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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 22 NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

OPEN LINES Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline poised to take calls

FEATURE 12

2C IN FOCUS The places and faces of Canyon County

ARTS 26

READY FOR THE SPOTLIGHT Nampa’s Pix Theatre readies for its sequel

NOISE 27

MUSICAL COMMINGLING The twisted web of 2C’s music scene

“Why did the Tofurky cross the road?”

CITIZEN 10

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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Sultan of Events: Harrison Berry Harrison@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Amy Atkins, Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Zach Hagadone, Damon Hunzeker, Randy King, Christina Marfice, Laurie Pearman, Ted Rall, Intern: Jordyn Price Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Zach Ritchie, Zach@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, production@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Patrick Sweeney, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2012 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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NOTE BOISE AND BEYOND One of the most common questions asked when Boise Weekly’s Best of Boise issue comes out is, “If it’s the best of Boise, then why does it include places not in Boise?” The answer is always the same: Because life in Boise doesn’t stop at the city limits. The Treasure Valley is one big interconnected place, and while we may all have our favorite corners of the valley, living in one town doesn’t exclude anyone from playing in another. We at BW are continually amazed by the depth and variety of entertainment, culture and all other aspects of life that we find when we venture beyond the city of Boise. It was part of the impetus behind our annual Guide to 2C. Four years ago, we turned our gaze the western end of the Treasure Valley, examining what would draw a Boisean there and trying to understand the nature of the community. Once again, we’re delving into an area that is a juxtaposition of traditional rural roots and a growing urban core. For our feature story, regular BW photographer—and Canyon County native—Laurie Pearman turns her lens on the faces of those who make the 2C what it is: from the business owners revitalizing the community, to the farmers helping evolve agriculture, to the Hispanic families who make up the area’s fastest-growing demographic. Of course, since we’re all about promoting valley-wide unity, we also have a reason for you to come to Boise. BW recently debuted our SmartCard program—a smartphone offshoot of our BW Card. To celebrate it, we’re hosting a full week of special deals topped off with a cocktail party at Idaho Botanical Garden. The first thing you need to know is that you must be a SmartCard member to take advantages of the deals, which start Wednesday, Nov. 28. The second thing to know is downloading the app is free and you can get more info at bwsmartcard.boiseweekly.com. Third, only the first 100 people who buy tickets through their SmartCard apps will be able to get in to the Look Smart BW SmartCard Party at Idaho Botanical Garden on Wednesday, Dec. 5. Tickets cost $25 each and include admission into the garden and its Garden aGlow light display, as well as drinks, music and food in a private heated tent. We’ll be dressing up for this shindig, so bust out your best cocktail-party attire and buy your tickets before they’re gone. —Deanna Darr

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Mike Landa TITLE: Flying Straw Bale MEDIUM: Three-color serigraph on chocolate paper ARTIST STATEMENT: See the Flying Straw Bale installation at Peaceful Belly Farm near Hidden Springs. Fly bale, fly!

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS The Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline is ready to take calls 8 CITIZEN

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FEATURE Visions of Canyon County 12

STALLING ON ‘STALINISM’ Idaho hit the deadline to declare if it would build a state health-insurance exchange as mandated by the Affordable Care Act or make the Feds do it, but instead of deciding, they got an extension. Read all about it at Citydesk.

MONKEY BUSINESS Some jackass broke into Zoo Boise and killed a monkey, leaving behind a hat as evidence. A suspect was arrested, but the story goes on. Read the sordid tale at Citydesk.

SUN VALLEY GETS LEMONY FRESH Author Daniel Handler, creator of Lemony Snickett, made an appearance in the Wood River Valley last week. Read what he had to say about letters to the editor at Cobweb.

COUGARTOWN As Boiseans ponder what to do if they encounter the Greenbelt cougar, Should You Encounter a Cougar, a comic book from Alaska artist Jacob T. Stoltz, offers advice on what to do when faced with such a beast. Read all about it on Cobweb.

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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ARTS Supporters hope to turn Nampa’s Pix Theatre into a performing arts center 26 NOISE The overlapping lives of 2C bands

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Silver Linings Playbook

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REC Private lands vs professional guides in 2C duck hunting 32 CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

ASK BILL ABOUT IT

Was it the dewsh what did Romney in? To the great big gob of greasy, grimy gofer guts named Bill Cope, If you were walking on a road anywhere in Homedale here, which I moved back to because Belinda wanted to be closer to her Grammy’s weener dogs, and I heard you were there, I would go there and run my Hemi over your sissy, herpes-ate-up, fatbag body back and forwards until there was nothing left but a wet spot, just like that pretty girl tried to do to that ugly flying lizard man in that one Jeepy Creepers movie. That’s how evel I think you are and what you deserve. It is exactly because of like Ted Newgunt said how pimps and whoers like you that made Mitt Ronney lose that president job. How could he ever win with lamestreem media crapballs like you and all those Ed Shulcks-types on MCNNB calling him a liar and a flit-flopper and all the things he was called. You and your boyfriend Badger Bob even called him a dewsh, which was the meanest thing I didn’t even think maggots like you would sink to, but you did anyway. I admit I never much thought it would be too great to have to look at Rommey’s face for four years, but that would have been better than watching “Whos Sane” Obama ruin our country with his not American upbringing, which he will do now because of bellybutton cheese like you and that bloated-up mouthhead Cris Mathhews letting him do it. At least most of Idaho people did not vote for the Obama. Especially in Homedale here. I dodn’t think there was even one Obama vote in Homedale except for maybe that flower shop guy, but even Belinda did not vote for Obama even though when that Sandy came where he walked around the ruined places with that one fat guy from New Jersey, she said, “See Dick? He’s not so bad.” I felt like she had rammed me in the ball bag with a weed whacker when she said that and I said “What do you mean, he’s not so bad!” and we yelled back and forth for most of the night until the deputies came and I said things what I wish maybe I hadn’t of because it had more to do with her taking off to Okalhoma with that other calf roper than it had to do with “Whos Sane” Obama and what a worst president in history he is. So she moved in with her Grammy for a few days until I took her out for a night of eating at Golden Corral and asked her to come back and she did, only now all her clothes are covered with weener dog hair, but she did not vote for Obama anyway. That is what she told me anyway. But anyway, it should tell you something about how you are not wanted here in Idaho since nobody ever votes like you think they should. Why don’t you go to one of those other states where you could marry your boyfriend Badger Bob, huh? That is where you deserve to be and you wouldn’t not anymore be ruining up our good old Idaho elections.—Signed, Dick from Homedale again. P.s. If any of your other libtards at that Boise “Weakly” want a teeshirt what says “Whos Sane Obama” I am selling them on the Internet at dicktees.com for 20 bucks plus what stamps and a box cost. Dear Dick, I had a feeling I’d be hearing from you, and here you are. I must say, it upsets me that you think I was mean to Mr. Romney by calling him a dews … er, douche. Actually, I believe I acted with great restraint throughout the campaign. There was so much I was tempted to say about your candidate and his family, but didn’t. For instance, by late summer I’d become convinced that the commonly held belief—that beneath the doofussy, disingenuous exterior, Mitt was an intelligent and competent person— was simply more altered reality honey dripping out of the Republican hive. He had shown me no evidence there was anything in his skull other than a meager talent for memorizing other peoples’ talking points. In fact, I began to suspect that the real brains in the family belonged to Ma Romney— who I privately took to calling “Lady MacBethanne.” I sensed she had such an itch to be FLOTUS, it made her nostrils quiver to think about it. But I didn’t ever say that in this column, did I? No, I didn’t. Nor did I ever refer to the boys as “The Five Feathers,” which I think is wonderfully witty, even if nobody else does. And I didn’t once call Paul Ryan “Gumby” because of that slant to his head. I wanted to in the worst way, but I didn’t. So then, Dick, how mean can I really be to have kept such gems to myself? What’s more, I doubt that my calling Mitt for the douche he is had anything to do with his loss. I know it’s the fashion these days within Republican circles to concoct theories on why they lost: “It was the hurricane, blah, blah, blah … It was all those urban voters, blah, blah, blah … It was because people aren’t informed enough, blah, blah, blah … It was because Barack Obama suppressed the Romney vote by telling voters about him, blah, blah, blah.” And now your contribution: “It was that damn Bill Cope calling Mitt a douche, blah, blah, blah.” The simple truth is, Dick, Romney is nowhere near the human being Obama is, and even most of those on your side could see it. That’s why he lost. By the way, I am pleased to gather from what you said about Belinda that there isn’t a restraining order putting a damper on the magic between you two lovebirds. At least, not yet. Also, I don’t mean to tell you how to run your business, Dick, but shouldn’t there be an apostrophe in “whos.” As in, “Who’s Sane Obama?” WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 5

OPINION/TED RALL

THE LEFTIST REPUBLICAN PARTY OF THE FUTURE To survive, GOP should out-Democrat the Democrats

Republicans, engaging in the traditional losing party’s post-election wound-licking, blameflinging and anger-at-the-dumb-voters ritual, are facing the awful truth: The American people just aren’t into their gay-bashing, race-baiting, woman-hating, Eisenhower-era positions on social issues. “It’s not that our message—we think abortion is wrong, we think same-sex marriage is wrong—didn’t get out. It did get out,” R. Albert Mohler Jr., president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Ky., told The New York Times. “It’s that the entire moral landscape has changed. An increasingly secularized America understands our positions and has rejected them.” Exasperated radio blowhard Rush Limbaugh asks, “Condoleeza Rice ... is a pinnacle of achievement and intelligent and wellspoken. ... You can’t find a more accomplished person. Marco Rubio. And really, speaking in street lingo, we’re not getting credit for it. ... Are these people perceived as tokens?” “In order to get the Hispanic or Latino vote, does that mean open the borders and embrace the illegals?” Yes. “If we’re not getting the female vote, do we become pro-choice?” Yes. Liberal pundits are offering advice to their Republican counterparts this week, arguing that if GOP officials and pundits make a few nips and tucks into their Neanderthal platform and tone, they may yet save their white male– dominated party from irrelevance.

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Let’s set aside the obvious fact that no one does nor should listen to counsel offered by their enemies. Nevertheless, Republicans might be more willing to listen to me than other columnists. After all, I love the GOP just as much as I care for the Democrats—not at all. The Republicans’ big problem is that they think they’re me. I am a pundit. The pay isn’t great, but I get to stand up for what I think is right regardless of whether anybody else is willing to follow. My job isn’t to be popular. However, if I were tapped to head a major political party, I wouldn’t have that luxury. If Republicans want to win elections, they need to set the stage for a transformational shift as dramatic as 1932, when FDR turned the Democrats into the party of liberalism and progressivism. Republicans need not wonder why President Barack Obama got 71 percent of the Latino vote; if anything, the shocker is that figure wasn’t higher. For decades, right-wing talk radio hosts and other Republican surrogates have been bashing illegal immigration. Now that the Latino vote has become essential to win national races, the GOP can no longer afford its hardline stance on immigration. On every social issue of note, Americans are moving away from the Republican Party. We are becoming more tolerant of gays and their rights, more supportive of abortion rights, and more open to 11 people of different backgrounds.

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 7

CITYDESK/NEWS Z AC H HAGADONE

NEWS

A DIAL TONE ... FINALLY Protester: “It’s never wise to trade your children’s futures and environment for jobs.”

