. While Skullvalanche starts down that road with a short blast of chaos called “Shit,” it quickly drops into first gear over the next three tracks, pushing audiences toward the heavy-nod with-crossed-arms dance over the seizure-speed head-bang. And nearly half the album goes by before it picks up again with the drum and guitar intro to “Holy Fetus,” the album’s fifth track. On Skullvalanche’s penultimate track, “Par for the Corpse,” things get back to normal, with impossibly fast blasts of distortion and solo wails that are gone before you can get your air guitar properly situated. That said, there isn’t much that largely distinguishes Hummingbird of Death’s particular brand of loud, fast screaming and snarling from other bands that have “of Death” tacked onto their names. But overall, Skullvalanche is a well-executed doom-and-thrash album more than a unique statement on doom-and-thrash. If you’re into that sort of thing, then Skullvalanche will find a firm hold in your heart. —Josh Gross

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LITERATURE FOR LUNCH: THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA—Discuss Ernest Hemingway’s last major work of fiction about an unlucky fisherman who finds himself in a titanic struggle with a marlin. For more info contact Cheryl Hindrichs at cherylhindrichs@boisestateledu or Carol Martin at cmartin@ boisestate.edu. See Picks, Page 16. 12:10-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

SATURDAY FEB. 2 Festivals & Events MAGIC OF BROADWAY ICE SHOW—See Friday. 8 p.m. $12$15. Manchester Ice and Event Centre, 200 Lake St., McCall, 208-634-3570, manchestericecentre.com. MCCALL WINTER CARNIVAL—See Wednesday. FREE-$20. McCall, mccallchamber.org. STEM EXPLORATION DAY—Meet former astronaut Barbara Morgan, build an edible aquifer, ride a bicycle generator, design a bridge, experience a wind tunnel or a portable planetarium and more. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Boise State University Engineering Complex, 1375 University Drive, Boise, coen. boisestate.edu/STEMExploration.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: SHARON LACEY—7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. GREEN ZOO ARTS COLLECTIVE PRESENTS SIGNAL-TO-NOISE— See Friday. 8 p.m. $6.50. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise, greenzooarts.squarespace. com. LIQUID LAUGHS: ROBERT DUCHAINE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com. A NIGHTTIME SURVIVAL GUIDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO’S NEST—See Thursday. Dinner at 6:15 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Dinner and show: $39, show only: $20. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | 19


8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends SATURDAY SHAKEDOWN—A show and celebration for the local belly dance community featuring students and professionals. 7-10 p.m. $5. The Alano, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, ceciliabellydance.com. WILL ACT 4 FOOD— Eight local playwrights and directors, and about 40 local actors have 24 hours to create original 10-minute plays to be performed for the audience and a celebrity judge. All of the proceeds benefit the Idaho Foodbank. See Picks, Page 16. 7:30 p.m. $15. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

SCBWI MEETING—Monthly meeting of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators. Each month will feature a short presentation on writing, illustrating or publishing. First Monday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

DOG DICK FUCK AROUND COMEDY SHOW—This stand-up comedy show, hosted by Mundek Clement-Stein, features 12 performers dealing with chaotic nonsense while on stage. At the end, headliner comedian Sean Peabody will deal with all of the different stage obstacles during his set. 9 p.m. FREE with nonperishable food donation. The Red Room Tavern, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-0956, redroomboise.com.

TUESDAY FEB. 5 Literature

MONDAY FEB. 4

Odds & Ends

Literature

BECOME A TEACHER—Learn more about how you can change careers and become a certified teacher in Idaho. Session is free and open to the public. Register at abcte.org. 4 p.m. and 5 p.m. FREE. Meridian Public Library, 1326 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian, 208-888-4451, mld.org.

DROP-IN WRITING WORKSHOP—Informal writers workshop is free to writers who wish to hone their skills, work on character development, overcome writers block and be inspired. Led by Adrian Kien, a poetry and composition professor at Boise State University. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

CLUB ISH—Club night created for plus-sized women and the men who adore them. Featuring DJs, a full bar and a VIP area. 9 p.m. $5. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430.

SUNDAY FEB. 3

SUDOKU |

BOISE’S NOVEL ORCHARD CRITIQUE NIGHT—Bring your current writing project and a red pen, and share opinions with other writers. View the guidelines at boisenovelorchard.org. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-429-8220, hydeparkbookstore.com. PARTNERS IN CRIME WRITING GROUP—Each meeting of this writing group includes a presentation by an author, teacher, crime specialist, agent, editor or others who can offer something of interest to writers of mystery and crime stories. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

Festivals & Events ASIA FEST—Join the Vietnamese Student Association and the Japan Club for an international dinner, student and guest performances, and silent auctions. 6 p.m. FREE-$6. Boise State University Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800, boisestate.edu. MCCALL WINTER CARNIVAL—See Wednesday. FREE-$20. McCall, mccallchamber.org.

On Stage LIQUID LAUGHS: ROBERT DUCHAINE—See Thursday. Two for one tickets. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THE WINTERREISE PROJECT—See Friday. 2:30 p.m. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net.

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

20 | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT Green

Food & Drink

Kids & Teens

THE COOK’S GARDEN—Jim and Elaine Jenkins share how they grow produce, season extenders, cool season crops and more. Pre-registration required. 6:30 p.m. $15, $10 member. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

DATE NIGHT AT CORKSCREWS—See Wednesday, Jan. 30. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews Wine Shop and Pub, 729 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-8884049, corkscrews1.com.

WE DO ROBOTICS—Build structures, and program motion and sound with LEGO software. For ages 7-10. 4:30-5:30 p.m. $35$40. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

WEDNESDAY FEB. 6 On Stage A NIGHTTIME SURVIVAL GUIDE—See Wednesday, Jan. 30. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Workshops & Classes WATER EFFICIENT LANDSCAPING CLASSES—Join United Water Idaho, the City of Boise and the University of Idaho for free water-efficienct landscaping classes. Susan Bell from U of I Extension teaches the principles of xeriscaping and landscape design. 6-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Odds & Ends BECOME A TEACHER—See Saturday. 4:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995, boisepubliclibrary.org. POETRY SLAM OF STEEL—Big Tree Arts presents this all-ages poetry slam workshop followed by a slam at 7 p.m. Contact Cheryl Maddalena at 208-426-0383 for more info. 6 p.m. $5, $1 with student ID. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3213.

Check out the entire week’s worth of Doonesbury online at boiseweekly.com—select “Extras” then “Cartoons.”

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | 21


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY JAN. 30 BARBARA LAING AND KAYLEIGH JACK—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge BEN BURDICK—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian FLEET STREET KLEZMER BAND—With Guess When Tribal Celtic and 605 to San Gabriel. 8 p.m. $3. Red Room

THE TOASTERS, JAN. 31, THE SHREDDER Everything old is new again. To one generation, ska hit in the ’90s. To another, it hit in the late ’70s. And to an even older generation, it hit in the late ’50s. Ska’s ragged-up stroked guitars and horn lines were originally Caribbean interpretations of American rock ’n’ roll that had been mutilated over the airwaves. One band that took its cues from early ska is The Toasters, which formed in 1981 and is now cruising along the underground club circuit on its 32nd anniversary tour. Sonically, the band hasn’t changed a thing, with peppy dance beats and up-tempo anthems to the working class. But why should it? Ska ain’t broke, so there’s no reason to fix it. So, if you want to see The Toasters before the next wave of ska hits, you can do so at The Shredder Thursday, Jan. 31. —Josh Gross With Mrs. Skannotto, The Useless and The Jerkwadz, 8 p.m., $10. The Shredder, 430 S. 10th St., Boise.

