Issuu on Google+

LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 15 OCTOBER 3–9, 2012

FR

TAK EE E ON E! FIND 13

BACON MOCHA Where does one find such a drink? 1ST THURSDAY 18

WALK THIS WAY First Thursday map and guide inside GUIDE 24

LIVE MUSIC GUIDE The deets on all of the city’s music happenings FOOD 28

TEFF GUY Idahoan Wayne Carlson pioneered the American teff industry

“It’s this incredible witch’s brew, a bubbling cauldron.”

NOISE 23


2 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, James Patrick, Kelly, Michael Lafferty, Chris Parker, Ted Rall Intern: Jordyn Price Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Patrick Sweeney, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Lars Lamb, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE BIG THINGS ARE HAPPENING AT BW IN OCTOBER First things first: If you’re trying to reach nearly anyone in the Boise Weekly editorial department other than myself this week, you’re out of luck. A good chunk of the department is out on vacation, so if you need to reach someone urgently and aren’t getting an answer: dial me up. In the next edition of Boise Weekly, on stands Wednesday, Oct. 10, you’ll find a four-page center insert for Boise Weekly’s 11th annual Cover Auction, detailing every cover we’ve published over the last year, all of which will be on the auction block come Wednesday, Oct. 17. Don’t forget: Doors open at 5 p.m., auction starts promptly at 6 p.m. at the Idaho State Historical Museum. If you want to get an early look at the work, it will all be on display starting First Thursday, Oct. 4. After First Thursday, you can stop by anytime to see the art, but remember, until 5 p.m. the day of the auction, regular admission fees apply. Hitting stands the same day as the Cover Auction, Wednesday, Oct. 17, is a first-ever publication, The Blue Review, which you’ll also find right smack in the middle of Boise Weekly. The Blue Review is a partnership between Boise State’s College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs and Boise Weekly, with contributions from academics, journalists and community leaders in public affairs covering a variety of topics from politics to the environment. This first edition of The Blue Review focuses on the race for the White House, examining the election from media, environmental and religious angles. More on that in the weeks to come. Two other things we’re working on behind-the-scenes include our annual Gift Guide, for which we’ve already scoured the city collecting a pile of holiday gifts in every price range, and the annual Christmas in the City guide, compiled by Downtown Boise Association as your guide to holiday events and shopping downtown. Yes, it may be barely October, but it is that time of year. In this edition of Boise Weekly, you’ll find your monthly, trusty guide to First Thursday, with a map, listings and an indepth look at the economic impact one First Thursday event has had on the city (see Page 17). Further back is an intriguing story about Idaho’s connection to Ethiopian food—which, as foodies know, is lamentably missing from Boise’s culinary landscape despite the valley’s close ties with it nationally. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Tarmo Watia TITLE: Black Unicorn MEDIUM: Acrylic

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2012 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

ARTIST STATEMENT: I find the reason for creating artwork seems to rotate around images with a touch of fun as well as creative interest. The juxtapositions with several objects usually related to the found image is then added to the mix. Finally I use color to tie all together and hopefully end up with a satisfied solution.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

SUBMIT

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 3


WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. IDAHO S TATE HIS TOR IC AL S OC IETY AR C HIVES

INSIDE 3

BILL COPE

5

TED RALL

6

NEWS CATCH vs. CATCH Inc.

HOLE-Y MOLEY You’ve walked by the Boise Hole a million times and now it is dangerously close to no longer being a hole. See a detailed retrospective of the Hole in pictures at Cobweb.

COVER AUCTION IS CRAY-CRAY Boise Weekly’s annual Cover Auction has made us crazy. How crazy, you ask? We’ve got video proof. Scan the QR code to the right or log onto Cobweb for the whole story. (P.S.: The auction is Wednesday, Oct. 17, at 5 p.m. at the Idaho State Historical Museum.)

EDUCATION AIN’T CHEAP A record one-in-five U.S. households now have student loan debt as college costs continue to rise. That’s up 15 percent from three years ago and more than double what it was two decades ago. Citydesk has the whole story.

LEAVE YOUR WALLET AT HOME We have free stuff, you love free stuff—let’s get together. Visit boiseweekly.com and click on Promo for a list of cool stuff we have tickets to/gift certificates for: Boise Classic Movies’ screening of Psycho, BW’s Food Truck Friday, Chicago Connection ... the list changes all the time.

4 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

EDITOR’S NOTE

7

BW PICKS

12

FIND

13

8 DAYS OUT

14

SUDOKU

15

FIRST THURSDAY Boise gets new AIR artists

17

FIRST THURSDAY Map and guide inside

18

NOISE Beach House returns to Boise

23

MUSIC GUIDE

24

SCREEN Argo

26

REC Video game releases for the rest of 2012

27

FOOD Teff in Southern Idaho

28

WINE SIPPER

29

CLASSIFIEDS

30

NYT CROSSWORD

32

FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

34

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BILL COPE/OPINION

DEWSHSHSHSHSHSHSHSH Part 2: Badger Bob reveals the essential Mitt

And another thing, Herr Wagner. Don’t you think a little dance music would have broken up the tension some? Really, there’s nothing like watching Rhine Maidens doing a little underwater polka to lighten the mood, don’t you think? Which brings up another question ... haven’t you ever heard of “comic relief?” “We’re a month out on this election, Cope. One f***ing month! And what the hell are you doing about it?” “Jeez, Bob. I told you? I’m writing a review of Der Ring Des Nibelungen. See, I’ve decided to frame it as an open discussion with the lingering vapors of Wagner’s ethereal presence—which isn’t as easy as it sounds, by the way—and here you are, butting into my concentration like a big old snoopy jackhammer.” “But that silly Wagner crap was last week.” “Well, it’s this week, too, darnit. I have as much reason this week to want to shut out the political cacophony as I did last week. Jeez Louise! ... what more is there to say about either President Barack Obama or Mitt Romney? Everybody who hasn’t been in a coma for the past year already knows who they’re going to vote for. If somebody doesn’t know by now what these two guys stand for, or how important this election is, or what they want for the future of this country, it can only mean he’s had his brain pickled in pixie dust. Now, Bob, let me get this review done. You know, there are other things in life than politics. So let me ask, Mr. Wagner, was it your intention for Siegfried to come off looking like such a dunce? Or did it just happen organically? And I don’t get how Brunnhilde could have fallen in love with him. What? Was it all about the size of his sword? Or am I missing some ...” “You already know what needs to be said.” “Remind me, Badger? What needs to be said?” “That Mitt Romney is a douche.” “Gosh, Bob! Has it come to this? Have American politics become so superficial and nasty that name-calling is all we have left?” “Don’t be a baby, Cope. Politics have always had plenty of name-calling. Fact is, there is so much name-calling that an important truth gets covered up in the incessant noise, which is that now and then, the person being called a name actually is what he’s being called. And Romney is a douche. You know what I mean—conceptually.” “No, not at all. What do you mean, ‘conceptually?’” “See, Romney’s douchedom is the gooey center that oozes through all the contrived images he tries so hard—and so ineptly—to project. Savvy? There is nothing at his core, other than the pure essence of douche. Every attempt he makes to convince people there’s a substantial, fully actualized, thoughtful and empathetic human being hidden away beneath that forced grin and gelled hair comes off as just more douchiness. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

His criticism of Obama for sympathizing with the Muslim protesters … douchy. His secret speech about the moocher 47 percent. More douchy. It all fits a pattern, don’t you get it? Whether he’s insisting that corporations are people, insulting the cookies some lady offered him, feigning interest in how tall the trees are ... he’s like an onion. Layer upon layer upon yet another layer of undiluted douche. Remember this, Cope, Romney isn’t a douche because he says the things he says and thinks the things he thinks. No, he says those things and thinks those things because he’s a douche.” “Look Bob, if I absolutely have to call him a name, does it have to be ‘douche?’ That’s so … uh, it makes me think about things I don’t want to think about. So how about ‘weenie?’ I see him as a graceless, charmless, stiff weenie screw-up who takes credit for the accomplishments of his underlings but doesn’t really know hardly anything about anything. Or ‘bully?’ My wife thinks he’s a bully.” “Oh, he’s a bully all right. A born bully, from the time he chopped off another kid’s hair while his prep-school pals held the kid down, to when he was that smarmy Bain CEO, vivisecting wounded companies and chopping off employees. And yeah, he’s a weenie, too. After this campaign’s over, we’ll never again see him in another pair of Levi’s, or shaking another coal miner’s hand. But ‘bully,’ ‘weenie,’ ‘screw-up’ ... those are just separate fingers on the complete Romney. He’s also a horse’s ass, a liar and a phony, all components to a larger presence, get it? Blend those elements together in one personality, and what you have is a great onomatopoetic word that sounds like what he is.” “Onomatopoetic?” “Yeah. Dewshshshsh. It’s the sound he hears in his head every time he flushes a previous conviction to make room for a new version. Dewshshshsh.” “I know what you’re saying, Badge … I think. But the deal is, I have this review to finish. And by golly, I mean to finish it. All right, Dick ... I sort of get what you were getting at with Siegfried. He was born to win the ring … ‘preened’ to win the ring, you might say. But when all is said and done, that ring proved to be the end of Siegfried, have I got that right? And I have to think, what a puny mortal old Wotan chose to make his go-to guy. But I will say, I love that one song from Apocalypse Now. You know the one mean. It’s got all the French horns and ... uh, say Bob, you don’t have a name for me, do you? Something that encapsulates the essence of my inner authenticity?” “Sure do, Cope. Got lots of names for you. Goofus ... Mortimer ... Chunkhead ... Twit ... Barney ... Blatherbutt ... Wasted Space ... Wimpy ... Blimpy ... Dippy ... Melvin ... Chump ... Clabbertrap ... Bilge-bottom ... Addle-ass ... Fatuous-fart ...

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 5


OPINION/TED RALL

U.S. DECLINE INEVITABLE? This November: The pessimist vs. the cynical pessimist This week, decline is on my brain. Specifically, the decline of America. “There’s not a country on Earth that wouldn’t gladly trade places with the United States of America,” President Barack Obama said, denying Republican assertions that the country is in decline. Clearly, we believe our country is in decline—polls show that Americans think the next generation will live worse than we do. Pessimism about the future is reflected in a 2011 survey in which 57 percent of the public identified the United States as the world’s most powerful nation but just 19 percent thought we’ll still be No. 1 twenty years from now. Now The New York Times reports that life expectancy for white people without a highschool degree fell between 1990 and 2007. “We’re used to looking at groups and complaining that their mortality rates haven’t improved fast enough, but to actually go backward is deeply troubling,” the newspaper quoted John G. Haaga, head of the Population and Social Processes Branch of the National Institute on Aging. Even the two major presidential candidates seem to think that the United States doesn’t have much of a future. During his 60 Minutes interview, Obama was asked what his big idea was for his next term. Interviewer Steve Kroft mentioned the Marshall Plan and sending a man to the moon as examples of big ideas. “I think there’s no bigger purpose right now than making sure that if people work hard in this country, they can get ahead,” replied Obama. “That’s the central American idea. That’s how we sent a man to the moon.

6 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Because there was an economy that worked for everybody and that allowed us to do that. I think what Americans properly are focused on right now are just the bread-and-butter basics of making sure our economy works for working people.” A nonsensical answer. Though depressing, Obama’s pessimism is dwarfed by Mitt Romney’s. Romney’s 2011 tax returns reveal that not only did he bet against the value of the American dollar, he received a quarter of his income from investments in other countries. Romney is literally betting millions that the U.S. economy will head south. That foreign equities will outperform U.S. stocks. He even bought shares in the Chinese state oil company, which has contracts with Iran. He’s worse than a hypocrite. He’s an economic traitor. But the United States has a future. Who will lead us into that future? Obama has the edge in the polls, partly because he presents a less somber vision. The United States is rich. The problem is that our wealth has become so unevenly distributed that there is no longer enough consumer demand to support the population. If we began focusing on the problems of poverty, unemployment and underemployment, as well as rising income and wealth inequality and then fix them, we’ll be OK. I don’t think we’ll be OK. We don’t have to be in decline. Some liberal elites, like Fed chairman Ben Bernanke and investor Warren Buffett, understand the need to redistribute wealth. They’re one side of a split in the ruling classes. Unfortunately for the system and for many Americans, they’re losing the argument to greedpigs like Romney.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

ONE NAME. IDENTICAL MISSIONS. TWO PROGRAMS.

