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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 18 OCTOBER 24–30, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 7

WORDS FOR THE WISE City of Boise looks at adding the words FEATURE 11

RACE FOR THE POLES The international grab for polar resources is on ARTS 26

FOUND STORIES Found magazine creator offers a peek between the covers SCREEN 28

GET LOST Cloud Atlas is not worth finding

“Their historical memory goes back to Tuesday.”

CITIZEN 9


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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall, Carissa Wolf Intern: Jordyn Price Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Emile Lemoine, Emile@boiseweekly.com Zach Ritchie, Zach@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, production@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Patrick Sweeney, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE THERE’S NO REASON TO BE BORED IN BOISE Few things irk this Idaho native more than the all-too-common misconception that there isn’t anything to do around Boise— except maybe the “no, U-da-ho” jokes and people who confuse Idaho with Iowa. Sure, Boise isn’t a metropolis with a population in the millions, 10 restaurants on every block and a must-stop for every touring band like San Francisco or New York City. But this high desert capital city that’s paradoxically called the City of Trees offers an array of entertainment options. Every week, Boise Weekly puts together pages of events for every interest, from theater productions to children’s puppet shows at local libraries. The 8 Days Out section provides a glimpse of the goings-on around town, but it’s a fairly small sampling. Boiseweekly.com boasts pages of things to do every day. If you haven’t checked it out yet, visit the site, click on the “Calendar” tab on the home page and search by day, category, neighborhood, event name or occurrence. You’ll also find the Need Something To Do Today blog at Cobweb, which features an extra look at a different event every day. We spend our time scouring community posting boards in coffee shops, venue and ticketing websites in an attempt to bring our beloved readers info on every concert, art exhibit, charity event and more. We also receive event submissions through our website and via emails to calendar@boiseweekly.com. And we get so many that, if emailed event submissions were actual letters, BW’s mailbox would look something like the entrance to Boise Towne Square on Black Friday—so full, it’s just waiting for catastrophe to ensue. One event that we hope you didn’t miss out on was our recent Cover Auction. BW staff, friends, artists and art enthusiasts packed the Idaho State Historical Museum Oct. 17, as we sold off all the artwork that graced our cover in the last year. Thank you, Boise, for choosing our event over all the other things you could have been doing that evening. And thanks for bringing your wallets. We set a record this year, with $22,060 net proceeds. That giant wad of cash will be put back into the arts community, with $4,400 going to Idaho Shakespeare Festival and the rest feeding our Auction Grant program. Grant applications are now being accepted, and a panel of judges will meet in February to decide which artists and arts organizations will receive the funds. Get the deets at boiseweekly.com and read more in Arts News on Page 26. Now read up, find something fun to do, and get moving. There’s no reason for being a couch potato in Idaho. —Sheree Whiteley

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Jim Sumii TITLE: Halloween Coloring Page Extravaganza (FREAKADOODLE I) MEDIUM: Pen and ink.

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2012 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

ARTIST STATEMENT: Freaks, birds, candy, broccoli, Mason Mummy, Twirly, Gingercleus, Baron Snickerdoodle, Zombie Pirate Kid, Be-Bop Kitty, Strawberry, Pinky the Elephant, screaming chimp head, rotten apple, mouse, Suzy Squid, Bonehead, pencils, a can, Billy Gator, Leroy the Merfish and Jon’s pet pig Justine.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

SUBMIT

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Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Since the state Legislature didn’t do it, the City of Boise is considering adding the words 7 CITIZEN

SO YOU WANT TO GHOSTBUST

FEATURE Polar Race

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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BW gave it a shot out Idaho City way. Check Cobweb for the thrilling and poorly lit video.

SUDOKU

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MUSIC GUIDE

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TAKE THIS BOARD AND SHOVE IT

ARTS The creators of FOUND magazine hit the road with a unique stage show 26

The Boise School Board has quit the Idaho State School Boards Association over allegations that the state organization’s director has been deceptive, especially when it comes to the controversial Luna Laws. Get the whole stor y at Citydesk.

YOUR PHONE IS A DIRTY ROSENBERG Researchers say that Android phones are leaking personal details that aid identity thieves. Get the full stor y at Citydesk.

WHOLE FOODS GETS IN TUNE Whole Foods is jumping into the local music scene by booking local acts into its taproom and throwing some sponsorship cash Treefor t Music Fest’s way. Get the full stor y at Cobweb.

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SCREEN Cloud Atlas

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FOOD REVIEW BW heads west to check out Meridian’s Momo Dumplings 29 BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

TAKE CARE, GIRL

And don’t take candy from Republicans As near as I can remember, I’ve been somewhat accountable to 11 editors during my extended stay on these pages, and somewhat less accountable to a handful of auxiliary editors. With few exceptions, they have all been young people. They aren’t all young people anymore, but during those intervals when he or she was the only person in Boise whose opinions on my opinions I gave much of a damn about, they were young. Their youth is not why I gave much of a damn about what they thought, though. I cared what they thought of what I was thinking—therefore, writing—because during their terms as editor, he or she was the only person (other than myself) who could twist my original copy into alphabet hash before translating it into the printed word. In other words, as editor, he or she had the power to turn whatever I had written— whether it was brilliant, not-so-brilliant, or the-exact-opposite-of-brilliant—into something other than what I set out to say. That is a power I have never been comfortable with in anyone else’s hands, let alone someone’s who, for all I know, may be listening to Justin Bieber through their ear buds and thinking they can’t hardly wait to get home to their Playstations. There is, however, another irritating thing about young editors that goes beyond any damage they can do to what I hand over to them on deadline day. They can’t seem to sit still. They’re always moving about. And I don’t mean wiggling and squirming in their editor’s chairs like an ADHD-afflicted seventh-grader in English class. No, just when a fellow gets good and comfortable with them, and learns to trust that they won’t be totally botching up what he hands over to them on deadline day, and when he feels like they’ve become a friend of his and maybe even a good friend, they pull up stakes, load the Subaru with everything they own and take off for distant corners of the country. Such is the tale of young Rachael Daigle. Over the four years she has been the only living human being whose opinions on my opinions mattered to me, I have grown good and comfortable with her. I’ve learned to trust that she wouldn’t be totally botching up whatever I turned in on deadline day. And she has become my friend. A pretty good friend, even. At least, from my side of the bargain. And it has nothing to do with the abuse she’s so calmly taken from me. It’s true, I’ve had my moments with young Rachael: “What do you mean I can’t say that!?” or “What the hell was wrong with the way I wrote it in the first place!?” or “Would you kindly keep your grubby paws off my syntax!?” But in each of those moments, she explained what she had done and why she had done it in such a lucid and logical way, my argument would crumble like mousetrap cheese. You see, she is smarter than I am. Not WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

only is she smarter, she’s nicer than me. Smart and nice—a combination I was bound to warm up to. And then she up and leaves. I would have been content to spend the rest of my Boise Weekly days putting my syntax in her grubby paws—even asking her the occasional “Are you the one jerking my paragraphs around like they were unruly goats!?”—but alas ... it was not to be. She is young. And young people move on, leaving us old people behind to miss them. U Yet I can’t help but worry about her. Rachael is sallying forth into a world that has grown increasingly hostile to smart, ambitious, capable, outspoken, independent women—be they young or not-so-young, The fears I hold for Rachael are the same I have for my daughters. And your daughters, too, dear readers. I fear for all those daughters and sisters and mothers who don’t fit the yoke that the deranged Republican theocrats are preparing for them. It is becoming increasingly iffy to be a woman in this country. And unless Americans have the good sense to reject those who insist women must be denied their own decisions, young Rachael’s future might well be determined by national leaders who believe a woman can’t conceive a “legitimate” rapist’s child; who believe that common forms of birth control are forms of early abortion, and that all abortion, no matter the circumstance, should be felonized; who believe that a fertilized egg is entitled to more rights and considerations than the mother; who believe a health organization run by women for women (e.g. Planned Parenthood) must be snuffed out, to be replaced by forced medical procedures (e.g. transvaginal ultra sound); who have no use for, and would happily nullify, all manifestations of gender equality, be it in the home, the schools, the insurance companies or the workplace; who believe that if it’s been determined by the Elders of the Free Market Tabernacle that women are to make less money than their male counterparts ... so be it; who believe in their Catholic/Mormon/Taliban/Neanderthal brain stems that the Holy Father in all His Studly Wisdom put women on this Earth for one thing only; who believe ... Ah, but there is really no end to this, is there? We know from long, nasty experience that once the Piously Fervent start pushing people around, it doesn’t stop. At least, not until the pushees push back. (Rachael, I am so, so sorry that I’ve turned my fare-thee-well, heart felt as it is, into another avenue to attack the Idiot Right. But I’m sure you understand, and I’m confident you would approve were you still in your twisty-turny editor’s chair. Good luck, friend.)

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 5


OPINION/TED RALL

IF YOU VOTE, YOU CAN’T COMPLAIN Why it’s OK for liberals not to vote for Obama Here we go again. Like Charlie Brown considering Lucy’s offer to hold the football so he can kick it, lefties are being urged to set aside their disgust over the last four years and vote Democratic. At least Lucy respected Charlie Brown enough to lie to him. President Barack Obama isn’t even bothering to tell disappointed progressive voters that things will be different this time. Despite my well-documented doubts, I voted for Obama in 2008. Not this time. “If you don’t vote for Obama, you’re letting Romney win.” Nonsense! No election in the United States has ever been decided by one vote. Thus, by definition, my vote is purely symbolic. My vote has no value other than as a symbolic endorsement. And I refuse to endorse what this president has done and failed to do. I won’t symbolically endorse his drone war, which has killed thousands of Pakistanis. I will not endorse Obama’s 2009 decision to hand $7.77 trillion to bankers—no strings attached—who ought to be in prison while consciously standing by and allowing millions of homeowners to fall victim to illegal foreclosures and failing to abolish the time limit for unemployment benefits, as is standard in other countries. The comedian George Carlin said, “People say, ‘If you don’t vote, you have no right to complain,’ but where’s the logic in that? If you vote and you elect dishonest,

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incompetent people into office who screw everything up, you are responsible for what they have done. You caused the problem; you voted them in; you have no right to complain. I, on the other hand, who did not vote, who in fact did not even leave the house on Election Day, am in no way responsible for what these people have done and have every right to complain about the mess you created that I had nothing to do with.” If you’re like me, you think Mitt Romney would be even worse than Obama. What should you do? Whatever you want. I don’t care if you vote for Obama, or for a third-party candidate like Jill Stein of the Greens, or if you don’t vote at all. Do whatever you want, but don’t think about it. You should be spending your time and energy thinking about revolution. Between now and the dictatorship of the proletariat, however, we have to fend off a lot of stupid pro-Democrat entreaties to forget the dead Pakistanis and the desperate poor and your own bank balance and endorse the man and the administration who made them possible. To help you refute your pseudo-liberal, Obama-loving, Democratic apologist friends, here are some powerful counterarguments to their lesserevilism. Argument 1: If you don’t vote for Obama, Romney will win. 10 Your response: Bull. That might

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NEWS/CITYDESK GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

NEWS

BOISE PREPARES TO ADD THE WORDS In the wake of Statehouse inaction, Boise leaders craft their own words CARISSA WOLF

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“A good strategy when making public policy is to learn from other cities,” said McLean.

be employed, to have housing and live in their communities as a community member,” said

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

Boise could become the next city in Idaho to extend nondiscrimination protection to gender identity and sexual orientation if a proposal slated for introduction before the Boise City Council wins the approval of city leaders. Statehouse lawmakers refused to add the words in past legislative sessions that would have affixed “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to Idaho’s Civil Rights and Human Rights acts, leaving Idahoans vulnerable to discrimination and even hate crimes, according to LGBT advocates. The lack of adequate support for the socalled “Add the Words” legislation left littleto-no protection from bias-based decisions in housing and employment. As a result, a select group of leaders has decided to find municipal solutions to help guarantee those rights. Sandpoint became Idaho’s first city to add gender identity and sexual orientation nondiscrimination protections to its city code in December 2011, and Pocatello is on track to follow suit with a similar ordinance. Now, a group of Boise leaders hopes to see the City of Trees enact its own nondiscrimination law with a measure that’s slated for introduction before the end of the year. “This has been about making it clear that all Boise residents should be treated equally and with dignity and respect,” said Boise City Council Member Lauren McLean, who plans to introduce the measure. “Cities are doing this across the country and I thought that it was important that we do the same.” It remains legal in Idaho to evict, fire and refuse service to people based on sexual orientation or gender identity. Anecdotal reports suggest a recent increase in hate-based crime against Idahoans because of their sexual orientation or gender identity–crimes that often go unreported, advocates say, because victims fear losing their jobs and/or homes after outing themselves in police reports. McLean and City Council President Maryanne Jordan want to change that, at least within the boundaries of Boise. “It’s very important to Maryanne Jordan and I that, in Boise, we treat everyone with dignity and respect, no matter who they love,” said McLean. Sandpoint and Pocatello have joined more than 160 cities across the nation in banning sexual orientation- and gender identity-based discrimination in housing, public accommodations and employment. The City of Boise has already adopted a personnel policy that protects city employees from gender identity- and sexual orientationbased discrimination, but that doesn’t protect workers for other employers within the city or extend protections beyond the workplace. McLean said she wants to see broader safeguards enacted within Boise and is studying ordinances passed by other municipalities.