GROUPS PROTEST PROPOSED COAL SHIPMENTS THROUGH IDAHO PANHANDLE

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CHRISTINA MARFICE Sitting at a desk in a half-unpacked room of what is to become the Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline, Nina Leary jumped and laughed

The rising number of Idaho suicides grabbed more attention from the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare and Idaho LAU R IE PEAR M AN

A plan by some of the globe’s biggest mining companies to ship hundreds of millions of tons of coal by rail through Idaho’s panhandle is still in its infancy, but that’s not stopping activists from raising a ruckus. Members of Moscow-based Wild Idaho Rising Tide joined Occupy Spokane Nov. 17 to take their opposition to the Idaho panhandle town of Sandpoint, where many of the shipments would roll through on a journey from Montana to the Pacific Coast. The coal would ultimately be loaded onto ships bound for China or India. According to WIRT organizer Helen Yost, communities like Sandpoint and Spokane are being left out of the process. “[Public hearings in Spokane, Wash.] are the closest hearings for folks who live in Idaho and Montana, and we feel like our concerns are being ignored,” said Yost. “How legitimate is the scoping process if they’re not even considering input from two of the affected states?” According to opponents, the coal-shipments’ effects could be dire. No. 1, there’s the sheer number of trains that would be running through small communities like Sandpoint: between 40 and 50 additional trains—some as long as a mileand-a-half—could be added to the regional rail system each day. In Sandpoint, where as many as 70 trains currently chug through daily, that means congestion, increased diesel emissions and increased risk of derailment. No. 2, communities along the line are concerned that coal dust blowing off the uncovered cars poses a human health risk. A consortium of doctors in western Washington concluded that those living along current coal shipment lines experience elevated health problems, including respiratory illness. Finally, opponents are rankled by the idea of ramping up coal production at a time when climate-change worries have convinced nations around the world to cut back on using fossil fuels. Meeting Asia’s demand for coal could mean billions of dollars in profits for energy firms like Arch Coal and Peabody Energy, owned by Warren Buffett, but for those living along the line, the benefits seem scant when compared with the potential costs. “We’re going to get all the crap and none of the money,” said Dave Bilsland of Occupy Spokane. “Show me one job, outside of medical, that’ll be created. It just doesn’t make sense to ship our pollutants overseas.” WIRT activist Cass Davis, who carpooled from Moscow, agreed. “I grew up in the Silver Valley, and I was lead-poisoned pretty good as a child,” he said. “It’s never wise to trade your children’s futures and environment for jobs. When we start putting jobs and the economy ahead of the environment and our children, we’re fools.” —Zach Hagadone

The return of the Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline

John Reusser, director of the Idaho Suicide Prevention Hotline, says there is growing evidence that shows volunteers are more successful than paid operators.

nervously when the phone rang. The hot line hasn’t yet launched. Its rooms are still in disarray with boxes and furniture waiting to be arranged. But in the coming weeks, Leary will be behind one of the desks prepared to answer some of the most important calls of her–and undoubtedly someone else’s–life. “I used a hot line when I was younger,” said Leary. “Ever since then, I’ve wanted to give back.” For six years, Idaho has been the only state in the nation without a certified suicide crisis hot line. Idahoans had the option of accessing a national hot line, but those calls were usually answered in Oregon or Nebraska, said Sydney Young, the Idaho hot line’s volunteer coordinator. “It’s important to have someone on the line who’s local,” said Young. “Idaho has its own culture, I think, that a lot of people, especially in a place like Portland [Ore.], wouldn’t understand.” Officials with the Idaho Suicide Prevention Action Network point to an Idaho attemptedsuicide rate that has been consistently higher than the national average. When a lack of state funding resulted in a shutdown of the Idaho hot line in 2007, an already too-high attempted suicide rate began to climb. By 2009, the Idaho Council on Suicide Prevention said the Gem State’s suicide rate was fourth highest in the nation, nearly twice the national average.

lawmakers who helped fund the launch of a new state hot line earlier this year. Coupled with donations from the United Way of Treasure Valley and the Speedy Peterson Foundation, the hot line secured enough funding to cover start-up costs and two years of operating expenses. Young spent the better part of the year recruiting the Idaho voices who will soon answer the crisis calls. A group of 18 volunteers, including Leary, participated in the first available training sessions and are poised to take the first calls. Most volunteers responded to print and radio advertisements while others like Leary– the mother of a deployed soldier–heard about the hot line from those already involved with the effort. “I mentioned [to a friend] that there was this suicide hot line, and he said, ‘Oh my gosh, you have to do it; you’d be perfect for that,’” remembered Leary. “So I called and here I am.” Leary joined others in the inaugural four-day training session: two days of Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training–a nationally approved discipline–with a third day examining specific topics such as identification of common causes for suicidal thoughts and a fourth day when volunteers practiced their new skills through role-play. “You know by the end of the first day whether you’re cut out for this,” said Leary,

who added that while the training was exhausting, it was also “affirming.” “It’s nerve-wracking,” she said. “You don’t know what to say sometimes, but the most important thing is to just let them know, ‘I’m here. I’m listening.’ When we were practicing, we [sometimes] felt like we didn’t say the right thing, but the caller always said it was comforting just to know someone was there. Even when it was silent, it was good to know someone was listening.” John Reusser, director of the Idaho hot line, said that other states mix their hot line operators with paid workers and volunteers, while others, like Idaho, are purely volunteer-based. “There’s a lot of evidence that shows volunteers are more successful than professionals,” said Reusser. “They’re fresh when they get here [because] they don’t do this 40 hours a week. We’re going to make sure our volunteers are taken care of. They won’t ever take a hard call home with them.” With 18 volunteers trained and ready to begin answering phones, the Idaho suicide prevention hot line will operate Monday through Thursday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Reusser told BW that the hot line had initially targeted Nov. 12 as the “ideal” launch date, but the certification necessary to begin taking calls stalled because the office that accredits hot lines is based in New York City and was temporarily shuttered during and after superstorm Sandy. The launch is now tentatively scheduled for Monday, Nov. 26. In addition to securing continued funding, Reusser and Young said they are searching for new volunteers. They hope to extend the hot line’s hours and begin operating Monday through Friday in January 2013, but that will require approximately 30 volunteers, according to Young. And to meet a further goal of operating 24/7, up to 90 volunteers may be needed. Young said that may be a possibility during the hot line’s second year of operation. The first batch of 18 volunteers range in age from 21 to 80; some are students, some are retirees and others, like Leary, are young parents with some spare time and giving hearts. “We’re all caregivers,” said Leary. “We come from all over but the word that describes all of us is ‘caregiver.’ In terms of a time commitment, it’s not much. But mentally, it’s huge. It’s so rewarding, though, knowing that you’re helping people. What more do you need?” And to Young and Reusser, it’s satisfying to work with volunteers that often isn’t the same with paid workers. Reusser said the volunteers’ passion stems from an intrinsic love for the work rather than the need for a paycheck. “That’s what really inspires me,” he said. “They have a passion for crisis work and doing it paid, nine to five every day in professional settings, can be really trying. Here, in a volunteer setting, it’s like they bring this light in every day.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 9

CITIZEN

SETH TIBBOTT Talking turkey with Mr. Tofurky GEORGE PRENTICE

Did you grow up with a traditional American diet? For the most part. I wasn’t a big turkey eater when I was a young boy. When we went to celebrate Thanksgiving at my aunt’s house, my mom would make peanut butter and jelly sandwiches for me to eat. My aunt thought it was rude and awkward. I never really liked going there. But by the time I was in high school, I was eating hamburgers every day.

into an economic model? I was looking to sink my teeth into something. We were living near Portland and we were dirt poor. Turtle Island Foods was founded in 1980 with tempeh products, but we were only selling regionally. For years I was earning about $300 a month, but I always wanted to do something for Thanksgiving. That’s what turned us around: Tofurky. We got a lot of press and became a national company.

Do you remember when you stopped eating meat? I do. It was 1974, and I read the great book by Frances Moore Lappe: Diet for a Small Planet. It pointed out that we treated our animals like protein machines in reverse. We pour 16 pounds of grain into an animal for one pound of meat and that didn’t make sense to me. It was the main reason I became a vegetarian. I started looking into diet and other issues and knew that I had made a good decision.

Give me a sense of your sales figures. We usually ship 300,000-400,000 units a year. We recently hit the 3 million mark.

Pardon my pun, but did you go cold turkey and stop eating meat on that day? I wasn’t too strict about it. I still ate cheese and eggs for several years. But in 1978, I spent time on a Tennessee farm that was doing cutting-edge work on tempeh and tofu. When did you want to turn that lifestyle

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Did you celebrate? Not anything big. It was a cool moment, but when you’re in business like this, stuff keeps coming at you. How many products do you currently market? Thirty. Eight tempeh and 22 Tofurky products. Where do you ship your products? Ten percent goes to Canada. The bulk of the rest goes to the United States. We’re getting more export savvy. We have a small presence in the United Kingdom and we just shipped our first load to Australia last week.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Seth Tibbott, 61, really hadn’t spent any time around turkeys until just before Thanksgiving 2011. “I visited a place called The Farm Sanctuary in Watkins Glen, N.Y.,” Tibbott remembered. “And they set up all these tables full of cranberries and squash and rice, and then they have this fabulous feast where the turkeys are the honored guests. Going eyeball to eyeball to turkeys was a unique experience.” Tibbott is a turkey’s best friend. As the founder of owner of Turtle Island Foods, makers of Tofurky products, Tibbott probably saves the necks of thousands of birds each holiday season while selling his vegan alternatives to customers across North America. How did you find the right recipe for taste and texture? The texture is always harder than flavor. Some flavors are easy. Bologna and bacon were easy, but ham is like the holy grail. People always ask me, “Why don’t you have an Easter ham?” We’re trying, but no luck so far. But the texture involves a special process that has evolved over time. We really want the Tofurky to pull apart in your hands similar to a pulled piece of poultry. Nobody does that like we do. How many competitors does Tofurky have? There are six or eight meat-alternative companies and most are owned by big multinational companies. We’re the largest family owned independent. The last of the Mohicans. Do consumers sometimes confuse other products with the Tofurky brand? They do. The trademark lawyers are always cautioning that you don’t want to be like Kleenex. You lose your mark if you don’t fight for it. I love real turkey. Why would I eat Tofurky? The health and nutrition aspect. Tofurky has the same protein as turkey but no cholesterol. Do you like white meat? Love it. You’re going to know the differ-

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ence, but it’s close enough that it’s not so bad. We get calls all the time from people who say their doctor told them their cholesterol is going through the roof.

Has Tofurky become a gateway toward other tofu products for a lot of your customers? No doubt. Five percent of America is vegan or vegetarian. But 17 percent of Americans eat 50 percent of their meals meatless each week. That’s a major force driving our numbers. Meat sales are down; the USDA says meat is down 12.2 percent since 2008. Pork, beef, chicken, turkey–all down. How big is your company? There’s my family, plus 100 employees. We’ve hired about 1.5 people a month for the last 16 months. I think President Obama can thank us for some of those improving employment numbers. What’s on your Thanksgiving table? Tofurky. I used to smoke them but lately, I’ve been putting a roast in a crockpot with some mushroom soup.

How many will a roast feed? We have two sizes, but our most popular one–26 ounces–easily feeds five people. The roast may seem small but there are no bones. Plus, there’s usually plenty of leftovers for sandwiches and casseroles. And I see that you package an entire meal. A Tofurky feast includes a two-pound roast, 14 ounces of gravy, an 11-ounce vegan chocolate cake and two Tofurky wish sticks to make a wish. That goes for 19 bucks and feeds six people. And how significant is your presence in the Treasure Valley? Our products are at Fred Meyer, the Boise Co-Op and Whole Foods. So I guess I should say Happy Tofurky Day. Do you know why the Tofurky crossed the road? OK, I’ll bite. Why? To prove that he wasn’t chicken.

RALL

THE REPUBLICAN PARTY CLAIMS TO BE THE PA RTY OF SMALL GOVERNMENT CON SER VAT I S M ; W HY N OT S AY THAT THI S IS A SI MPL E M AT T E R O F K E E P I NG THE GOVER N MENT OU T OF O U R B EDROOMS A ND OUT O F WO M E N’ S B ODI E S ? ” —TED RALL

Beginning last summer, Republican strategists consciously decided to 6 downplay Mitt Romney’s stances on the Republican Party’s platform on social issues. Now liberal commentators are joining them, strangely and cynically suggesting that Republicans need to change their emphasis of their messaging—but not the content of their policies. Style isn’t enough. Republicans are doomed unless they radically change to socialissue policies that are in step with the country. If the Party of Lincoln is adaptable and intelligent, it will exploit the opportunity to move, not just left, but to the left of the center-right Democratic Party. The GOP could make good on its longstanding assertion that it favors a legal path to immigration by proposing that we open our WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

doors to a huge surge of legal immigration. The Republican Party claims to be the party of small government conservatism; why not say that this is a simple matter of keeping the government out of our bedrooms and out of women’s bodies? Same thing goes for same-sex marriage and other rights for people who are discriminated against because of their sexual orientation. You can’t roll out a new and improved Republican Party social issues platform overnight without alienating the crazy Christian fundamentalists and other unattractive sorts who form the basis of the Republican Party. But you can start a transition to a viable future in a methodical way that prepares the Republican Party for the huge demographic shifts that will drive the politics of the country as it moves further and further to the left.

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VISIONS of

Adam Haynes opened Rolling H Cycles in March to bring a bike shop to downtown Nampa. Haynes—whose staff includes two helpful shop dogs, Buddy and Bandit—said it feels like Nampa is finally getting some momentum. According to a mid-year Real Estate Market Review by Collier’s International, occupancy in downtown Nampa went down in the first half of 2012. Despite the dip, Collier’s expects the development on Haynes’ Pivot Block to influence more growth.

CANYON COUNTY A PHOTOGRAPHIC TREK ACROSS 2C PHOTOGRAPHS AND CUTLINES BY LAURIE PEARMAN

A warm buzz of espresso grinders, quiet chatter and natural light flood the Flying M Coffeegarage. Lisa and Kevin Myers opened the Flying M Coffeehouse in Boise in 1992, but they knew they wanted to open a location in Nampa as well. When the City of Nampa began to talk about revitalization, the Myers’ plans clicked into place and the Coffeegarage opened in 2006. Many downtown Nampa business owners say the coffeegarage was the catalyst for the change which has brought in several new businesses. A decade ago, businesses like The White Pine and hip eateries like Messenger Pizza and Simple Sushi would have only been found in Boise. “When I was a kid, the [Nampa] downtown was a vibrant place,” Lisa said.

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anyon County is a place of great contrasts—traditional rural lifestyles coexist with a growing hip, urban population. It’s home to the state’s largest Hispanic population, an increasing number of young families looking for affordable homes and several highly regarded institutions of higher learning. It can be a tough place to understand. That’s why Boise Weekly sent photographer and Canyon County native Laurie Pearman to bring back a visual tour of the 2C, sharing images of the people and places that are the essence of Canyon County.