Hammerskin Nation, producer and promoter of white supremacist music, was formed in 1988.

NEO-NAZIS PLAN OCT. 6 MUSICFEST No one is saying exactly where white supremacists are planning to hold their

What’s the difference between CATCH and CATCH Inc.?

annual music fest Saturday, Oct. 6. While organizers remain tight-lipped about the location, they are expecting neo-Nazis and Klan sympathizers from across the globe to descend on the Boise area to attend Ham-

GEORGE PRENTICE

merfest 2012. And that’s enough to get the attention of Boise Police.

One year ago, when Greg Morris, director of CATCH, an acronym for Charitable Assistance for Community’s Homeless, was asked to resign from the highly successful City of Boise program, no one would say anything on the record. “I really can’t talk about it,” said Adam Park, Mayor Dave Bieter’s communications director in November 2011. “It’s related to a personnel action,” said Bruce Chatterton, then-planning and development director for the city. But for the five years prior, the city couldn’t say enough about CATCH. The program established its own office on River Street, produced radio and television public service announcements, and trumpeted regional and national awards for the innovative program, which provides long-term housing to homeless families, boasting an 85 percent to 90 percent success rate. But now, an organization calling itself CATCH Inc. is about to swing open the doors of a new headquarters on Americana Boulevard, promising to serve as many as 20 homeless families in Ada and Canyon counties at any given time. However both programs—the City of Boise’s CATCH and the nonprofit CATCH Inc.—are both serving the same population with only nuanced differences. “I don’t know if there is a difference. Come to think of it, there isn’t a difference,” said CATCH Inc. board member Ross Mason. “CATCH Inc. does what CATCH always did. It helps the homeless. The fact that we have an ‘Inc.’ at the end of our name is for a nonprofit designation and nothing more.” City officials said Mason was right, to a point. “Yes, the services are very similar, but to say they’re the same program isn’t correct,” said Park. “We have different staff, and we’re serving different families. But we’re both doing similar work.” Mason was quick to add that much of last year’s drama,which played out behind closed doors between CATCH and CATCH WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

CATCH Inc. management, staff and board members (left to right): Abby White, Bruce MacMahon, Greg Morris (executive director), Ross Mason, Craig Hepworth and Beck Fenton.

“There have been skirmishes (at previous events) between people at the venue and people who don’t like their racist

Inc., was what he called “behind-the-scenes minutia.” In addition to being a board member for CATCH Inc., Mason is also regional director of Southwest Idaho’s 10 counties for the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare. And when Morris was ready to help create CATCH Inc. to include services to the homeless beyond Boise’s borders, Mason said his department couldn’t have been happier. “Dick Armstrong”—director of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare—“loves this program,” said Mason. “When I asked his administrative assistant if he would speak at our grand opening”—on Thursday, Oct. 4—“she said ‘yes’ without even looking at his schedule.” And as for plans for expansion, CATCH Inc. has already opened the doors for a Canyon County office with additional satellite locations in the pipeline. “We would love to have CATCH Inc. statewide,” said Mason. “Twin Falls is the next logical place, and now it’s on the horizon.” But first, Morris said it was important to make CATCH Inc. a nonprofit. “Let’s be honest, donors prefer to give to a 501(c)3,” said Morris. “We needed to augment, and we needed to be able to write grants. We tried being a nonprofit while still operating as a city program for a year, but we got to a place ….” Morris paused. “We got to a place where it became uncomfortable.” But Morris quickly smiled. “And here we are,” he said pointing to a 4,000-square-foot warehouse recently refurbished into office space for counseling adults while children have fun in a nearby play room. The building also includes ample storage space for furniture and supplies, which families will be able to access when they’re ready for a fresh start. But the City of Boise is far from clos-

ing the doors of its own CATCH program. In fact, city officials told Boise Weekly that $165,000 in general funds are earmarked for Fiscal Year 2013 to fund the city’s CATCH, with plans to continue accepting homeless families into the program for the foreseeable future. “We’re continuing to accept applications. As a matter of fact, we’re placing a seventh family into our program this coming week,” said Beth Geagan, who was brought on board by the city in April to run its CATCH program. “We’re going to manage this as effectively and efficiently as possible and serve as many families as we can.” Long before Geagan took over Boise’s CATCH program, Beck Fenton worked as a case manager for CATCH, assisting more than 80 homeless families. But she has since been recruited by Morris to leave the city and join his new team at CATCH Inc. “I have the best job in the world,” said Fenton, who is fond of handing out business cards that entitle the receiver to a free hug. “When I meet the families, they’re already in a shelter. I help them find housing and help them get a job or, quite often, a better job.” Fenton said it is a common misconception that all homeless adults are unemployed. “Many of them have jobs, but they still have countless obstacles keeping them from getting housing,” she said. “When they’re in a survival situation, they don’t want to acknowledge any of the pressures. So I teach them to take the blinders off.” Morris said the program’s success rate is tangible. “We consider any family that can pay its own rent after six months in our program a success,” said Morris. “We consistently experience an 85 to 90 percent success rate.” 9 In the shadow of what Morris called “the great recession,” he said

messages,” said Sgt. Jeff Basterrechea of Boise Police Depar tment’s Gang Intelligence Unit. “A lot of times, you already have violence in the concer ts and then you have people come on board with alcohol or drugs.” Hammerfest, which has seen previous incarnations in Australia, Italy and Wales, is promoted by Dallas-based Hammerskin Nation. According to the Anti-Defamation League, Hammerskin Nation “is the most violent and best organized neo-Nazi skinhead group in the United States.” “I don’t even know how many people to expect,” Basterrechea told Citydesk. “I don’t know why they’re having it here, to be honest.” Hammerskin members often congregate via a website called Crew38, with details about the concert location and lodging accommodations available only to vetted members. On that site, one member wrote that people who were interested in attending the show should message “one of the Idaho brothers,” saying, “There’s no way anyone we don’t already know is gettin in.” Law enforcement can’t stop the concert unless there’s violence, disturbing the peace or other violations. “I would have parents be very aware. This is not going to be your typical heavy metal concert,” said Basterrechea. “It’s going to have a message and it’s probably a message about trying to recruit you into the skinhead movement.” —Andrew Crisp

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 7


NEWS THE FAR M S TEAD

LEFT OR RIGHT The ultimate political trap

sign up to win free stuf f at boiseweekly.com

ANDREW CRISP

8 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

For Jim and Hillary Lowe, this year’s race for the White House is ... wait for it ... corny. Their interest in all things presidential is particularly noteworthy to low-flying aircraft buzzing over their Meridian cornfield at the corner of Eagle and Overland roads. “It’s the hot topic,” said Jim Lowe. “It’s all over the place so we thought we’d do a little different take.” In 16 seasons, the Lowe’s Farmstead Festival corn maze has taken a lot of different shapes, including the Boise State Broncos’ logo and a bumblebee, a trout and Jim and Hillary Lowe plan for their corn mazes for a full year. It takes more than a week to cut the Abraham Lincoln. The current occupant of design at their Meridian cornfield at the corner of Eagle and Overland roads. the White House, President Barack Obama, is featured in this year’s maze alongside challenger Mitt Romney, covering nearly 20 through the season can see the pumpkin size of the corn field. Then Lowe and his acres of corn. crew took to the corn, painting Obama and levels in the two different towers,” he said. “I’ve got 260 rows and they’re 2-and“We’ve also made it available online at Romney’s faces onto the ground. a-half feet apiece. Maybe 800 feet or so pumpkinpoll.com.” “We just start measuring and counting from bottom to top, in total; something While Lowe said he voted in the Repuband walking in circles,” said Lowe. “Hopelike that,” said Lowe. “Mazes and politics lican caucus, his family’s corn maze isn’t fully it looks right when it’s done.” are all about left and right. It’s all about designed to take a side. After visitors navigate the choices.” “People are passionate about politics,” maze, staff will hand them a As for which is the best stratsaid Lowe. “That’s a good thing. But a lot pumpkin to be placed in one egy, left of right, Lowe shrugged. of our conversation isn’t really face to face; of two large baskets, one for “That’s up to you. Some people rather it’s on message boards and blogs Obama, the other for Romney. say always go left, some people and whatnot. And sometimes we get a little Lowe called the unofficial study always go right. Sometimes it coarse in the way that we interact. I think his “pumpkin poll.” works, sometimes it doesn’t.” it’s good for people to be passionate. “We thought we’d take our “Vote With Your Feet” is But we don’t want to be too serious own little twist on a straw poll,” etched into the corn field as part out here. Whether you’re a Democrat or he said. “We have a lot of straw of the maze. VIDEO: BW visits the 2012 corn maze. Republican or something else altogether, out there but pumpkins are our “There’s actually two different we all like to have a good time. We like to thing.” mazes. Phase No. 1 just goes up come out with our family to improve our The Lowe farm will stack the through Obama on the left side, quality of life. That’s what this is all about. and Phase No. 2 goes up through Romney.” candidates’ pumpkins in two towers near The politics, it can be kind of crazy, but it Interstate 84. The two portraits were sketched out can be kind of fun, too.” “People driving by on the freeway online, creating a blueprint scaled to the

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS I D O N ’T K N OW I F T HE R E I S A D I F F EREN C E . ” —CATCH Inc. board member

“ “

T O S AY W E ’ R E T H E S A M E PROGRA M I S N ’T C O R R E C T. ” —City Hall official

the need has never been greater. “We’ve seen a lot of first-time 7 homeless families that have never been on any support system before,” he said. Bruce MacMahon, director of accounting for Idaho Power and board president of CATCH Inc., said the new program, operating separate offices in Ada and Canyon counties, has secured solid donations and grants to grow the program further. “The annual size of our organization for 2013 will be close to $600,000,” he said. “That should be enough for us to serve as many as 20 families in Ada and Canyon counties at any given time.” But Teresa McLeod, assistant to Mayor Dave Bieter who works extensively on the city’s homeless initiatives, was more cautious about CATCH Inc.’s potential growth. “If they can scale up to that degree, that’s wonderful. But that’s doesn’t prove financial sustainability,” said McLeod. “For instance, we know that CATCH Inc. has a mortgage now that they didn’t have previously.” McLeod said the City of Boise had no plans to scale back CATCH, simply because there is a CATCH Inc. “Until we’re confident that there is one or more nonprofits with the self-sufficiency to operate this program, we’ll continue to steward it under the city banner,” said McLeod. “Our biggest concern would be to pass this off to an organization that maybe has the heart to serve these families but doesn’t have the financial track record to sustain the program in the long run.” But CATCH Inc.’s immediate financial outlook looks pretty strong, according to Mason, who told BW that state and federal dollars, through the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program, will soon begin a direct pipeline of cash into the nonprofit. “I can’t stress enough how important CATCH Inc. is to the Department of Health and Welfare,” said Mason. “And the departWWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

ment reflects that by providing the TANF funding. This is money to be used to help families help themselves, and this program fits that idea to a ‘T.’ It supports them temporarily until they get back on their feet.” Boise City Council Member TJ Thomson looks at the city’s version of CATCH as something that won’t be around forever. “I see [the current situation with two programs] as a transition and I think, not too far from now, there will just be CATCH Inc.,” said Thomson. “I think the reason that CATCH needs to stay in the city’s budget is that we’re currently serving [six] families through the program, and we don’t want to put them out in the cold. I really don’t foresee the city keeping CATCH.” In addition to $165,000 in taxpayer dollars for the city’s CATCH, Thomson pointed to more than $1 million inside the city’s FY 2013 budget supporting homeless services, ranging from $225,715 in community block grant programs for organizations such as Terry Reilly Health Services and the Women’s and Children’s Alliance to $240,000 for Allumbaugh House, a detox and mental health provider. “We can’t take the weakest of our population and push them down,” said Thomson. “This isn’t a statutory requirement; addressing homelessness is a moral obligation of city government.” Thomson said the recent incarnation of CATCH Inc. made perfect sense. “They wanted to take it to a nonprofit level with all good intentions,” said Thomson. “The mission is exactly the same.” And while the city’s CATCH may indeed share a similar mission with CATCH Inc. more than a few city hall officials will be keeping a close eye on the new entity with a familiar name. “We’re always thrilled to see a nonprofit rise in the community to provide a housingfirst model that we’ve been using for some time,” said Park. “We wish them the best and hope that they’re successful. We know the need is out there.”