Boise School Trustees, meeting Oct. 22, agreed to refine its letter to Karen Echeverria.

BOISE SCHOOL BOARD TRUSTEES ALLEGE DECEPTION, ‘LACK OF CONFIDENCE’ IN ISBA DIRECTOR

Boise City Council Member Lauren McLean: “It’s very important to [Council President] Maryanne Jordan and I that, in Boise, we treat everyone with dignity and respect, no matter who they love.”

“We have also looked at how our law in Boise works, and we’re trying to craft an ordinance that will work well with Boise–for the people and the city.” LGBT advocates and thousands of Idahoans tried to persuade members of the Idaho House and Senate to add civil rights protections to state law earlier this year. The 2012 legislative session marked the sixth attempt to pass such a law, but a GOP party line vote in the Senate State Affairs Committee killed the bill. “This [Boise] ordinance is about freedom for everyone,” said Lisa Perry, who advocated for the Add the Words measure. “City leaders understand that all citizens should be treated with respect, fairness, compassion and equal protection under the law. They understand that this puts all of their citizens on an equal playing field with those who are currently protected under city ordinance. I applaud their leadership and hope the Idaho State Legislature follows.” Twenty-one states have gender identity and sexual orientation nondiscrimination protections on the books, and where other states have failed to pass such laws, some cities have stepped up to protect the vulnerable rights of its citizens. “This is the proper role of government. The proper role of government is to ensure that people live free from civil rights violations, live free from harassment and have the ability to

Monica Hopkins, executive director of the American Civil Liberties Union of Idaho. “We all have a sexual orientation. We all have a gender identity. And so this is not about a special segment of the population,” she said. Boise advocates say a citywide nondiscrimination ordinance isn’t just about liberty, equality and civil rights, but also good business sense, sound economic policy and ensuring a quality of life for everyone. “We live in tough economic times,” said Perry. “The people that live and work in cities that have passed ordinances similar to the one proposed by Boise know that they don’t have to fear losing their job or home because of sexual orientation or gender identity. This has helped to build a safer community and Boise will become safer once the ordinance has passed. And employers see the right steps forward in cities with similar ordinances and they want to bring new businesses there. Cities that fail to offer basic protections are a turn-off for job creators.” McLean said she hopes to hear from more voices in Boise’s business and faith communities in conversations and testimony, which would follow the measure’s introduction before moving toward a City Council vote. “I really feel confident that our council understands the importance of this,” she said. “This is something that our citizens expect us to do.”

The Boise School District Board of Trustees is upset with Idaho School Boards Association Executive Director Karen Echeverria, and she knows why. “I have a good idea what this is all about,” Echeverria told Citydesk, but Echeverria didn’t want to comment on the record until she spoke with her ISBA executive board. The tangible evidence of the Boise School Board’s ire, a two-page scathing indictment labeling Echeverria’s actions as “deceptive” in garnering support for Proposition 1, one of three tiers of the so-called Luna Laws that asks voters to approve or reject legislation limiting negotiated agreements between teachers and local school boards. The letter-–which is still in draft form-– points to the ISBA executive board voting to support Prop. 1, just weeks after ISBA President Dallas Clinger told Boise trustees that ISBA membership “was very split on all three measures.” “We’re not complaining about the decision [the executive board] made. We’re concerned about the lack of process involving membership,” Boise School Board of Trustees President A.J. Balukoff said Oct. 22 at a special session of the trustees. Balukoff cautioned that the document, as written, was still a draft and shouldn’t be interpreted as the Boise School Board threatening to pull its membership from the ISBA–at least not yet. “Absent positive action to improve the situation, the Boise School Board will no longer remain members of this association,” reads the draft. “We do not take this action lightly.” The draft also says Echeverria attended a Boise School Board meeting in September to encourage the Boise board to renew its membership with ISBA. But Boise trustees said Echeverria failed to mention the ISBA’s executive board’s “yes” vote on Proposition 1, until after the Boise School Board had already put its membership renewal check in the mail. Ultimately, the Boise School Board agreed to move forward with refining the letter to Echeverria, and Trustee Joan Boren suggested that the finished product be shared with other school board trustees throughout the state. —George Prentice

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 7


NEWS

ACHD DEBATE LIVELIER THAN EXPECTED ‘Can’t we all get along?’ GEORGE PRENTICE

GEORGE PRENTICE

verbal jousting. But when asked what their Political jabs are pretty much the order of priorities would be in serving on a board the day through much of October. Charges that oversees more than 300 employees and and countercharges fly with greater intensity in the weeks and days leading up to the more than 2,000 lane miles throughout Ada County, McKee warned attendees that first Tuesday in November. the department would “hit a wall” by 2014 But more than a few attendees were because of much-needed maintenance and jolted awake Oct. 18 when verbal sparks new equipment. flew at a pre-dawn candidate forum–and “Plus, storm water is a major issue for Barack Obama, Mitt Romney or the Luna ACHD,” said McKee. “Right now, storm Laws weren’t mentioned once. Instead, water mitigation continues to rob ACHD the unexpected barbs pierced a gathering of 30 percent of the price of every one of of candidates running for the Ada County our projects. We need to go to the Idaho Highway District Commission. Legislature “I think and ask them ACHD has a to name an bully issue,” agency to mansaid candidate age this issue John Carver, and, more imrunning in portant, to help ACHD District pay for it.” 2. “I watched Hansen audience memknows a thing bers scolded, or two about ignored and the Legislature, bullied at an having served ACHD meetthree terms at ing.” the Statehouse. But District “We need 2 incumbent to build more Rebecca accountability Arnold, who to the public,” also serves as Ada County Highway District Commission wannabes snapped atcommission tendees awake during a pre-dawn October 18 candidates forum. said Hansen. “In particular, president, was we need to be having none improving ACHD’s relationship with the of it. City of Boise. We shouldn’t be waiting for “I’m offended by that,” said Arnold. agencies or municipalities to ask us for “[Carver] has been to one meeting. One something. We should already know about of the commissioners was expressing his things through constant communications.” opinion. It’s unreasonable and ridiculous Unfortunately, Piispanen had a commuto keep someone from expressing their opinion, as long as they’re not being vulgar nication problem of his own at the candidate forum. With few exceptions, most of and abusive.” his answers were difficult to hear due to the And as much as candidates in ACHD low volume of his voice. When an overhead District 1 wanted to move on, Carver and fan turned on in the lower conference room Arnold continued to swap barbs. of the Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce, “I chastised Rebecca because she’s the president of the board,” said Carver, insist- it was impossible to make out any of what Piispanen said. ing that Arnold should have curbed the Arnold didn’t have a problem being remarks of her fellow board member. heard (nor did the other candidates). When “It’s not my job to squelch freedom of asked about why she should be re-elected speech,” she responded. to another term, Arnold said she “liked to “I was personally embarrassed at the one meeting I attended,” Carver shot back. get things done.” “But I don’t think this is something you “If two people never disagree, they’re dabble in when you’re in retirement,” she probably not talking with one another,” said, tossing a final dig toward her opponent. said Arnold. Carver, who is retired, quoted Rodney The other three candidates–ACHD District No. 1 commissioner Carol McKee and King, victim of police brutality in Los Angeles in 1991. her challengers Jim Hansen and Neil Piis“Can’t we all get along?” asked Carver. panen–quietly watched Arnold and Carver’s

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CITIZEN

GARY GALLAGHER Why the Civil War matters more than ever GEORGE PRENTICE

Does it frustrate you or have you come to accept the fact that so many of us base much of our alleged knowledge of the Civil War on fiction, movies or television? I’m amused and sometimes frustrated, but I’m also a realist and understand that Gone With the Wind has had a greater impact on how Americans understand the Civil War than everything since the movie premiered in 1939. How do you look at Margaret Mitchell’s bestseller? It’s a good story but it perpetuates a lot of the myths about the Confederacy, like their gallantry against impossible odds and happy slaves and so forth. Do you have any hopes for the upcoming Steven Spielberg movie about Abraham Lincoln? I never have any hopes for Civil War movies. When something good happens, I’m pleasantly surprised. Something like, for instance, Glory, which I think is the best Civil War movie. But as far as the Spielberg movie, the casting of Sally Field as Mary Todd Lincoln is ludicrous. She’s 30 years too old. But I do think Daniel Day Lewis should make a very good Lincoln.

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You have written that the hardest thing for you to get across to your students is the understanding of what the word “union” means. If you don’t understand what “union” means, in a mid 19th century context, you have absolutely no chance of understanding the American Civil War. Not a slim chance. The problem is, union as understood in the mid 19th century is gone from our vocabulary. Is that because the term union is so nebulous in the 21st century when asking someone to risk their life? Not only nebulous, but preposterous because there’s nothing comparable now. When white people of the mid 19th century used the words “freedom” and “liberty,” they were not, by any means, talking about emancipation. They were talking about those liberties and freedoms bequeathed through the great documents of our founding generation: the liberty to have a direct voice in your government, to rise economically. And of course, Lincoln was an absolute poster boy for this conception of the United States. Is it fair to say that a fair amount of the Southern aristocracy had more in common

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Dr. Gary Gallagher, prolific author and historian, doesn’t simply think more Americans should be better informed on the Civil War, he thinks it’s imperative to understand the seminal moment in American history. In fact, he says it has never had greater relevance. “You can’t understand America until you can understand the Civil War,” said Gallagher. “I’m so put off by the demented 24-hour news channels – and I throw them all in together – a plague on all their houses. They have no sense of history.” Gallagher, professor of history at the University of Virginia and author or co-author of more than 20 books, including his latest, The Union War, will keynote the Thursday, Oct. 25, conference Why the Civil War Still Matters, sponsored by the Andrus Center for Public Policy.

with some Western European nations that were leaning away from democracy? The loyal citizenry [of the North] saw slaveholders as oligarchs, in lock step with the forces of privilege and exclusion in Western Europe. To that end, was America’s democracy in the 19th century a beacon to the rest of the world? If it failed here, why would it have succeeded anywhere else? If union was not salvaged from the Civil War, aristocrats in Europe would have said, “Look, we told you that you weren’t capable of self-government.” Can you speak to the inexplicable energy of Civil War buffs’ determination to reenact Civil War battles? That’s a subculture I don’t understand. They lose me when they think they’re fighting battles. Someone told me once, “Oh, it was just like Gettysburg.” I said, “Really? Did the guy next to you get his head blown off? Were there bottle flies everywhere and bloating horses?” These people just lose me. When you wrote The Confederate War in 1997, had you always planned on writing The Union War (published in 2011) as a companion piece? They work very well together, but 10 they were not planned that way.

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CITIZEN A BRA HA M L INC OLN WOULD S AY, “TELL ME A GA I N WHAT OB AMA’S WOR S T DAY IS . THAT’ S THE DAY I WANT EVERYDAY.”

—Gary Gallagher

But do you acknowledge that they’re companion pieces? I had continued to read about how the Confederacy was never committed and never had a chance, and that is completely at odds with the facts. For goodness sakes, they were committed enough to lose a quarter of their middle-aged white men, far more than any other segment of American society. It evolved into the destruction of their entire social system. I think it’s important to stay grounded in what was truly happening at that time. 9

Are young adults as engaged as ever in learning about the Civil War? I see no dimunition whatsoever. I’ve been teaching [at the University of Virginia] for 25 years, and my class is always filled. I purposely teach the class at 8 o’clock in the morning to weed out the faint of heart. On the first day of class, I even read a bit of Henry V’s St. Crispin Day speech. I tell them to get up early and get to class or get out right now.