—Deanna Darr

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Puffy Mondaes Sustainable Arts opened in downtown Nampa in December 2007 and has become a mainstay. Owners Karen and Aaron Brown have lived in Nampa for 20 years and felt the craft store was a natural fit for the area. The myriad classes taught by 10 local instructors, including Amy Olenik, pictured, attract creative types from across the valley.

Until about five years ago, Shaun King lived in Southern California. But after visiting a friend in Nampa, he packed his bags, bought a house in downtown Nampa and started working at Flying M Coffeegarage. Shaun, his wife Liz and their 5-year-old daughter Addie are indicative of a growing number of young families building their lives in Canyon County, attracted by lower home prices, among other factors. According to intermountainmls.com, the 2012 median price of a home in Canyon County was $95,000—almost half the $167,500 median price in Ada County.

Christina Love would never have guessed she would call Idaho home, but with her career in mind, she and her daughter moved to Nampa from Snowflake, Ariz., about a year ago. Love’s profession represents some of the new directions the community is going. As a colon therapist at Earth’s Legacy in Nampa, she feels the community has been very open to her line of work.

Armed with six-egg omelets, Kim Biennion (left) serves up lunch at The Garage Cafe in Notus. The Garage is a modern take on the highway diner with a casual atmosphere and food that has been kicked up a notch. On the menu, you’ll find lugnuts (biscuits and gravy), a nitrous burger (jalapeno and pepperjack hamburger), prime rib, hand-scooped milkshakes and, of course, a cup of joe. The cafe has evolved from a garage to a produce stand to an eatery, according to John Wagoner of Caldwell (above), who shared some history while getting caught up on the news over a cup of coffee.

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Farmway Village lies on the edge of Caldwell near Notus. Originally built by the federal government in 1939 as a 350-person campsite, it is now home to about 1,500 people living in 243 housing units. Managed by the Caldwell Housing Authority, it includes a small grocery store, laundromat, health clinic, community center, Head Start program and Canyon County Sheriff’s Office substation.

The College of Idaho opened its doors to 19 students in 1891 at the Caldwell Presbyterian Church. The campus moved in 1910 to its current location along Cleveland Boulevard in Caldwell, where it has evolved into one of the top-ranked private colleges in the state. Histor y professor Dr. Howard Berger arrived at C of I in 1982, and since then, the student population has doubled to about 1,050 students, including representatives of 53 countries. Earlier this year, C of I announced the return of its football program, with a team slated to assemble in fall 2013 and play its first game in 2014.

Julie Humphreys moved from San Antonio, Texas, to Greenleaf in 1970. She raised three daughters in Greenleaf—population 846—and came to appreciate the slow pace of life in a Quaker town. Though her daughters have moved away and Humphreys works for a company in Meridian, she still calls Greenleaf home. After a temporar y move to Pennsylvania, she came back because, “it just wasn’t Idaho.”

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According to the 2010 U.S. Census, Canyon County’s Hispanic population accounts for 24.1 percent of the county’s population. The distribution of the Hispanic population varies across Canyon County, with Middleton having the lowest percentage, at 10 percent, and Wilder having the highest, at 76 percent. Before the Hispanic Cultural Center was built there was no gathering place for the community, said Humberto Fuentes, president HCC. Now the center plays an important part in providing a space for education, workshops and socializing for all ages, including in its public galler y—now featuring works for Dia de Los Muertos.

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Chuck Randolph has taken such an interest in Caldwell’s history that he has become the go-to guy for anything having to do with the area. Randolph lives in his parents’ former home in the Steunenberg Historic District, named for Gov. Frank Steunenberg, who was assassinated in 1905. For a display of mid-century modern homes, take a drive down Washington and Idaho streets, where bits and pieces from Canyon County’s past linger among the new housing and shopping developments that dot the edges of the community.

Idaho is a growing producer of hops, ranking third in the country and representing 2 percent of the world’s hop harvest. Nate Jackson, owner of Jackson Hop, is one of several growers near Wilder. In 2011, he produced 400,000 pounds of hops, growing eight varieties, four of which are organic. In an effort to produce on a local level, Jackson Hop and Obendorf Hop Inc. have formed Alpha Hop Sales, which will begin to provide hops to local breweries starting next year.

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The first cherry and apple trees were planted at Williamson Orchards in Sunnyslope in 1920. Nearly 100 years later, the orchard has changed and diversified, but it’s still a tight-knit, family operation. “Everything we have here is local. We probably stay within 10 miles with a lot of the produce, most coming from the Sunnyslope region.” said Beverly Williamson, great niece of the original 1909 homesteaders, the Gammons. In 2011, the family sold part of the orchard, going from employing 300 during the peak season to about 40 people during the peak and eight to 10 year round. Like many growers in the region, the Williamsons added vineyards in 1998. By 2001 the family released its first wine, a cabernet sauvignon. Ten years later, they make 11 types of wine and produce about 1,200 cases. Beverly’s sister, Emily Williamson (below), took a break from sorting fruit to join her dog, Sookie, for a photo in front of the 1912 barn that holds the year-round fruit stand.

9:30AM - 1:30PM

8th Street from Bannock to Main Street & on the Grove Plaza

HOLIDAY MARKET - NOV. 3RD TO DEC. 22ND This Week at the Market BRING YOUR HOLIDAY GIFT LIST! COME DOWN AND SEE ALL OUR UNIQUE HANDCRAFTED GIFTS!

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* Fresh locally grown produce, herbs, & flowers * Idaho Specialty Foods & Wines * Great Selection of Local Artwork

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

How fast can a turkey run? Pretty fast if it’s Thanksgiving.

THURSDAY NOV. 22 gobble hobble TURKEY DAY 5K Twinkle, twinkle little tree, and shrub, and other tree, and oh, and that whole wall and, well, everything.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY NOV. 22-25 illumine WINTER GARDEN AGLOW Idaho Botanical Garden is a place defined by a seamless embrace of opposites, where the pert blooms and shrubby grasses of the high desert collide with lush lawns, and vines hang lazily from garden arches and luscious floral hedges. Now that winter is upon us, however, the garden has lost some of its lusty verdance. Flowers have retreated, the vines have withered and the lawns have lost their summer fulsomeness. But that hasn’t stopped the garden from being a wonderland of contradictions. Enter the 16th annual Winter Garden aGlow, when workers festoon IBG with almost 250,000 holiday lights to dazzle the senses and whip spectators into the winter spirit. Pull a hat snugly over your head and wander the broad brick thoroughfares shimmering with electric luminescence under the icy clarity of Boise’s night sky. But there are more than lights: the IBG crew has put together a full lineup of live entertainment throughout the event, from choirs and musicians to visits with Santa. Check the online calendar of events for more info. And while you’re at it, take a gander at the Botanical Garden Winter Online Auction. Swag up for grabs includes a weekend trip for two to Las Vegas and a year’s supply of bagels from Blue Sky Bagels. Bidding ends Saturday, Dec. 1. The garden opens Thursday, Nov. 22, at 6 p.m., but this first run will only last through Sunday, Nov. 25. Garden aGlow will reopen to the public Friday, Nov. 30 and continue daily through Sunday, Jan. 6. Admission costs $4 for IBG members and kids ages 5-12, $8 for non-IBG members and children 4 and younger get in for free. 6-9:30 p.m., FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

FRIDAY NOV. 23 stew EMPTY BOWLS The holiday season is one of giving. It ought to be an uplifting statement. After all, acts of giving and

receiving require humility, gratitude and graciousness—or, at least, they should. Instead, the holidays are stressful. Giving gifts can seem obligator y and oppressive and receiving them, well, let’s say that sometimes gratitude can feel like the wooden reading of a bad script.

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And if you think that’s a cynical take, you’ve never been the 15-year-old recipient of footie pajamas from a faraway grandparent. Instead, tr y focusing on the things about winter you looked for ward to during the summer—warm winter clothes, snow glistening in the sunlight and hot soup. Empty Bowls is a rare

Maybe it’s just us, but the holidays are a guaranteed way to feel fat. Don’t get us wrong, we love all of the fresh buttered rolls, homemade stuffing, pumpkin pie and endless eggnog as much as the next person—but it’s possible that we tend to love it a little too much. If you have to change into sweatpants to comfortably finish your last slice of pie, it’s probably time to reevaluate your holiday diet. But if you just can’t put your fork down, may we suggest some proactive measures in the form of running. This Thanksgiving, the Boise Rescue Mission and Special Olympics have teamed up for the 2012 Life Time Turkey Day 5K, which may ease the guilt over all of grandma’s garlic mashed potatoes you ended up eating. The race begins at the corner of Main Street and Capitol Boulevard at 8 a.m. on Thanksgiving morning; from there, participants are invited to walk, run or jog the next 3.1 miles through downtown Boise. All racers are encouraged to dress in costumes celebrating the spirit of Thanksgiving—we envision something along the lines of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, but this time you’re the float. There are prizes for the top 10 men’s and women’s race times, as well as the best costume. The race ends on Eighth Street between Bannock and Idaho streets, where participants start their Thanksgiving feast early with Great Harvest Pumpkin Chocolate Chip Muffins and hot chocolate or coffee provided by Goldy’s Corner. Now that’s something to be thankful for. 8 a.m. $15-$40. Corner of Main Street and Capitol Boulevard, turkeyday-5k.com.

win-win, scoring you warm feelings in tummy and soul. The annual fundraiser for the Idaho Foodbank offers hot soups donated by some of Boise’s favorite restaurants in hand-painted bowls diners get to take home. Show up at Grove Plaza at 11 a.m. Friday, Nov. 23 and get a bowl for $10 (although some bowls created by area artists cost up to $75). Fill it with soup, a slice of bread and a side order of knowing you’re helping those who need it. Proceeds go to Idaho Foodbank programs which feed those who can’t feed themselves this holiday season. Last year Empty Bowls raised $30,500. Ignore the Thanksgiving

leftovers for a day and help Idaho Foodbank make the cold winter months a little warmer for Idaho’s hungr y. 11 a.m.-3 p.m., FREE$10. Grove Plaza, downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, 208-336-9643, idahofoodbank.org.

SATURDAY NOV. 24 celebrate BOISE TREE LIGHTING AND PARADE If the whole Black Friday thing didn’t tip you off, consider this your official notice: the holiday season is here.

Still in doubt? Well, get over it because Saturday, Nov. 24 marks the official star t of Boise’s community celebrations with both the annual holiday tree lighting and the annual Holiday Parade. First up is the Holiday Parade, which begins promptly at 9:45 a.m. at the corner of 10th and Jefferson streets, and runs through downtown to Fourth and Bannock streets. From previous experience, we know there’s really no way to miss the parade since you’re likely to get stuck in gridlock waiting for Rudolph and all of his friends to get out of your way if you venture anywhere near downtown. But why not get WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FIND J. B RYAN C HIER IC I

Journalist Timothy Egan gets in touch with our shared past.

FAT RIVER TRADING COMPANY SHAVING BRUSHES Who ever said words aren’t art?

SATURDAY NOV. 24

biography TIMOTHY EGAN

synesthesia TROY PASSEY EXHIBITION From Gounod’s Faust to Bruegel’s Landscape with the Fall of Icarus to Michelangelo’s Statue of David, the visual and performing arts have derived inspiration from the written word—or, more precisely, from stories. Visual artists have split the atom of the written word by representing phrases, words and even individual letters in the abstract. That might sound like a mouthful, but printers put a lot of time and thought into facilitating reading, software developers develop fonts that don’t exhaust the eyes, and advertisers care about what words are easiest to recognize without obfuscating their messages. Troy Passey takes the artist’s approach to the issue in his exhibition at Boise Art Museum, Left Unsaid, opening Saturday, Nov. 24. Passey’s paintings, drawings and sketches draw from his literary background, including the works of William Shakespeare, Emily Dickinson and Friedrich Nietzsche, as well as references from film. But Passey’s approach isn’t to directly represent those writers or their works. Instead, he might select a detail from Zarathustra’s mountaintop, Death’s carriage or King Lear’s storm, portraying it as he imagines that detail as he reads. His method harkens to the literature but draws toward the relationship between the written word and creativity. It’s a method that is deeply personal and introspective—a flashlight beamed onto one man’s imagination and inspiration. Far from a self-indulgent examination of an artist being an artist, this exhibition promises to introduce museum goers to a man reading between the lines of literar y masterpieces. 10 a.m., FREE-$5. Boise Art Museum, 610 Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

in the spirit and remember, if you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. Grab a hot drink, dress warmly, sit back and enjoy the show. You can check out the parade route online at boiseholidayparade.org. If you’re still riding a holiday high after the parade, head to the Holiday Tree Lighting ceremony from 5-7 p.m. in Grove Plaza. The event includes

S U B M I T

WEDNESDAY NOV. 28

caroling by Encore Theatre Carolers and The Celebration Band, as well as 4,000 audience-lit candle cups as Mayor Dave Bieter leads the official tree lighting countdown and throws the switch to light the city’s official tree. And since it really wouldn’t be Christmas without Santa, the man in red will be setting up shop in

Not everyone understands the history of the United States well enough to bridge the legacy of our past with the predicaments of the present. It’s even harder to hop-scotch between providing an exhaustive look at the devastation wrought by the Dust Bowl disaster, then jump back to timely analysis of the political realm. Author and New York Times columnist Timothy Egan is someone who has done it for years. Egan expands on that and more in a visit to Boise, Wednesday, Nov. 28, courtesy of the Andrus Center for Public Policy at Boise State University. Egan’s New York Times column, Opinionator, comes after almost two decades as a Pacific Northwest correspondent for the paper. The prize-winning author and reporter offers analysis on American politics in the wake of the 2012 election, and discusses his latest book, Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher: The Epic Life and Immortal Photographs of Edward Curtis. Egan told the Seattle Times that Curtis may be one of America’s greatest photographers but is now virtually unknown. While he was once one of the Pacific Northwest’s most well-known individuals, his legacy didn’t last. Curtis died indigent and alone in Southern California. But his accomplishments are still worth noting and have effects that touch today. In his book Egan describes Curtis’ attempt to document the lifestyle, language and culture of Native Americans, whose population had dwindled to less than 250,000 people by 1896. Curtis recorded pronunciation guides for dying languages and recorded more than 10,000 songs on a primitive wax cylinder, the result of which was the 20-volume book, The North American Indian. Egan’s lecture is open to the public. 7:30 p.m., FREE. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-5800, boisestate.edu.

the lobby of D.L. Evans Bank on the corner of Ninth and Idaho streets every Saturday from Nov. 24 through Dec. 22. Take some time to go and meet old St. Nicholas himself and make any lastditch effort to get your name on the Nice list. For a small donation, you can have your child’s photo taken with Santa, and all proceeds will go to benefit area nonprofit organizations.