22 | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JIM FISHWILD—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TRILL WEDNESDAYS—With Big Ups and STZBLV. 10 p.m. FREE. Reef

THURSDAY JAN. 31 BUDDY AND THE BB’S—6 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE TOASTERS—With Mrs. Skannotto, The Useless and The Jerkwadz. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $10. Shredder

KATIE MORELL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown LIQUID LABS—Featuring DJ Ron Groove and Mixstress Morningstar. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SPEEDY GRAY—6:30 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

JOHNNY BUTLER—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

DUCK CLUB PRESENTS: INCAN ABRAHAM—With AAN, The Oneirics and DJ Eric Rhodes. 8 p.m. $5 advance, $7 door. Red Room DYING FAMOUS & FRIENDS—9 p.m. FREE. New Frontier Club GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel MIKE RUTTLEDGE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

Blurred Vision GO LISTEN BOISE PRESENTS: BLURRED VISION—With The Bare Bones, Fort Harrison and The Replikants. 8 p.m. $4. Red Room

AAN

PAUL DRAGONE—7 p.m. FREE. Whole Foods

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

SKATE NIGHT—Featuring Heroine and Old One Two. 7 p.m. $3. Shredder

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—With Free Peoples. 9 p.m. $5. Neurolux

PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Vista

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

Jonathan Warren and The Billygoats

FRIDAY FEB. 1

THE NAUGHTIES—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s NED EVETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

BUDDY AND THE BB’S—6 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE NONPOINT—With Candlelight Red. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory RECKLESS KELLY—See Picks, Page 18. 8 p.m. $23.50 advance, $28.50 door. Morrison Center ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—Midnight. FREE. Liquid

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE NAUGHTIES—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s PUNK ROCK SATURDAY NIGHT—With Acrotamoans, The Sneezz and Tetraphobia. 8 p.m. $2. Red Room

SUNDAY FEB. 3

KEN STRINGFELLOW—6:30 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange

BEN BURDICK—Noon-3 p.m. FREE. Grape Escape

TUMBLEWEED WANDERERS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

REILLY COYOTE—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

MONDAY FEB. 4

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club SMOOTH AVENUE—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle STARDUST LOUNGE CATNIP—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

BLUES JAM WITH WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

WILLISON ROOS—With Charlie Burry. 7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

SATURDAY FEB. 2 BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub DJ ERIC RHODES—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux DJ RORY—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill EZ STREET UNPLUGGED—7 p.m. Willi B’s

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Rocci Johnson Band ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—Midnight, FREE. Liquid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club DUCK CLUB PRESENTS: WOVENHAND—See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $8 advance, $12 door. Visual Arts Collective

TRAVIS WARD—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

TUESDAY FEB. 5 EXCISION—With Paper Diamond and Vaski. 8 p.m. $26-$50. Knitting Factory

WEDNESDAY FEB. 6 JIM LEWIS—7 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle LIQUID LABS—Featuring DJ Ron Groove and Mixstress Morningstar. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid OPHELIA—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TRILL WEDNESDAYS—With Big Ups and STZBLV. 10 p.m. FREE. Reef

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

WOVENHAND, FEB. 2, VAC Any good revival requires an enigmatic leader. For Denver, Colo., band Wovenhand, that role is filled by singer David Eugene Edwards, who pens songs inspired equally by his Christian faith and early European history. The former 16 Horsepower frontman left that band in 2001 to form Wovenhand as a solo project, which more than a decade later has filled out to include a revolving blend of violin, banjo, acoustic guitar and organ. After finding early success with 2002’s self-titled debut, which includes a haunting take on Bill Withers’ “Ain’t No Sunshine When She’s Gone,” Wovenhand has continued to distort country and folk themes into an enchanting brand of gothic bluegrass. —Andrew Crisp With Eluder and Grandma Kelsey, 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $8 adv., $10 doors. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | 23


NEWS/ARTS ADAM FINK LE

ARTS/STAGE

MONSTER RALLY A Nighttime Survival Guide tackles big, hairy themes at BCT ANDREW CRISP

With a stubborn blanket of snow still clinging to Boise, everywhere you look, there’s a whole lot of white. But if white makes you think of a blank canvas that begs to be decorated, that inner artist may benefit from a visit to Boise State University’s Visual Arts Center for a public lecture by visiting artist Whitney Tassie. The curator of modern and contemporary art from the Utah Museum of Fine Arts, Tassie has been invited by Boise State’s Visiting Artist and Scholar Program to give the free lecture at the Student Union Building in the Jordan Ballroom at 6 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 31. Her presentation, Being an Artist Today, will cover a variety of topics, ranging from the theory and ethics of artistic purpose, an artist’s responsibility in today’s globally connected world and practical strategies for artists to consider, like websites and art fairs. Tassie will also be the guest juror selecting artwork to feature in Activate: 2013 Student Juried Exhibition. Students enrolled in art classes at Boise State are eligible to submit up to three works for consideration. Tassie will review the submissions, give awards and select works to be exhibited at the Visual Arts Center between Friday, Feb. 8, and Wednesday, March 20. Tassie will also speak at the gallery’s opening reception from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 8. And in other Boise State opening news, Baghdad, Iraq native Luma Jasim will debut Circumstances of War, Thursday, Jan. 31, from 4:30-6:30 p.m. in the SUB Gallery. According to Boise State, Jasim “utilizes paint on canvas to reflect upon her personal experiences with war.” The show will remain on display though Sunday, Feb. 24. In call-to-artists news, The Modern Hotel and Bar is seeking artists for its sixth annual Modern Art event, taking place First Thursday, May 2. Hotel rooms are available for artists of all disciplines looking to display, show, create or perform their work. Submission forms will be available online at themodernhotel.com or at the front desk of the Modern Hotel beginning Wednesday, Feb. 6. All completed forms are due at The Modern by Friday, March 1. For more info, contact Amy O’Brien or Kerry Tullis at theshop11@gmail.com. Boise Open Studios Collective Organization is also seeking new artist applications for membership. Applications are due electronically Sunday, March 31. For more info visit boiseopenstudios.com or email bosco.membership@gmail.com.

all supernatural creatures, including the maIt’s rare for Matthew Cameron Clark and levolent, the good-natured and mischievous. Dwayne Blackaller and to work as closely as “There are countless Yokai. Japanese folkthey have for their newest creation, A Nightlore is rich with all kinds of opportunities for time Survival Guide. As Boise Contemporary monsters,” said Clark. Theater’s artistic director and associate artist/ Boise artist Bill Carman, known for his sureducation director, respectively, the two real paintings, was an early choice to design haven’t had time to collaborate on building a production from scratch since 2005. This play, puppets to serve as the Yokai. “I didn’t have the time when they called they said, feels fresh in many ways. me, but I couldn’t pass up monsters,” he said. “The writing itself is new. This is the first Carman drew his vision of the reptilian, time I’ve co-written so closely with someone,” cucumber-loving Kappa—a creature said to said Blackaller. lure children into deep waters to drown—as a In the script’s early stages, Blackaller and short puppet with webbed feet and hands. Clark would open a shared Google Docs “Bill’s work always has some weird, document and hammer the script out at the strange, muddy edge to it, in a really excitsame time. ing way for me,” said Clark. “It’s dark and “You could see each other’s cursors and strange and playful at the watch each other same time.” type,” said BlackAkaname, the “filth aller. “So he could licker,” haunts children see the line I was who don’t clean their writing, and write bathrooms. Carman and respond simultaimagined a large, hairy neously. It was a very beast with a tongue energizing way to write, spooled around a broomgoing to Denny’s late at like staff. On stage, it night and sitting over stands at an immense 7 coffee, watching the feet tall. script crank out.” “I kept in mind that I That image is didn’t want to make the mirrored in the play, monsters too brutal,” said when the two main Carman. “That’s not really characters, Verne and the place I come from with Aki, first encounter my work. I can do things one another looking that are sort of scary, but through a transparent BI LL they have this humourous mock-up of a laptop. CA RM side, because humor is a “Face-to-face and AN big part of the my work. 4,865 miles apart,” I think that’s what these Blackaller excharacters represent to plained. me.” At its most basic While the play is level, A Nighttime accessible to children, its Survival Guide is writers stress they wanted a story about two to keep the story free of 11-year-old children A Nighttime Survival Guide runs the squeaky-clean motifs (played by adult actors) through Saturday, Mar. 2. that dominate children’s and their conflicts with BOISE CONTEMPORARY THEATER television. growing up. Aki, played 854 Fulton St., “There are some themes by Carie Kawa, lives 208-331-9224, in this play that are big in the small village of bctheater.org themes,” said Blackaller. Akaigawa on the island “Part of the test we went of Hokkaido in northern through is, if you go through the play and Japan. Verne, played by Blackaller, lives in you’re entirely dry-eyed or stoic through the windswept Arco. entire thing, or if you don’t have a moment of Blackaller and Clark wanted a play they surprise, you’re in trouble.” could bring their children to, a rarity at BCT. They wanted something adults could enjoy, “[We] stumbled on this idea of these two as well. kids, on either sides of the world, encounter“The best analogy is a Pixar movie,” said ing these creatures,” said Clark. Clark. “There are plenty of people that go see He and Blackaller drew inspiration from Japanese legends of Yokai, which encompasses a Pixar movie that aren’t there because they’re

N

TASSIE TALKS AT BSU AND MODERN ART SEEKS PROPOSALS

B IL L C ARMA

Whitney Tassie speaks at Boise State Jan. 31.