Can you speak to the theme of the upcoming Boise conference, Why the Civil War Matters? News broadcasts now have such a shrill, hysterical approach to what’s currently going on in our country. They say, “Oh, it’s terrible. No president has ever been attacked as much as [Barack] Obama. Nobody has ever put up with what he’s had to put up with.” The only way they can say those things is because their historical memory goes back to Tuesday. If they had any sense of perspective, they would know that we have faced far greater crises than we’re facing now. Abraham Lincoln would say, “Tell me again what Obama’s worst day is? That’s the day I want every day.” Television commentators say, “We’ve never been so divided on immigration.” Really? I feel very strongly that if we had a better sense of our history, we would be much less inclined to get hysterical about what’s going on now. We have overcome far greater things and we ought to be able to approach current crises much more calmly and productively.

RALL MY V OTE H AS NO VALUE OTHER THAN AS A SY MBOLIC ENDOR S EMENT. ”

be true if you live in a swing state. Feel free to stay home. Hell, vote for 6 Romney. Won’t make any difference. Argument 2: Obama will be more liberal in a second term. Your response: How do you know? Not having learned anything from the last four years, Obama still says he’ll be “more than happy to work with Republicans” after the election. Even if we stipulate Obama’s secret, silent liberal intentions, how will he push them through a House that will likely remain Republican? Not to mention, lame duck presidencies aren’t renowned for their record of legislative achievement. Argument 3: Romney will push the country even further to the right. Your response: The United States has moved to the right since the early 1970s. But it wasn’t just because of Ronald Rea-

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—Ted Rall

gan and George W. Bush. Presidents Carter, Clinton and yes, Obama also moved the needle to the right. They ridiculed, marginalized and silenced liberals and progressives within the Democratic Party. Most of all, they didn’t hold the line against GOP ideas, rarely resorting to filibusters and frequently going along with conservative initiatives. In the short run, it makes sense for liberals to vote Democratic. In the long run, voting for conservative Democrats costs libs their leverage. During times of crisis, like now, short-term and long-term considerations intersect. This is not a time to vote same-old, same-old—or to think that voting matters.

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P O L A RR A C E THE UNITED STATES IS FALLING BEHIND IN RACE FOR ARCTIC ASSETS CHARLES M. SENNOTT / GLOBAL POST

BARROW, ALASKA—THERE IS A BATTLE AT THE TOP OF THE WORLD FOR OIL AND MINERALS, AND MANY OBSERVERS OF THIS COMPETITION IN THE ARCTIC BELIEVE THE UNITED STATES IS LAGGING FAR BEHIND. “In some ways, we’re not even in the race,” said Alaska Lt. Gov. Mead Treadwell. “If we’re not there, it is up to the Russians and the Canadians to set the rules. If we’re not more aggressive in the Arctic, we’re missing the boat,” he added in an interview with GlobalPost. At stake are what economists predict could be trillions of dollars in profit in the coming decades, not only for the oil companies but also in the form of revenue for the state and the small villages and towns of native populations that stand to benefit. And, as Treadwell points out, there are lots of jobs in Alaska and elsewhere that come with those profits as well. There is also a gain to be had in global diplomacy, a chance for the Arctic nations to work together or risk splintering into hostility. And, of course, there is the fate of a delicate ecosystem that the planet needs to stay cool amid the perils of global warming.

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 11

STEFAN O DE LUI GI/VI I/GLO BALPO ST

A glacier is seen off the coast of Kraushavn, Greenland, July 22. Kraushavn sits at the beginning of the Northwest Passage, a sea route through the Arctic Ocean, which connects the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans.


A BRIEF HISTORY OF ARCTIC DISCOVERY

From the 18th century to present day, the human search for natural treasures has steadily opened up the Great North.

1729

THE BERING STRAIT

Danish explorer Vitus Bering discovers the Bering Strait between Asia and North America.

1741

THE FIRST DISCOVERY

Bering and fellow explorer George Steller first land near Kayak Island in Alaska while leading a Russian expedition.

1841

THEN THERE WAS OIL ...

Oil is first discovered in Cook Inlet on the northwest coast of Alaska.

1857

1872

COAL ISLAND

Coal mining begins at Coal Island. Today, Alaska holds an estimated 5.5 trillion tons of coal and one-eighth of the world’s reserves. Developers predict that Alaska’s reserves will play a significant role in meeting the growing demand for coal.

A GOLDEN FINDING

Gold is first discovered near Sitka in southeast Alaska.

SEWARD’S FOLLY 1876

1897

The United States purchases Alaska from Russia for $7.2 million in gold, roughly 2 cents per acre. At the time of purchase, the territory was widely referred to as “Seward’s Folly” after the U.S. statesman, William Henry Seward, who negotiated the purchase. Seward’s decision was unpopular at the time, but the discovery of oil and gold would later change that.

THE KLONDIKE GOLD RUSH

The Klondike Gold Rush begins, and more than 100,000 people travel north to seek their fortunes.

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Despite the extraordinary opportunity—and peril—that the Arctic represents, there are many leaders in business, government and the environment who throw up their hands in frustration at the failure of successive American administrations—Republican and Democrat—to understand the Arctic’s potential. Iceland President Olafur Grimsson, with silver hair and a well-tailored suit, has worked tirelessly to develop the Arctic Council as a strong international body that can work together productively and someday have the weight and clout of other major international alliances, such as NATO and ASEAN.

I DON’T SEE HOW THE U.S. IS GOING TO CONDUCT A COMPREHENSIVE FOREIGN POLICY WITHOUT BEING A LEADER OF THE ARCTIC. —OLAFUR GRIMSSON, PRESIDENT OF ICELAND Speaking before the Arctic Imperative Summit in Girdwood, Alaska, in late August, Grimsson was openly frustrated about the failure of the United States to see the potential in the Arctic for nations to come together to protect the environment and create a responsible climate for investments in tapping much-needed oil and natural gas reserves. The Chinese and the Russians, he said, are way ahead of the United States in understanding this and moving to secure deals in the other Arctic nations, including his own. “It will take a long time and great effort for the U.S. to become as active as China is now in the Arctic. To be as active as Russia will take even longer time. I don’t know how to move Washington further on this issue.” “I don’t see how the U.S. is going to conduct a comprehensive foreign policy without being a leader of the Arctic,” he added. The historic melting of the Arctic, which is widely viewed to be caused by global warming, has unlocked shipping lanes and opened up the potential for tapping huge oil reserves that lie beneath the floor of the Arctic Ocean. Yet, right now, there is not a single deepwater port from Dutch Harbor to Barrow that can handle large freight and oil vessels. Russia and Canada and virtually all of the nations of the Arctic Council, except the United States, have prepared their ports for the coming increase in activity. The U.S. Coast Guard is not equipped to handle the surge in shipping and oil exploration and openly concedes it is not adequately prepared to respond in the event of a catastrophic oil spill like the 2010 Deepwater Horizon blowout. The Coast Guard also concedes that it has only one ice cutter, which is old and in need of repair, compared to Russia, which has 20 ice breakers to assist ships passing through these waters. “It’s a real time problem for the people of the Arctic. We don’t control it, and we are late to the table. When I look at the Arctic strategically, I see a host of decisions that need to be made today,” said Rear Adm. Thomas Ostebo, commander of the 17th District of the Coast Guard. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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RADIOTHON 2012 FALL

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 13


1968

LARGE-SCALE OIL TRANSPORTATION

Government plans to build a pipeline from Prudhoe Bay to the Northern Slope after the discovery of oil in Prudhoe Bay. This northwest region is now known as the largest oil field in North America. At its peak production in the 1980s, the oil field supplied up to 20 percent of the nation’s total oil production.

NORTH SLOPE PIPELINES 1974

Construction begins on the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System, which is completed three years later. TAPS spans several hundred miles of feeder pipelines along Alaska’s North Slope toward the U.S. mainland and includes 11 pump stations and the Valdez Marine Terminal. The pipelines were built after the 1973 oil crisis.

THE EXXON VALDEZ CRISIS 1989

2006

The Exxon Valdez oil tanker runs into a reef in the Prince William Sound, spilling 11 million gallons of crude oil in what becomes known as the second-largest oil spill in U.S. history. Thousands of government employees and volunteers take part in a three-year clean-up effort.

PRUDHOE BAY OIL SPILL

BP has a 267,000 gallon oil spill at Prudhoe Bay, the original site where oil was discovered in Alaska. The spill originates from a pipeline in the wildlife-rich North Slope region.

DEEP WATER HORIZON OIL SPILL 2010

The Deepwater Horizon oil rig explodes in the BP Macondo Prospect Oil Fields in the Gulf of Mexico. This spill is officially deemed the largest accidental oil spill in the history of the petroleum industry. The well releases 4.9 million barrels of oil before it is finally capped. It is argued that a spill of this magnitude in the Arctic would be an even bigger disaster.

HEATING UP 2012

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The rate of glacier melting in the Arctic reaches a record high, as the arctic sea ice extent is measured as 293,000 square miles smaller than the ice extent measured in 2007, which was the previous record low.

“We are leaning forward operationally. But on a tactical level, I lose a lot of sleep,” he added. The number of ships moving through the Arctic waters in his district on this day in August was more than 95, a tripling of sea traffic compared to last year. “It is spinning a little bit out of control,” he said. Part of the problem, he said, is that “the U.S. has to look at the Arctic not as a cost sink, but an investment.” “Ready or not, America, here comes the Arctic,” he said. Beyond its lack of preparedness, many international observers believe the United States is also failing to understand the importance of establishing itself in a leadership role in the international community and the international law that is emerging in the Arctic. The United States is one of the only industrialized countries in the world that is not a signatory to the Law of the Sea Treaty. The resistance to signing the treaty, which observers say is largely pushed by a small, far-right group of Republican skeptics of all international treaties and which has also suffered from indifference by Democrats, has become a prominent example of the political dysfunction in Washington, D.C. It has been brought before the Senate for hearings, amendments have been made, but for nearly 20 years, it has foundered in Congress. This despite the fact that it is supported by a coalition of the military, including the commandant of the U.S. Coast Guard, business interests, including leaders in oil and shipping, and a host of environmental lobbyists. Chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Sen. John Kerry, has led the effort to support the treaty and has vowed to bring ratification to a vote after the heated, partisan politics of the presidential election. “Many investors will be uncertain about investment here until the Law of the Sea Treaty is ratified,” said David Rubenstein, co-founder of The Carlyle Group, a powerful investment firm stacked with leaders of government and military. Rubenstein believes the Arctic is one of “the last emerging markets” in the world. But he said the United States is thwarted by the lack of a strategy in Washington, D.C., to develop the Arctic. Scott Minerd, chief investment officer at Guggenheim Partners, one of the largest private investment firms in the United States, said, “It’s already true that we are falling dramatically behind. ... Someone needs to start articulating that there is a crisis in the Arctic.” For some of these critics, Washington, D.C., bureaucrats are the enemy. David Hayes, deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of the Interior, is aware of that. But he has worked tirelessly for years within the behemoth of Interior, which has a sprawling mandate that includes managing more than 200 million acres of Alaska, about half the state. He conceded that federal officials had been “tripping over each other” in Alaska for a long time, but he also countered that the department has to balance the environmental issues with business interests. “We must balance conservation and development,” he said. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 15


BOISE ART MUSEUM

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Can you rock a fashion statement as bold as a soundsuit?

Too old to head to a rave? Try the Discovery Center of Idaho’s Adult Night.

THURSDAY OCT. 25

style ART OF FASHION SHOW

glow ADULT NIGHT: THE SCIENCE OF LUMINESCENCE Those who want to perfect their Halloween costumes before Wednesday, Oct. 31, can give them a test run at the Discovery Center of Idaho’s next Adult Night. Grown-ups can don colorful neon threads Thursday, Oct. 25, and get their glow on with the Science of Luminescence. The event includes luminescence as both science and fashion—those who wear neon or a costume will be entered into a drawing for a host of prizes. To commemorate the evening, attendees can snap a photo with a glowing beau or belle in an on-site photo booth. What’s a luminescent costume, you ask? Think the Light Cycle-riding characters in both Tron movies, or neon Morph Suits. The adults-only event puts together glow sticks, electroluminescent costumes, booze and bodies. Admission includes access to the national touring exhibit Bodies: Revealed. The collection of plasticized cadavers showing the intricate workings of the human body will be on display at DCI through March 31, 2013. In addition, access to DCI’s cast of installations and a glass of beer or wine are included in the ticket price. Alcohol offerings include vino from Indian Creek Winery and brews from Crooked Fence Brewing and Payette Brewing Company, which can be poured into an Adult Night commemorative color-changing cup for $2. Archie’s Place, A Cupcake Paradise and Boise Fry Company will offer eats. Staff will lower the black lights to cast a glowing pallor over the exhibits. To light things up, DCI Education Director Woody Sobey will show visitors how to make their own glow sticks. Tickets are available in advance at the center’s website. 6-10 p.m., $20, $18 Discovery Center members. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org.