In the classic barbershop scene, a man sits down for a shave and an apron is whirled around his neck. His face is swathed in a warm towel, then he’s daubed with shaving cream facebook.com/ fatrivertradingco from a brush and the barber Also available at the drags a blade across the man’s Crow’s Nest Mercantile whiskers, revealing a smooth in Nampa. visage. It’s a quaint exercise that takes time and precision—a far cry from a Mach 3 Turbo commercial. A growing community of men is embracing the wet shave tradition of yore. And Nampa’s Curt Chierici is helping them by handcrafting badger-hair shaving brushes with wood handles and homemade shaving soap. “The soap I make is very mild. It’s all-natural, there’s no synthetic fragrances or chemicals in there,” said Chierici. After Chierici made his first batch of soap, he realized he needed a shaving brush to test it out. “I came across a cheap boar’s hair brush and that was the only one I could find so I bought it. … But like a month later all of the bristles fell out of this brush,” he said. So Chierici began making brushes using higher quality badger hair. He now sells them online and by commission. “The people who buy them are out there looking for them. ... Usually, a lot of my customers are women; they buy them as gifts and then their husbands get hooked on them.” —Tara Morgan

Holiday Parade: 9:45 a.m., FREE. downtown Boise, corner of 10th and Jefferson streets, boiseholidayparade.org. Tree Lighting Ceremony: 5 p.m., FREE. Grove Plaza, Eighth Street between Grove and Front streets, downtownboise. org. City Santa: 10 a.m.-2 p.m., FREE, photos with donation. D.L. Evans Bank, 213 N. Ninth St., downtownboise.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY NOV. 21 Festivals & Events BODIES REVEALED—The Bodies Revealed exhibit features an intimate and informative view into the human body using an innovative preservation process. Visitors have an exceptional opportunity to come face-to-face with 12 full-body specimens, and more than 150 additional organs and partial specimens. 9:30 a.m.-7:30 p.m. $14-$18. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-3439895, dcidaho.org. KING TUT: TREASURES OF THE TOMB—Ten years in the making from the artisans of the Pharaonic Village in Giza, Egypt and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, this dazzling collection of King Tut’s legendary treasures recreates the richest archaeological find of all time. 9 a.m. $6-$25. Museum of Idaho, 200 N. Eastern Ave., Idaho Falls, 208-522-1400, museumofidaho.org. PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP, SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Part of The Idaho Loud Writers’ Program. Includes a performance poetry workshop and an all-ages poetry slam. For more information, email cheryl_maddalena@ yahoo.com. There is a $25 prize for the haiku champ. 7 p.m. $1-$5. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3315632, boisepoetry.com. ST. ALPHONSUS FESTIVAL OF TREES—An annual tradition for nearly 30 years, the Festival of Trees bedecks Boise Centre in holiday wreaths and trees, and provides entertainment including live music, dancing and cheerleading as part of a fundraiser to improve the hospital’s services in the Boise community. 10 a.m.9 p.m. FREE-$7. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208367-8733, saintalphonsus.org.

Art HAPPILY EVER AFTER?— Whether morality tales or cautionary stories against heading too deep into the forest, fairy tales continue to resonate centuries after they were written. Artists respond to these stories, exploring their powerful imagery and hidden meanings. The exhibition includes a room-sized tunnel book created by artist Andrea Dezso in the gallery’s Project Room. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Kids & Teens THANKSGIVING SCHOOL BREAK PROGRAM—In addition to the hands-on fun in the exhibit hall, special fall-themed activities and crafts take place with a wastewater treatment plant tour at 11 a.m. Tour limited to 40 people, closed-toe shoes required, no strollers. No pre-registration required. 10 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, cityofboise.org/ bee/watershed.

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Odds & Ends BIOTZETIK BASQUE CHOIR—You don’t have to speak Basque and there are no tryouts, just singing. The choir meets at Bishop Kelly High School. Please call 208853-0678 or email averquiaga@ hotmail.com for more info. 6 p.m. FREE, 208-853-0678. PIONEER TOASTMASTERS— Work on public speaking and leadership skills. For more info call 208-921-2480. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE. Elmer’s, 1385 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-343-5714.

THURSDAY NOV. 22 Festivals & Events ST. ALPHONSUS FESTIVAL OF TREES—See Wednesday. 2-9 p.m. FREE-$7. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3678733, saintalphonsus.org. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—More than 250,000 lights transform Idaho Botanical Garden into a sparkling sight. Enjoy trains, Santa and choirs. See Picks, Page 18. 6 p.m. FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiar y Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

ARTS/SHOW REVIEW SACRED LAND DEBUTS AT MORRISON CENTER Sacred Land: A Tribute to the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes, had its world premiere Nov. 16 in Nampa and a second showing at the Morrison Center Nov. 17. Composed by Jim Cockey, the piece tells the story of Idaho’s American Indian tribes. The performance opened with a creation story acted out by Ballet Idaho dancers in beige uniforms blending the origins of flora, fauna and the humans who would come to inhabit southern Idaho. The act was set to a throbbing drum beat and featured choral accompaniment by Boise Philharmonic Master Chorale. In the second act, the dancers broke into groups and began to interact and mingle as tribes. The third act described the forced relocation of tribes by the U.S. Army to Fort Hall. A white sheet enveloped the dancers and was back-lit with red light to symbolize the violence of the forced march. The brief final movement, “To the Healing of All People,” tied Sacred Land up with a bow. This was the opening event of Boise 150, the celebration of the city’s sesquicentennial, and Cockey wrote Sacred Land to commemorate Boise as a point of intersection for European and Native American cultures. As he explained at a panel discussion Nov. 17 at Boise Art Museum, composing music about that intersection required an open mind—and open ears. “My major job in developing this piece is listening,” he said. For research, Cockey traveled to Fort Hall, where he found recorded indigenous music that inspired his own composition. His project was met with some skepticism. As Ted Howard of the Shoshone-Paiute Tribe explained at the panel discussion, “One hundred and fifty years isn’t a long time for our people, and the events of those times are still fresh in our memories.” “We always feel like our culture is being commercialized. We always feel suspect,” Howard added. Ultimately, the collaboration will be judged on whether it did right by its subject as a step toward bridging the gap between Idaho’s past and present. —Harrison Berry WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT On Stage

FRIDAY NOV. 23

LIQUID LAUGHS: MATT BRAGG—Also featuring Ryan Noak and Chad Heft. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs.com, by calling 208-941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. A 10:15 show will also be offered Friday and Saturday nights. Buy one get one free tickets for Thursday and Sunday performances. 8 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

LIQUID LAUGHS: MATT BRAGG—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Festivals & Events BODIES REVEALED—See Wednesday. 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $14-$18. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org. ST. ALPHONSUS FESTIVAL OF TREES—See Wednesday. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE-$7. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208367-8733, saintalphonsus.org.

Sports & Fitness

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Thursday. See Picks, Page 18. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

TURKEY DAY 5K—Warm up your Thanksgiving appetite with the 2012 Life Time Turkey Day 5K. The Boise TD5K lets family and friends start the day in a healthy way. Come dressed the part and join runners, joggers and walkers for this lighthearted run. Proceeds benefit the Boise Rescue Mission’s City Light Home for Women and Children as well as Idaho Special Olympics teams. Special Olympians from the Boise Community Stars and Ghostbusters teams will be on the course serving Thanksgiving holiday cheers at the aid station and finish line. See Picks, Page 18. 8 a.m. $10-$30. U.S. Bank Plaza, Intersection of Capitol Boulevard and Main Street, Boise, turkeyday-5k.com.

On Stage CHRISTMAS CAROL II—Ebenezer Scrooge is a pushover, so the ghosts rehaunt him to get him back on track. Fun for the whole family. Call 208-336-7383 for details. 7:15 p.m. $10-$15. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: RYAN WINGFIELD—Watch live comedy. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

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Concerts TREASURED GROOVES—With Gil Aguilar. 9 p.m. $7. The Red Room Tavern, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-0956, redroomboise.com.

Art HAPPILY EVER AFTER?—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. HOLIDAY ART SHOW—McCall Art Connections presents its seventh annual Holiday Art Show on Payette Lake at Shore Lodge. Members present their artwork, including fine arts and photography. Live music. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Shore Lodge-McCall, 501 W. Lake St., McCall, 1-800-6576464, shorelodgemccall.com.

Citizen EMPTY BOWLS—Idaho Foodbank hosts soup selections donated by local restaurants, reminding the public that there are those in the Treasure Valley who are unable to feed their families. Donations accepted. See Picks, Page 18. 11 a.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise.

SATURDAY NOV. 24 Festivals & Events BODIES REVEALED—See Wednesday. 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $14-$18. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org. BOISE HOLIDAY PARADE—Bring the family to this year’s parade to celebrate An Outdoor Idaho Christmas with Grand Marshal Arthur Hart. See Picks, Page 18. 9:45 a.m. FREE, Corner of 10th Street and Jefferson Street, Boise, boiseholidayparade.org.

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

BRAVE GIRLS CLUB OPEN HOUSE—Meet Melody, Kathy and all the Brave Girls Club team at this open house, featuring a Brave Girl Gift for the first 100 guests and door prizes ever y hour. There is also a 10 percent discount on ever ything in the Brave Girls Club online store. Take along your brave dudes, too. This party is for girls and guys. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Brave Girls Clubhouse, 1309 N. 39th St., Ste. 110, Nampa, bravegirlsclub.com.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 21

8 DAYS OUT CITY SANTA—For a small donation, children may meet Santa and have their pictures taken. See Picks, Page 19. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE with donation. D.L. Evans Bank, 213 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-331-1399, downtownboise.org.

WEEK IN REVIEW

ST. ALPHONSUS FESTIVAL OF TREES—See Wednesday. FREE$7, 208-367-8733, saintalphonsus.org. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Thursday. See Picks, Page 18. 6-9 p.m. FREE-$8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. ZIONS BANK HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING CELEBRATION—Welcome the holiday season with the light of the community Christmas Tree, music, candle lighting, food and beverages. See Picks, Page 19. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise, downtownboise.org.

On Stage CHRISTMAS CAROL II—See Friday. 7:15 p.m. $10-$15. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: RYAN WINGFIELD.—See Saturday. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. EARS ON A BEATLE—Check out Mark St. Germain’s play about FBI agents assigned to watch John Lennon. 8:15 p.m. $15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: MATT BRAGG—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Food & Drink FRASER VINEYARD THANKSGIVING BARREL TASTING— Taste wines paired with goodies from The Chocolat Bar and Zeppole breads and cheese. Noon-5 p.m. $5. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard., Boise, fraservineyard.com.

Art HAPPILY EVER AFTER?—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. HOLIDAY ART SHOW—See Friday. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Shore Lodge-McCall, 501 W. Lake St., McCall, 1-800-657-6464, shorelodgemccall.com. TROY PASSEY: LEFT UNSAID—A fourth generation Idahoan’s art draws inspiration from literature and the everyday to explore the intersection between words and images. See Picks, Page 19. 10 a.m. FREE-$5. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

22 | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Daniel Handler’s lecture in Hailey was far from an unfortunate event.