Bill Carman took inspiration from Japanese Yokai folklore to create his characters.

taking their kids to see it.” With this play, Blackaller and Clark are taking some big risks, weaving dance, puppetry and musical elements. But to bring those conceptual ideas to life, the production had to incorporate some complicated moving parts. Elaborate costumes were designed by Star Moxley. Dance segments were put together by Balance Dance Company Artistic Director Leah Clark. The stage itself does heavy lifting; an expensive arcing bridge designed by set designer Mike Baltzell recreates the curvature of the Earth between the two children. “They stay distant from each other, essentially for the whole show,” said Blackaller. “The distance between them is a big part of what we’re playing with.” When Carman’s puppets take the stage, they do so operated by three silhouette “characters,” who serve as equal parts puppeteers, crew members and dancers. “Puppetry is a bit of a spectrum in the play,” said Clark. Even though it has the largest budget of BCT’s season, it became apparent A Nighttime Survival Guide would need more funding. “In order to pursue this particular idea, we knew it was going to take more resources than a typical show here,” said Clark. Before a $10,000 Kickstarter goal was reached, Clark and Blackaller had nervously crossed their fingers. Asked how the play would be different without the extra funds, Clark said it would affect the play as a whole. “It probably doesn’t boil down to a particular thing ... but as we go into the final stage, new ideas as they come, it would limit us in how we’re able to pursue that, because we’d be out of money,” said Clark. By the Jan. 19 Kickstarter deadline, 171 backers had contributed $11,172, bringing the campaign to its tipping point and providing extra funding for the project. But that doesn’t mean it’s home free yet; Blackaller and Clark will also have their fingers crossed before opening night, Wednesday, Jan. 30. “We want a lot of people to see our work,” explained Clark. “But in order to do that, we’re just trying to make the best work that we can, that excites us the most, as opposed to trying to guess what everyone else wants— that’s kind of a losing proposition.”

—Christina Marfice and Tara Morgan

24 | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

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SCREEN/LISTINGS THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

Special Screenings

TALL ON TALENT Oscar-nominated shorts come to The Flicks GEORGE PRENTICE Predicting who will take home this year’s Oscars isn’t the toughest guessing game in Hollywood—you can pretty much bet the farm that Daniel Day-Lewis (Lincoln) and Jennifer Lawrence (Silver Linings Playbook) will be hauling home some hardware. But choosing a winner among the nominees for Best Animated Short Film and Best Live AcHead Over Heels is a contender for Best Animated Short Film at the 2013 Oscars. tion Short Film is a bit more complicated. This year’s nominees—in both categories—are superb. And as it has done for the Walter and Madge, who have grown so far office worker who uses a squadron of paper last several years, The Flicks is showcasing apart emotionally, that Madge lives upside some of the best contenders beginning Friday, airplanes to meet the girl of his dreams. Maggie Simpson stars in another nominee: down—walking on the ceiling—while Walter Feb. 1, in two separate screenings. You can’t go wrong with either showcase, The Longest Daycare. Maggie’s brother Bart coexists in the same space on the floor. When they try to put their marriage back together, and father Homer are nowhere in sight in but here are some highlights from the aniachieving equilibrium is easier said than this five-minute charmer, directed by David mated category, which includes some of the done. Silverman. Longing to be grouped with the finest efforts in recent memory. Adam and Dog is a beautiful fable of how gifted children who Paperman, directed the first man and first dog find each other are musical virtuosos, by John Kahrs and in God’s new creation. Put together with Maggie is instead produced by Walt OSCAR NOMINATED SHORTS 2013 $25,000 out of director Minkyu Lee’s pocket dumped in the “nothDisney Studios, is The Flicks will screen two collections of ing special” section of and an all-volunteer crew, the story is unique seven minutes of Oscar-nominated short films: Live Action in that the dog is never turned into a cartoon. a daycare with todbeauteous black and shorts and Animated shorts. dlers who are guzzling It truly looks and acts like a dog and is never white. The short film Opens Friday, Feb. 1, at The Flicks anthropomorphized. Lee tells the oldest story paste or killing bugs is a unique product ever known—quite literally—but adds fresh with mallets. of something called subtext about discovery and friendship. Head Over Heels “final line advection,” Fresh Guacamole, directed by Adam Pesamay be the most successful school project in which allows an artist to refine or draw over pane (aka Pes) is a two-minute gem of how movie history. Written by Timothy Reckart, computer-generated images, resulting in a to transform familiar objects (grenades, dice, the 11-minute film was crafted by a team marriage of 21st century CG dimensionality Christmas lights) into fresh guacamole. of 11 of Reckart’s students at the National and old-school handiwork that we saw in There’s not a loser in the bunch. It’s too Film and Television School in the United Disney’s halcyon days. bad they can’t morph the Oscar into five Kingdom. But Paperman’s technical wonder never pint-sized statuettes. The stop-motion film tells the story of overtakes the enchanting yarn of an urban

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR—Join the Banff Mountain Film Festival for films featuring exotic landscapes and remote cultures. Monday, Feb. 4-Wednesday, Feb. 6, 7 p.m. $17-$45. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. THURSDAY BLOCKBUSTER SERIES PRESENTS: ARGO—Watch this 2012 Golden Globes Best Picture winner and enjoy free popcorn and soda. When Americans are taken hostage in the wake of the Iranian Revolution, the CIA sends a fake film crew to rescue them. Thursday, Jan. 31, 7 p.m. FREE-$1. Boise State University Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub. boisestate.edu. GROSSVISION: SHORT FILMS BY JOSH GROSS—Boise Weekly New Media Czar Josh Gross screens three of his award-winning short films (The Sundae Rider, The Lost Van Gogh, and The Dog House) and then sticks around to discuss them. Gross will also make an announcement about his next project at the screening. Wednesday, Feb. 6, 8 p.m. $2. The Red Room Tavern, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-0956, redroomboise.com. OSCAR NOMINATED SHORTS 2013—Join The Flicks for live-action and animated short films nominated for the upcoming Academy Awards. See Screen, this Page. Live Action: Friday, Feb. 1-Sunday, Feb. 3, 2:45 p.m., 6:45 p.m.; and Monday, Feb. 4-Thursday, Feb. 6, 6:45 p.m. Animation: Friday, Feb. 1-Sunday, Feb. 3, 1 p.m., 5 p.m., 9 p.m.; and Monday, Feb. 4-Thursday, Feb. 6, 5 p.m., 9 p.m. $7-$9. The Flicks, 646 W. Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com. WEIGHT OF THE NATION: CONSEQUENCES— Activate Treasure Valley presents a three-part screening of HBO’s The Weight of the Nation. The series addresses the growing obesity epidemic in the United States. Each screening is followed by a panel discussion with health experts. In the Ada 1 Room on the fifth floor. Tuesday, Feb. 5, 6-8 p.m. FREE. St. Luke’s Anderson Center, 190 E. Bannock St., Boise, 208-381-3491, stlukesonline.org.

Opening

SAY WHAT?/SCREEN SAY WHAT?

A round up of TV’s best zingers BULLET TO THE HEAD—A New Orleans hitman played by Sylvester Stallone and a Washington, D.C., cop played by Sung Kang form an alliance when the same killers murder their respective partners. (R) Opens Friday, Feb. 1. Edwards 9, 22.

THE TODAY SHOW IS NBC’S MOST PROFITABLE NEWS PROGRAM—12 HOURS OF DAILY NEWS FUNTERTAINMENT WITH VERY LOW OVERHEAD. WE PAY MOST OF OUR HOSTS IN WHITE WINE.”