FRIDAY AND SUNDAY OCT. 26 AND OCT. 28 music

FRIDAY OCT. 26

OPERA IDAHO’S FALSTAFF Opera Idaho’s 20122013 lineup opens after the sweltering summer season with the first of its mainstage operas, Giuseppe Verdi’s Falstaff. Per formances will run Friday, Oct. 26, and Sunday, Oct. 28, at

16 | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | BOISEweekly

the Egyptian Theatre. More than 100 years after a hugely successful debut at La Scala in Milan, Italy, the comedic opera centered on the exploits of the fat knight Sir John Falstaff has become a classic. This season, Opera Idaho brings Falstaff to Boise for two nights of 19th centur y rollicking.

Oscar Wilde said, “One should either be a work of art or wear a work of art.” Many a link has been made between attire and artwork, and artists occasionally cross over into the world of style, such as Nick Cave, whose soundsuits have caused many an art enthusiast to flock to Boise Art Museum or spy the wearable pieces at various locations around town. The fusion of fashion and art will be on display Friday, Oct. 26, when BAM presents its Art of Fashion Show. The museum hosted a Recycled Fashion contest in early May, in which designers submitted their creations of attire made from repurposed materials. Those designs will head down the runway at the show, and attendees can vote for their favorite, with the victorious designer taking home $500. The event will also feature a selection of fashions from Dillard’s and a raffle with prizes including a $500 shopping spree at the store and $50 gift certificate to Barbacoa. Raffle tickets cost $1 each or $5 for six. Cave’s soundsuits will be brought to life when dancers from Ballet Idaho don the creations for a performance. The event is for those age 18 and older, and there will be a cash bar available for those of legal imbibing age. Tickets can be purchased in advance at BAM’s website and will be available at will call the night of the event. Proceeds benefit BAM’s educational programs. 6-9 p.m. $15, $10 BAM members. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-3458330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Italian Romantic composer Verdi is known mostly for the iconic sounds of “Va pensiero” (The Chorus of the Hebrew Slaves) from his famous opera Nabucco, in which he tells the Biblical stor y of the persecution of Jewish faithful by Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar. Slightly less well-known is Verdi’s three-act comedy Falstaff, which tells adapted stories from William Shakespeare’s Henr y IV and The Merr y Wives of Windsor. Never theless,

critics and fans around the world have made Falstaff into an essential component of companies’ reper toires. Opera Idaho’s other productions this season include Carlisle Floyd’s Susannah and a collaboration with Ballet Idaho pairing Igor Stravinsky’s Pulcinella Suite with Ruggero Leoncavallo’s Pagliacci. Opera Idaho’s Falstaff production is directed by David Cox and features Peter Castaldi as Falstaff

and Jason Detweiler as the wealthy Ford leading a cast of 10. Individual tickets or season subscriptions are available at operaidaho.org. Friday, Oct. 26, 7:30 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 28, 2:30 p.m.; $19.20-$69. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net.

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FIND PATR IC K S W EENEY

THE RAM’S LOCAL PUMPKIN BEER Are you ready for Halloween? No, we mean really ready.

FRIDAY-WEDNESDAY OCT. 26-OCT. 31 spooky HALLOWEEN HAPPENINGS Back in your college house party days, going out and about involved a closet full of reasons to dress in odd attire, with themes ranging from black light and white trash to tennis attire and wearing colors to signify your relationship status. But we can’t all stay in the Neverland of creative drunkfests, and so the end of October serves as an excuse for adults and children alike to wear something crazy and get a little wild. Boise has plenty of places to do just that; here’s a rundown of a few. Those still weaning themselves off of the college party circuit can enjoy a sure-to-be scantily clad costume party at the Bermuda quasi-Triangle of downtown Boise bars Saturday, Oct. 27. China Blue, Dirty Little Roddy’s and the Main Street Bistro will team up for a Zombie Apocalypse Halloween Block Party. $15 gets you into all three clubs. Want your near-naked party to be a little more artsy? The Red Light Variety Show’s Halloween Costume Party happens Friday, Oct. 26, at the Visual Arts Collective. Enjoy the varied talents of the Red Light performers, videos by Antimagic and music by Jumping Sharks and Slow Bunny. Costumes—including “constricting underwear” for men and “ShamWow” panties (think about that one for a minute) for women—are encouraged. Entry is $5 and proceeds benefit VAC. Visit redlightvarietyshow.com for more info. Prefer to look at Boise scenery? The Halloween Boise Trolley Tour takes place Friday and Saturday evenings through Saturday, Oct. 27, and then nightly through Wednesday, Oct. 31. The always-informational tour takes a spooky turn for the season, with certain nights featuring an extended two-hour tour and adults-only evenings. Prices start at $16; visit boisetrolleytours.com or call 208-334-2844 for more info. If getting creeped out by nature is more your style, there are plenty of places to make you scared of the woods around the Treasure Valley. Check out the Freaky Forest, at 1800 W. Hubbard Road, in Kuna, or the Eagle Volunteer Firefighters Association’s Haunted Woods at Merrill Park in Eagle. Both run Friday and Saturday evenings and on Halloween night. Halloween enthusiasts of all ages can enjoy the Monster Bash Friday, Oct. 26, at Boise State University’s Student Union Building. The event features a costume contest, pumpkin carving and more. Admission is FREE and the bash is presented by the Student Involvement and Leadership Center. The kiddies can also attend Boo at the Zoo, Zoo Boise’s annual event, where costumed kids can partake in various activities and check out the animals. Standard admission rates apply and proceeds support improvements to the zoo. That event takes place from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 27. For even more Halloween events, visit boiseweekly.com.

S U B M I T

Even the dead feel the need to get down once in a while.

SATURDAY OCT. 27 corpse DANCE OF THE DEAD Death and dancing don’t generally go together—unless you’re pulling a Weekend at Bernie’s, doing the zombie-laden Thriller dance or attending a very nontraditional funeral. But Saturday, Oct. 27, Off Center Dance Project presents a lively Halloween show, Dance of the Dead, at the El Korah Shrine Center. The creative company employed plenty of red body paint and stretched sheets of latex in the premiere of Artistic Director Kelli Brown’s Skin at the Boise Dance Co-Op performance in August. Audiences should expect more innovative choreography and technical skill mixed with horror and humor at the company’s second-annual Halloween performance. According to a press release, the show features dancers, grim reapers and a cast of “thrillers.” But it won’t be all ghosts and ghouls. One piece, Dia de los Muertos, pays homage to the Mexican Day of the Dead with inspiration from traditional forms of celebrations such as altars and sugar skulls but combines them with a bit of folklore. The piece will also be performed at the Idaho State Historical Museum for November’s First Thursday event Nov. 1. Three other pieces round out the show, including one that uses tarot cards as inspiration. Musician J. Rebeca Suarez is also slated to perform. Break out your Halloween costume and you may take home a prize at intermission. Tickets are available in advance at brownpapertickets.com or at the door. 4 p.m. and 8 p.m., $15, $10 students and seniors. El Korah Shrine, 1118 W. Idaho St., offcenterdance.org.

This is a brutal time of year for pumpkins. They’re carved up, scooped out, skinned, roasted, smashed and carelessly left to rot on front porches nationwide. But The Ram head brewers Jake Schisel and Jake Talbot have come up with an 709 E Park Blvd., Boise even more sinister way to abuse 208-345-2929 theram.com pumpkins: turn them into booze. Schisel and Talbot took 100 pounds of local raw, sweet pumpkins from Wagner Farms in Meridian, roasted, skinned and macerated them, and then threw the remaining 62 pounds of pumpkin pulp into a fermentation tank with base malt from Pocatello, specialty malt from Washington, hops from Idaho and the Yakima Valley and a spice bag loaded with ginger, cinnamon, nutmeg, clove and star anise. The result, which will debut at The Ram Thursday, Oct. 25, is a local pumpkin beer. “We got our hands on as many pumpkin beers as we could off the shelves at the local stores and read about them and tasted all of them,” said Schisel. In that process, the Jakes sampled brews loaded with a pumpkin pie’s worth of spice, some with no spice, some that used real pumpkin and many that didn’t. “It’s so varied, everybody’s take on them, which is kind of the fun part of the style. Everybody gets to put their best foot forward,” said Schisel The Ram’s pumpkin beer will be available at its Boise and Meridian locations, and at Murphy’s Seafood and Steakhouse. —Tara Morgan

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 17


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY

REVIEW/SHOW PATR IC K S W EENEY

OCT. 24 On Stage TAP DOGS—This tap-dance show employs a construction site set and is part dance, part theater and part rock concert. 7:30 p.m. $30-$50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu. TIGERS BE STILL—When Sherry’s art therapy degree doesn’t yield the job of her dreams, she moves back in with her mother. See Review, this page. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. THE WOMAN IN BLACK—Prepare to be scared out of your wits at Company of Fools’ production of this play based on Susan Hill’s novel. 7 p.m. $10-30. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org.

THURSDAY OCT. 25 Festivals & Events DISCOVERY CENTER ADULT NIGHT—Get your pre-Halloween groove on as you play with exhibits in black lighting, make your own glow sticks and check out the new Bodies Revealed exhibition. See Picks, Page 16. 6-10 p.m. $18-$20. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, dcidaho.org.

On Stage AMADEUS BY PETER SHAFFER—Winner of a Tony Award for Best Play, this provocative work about composers Wolfgang Mozart and Antonio Salieri weaves a confrontation between mediocrity and genius into a tale of dramatic power. 7:30 p.m. $9$12. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: GABRIEL RUTLEDGE—Enjoy some jokes followed by dueling pianos and music from DJ Mighty Delta One. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL—Last year’s zany musical interpretation of the Sam Raimi series returns with even more fake blood. Tickets are available at brownpapertickets.com. See daisysmadhouse.org for more info. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise, idahooutdoorassn.org. LIQUID LAUGHS: CHRIS FAIRBANKS—Also featuring Zoltan Kaszas. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs.com, by calling 208941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. Buy one, get one free tickets. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

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Grace and Sherry wrestle their inner tigers in BCT’s Tigers Be Still.

BCT’S TIGERS BE STILL At first glance, Boise Contemporary Theater’s Tigers Be Still feels like a familiar TV comedy. Protagonist Sherry is a quirky 20-something art therapist who has recently moved back in with her parents and is searching for direction. Her supporting cast is a ragtag team of lovable misfits: a Jack Daniels-spooning sister with a Top Gun obsession, a hermit mother who won’t leave her room, a young patient with anger-management issues and his father, a widowed middle-school principal with a fondness for butterscotch candies. BCT’s uncharacteristically elaborate set also screams sitcom. There’s a dining room with lingering feminine flourishes, a cluttered basement couch “that smells like tears,” and a dated school office, its shelves stacked high with books and files. Stringing these three sprawling sets together is a winding sidewalk and rows of miniature suburban homes on strips of Astroturf. But while the play’s author, Kim Rosenstock, has a background in TV writing for Fox’s “New Girl,” Tigers Be Still is not primed for prime time. Lurking just below Rosenstock’s eccentric plot and hilarious dialogue is a much darker theme that would likely flounder a serial format: depression. Her characters’ major triumphs are seemingly minor: getting out of bed, leaving the couch, having a conversation. While Sherry, played with a little too much enthusiasm by BCT newcomer Lina Chambers, has wrestled free from the clutches of sadness after landing a job as an art teacher, her sister Grace (Cassie Moloney) is being swallowed by—and swallowing —it. Recently dumped by a cheating fiancee, Grace provides a hilariously morose, mailman-seducing foil to Sherry’s grinning good girl. But the play’s truly moving performances are given by the grieving father-son duo of Joseph (Arthur Glen Hughes) and Zack (Evan Sesek). Hughes imbues Joseph with a tragic earnestness, while Sesek perfectly channels the mercurial highs and lows of adolescence, vacillating between silence, sarcasm and lightning bolts of rage. Despite these dark themes, Tigers Be Still isn’t itself depressing. Rosenstock’s script is consistently witty without being overly cutesy. At the beginning of the play, Joseph calls an assembly to tell students that a tiger has escaped from the nearby zoo. “Here are the things I know about tigers,” he says authoritatively. “They’re fast, they’re big, they’re mean and they have stripes.” Though the play’s characters are just as clueless about the snarling emotional tigers they have lurking inside, it’s a treat to watch as they try to tame them. Tear yourself away from a night of trite TV to see this tender production; it’s some of BCT’s best work in recent memory. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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8 DAYS OUT THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW— Go along with Brad and Janet on a strange adventure with this cult classic. 7:30 p.m. $20. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

registration is required at andruscenter.org. See Citizen, Page 9. 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. FREE students/teachers, $25. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5800, boisestate.edu.