LED LIGHTS AND LEMONY SNICKET From sweeping arches to sweeping statements, Boiseans were inundated with artistic unveilings and lectures last week. On Nov. 13, artist Byron Folwell unveiled a new public art piece, “Razor Sharp and Fast,” at Idaho IceWorld. According to Boise Weekly’s Andrew Crisp, the original work was formed of aluminum bent into sweeping arches, glass and more than 8,000 LED lights. “Folwell said he chose to work the molecular structure of ice—a hexagon—into the colorful central node. His brother, Jeff Flitton, was tasked with writing a program to teach the myriad LEDs to flicker in formation, creating the effect of swooping color beams meeting in central intersection points,” said Crisp. Speaking of strange structures, Idaho State Historical Museum hosted a brown bag lecture Nov. 13 about a rare rammedearth home, located just above Boise’s Hill Road. “Army veteran John Fairchild and his wife Marjorie, a local librarian, spent 20 years building the home following World War II,” Crisp wrote. “John was a devoted tinkerer and after reading about rammed-earth construction in a magazine, he set to work building the family home using the process. … The completed home was built without a single nail, and its landscaping features sandstone blocks John salvaged from the original Boise City Hall.” The following day, Nov. 14, Crisp swung by Boise Contemporary Theater for a presentation titled Arts Matter, hosted by the Idaho Women’s Charitable Foundation. Speakers included BCT Artistic Director Matthew Cameron Clark, Boise Philharmonic Music Director Robert Franz and Opera Idaho Executive Director Mark Junkert, among others. “Following the speakers, artists engaged the audience with short performances,” noted Crisp. “Representing the role the arts play in education, three high-school dancers performed ‘Post Card,’ a movement gleaned from their time spent with Balance Dance Company.” On Nov. 18, author Daniel Handler, aka Lemony Snicket, spoke animatedly to fans of all ages at Hailey’s Wood River High School Performing Arts Theater. Handler is best known for his 13 novels, titled A Series of Unfortunate Events about the misadventures of the Baudelaire orphans. “[Handler] said he misses the scorn he had as a child, something that prompted him to throw books at the wall when they dissatisfied him, seemed too moralistic or when nothing interesting happened,” wrote BW freelancer Matt Furber. “In fact, Handler keeps a picture frame on his desk with the saying ‘remember to brood,’ a reminder that has served him well by all accounts.” After a question-and-answer session, the enthusiastic crowd lined up for a book signing. “Handler put a library stamp in each book, then signed and dated as if he was the librarian,” said Furber. “‘To Sam with admiration and dread,’ Handler wrote in one boy’s book.” —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 23

8 DAYS OUT SUNDAY

Art

Art

NOV. 25

HAPPILY EVER AFTER?—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

HAPPILY EVER AFTER?—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Calls to Artists

Literature

BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS— Each week’s cover of Boise Weekly is a piece of work from a local artist. BW pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded. For more information contact Art Director Leila Rader at leila@boiseweekly.com or 208344-2055. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com.

BLIP PLAY READING SERIES—Check out this monthly reading of new work by Idaho playwrights. This month’s play is The Basement Company by local Adam Harrell in which a desperate playwright kidnaps the city’s actors to perform a play in his basement. 7 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-429-8220, hydeparkbookstore.com.

Festivals & Events BODIES REVEALED—See Wednesday. 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $14-$18. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org. EDWARDS GREENHOUSE HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE— Browse decor, gifts, ornaments, poinsettias, amaryllis, Christmas trees, wreaths and more. Featuring wine tasting, local vendors, refreshments and a visit from Santa. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Edwards Greenhouse, 4106 Sand Creek St., Boise, 208-342-7548, edwardsgreenhouse.com. ST. ALPHONSUS FESTIVAL OF TREES—See Wednesday. 10 a.m. FREE-$7, 208-367-8733, saintalphonsus.org. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Thursday. 6-9 p.m. $8. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

On Stage LIQUID LAUGHS: MATT BRAGG—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN—This musical, based on the Peanuts comic strip, combines the adventures of everybody’s favorite underdog with those of his friends (both human and animal) in the arc of a single day. Visit companyoffools.org for more info. 3 p.m. $10-30. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org.

Odds & Ends BOISE BRIDGE CLUB HOMESTYLE BRIDGE—Play homestyle bridge every Tuesday. 12:15-5 p.m. $8. Boise Bridge Club, 6711 N. Glenwood St., Ste. 101, Boise, 208-327-0166, linkedin.com/company/boisebridge-club. IDAHO CAPITAL CITY KENNEL CLUB—The monthly meeting of the Idaho Capital City Kennel Club is open to all who are interested in showing their dogs in conformation, agility, obedience or rally events. FREE, 7 p.m. Idaho Fish and Game Headquarters, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-345-5197, icckc.org.

TUESDAY NOV. 27 Festivals & Events BODIES REVEALED—See Wednesday. 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $14-$18. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org.

Art HAPPILY EVER AFTER?—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

MONDAY NOV. 26 Festivals & Events BODIES REVEALED—See Wednesday. 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $14-$18. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org.

Concerts THE IRISH TENORS—The Irish Tenors perform with the Boise Philharmonic as part of a holiday celebration tour. 7:30 p.m. $25$35. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

24 | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY NOV. 28 Festivals & Events BODIES REVEALED—See Wednesday. 9:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $14-$18. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org.

On Stage

Art

DAMASCUS—A dubious hero seeks truth, fulfillment and grace on a trip to Dunkin’ Donuts in this comedy by Namaste Man playwright and stage and screen actor Andrew Weems. 8 p.m. $14. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

HAPPILY EVER AFTER?—See Wednesday. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Talks & Lectures CECIL D. ANDRUS LECTURE SERIES—Author, journalist and historian Timothy Egan discusses the state of American politics after the 2012 presidential election. See Picks, Page 19. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800, boisestate.edu.

Kids & Teens

Odds & Ends

PUPPET SHOW—All ages are invited to puppet renditions of popular children’s stories. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, Lake Hazel Branch, 10489 Lake Hazel Road, Boise, 208-297-6700, adalib.org.

BIOTZETIK BASQUE CHOIR— See Wednesday. 6 p.m. FREE, 208-853-0678. PIONEER TOASTMASTERS— See Wednesday. 6 p.m. FREE. Elmer’s, 1385 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-343-5714.

idaho botanical gardens

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 25

NEWS/ARTS ARTS/VISUAL

INSIDE VIEW AND OUT OF THE FIRE Frida Kahlo was a larger than life personality—with her vivid self-portraits infused with Mexican folk influences, her tumultuous relationship with Diego Rivera and that famous furrowed unibrow. For Inside View, a new group show featuring an array of Treasure Valley Artists Alliance members, local artist and miniaturist Marilyn Cosho recreated Kahlo’s living space in a smaller-than-life one-inch scale. Intricate lace tablecloths and comforters adorn tiny tables and beds, while traditional Mexican pottery sits on brightly hued shelves. The show opened Nov. 16 at the Boise State Public Radio offices in the Yanke Building at 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., and will remain up until Jan. 24. Speaking of the TVAA, members Kathleen Probst and Lisa Flowers Ross will unveil a new joint exhibit, Textiles x Two, at Meridian’s Initial Point Gallery, 33 E. Broadway Ave., on the Meridian City Hall building’s third floor. The show boasts textile paintings featuring stitching techniques based in traditional quilt making. It runs from Saturday, Dec. 1, though Thursday, Dec. 27, with a public opening reception on Tuesday, Dec. 4, from 4:30-7:30 p.m. On the subject of textiles, fashion designers joined accessory makers, hairstylists, photographers, performance artists, filmmakers and musicians to converge on the Revolution Concert House Nov. 15 for the inaugural Boise RAW Awards. Audience members were able to cast votes for their favorite RAW artists, nine of which will be moving on to the national portion of the competition to vie for a top spot at the RAWards in Los Angeles. Boise winners include Troy Custer of Bumblebirds Film, musician Desirae Bronson, performance artists Ophidia Pole Dance Studio, fashion designer Brianna Allen of Native, hairstylist Sara Murray of Indigo Palm Salon, makeup artists Spencer McBride and Jose Martinez of M2 Artistry, jewelry maker Monica Macha, photographer Analisa Ravella and spray-paint artists Sector 17. Moving from RAW to cooked, ceramics artist Rick Jenkins unveiled a new exhibit, Out of the Fire, at the Eagle Performing Arts Center Nov. 10. His work explores a glazing technique called carbon trap shino, which originated in 16th century Japan and is linked to the Buddhist tea ceremony. Colors produced by the glaze include “iron red, golden brown, tan, black or spotted black,” according to EPAC’s website. An artist’s reception is scheduled for Friday, Nov. 30, from 6-9 p.m. at 1125 E. State St. in Eagle. Jenkins’ work will remain on display through December. —Tara Morgan

26 | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

An Inside View of Frida Kahlo’s tiny digs.

REVIVING THE PIX THEATRE Converting Nampa’s old movie palace into a thriving arts hub ANDREW CRISP It has been more than 12 years since lines of moviegoers stretched down the sidewalk of 12th Avenue South, anxious to purchase a ticket at the Pix Theatre’s brightly lit booth. Yet the Pix Foundation, organized to rehabilitate the ailing 66-year-old cinema, envisions turning the space into a arts-focused multipurpose venue. “Our goal is to create a centerpiece in Nampa for entertainment, as well as education,” said foundation board President Debra Lindner. “There really isn’t anything like that in downtown.” The 10-member board sees the theater as a venue for the performing arts, and a space for workshops and community events at the core of Canyon County’s fastest-growing city. “For the second largest city in the state, we’re kind of behind on this,” said board member Dustan Bristol. Bristol, owner of Brick 29 Bistro a block away from the old theater, has contributed money and time to the project to assist in cultivating a strong downtown culture. “I want to help create an environment that’s similar to downtown Boise, where people don’t have to go to a chain, where they don’t have to go to Edward’s and Red Robin to have the same experience,” said Bristol. Entering through the theater’s glasspaneled wooden doors, Lindner gestured to the building’s stark, expansive interior. At the bottom of the sloped concrete floor sits a platform for a stage. After the Pix was gutted of its deteriorated furnishings between 2004-2006, the damaged roof was repaired and steel beams were installed to reinforce the structure. On Sept. 11, 1946, the glittering new theater was a major draw, and a full house filed into the 688-seat venue to watch Rita Hayworth star in the musical Tonight and Every Night. “People came from all over the surrounding states and this area. It was quite a grand opening,” said Lindner, “because it was the largest theater in Idaho.” Single-screen movie palaces, many boasting opulent architecture, once showcased first-run Hollywood films in the hearts of American cities, but have since given way to multiplexes. “There are only two historic theaters left in the Treasure Valley,” Lindner said. “All the theaters in Boise are gone, and all the theaters

The Pix Foundation is raising funds to turn Nampa’s old Pix Theatre into a multi-use arts venue.

here are gone.” In Boise, the updated Egyptian Theatre serves as a multi-use venue and performing arts center, and even shows the occasional film. The Pix hopes to do the same for Nampa. “We have learned there is a huge need for a place for smaller, local performers,” said Lindner. “All of the places that are available for local performances are really expensive and way too big.” Plans for the Pix’s future include a stage, stadium seating for 400, a balcony and a mezzanine. The Nampa Civic Center, which seats 640 people, is often too large for small community groups and performers. The Pix could serve as a more intimate venue. “I think if you only have a couple of hundred, or maybe 150 people, you’re not going to feel as dwarfed as you do at the Civic Center,” Lindner said. “I think it’s going to make a huge difference in downtown Nampa.” The Nampa Children’s Theatre, a youth theater program organized as a subsidiary of the Pix Foundation, could eventually use the Pix stage for regular performances. Executive Director Annie Cerda sees the Pix as a homebase for the organization. “We’ll have a stable venue, so we’ll never have to go in search of a stage or do all the crazy things we do right now. Right now, we have to have lighting donated, changing areas donated—everything is really difficult and really time-consuming. It makes it more difficult to focus on the production,” she said. The NCT began its inaugural season in June staffed by a group of volunteers and chaired by an all-youth board. December’s production of The Velveteen Rabbit, said Cerda, features a cast of 30 children. While the NCT could regularly make use of the stage, Lindner stressed the Pix would serve a variety of organizations and nonprofits. “We’re trying to create something for the community. So we’re going to be very reasonable in our rental fees,” said Lindner. But before the Pix Foundation can begin updating the interior, it needs to raise $65,000

to pay for the building. The foundation has organized a capital campaign called the 650 Club, a campaign to find 650 people to each donate $100. Those donors will have their names immortalized within the building and will help free The Pix from the bank. From there, Lindner said local companies have offered in-kind contributions, including material donations and the building’s electrical system, to chip away at the $1.5 million in funds needed to get the building ready for the public. “Personally, I don’t think we’re going to have any trouble at all doing the equipment and the furnishings for what we get in donations,” she said. On the other side of 12th Avenue South a major development may soon make The Pix even more central to the City of Nampa. The Nampa Development Corporation will soon finalize contracts to build a 60,000-sq.-ft. public library, including a parking garage and public plaza. The new library is planned to directly face the front door of The Pix. “The city has been a big supporter of [The Pix Theatre] project for a long time,” said Cliff Long, City of Nampa office of economic development director. Long said the new Pix Theatre could be a real “shot in the arm” for downtown, extending the operating hours of the area. To aid in The Pix Foundation’s efforts, the city dedicated grant funds to the project two years ago. “Having something like this in your downtown core is a tremendous asset. The size of the venue is perfect for readings, small concerts and community gatherings,” Long said. Sixty-six years after Lindner’s father, Harold Lovelady, helped add the last layers of plaster to the Pix Theatre, she believes there’s still a chance to preserve that history. “For me, this theater needs to be here,” said Lindner. “It’s stood the test of time for a long time, and we need to stop destroying our historic buildings. We need to take care of the buildings we can save.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NOISE/NEWS NOISE

BAND TOGETHER Mapping out the interconnected Caldwell music scene

Small towns can be culturally incestuous—and subcultural communities within them, even more so. A small but growing Caldwell music scene is based largely around several house venues but, being a small town, many of the bands there are simply reorganizations of existing groups. The diagram on this page shows how much overlap there is in the growing Caldwell music community.