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 9


10 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 11


LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

You can’t see the leg shackles around Noble Hardesty’s ankles as he turns out the art for Crooked Fence Brewing Company’s Artist Sweatshop.

Short attention span? Catch 10 shorts, including A Curios Conjunction of Coincidences, at the Manhattan Short Film Festival at The Flicks.

FRIDAY OCT. 5 work it

THURSDAY OCT. 4

ARTIST SWEATSHOP

reels MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL For those who have the attention span of a first-grader and think that 140 characters is still too much per tweet, a feature-length film is probably pure torture. To combat your cinematic attention deficit, check out the Manhattan Short Film Festival (emphasis on the short). The Flicks will once again host the festival Thursday, Oct. 4. While Boise has welcomed this event for more than five years, the festival has been taking place since 1998. What began as a sort of guerilla-style festival, with televisions attached to a truck projecting 16 short films in the middle of New York City, has grown into a worldwide event. Each year, a collection of 10 short films submitted from around the world are shown across the globe, uniting hundreds of thousands of people in the name of art and film. Each Flicks attendee will be given a ballot to vote for which film he/she loves the most (or in the case of pseudo film critics, hate the least), and votes will be tallied worldwide. The victor will be announced Sunday, Oct. 7. If the allure of independent films isn’t enough to get you there, remember that The Flicks has a full range of beer and wine, and everything is better with a drink in your hand. Visit manhattanshort.com for more info about the films and a trailer of the 2012 festival. 7 p.m; $9, $7 students and ages 65 and older. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

THURSDAY OCT. 4 talk DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES A mind may be a terrible thing to waste, but trying to understand the way it works can cause you to waste a ton of time. Unless you’re Steven Pinker. The experimental psychologist, Harvard professor

and contributor to The New York Times, Time and The New Republic has published a slew of books that investigate language, the mind and human nature. Pinker will speak about his research and latest book, The Better Angles of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined, at the Morrison Center Thursday, Oct. 4, at 7 p.m. Pinker’s visit is part of the Distinguished Lecture Series, hosted by Boise State. The series occurs twice each year and aims to be

12 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

intellectually stimulating and invite discussion. “Dr. Pinker offers a provocative thesis about the decline of violence in modern history,” said Boise State Honors College director Andrew Finstuen. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions and talk with Pinker after his lecture. 7 p.m., FREE. Morrison Center, 2201 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1609, go.boisestate.edu/distinguishedlectures.

Zombies and ghouls will haunt Crooked Fence Brewing Company when the Artist Sweatshop returns Friday, Oct. 5, for the ghastly Halloween edition. “It should be a lot of blood and guts,” said artist and event organizer Kelly Knopp. Crooked Fence plans to kidnap 11 local artists, chain them to desks at its Garden City location and force them to churn out sketches. With sweaty brows and fingers stained with ink, a group of artists poured over paper at Crooked Fence Brewing in April during the inaugural Artist Sweatshop, while art fans jockeyed to snap up their prints. OK, so they aren’t exactly kidnapped, but the Artist Sweatshop does put artists in a tough situation—they’re asked to pen sketches on the factory floor while an eager audience watches. April’s attendees sipped beer, ogled fast-moving pens and pencils, and waited to nab original work from artists such as Noble Hardesty and Julia Green. As soon as the artists finish their sketches, they hang them from a clothesline running above their heads. The first person to fork over cash is ruled the victor of that artistic spoil. Prices range from $5-$10, cash only, with 100 percent of the profits given to the hard-working artists. The sweatshop’s second iteration will feature Hardesty, Knopp, Cale Cathey, Conrad Garner, Cody Rutty, Steve Willhite, Pickle, Grant Olsen, Jason Large, Danielle Demaray and James McKain. The event is only for the legal-to-drink set. P. Ditty’s Wrap Wagon will serve wraps out front of the brewery while Crooked Fence pours the new Grim Reaper Imperial Black IPA inside. 6:30-10 p.m., FREE admission. Crooked Fence Brewing Co., 5242 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, crookedfencebrewing.com.

SATURDAYSUNDAY OCT. 6-7 pumpkin party IDAHO BOTANICAL GARDEN HARVEST FESTIVAL Celebrating the shift from the sweltering heat of summer to the cool pumpkinprimping temperatures of fall requires celebration,

and the Idaho Botanical Garden’s Har vest Festival 2012 is just the right seasonal soiree. The first day of fall was Sept. 22. To celebrate, IBG invites visitors of all ages to celebrate the autumnal transformation in the shadow of the garden’s foliage Saturday, Oct. 6, and Sunday, Oct. 7, from noon-6 p.m. Live music, hayrides and IBG’s straw-filled historical figures in the Scarecrow Stroll will create some falltime fun.

A farmers market chock full of local vendors with fresh seasonal ingredients will assemble within the garden both days giving visitors a chance to purchase pumpkins, food, seasonal beers, wine and freshpressed apple cider. On Saturday, the fiddle-wielding Jr. Jammers, Tyler Clayton featuring Quinn Perr y and Grand Falconer will provide live music. On Sunday, Possum Livin’ and High Desert Band will provide their bootWWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


JEN GR AB LE

IDAHO HU M ANE S OC IETY

FIND

Oh, Rocky, you’re back at Stage Coach Theater.

BACON MOCHA

FRIDAY-SATURDAY OCT. 5-6 fun theater THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW A night at the theater would typically rule out water guns, flashlights and strange interactive dances. But the Rocky Horror Show is anything but typical. Perhaps it’s that atypicality that has allowed it to retain a cult following for more than 40 years. Or maybe it’s just that people really like aliens, sweet transvestites and song titles that rhyme with Janet. But whatever the cause of Rocky Horror’s success, it’s evident that Boise loves it just as much as the rest of the world. Stage Coach Theater will once again stage the fantastically absurd work of Richard O’Brien beginning Friday, Oct. 5. The 15-performance run will continue through Wednesday, Oct. 31, with midnight performances on Saturdays, Oct. 20, and Oct. 27. Dan Allen, Carly Wasserstein, Todd Ryan King, Shannon E. Gans, Jordan Danger Peterson, Joseph Wright, Russell Smith Jr., Eugenia Horne, Kierra Hansen, Coralee Sharp, Melanie Falls, Hailey Jorday and Erin Fahey will bring the story of a newlywed couple’s strange adventure to the Boise stage alongside Minerva Jayne, who will once again play mad genius Dr. Frankenfurter. Rocky Horror virgins can expect an exceptionally interactive theater experience, with veterans singing along and shouting often-outlandish phrases. Purchase a kit of Rocky Horror accessories for $5, and enjoy doing the sorts of things you were never allowed to do during childhood—like throwing toilet paper, shooting water guns indoors and making lots of noise. Reservations can be made up to one hour before show time by calling Stage Coach’s reservation line. A discount is available for students and military personnel with a valid ID for Thursday performances. Fridays-Saturdays, Oct. 5-Oct. 27, 8:15 p.m.; Thursdays, Oct. 11-25, and Wednesday, Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m.; Saturdays, Oct. 20, and Oct. 27, midnight; $20. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. stompin’ ditties. A coop full of chickens will also join the festival, with urban gardening expert Gretchen Anderson, author of The Backyard Chicken Fight, on hand to answer questions. A scale-model locomotive chugging along railroad lines that will run through the garden, courtesy of

S U B M I T

the Southern Idaho Garden Railway Society. Noon-6 p.m., $6, $3 IBG and Boise Co-op members and children ages 4-12, FREE for children ages 4 and younger. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiar y Road, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Stretch your legs, along with your dog’s legs, in support of Idaho Humane Society at See Spot Walk.

SATURDAY OCT. 6 bark SEE SPOT WALK Most individuals can be divided into two categories—dog people and cat people. Not to choose sides, but we’re pretty sure there’s a reason that nobody refers to cats as man’s best friend, unless of course, that man happens to enjoy passive-aggressive felines who occasionally claw your face in the middle of the night for no damn reason. So, for everyone aside from that man, be sure to bring your four-legged friend to the 20th annual celebration of See Spot Walk Saturday, Oct. 6. This one-mile stroll through Julia Davis Park begins promptly at 10 a.m., when children, adults, family, friends, co-workers and teams are encouraged to bring their pups to walk in support of Idaho Humane Society’s homeless pet shelter. Part of each registration fee directly benefits the Idaho Humane Society, but if that isn’t enough puppy love for you, participants can make extra donations online as well, and invite friends and family to make pledges in their name. Basic registration is $20 for adults, $15 for children and FREE for four-legged friends. Participants will receive one T-shirt and a dog bandana. Even if you’re missing the most important part of the walk (your dog), you can still participate, and Idaho Humane Society has a finite number of shelter dogs that you can register to walk with. After the walk, dogs and their people can enjoy games and contests, cruise by microchip and vaccination booths, and meet some adorable canines up for adoption. 9 a.m., walk begins at 10 a.m. $20 adults, $15 children. Julia Davis Park Bandshell, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-3872760, idahohumanesociety.org.

Those blasting down Chinden Boulevard may have found themselves rubbernecking at a marquee board so wacky, so preposterous, that they concluded they didn’t read it properly. But it’s no mirage: All the Buzz Coffee does, in fact, serve piping hot bacon mochas. $2.95 for 12 oz.-$5.45 for 32 oz. Mary Lynn Dehner ALL THE BUZZ didn’t set out to merge 2941 Chinden Blvd., meat and mocha. People Garden City kept coming through the 208-342-7596 drive-thru of her family owned kiosk (formerly Hotties Mochas and More) and requesting bacon in their morning Joe. But it wasn’t until she and her son saw a piece on the Food Channel about a bacon milkshake that she took the request seriously, realizing that it must be some sort of flavoring syrup. The bacon syrup, unavailable locally, had to be specially ordered from Torani. It isn’t like drinking from a cup of drippings, though. It’s far closer to a traditional mocha than one would believe. Instead of a strong meaty flavor, it has a rich mapley sweetness, with hints of cured bacon mixed in with the existing richness of a chocolatey mocha. It’s certainly not for the diabetic set, but if there’s a better meat-themed coffee beverage available on the side of the road in Garden City, we don’t know about it. —Josh Gross

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 13


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY OCT. 3 Animals & Pets CUTTING EDGE CONSERVATION IN BELIZE—Sharon Matola, founding director of the Belize Zoo and subject of the book The Last Flight of the Scarlet Macaw, will speak about her work to conserve raptors and endangered species in the small tropical nation of Belize. Her illustrated presentation is FREE and open to the public. 7 p.m. FREE. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208362-8687, peregrinefund.org.