SOMETHING’S AFOOT—This musical murder mystery takes a satirical poke at Agatha Christie mysteries as 10 people in an isolated country house are picked off. 7 p.m. $15-$18. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org.

FRIDAY OCT. 26 Festivals & Events

TAP DOGS—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $30-$50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu.

FRIGHTENED FELONS HALLOWEEN EVENT—Walk through 140 years of history and hear about all the scary but true things that happened in the Old Idaho Penitentiary. Friday, Oct. 26, is family night. All ages are welcome, but some themes can be scary for kids younger than 10. Saturday, Oct. 27, is adult night, for ages 18 and older. Last admission is at 10 p.m. Call 208-334-2844 for more information. 7-11 p.m. $15. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-368-6080, history.idaho. gov/oldpen.html.

TIGERS BE STILL—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. THE WOMAN IN BLACK—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $10-$30. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org.

Workshops & Classes

HALLOWEEN CARNIVAL—Enjoy spin art, pumpkin bowling and more. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, 208344-5501, ymcaboise.org.

DOES THE CIVIL WAR STILL MATTER?—The Andrus Center for Public Policy presents some of the nation’s pre-eminent historians to reflect on Why the Civil War Still Matters. Advance

MONSTER BASH—The Student Involvement and Leadership Center presents the annual Monster Bash, a Halloween carnival that includes a costume contest, pumpkin carving and more. See Picks, Page 17. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Hatch Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1677, sub. boisestate.edu.

On Stage AMADEUS BY PETER SHAFFER—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9$12. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. THE CAPITOL STEPS—Put a little humor in the election season with this blend of music and political comedy. Tickets are available at the Morrison Center box office, all Select-A-Seat outlets and at idahotickets.com. Visit capsteps.com for more info. 8 p.m. $29.50 and $39.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: GABRIEL RUTLEDGE—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL— See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise, idahooutdoorassn.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

FALSTAFF—Opera Idaho kicks off its season with this Giuseppe Verdi comedy. Visit operaidaho.org or call 208-387-1273 for more info and tickets. 7:30 p.m. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net. GHOSTS: MANIFESTATIONS OF MUSIC AND STORY—Classical violinist Jennifer Dunn and Daniel Bishop: The Storyteller share the stage for an evening of ghostly entertainment. Tickets available at brownpapertickets.com. See Picks, Page 16. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: CHRIS FAIRBANKS—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. PETER PAN—Catch the classic story about lost boys and grand adventures. Visit mtionline. org for more info and tickets. 7:30 p.m. $17 adv., $20 door. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW— See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $20. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com. SOMETHING’S AFOOT—See Thursday. 6:30 p.m. $20 show only, $39 dinner/show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org. TIGERS BE STILL—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 19


8 DAYS OUT WEEK IN REVIEW ANNALEE HAR K INS

THE WOMAN IN BLACK—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$30. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org.

Art THE ART OF FASHION SHOW—Enjoy a glamorous night at BAM as 22 contestants show off their original Recycled Fashion and vote for your favorite design. Show is for 18 and older. See Picks, Page 16. 6-9 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

SATURDAY OCT. 27 Festivals & Events FRIGHTENED FELONS HALLOWEEN EVENT—See Friday. 7-11 p.m. $15. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3686080, history.idaho.gov/oldpen.

On Stage AMADEUS BY PETER SHAFFER—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9$12. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: GABRIEL RUTLEDGE—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. DANCE OF THE DEAD—Grim reapers, modern dancers and a slew of “thrillers” will perform. Tickets are available in advance at brownpapertickets.com. 4 p.m. and 8 p.m. El Korah Shrine Center, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, elkorah.org. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL— See Thurday. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise, idahooutdoorassn.org. LIQUID LAUGHS: CHRIS FAIRBANKS—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. MY HEART IS AN IDIOT—Catch Found Magaine’s 10th anniversary tour. See Arts, Page 26. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Garden City, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com. PETER PAN—See Friday. 1:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. $17 adv., $20 door. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208468-5555, nampaciviccenter. com. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW— See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $20. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com. SOMETHING’S AFOOT—See Thursday. $20 show only, $39 dinner/show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

20 | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Fans got lost in the music at Lost in the Trees Oct. 19 at Neurolux.

A PACKED WEEK From sold out shows to painted pumpkins to Devo domes, this week was colorfully alliterative. Attendees packed Egyptian Theatre Oct. 18 for Ignite Boise 9, an event that gives presenters five minutes and 20 Powerpoint slides to deliver their widely varied messages. “Approximately 700 people came to see 14 presentations on a variety of topics, from James Gravatt’s explanation of how Harry Potter is a global moral phenomenon, to Brett Kennedy’s plea for Boiseans to stop giving money to panhandlers and start finding solutions to the problem of homelessness,” wrote Boise Weekly freelancer Harrison Berry. Also on Oct. 18, BW intern Jordyn Price squeezed into the sold-out Knitting Factory to sweat it out with Seattle-based hiphop artist Macklemore and producer Ryan Lewis. “With everything from confetti and gold capes to songs about unicorns and having a ‘really, really, really good time,’ there’s no doubt that Macklemore and Lewis know how to throw a damn good party,” Price gushed. Down the street at Beside Bardenay, Opera Idaho also threw a damn good party Oct. 18, but for a much more composed crowd. BW freelancer Steven Keely swung by Operatini to take in an array of arias and swill jewel-like cocktails. “Loud applause and occasional shouts gave momentum from the first of the 10 arias, ‘La Donna e Mobile’ from Verdi’s Rigoletto, through the last, Puccini’s Manon Lescaut,” said Keely. Moving from arias to art, BW’s Sheree Whiteley stopped by Enso Artspace Oct. 19 to check out Michael Cordell’s debut solo show, Dots, Twists and Drawings of Nothing. “Attendees scoured Enso’s simple white walls to view Cordell’s intricate dots and twists, which seemed at home in the space and gave a minimalist vibe to the rooms,” noted Whiteley. Also on Oct. 19, families took in the crisp fall air at the North End Organic Nursery’s annual autumnal affair, the Harvest PaBrew-Za. In addition to boasting an array of food trucks and local beer, the event was a fundraiser for Boise Urban Garden School. “Kids at the Pa-Brew-Za got their mitts on fresh, bright orange pumpkins piled high near the NEON main building,” observed BW’s Andrew Crisp. “One by one, little tykes and their parents grabbed pumpkins to plaster them with paint at a nearby table.” Later that evening, Crisp also swung by Neurolux to check out North Carolina’s Lost in the Trees. “LITT jumped down off the stage for an unplugged rendition of its final track, ‘Song for the Painter.’ Violinist Jenavieve Varga and cellist Drew Anagnost plucked their strings while [Ari] Picker’s vocals soared above the din of the bar crowd,” he said. And speaking of crazy stage shows, BW’s Josh Gross hit up the Knitting Factory Oct. 20 for EDM buzz band Big Gigantic. “The band played from twin risers that looked like Devo’s domes made from LED screens that flashed patterns of light and scenes from Pac Man as fog rolled off the stage,” Gross said. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 21


8 DAYS OUT TIGERS BE STILL—See Wednesday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org. THE WOMAN IN BLACK—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$30. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org.

Kids & Teens BOO AT THE ZOO—Costumed characters will pass out candy, with costume contests for all ages, bat toss, pumpkin patch photos and more. All proceeds from activities go to support improvements to the zoo. See Picks, Page 17. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Standard admission rates. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-384-4125, zooboise. org.

Odds & Ends THRILL THE WORLD BOISE— Thrill the World is an annual worldwide simultaneous performance of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.” For more info, email thrilltheworldboise@gmail.com. 1 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza, Downtown on Eighth Street between Main and Front streets, Boise.

SUNDAY OCT. 28 On Stage FALSTAFF—See Friday. 2:30 p.m. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. LIQUID LAUGHS: CHRIS FAIRBANKS—See Thursday. Buy-one, get-one-free tickets. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Recurring

TITANIC THE MUSICAL—The Tony Award-winning musical recounts the dreams, hopes and aspirations of those aboard the fateful ship. 7:30 p.m. $44. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

EAGLE VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPT. HAUNTED WOODS—See Picks, Page 17. Fridays, Saturdays and Wednesday, Oct. 31. Continues through Oct. 31. $10, $6 ages 5-12, FREE for ages 4 and younger. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive, Eagle River Development, Eagle.

THE WOMAN IN BLACK—See Wednesdasy. 7 p.m. $10-$30. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org.

THE FARMSTEAD 2012—Saturdays, 10 a.m.-11 p.m., Fridays, 4-11 p.m. and MondaysThursdays, 4-9 p.m. Continues through Saturday, Nov. 3. The Farmstead, 1020 S. Rackham Way, Meridian, 208-922-5678, farmsteadfestival.com.

WEDNESDAY OCT. 31

FREAKY FOREST—See Picks, Page 17. Fridays-Sundays, 8-11 p.m., Thursdays, 8-10 p.m. and Wednesday, Oct. 31, 8-10 p.m. Donations appreciated. 1800 W. Hubbard Road, Kuna.

On Stage A HORRIFIC PUPPET AFFAIR— See Monday. 9 p.m. $5. The Red Room Tavern, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-0956, redroomboise.com.

HALLOWEEN HAUNTED HISTORY TROLLEY TOUR—See Picks, Page 17. Fridays, Saturdays, 8 p.m. and through Wednesday, Oct. 31, 8 p.m. $18, $16 students. Joe’s Crab Shack, 2288 N. Garden St., Garden City, 208-336-9370, boisestrolleytours.com.

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW— See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $20. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com. TIGERS BE STILL—See Wednesday, Oct. 24. 8 p.m. $10-$15. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org.

HAUNTED WORLD—MondayThursday, dusk-10 p.m.; FridaySaturday, dusk-midnight. Continues through Wednesday, Oct. 31. $20, FREE for children younger than 5. Hauntedworld.org.

THE WOMAN IN BLACK—See Wednesday, Oct. 24. 7 p.m. $10$30. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org.

SCARECROW STROLL— Through Wednesday, Oct. 31. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Kids & Teens HALLOWEEN AT CHILDREN’S HOME—Staff and volunteers will put on their best kid-friendly scary and greet trick-or-treaters on the porch. 4-6 p.m. FREE. The Children’s Home Society, 740 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-343-7813, childrenshomesociety.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

MONDAY OCT. 29 On Stage A HORRIFIC PUPPET AFFAIR— HomeGrown Theater and Evil Wine present three gruesome and hilarious puppet shows, written by Janessa Nichole White, Josh Gross and Chad Shohet. Live music to follow. 9 p.m. $5. The Red Room Tavern, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-0956, redroomboise.com.

TUESDAY OCT. 30 On Stage A HORRIFIC PUPPET AFFAIR— See Monday. 9 p.m. $5. The Red Room Tavern, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-0956, redroomboise.com.