JOSH GROSS Boise’s Wolvserpent sign to Relapse Records.

ART FAD Art Fad might be the patient zero of the Caldwell music scene. The duo started two years ago, and a wash of related bands flowered in its wake. Its members both do double-duty, trading back and forth between the twangy, reverb-drenched guitar and cheaper-than-shit sounding drums, blasting out noisy garage punk tunes that rarely break 90 seconds. There are elements of surf guitar and noise pop, but mostly it’s nonstop rock ’n’ roll. Art Fad dropped its second album, Banditos, in July.

URN

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Members: Jacob Milburn, Theo Maughan

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The best way to describe Cat Massacre is with its name. The four-piece hardcore band sounds like being cloaked in screaming and caterwauling guitars while being repeatedly pummeled by thrash-style drums. Its singer, Colby Meade, makes his way around a performance space wailing directly into the audience as the band thrashes around on stage like fish being electrocuted.

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Members: Jacob Milburn, Jordan Judd, Dominic Munoz, Colby Meade

BRANDON MILLS

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FOUNTAINS Fountains represents the strongest break from “the Caldwell sound,” in this grouping. The instrumental trio dropped the blazing guitars and vocals motif and brought in synthesizers and clean dance riffs in the vein of Justice or The Rapture. The textural guitar, repeated keyboard riffs and lo-fi drums create a sound that’s equal parts danceable and shoegazy. The band’s debut recordings are available on Soundcloud. Members: Matt Stone, Mason Johnson, Brandon Mills

LAKEFRIEND

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(F OR M ER )

With Lakefriend, Matt Stone from Fountains moved from drums to guitar. The band issues the indie-rock generation’s take on the ’80s with bombastic overdriven riffs played through amps turned up to eight instead of 11. The band describes itself as “party-rock,” and does its best to live up to that with major key riffs and gleeful shout-a-long songs. Members: Mason Johnson, Matt Stone, Jacob Milburn, Chris Jennings (former), Gabe Arellano (current)

DEAF KID With raw guitars, four-on-the-floor beats and a pop songwriting structure, Deaf Kid is what Art Fad might sound like if it became a four-piece, slowed the tempo down a notch and aimed its songs at the radio dial instead of the waves. The resulting garage rock could be compared to early bands like The Sonics, early punks like The Dead Milkmen or to modern locals like Teens. Members: Jacob Milburn, Dominic Munoz, Matt Stone, Leaf Defehr

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NAKED APES

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The newest of the bunch, Naked Apes dish up dreamy low-fi guitars and vocals. The reverb on the band’s basement recordings is so dense, the group sounds nearly underwater, with layers of twinkling guitars and catchy—though unintelligible—vocal melodies floating on top. The total effect is somewhere between power pop and mid-’90s proto emo. Members: Gabe Arellano, Devon Roth

WOLVSERPENT RELAPSES AND FLOGGING MOLLY GETS REVOLUTIONARY Wolvserpent, Boise’s musical answer to howling winds at the stroke of midnight, announced Nov. 14 that it signed with Relapse Records, a label Alternative Press described as “the Justice League of extreme metal.” Relapse will work with Blake Green and Brittany McConnell on their next release, Perigaea, a concept album the duo has been reworking for nearly a year. “Perigaea is inspired by the four stages of existence and with that, the phases of humanity within the Earth and the greater Universe,” the band wrote in a press release. To tease the full-length release, Wolvserpent released a demo of material that will come out on Relapse. It is available for download via the band’s website or for streaming courtesy of Bandcamp. The full-length album should be available sometime around the start of 2013. Also coming to Boise in 2013 will be Irish punk supahstahs Flogging Molly. The band recently announced new tour dates, including a stop at Boise’s Revolution Concert House Thursday, March 14—dangerously close to St. Patrick’s Day, Sunday, March 17. The moral of the story is that cab drivers should make a point of not being anywhere else that night, whereas pedestrians should make a point of being anywhere else. That show star ts at 8 p.m. and costs $29.50-$49.50. Mariachi El Bronx and Donots open. Also on his way to the Revolution Concert House is one Calvin Broadus, better known as Snoop Dogg/Lion/Wolverine, oh my. Snoop turtle will be poking his head out of his shell at Revolution Thursday, Dec. 20, just shy of Christmas. The show starts at 8 p.m. and costs $35-$55. We’re not exactly sure how an appearance by the rapper turned rasta will affect Christmas celebrations, but we’ll bet it involves green-colored nog. Moving from green to red, swing by Red Room Saturday, Nov. 24, to catch Boise punks Piranhas. That show starts at 8 p.m. Or if you prefer your post-Thanksgiving tunes with gold teeth instead of razor-sharp ones, then swing by The Shredder Saturday, Nov. 24 for hip-hop performances from Leezy Soprano, Tha Committee and Second Family, all out of Tacoma, Wash. The event is billed as The Tacoma Takeover. That show starts at 9 p.m and costs $10 at the door with Boise’s P-Dirt and Yung Verb opening. But if you get a ticket online through Ticket River, it’s only $4. That leaves you an extra $6 to blow trying to beat Shinobi. —Josh Gross

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 27

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE W HITEY M C C ONNAU GHY

GUIDE WEDNESDAY NOV. 21

PAUL DRAGONE—6 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La RED FANG—With Lord Dying and Black Tusk. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $13. Neurolux RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid SECONDHAND SERENADE— With Ryan Star. 8 p.m. $17-$30. Knitting Factory

You can’t just name your band Red Fang. You’ve also got to back it up with tunes as fearsome and brutal as your moniker. Luckily, the Portland, Ore., band backs it up and then some with gargantuan, overdriven riffs, thundering drums and a general look of being up to no good. But what sets Red Fang apart from other rocking nogoodniks is that its tunes are both metal and supercharged power pop—with hooks and catchy vocal melodies. Their style is as much Iron Maiden meets Cheap Trick as it is Mastodon meets Black Sabbath. The band’s last show at Neurolux was a loud, rowdy affair that left eardrums blasted and the whisky reserves depleted. When Red Fang returns this week, no self-respecting rocker will be anywhere else. —Josh Gross Red Fang with Lord Dying and Black Tusk. Wednesday, Nov. 21, 7 p.m., $13. Neurolux, 111. N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

28 | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—7:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

FRIDAY NOV. 23

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5, The Buffalo Club TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

AUDIO MOONSHINE—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

SKATE NIGHT—With Red This Ever, DJ Bones and Creatures of Wizardland. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

BAND OF BUSKERS—8 p.m. FREE. The Crux

ALICE COOPER—With Halestorm. 8 p.m. $35-$55. Revolution

SPEEDY GRAY—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

BIG WOW—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

BEN BURDICK—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BUCKIN COUNTRY—9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s

5 GEARS IN REVERSE—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

DAN COSTELLO—With Steve Eaton and Phil Garoznik. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

CARY JUDD—10 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s

AUDIO MOONSHINE—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

CHUCK SMITH—With Ben Burdick Trio and Amy Weber. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BERNIE RIELLY—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

Alice Cooper

RED FANG, NOV. 21, NEUROLUX

WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JOHNNY SHOES—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s KEVIN KIRK—6:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 LARRY CONKLIN—10:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La LIQUID LABS—Featuring D Ron Groove and Mixstress Morningstar. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

THURSDAY NOV. 22 BEN BURDICK—With Camden Hughes. 3:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DOUG CAMERON—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

SATURDAY NOV. 24

BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle BUCKIN COUNTRY—9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s CARTER FREEMAN—8 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe

TRUCK STOP TRIO—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

MEGAN NELSON—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon

CHICANO RAP LEGENDS— Featuring Ms. Krazie, Mister D, Frank V, Malow Mac, Cuete Yeska, Mister One, Selo, L Boy, Sonny Loc, and locals Joker and Ruvio. 7 p.m. $25. The Venue

VINTAGE SOUL DANCE PARTY—See Listen Here, next page. 9 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

PRAIRIE SKY PILOTS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

JOHNNY SHOES—8 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe

REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE EZ STREET—9 p.m. FREE. Gathering Place

BLUES JAM WITH WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

SUNDAY NOV. 25

JOSH INGYU—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

BEN BURDICK—Noon-3 p.m. FREE. Grape Escape

RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 6:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JASON BUCKALEW—10:15 a.m. FREE. Berryhill KEVIN KIRK—10:30 a.m. FREE. Bar 365 LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s SUNDERGROUND—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s The New Electric Sound THE NEW ELECTRIC SOUND— With Sun Blood Stories. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—7:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

TURNS OUT—Midnight. FREE. Liquid

TUESDAY NOV. 27

KEVIN KIRK—6:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THE BLACKBERRY BUSHES STRINGBAND—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

LIQUID LABS—Featuring D Ron Groove and Mixstress Morningstar. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

THE JUKE DADDYS—With Travis Ward. 7 p.m. $3. Neurolux

PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

LUKE CARTER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

A-N-D FRIENDS—6 p.m. FREE. Moxie Java and More-Five Mile

OLD-TIME JAM SESSION WITH THE HOKUM HI-FLYERS—6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

PAUL DRAGONE—6 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

VINTAGE SOUL DANCE PARTY, NEUROLUX, NOV. 22 Modern dance music, with its heavy reliance on computer beats and heavy bass, can be tough to dance to. Club devotees Steve and Doug Butabi, the head-bopping brothers from A Night at the Roxbury, had the limited moves needed for modern music down pat. But back in the ’60s and ’70s, dancing went hand-inhand with the era’s biggest bands. Soul and funk pioneers like James Brown and Aretha Franklin knew how to lay down tracks that filled up dance floors with groovy beats and snappy chanted choruses. That’s why Boise’s Blake Green is bringing the power of soul to Neurolux on Thanksgiving night, Thursday, Nov. 22, giving everyone an alternative to stewing in a post-gorge coma. While Green spends his days as one-half of Boise metal duo Wolvserpent, in the DJ booth, he queues up funky classics. —Andrew Crisp

Babies BABIES—With Deaf Kid and First Borns. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux

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LARRY CONKLIN—10:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La

SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

TURNS OUT—Midnight. FREE. Liquid ZEN JUNKIES—10 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Moon’s Kitchen Cafe

MONDAY NOV. 26

WEDNESDAY NOV. 28

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

Thursday, Nov. 22, 9 p.m. FREE. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 29

THE TUBE/SCREEN SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

Appalachian Moonshiners hold still for a photo.

MOONSHINERS: DUKES OF HAZZARD WITHOUT ALL THE PESKY CULTURE The Discovery Channel’s Moonshiners has returned for a second season, and it’s more fun than feedin’ frog eyes to a possum—or something like that. The show begins with a stark warning: Moonshining is an Appalachian way of life and an illegal one. “Do not tr y any of this at home,” the opening concludes. (Damn. Time to put a tarp over the ol’ backyard corn still.) In a recap of season one, we see an old guy named Mar vin “Popcorn” Sutton, who looks like a prospector cartoon. He says of himself, “When Popcorn Sutton ever dies, it will never be stopped talking about.” Yes, that explains why so much of the recent election was spent arguing about Popcorn’s moonshine legacy. We also see his gravestone, featuring the glorious epitaph, “Popcorn said fuck you.” It’s probably more accurate to say that he said, “Fuck himself,” because his 2009 death was self-inflicted. Like all reality shows, it’s easy to question the narrative credibility of Moonshiners. Why aren’t they constantly arrested, for instance? But it does feel real. The main moonshiner is Tim Smith, a man who apparently refuses to wear anything but overalls without a shirt underneath. Other people have names like Jim Tom (one person) and Tickle, who proclaims, “If you really love your country, you’re gonna have to love moonshine.” And why wouldn’t you? As Jim Tom makes clear after taking a toothless swig from a pickle jar, “Golly, that’s good.” Perhaps the most welcome aspect of the show, aside from the use of Steve Earle’s “Copperhead Road,” is the convenient presence of subtitles. These aren’t Chinese moonshiners—they’re from the same lineage as backwoods Virginians who have been making jugs of 180-proof booze for hundreds of years—but comprehending their version of English can be quite a linguistic slog. And it’s not just the guys wandering around in the woods carr ying loaded guns and sipping dir ty hooch: Even the cops, maybe especially the cops, need subtitles. Surprisingly, though, nearly all of the hillbillies come across as more creative and self-aware than their clothes suggest. It becomes most evident when an old guy named Barney says, “We’re just trying to make something to get drunk on. We ain’t trying to make a Rembrandt.” He’s now dead, but, like a bottle of corn whiskey, he was probably a lot of fun while he lasted. —Damon Hunzeker