THURSDAY OCT. 4 On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: MICHAEL WHEELS—Enjoy some jokes at the comedy show followed by dueling pianos and dance the night away with DJ Mighty Delta One. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: TYLER BOEH—Also featuring Alex Falcone. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs.com, by calling 208941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com. SOMETHING’S AFOOT—This merry musical murder mystery takes a satirical poke at Agatha Christie mysteries as 10 people in an isolated country house are picked off by clever, fiendish devices. The question is: “Who dunnit?” All dinner-show tickets for Friday and Saturday performances must be purchased at least one day in advance online. 7 p.m. $15-$18. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Workshops & Classes VEGAN COOKING CLASSES— Join Francoise Dunn, a health practitioner and instructor of vegan cooking and raw food preparation, for two classes, where you will learn facts about the standard American diet vs. the nature diet and how to prepare meals that will help you be healthy. 6-8 p.m. $40-$50. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Literature FRIENDS OF THE EAGLE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE—Find hardcover, paperback, children’s, rare and specialty books, as well as movies at this fundraiser for Eagle Public Library. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Eagle Public Library, 100 N. Stierman Way, Eagle, 208939-6814, eaglepubliclibrary.org.

14 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Talks & Lectures

Odds & Ends

DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES—Cognitive scientist Steven Pinker will speak about The Better Angels of our Nature. Visit boisestate.edu/distinguishedlectures for more info. See Picks, Page 12. 7 p.m. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu.

LADIES’ LOUNGE—Swig some cocktails with the ladies of Boise Weekly and enjoy prize giveaways, drink specials and oh so much more. Visit BW’s promo page to get the 4-1-1. 5 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs. com.

Kids & Teens SCHOOL’S OUT MINI ART CAMP—Join the artistic fun during teacher in-service days. Create at least two projects each day while learning about different cultures, art styles and more. For ages 6-12. 1-3:30 p.m. $45-$50. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

FRIDAY OCT. 5 Festivals & Events HOKUM HOEDOWN SQUARE DANCE AND OLD-TIMEY MUSIC SERIES—Enjoy music from the Hokum Hi-Flyers while you learn square-dance moves, followed by an old-time hootenanny. 7 p.m. $5, $15 per family. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

NOISE/CD REVIEW THE WELL SUITED, THE STORY OF JAMES DOUGLAS In an age of easy access to digital recording and instant Internet distribution to a single-driven market, spending two years writing and recording six songs and releasing them as a hard-copy album seems old-fashioned. But that’s what Boise band The Well Suited did for its debut EP, The Story of James Douglas. But it isn’t just the band’s recording style that is wistfully retro. The EP’s sound tosses out the simple verse-chorus structure to employ a more complex lyrical and auditory story that owes largely to ’70s prog-rock. The album uses big rock riffs, layers of analog synthesizers, sprawling arrangements and fantastical lyrics to explore the concept of love in the time of a robot apocalypse. The third track, “I’m Your Machine,” is the closest thing the album has to a single, with a catchy singalong section and a driving beat. The rest of the EP moves like a single rolling composition with elements of classic rock stalwarts like Rick Wakeman and Pink Floyd. And while it lacks some of the masterful recording fidelity of an album like Dark Side of the Moon, The Story of James Douglas is still well composed, complex, unpredictable, moody, poppy and occasionally frustrating. The Story of James Douglas isn’t the sort of thing you’ll belt out while driving down the freeway, but there’s a decent chance that if you hit play right as the lion roars in The Wizard of Oz, you might find it sheds a very different light on the Tin Man. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


THANK-YOU FOR VOTING

8 DAYS OUT On Stage

Art

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: MICHAEL WHEELS—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

ARTIST SWEATSHOP— Watch a slew of local artists create sketches in rapid succession and battle it out to take one home. See Picks, Page 12. 6:30-10 p.m., FREE. Crooked Fence Brewing Co., 5242 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, crookedfencebrewing.com.

LIQUID LAUGHS: TYLER BOEH—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

BOSCO SHOW OPENING—Preview art from many Boise Open Studios Concept members, meet the artists, enjoy snacks and a no-host bar while you pick up your free studio tour map. The exhibition will be up through Sunday, Nov. 25. 7-10 p.m. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—Go along with Brad and Janet on a strange adventure with this cult classic. Call Stage Coach Theatre up to one hour prior to show time to reserve your tickets. See Picks, Page 13. 8:15 p.m. $20. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Literature

SOMETHING’S AFOOT—See Thursday. 6:30 p.m. $20 show only, $39 dinner-show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

FRIENDS OF THE EAGLE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE—See Thursday. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Eagle Public Library, 100 N. Stierman Way, Eagle, 208-9396814, eaglepubliclibrary.org.

Food & Drink

Kids & Teens

ADULT COOKING CLASS—This Fall Faves class involves three courses and a dessert. Visit the website for a complete menu. 6:30-9 p.m. $50. Fuel for the Soul, LLC, 1941 N. 18th St., Boise, 208-342-7118, fuelforthesoulboise.com.

DREAM BIG—A monster and his friend go to a costume party in this puppet show, for children ages 7 and younger. 2 p.m. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

SCHOOL’S OUT MINI ART CAMP—See Thursday. 1-3:30 p.m. $45-$50. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

SATURDAY OCT. 6

Best Movie Theater!

Festivals & Events BALLET IDAHO’S MASKED BALL GALA—Join Ballet Idaho for its annual fundraiser. Mascherato seating: $150, includes a sit-down dinner and starts at 6:30 p.m. Bistro seating: $50, includes light appetizers and starts at 8:30 p.m. Masks are required and creative attire is strongly encouraged. 6:30 p.m. $50-$150. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, riversideboise.com.

208-342-4222 www.theflicksboise.com

FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL—Enjoy traditional fall activities with live music, hay rides, games, a farmers market, children’s activities and fall brews and wine. See Picks, Page 12. Noon-6 p.m. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. HOLISTIC AND METAPHYSICAL FAIR—This event will feature professionals and practitioners in the holistic and new age industries, readers, healers, astrologists, massage therapists, holistic nutritionists, tarot readers, shamans, Reiki and energy workers, psychics, angel healers, aromatherapists, acupuncturists, ayurveda practitioners, Feng Shui masters, intuitive empaths and other light workers. Email goldhealing@gmail.com or call 208-429-6393 for more info. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Collister Shopping Center, 4764 W. State St., Boise.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: MICHAEL WHEELS—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: TYLER BOEH—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

9:30AM - 1:30PM

8th Street from Bannock to Main Street & on the Grove Plaza

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—See Friday. 8:15 p.m. $20. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

SOMETHING’S AFOOT—See Thursday. 6:30 p.m. $20 show only, $39 dinner-show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Chef Abbigail Carlson - Cooking with fresh, seasonal produce from the Market - Saturdays Q 10am to Noon

This Week at the Market -

1st gourds and pumpkins of the season!

* Fresh locally grown produce, herbs, & flowers * Idaho Specialty Foods & Wines * Great Selection of Local Artwork

Concerts

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

LANGROISE TRIO—Geoffrey Trabichoff, David Johnson and Samuel Smith present the first concert in their 2012-2013 series. 7:30 p.m. $8-$10. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 15


8 DAYS OUT Food & Drink ADULT COOKING CLASS—This Thai Die class involves three courses and a dessert of favorite Thai dishes. Visit the website for a full menu. 6:30-9 p.m. $55. Fuel for the Soul, LLC, 1941 N. 18th St., Boise, 208-342-7118, fuelforthesoulboise.com. SLOPPY JOE EATING CONTEST—Do you love, love, love sloppy joes? Is your favorite part of Billy Madison when the lunch lady said she “made ‘em extra sloppy for ya?” Are you not grossed out by people downing mass quantities of joes while keeping with the “sloppy” part of the name? Then this is the event for you. Visit archies-place.com for more info, and the boiseweekly.com promo page for the chance to win free entry into the competition. See Food News, Page 28 and enter to win a chance for a free entry at Boise Weekly’s promo page. 4-10 p.m. $5 entry and one beer; $15 entry, beer and buffet; $40 to compete. Payette Brewing Company, 111 W. 33rd St., Garden City, 208-344-0011, payettebrewing.com.

ability to pay. Call 208-343-0571 for more information. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. ISU-Meridian, 1311 E. Central Drive, Meridian, 208-3731700, isu.edu/meridian.

Odds & Ends MAD HOT FOR BALLROOM— USA Dance Boise is celebrating National Ballroom Dance Week with a dance showcase featuring local dance teams, couples and professional Latin dancers Thomas and Izabella Lewandowski. A portion of the proceeds from the event goes to help support local youth dance activities. For more info and prices, visit madhotforballroom12.eventbrite. com. 6 p.m. Boise Square Dance Center, 6534 Diamond St., Boise, 208-342-0890, treasurevalleycwda.org.

Animals & Pets OKTOBERFEST FUNDRAISER FOR MCPAWS—This annual fundraiser for MCPAWS Regional Animal Shelter brings a little piece of Bavaria to the area. For a donation, participants receive three beer tastings, a MCPAWS reusable shopping bag, MCPAWS keepsake item and sticker. For more information, call MCPAWS at 208-634-3647 or visit mcpaws. org/news-events/oktoberfest. html. Noon-6 p.m. $10 donation with beer tastings, FREE for those younger than 21. Alpine Village, 600 N. Third St., McCall, 888634-3430, alpinevillagemccall. com. SEE SPOT WALK—Walk with your canine or sign up to walk a shelter pup in this annual Idaho Humane Society fundraiser. See Picks, Page 13. 9 a.m., $20 adults, $15 children. Julia Davis Park Bandshell, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., 22 Boise, 208-387-2760, idahohumanesociety.org.

Art ART IN THE BAR VII—Mingle with members of Boise’s art scene with more than 40 artists displaying and selling their work. All ages welcome; full bar available with ID. Presented by Dead Bird Local Art and Framing. Noon-11:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

Literature FRIENDS OF THE EAGLE PUBLIC LIBRARY BOOK SALE—See Thursday. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Eagle Public Library, 100 N. Stierman Way, Eagle, 208-939-6814, eaglepubliclibrary.org.

Sports & Fitness IDAHO HEALTH, BEAUTY AND FITNESS FAIR—Looking for healthier lifestyle options? Visit with doctors, dentists and health-care professionals, along with fitness, nutrition and beauty experts. Stimulate your senses with practical, take-home solutions for better nutrition and physical activities. Get your flu shot and select from health screenings all in one visit. Bring the entire family. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208287-5650, expoidaho.com.

Kids & Teens FREE SHRINERS SCREENING FOR CHILDREN—Children age 18 and younger will be screened for orthopedic and spinal cord injuries, burns and cleft lip and palate. Screenings, which are FREE, will be conducted by volunteer physicians and ISU-Meridian clinical faculty and health-science students. After examination, a child may be referred to a Shriners Hospital for Children for further treatment. Acceptance is based on a child’s medical needs and not on the family’s

16 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

NOISE/CD REVIEW WALKING PAPERS, WALKING PAPERS The seductive neo-blues of Seattle’s The Missionary Position is already one the most compelling sounds in the Northwest. But a dose of star power rarely hurts, and that’s just what the band’s sound gets with Walking Papers, a new collaboration between The Missionary Position’s singer and guitarist Jefferson Angell, Barrett Martin of Screaming Trees and Guns ’n’ Roses alum Duff McKagan. The band’s debut self-titled album, released Oct. 2, also features Pearl Jam guitarist Mike McCready. Because of the distinctiveness of Angell’s richly toned blues moan and guitar work, much of the album follows in the vein of the two existing Missionary Position albums, especially on early tracks like “Your Secret’s Safe with Me” and “Red Envelopes.” Walking Papers really sets itself apart when it puts aside the fuzz guitar and explores blues territory more in the vein of Tom Waits than the proto-grunge of John Lee Hooker. “A Place Like This” has a lagging Latin beat with sparse tremolo guitar and flourishes of trumpet. It apes the seduction Angell’s work is known for but with a restrained, evil jazz sound like a smooth “Jockey Full of Bourbon”-era Tom Waits. It is followed by “Independence Day,” a driving tune with watery guitar textures layered over driving, come-hither fuzz riffs. On the whole, Walking Papers’ debut album is cleanly split between two sounds: big blues rock riffs and spooky vocals, and more experimental tracks. Both are solid work, but listeners may find themselves skipping back and forth between the sound they prefer. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


1ST THURSDAY

New Artists in Residence, from left to right: Abby Christensen, Pam Demo, Tyler Bush, Tuong Anh Ens.