22 | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 23


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY OCT. 24 BEN BURDICK—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

THE WHIGS—7 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

TOM HOGARD—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

YVE EVANS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

JON KLEIN BAND—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

YVE EVANS—6 p.m. FREE. Sapphire Room

COREY OSWALD—8 p.m. FREE. High Note DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

BOWERBIRDS, OCT. 26, NEUROLUX The indie world is rife with folk bands, many of which seem intent on moving the style back in time instead of forward. But Bowerbirds are a different story. The North Carolina band dodges many of the pitfalls of modern folk music by openly accepting that it is 2012 and crafting its own modern style. The songs on Bowerbirds’ new album, The Clearing, are alternately minor-key ruminations on profound emotions and shuffling existential ballads garnished with big indie-rock flourishes of guitar and orchestration. Ambient echoes of electric guitar and sparse piano chords turn the song “Brave World” into far more than a simple folk tune. Catch Bowerbirds at Neurolux Friday, Oct. 26, and you may see that folk doesn’t necessarily mean traditional. —Josh Gross With Strands of Oak and Prypyat. 8 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

24 | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | BOISEweekly

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s LARRY CONKLIN—10:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La PAMELA DEMARCHE—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel PAUL DRAGONE—6 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La REBECCA SCOTT—With Rob Hill and Debbie Sager. 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THURSDAY OCT. 25

MYKE SANCHEZ—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

FRIDAY OCT. 26 ALL TIME LOW—7:30 p.m. $21$40. Knitting Factory

BASSNECTAR—6:30 p.m. $35. Revolution

ANDREW CORTENS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

COBERLY AND TOWN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

BAND OF BUSKERS—8 p.m. FREE. Crux

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers EXCELLENT GENTLEMEN—9:30 p.m. $5. Liquid

BOWERBIRDS—With Strand of Oaks and Prypyat. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

JIMMY BUFFETT AND THE CORAL REEFER BAND—8 p.m. $49-$99. Taco Bell Arena

CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

SHON SANDERS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

REEL BIG FISH—7:30 p.m. $18.50-$35. Knitting Factory

STEVE AND GRACE WALL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE COUNTRY CLUB—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye THE DIRTY SUIT—8 p.m. FREE. High Note

OLD DEATH WHISPER—With Poke. 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 SASSPARILLA—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s $OUL PURPO$E—10 p.m. $5. Reef TURNS OUT—Midnight. FREE. Liquid

SATURDAY OCT. 27 DC3—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

FINE LINE—9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s

DUCK CLUB PRESENTS RAMONA FALLS—With Dark Swallows and Sleepy Sea Horse. 7 p.m. $6 adv., $8 door. Neurolux

ROBERT JAMES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

FRIGHT FEST FEATURING DIRTYROCK—With Rubicon 7. 7 p.m. $5-$20. Revolution

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

THE TRUE SPOKES—10 p.m. $3. Reef

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

FINE LINE—9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE FORBIDDEN PLANET PARTY—Featuring Vakkuum, Final Frequency, Soundwave, MFKTZ, J.T.R. and Stormshadow. 8 p.m. $10. Red Room FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid HAVEN SNOW—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown JOSH INGYU—10 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s NEEDTOBREATHE—With Good Old War and Matthew Mayfield. 8 p.m. $27-$45. Knitting Factory OLD DEATH WHISPER—With Poke. 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s OPHELIA—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s PLAY DATE—See Listen Here, this page. 4:30 p.m. $3 suggested donation. Crux RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 SASSPARILLA—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

WAYNE WHITE—9 p.m. FREE. High Note

SUNDAY

TRAVIS WARD—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

TUESDAY OCT. 30

OCT. 28 DUCK CLUB PRESENTS DARK DARK DARK—With Emily Wells and Storie Grubb and the Holy Wars. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Visual Arts Collective EVIL WINE PRESENTS THE SOFT WHITE SIXTIES—With CAMP and Brett Netson and Snakes. 8 p.m. $5 adv., $8 door. Red Room JASON BUCKALEW—10:15 a.m. FREE. Berryhill JOHNNY SHOES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid KEVIN KIRK—9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 PAT RICE—1:30 p.m. FREE. Solid

BARBARA LAING—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

DEMONI—With Amanofaction, Teton Avenue and Marshall Poole. 8 p.m. $5. Crux GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

BLAZE-N-KELLY—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

BROCK BARTEL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

JUNKYARD BANDSTAND—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

NED EVETT—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

KATIE MORELL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

RADIO BOISE TUESDAYS—Featuring The Reverand Petyton’s Big Damn Band and Poke. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

KYLER EAMON—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 WAITING FOR A LION—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

LARRY CONKLIN—10:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La MONSTERS OF METAL—Featuring After Death, Rise of the Fallen and Krystos. 9 p.m. FREE. New Frontier PAUL DRAGONE—6 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

WEDNESDAY OCT. 31

MONDAY OCT. 29

SHON SANDERS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

DON WILLIAMS—7:30 p.m. $30$65. Morrison Center

SMOOTH MONEY GESTURE—10 p.m. $5. Reef

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

TURNS OUT—Midnight. FREE. Liquid

SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BEN BURDICK—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

PLAY DATE, OCT. 27, THE CRUX This Listen Here is dedicated to smaller ears. While The Crux has helped build Boise’s all-ages music scene since it opened, an even younger crowd is invited to rock out Saturday, Oct. 27. The musical duo Play Date—comprised of Bouncing Souls singer Greg Attonito and his wife, Shanti Wintergate—are hosting a family friendly Halloween party. The pair will celebrate the Oct. 9 release of Play Date’s first record, Imagination, with face painting, games and an animated screening of the its colorful book, I Went for a Walk. Chock full of kooky sounds and warm harmonies, Imagination was recorded at the couple’s hideaway studio in McCall. One track is the punchy call to pint-sized arms, “Dance Like a Monster,” a dance that will be taught to the audience. A portion of proceeds will benefit the Treasure Valley Institute for Children’s Arts, and the first 50 people to purchase Imagination will receive a screen-printed tote filled with goodies. —Andrew Crisp 4:30 p.m., $3 suggested donation. The Crux, 1022 W. Main St., 503-784-1182.

B

Ber ryh i ll &

Co.

John Berryhill’s 12th Annual

Wine Sale! First Thursday, Nov. 1st, 4-9pm By the Case, Mixed Cases Free Wine Tasting with Sommeliers Plan b Lounge’s ViP Tasting

Berryhill & Co. Restaurant · Bar 121 N. 9th, Downtown Boise WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 25


NEWS/ARTS B ILL C AR M AN

ARTS/VISUAL DAN B U S TA

LOST AND FOUND Bill Carman’s cover brought in the big bucks.

AUCTION, AUTUMN AND AWARDS A few hundred of Boise’s finest donned their fancy duds and gathered at the Idaho State Historical Museum Oct. 17 for Boise Weekly’s 11th Annual Cover Auction. The paper’s original cover artwork from the last year was all on sale to the highest bidder, with the money going to benefit BW’s Cover Auction Grants. The evening netted $22,060, the most money raised at a Cover Auction to date. All told, the program has raised a total of more than $125,000 for local arts grants. This year’s event partner was Idaho Shakespeare Festival, which received 20 percent of the funds raised, totaling $4,400. “There’s nothing better than receiving money in the arts,” said ISF Producing Artistic Director Charlie Fee during the event. “If we raise $50,000 tonight, we would get $10,000 of that, which would pay the price of one union actor for next season.” Funds fell a little short of Fee’s goal, but netting $22,060 wasn’t too shabby, compared to last year’s $17,500. The big ticket item of the night was Bill Carman’s “To Be a Milker of Giant Bees,” which sold for $1,500. The proud purchaser, Swarnal Borthakur, told BW he came to the auction specifically for that piece. “It has a lot of things happening for it besides the color palette,” he said. Cover Auction Grant proposals will be accepted until Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, via the BW Community Fund page, and will be awarded at the end of February 2013. For a photo slideshow of the Cover Auction, visit boiseweekly.com. Moving to the national stage, Boise Contemporary Theater’s 2011 world premiere production The Velocity of Autumn, by Eric Coble, is moving to Broadway in the spring of 2013. The two-person play will be directed by Molly Smith, artistic director for Washigton, D.C.’s Arena Stage, and will star Academy Award winner Estelle Parsons and Tony Award winner Stephen Spinella. A specific Broadway theater and show dates have yet to be announced. And in other national arts news, two Idaho authors have once again taken home prestigious $50,000 Whiting Awards: fiction writer Alan Heathcock (Volt) and playwright Samuel Hunter (A Bright New Boise). The duo were two of 10 honored at a ceremony in New York City on Oct. 23, which featured remarks by former Whiting recipient Jeffrey Eugenides (Middlesex). Idaho authors Daniel Orozco and Kerri Webster both took home Whiting Awards in 2011.

FOUND magazinemaker brings his idiot heart to Boise ANDREW CRISP While traveling, Davy Rothbart often chats with strangers. And when he does, he doesn’t mince words. “I’m the kind of person that, when I meet someone, I always want to go there and dig in with them and talk about real things,” he told Boise Weekly. “Skip the small talk and talk FOUND Magazine co-creator Davy Rothbart shows off his new book, My Heart Is an Idiot. about real stuff.” As a filmmaker, author and regular contributor to Public Radio International’s This “I think the fundamental thing about all of American Life, Rothbart has made a career out ever get to read it,” he said. “It was on my these projects is just having a curiosity about laptop for so many years. It’s thrilling that so of telling stories. But for 10 years, Rothbart’s other people’s lives,” he said. “The people we many people have read it, but it’s also kind of voyeuristic oeuvre, FOUND magazine, has share the world with, having a sense of empaweird.” told the stories of complete strangers. The thy and curiosity and compassion. Whether it’s Within the book’s pages, Rothbart tells the zine’s pages are chock-full of forgotten scraps stories of people he has FOUND notes, some mystery stranger you’ll of paper found on met on his travels. One never meet in person—you might benefit by street corners and in having a glimpse into their lives and caring is about Laquisha, a old boxes: everything Saturday, Oct. 27, 8 p.m. about them.” young black woman from hastily scribbled $8 adv. $10 doors Rothbart said he encourages the audience to on a bus from Chicago to-do lists to passionate do the same—to talk with a stranger on a bus to the still-smoking love notes. Davy and VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE 3638 Osage St., Garden City or a park bench. Ground Zero in New his brother, Peter, share 208-424-8297 “The rewards outweigh the risks,” he said. York City just days these tidbits on crossvisualartscollective.com. Rothbart has always been a guy to dig in after Sept. 11, 2001. country tours. with people and share real things, which may Another tells the story “FOUND is this explain why he’s only a little uncomfortable of nursing a love for a entire community art British girl—and realizing he can’t move to the sharing My Heart is an Idiot with audiences. project,” Rothbart explained, “so after our But he said it’s worth the trade-off. United Kingdom to be with her. performances, I feel like people are inspired to “People smile at me and say, ‘Yeah, I read One story he shares with audiences, “What go out and discover finds of their own.” the book.’ They suddenly know a lot about are you wearing?” chronicles a months-long In September, the Rothbarts embarked on me, which is a little uncomfortable. But people romance with a woman he never met, entirely a FOUND magazine 10th anniversary tour, a have felt really comfortable sharing things with 75-city sprint that lands in Boise Saturday, Oct. over the phone. It started with steamy phone me because of it.” 27, at Visual Arts Collective. The brothers turn sex, but eventually became more serious, he Rothbart said he’s happy that his book tells the audience. FOUND into performance art—Peter with a helps people open up. “I find myself drinking a little more those guitar, singing songs inspired by notes, while “I’ve already disclosed some of my more nights,” said Rothbart. “It’s one thing to write Davy reads a few aloud. painful, humiliating, awkward, weird mothat in a book. But it’s another to read it in FOUND started with a single note, which ments, and now people have opened up and front of people.” began, “Mario, I fucking hate you.” Peter interacts with the audience in a differ- shared what’s really on their minds,” he said. While living in Chicago in 2000, Davy Helping strangers open up is one of Rothent way: He provides original songs, singing found the note stuck to his car by mistake. bart’s talents. He describes a moment during lyrics often based on FOUND notes. They Though the author, Amber, accused Mario of a segment when he pulls an audience member range from the folk-ballad cover of a found infidelity, it was signed, “Page me later.” onto the stage to talk about life. tape of “Booty Rap” anthems recorded by a “I try to read them with the same emotion “The guy in Vermont, he was the most group of kids to more haunting songs. which they were written with,” he said. guarded and officious. At first, he was keeping “There’s this one song, based on this note The point of preserving each find is to his cards close to the vest, I guess you could that’s in FOUND magazine No. 6,” Rothbart share something that offers a glimpse into a stranger’s life. However, on this tour, Rothbart said. “This guy found a woman’s letter written say. The question came up, ‘Do you have any regrets?’” Rothbart explained. “He said, ‘I to God. She had just had a miscarriage, and is also telling personal stories from his new regret that I have no relationship with my third she was questioning her faith. Peter took the book, My Heart Is an Idiot. child.’” FOUND note and wrote a song based on it, “With FOUND, I get to share all these The guy explained she’s the daughter of a wondering what it would be like to be the glimpses into these other people’s lives and brief second marriage who lives in Arizona. He husband of this woman.” it’s up to you to imagine the rest of the story,” just never made an effort to be in her life. Rothbart said he still tears up listening to he said. “All the stories in the new book, it’s “Afterwards, his wife came up to me and that song, “A Child to Call Our Own.” almost like FOUND notes come to life.” said, ‘I’ve been married to him for 10 years Rothbart explained that there’s a common Yet sharing his personal stories in front of audiences has made him a little uncomfortable. thread between My Heart is an Idiot, FOUND and I had no idea,’” Rothbart said. “It’s a safe place to talk about what’s on their mind.” notes, a stranger’s stories and Peter’s songs. “I forgot somehow that people would

—Josh Gross and Tara Morgan

26 | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 27


V i s i t b o i s e w e e k l y. c o m a n d c l i c k on Scr een for movie times.