30 | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

CAN I HAVE THIS DANCE? Silver Linings Playbook dances in the dark GEORGE PRENTICE I’m not so sure that Pat Solitano should have been released from a Philadelphia mental hospital. But I’m really glad he was. Pat, as played with equal parts mania and warmth by Bradley Cooper, breaks all the rules (in fact, he has a propensity for breaking a lot of things—windows, furniture, you name it). But Silver Linings Playbook breaks a lot of rules, too. Where else, for example, are you going to find a great romantic comedy in which the leading characters don’t even kiss until the final moments of the film? Bradley Cooper plays Pat Solitano, a man searching for a silver lining. In a taut but tart script by writer and director David O. Russell, based on the in the film), while Pat sees the dance-off as running while wrapped in a garbage bag. 2008 bestseller by Matthew Quick, Silver a platform from which he can win back his Enter Tiffany (Jennifer Lawrence), the Linings Playbook drags us by the shirt collar widow of a police of- ex-wife. through the unlikely Meanwhile, Pat’s dad is probably the ficer, or as she puts it: settings of a mental biggest basket case of the lot (he just hasn’t “Yeah, I’m Tommy’s hospital, a PhiladelSILVER LININGS PLAYBOOK (R) been diagnosed yet). Played deliciously by crazy whore widow, phia Eagles tailgate Directed by David O. Russell Robert De Niro, Pat Sr. is such an avid minus the whore party and a ballroom Starring Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence Eagles fan that he’s been banned by Philathing sometimes.” dance competition. and Robert De Niro delphia police from attending home games Tiffany, also strugI can unequivoOpens Wednesday, Nov. 21, at The Flicks because of his overexuberance (a cogent gling with mental cally guarantee you reminder that the word “fan” is indeed a illness, encountered that this is the best derivation of fanatic). a bit of trouble with movie about bipolar Cooper and Lawrence deliver Oscardisorder, football and dancing that you’ll see her job: She slept with everyone—literally caliber performances as volatile partners who this year. Oh hell, it’s one of the best movies everyone—in her workplace. Lawrence hurt more than they ever say, even though is perfectly nuts as Tiffany, who dances you’ll see this year, period. they can’t seem to stop talking. Ultimately, through life to her own crazy rhythm. Pat is a piece of work, searching for a Silver Linings Playbook reminds us that life— And rhythm is key to Pat and Tiffany’s silver lining inside what he calls his playsometimes quite literally—is a dance and rematch made in hell. Somehow, Tiffany book: a ridiculous manifesto to win back quires a bit of choreography. Some of us just recruits Pat to be her partner in a ballroom his estranged wife. For example, Pat’s idea take a little longer to learn the moves. competition (trust me, it makes perfect sense of a weight-loss program is long-distance

SCREEN/DVD SAY WHAT?

A round up of last week’s wittiest TV quotes

A Rhode Island man was arrested after he told a knock-knock joke at a bar and for the punchline, pulled down his pants and waved his genitals around. Though some blame rests with the guy at the bar who asked, “Genitals who?” —Seth Meyers, Nov. 18

The movie Lincoln opened over the weekend. It’s getting unbelievable reviews. It’s so authentic. Daniel Day-Lewis plays Lincoln. Sally Field plays Mary Todd Lincoln. John McCain plays himself. —Jay Leno, Nov. 13

“This countr y has never been fatter. How are the people who make Zingers and Sno Balls losing money?” —Jimmy Kimmel, Nov. 15 WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 31

NEWS/REC REC

DUCK AND COVER Rule changes could mean guided duck hunting RANDY KING

—Deanna Darr

32 | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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OY

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A guide is a person with special knowledge and skill who ensures greater success for a hunter. Guides are legal for hunting big game in Idaho, including sheep, moose, deer and elk. But as it stands right now, hunters are not allowed to pay for a guide to take them either waterfowl or turkey hunting. A proposed rule change could affect waterfowl and turkey hunting across the state. In the new draft rules laid out by the Idaho Outfitters and Guides Licensing Board, land owners, guiding companies and individuals licensed with the IOG will be able to guide hunters on private land. The IOG Licensing Board argues that allowing for paid guiding will ease pressure on heavily hunted areas and allow greater opportunities for all. On the other hand, opponents like the Idaho Waterfowl Association argue that given the already limited access to private property, adding the economic benefit of lease money will only decrease the public’s access to private land. The IOG is currently in the public comment phase, and several letters have been posted to the organization’s website ioga.org. In a letter concerning the proposed draft rules, hunter George Valentine writes, “by allowing an Outfitter to have access to commercialize waterfowl hunting, my opportunities will reduce and so will others. … The fact remains that once this is established, it will encroach on the public areas and have a negative impact for everyone else.” The next hearing for the IOG Licensing Board in Canyon County is Tuesday, Dec. 11, at the Nampa Civic Center, with the last meeting in Boise on Wednesday, Dec. 12, at the Boise Hotel and Convention Center. Any new rules will have to be approved in Ada County through the Governor’s Office and legislative review. Private or public land issues aside, Canyon County, with its vast agricultural fields, borders two rivers and a large lake, making it a waterfowl hunter’s playground. And when the weather gets cold and ducks start to migrate, you will find me in little old 2C holed up in some cornfield waiting for someone to cry, “Take’em!” as the ducks fly overhead. ES

Recently, Boise Weekly told you about Idaho author Jo Deurbrouck and her book, Anything Worth Doing (BW, Rec, “River Tales,” Oct. 10, 2012). The book tells the story of one fateful trip by two well-known Idaho river guides. Well, Deurbrouck’s book recently won the History/Biography category of the 2012 National Outdoor Book Awards. Of her nowaward-winning book, awards Chairman Ron Watters said in a press release, “This is a highly creative and exceptionally well-written book. It will keep you glued to the pages.” Boise-based author Michael Lanza also received an honorable mention in the Outdoor Literature category for Before They’re Gone: A Family’s Year-Long Quest to Explore America’s Most Endangered National Parks. Since we’re on the subject of Boiseans getting a little love, Shu’s Idaho Running Company has once again been named one of the 50 best running stores in America by Running Insight and Competitor Magazine. Shu’s win was based on nominations and reviews of its services, products, know-how and community involvement. Shu’s crew will be honored at a ceremony on Wednesday, Dec. 5, during The Running Event, an annual trade show for running retailers. Shu’s will also be featured in the December issue of Competitor Magazine. And more in good news, biologists with Idaho Power announced positive findings after a three-year-long survey of white sturgeon populations in the Snake River between Hells Canyon and Lower Granite dams. During the study period, researchers recorded 630 sturgeons along the 140-mile stretch of river. The fish ranged in size from 1.8 feet and 1.3 pounds to 9.3 feet and 344 pounds. Now that will make you think twice about what’s swimming around under you the next time you take a dip in the river. Finding such an array of fish is a good indication that the sturgeon population in the area is diverse, representing a good range of ages. In less-positive sturgeon news, the Idaho Department of Fish and Game is looking for information about the poaching of a large sturgeon in the King Hill area of the Snake River. The fish was taken sometime around Nov. 7, and its remains were found near King Hill bridge. All sturgeon fishing in Idaho is catch and release only. Anyone with information can call the Jerome Fish and Game office at 208-3244359. Citizens Against Poaching is offering a $1,000 reward for info, and the group can be reached at 800-632-5999.

Hunters band together, join a club or fork over the cash to have the exclusive or semiexclusive rights to hunt a certain area. These land leases are typically negotiated on the total acreage leased and the quality of the hunting grounds. Some areas are more attractive to ducks and geese than others, and land owners can charge more for them. “I was paying a lot of money, before the economy went bad, for some hunting rights,” said Leon. Some of his former leases are now being run by duck hunting clubs.

M

TIME FOR SOME GOOD NEWS

I listened closely for my cue to spring into action. Above me, hundreds of ducks seemed to be falling out of the sky onto our decoy spread. “Wait for it,” my buddy whispered to me. We had set up our decoys in a tilled-under corn field. The Reams brothers, Leon and Mike, had been nice enough to dig four coffinstyle blinds. I lay down in a blind covered in camo to look like the corn field, and waited for the brothers to call in the waterfowl. When the ducks got within 30 yards or so, Leon cried, “Take’em!” and we all sat up and shot. In one hour, we had shot our limit of ducks, 21 in total. It was the best duck hunting a person could hope for, and it was conveniently located in good-ol’ Canyon County. Our experience is not uncommon; the 2C is a duck hunting hot spot in Idaho. The county is home to duck hunting clubs and a waterfowl association, but it is also home to issues concerning guided waterfowl hunting. Geographically, Canyon County is part of the Pacific Flyway, according to Mond Warren of Nampa, the regional director for Ducks Unlimited in Idaho. It is one of the four major migration routes that ducks use to fly across the country. The Pacific Flyway starts in northwest Canada and swings birds directly over the top of the Treasure Valley. In 2C, there are five major public access points for waterfowl hunters. “You have the Snake [River], the Boise, Lake Lowell, Roswell and the Fort Boise [Wildlife Management Area],” Warren said. “Most of the other hunting is done on private land, some with permission and other with leases. ... The key with hunting waterfowl is to get them when they are on the move.” Birds tend to sleep on the water and then fly off the water in the morning to feed. Hunters set out decoys on dry land in areas with food like cornfields. Private fields like these offer significant hunting opportunities. So many opportunities, in fact, that land owners have started to charge for the right to hunt on the land via leases.

JA

Author Jo Deurbrouck was honored with a 2012 National Outdoor Book award.

Hevi Hitters, a waterfowl club with acreage under lease in 2C, is run by Cory Hamrick. He manages the club’s operations and functions as its point person during the fall and winter duck season. Hamrick also manages the land and does lease improvements like building blinds—hiding areas for the hunters—and doing other hunting odds-improving things to the leased land. The controversy around duck clubs is that they can seem to essentially function as guiding companies for the member. A club employee will often take hunters to a location, ensure the decoys are set properly and do the calling—all the same functions that a guide would normally offer.

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HO U S IN G BW ROOMMATES EMERALD/CURTIS AREA 1BD, private bath, grg. parking & storage. Preferably an evening/ night shift employee. Will consider a small pet. References and background check required. 850-9571.

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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

BW FOR RENT NORTH BOISE Charming & Private Triplex - Super cute! End Unit! 785 sq. ft., plus additional storage space in the attic. Rent $595/mo. Includes W/S/T. Lease term: 12 mo. Credit report & landlord references required. Cats would be considered. Sorry - we do not have facilities for dogs. Non smoking unit & property. Call 867-7435. Fresh paint throughout! Gas heat.

BW FOR SALE 20 ACRES FREE. Buy 40-Get 60 acres. $0-Down, $168/month. Money back guarantee. NO CREDIT CHECKS. Beautiful views. Roads/surveyed. Near El Paso, Texas. 1-800-843-7537 www.SunsetRanches.com

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BW CAREERS EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup ArtistsFor: Ads - TV Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool.com HELP WANTED!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram.com FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls.

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AIRLINE CAREERS – Become an Aviation Maintenance Tech. FAA approved training. Financial aid if qualified – Housing available. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-492-3059. ATTEND COLLEGE ONLINE from Home. *Medical, *Business, *Criminal Justice, *Hospitality. Job placement assistance. Computer available. Financial Aid if qualified. SCHEV authorized. Call 800-481-9472 www.CenturaOnline.com NEW inventions and Product IDEAS WANTED! Free info & confidential consultation on your idea at DAVISON. Call toll free at 1-800-428-5116 Today. Feebased service.

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34 | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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B OISE W E E KLY Tantra sessions available with Jamie. 440-4321.

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com Cold Outside? Come in for a Massage! 322 Lake Lowell. Betty 283-7830.

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 8662759. Embrace the moment with a sensual massage at ULM. Now accepting new clients. ULM 3408377. Hrs. 8:30AM-8PM.

FULL ROOM MASSAGE Deep tissue Swedish. Full body: $50/hr., $40/half hr. Foot Massage: $25/hr., $20/half hr. 7 days a week. 9am-10pm. 626-3454266. 320 N. Orchard St. Massage therapist. 12 yrs. exp. $75/hr. Call Amy 375-2346. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

BW YOGA YOGA Teacher training starting soon in the North End. Call or text for details. 208-440-6344.

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CERTIFIED MASSAGE THERAPY

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ADOPT-A-PET SPECIALIZING IN PAIN RELIEF

FREE Head & Should Massage with 1 hr. Chinese Reflexology Foot Massage at VIP Massage. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole. RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

COUNSELING

COMMUNITY BW HOLIDAY BAZAAR HOLIDAY FLEA MARKET Join us at The Treasure Garden. 6521 Ustick Rd. Boise. Open Friday-Sunday 10 to 6. Renting 10 x 10 spaces for $37 for 3 days & few spaces for $25 for 2 days. On going Flea Market. Stop in this weekend & check it out. Reserve your space now. Call 208344-0811

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TEDDY: 2-year-old male Chihuahua mix. Housetrained. Good with other dogs. Shy, sensitive, active little guy. (Kennel 417- #17508668)

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SHMEEGLE: 4-monthold domestic longhair. In constant play mode. Enjoys playing with other cats. (Kennel 16#17089584)

BUDDY: 9-year-old male Chesapeake Bay retriever. Good with children and other dogs. House-trained. Loves everyone. (Kennel 308- #17717322)

JAXX: 9-year old male miniature poodle. Would do best as an only pet in an adult home. Needs a calm home. (Kennel 414#17756316)

SPICE: 7-month-old female domestic longhair. Beautiful cat with a feisty, playful personality. Likes to be in the middle of things. (Kennel 07- #17901308)

BEAUTY

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

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HOLSTEIN: Bring some color to this playful black-and-white boy’s life.