RESIDENT GOOD Examining the economic impact of the 8th Street Marketplace AIR Program TARA MORGAN The idea was just crazy enough to work: Take two revamped BODO buildings struggling to find tenants in the recession, fill the empty office spaces with a rotating lineup of artists, then watch as the buildings attract the attention of other, paying creative types. “When the program started, the 8th Street Marketplace had just been renovated but there was an incredible amount of empty spaces,” explained Karen Bubb, public arts manager at the Boise City Department of Arts and History. “And over the three years that we’ve been doing this program, that has really changed; they have been renting more and more spaces.” Some creative tenants who have moved into the 8th Street Marketplace buildings since the start of the AIR program in 2009 include architecture firms like HZ Studio and Think Architecture, Red Sky Public Relations, Renee Vaughn Design Group and NfiniT Gallery. “Every time I mention it when I’m showing spaces, ‘Oh, the landlord is very benevolent to the arts, he loves the arts and we have this program,’ everyone’s like, ‘Oh, that’s so cool,’” said Debbie Smith, 8th Street Marketplace property manager. But in addition to drawing potential tenants to wander through the BODO buildings every month during First Thursday, the AIR program also provides a launching pad for new artists. The residencies—which take place in spaces sprinkled throughout the Mercantile and Northrup buildings and in Renewal Underground—used to be three months long, but have since been extended to six. “It continues to be a space where artists can gain visibility,” said Bubb. “We’ve had some artists who have applied repeatedly until they’ve been selected and others who are brand new to the program—brand new to the area—so I feel like it’s a place that continues to be a welcoming beacon as an opportunity for artists.” One of those new-to-Boise artists is Abby Christensen, a mixed-media conceptual visual artist who recently graduated from Trinity Christian College in Chicago. Christensen will occupy a room in the Northrup Building WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

starting First Thursday, Oct. 4, and running through March 2013. “Her work samples were really varied from what looked like a stack of books on a shelf to something that looked like an outline of a layer to library indexes,” explained Bubb. “So she does small installations that make you think about human presence.” Christensen plans to continue exploring the idea of the index in her AIR space. “I’m excited to just dive in and have a space to work. … Coming from Chicago, I didn’t have a studio there so I was working out of my home so that’s going to be very exciting and it will allow me to expand my project, which I think will be nice in a new area to be able to work bigger and work more,” she said. Mixed media sculptor and performance artist Tyler James Bush (Northrup Building) is also amped to have more room. “The biggest pain in the butt as an artist is always having to re-put everything away and then drag it out the next day,” said Bush. “So the cool thing about this is, all I have to do is lock the door, and then when I come back the next day, I can pick up right where I left off.” On First Thursday, Oct. 4, Bush will set up a retrospective of his Home on the Strange series, which included a live performance art installation of poker playing deer ladies at Modern Art in 2011 and an exhibit at the Eagle Performing Arts Center. From there, he will move on to new projects, which will include screen-printing, stop motion animation and 3D video projection mapping. “I’m going to be doing some celebrity silk screening, like Andy Warhol inspired; that will be kind of the next phase,” said Bush. Other new AIR artists include mixed media visual artist Mary Lantz (Mercantile), who creates woven collages from her cut up watercolor paintings; Pam Demo, also a collage artist, who dyes her own paper and assembles it into layered landscapes (Northrup); and fine arts digital printmaker Tuong Anh Ens (Renewal). But artists and business owners aren’t the only ones invested in the AIR program. Boise State’s recently created Department of Com-

munity and Regional Planning is using the program as a lens through which to examine arts economic development in Boise. “What we’re basically asking with the project that my students are doing is, has it been an effective downtown economic development tool? And if it can be strengthened or improved, then how do we go about doing that in an efficient and sustainable manner?” explained Amanda Johnson, Boise State assistant professor. The class, State, Regional and Community Economic Development, has three masters students seeking to quantify the impact the program has had on the community as part of a larger arts ecology within Boise and the region. “It’s really this quest to figure out how the AIR program has shaped creative placemaking and development in the core while also trying to figure out how local artists make a living as creative professionals, particularly in a time when innovative economies are such a high priority,” said Johnson. “They’ll also be analyzing commercial and nonprofit arts industries and occupation in the city as a whole,” she added. “We’ll also be interviewing the developers that were really visionary in participating and leading this program to get a sense of what their experiences were. And all of this is in partnership with the city.” At this point, the Arts and History department only provides help with administrative support and artist selection for the 8th Street AIR program, but department officials eventually hope to launch a similar program of their own. “We don’t provide any funding for this program, but we’re looking in the future—are there opportunities for us to have spaces that the city invests in as an artists in residence space?” Bubb said. “But to make those kinds of policy and financial shifts, we have to have more data, more information about the economic impact of this program.” And that’s exactly what they’ll have as Boise State’s fall semester draws to a close.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 17


1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS East Side BANDANNA RUNNING AND WALKING—A stop for Pink Proj1 ect. 504 W. Main St., 208-386-9017. BASQUE MARKET—Taste some tapas, wine, sangria and paella. Festivities begin at 4 p.m. and paella will be served at approximately 6 p.m. 4-8 p.m. 608 W. Grove St., 208-4331208, thebasquemarket.com.

BASQUE MUSEUM & CULTURAL 2 CENTER—Enjoy gallery tours for the exhibit Hidden In Plain Sight: The

BRICOLAGE—Shop Bricolage’s 4 collection of unique artwork and more. 5-8 p.m. 418 S. Sixth St., 208-

Basques, and tours of the Jacobs/ Uberuaga House every half hour from 6:30-8:30 p.m. The Basque music jam session will feature local musicians. 6:30 p.m. 611 Grove St., 208343-2671, basquemuseum.com.

345-3718, bricoshoppe.com.

3

BOISE ART GLASS—Make your own pumpkin for $40 per 30-minute session, or watch artist demos while enjoying snacks. 5-11 p.m. 530 W. Myrtle St., 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com.

5

THE COTTON CLUB—View first quilts from the Cotton Club staff and others. 106 N. Sixth St., 208345-5567, cottonclub.com. THE DISTRICT COFFEE HOUSE— Have you ever wanted to try what they do on the TV show Whose Line Is It Anyway? Have some family friendly fun with hosts Recycled Minds improv troupe. 8 p.m. 110 S. Fifth St., 208343-1089, districtcoffeehouse.com.

DRAGONFLY—All clearance items are an additional 50 percent off through Saturday, Oct. 6. Free wine tasting from 5-9 p.m. 414 W. Main St., 208-338-9234. EPITOME HOME AND GARDEN— Check out new items for fall. 121 N. Fifth St., 208-333-0123. FLATBREAD COMMUNITY OVENDOWNTOWN—Kids younger than 12 eat free with a purchase. Happy hour goes until 6 p.m. and every bottle of wine is on sale, starting at $20. 615 W. Main St., 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com.

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE—View work by 6 featured artist of the month Tony Rios, who will have paintings on display. 500 W. Idaho St., 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com. GOLDY’S CORNER—View the work of more 7 than 10 local artists. 625 W. Main St., 208433-3934, goldysbreakfastbistro.com. INDIE MADE—Local crafters and artists will set up shop in pop-up tents in the Pioneer Building. 108 N. Sixth St. MELTING POT—What goes better with art 8 than wine and cheese? Enjoy all three with two glasses of wine and one cheese fondue for $22. 200 N. Sixth St., 208-383-0900, meltingpot.com. NORTH BY NORTHWEST PRODUCTIONS—A 9 Pink Project stop. 601 Broad St., 208-3457870. BIRCH—View local artwork and 10 SILLY enjoy a Proletariat wine tasting from 6-9 p.m. 507 Main St., 208-345-2505.

South Side 8TH STREET MARKETPLACE AT BODO— 11 View work by new artist in residence Mary Lantz, a mixed-media visual artist. See First Thursday, Page 17. 404 S. Eighth St., Mercantile Building, 208-338-5212, 8thstreetmarketplace. com.

12

ATOMIC TREASURES—Enjoy a mix of retro and found objects and art that are sure to make unforgettable gifts. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-344-0811, atomictreasures.com.

13

BOISE ART MUSEUM—The museum will be open until 9 p.m. for First Thursday. View works from and visit with artists participating in the upcoming Boise Open Studios Concept Weekend. Studio Art Exploration is from 5-8 p.m. and visitors can create a work of art inspired by BAM’s permanent collection. 5-8 p.m. 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum. org. BUNS IN THE OVEN—Attendees who participate in the two-minute sessions on babywearing, nursing essentials, expecting and cloth diapering will receive discount coupons and one prize-drawing entry per session. Snacks and drinks will be available. 6-9 p.m. 413 S. Eighth St., 208-3425683. BUSINESS INTERIORS OF IDAHO—View 14 local artists’ bra creations as part of Pink Project, enjoy snacks, beverages and a raffle drawing for a pink Haworth Lively chair. Tickets are $1 each and proceeds benefit the Boise affiliate Susan G. Komen Foundation. 176 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-384-5050.

15

CHIC BRIDAL BOUTIQUE—View a collection of gowns at the expanded location. A Pink Project stop. 404 S. Eighth St., 208-4248900, chicbridalboutique.com.

16

THE COLE MARR GALLERY/COFFEE HOUSE—View the bird photography of naturalist David Marr. 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, 208-336-7630. HAIRLINES—Stop in and talk to Lui the Hair Whisperer. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-383-9009. HELLY HANSEN—Buy one item, get 10 percent off. Buy two or more items and get 15 percent off your entire purchase. 860 W. Broad St., 208342-2888.

17

IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM— View the work of local artists whose work graces the cover of Boise Weekly throughout the year, and decide which piece you’d like to purchase at the Boise Weekly Cover Auction Wednesday, Oct. 17. Also a Pink Project stop. See Downtown News, Page 20. 5-9 p.m. Donation. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov. IDAPRO INDOOR GOLF—Buy one, get one special on course play all day. 333 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-336-4653, idaproindoorgolf.com.

18

JACK’S URBAN MEETING PLACE—Local Photographer Allan Ansell and Art Project Boise present the global experiment Inside Out Boise. Ansell’s large-scale photographs of everyday people in the community whose work affects the daily lives of everyone will be displayed at the corner of Ninth and Front streets. Learn more

18 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | BOISE OPEN STUDIOS COLLECTIVE ORGANIZATION 2012 | 1


2 | BOISE OPEN STUDIOS COLLECTIVE ORGANIZATION 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

“... EACH SONG STARTING WITH THE SIZZLE OF A LIT FUSE AND AT SOME FINE MOMENT EXPLODING LIKE A FIREWORK IN SLOW MOTION.” 9.1 ON PITCHFORK!