—Alec Baldwin as Jack Donaghy on 30 Rock

THE HOLLYWOOD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE GAVE ME A STAR ON THE HOLLYWOOD WALK OF FAME. THEY SAY YOU HAVEN’T MADE IT IN HOLLYWOOD UNTIL YOUR NAME IS PERMANENTLY DISPLAYED WHERE HOMELESS PEOPLE GO TO THE BATHROOM.”

—Jimmy Kimmel on Jimmy Kimmel Live WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THIS YEAR MARKS THE 50TH ANNIVERSARY OF MARTIN LUTHER KING JR.’S HISTORIC ‘I HAVE A DREAM’ SPEECH AS WELL AS THE ONEYEAR ANNIVERSARY OF MY GIRLFRIEND’S ‘I HAD THE WEIRDEST DREAM’ SPEECH. GUESS WHICH ONE WAS LONGER.”

—Seth Meyers on Saturday Night Live

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | 25


SCREEN/LISTINGS STAND UP GUYS—Val (Al Pacino) is released from prison after nearly 30 years. His best friend, Doc (Christopher Walken), picks him up. They join Hirsch (Alan Arkin) and try to relive their glory days of crime, drugs, sex and violence in the shadow of one of the trio’s entanglement with a former mob boss. (R) Opens Friday, Feb. 1. Edwards 9, 22. 38

SCREEN/THE TUBE

WARM BODIES—After a zombie apocalypse, a zombie named R (Nicholas Hoult) demonstrates his nascent humanity by saving human survivor Julie. As R becomes more human, the two fall in love and discover how to bring other zombies back to life. Also starring Teresa Palmer, Rob Corddry and John Malkovich. (PG-13) Opens Friday, Feb. 1. Edwards 9, 22.

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T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999,

Even the deer statue looks terrified of Honey Boo Boo.

WHAT THE HELL IS A HONEY BOO BOO? The Learning Channel isn’t very good at teaching things— unless, of course, your idea of scholarly enlightenment involves watching a kid drink Red Bull and Mountain Dew. The network’s latest hit is a cultural catastrophe called Here Comes Honey Boo Boo. It’s about a vile child and her equally despicable family’s attempts to turn the kid into a serial beauty pageant winner. They seem to think she’ll become a song-and-dance icon along the lines of Shirley Temple. But Honey Boo Boo is less like the star of Bright Eyes and more like the monstrous manifestation of a fever dream. Discovered on something called Toddlers and Tiaras, the creepy little girl looks like a doll—and not the good kind of doll. She resembles that talking emblem of decay from the Forbidden Zone in the original Planet of the Apes that Dr. Zaius refuses to acknowledge as evidence of humanity’s past HERE COMES superiority. HONEY BOO BOO “Honey Boo Boo” is the Sundays on TLC name 7-year-old Alana Thompson gave herself. It’s unclear from the show if her dad, Mike “Sugar Bear” Thompson, named himself—but it’s obvious that he’s prone to questionable decisions, as one look at his daughter’s mom reveals. June is Honey Boo Boo’s snot-faced succubus of a manychinned mother. She, along with the rest of her frequently farting family, is quite disturbing. During the inaugural season of Here Comes Honey Boo Boo, neither June nor anybody else seems to notice how weirdly sexualized the kid is, even when she “rocks her Daisy Dukes” for the judges. “Ain’t no one bringin’ home the crown but me,” she announces and then squeezes her big roll of stomach fat for the camera before referring to “booty calling.” While delivering a lesson on how to save money on toilet paper, June says coupons are “even better than sex.” After seeing two minutes of a Here Comes Honey Boo Boo episode, it’s easy to agree with June—which means, if enough people watch it, the show actually wields the potential power to kill off the human race. But perhaps a worse person than anyone from the Boo Boo clan is Barbara Walters, who placed the show’s titular abomination on her list of 2012’s most fascinating people. Then again, Walters is only 83. Like Alana Thompson, maybe she’ll grow up. —Damon Hunzeker

northernlightscinemagrill.com

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REC/NEWS IDAHO S TAM PEDE

REC

COUGAR CHRONICLES Mountain lions remain elusive, controversial RANDY KING

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

tight pants on horses. Like most things, mountain lion hunting does not come free of drama. In January 2012, California Fish and Game Director-elect Dan Richards came to Idaho for a guided lion hunt, paying thousands of dollars for the opportunity. Richards was photographed with his kill, smiling proudly while holding a big male cougar. A few weeks after taking the position at the head of the California department, the pictures surfaced on an outdoor blog. Outrage followed. In California, it is illegal to hunt or kill a cougar since they are a protected species. Groups across the state asked for Richards to be removed from his office for a legal hunt in Idaho. Eventually, he was removed by Gov. Jerry Brown. Calls to Richards were not returned by press time. “We [IDFG] value cougars as much as anyone else. We have a history of studying and understanding them,” White said. “Along with that history is management, and with that comes respect, admiration and a regulated harvest. ... This particular person was here legally and was following our rules and regulations.” He went on to add, “It is a values system thing. Not a right-and-wrong thing. Some appreciate harvesting animals; others would rather get their meat from the grocery store. That doesn’t make one person better than the other.” Outside of hunting, seeing cougars is limited to chance encounters and fleeting glimpses. Unfortunately with urban sprawl and habitat loss, cougars are showing up in populated areas more often. This has happened several times in the past few years around Boise, with one cougar shot in the Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center parking lot in 2011, and another was seen, and eventually killed, near Julia Davis Park in May 2012. Hounds and a professional hunter were called in to find the cougars. I get spooked by cougars. I hike a lot of canyons and rim rock and see cat signs often, which rattles my nerves. “They definitely have that ‘there could be one right now watching me’ feeling,” said White. But in the end, I have seen a grand total of one wild cougar in my life. I watched as a huge cat crested a ridge, looked back and disappeared into the brush near Silver City. As its tan and brown body faded into the wilderness, the look on its face was priceless—it reminded me of an annoyed housecat. BEN WILS ON

A light snow had fallen in the high desert of southern Idaho. It was deer season and I was creeping down a gully toward a small herd. I rounded a corner and could see tracks going the same direction. Big tracks, about the size of my palm, glared up at me. It took me a little while to realize that I was only moments behind an elusive predator, a mountain lion. My eyes face forward and I carry a gun—I am not normally scared in the forest. I am top dog. But at this moment, I felt disconcerted. Cats are known for circling around behind their prey and attacking from steep ledges. To my left and right were steep ledges. Topping out at 220 pounds or so, these cats can weigh as much as a full-grown man. And they have claws. I kept having visions of a cat leaping at me, latching on with its jaws and raking down with its hind legs. I was being irrational and I knew it, but just the idea of being in the same area as a big cat gave me the creeps. Not that I can ever help being in the same area as a mountain lion since they range from the Canadian Yukon to the southern Andes Mountains. Eventually, the cat tracks faded off into the pines, not around behind me. It seemed like we were hunting the same herd of deer. My scent or my sound probably sent it back into the wild, and I never even caught a look at it. Never seeing a cougar is the most common experience that most people have. According to Craig White of the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, cougars are “the wallflower type, so to speak. They are shy, timid and quiet. And they are good at it ... compared to a bear, who is more like that uncle that doesn’t care who knows he is in the room.” That is why seeing a bear in the wild is so much easier than spotting a cougar: big cats just don’t want to be seen. The most common way of seeing a cougar is by using hound dogs to follow a cougar’s scent track. “Hounds are used because of the natural animosity between canines and felines. The cats do what evolution tells them to do: run up a tree when a canine is around,” White said. In the past, hunters would hike behind the dogs, making sure to keep within earshot, but with the advent of GPS collars, keeping the dogs within hearing range is no longer necessary. According to Dale Denney, owner of Bear Paw Outfitters in northern Idaho, “the new dog collars emit a GPS signal that helps you find them.” Typically, when the dogs congregate and stop chasing, they have a cougar in a tree.