OPHELIA: Fluffy snugARCHIE: This lovable gler seeks a friend who kitten has crossed eyes likes to play. for only you.

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NYT CROSSWORD | BOTTOMS UP! 1 Coll. student’s declaration

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89

93

42

60

75

88

41

52

69

83

40

56

68

73

92

51

62

67

16

47

59

61

15

35

39

45

14

31

38

82

13

26

34

44

66

12

21

30

43

65

11

25

33

57

10

20 Carved Polynesian talisman 21 Shoe brand 22 “It ___ right” 23 Pipe-fitting and others 25 Lie-abed 27 Not hoof it, maybe 29 “Too Late the Phalarope” novelist 31 He wrote “Words are loaded pistols” 32 Subject to double jeopardy, say

20

23

27

9

19

22

36

7

BY ELIZABETH C. GORSKI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

17 Big score, maybe 19 Leisure suit fabric

4 Must 9 Three-stripers: Abbr. 13 Cut line

ACROSS

91

95

99

100 105

106

108

109

110

112

113

114

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36 | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

101 107 111 115

102

33 Animal in una casa 34 “___ You” (#1 Rolling Stones album) 36 Verdi opera 38 Informal greeting 39 H.S. support groups 40 ’70s TV production co. 43 “Dirty Jobs” host Mike 44 Candy man Russell 46 Asian holidays 47 Actress Garr 48 Tusked animal 49 Periodic function 50 Villainous “Star Wars” title 52 “Quo ___?” 53 Bargain basement markings 54 Casino machine 55 Narrowly, after “by” 56 Sonneteer’s Muse 57 Tiny amount 58 Subject explored in “The Crying Game” 60 Little garden guardians 61 Draft raisers 62 ___ lark 63 Jamboree attendee 65 Bored employee’s quest 68 Target for many a political ad 70 Some execs 73 One of Dumas’s Musketeers 74 2010 and 2011 L.P.G.A. Tour Player of the Year Yani ___ 76 San ___ (Italian seaport) 77 Auditioner’s hope 78 Burns black 79 Abrasive 80 Neutrogena competitor 81 Cartridges, e.g. 82 Part of AARP: Abbr. 83 Spouse’s sleeping place after a fight, maybe 84 “Really?” 86 Wrangle 87 Some Chi-town transportation 88 Sizable garden

89 Silas of the Continental Congress 90 Bearish 92 Like draft e-mails 94 Stock market figs. 95 Announcer of yore 96 Doubled over, maybe 98 “Capeesh?” 100 Kahlúa and cream over ice 103 Place that sells shells? 105 Like about 7% of the U.S. electorate 107 Bingo call 108 Split bit 109 Writer Wiesel 110 Title gunfighter of a 1964 #1 hit 111 Southern pronoun 112 Battle of ___, 1796 Napoleon victory 113 Guacamole and salsa 114 Name on a college dorm, perhaps 115 “Gee!”

DOWN 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Defense against a siege Pacific capital Cash for trash? Angry slight? Assortment Sidewalk square, e.g. The fox in Disney’s “The Fox and the Hound” 8 Suggested résumé length 9 Battle of Normandy site 10 Great Danes, e.g.? 11 Sta. purchase 12 Times out in Mexico? 13 Politico Agnew 14 One-of-a-kind Dutch cheese? 15 Part of AARP: Abbr. 16 Like a four-leaf clover 18 Super Bowl XLIII champs 24 Demon’s weekend plans? 26 “Curses!” 28 Canaries locale: Abbr. 30 Cracker Jack box bonus

33 Hand 35 “___ Ballet” (“A Chorus Line” song) 36 Revolutionary path 37 Irish lullaby opener 38 Kind of class 41 Shopworn 42 Sushi bar bowlfuls 45 Piñata part 46 Ancient siege site 47 Gypsy’s aid 51 United Nations chief from Ghana 52 Concert hall, e.g. 58 Throw for ___ 59 Ball coverings? 60 Catherine’s demand of Heathcliff in “Wuthering Heights”? 61 Glacier site, maybe 63 Sleek and graceful 64 Head cases? 65 Mosaic material 66 Lucy’s TV pal 67 “How’s it going, fish?”? 68 Vital fluids 69 Haunted house sounds 70 Dracula’s bar bill? 71 Hired spinmeister 72 Stash 74 Briar part L A S T M C N A B B

G O A L I E

B R A C K E N

S E R R A T E

R O M A N G L A D I A T O R

I N S O L E

N O T F O R

T O O F A R

I D E E A S S E N T E S A I

75 Celebratory swig after a football two-pointer? 77 Random witness 83 Odoriferous 85 Drawn 88 Caveat to a buyer 89 Ward, to Beaver 91 Josh 93 One of the Judds 95 Michael Crichton novel about diamond-hunting 96 Right-leaning type: Abbr. 97 Peacekeeping grp. 99 Fruity drinks 100 ___ Fein (Irish group) 101 Move, in Realtor lingo 102 Just 104 “Lawrence of Arabia” role 106 Spanish uncle Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

S T E N T H R E L E A S A T S E R I N T L E G I T I S R A N T Y E G E S E R S A D O N E S N A T A I L R N E T E S T S L C E T E H E D G Y E S O

T L W A E M E A N T U T R R E B E L E L L M E P U D L O T O F O Y A J C H A R A M A T M P S E I N R N O

A N E M I A

A N S W E R S S T R A T I

S E E N

N E B A R O W F R A S G Y F A U R S N O S I M T J A D A S I G M U E A D R

O E D P N N A L M O R T A E K O N T A M A I N G B R N N E F S A P I N B A E R L I L A D A N D I Z M C L E A T R A N S I T K A P M O R G E R I E E P S M R A L E S Y A N E S S T

O O L A L A

P O S S E S

O B E S I T Y

R E V E R S E

A P O G E E

N A G G E D

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2012, at the County Courthouse, located at 200 W. Front Street, Boise, Idaho. Objections may be filed by any person who can, in such objections, show to the court a good reason against such a change of name. DATED this 28th day of September, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT By DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 31, Nov. 7, 14 & 21, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the matter of the Estate of: DOROTHY MAXINE CHASE, Deceased. Case No. CV IE 1219719 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have been appointed as Co-Personal Representatives of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or her estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated or filed with the Clerk of the Court. Kevin Chase 2288 East Faunhill Dr. Meridian, ID 83646 (208) 860.2876

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Todd S. Chase 18 Bakers Hill Road Weston, MA 02493 (781) 899.5528 DATED this 24th day of October, 2012. BRADLEY B. POOLE Attorney for Personal Representative 1110 North Five Mile Road Boise, Idaho 83713 (208) 322-5536 Pub. Nov. 7, 14, 21 & 28, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estates of: JOSEPH OSSIAN RYAN and JUNE MARY RYAN, Deceased. Case No.: CV IE 1219863 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named decedents. All persons having claims against the decedents or their estates are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED This 6th day of November, 2012.

Stephen F. Ryan, Person Representative c/o Richard A. Cummings 412 East Parkcenter Boulevard, Suite 325 P.O. Box 1545 Boise, Idaho 83701 Telephone: (208) 367-0722 Pub. November 14, 21 & 28, 2012.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 37

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Don’t think about making art, just get it done,” said Andy Warhol. “Let everyone else decide if it’s good or bad, whether they love it or hate it. While they are deciding, make even more art.” I encourage you to adopt that mini-manifesto for your own purposes in the coming weeks, Aries. If you’re not an artist, simply substitute the appropriate phrase for “making art.” It could be “creating interesting relationships,” “exploring exotic lands,” “changing corrupt political institutions,” “fixing environmental problems,” or even “making money.” The main point is: Focus on doing what drives your quest for meaning, and forget about what people think of it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Iona Miller made the following observation: “In a man’s psyche, the unconscious is experienced as chaotic, filled with violent and irrational processes of generation and destruction. But to a woman’s psyche, the unconscious is a fascinating matrix of sacred images and rituals, which in their wildly contradictory meanings, express the secret unity of all life.” After analyzing the astrological omens, I suspect that you Taurus men now have an unprecedented opportunity to experience your unconscious as women do. As for you, Taurus women, you have the chance to get a vivid, visceral understanding of how true this description of the female unconscious is. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Let’s talk about the Decision. I’m referring to the Choice you have been dancing around and fretting about and analyzing to death. By my estimate, there are at least 15 different solutions you could pursue. Seven of those solutions would meet the requirements of being intelligent, responsible and fun. Of those seven, only four would be intelligent, responsible, fun and enduring. Of those four, only two would be intelligent, responsible, fun, enduring and best for all concerned. I suggest you opt for one of those two. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’m not necessarily asserting that you need to edit yourself, Cancerian. Only you can decide that. But I will state unequivocally that if there is any editing needed, now would be a good time to do it. You will have extra insight about what aspects of your life might benefit from being condensed, corrected and fine-tuned. It’s also true that the rectifications you do in the coming weeks will be relatively smooth and painless. So look into the possibilities, please. Should you calm your blame reflex? Downsize a huffy attitude? Shed some emotional baggage?

38 | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): How many times have you been in love, Leo? Just once or twice? Or have you dived into the depths of amorous togetherness again and again over the years? Whatever the case may be, I bet you have strong ideas about the nature of passionate romance and profound intimacy. That’s natural and normal. But I’m going to ask you to temporarily forget everything you think you know about all that stuff. I invite you to become innocent again, cleansed of all your mature, jaded, hopeful and resentful thoughts about the game of love. In my astrological opinion, there’s no better way for you to prepare for what will come next. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A medical research journal reported on a British woman who accidentally swallowed a felt-tip pen. It lay there in her stomach for 25 years. When surgeons finally removed it, they were surprised to find it still worked. I am not suggesting that anything remotely as exotic or bizarre will be happening to you, Virgo. I do suspect, though, that you will soon have an experience with certain metaphorical resemblances to that event. For example, you may retrieve and find use for an element of your past that has been gone or missing for a long time. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Sapiosexual” is a relatively new word that refers to a person who is erotically attracted to intelligence. Urbandictionary.com gives an example of how it might be used: “I want an incisive, inquisitive, insightful, irreverent mind. I want someone for whom philosophical discussion is foreplay. I want a sapiosexual.” In the coming weeks, Libra, I suspect you will be closer to fitting this definition than you’ve ever been before. The yearning that’s rising up in you is filled with the need to be stimulated by brilliance, to be influenced by wisdom, to be catalyzed by curiosity. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 2007, the band White Stripes toured Canada. One of their final gigs was outdoors in St. John’s, Newfoundland. They came on stage, played one note—a C-sharp—and declared the performance over. It was the briefest rock show in history. Judging from the current astrological omens, Scorpio, I’m thinking it would be a good time for you to do some almost equally pithy things. You have the potential to be extremely concise, intense and focused in all you do. I urge you to fulfill that potential. Pack every speech, gesture and action with a concentrated wealth of meaning.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Your redesigned thrust vectoring matrix is finally operational. Moreover, you’ve managed to purge all the bugs from your cellular tracking pulse and your high-resolution flux capacitor is retooled and as sexy as a digitally remastered simulation of your first kiss. You’re almost ready for take-off, Sagittarius! The most important task left to do is to realign your future shock absorbers. No more than a week from now I expect you to be flying high and looking very, very good. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The plot twists will be intriguing. The actors unpredictable, even erratic. Blossoming and decay will be happening simultaneously and the line between wisdom and craziness could get blurry. There’s not enough room in this horoscope to describe the epic sweep of forces working behind the scenes. Are you willing to confront uncanny truths other people might regard as too unruly? Are you brave enough to penetrate to the depths that others are too timid to look at, let alone deal with? I hope you are, Capricorn, because that will give you the power to ultimately emerge from the drama with your integrity shining and your intelligence boosted. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Psychologists have done studies that suggest we subconsciously adopt the qualities of fictional characters we read about or see in movies. That’s not a problem if those characters are smart, ethical and motivated people whose ideals are similar to ours. But if the heroes of the stories we absorb are jerks who treat others badly and make messes wherever they go, our imitative urges may lead us astray. Right now is a crucial time for you to be extra careful about the role models you allow to seep into your imagination. You’re especially susceptible to taking on their attributes. I say, be proactive: Expose yourself intensely to only the very best fictional characters who embody the heights you aspire to reach. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “The fates guide him who will; him who won’t, they drag.” So said the Roman author Seneca, and now I’m passing it on to you. It’s an excellent time for you to think about the issue. Ask yourself: Have you been cooperating with fate so that it has maximum power to shepherd you? Have you been working closely with fate, giving it good reasons to consistently provide you with useful hints and timely nudges? Or have you been avoiding fate, even resisting it out of laziness or ignorance, compelling it to yank you along? Spend the next few weeks making sure your relationship with fate is strong and righteous.

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BOISEweekly | NOVEMBER 21–27, 2012 | 39


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