“WITH GUITARS STRAIGHT OUT OF A TARANTINO MOVIE, THE GROUP SEAMLESSLY BLENDS MARIACHI, GYPSY, FLAMENCO AND SKA INTO ONE BEER-SOAKED FIESTA, WITH SONG TOPICS VARYING FROM HEARTACHE TO REVOLUTION.” -NEWSREVIEW.COM

AN EVENING WITH

GEORGE WINSTON

JAKE

“A REPERTOIRE OF EVOCATIVE ORIGINALS AND INTERPRETATIONS, A SELF DESCRIBED FOLK MUSICIAN, BETTER KNOWN AS NEW AGE”-ELPASOTIMES.COM

SHIMABUKURO SUN, OCT 21 @ EGYPTIAN THEATRE

“ONE OF THE TOP 10 LIVING SONGWRITERS ALONG WITH PAUL MCCARTNEY, BOB DYLAN AND BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN.”-NPR

FRI, OCT 5 @ EGYPTIAN THEATRE

THUR, OCT 4 @ EGYPTIAN THEATRE

C FA

AN EVENING WITH

CAN CEL LED

W/ POOR MOON

W/ FIELD REPORT

TUE, OCT 9 @ EGYPTIAN THEATRE

DIEGO’S UMBRELLA & VOKAB KOMPANY

AIMEE MANN BEACH HOUSE SUN, OCT 14 @ VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE

M CO E C. IV SI OL U H EM A IV /ID OL OM H A C ID K. W. BOO W E W

TICKETS ONLINE AT EGYPTIANTHEATRE.NET CALL 208-387-1273 EGYPTIAN THEATRE BOX OFFICE TU-SA 11A-6P & AT RECORD EXCHANGE

“JAKE IS TAKING THE INSTRUMENT TO A PLACE THAT I CAN’T ANYONE ELSE CATCHING UP” -EDDIE VEDDER

BOISEweekly | BOISE OPEN STUDIOS COLLECTIVE ORGANIZATION 2012 | 3


4 | BOISE OPEN STUDIOS COLLECTIVE ORGANIZATION 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


LISTINGS/1ST THURSDAY about Inside Out Project Boise and how it connects Boise to this global movement, and meet the subjects of the photographs. Enjoy appetizers by A la Maison and Co. 5-7:30 p.m. 1000 Myrtle St., 208-389-7605.

monument in the Idaho State Historical Museum Plaza at 5:30 p.m. and take a self-guided tour using the app for iPhone and iPod, bicycle tour or walking tour with a docent. For additional information about the program or if you would like to be trained as a docent, contact Kathleen Barrett at 208-338-9108 or kathleenbarrett@cableone.net. 5:30 p.m. 700 S. Capitol Blvd.

JULIA DAVIS PARK—Did you know that Julia Davis Park receives 1 million visitors each year? And just who were Tom and Julia Davis—and what part did they play in creating Boise? If you love local history, take a docent tour of Julia Davis Park. Meet at the Sacajawea

LIQUID—A Pink Project 19 stop. 405 S. Eighth St., 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

ART WALK Locations featuring artists

J E F F E RSON

B A N N O CK

photography, Carl Rowe’s Foothill oil paintings and Jerri Lisk’s acrylic paintings on aluminum. Wine tasting provided by Sawtooth Winery. 401 S. Eighth St., 208-342-3773, liskgallery.com. THE MONOGRAM SHOPPE— Stop in to check out fantastic gift ideas. 409 S. Eighth St. themonogramshoppe.com. MR. PEABODY’S OPTI21 CAL SHOPPE—Watercolorist Alexa Rose Howell will present her images of dogs. Proceeds from the show will benefit the Idaho Humane Society. Originals and prints will be for sale, or bring a picture of your dog and Howell will paint its portrait. A French bulldog puppy named Maurice, featured in the show, will also be in attendance. See Downtown News, Page 20. 5:30-8 p.m. FREE. Mr. Peabody’s Optical Shoppe, 404 S. Eighth St., 208-344-1390. NFINIT ART GALLERY— 22 This Oktoberfest-themed evening features oompah music, beer tasting, bratwurst and works of art by Liz Hilton, Debbie Fischer, Donna Bernstein, Brian Kahn, John Giffin, Katy Johnson, Jake King and Mark Baccay. 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 131.

IDAHO

M AI N

5TH

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

G R O VE 6TH

C APIT O L

NORTHRUP BUILD23 ING—Featuring work from new artists in residence Abby

G ROVE 13TH

LISK GALLERY—View 20 Gina Phillips’ eclectic lamps, Mark Lisk’s landscape

F R O NT BROAD MYRTLE

8T H

F U LT O N

1. Bandanna Running and Walking

15. Chic Bridal Boutique

2. Basque Museum and Cultural Center

16. Cole Marr

32. Idaho Advantage Credit Union

17. Idaho State Historical Museum

33. Idaho Poster and Letterpress

3. Boise Ar t Glass 4. Bricolage 5. The Cotton Club 6. Flying M Coffeehouse 7. Goldy’s Corner 8. Melting Pot 9. Nor th By Nor thwest Productions

18. Jack’s Urban Meeting Place 19. Liquid 20. Lisk Galler y

31. Ar tisan Optics

34. Mixing Bowl 35. Sage Yoga and Wellness 36. See Jane Run 37. Thomas Hammer

21. Mr. Peabody’s Optical Shoppe

38. Alaska Center

22. NfiniT Ar t Galler y

39. Ar t Source Galler y

23. Nor thrup Building

10. Silly Birch

24. Que Pasa

40. Basement Galler y

11. Eight Street Ar tist in Residence Program

25. R. Grey Galler y

41. The Crux

26. Renewal Underground

42. Gamekeeper Lounge

27. Salon 162

43. The Galler y at the Linen Building

12. Atomic Treasures 13. Boise Ar t Museum

28. Solid

14. Business Interiors of Idaho

29. Van Dyck Frame Design 30. The Ar t of Ward Hooper Galler y

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

PHILIP JAMES PAUL MITCHELL FOCUS SALON—Philip Wood, Paul Mitchell national educator, will offer consultations. Buy one product, get the second one half off, and receive 20 percent off a service booked during First Thursday. Samples will also be available. 521 S. Eighth St., 208-409-0307, philipjames-paulmitchell-focussalon.com. QUE PASA—Check out 24 the best selection of Mexican artwork in town, includ-

B AT T E RY

R IV ER

Christensen, mixed-media conceptual visual artist; Pam Demo, mixed-media paper collage artist; and Tyler Bush, mixed-media sculptor/performance artist. See First Thursday, Page 17. Eighth and Broad streets, second floor.

ing wall fountains, silver, Day of the Dead decor and cedar and leather sofas. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-385-9018. R. GREY GALLERY 25 JEWELRY AND ART GLASS—Celebrate R. Grey being named America’s Coolest Store in 2012. View jewelry created by Robert Grey Kaylor and Winston Gamble. Plenty of opal jewelry. Wine tasting by Telaya Wine Co. Also a Pink Project stop. 5-9 p.m. 415 S. Eighth St., 208-3859337, rgreygallery.com. RENEWAL CONSIGN26 MENT HOMEWARES— Renewal Underground. Featuring work by new artist in residence Tuong Anh Ens. See First Thursday, Page 17. 517 S. Eighth St., 208-338-5444. SALON 162—A Pink Proj27 ect stop. 404 S. Eighth St., 208-386-9908. SOLID—Enjoy live music 28 from Robert James, appetizers, spirit sampling from Elite Distributing and art from Grant Olsen. Followed by Last Call Trivia at 8 p.m. A Pink Project stop. 405 S. Eighth St., 208-345-6620.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 19


1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS 1ST THURSDAY/NEWS ALEX A HOW ELL

SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Taste the 2011 old vine chardonnay. New vintages of cabernet sauvignon and late harvest riesling will also be available. 786 W. Broad St., 208-345-9463. VAN DYCK FRAME DE29 SIGN—View work in oils by Linda Williams. 733 Broad St., 208-336-3454.

Central THE ART OF WARD 30 HOOPER GALLERY— View Ward Hooper’s latest Halloween image. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. 745 W. Idaho St., 208-8664627, wardhooper.com. ARTISAN OPTICS—View 31 eyewear and sunglass collections from Alain Mikli and Philippe Starck. 190 N. Eighth St., 208-338-0500, artisanoptics.com. BARBARA BARBARA AND CO.—The store will be open late for First Thursday. 807 W. Bannock St., 208-342-2002. BEN & JERRY’S SCOOP SHOP—Enjoy $1 scoops in cups or cones. 103 N. 10th St., 208342-1992, benjerry.com. THE BRICKYARD—Check out Brickyard’s Home Grown Thursday with an American Revolution cocktail for $4 or Payette Outlaw IPA or Rodeo Rye Pale Ale for $3. 601 Main St., 208-287-2121, brickyardboise.com.

An interactive seminar series for homeowners Second Thursdays 7-9pm @ Integrated Design Lab 306 South 6th Street, Boise, ID 83702

Fall Topics 10/11 Building Science & Home Energy Performance 11/8 What Does a Sustainable Home Cost? 12/13 Walls & Windows: Case Studies $10 per session // $5 for Snake River Alliance members

Registration at the door

SPONSORED BY New classes/topics every second Thursday For more information contact Steve Howe at 208.863.8679 or Stephan.Howe@gmail.com www.goodhomeboise.com  www.stephanhowe.wordpress.com

20 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

CHOCOLAT BAR—New Belgium Brewery will pair beers with Chocolat Bar chocolates. 805 W. Bannock St., 208-338-7771, thechocolatbar.com. CITY PEANUT SHOP—Enjoy beer-and-nut pairings with Sockeye Brewery beers at City Peanut Shop and Sockeye as well. 803 W. Bannock St., 208-433-3931. THE ELECTRIC CHAIR SALON— Enter the raffle for hair care products and enjoy refreshments. 783 W. Idaho St., 208331-2588. FETE STYLE BAR—Enjoy refreshments and complimentary up-dos, as well as a raffle featuring a salon service. 110 N. Eighth St., 208-344-3559. FOOT DYNAMICS—Check out the Altra zero-drop trail shoes and browse shoe deals. Certified pedorthist on staff and on-site orthotics lab. 1021 W. Main St., 208-386-3338. FRONT DOOR NORTHWEST PIZZA AND TAP HOUSE—Enjoy a three-course tasting menu with beers from Elysian Brewing. 6 p.m. 105 S. Sixth St., 208-2879201, thefrontdoorboise.com. GOLITE—Check out the promotion on Black Mountain softshell jackets. Also a Pink Project stop. 906 W. Main St., 208-258-2091, golite.com. HEIRLOOM DANCE STUDIO— Check out the improvisational comedy of Insert Foot Theater. 8 p.m. $5. 765 Idaho St., 208871-6352, heirloomdancestudio. com.

We suggest the artist change her name to Alexa Rose Howl.