According to a mountain lion survey done by Idaho Fish and Game, during the 20102011 season, hunters reported harvesting 467 mountain lions in the state. Resident hunters killed 344 mountain lions and nonresident hunters killed another 123. Guides like Denney accounted for 89 of those mountain lions and 72 percent were taken with dogs. In 2010, 2,976 resident and 112 nonresident hound hunting permits were sold, according to the survey. That is about a 16 percent success rate for the hound hunters in 2010. But often the cats are treed for the sheer sport. Fish and Game officials estimate that there are between 2,000 and 2,500 cougars in Idaho. “The biggest sport in cougar hunting is the chase with the dog, not the shooting. I often think the killing of the cat is anti-climactic” Denney said. The act of hound hunting goes back centuries and has roots in the aristocratic hunters of Europe: Think foxes and floppyeared hounds followed by uptight dudes in

It’s true, real men do wear pink.

FEEL-GOOD REC Right about now, we could all use a warm and fuzzy feeling. While we can’t deliver it via the weather forecast, we can do it in the humanitarian sort of way. Idaho Special Olympics is gearing up for the annual Southwest Area Winter Games on Saturday, Feb. 2, at Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area and the Boise State University Rec Center. On the ski hill, athletes will compete in Alpine skiing, snowboarding and Nordic skiing, and the public is encouraged to come out and cheer on the competitors. Downhill and snowboarding events get going at 10 a.m. on Coaches Corner and the lower portion of Stewart’s bowl, with plenty of viewing opportunities from the J.R. Simplot Lodge. Nordic competition will also start at 10 a.m., and spectators can join in the celebration at the Frontier Point Nordic Lodge. The action at Boise State will come in the form of the floor hockey tournament, opening ceremonies for which will begin at 4:45 p.m. Friday, Feb. 1, with play beginning at 5 p.m. Competition will continue on Saturday, Feb. 2, beginning at 9 a.m. with matches scheduled throughout the day. All of the participants in the regional games will automatically be qualified to compete in the Special Olympics State Winter Games, scheduled for Friday, March 1-Saturday, March 2, also at Bogus Basin, so there will be plenty of chances for the public to get in on the action this winter. Putting on large events requires a lot of volunteers, and there are still openings for volunteers at both the regional and state games. For more information or to check the games schedule, visit the Idaho Special Olympics website at idso.org. Not to be outdone in the warm-and-fuzzy category, Idaho Stampede players will wear their cause on their backs. The team will take part in Real Men Wear Pink night for the second year, wearing pink jerseys as they take on the Los Angeles D-Fenders Friday, Feb. 1, and Saturday, Feb. 2. More than just displaying the color that has become synonymous with breast cancer research, the jerseys will be embroidered with the names of those affected by cancer in the Boise area. The pink jerseys will then be auctioned off as part of an online charity auction supporting the St. Luke’s Mountain States Tumor Institute. Money will be used to help provide mammograms for those who can’t afford them—especially important considering Idaho ranks last in the nation for mammogram screenings. For more information visit idahostampede.com. —Deanna Darr

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | 27


REC/LISTINGS Events & Workshops

REC/PLAY

INDOOR TRIATHLON—Featuring a half-mile swim, 10-mile ride on a stationary bike, and four-mile run on the indoor track. All participants will receive a prize. Space is limited, so register early. Saturday, Feb. 2, 8:30 a.m. $30-$36 individual, $66-$72 team. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. SUPER POLE SUNDAY—Enjoy a full day of classes, including pole dancing, aerial yoga and Curvesque while grabbing a bite with the Ophidia crew. Sunday, Feb. 3, noon-3 p.m. $20. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

Recurring AERIAL YOGA—Stretch out in wraps of silk suspended from the ceiling for a fun, de-stressing workout. Mondays 8 p.m., Thursdays 7 p.m., Saturdays 10 a.m. $15. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com. BELAY CERTIFICATION—Participants learn basic safety principles and proper belay technique during this one-hour course. Upon completion, students receive a certification card that enables them to skip introduction prior to each climbing wall session at the YMCA. Saturdays, noon-1 p.m. $5. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-5501, ymcaboise.org. BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT OPEN SHOP—Donate unwanted bicycles or equipment to a good cause and receive a tax write-off. The shop is open for volunteers interested in working on bikes for children of low-income families, refugees and Boise’s homeless population. During open shop time on Saturdays, use tools and stands to work on your own bike or bikes for the community. No experience is necessary. Volunteer orientations are on the first and third Saturdays of the month at 11 a.m. For more information, email boisebicycleproject@gmail. com. Wednesdays-Saturdays, noon-6 p.m. FREE. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org. BOISE DART LEAGUE—Dart players of any caliber are welcome to sign up for the Boise Dart League. Players do not need to be on a team to participate. Sign up at 6 p.m. and start playing at 7 p.m. Call 208-3535830 or email bigmo425@ msn.com for more information. Wednesdays, 6 p.m. $5 entry fee. VFW Post 63, 8931 W. Ardene St., Boise, 208-424-8387, vfwpost63.org. BOISE FOOSBALL—Draw-yourpartner foosball tournament. Sign-ups begin at 7:30 p.m., matches beginning about 8 p.m. Tuesdays. For more information, call 208-860-4990, boisefoosball.com. Dutch Goose, 3515 W. State St., Boise.

28 | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly

Have snowshoes, will travel.

PARK N’ SKI Winter recreation can be daunting—and not just because of the cold, slick roads and danger of being buried in an avalanche. We’re just talking about the hassle. Not only do you have to locate your gear, but you have to find the right layers to wear, guessing how cold it will be before and after you recreate compared to how warm you’ll be while doing said recreation. And after you get done packing enough clothing options to get you through all possible conditions (including and not limited to: nuclear winter, Indian summer, spring corn, Arctic blast, whiteout blizzard and/or alien invasion), you still have to jam your just-in-case necessities into your pack before locating your sunscreen, polarized glasses and emergency hand warmers. Wouldn’t it be nice to have at least one aspect of the experience made a little easier? It’s one reason to love the Park n’ Ski program across Idaho. One little pass—$25 annual or $7.50 for three days, available online or at select retailers—grants access to 17 Park n’ Ski trail systems across PARK N’ SKI the state, offering a whoppin’ parksandrecreation.idaho.gov 180 miles of Nordic trails, as well as several yurts available for rental. The fee helps keep the parking lots plowed through the winter and some of the trails groomed. Some areas share trail access with snowmobilers, but there are plenty of Nordic-only trails for those who don’t want to have to dodge their motorized brethren. Several also allow dogs. In an effort to briefly escape the winter inversion clutching Boise in a death grip, I recently headed to one of the closest Park n’ Ski locations—Whoop-Um-Up, located 18 miles north of Idaho City along Highway 21. Climbing out of the valley meant leaving the frigid temperatures and chewable air behind in exchange for clear skies and miles of looping trails. With snowshoes on my feet and roughly half my winter wardrobe in the car, I spent several hours casually meandering the well-marked trails, weaving in and out of the sun as it filtered through the trees. Despite a packed parking lot, the trails were surprisingly empty, and whatever groups were encountered along the way were so clearly thrilled to have made a daylong escape, we were all grinning like kids on spring break. Thanks to the variety of intersecting trails, it’s easy for snowshoers and cross country skiers of varying abilities and fitness levels to chose a route that meets their needs. Back in the parking lot, fellow escapees perched on tailgates or in camp chairs, downing picnic lunches and warm drinks before facing the inevitable return home and that dreaded end-of-day duty: putting away all those clothes you dragged out, just in case. —Deanna Darr WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


DRINK/WINESIPPER FOOD

Although its genetic precursors have been identified (dureza and mondeuse blanche), the actual origin of syrah remains a mystery. While some champion the theory that it came from the ancient Persian city of Shiraz (the name still used for the grape in Australia), stronger evidence places it in France’s Rhone Valley as early as the first century. Today, it is one of the world’s most popular red varieties. As our tasting proved, it’s very well suited to the Northwest, with all three of this week’s top picks coming out of Washington.