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

ATLAS SHRUGGABLE Cloud Atlas is sensory overload with minimal entertainment value GEORGE PRENTICE Cloud Atlas—an overly ambitious film exploring revolution, free will and Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, with a prolific density of themes, characters and effects—is an unfortunately vacuous experience. And while I have little doubt that audiences and critics will be equally divided on its execution, I’m sorry to report that this nearly three-hour effort left me wanting. Though I vividly recall its technical splendor, its relevance evaporated soon Love it or hate it, Tom Hanks hopes you to argue about Cloud Atlas. after watching two screenings of it at the Toronto International Film Festival. In fact, the film: Instead of a fully realized concepIt also includes one of the most beautiful audience reactions were wildly different at tion, the movie comes across more as a musical scores in a while and the makeup each showing. While one sold-out theater parlor game, beckoning audiences to guess and cinematography are groundbreaking. cheered wildly at its conclusion (though which movie star wins the grand prize in a But alas, sensory overload does not equal I imagine the in-person presence of Tom ridiculous masquerade ball. entertainment. Hanks and Halle BerReaders of David Mitchell’s epic novel Hanks is joined ry helped), a second CLOUD ATLAS (R) were invited to be their own time voyager on screen by Berry, packed-to-the-gills across the six stories that comprise Cloud Jim Broadbent and theater greeted the Directed by Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski and Lana Wachowski Atlas. Susan Sarandon (all movie’s conclusion With such grand source material, the Oscar winners), each with eerie silence and Starring Tom Hanks, Halle Berry and Hugh Grant film’s directors—Tom Tykwer and Wain multiple roles, even some grumbling. chowski siblings Lana and Andy—overweaving six stories I had more in comOpens Friday, Oct. 26, at Edwards 9, 22 through past, present reach and leave little to the imagination. mon with attendees of Their not-so-subtle preaching about and future. the latter. Their reincarnations are dramatic: Hanks pursuits of freedom, art and love are more “I love coming to Toronto,” Hanks told hamfisted than introspective. plays no less than a cave-dwelling goat Boise Weekly at the TIFF premiere. “There Ultimately, Cloud Atlas left me lost in herder, a seafaring physician and a 1970s are great movie audiences here, and I hope inventor. And your cinematic bucket list just the clouds. But I encourage you to see the that they either love this movie or hate this movie. As long as they argue about it, that’s isn’t complete until you’ve seen Hugh Grant movie. If nothing else, Hanks would love for us to argue about it. as a cannibal. Grant, also in myriad roles what matters.” here, wanders in and out of Cloud Atlas but My primary argument was with myself. never seems to belong anywhere. I truly wanted to like Cloud Atlas. It’s one And therein lies the main problem with of the more eye-popping films of the year.

SCREEN/DVD BOISE’S FAVORITE DVD RENTALS THIS WEEK

1. PROMETHEUS Moved up from No. 2 spot on Oct. 17.

28 | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | BOISEweekly

2. DARK SHADOWS Moved up from No. 3 spot on Oct. 17.

—Source: Video Memories, 4504 Overland Road, Boise, 208-385-0113

3. ROCK OF AGES Moved up from No. 5 spot on Oct. 17.

4. THE AVENGERS Dropped from No. 1 spot on Oct. 17.

5. MADAGASCAR 3 First week in release.

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FOOD/BEERGUZZLER REVIEW/FOOD Restaurants get one chance to hit BW with their best shot.

It’s that time of year. The harvest is in, the just-picked hops have been rushed to various Northwest breweries, and the resulting freshhopped beers are making their way to the valley. Seattle-based Hale’s made the first one some 20 years back, and it has always been a favorite. This year, I got one bottle, loved it and wanted more, but it had already sold out. You snooze, you lose. No worries—here are three other worthy fresh hop brews.

ADAM R OS ENLU ND

MOMO DUMPLINGS Nepalese eats in Meridian JOSH GROSS

Nearly everything about Momo Dumplings is unexpected, beginning with the fact that it serves Nepalese food in Meridian. Though an employee referred to it as “the McDonalds of the Himalayas,” it’s about as conceptually distant from McDonalds as Nepal is geographically distant from Meridian. Then there is the restaurant’s physical space. Located in a generic strip mall just off Eagle Road, Momo has big windows, brightly colored plastic furniture and steam tables heaped with ingredients for you to choose from, all of which scream, “chain.” But it’s not a franchise. Momo’s is locally owned and everything it serves is made on-site. The menu even offers the Combo Apparently, this crazy scheme is working Confession ($7.29), a half rice bowl and like gangbusters. During a recent lunchtime half order of dumplings on a visit, the place was packed as single plate—pretty much one hungry hordes chowed down of everything—which is easily on strange delights. MOMO DUMPLINGS the best bargain in the place. Momo offers three kinds 3223 E. Louise Drive, The flavors are bold and of steamed dumplings—pork, Meridian bright, making heavy use turkey and vegetarian—and a 208-514-2137 momodumpling.com of cumin, coriander and variety of rice bowls that are turmeric. Fans of Indian food topped with black-eyed peas, will find similarities, especialturkey meatballs, ground turkey or chicken chili, then garnished with ly in the sauces ladled over the dumplings. The tomato-based sauces—served medium cilantro, yogurt and curry sauce. There are or very spicy—are richly flavorful, but with also fresh-made spiced potato samosas. their own distinct flavors from the regional And most of the items can be mixed and spice palette. matched as you like.

In the midnight hour, we cry mo, mo, mo.

And unlike the searing pain common with spicy food, Himalayan heat remains smooth while still bringing the thunder. The one disappointment—other than not being directly outside Boise Weekly so we can eat there daily—is that for all its traditional cuisine, Momo only serves Coke products. Apparently being the McDonalds of the Himalayas in Idaho means you still have to give a shoutout to the OG McDs. But location and fountain drinks aside, Momo leaves little to be desired. It’s fast, cheap, delicious—even for vegetarians—and different. Stop by and let your tongue reach enlightenment.

NEWS/FOOD Italian style. “All of our pastas will be made fresh in house,” said Lumsden. “We As Whole Foods Market nears its projected opening date in November, have an open display kitchen and you’ll be able to view everything we’re more info about the space—located on Broadway Avenue between Myrtle doing: preparing the food fresh, as well as hand-making the pasta.” and Front streets—is starting to materialize. The store sent over a list of Lumsden hoped to have the lunch and dinner joint open this year, but 56 local vendors that will be selling products in the grocery store—includhas pushed the projected opening date to January 2013. ing Homestead Natural Meats, Rice Family Farms, Ferranti Pasta and The “We pulled the stucco off the west wall to expose the 120-year-old red Cake Ballers—and has also started gushing about its upstairs taproom, brick. … We’ll have a really open floor plan, just a small, quaint, little hip which will be officially called the River Room. joint—only 70 seats,” added Lumsden. According to Whole Foods’ Marketing And in more opening news, Bosnia and Community Relations representative Express recently expanded its operation to Matt Collins, the space will hold 50 people include a new drive-thru shack on Chinden and offer 16 beers on tap, including local Boulevard and Glenwood Street in Garden brews, and patrons can also open and City. According to a post on Facebook, the consume bottles purchased downstairs. BOEX Deli opened Oct. 11. There will be a small menu of prepared “We are located [at the] Stinker gas foods, including sliders, cheese boards and station, little blue and white drive thru sandseasoned nuts. In addition to having TVs, wich shop. Still have best sandwiches in the space will also boast local live music town, paninis, baguettes, salads and don’t every Thursday, curated by Go Listen Boise. forget popular Nutella panini.” And in other soon-to-open news, Fork The BOEX Deli will be open from 10 owner Cameron Lumsden has announced a.m.-7 p.m., Mondays through Saturdays. the name of his new Italian concept, which is currently under construction at 807 W. —Tara Morgan Idaho St. Alavita, which means “to life,” The former Palmercash space is getting an Italian makeover. will focus on local products prepared in an

PLANS ANNOUNCED FOR RIVER ROOM, ALAVITA

VI A FACE BO O K

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FRESH HOP BREWS

BEER VALLEY LEAFER MADNESS IMPERIAL PALE ALE, HOP HARVEST EDITION This is a hazy, straw-colored brew with an egg-white head that leaves a lovely lacing. The aromas are fresh and lively, offering sweet citrus and tropical fruit, along with smooth hops backed by touches of pine and caramel. This beer has a nice warmth on the palate that leads off with lightly bitter hops followed by a creamy malt middle and finishes with cleansing citrus. This is a very fine effort from this Ontario, Ore., brewery. DESCHUTES CHASIN’ FRESHIES FRESH HOP IPA A bright straw in color with a thin, porous head, this brew’s aromas are a mix of herb, grass, pepper, resiny hops and a touch of citrus. On the palate, bread-laced malt plays against prickly hops, both colored by ripe lemon and an earthiness that comes through on the finish. This 22-ounce bomber uses an heirloom Cascade hop sourced from Goschie Farms in Oregon’s Willamette Valley. DESCHUTES HOP TRIP This beer pours a bright amber with a twofinger mocha head that collapses slowly, leaving a decent lacing. You get enticing aromas on the nose with tangy pine, tangerine and grapefruit leading off, followed by undertones of caramel and grass. It’s big and fruity in the mouth, with dark, chocolaty, lightly toasted malt backed by a nice hit of fresh hop bitterness. The finish is smooth and dry—this beer is a definite winner. —David Kirkpatrick

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 29


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ENDING THE WAR WITHIN WOMAN Muse Project. If you are curious about how gender conditioning impacts relationships between men & women, come Friday night, Nov. 2 to hear Mary Adams. Saturday, Nov. 3 Mary addresses conditioning & women’s solidarity! Scholarships, apply early for registration. Link to the flyer: museinfo@museproject.org

LAUNDRY & WET CLEANING Free Pick-up & Delivery. Wet cleaning is an environmentally friendly & toxin-free alternative to dry cleaning. Call 938-9539. Leathers, silks, wools, shirts, slacks, suits, unique items, restoration & preservation. Weekly fluff & fold laundry service only $2.75/pound. (Sign up for 6 wks. & receive 20% off all services). We are fragrance-free. Organic & biodegradable. No water pollution or hazardous waste is produced during the wet cleaning process. Uses 65% less energy 75% less water than traditional cleaning methods. Mention this ad and receive 50% off first order.

BW ANNOUNCEMENTS Prepper would like to talk & share ideas with other preppers. 2975038.

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BW FOR SALE MANUAL WHEELCHAIR Only used twice. Seat width is 17 ”, depth is 15 .” Chair is in good condition. $100 OBO. 376-2353.

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One of kind! Classic in great condition, comes with everything. 16’ w/ brand new cover. Anchor system, trailer w/new tires, Cataract oars, leg locks & ample storage. Motivated seller. Asking $4,000. Call for more info. 208-761-9969. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

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BW HEALING ARTS WANG MEDICAL ACUPUNCTURE Traditional Chinese acupuncture has been used to successfully treat diseases that have been chronic and hopeless. Dr. Wang was trained in China and has been practicing in Boise for almost 15 years. He offers free consultations. He won’t treat you if he can’t help you. Call to schedule today 208-321-7348. Same day appointments available. Some insurance accepted. Clean, private and comfortable treatment rooms.

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Get a free apothecary bottle of your favorite essential oil with your first visit for any service at Wholistic Beauty Boutique. Go to massageboutique.com for treatments. 16th & State Street Boise. 841-9062.

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NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Katrina Joy Holmes-Knight Case No. CV NC 1217429 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Katrina Joy Holmes-Knight, now residing in the City of Garden City, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Kevin Jesse Holmes. The reason for the change in name is: transgenderism: I am transitioning female to male. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on November 15, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Oct. 2, 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Melissa Lorraine Roberts Case No. CV NC 1218062 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Melissa Lorraine Roberts, now residing in the city of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Lilo Wright. The reason for the change in name is: for personal self-help in mental health issues. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on November 29, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any per-

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B O I S E W E E K LY son who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Oct. 10, 2012. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk

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State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Taja Rene Roselle. The reason for the change in name is: I have been divorced and want neither my maiden name nor previously married name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on December 11, 2012 at the Ada

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Taja Thomas January 21, 1970 Case No. CV NC 1217949 NOTICE IF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Taja Rene Thomas, now residing in the City of Garden City,

County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: October 12, 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. October 24, 31, November 7 & 14, 2012.