PAWS AND AN ELEPHANT SCHNOZ As the warmth of summer wanes, the political arena is heating up. And on First Thursday, Oct. 4, sculptor Jim Budde will get metaphorically steamed when he reveals his new political teapot series, Underground Politics, which features busts of politicos like Mitt Romney, Newt Gingrich and President Barack Obama. “I always fall back on these teapots that are based on that Mesoamerican or Pre-Columbian pottery that combine human and animal forms,” said Budde. However, his pottery bears the faces of wild political animals. One teapot features Gingrich with a protruding elephant’s snout and a dunce cap, another depicts Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter noseto-nose with fellow cowboy Ronald Reagan and a pair of horses. With newer pieces focusing on the 2012 election, Budde said it’s exciting to add commentary to history. “A few years from now, I want people to be able to look at the Obama or Romney pieces and see the reflection of what was happening at a political time,” said Budde. Underground Politics will also include a series of painted cardboard signs with phrases like “Will Work for Friends” and quotes from the candidates. The show will be the last in the former Basement Gallery space. Owners Mike and Jane Brumfield have since relocated to the former Hyde Park Gallery space, which reopened Sept. 22. Some of Budde’s other work is on display there. For more First Thursday politics, the Fettucine Forum returns at 5 p.m. at the Rose Room, led by Idaho Public Television’s Greg Hahn. He’ll present audio, video and images on the topic The Left, The Right: Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party. Over at Mr. Peabody’s Optical Shoppe, artist Alexa Rose Howell, formerly of Gallery Alexa Rose, will debut a series starring a less political animal: a French bulldog named Maurice. “French bulldogs were bred to be the dogs of royalty,” said Howell. “They have no purpose other than to be cute and charming. And they’re stubborn and very self-aware that they’re cute.” Her daughter’s puppy hammed it up for Howell for the series, Spectacular Dogs. She painted him and other pooches in black-and-white watercolor and colored pencil, including mixed media and other watercolor studies. Proceeds benefit the Idaho Humane Society. And while we’re at it, Boise Weekly has its own cause to support this First Thursday. Each week, BW features the work of a local artist on the cover. The originals are then auctioned off to benefit our Cover Auction Grant, which supports local artists and organizations. During First Thursday, the Idaho State Historical Museum will boast a gallery of the pieces that have graced our cover from Oct. 2011-Sept. 2012. You can also catch a preview of the covers in the BW’s Wednesday, Oct. 10, edition, before bidding on your favorite piece at our annual Cover Auction at ISHM, Wednesday, Oct. 17, at 6 p.m. —Andrew Crisp WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT K AM TAYLOR

HIGH NOTE CAFE—Enjoy $2 specialty mimosas in more than 10 flavors, along with half-price draft beer or wine with purchase of an entree. 225 N. Fifth St., 208-429-1911.

32 5660. IDAHO POSTER AND LETTERPRESS—View 33 the collection of antique wood signs and poster type, as well as quotes printed on 100-year-

on wood. 5-9 p.m. 1402 W. Grove St., 208-3850111, thelinenbuilding.com.

IDAHO ADVANTAGE CREDIT UNION—A Pink Project stop. 249 N. Ninth St., 208-342-

old presses and framed in repurposed thrift store frames. 280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 118, 208-761-9538, idahoposterandletterpress.com. LE CAFE DE PARIS—Try out the new dinner menu. Free wine tasting with purchase of an appetizer. 204 N. Capitol Blvd., 208-336-0889, lecafedeparis.com.

THE GALLERY AT THE LINEN BUILDING— 43 View Matt Bodett’s oneoneoneoneone exhibition, featuring more than 100 small works mounted

GAMEKEEPER LOUNGE—The Owyhee Plaza 42 will have a fundraiser and raffle benefiting Komen Idaho for the Pink Project. Three bras will Pink Project: More than 60 artful bras, created by local artists, are on display throughout downtown in conjunction with Susan B. Komen Boise for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Participating businesses are noted in the listings.

be on display for voting. Music by Nathan Moody and Amy Weber. 1109 W. Main St., 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com.

RADIO BOISE—Watch the live on-air DJ, tour the studio and step up to the mic and record a testimonial. Broadcasting on KRBX, 89.9 FM. 1020 W. Main St., Alaska Building, Ste. 200, 208-424-8166, radioboise.org. THE RECORD EXCHANGE—Watch videos from September’s 208 Music Video Show, enjoy an in-store concert and beer from Payette Brewing Co. 5-9 p.m. 1105 W. Idaho St., 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com.

THE HUDDLE—Enjoy $3 local beer, $4 glasses of wine and 50 cent wings. 205 N. 10th St., Ste. 110, 208-338-5454.

MAI THAI—Start First Thursday with a trip to the lunch buffet. After work, meet mixologist Michael Reed and enjoy two-for-one handcrafted drinks during happy hour 5-6:30 p.m and 9 p.m.-close. Appetizers will be at the bar starting at 3 p.m. Buy two entrees and receive a complimentary dessert. Not valid during happy hour or with any other promotions. 750 W. Idaho St., 208-344-8424, maithaigroup.com. THE MATADOR—Taste Matador’s private-label tequila. 215 N. Eighth St., 208-342-9988, matadorrestaurants.com. MCU SPORTS—View new gear and clothing for winter. 822 W. Jefferson St., 208-342-7734, mcusports.com. MIXING BOWL—View the constantly chang34 ing selection of cookware and presentation dishes. A Pink Project stop. 216 N. Ninth St., 208345-6025, themixingbowlboise.com. PLAN B LOUNGE—Enjoy a tasting flight from Laughing Dog Brewery, a pint and German sausage munchies for $5 and chat up the Laughing Dog representative. 121 N. Ninth St., 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com. REDISCOVERED BOOKS—Author Robert Morgan will discuss his book Lions of the West. 7 p.m. 180 N. Eighth St., 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org. ROSE ROOM—Greg Hahn will moderate this installment of the Fettuccine Forum, entitled The Left, the Right: Occupy Wall Street and the Tea Party. Visit boiseartsandhistory.org for more info. See Downtown News, Page 20. 5:30 p.m. 718 W. Idaho St., 208-381-0483, parklaneco.com/roseroom. SAGE YOGA AND WELLNESS—View Tony 35 Andrews’ new show, Young Summer. Lori Dicaire of ReDux Goods will have a one-night-only sale on her upcycled and handcrafted yoga bags, bike seat covers, eye pillows and more. Indian Creek Winery will pour from 5:30-8:30 p.m. Vinyasa Yoga with Lori Tindall is from 5:30-7 p.m. 242 N. Eighth St., Ste. 200, 208-338-5430, sageyogaboise.com. SEE JANE RUN—A Pink Project stop. 814 36 W. Idaho St., 208-338-5263, seejanerun. com. THOMAS HAMMER—Featuring artist 37 Arayana Howard’s work. 298 N. Eighth St., 208-433-8004, hammercoffee.com.

West Side THE ALASKA CENTER—Featuring Zen-the 38 empty brush by Chi E Shenam Westin and Panoramic Idaho by Eric Obendorf. 5-9 p.m. 1020 Main St. ART SOURCE GALLERY—Enjoy the opening reception of Feathered Friends, featuring new 39 work in oils by Kay Coughran. Enjoy live music by Naomi Johnson, wine from Indian Creek Winery and snacks. A Project Pink stop. 5-9 p.m. 1015 W. Main St., 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. BASEMENT GALLERY—Jim Budde has cre40 ated new ceramic sculptures for Underground Politics, which combines caricatures of political candidates shown alongside a series of works based on panhandling cardboard signs. Visitors will have a choice of campaign buttons featuring Budde’s depictions of Barack Obama or Mitt Romney on a first-come, first-served basis. See Downtown News, Page 20. 928 W. Main St., 208-333-0309. THE CRUX—Enjoy Stumptown coffee, a 41 glass of wine or a beer and check out local artwork. 1022 W. Main St., 208-342-3213.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 21


8 DAYS OUT 16

SUNDAY OCT. 7

TUESDAY OCT. 9

On Stage

Workshops & Classes

LIQUID LAUGHS: TYLER BOEH—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Festivals & Events HOLISTIC AND METAPHYSICAL FAIR—See Saturday. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Collister Shopping Center, 4764 W. State St., Boise. FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL—See Saturday. Noon-6 p.m. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Concerts ERIC ALEXANDER QUARTET— The Boise Jazz Society presents this performance of modern mainstream swing. Visit boisejazzsociety.org for more info. 7 p.m. $40. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116.

Sports & Fitness IDAHO HEALTH, BEAUTY AND FITNESS FAIR—See Saturday. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com.

Odds & Ends ANNUAL HERITAGE HOMES TOUR—This self-guided walking tour will start at Roosevelt School, 908 E. Jefferson St., and includes East Jefferson and East Bannock streets, Boise’s East End. The tour takes about two hours to complete and includes walking several blocks. This is a rare opportunity to view the interiors of these historic homes. The annual Heritage Homes Tour is sponsored by Preservation Idaho. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $20. preservationidaho.org.

CANTUS—The renowned men’s vocal ensemble presents timeless classics in a cappella arrangements. Visit caldwellfinearts.org for more info. 7:30 p.m. $7-$25. Jewett Auditorium, The College of Idaho, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208459-3405 or 208-454-1376, caldwellfinearts.org.

DRAWING HOLIDAY CARDS— Learn basic drawing techniques, beginning with linear drawing, progressing to form and modeling and finishing with an introduction to the use of color. You will complete pen-and-ink holiday cards. Supplies provided. For ages 14 and older. Instructor: Patty Bess. 7-8:30 p.m. $45$50. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Food & Drink SAVORY SOUPS CLASS—Learn to make red bean and chorizo and potato leek soups. Price includes wine tasting, tapas and cooking instruction. Preregistration required. 6 p.m. $35. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com.

PARENTING WITH LOVE AND LOGIC—Six-week class will teach simple and easy-to-use techniques that will help you have more fun and less stress while raising responsible kids. Tuesdays through Nov. 13. Ask about childcare if needed. $12 for book. For details and registration, go to wingscenter.com, or call 208-376-3641. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $45 for one parent, $55 for co-parent. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, wingscenter. com.

Recurring THE FARMSTEAD 2012—This year’s corn maze is shaped like presidential candidate Mitt Romney and President Barack Obama. Maze goers are encouraged to “vote with their feet” and move left or right, and can vote in the “pumpkin poll.” Hayrides, pumpkin picking, pig races and more will also take place. Visit farmsteadfestival.com for more info. See News, Page 8. Saturdays, 10 a.m.-11 p.m., Fridays, 4-11 p.m. and MondaysThursdays, 4-9 p.m. Continues through Saturday, Nov. 3. The Farmstead, 1020 S. Rackham Way, Meridian, 208-922-LOST (5678), farmsteadfestival.com.

Literature AUTHOR READING—Local writers Amanda Turner and Elaine Ambrose will discuss their work. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

HAUNTED WORLD—Scare yourself silly at this annual location of terror, which includes the eponymous 30-acre outdoor haunt, Skullvania and the less terrifying corn maze. Monday-Thursday, dusk-10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, dusk-midnight. Hauntedworld.org. Continues through Wednesday, Oct. 31. $20, FREE for children younger than 5.