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

BRING ON THE BARREL Barrel-aged cocktail trend hits Boise TARA MORGAN On the list of things benefitting from time in a barrel—wine, whiskey, pantless cartoon prospectors—hand-crafted cocktails have traditionally been absent. But with the help of mixologist Jeffrey Morgenthaler at Portland, Ore.’s Clyde Common, barrel-aged cocktails have swept spirit menus from coast to coast. In fact, the National Restaurant Association named onsite barrel-aged drinks as one of the top 10 trends in drinks and cocktails for 2013. “We started our barrel-aging program almost a year and a half ago,” explained Mai Thai head bartender Michael Reed. “Usually, we’ve got one in service and one that’s going to take it’s place, that way we’ve always got something to offer on our menu.” To make a barrel-aged drink, Mai Thai bar staff mix a large batch of one of their signature cocktails—like The Moonraker, with Leopold Bros. Georgia peach whiskey, cognac, Cocchi Americano and absinthe— and then pour the boozy brew into a 5-liter new American oak barrel to age. “One of the advantages of doing barrel programs is that you can make it regular and consistent, and you can take a product that is a little bit harsh and you can give it that extra nurture in the barrel and its going to round out,” said Reed.

Mai Thai mixologist Michael Reed crafts small batch barrel-aged cocktails.

Alavita, the recently opened Italian concept from Fork owner Cameron Lumsden, also boasts barrel-aged cocktails on its menu. “We were just looking for something to separate us, set us apart from other cocktail programs,” said Lumsden. “And we think what’s great about the barrel-aged cocktail program is the fact that it’s a very consistent drink.” Alavita, which has close to a dozen 3and 5-gallon toasted-oak whiskey barrels, currently features four barrel-aged cocktails on its menu: a Negroni, a Manhattan, the Rock ’n’ Rye and a house cocktail called Alavita, which uses Crater Lake gin, St. Germain, sweet vermouth and bitters. In Lumsden’s opinion, barrel-aging spirits

for six to seven weeks helps to soften their harsh, boozy notes and adds a friendly vanilla tone to the drinks. “What it does is, it exposes people to maybe different kinds of cocktails that they wouldn’t normally order,” said Lumsden. For Reed, barrel-aging drinks is a way to expedite the often labor-intensive process of making craft cocktails. “It takes longer to get drinks out because technique is more important in how we do it. … If you can figure out ways in which certain cocktails are already batched and prepped, then you can produce a really nice product that doesn’t take as long because you’ve done most of the work already,” said Reed.

NEWS/FOOD now during the transition, we’re keeping that a little close to the vest until we make sure we have ever ything just the way we want it,” Caffeine fiends in Meridian and Mountain Home might have noticed said Rickard. that Moxie Java’s teal-winged signage was recently replaced by a new Rickard confirmed the stores will also keep their same staff. brand: Lucky Perk. Two owner groups that control six Treasure Valley “We’re not letting anyone go; same employees,” said Rickard. “HopeMoxie Java franchises decided to team up and go their own way. fully, we’ll be so busy, we’ll need to add more.” “We’re trying to get a little bit more control of our products and really In other changing of signage news, Falcon Tavern at 705 W. Banfocus on what our customers have been asking for,” said Dave Rickard, nock St. in Boise, has now become The Redheaded Finn Pub, under owner and manager of the former Moxie on Maple Grove and Overland new owner Ginger Ragan and her sister, roads. “We’ve always gotten along great— manager Rhonda House, who took over the two different owner groups from the space in 2012. Moxie—and when the opportunity came “We chose the name The Redheaded along to go with them, we really jumped at Finn to recognize our ethnic heritage (and the opportunity.” Ginger’s red hair),” reads the restaurant’s New Lucky Perk locations include Eagle website, redheadedfinnpub.com. and Ustick roads, Cherry Lane and Linder The menu, staff and decor at RedRoad, Overland and Eagle roads, Overland headed Finn will remain mostly the same and Meridian roads, Overland and Maple as Falcon Tavern. Grove roads, and American Legion Boule“We hope that the regulars realize we vard and N. Fourth E. in Mountain Home. are doing some new things but not taking Rickard said the stores will retain the away from the old … just adding our own same equipment but have contracted with touches and twists, and maybe adding another coffee provider. some of our cultural flavor,” reads the “We actually are reser ving who we are restaurant’s website. doing that with, they actually are local—a Six former Moxie Java locations are now called Lucky Perk. —Tara Morgan small-batch artisan roaster—but just right

THE NAME CHANGE GAME

LUCKY PERK

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QUE SYRAH

2008 HESTIA SYRAH, $36 The wine’s dark, dense, almost brooding purple color foreshadows the richness of its aromas. The nose is filled with cherry liqueur, blueberry and plum, backed by earthy touches of toasted oak. On the palate, it’s fruit-forward with creamy cherry and berry flavors, silky smooth tannins and a long, bright finish. This is an impressive wine that has received well-deserved critical acclaim. 2008 NXNW SYRAH, $30 King Estate (one of Oregon’s most stunning properties) has ventured beyond that state’s borders, creating the equally impressive North by Northwest label. The Columbia Valley syrah opens with floral berry and plum fruit aromas, colored by soft oak and mocha-laced coffee. Lean and lively in the mouth, this is a well-integrated wine, filled with tangy cherry and blueberry fruit flavors. Ripe tannins come through on the finish. 2008 SYZYGY SYRAH, $32 A blend of grapes from three different Walla Walla, Wash. vineyards, the Syzygy syrah has complex and enticing aromas including spicy plum, berry, cherry, white pepper, oak, earth, herb, meat and light smoke. It’s an elegantly structured wine that’s beautifully balanced and offers ripe berry and plum flavors that play against a core of tangy, food-friendly acidity. —David Kirkpatrick

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CAREER TRAINING

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20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back guarantee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com 5 condos. 3rd/Idaho. $149K & up. Owner carry. 343-5476.

CA R E E R S BW CAREERS Help Wanted! Make extra money in our free ever popular homemailer program, includes valuable guidebook! Start immediately! Genuine! 1-888-292-1120 www.howtowork-fromhome.com HELP WANTED!!! MAKE $1000 A WEEK mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping

Home Workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No Experience required. Start Immediately! www.mailingcentral.net $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com Live like a popstar. Now hiring 10 spontaneous individuals. Travel full time. Must be 18+. Transportation and hotel provided. Call Loraine 877-777-2091. LIVE,WORK, AND PLAY IN IDAHO’S SAWTOOTH MOUNTAINS Sawtooth Hotel, in Stanley, Idaho, is now accepting applications for summer employment. We are seeking people who are hard-working, and possess a high level of hospitality skills. Positions include chef, souschefs, prep cook, and waitstaff. For more info, see www.sawtoothhotel.com. If interested, please provide a cover letter, resume, and 3 references to info@sawtoothhotel.com

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LIVE, WORK AND PLAY IN IDAHO’S SAWTOOTH MOUNTAINS Stanley Baking Co. and CafÊ, in Stanley Idaho, is now accepting applications for summer employment. We are seeking people who are hard-working and possess a high level of hospitality skills. Positions include breakfast/lunch line cooks, prep cooks, and servers. For more, see www. stanleybakingco.com. If interested, please provide a cover letter, resume, and 3 references to info@stanleybakingco.com Films, Commercials, TV, Fashion. Part time & great pay. All ages & exp. levels. 208-433-9511

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COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS OPEN AUDITIONS Common Ground Community Chorus will be holding open auditions on Monday, February 4th starting at 6PM. Please contact Randy Coryell to lock in your slot at director@commongroundboise.org. Auditions are held at the First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2001 Woodlawn, Boise. Come join our wonderful choir!

BW BEAUTY WIDEN YOUR REACH Need more eyes on your business? Ask me how to reach out regionally and/or nationally in print. Email jill@boiseweekly.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

PERMANENT MAKEUP SPECIAL! Treat yourself this Valentine’s Day with the gift of Permanent Makeup. Only $200 buys you your choice of one of the following... Eye Liner, Eyebrows, Lip Liner & Full Lips. Beautiful work done by Logan, a CertiďŹ ed Permanent Makeup Artist. Check out landlpmu.com. Call Logan at 208-4623796 to book your appointment today, email landlpmu@gmail. com with any questions you might have. Special good now through the month of Feb.

VALENTINES SPECIAL! Book a Signature Facial or AntiAging Facial now through the month of Feb. for only $37. Over half off the original price! Located at BEAUTIFUL new Muse Salon and Spa 280 N. Latah St. Boise. Visit my website at www.loriskincare.com for other pricing and specials. Call Lori at 208-9214069 to book your appointment.

CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPY

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MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - COUNSELING

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BW COUNSELING BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

HYDROTHERAPY

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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. FULL BODY MASSAGE Experienced Certified Massage Therapist. $40 for 60 mins. & $60 for 90 mins. Call or text Richard at 208-695-9492.

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BW HYDROTHERAPY BATTLE THE HOLIDAY BULGE WITH A NEW YEAR CLEANSE! Colonics, FIR Sauna therapy & the NEW Vibra-Trim- 3-packpower-punch, wins the BATTLE, hands down! Cleanse Specials available-makes an awesome gift! High Stream Healing-Boise Colon Cleanse. 850-8075. boisecoloncleanse.com

SPECIALIZING IN PAIN RELIEF

FREE Head & Should Massage with 1 hr. Chinese Reflexology Foot Massage at VIP Massage. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole. ULM 340-8377. Now accepting new clients.

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BW YOGA HAVE A STUDIO? Let us know. Boise Weekly wants to spread the word. Email: classifieds@boiseweekly.com MUUV Cardio, stretching, rejuvenating? Fusion Dance Fitness at MUUV is a fantastic low-impact dance class for all ages. Your first class is free. Visit MUUV.com to sign up!

EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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Mystic Moon Massage. 322 Lake Lowell Ave., Nampa. New hours: M-W 1-10pm, Th.-Sat. 5-9pm. By appt. only. Betty 283-7830.

MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

NYT CROSSWORD | ALL-INSPIRING BY YAAKOV BENDAVID / ACROSS

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34 Hooter 35 New members of society 36 Prepares for action 38 Madras title 39 Soft cheese 40 Dutch city near Arnhem 41 Ten, for openers 42 Manhattan area bordered by Broadway 44 Boobs 45 Certain sorority woman 47 Cat on the prowl 48 Soup kitchen needs 50 2006 Winter Olympics host 52 Radio wave producer 53 Part of one’s inheritance 54 Those girls, to Juanita 55 Public ___ 57 Lack of enthusiasm 61 The year 151 62 “Goosebumps” writer 63 Jewelry material 64 Leaves after dinner? 65 Best Actor Tony winner for “Mark Twain Tonight!” 67 Of the blood 70 Pete Seeger’s genre 71 Punch-in-the-gut sounds 72 Have no doubt 73 Mournful rings 75 Put back up, as a blog entry 78 Kind of TV 79 Online health info site 80 Hard cheese 81 In hiding 83 “Doctor Zhivago” role 84 Hails from Rocky Balboa 87 Makes a lap 88 Modern group-mailing tool 89 Some barkers 91 Eve’s counterpart 92 Commonly, once 93 Infatuated with 95 “Yes, Cap’n!” 96 Semisoft cheese 97 Einstein’s “never”

98 Teachers love hearing them 99 Some classical statuary 101 Big name at Indy 102 Tumbler 104 Stop proceeding in the maze when you reach the end? 106 Kind of strength 107 Flamenco shout 108 Det. Bonasera on “CSI: NY” 109 Dead Sea Scrolls preservers 110 “The Player” director, 1992 111 What the weary get, in a saying

DOWN 1 Not object to 2 Conscience- stricken 3 Strategy employed by a Siberian Hansel and Gretel? 4 Ivory alternative 5 Left on board 6 Willy who wrote “The Conquest of Space” 7 Big name in radio advice 8 VCR button 9 Chefs hate hearing them 10 Of the lower small intestine 11 Fencing coach’s pronouncement? 12 Paris seasoning 13 Like the Talmud 14 Haymakers? 15 Basic bait 16 Dir. from WinstonSalem to Raleigh 17 Of the seashore 18 Biblical figure punished for hindsight? 19 Fastened with Velcro, e.g. 24 One of six areas on a Risk board 28 Additional 33 Name on pencils 36 Advice to Jonah?

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Russian import, briefly Was an omen of Place to rest Reddish brown What’s-___-name Grand Canyon rental Deep blue Georgia ___ Nobel Peace Center site 52 It can be shocking 53 Ginger Spice’s first name 56 Members of la familia 57 Haul around 58 “Waiter, we ordered the fish!”? 59 Swiss patriot 60 Sherpa’s herd 62 Low-budget hotels, for short 63 Italian beloved 66 Sail supports 67 Approach a thruway booth? 68 “Mi casa ___ casa” 69 Swollen glands cause 70 Woman, in slang 72 Hallowed, old-style 74 Warriors’ grp. 75 Strike a chord L A S T

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Feats of construction Paisley and plaid Carries on steadily President who was an electrician by profession 82 Some chemical salts 83 Expose, as to criticism 85 Trials 86 Greet like a junkyard dog 90 Calif. barrio setting 91 Hawker 93 Polio vaccine developer 94 Good-sized musical group 96 Heartiness 100 Leeway 103 Sugar suffix 104 Dennis Quaid remake of a 1950 film noir 105 Govt.-issued ID Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

J O B H O P E A E E F I V S O M A C R A N T H E M A M I E A D S N N I A L T A T I L I G H T Y O O H C N L E E S A R E A L S S T L E A Y E S O N S T H I T A I S H I O T Y N

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YOGA FOR BEGINNERS If you always wanted to try yoga, check out our super affordable beginner’s classes at Body & Soul Fitness Studio! Check our Facebook page for details before you forget.

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BW ART, ANTIQUES & COLLECTABLES TIFFANY DESK LAMP Tiffany style dragonfly desk lamp. Beautiful colors & warm lighting. Moving & cannot take. $15. movielife85@yahoo.com

BW 4 WHEELS

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BW ENTERTAINMENT TAKE VIAGRA? Stop paying outrageous prices! Best prices... VIAGRA 100MG, 40 pills+/4 free, only $99.00. Discreet shipping, Power Pill.1-800-374-2619.

FOR SALE BW FOR SALE AUTO VINYL DECAL STICKERS. isymbolz offers hundreds of cut vinyl car decal stickers for your auto, truck, boat, or motorcycles. Only $4.49 for 5” decal. Variety of colors an sizes to choose from. We Also Offer Vinyl Lettering Sign Banners. Visit our site for samples. We Ship Worldwide. Free Shipping Available. See Site For Details: isymbolz.com BODY-WORN HIDDEN CAMERAS dpl-surveillance-equipment.com/ body-worn_hidden_cameras.html KENMORE WASHER & DRYER Heavy Duty Set, white, only $350/ set. Matching set paid $499 for each. Used for a couple years do not need. Super capacity, they work great. Call Brett 208-353-1943. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

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BW SHOP HERE INDOOR GARDENING SUPPLIES cascadiagardensupply.com Gardening supplies for indoor gardeners. We ship to our friends in Idaho! Check out our website or visit us on Orcas Island in Washington state.

TRANSPORTATION BW AUTO SERVICES ULTIMATE TRANSMISSION Need repair on your car or truck? We offer a variety of services including brakes, transmissions, suspension, and much more! We have FREE estimates, FREE diagnostic road tests, and FREE towing on major repairs. We also offer heavy duty application services,parts, and installations. We have fat shafts, valve bodies, MITUSA pumps, torque converters, etc. Come visit us at 220 W. 37th St. in Garden City or call 208631-2133.

MUSIC BW MUSICAL INSTRUCTION PIANO TEACHER My teaching is gentle yet effective. I love to share the joy of music. All ages. Piano lessons $15/lesson. 505-603-3634.

MUSIC

ADULT BW ADULT

BW CHAT LINES FUN LOCAL SINGLES Browse & Reply FREE! 208-3458855. Use FREE Code 7887, 18+. MEET GAY & BI SINGLES Listen to Ads & Reply FREE! 208472-2200. Use FREE Code 5988, 18+. REAL DISCREET, LOCAL CONNECTIONS Call FREE! 208-287-0343 or 800210-1010. www.livelinks.com 18+.

GETTING PAROLE IN IDAHO IS NOT EASY

If you have a family member or friend who is trying, there are things they can & must do to help their cause. Contact Maloney Law on our 24 hr. line 208-392-5366 for a free consultation. Assistance available in parole & probation violations also.

BW HELP WANTED HIRING DANCERS New Topless Club on the Bench hiring 18 & over dancers. Will train! Call Eclipse after 7pm. Interviews daily, 7-7:30pm. 376-4302.