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the matter of name change of: SARAH ANN FOY, An Adult. Case No. CV NC 121741 NOTICE OF HEARING A petition by SARAH ANN FOY, who was born on December 9, 1979, at Oregon City, Oregon,

and now residing at 3988 N. Pepperwood Drive, Boise, County of Ada, State of Idaho, has been filed with the above -entitled Court a Petition for Change of Name to SARAH ANNE CLENDENON, for the reason that Petitioner and her fiance’ have a child together, and Petitioner wants to have the same surname, as she and her fiance’ are not planning to marry for several years. Petitioner’s father is BRADLEY JOHN FOY, residing at 12221 S.E. Eagle Glen Drive, Happy Valley, Oregon 97086. The Petition for Change of Name will be heard at 1:30 o’clock p.m. on the 27th day of November, 2012, at the County Courthouse, located at 200 W. Front Street, Boise, Idaho. Objections may be filed by any person who can, in such objections, show to the court a good reason against such a change of name. DATED this 28th day of September, 2012. CLERK OF THE COURT By DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 24, 31, Nov. 7 &14, 2012.

NYT CROSSWORD | MEDIA START-UPS BY TODD GROSS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 11 Men’s suit specification 15 Bread dispensers

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18

32

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46

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“Dies ___” Slow leak Special attention Lioness’s lack Behind Against one’s will Salon worker Island west of Maui Didn’t come right out and say 33 Word with Army or ant 34 Lapful, maybe 37 Tantrum, colloquially

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General headquarters? Farm wagon Some baby sitters Soap discontinued in 2011 50 Speakeasy’s distilling locale 54 Buzzer 55 Buzzes 56 Repeated phrase in “Hot Hot Hot” 58 Ikea store, to some 59 Something with a Blue Book value 61 1937 hit with the lyric “You’re like the fragrance of blossoms fair” 62 Brown ink 63 Comic strip with the characters Rat and Pig 67 A little off 69 Not well 70 Behind 73 Low-battery signal 74 Dog with “rough” and “smooth” breeds 75 British pens 77 Southwest terminal? 78 “The Gates” artist 80 M.R.I., maybe 83 Old-fashioned boiler input 85 “Have you ___ good?” 86 Tex. neighbor 87 Egypt’s Sadat 90 What a pusher may push in a park 94 Cabinet dept. since 1889 96 Stoller’s partner in songwriting 98 Like some coincidences 99 Enters hurriedly 104 What dead men are said to do 106 You may go under it at a hotel 107 Stock: Abbr. 108 With “The,” former sketch comedy program on CBS … fittingly enough 110 Bit of science 111 Farm fowl 112 Chilled

113 114 115 116 117

Some up-and-comers Teetotaler’s amount Or follower Some classwork Relative of a crown

DOWN 1 Top of a ladder, maybe 2 “___ Evil” (Mia Farrow film) 3 Chronicle 4 “Our Town” opera composer 5 On the ground, in ballet 6 Volume of the world 7 Pet that doesn’t need much brushing, say 8 Old Brit. coins 9 Son in “The Royal Tenenbaums” 10 Italian ladies 11 Itty-bitty breath mint 12 Omani or Yemeni 13 Three-time All-Star pitcher Frank 14 Hanger-on 15 Warning 16 Blue eyes and blond hair 17 Takes baby steps 18 Alka-Seltzer ad character 24 Frist’s successor as Senate majority leader 25 Outta here 29 Percussionist’s setup 31 Home of the oldest school in Sweden, founded in 1085 35 Palm products 36 Recipe unit 38 Hindu title of respect 39 Round in Britain, maybe 40 More likely to crash? 41 Boating hazards 43 “Uh-uh, laddie” 45 Blue Triangle grps. 46 Not burn completely 47 It might extend above a side door 48 The youngest Jetson 49 Only a day away, say 51 Cassette player 52 “Pulp Fiction” weapon

91 Take off again, as pounds 92 Dodger Hershiser 93 Vasco da Gama’s departure point 94 #2: Abbr. 95 Low-rent district 97 Pharmaceutical giant that makes Boniva 100 “___ Gold” 101 African region including Khartoum and Timbuktu 102 “___ roll!” (bettor’s cry) 103 Full of the latest 105 Asian gold bar measure 106 Glassmaking material 109 Game with Wild Draw 4 cards

53 Benaderet of “The Beverly Hillbillies” 57 Cinnabar, e.g. 60 2010 movie with a plot to steal the moon 61 Prefix with comedy 62 Wuss 64 Pine-___ 65 Split in a hurry 66 Forest, in Germany 67 Epitome of simplicity 68 “Whatever” 71 River through Orsk 72 Central Sicilian province 74 Windy City commuters’ inits. 75 Lottery winner’s feeling 76 Departure from the norm 79 Philosopher Kierkegaard 81 Competent 82 Ted who wrote “The Kennedy Legacy” 84 T. S. Eliot’s middle name 87 “Nashville” director 88 Must 89 Presidential middle name or last name

L A S T M A Y B E

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A S O R T P E R K U P H A L E N O H

N Q H U L A G H M E I A R R E S E T A O T K T A L P E I G D E E T B I I N

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W E E K ’ S

S P H L E A R N E E S L O O F L I L E S M H A A D M E M O O F C K

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S M D E D E E T O F N P Y A T I S K I N T I N G I N G E S L B H I B A T B I N E A D E S L E S E T H S O R U M P E L O O A C K T E E A R S

A M P L E B O U G H T T E L E P O R T

M A G E S I N E N T L E N T Y E T I L Y E T I G A E L S U L L E T L E C S T R H F I V E L E S T F E V E R O W E T O R U S S M P A B T U T C A R D A S A D F F I C E I F L E R R E S S

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estates of: CARL J. SIELAFF and LILLIAN PAULINE SIELAFF, Deceased. Case No.: CV IE 1212266 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that

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the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred.

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Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED This 19th day of October, 2012. Tamalla Hart, Personal Representative c/o Richard A. Cummings 412 East Parkcenter Boulevard, Suite 325 P.O. Box 1545 Boise, Idaho 83701 Telephone: (208) 367-0722 Pub. Oct. 24, 31 & Nov. 7, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estates of: LOUIS J. RAFFETTO and

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JEAN R. RAFFETTO, Deceased. Case No.: CV IE 1217850 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED This 19th day of October, 2012. Thomas J. Raffetto, Personal Representative c/o Richard A. Cummings 412 East Parkcenter Boulevard, Suite 325 P.O. Box 1545 Boise, Idaho 83701 Telephone: (208) 367-0722 Pub. Oct. 24, 31, & Nov. 7, 2012.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 33


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the coming days, many of your important tasks will be best accomplished through caginess and craftiness. Are you willing to work behind the scenes and beneath the surface? I suspect you will have a knack for navigating your way skillfully and luckily through mazes and their metaphorical equivalents. The mists may very well part at your command, revealing clues that no one else but you can get access to. You might also have a talent for helping people to understand elusive or difficult truths. Halloween costume suggestions: spy, stage magician, ghost whisperer, exorcist. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The coming week could have resemblances to the holiday known as Opposite Day. Things people say may have meanings that are different or even contrary to what they supposedly mean. Qualities you usually regard as liabilities might temporarily serve as assets, and strengths could seem problematical or cause confusion. You should also be wary of the possibility that the advice you get from people you trust may be misleading. For best results, make liberal use of reverse psychology, freaky logic and mirror magic. Halloween costume suggestion: the opposite of who you really are. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I don’t have a big problem with your tendency to contradict yourself. I’m rarely among the consistency freaks who would prefer you to stick with just one of your many selves instead of hopscotching among all nine. In fact, I find your multi-level multiplicity interesting and often alluring. I take it as a sign that you are in alignment with the fundamentally paradoxical nature of life. Having said all that, however, I want to alert you to an opportunity that the universe is currently offering you, which is to feel unified, steady and stable. Does that sound even vaguely enticing? Why not try it out for a few weeks? Halloween costume suggestion: an assemblage or collage of several of your different personas. CANCER (June 21-July 22): An avocado tree may produce so much fruit that the sheer weight of its creation causes it to collapse. Don’t be like that in the coming weeks, Cancerian. Without curbing your luxuriant mood, simply monitor your outpouring of fertility so that it generates just the right amount of beautiful blooms. Be vibrant and bountiful and fluidic, but not unconstrained or overwrought or recklessly lavish. Halloween costume suggestion: a bouquet, an apple tree, a rich artist, or an exotic dancer with a bowl of fruit on your head.

34 | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I hope your father didn’t beat you or scream at you. If he did, I am so sorry for your suffering. I also hope that your father didn’t ignore you. I hope he didn’t disappear for weeks at a time and act oblivious to your beauty. If he did those things, I mourn for your loss. Now it’s quite possible that you were spared such mistreatment, Leo. Maybe your dad gave you conscientious care and loved you for who you really are. But whatever the case might be, this is the right time to acknowledge it. If you’re one of the lucky ones, celebrate to the max. If you’re one of the wounded ones, begin or renew your quest for serious and intensive healing. Halloween costume suggestion: your father.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): As you contemplate what you want to be for Halloween, don’t consider any of the following options: a thoroughbred racehorse wearing a blindfold; a mythic centaur clanking around in iron boots; a seahorse trying to dance on dry land. For that matter, Sagittarius, I hope you won’t come close to imitating any of those hapless creatures even in your non-Halloween life. It’s true that the coming days will be an excellent time to explore, analyze and deal with your limitations. But that doesn’t mean you should be overwhelmed and overcome by them. Halloween costume suggestions: Harry Houdini, an escaped prisoner, a snake molting its skin.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Do you know how to tell the difference between superstitious hunches and dependable intuitions? Are you good at distinguishing between mediocre gossip that’s only 10 percent accurate and reliable rumors that provide you with the real inside scoop? I suspect that you will soon get abundant opportunities to test your skill in these tasks. To increase the likelihood of your success, ask yourself the following question on a regular basis: Is what you think you’re seeing really there or is it mostly a projection of your expectations and theories? Halloween costume suggestions: a lie detector, an interrogator with syringes full of truth serum, a superhero with X-ray vision, a lab scientist.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Does anyone know where I can find dinosaur costumes for cats?” asked a Halloween shopper on Reddit. In the comments section, someone else said that he needed a broccoli costume for his Chihuahua. I bring this up, Capricorn, because if anyone could uncover the answers to these questions, it would be you. You’ve got a magic touch when it comes to hunting down solutions to unprecedented problems. Halloween costume suggestion: a cat wearing a dinosaur costume.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I am officially protesting you, Libra. I am staging a walkout and mounting a demonstration and a boycott unless you agree to my demand: that you take better care of the neglected, disempowered and underprivileged parts of your life. Not a year from now; not when you have more leisure time; now. If and when you do this, I predict the arrival of a flood of personal inspiration. Halloween costume suggestion: a symbolic representation of a neglected, disempowered, or underprivileged part of your life. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “It’s so fine and yet so terrible to stand in front of a blank canvas,” said French painter Paul Cezanne. Many writers make similar comments about the excruciating joy they feel when first sitting down in front of an empty page. For artists in any genre, getting started may seem impossible. And yet, there can also be a delicious anticipation as the ripe chaos begins to coalesce into coherent images or words or music. Even if you’re not an artist, Scorpio, you’re facing a comparable challenge in your own chosen field. Halloween costume suggestion: a painter with a blank canvas.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The Live Monarch Foundation made a video on how to fix a butterfly’s broken wing. It ain’t easy. You need 10 items, including tweezers, talcum powder, toothpicks and glue. You’ve got to be patient and summon high levels of concentration. But it definitely can be done. The same is true about the delicate healing project you’ve thought about attempting on your own wound, Aquarius. It will require you to be ingenious, precise and tender, but I suspect you’re primed to rise to the challenge. Halloween costume suggestion: herbalist, acupuncturist, doctor, shaman or other healer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It’s not a good time to wear SuperControl Higher Power Spanx, or any other girdle, corset or restrictive garment. In fact, I advise you not to be a willing participant in any situation that pinches, hampers or confines you. You need to feel exceptionally expansive. In order to thrive, you’ve got to give yourself permission to spill over, think big and wander freely. As for those people who might prefer you to keep your unruly urges in check and your natural inclinations concealed: Tell them your astrologer authorized you to seize a massive dose of slack. Halloween costume suggestions: a wild man or wild woman; a mythical bird like the Garuda or Thunderbird; the god or goddess of abundance.

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 24–30, 2012 | 35



Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 18