BW KISSES KISS One year has quickly come and gone and I am still very fond of you Mr. B. Happy Anniversary. SEND BIG KISSES To the one you love or hope to love you! $2/line now through Valentine’s Day in the Boise Weekly. email: classifieds@boiseweekly.com SMILES T. Good to see you again. Miss u. Y. WE’RE COMING OUT! Engagement~Wedding~ Anniversity Announcements for everyone! Boise Weekly welcomes all and does not discriminate against gay or straight couples! Call 3442055 for a price quote!

ADULT

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | 33


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Wageni ni baraka” is a Swahili proverb that means “guests are a blessing.” That’s not always true, of course. Sometimes guests can be a boring inconvenience or a messy burden. But for you in the coming weeks, Aries, I’m guessing the proverb will be 98 percent correct. The souls who come calling are likely to bestow unusually fine benefits. They may provide useful clues or missing links you’ve been searching for. They might inspire you to see things about yourself that you really need to know, and they might even give you shiny new playthings. Open your mind and heart to the unexpected blessings. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “I feel my fate in what I cannot fear,” said Theodore Roethke in his poem “The Waking.” I invite you to try out that perspective, Taurus. Learn more about your destiny by doing what makes you feel brave. Head in the direction of adventures that clear your mind of clutter and mobilize your gutsy brilliance. Put your trust in dreams that inspire you to sweep aside distracting worries. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s the First Annual Blemish Appreciation Week—for Geminis only. One of the best ways to observe this holiday is to not just tolerate the flaws and foibles of other people, but to also understand them and forgive them. Another excellent way to celebrate is to do the same for your own flaws and foibles: Applaud them for the interesting trouble they’ve caused and the rousing lessons they’ve taught. Be creative and uninhibited as you have fun with the human imperfections that normally drive you crazy. CANCER (June 21-July 22): When I turn my psychic vision in your direction, I see scenes of heavy rain and rising water, maybe even a flood. I’m pretty sure this has a metaphorical rather than literal significance. It probably means you will be inundated with more feelings than you’ve experienced in a while. Not bad or out-of-control feelings, just deep and enigmatic and brimming with nuance. How to respond? First, announce to the universe that you are glad and grateful to accept this deluge. Second, go with the flow, not against it. Third, promise yourself not to come to premature conclusions about the meaning of these feelings; let them evolve. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “I want to know more about you” may be the most potent sentence you can utter in the coming week. If spoken with sincere curiosity, it will awaken dormant synergies. It will disarm people who might otherwise become adversaries. It will make you smarter and work as a magic spell that gives you

34 | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

access to useful information you wouldn’t be able to crack open with any other method. To begin the process of imbuing your subconscious mind with its incantatory power, say “I want to know more about you” aloud 10 times right now. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): My hotel was nice but the neighborhood where it was located seemed sketchy. As I returned to my room after a jaunt to the convenience store, I received inquiries from two prostitutes whose sales pitches were enticingly lyrical. I also passed a lively man who proposed that I purchase some of his top-grade meth, crack or heroin. I thanked them all for their thoughtful invitations but said I wasn’t in the mood. Then I slipped back into my hotel room to dine on my strawberry smoothie and blueberry muffin as I watched HBO. My experience could have something in common with your immediate future, Virgo. I suspect you may be tempted with offers that seem exotic and adventurous but are not really that good for you. Stick to the healthy basics, please. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A West Coast DJ named Shakti Bliss wrote a remarkable status update on her Facebook page. Here’s an edited excerpt: “In the past 24 hours, I did yoga in a bathtub, hauled furniture by myself in the rain, got expert dating advice from an 11-yearold, learned the lindy hop, saw a rainbow over the ocean, had thrift store clothes stolen out of my car by a homeless man, made a magic protection amulet out of a piece of cardboard, was fed quinoa soup by the buffest 50-yearold South African woman I’ve ever met, bowed to a room full of applause, and watched two of my favorite men slow dance together to Josephine Baker singing in French.” I suspect that you Libras will be having days like that in the coming week: packed with poetic adventures. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Thomas Jefferson, third president of the United States, called himself a Christian. But he also acknowledged that there weren’t any other Christians like him. He said he belonged to a sect consisting of one person—himself. While he admired the teachings of Jesus Christ, he had no use for the supernatural aspects of the stories told in the New Testament. So he created his own version of the Bible, using only those parts he agreed with. Now would be an excellent time for you to be inspired by Jefferson’s approach, Scorpio. Is there a set of ideas that appeals to you in some ways but not in others? Tailor it to your special needs and make it your own. Become a sect of one.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Everyone is a damn fool for at least five minutes every day,” said writer Elbert Hubbard. “Wisdom consists in not exceeding the limit.” Judging from my personal experience, I’d say that five minutes is a lowball figure. My own daily rate is rarely less than half an hour. But the good news as far as you’re concerned, Sagittarius, is that in the coming weeks, you might have many days when you’re not a damn fool for even five seconds. In fact, you may break your all-time records for levels of wild, pure wisdom. Make constructive use of your enhanced intelligence. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Most humans have an absolute and infinite capacity for taking things for granted,” said Aldous Huxley. If that’s true, Capricorn, it’s important that you not act like a normal human in the next few weeks. Taking things for granted would be a laziness you can’t afford. In fact, I think you should renew your passion for and commitment to all your familiar pleasures and fundamental supports. Are you fully aware of the everyday miracles that allow you to thrive? Express your appreciation for the sources that nourish you so reliably. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Poet Jacob Nibengenesabe was a member of the Swampy Cree, a First Nation tribe in Canada. He wrote shamanic poems from the point of view of a magical trickster who could change himself into various creatures. In one poem, the shapeshifter talked about how important it is to be definite about what he wanted. “There was a storm once,” he said. “That’s when I wished myself / to be a turtle / but I meant on land! / The one that carries a hard tent / on his back. / I didn’t want to be floating!” By the end of the poem, the shapeshifter concluded, “I’ve got to wish things exactly! / That’s the way it is / from now on.” I hope that will be the way it is from now on for you, too, Aquarius. Visualize your desires in intricate detail. For example, if you want to be a bird for a while, specify what kind. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): As you sleep, you have at least 1,000 dreams every year. But you may recall only a few of them. Doesn’t that bother you? To be so ignorant of the stories your subconscious mind works so hard to craft? To be out of touch with what the Iroquois call “the secret wishes of your soul”? Now is an excellent time to develop a stronger relationship with your dreams, Pisces. It’s high time to explore the deeper strata of your life’s big mysteries.

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JOURNEYMAN PAINTER 30+ years exp. in the trade, fair rates, clean & courteous. lic/insured. 463-7771. PAMPERED CHEF CONSULTANT Kitchen products that make cooking fun & easy! Carrie Dillon 918440-5930.

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE IF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the matter of: EMRIE SAGE KRAMER, minor child. Case No. CV MG 11-21515 SUMMONS BY PUBLICATION TO: JESSICA CHRISTINE KRAMER and MATTHEW JORDAN HOFFMAN; PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that a Final Hearing for Guardianship is scheduled for February 11, 2013 at 9:30 a.m. before the Honorable Christopher Bieter, at the Ada County Courthouse located at 200 W. Front Street, Boise Idaho 83702. A copy of the Petition for Appointment of Guardian of Minor Child can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for the Petitioners, Charles B. Bauer, of the firm Bauer and French, 1501 Tyrell Lane, Boise, Idaho 83701, (208) 3830090. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter. Dates: this 21st day of Dec. 2012 Ada County District Court By LAURA MARTIN Deputy Clerk

PETS BW LOST MISSING WHITE CAT Rowan. White cat, female, green eyes & pink nose. She is 14 yrs. old & not used to being outdoors. Missing September 4th from Hillway Dr. cross streets Hill Road & Lancaster. Area backs up to Highland Hollows. We are still hoping she is alive. Please contact if you have any information. Reward if found and returned. 283-3509.

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Holly Stimers Case No. CV NC 1223454 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Holly Stimers, now residing in the City of Star, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court of ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Holly Thomas. The reason for the change in name is: because I divorced my spouse. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. February 26, 2013 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Dec. 28, 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 30 – FEBRUARY 5, 2013 | 35



Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 32