WEDNESDAY OCT. 10 Concerts

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

MONDAY OCT. 8 Concerts GLENN MILLER ORCHESTRA— The most popular big band of all time, Glenn Miller’s music has been an international phenomenon for more than half a century. 7:30 p.m. $39. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

22 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NOISE/NEWS NOISE LIZ FLYNTZ

PERPETUAL BLOOM A fall breeze blows Beach House back to Boise CHRIS PARKER

For someone who makes such minimalist and ethereal music, Beach House singerkeyboardist Victoria Legrand sure can be voluminous. Legrand and Alex Scally craft dreamy, slow-moving songs with emotional resonance that outstrips the spare details. It can be as simple as Legrand murmuring, “Other people want to keep in touch / Something happens and it’s not enough” over crashing waves of keyboard melancholia. Legrand’s sultry coo and the slowly undulating textures conspire for a Rorschach effect, accommodating whatever you might project onto it. “It can be a specific feeling and a specific story, but it’s all in the way you do it,” said Legrand. “The way that you arrange it can Dream pop duo Beach House will take your ears on a vacation at the Egyptian Theatre. be abstract or minimalistic. It doesn’t have to be all the details or all the information. very easy and happens very quickly, and then is darkness—but you can’t create something That’s why it’s art.” sometimes it takes a great deal of work to without conflict.” She continued: “If you look at a Rothko, The music’s understated nature camouflag- preserve that feeling.” that painting is performing beyond his hands Legrand tries to form an ecosystem es its contrasts and ambivalences. The sound and it’s communicating something different around which a feeling can grow. And since can be nonthreatening—lulling organ fills to every person that experiences it. Some of it, he could have predicted, I’m sure; some of that suggest a shoreline watercolor, low dron- it’s all about emotion, she tries not to intellectualize it much. Instead, she gives the song ing guitar like whistling wind—but the lyrics it, he could never predict.” what it calls for, all while crafting and guidare rife with ache, longing and a struggle to The band’s fourth album, Bloom, was ing the work to its culmination. maintain hope. released in May and reached No. 7 on the “It’s like a psychological, emotional and On “New Year,” Legrand’s vocals waver Billboard charts. It was the follow-up to artistic invisible tennis match in slow-motion. between an upbeat trill (“Can you call it? 2010’s commercial hit, Teen Dream. Bloom They go back and forth, those things,” she doesn’t break new ground, nor does it try to. / See it coming?”) and doleful resignation The band’s intent and style has remained con- (“All you ever wanted? / Is it getting away?”) said. “It’s this incredible witch’s brew, a bubbling cauldron.” amidst the whirl of a slow-moving calliope. sistent since it formed eight years ago. She continued: “There’s a great deal of On “Wild,” she ponders her father’s profliAnd while Beach House has honed its craft that happens, but the big moments— song-crafting skills since its eponymous 2006 gate ways, deriding and romanticizing them when you have the title, or the first line, or at the same time: “A little wine / you stole a debut, the duo’s process is very much the when you write the bridge, when you realize smile / the earth is wild / you’ve got no time same as it ever was. Legrand and Scally hit that the guitar part for the beginning of the … Heartless to say / go on pretending.” the studio without preconceptions or intelverse is totally not the right feeling—these are There’s an intimacy and a distance in the lectualized constraints. The idea is to let the all these very deep intuitive feelings. ... It’s music—like a dream music come out of very beautiful and sometimes can be frustrathalf-remembered or a them and surrender ing because for months you do everything startlingly crisp childthemselves to their you can and don’t get that lightning bolt.” hood memory, the creativity and the Beach House with Poor Moon. Friday, Oct. 5, 8 p.m., $22-$25. But songs, like a child, are raised to be snapshot colored by process. released and find their own homes. Legrand pastel marker embel“Chaos is in nature, EGYPTIAN THEATRE 700 W. Main St. is quite rhapsodic about her role in what she lishments. Legrand entropy is in science 208-345-0454 sees as a symbiotic relationship. loves the dance of life and the universe. You egyptiantheatre.net “It’s yours for so long. You work it, you and finding different have to accept that dream it, you live with it. So at the end of ways to engage it. things aren’t going the day, what joy is there for us to hold on to “All humans have to be perfect ever, no that urge to connect to it?” asked Legrand. “That invisible incredible matter how hard you try. The vision you have will always be some- something they believe is there but they don’t feeling that occurs when you know you’ve made something that means something to know. Some people go to church and they thing slightly different when it comes out, you, and will by the power of transference believe it is this one thing and other people but you have to love that and go with it,” mean something to another human? At the believe it is in another person, or some Legrand said. “That’s the beauty of it. Yes, end of the day it’s not for me. It’s something I people believe it is in a song,” she said. “It’s there are moments of chaos where you’ve the romanticism as much as the idea that’s in- need because that’s how I express the condispent weeks on the song and then the feeling side of songs, and the paradox is the fact that tion of living as a human, but it’s ultimately is gone and you have to start all over again. to achieve that feeling in a song sometimes is supposed to help someone else.” There is darkness, too—in every light there WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Shake your fibulas this week in Boise.

BONE DANCES AND BURIAL GROUNDS What’s that you say, Boise? You like it heavy. Well you’re in luck, ’cause Boise’s Bone Dance is dropping a new album approximately as heavy as the collective balls of Seal Team Six this week. The self-titled LP on Melotov Records has been garnering killer advance reviews across the Internet and advance tracks have been featured on Alternative Press and CVLT Nation, which called it “sonic bricks coated in aggression.” All you non-advance-copy-holding netizens can get your hot little hands on a copy of Bone Dance’s album this weekend, at the album release show at Red Room Saturday, Oct. 6. Trite, Black Bolt Gernika, and Blackcloud—no strangers to the loud stuff—will open. The show starts at 9 p.m. and costs $5. After that, the lads will head out on a 24-date East Coast tour that will include a gig at the CMJ festival in New York and The Fest in Gainesville, Fla. Or, you can let the rest of your body dance along with your bones at all kinds of shows this week. The surf-tinged psych rock of Wooden Indian Burial Ground at The Crux might be a good place to start, provided you have the proper footwear. Without a solid set of polished white go-go boots, it is entirely possible you could pull a whatzit from your watusi and miss all the fuzzy, reverby, caterwauling goodness. That show starts at 10 p.m. and costs $5, unless you have a ticket from the Beach House show earlier that night at The Egyptian (see Noise, this page) and then it’s FREE. Lionsweb and Hot Lava will open. Another good place to get your dance on is Maus Haus at Neurolux Wednesday, Oct. 3, which will be rocking all the dreamy lo-fi synthesizers you can shake a stick at, unless you dislike shaking sticks at dreamy lo-fi synthesizers. The Dirty Moogs will open, and the show starts at 7 p.m. for $5. And finally, you can get your ’90s nostalgia on at The Knitting Factory this week with one of only a handful of special reunion shows from reunited roots-rockers Calobo. The Portland, Ore., band hasn’t played since the dawn of the millennium, while its members were busy doing things like being in The Decemberists, but it will be hitting Boise as part of a three-show reunion tour. That show goes down Thursday, Oct. 4, at 8:30 p.m. and costs $16-$35. —Josh Gross

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 23


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE LAR RY DIM AR Z IO

GUIDE WEDNESDAY OCT. 3

THURSDAY OCT. 4

FRIDAY OCT. 5

BAND OF BUSKERS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

AIMEE MANN—8 p.m. $24 adv., $27 door. Egyptian Theatre

BAND OF BUSKERS—8 p.m. FREE. Crux

THE COUNTRY CLUB—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BROCK BARTEL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

BEACH HOUSE—See Noise, Page 23. 8 p.m. $22 adv., $25 door. Egyptian Theatre

CALOBO—See Noise News, Page 23. 8:30 p.m. $16-$35. Knitting

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

STEVE VAI, OCT. 3, KNITTING FACTORY There are guitar gods and then there are people so convincing in the role that they are cast to play guitar gods on film. Steve Vai is both. He has backed Frank Zappa and David Lee Roth, has his own custom model electric and acoustic guitars and pedals, and is an alumnus of the guitar virtuoso G3 tour organized by his old teacher, Joe Satriani. But if instrumental shred metal doesn’t mean much to you, you still probably know Vai’s work from film. In the 1986 film Crossroads, Vai was cast as Jack Butler, the supernaturally talented devil who is challenged in a guitar showdown to win back an old bluesman’s soul. The back-andforth between Vai and The Karate Kid’s Ralph Macchio one of the greatest climaxes in music-themed cinema. And if you haven’t seen that—a thousand pities on you—Vai is also the man behind the wicked air guitar licks in Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure and Bill and Ted’s Bogus Journey. —Josh Gross With Beverly McClellan. 8 p.m. $28-$65. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

24 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

DEATHBLOW—9 p.m. $3. The Shredder

Factory

GAYLE CHAPMAN—With Robb Howell. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

CONCERTS IN THE GARAGE— Featuring James Orr and Boise Rock School bands. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Rock School

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow MAUS HAUS—See Noise News, Page 23. With The Dirty Moogs. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers STEVE VAI—With Beverly McClellan. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $28-$65. Knitting Factory

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HILLFOLK NOIR—9 p.m. FREE. Bittercreek HOTEL INDIA—9 p.m. FREE. Reef JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BILL COFFEY AND HIS CASH MONEY COUSINS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s BOISE EDELWEISS BAND— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SHON SANDERS TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TODD DUNNIGAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill TRAVIS WARD—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s YUNG VERB ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—10 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Reef

CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FIVE SMOOTH STONES—9 p.m. FREE. Monkey Bizness GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m. $3. Kay and Traci’s 127 Club

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

THE MUSIC OF ABBA—Featuring Arrival from Sweden. 8 p.m. $10-$39.50. Revolution

ROBERT JAMES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

NEW MEDICINE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory

ROCK AND RODEO SHOWCASE—Featuring the Getaway Car and Jerry Fee. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

SALLY TIBBS—With Kevin Kirk. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

SAINT VITUS—With Weedeater and Sourvein. 7 p.m. $16 adv., $18 door. Neurolux

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid

SATURDAY OCT. 6 A DOSE OF BREWTALITEA— Featuring Arsenic Addiction with Latimer, Grind Sole, Where We Are Now and Ashes of Abaddon. 7 p.m. $3. Whiskey River BONE DANCE LP RELEASE/TOUR KICKOFF—With Blackcloud, Gernika, Trite and Black Bolt. See Noise News, Page 23. 9 p.m. $5. Red Room DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL— 10 p.m. $5. Reef ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FIVE SMOOTH STONES—9 p.m. FREE. Monkey Bizness

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid HELL ON WHEELS TOUR—Featuring Brantley Gilbert with Uncle Kracker, Greg Bates and Brian Davis. 7:30 p.m. $20-$35. Taco Bell Arena IVAN AND ALYOSHA—With Hollow-Wood. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux JOHNNY BUTLER—7:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s NED EVETT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid SALLY TIBBS—With Kevin Kirk. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers WOODEN INDIAN BURIAL GROUND—See Noise News, Page 23. 10 p.m. $5. Crux

SUNDAY OCT. 7 BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

HOSPITALITY—With Teen and Ash Reiter. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $7. Red Room

TRAVIS WARD—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid VELVET LOUNGE FROGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

JACK KLATT AND STEPHANIE NILLES—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JOHNNY SHOES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

WEDNESDAY OCT. 10 BAND OF BUSKERS—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s BUMPIN UGLIES—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

TUESDAY OCT. 9

LUKE CARTER—12:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

BARBARA LAING—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

OSO NEGRO EP RELEASE SHOW—Featuring Phil A. Eerieverse, L-Nasty, John Weighn, Lojic, Customary and Edable. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

JONAH SHUE AND THE COUNTRY CLUB—5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La

PAT RICE—1:30 p.m. FREE. Solid

NED EVETT—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

TERRY JONES—10:15 a.m. FREE. Berryhill

RADIO BOISE TUESDAY—Featuring Little Owl, Junior Rocket Scientist and Naked Apes. 7 p.m. $3. Neurolux

TODD DUNNIGAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KORBY LENKER—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

SYSTEM AND STATION—8 p.m. $5. Shredder

MONDAY OCT. 8 ALANIS MORISSETTE: GUARDIAN ANGEL TOUR—7:30 p.m. $48-$100. Knitting Factory

GAYLE CHAPMAN—With Robb Howell. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

LITTLE OWL—8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La REILLY COYOTE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SWANSEA—8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage XANDRA—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

HOSPITALITY, OCT. 7, RED ROOM Life in New York City serves as inspiration for songwriter Amber Papini, vocalist and guitar-wielding frontwoman of Brooklyn, N.Y., indie-pop quartet Hospitality. Her lyrics tell the story of various NYC characters, like a former co-worker in “Betty Wang,” to whom Papini sings: “If you leave New York / I don’t care / I’ll follow you back to Tokyo.” Papini’s whispered odes unfold like a poem for a tender lover. But Hospitality’s tracks also meander down punky back alleys, most memorably on the catchy “Friends of Friends,” where Papini sing-shouts the song’s refrain with spunk. However, Hospitality’s slower songs, like the mid-album “Sleepover,” show more soul as Papini sings “Beige chiffon, silk and roses / Lock the door, I’ll take your coat.” Hospitality released its first self-titled LP earlier this year. The band will spread out the silk sheets for Boise Sunday, Oct. 7. —Andrew Crisp

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

With Teen and Ash Reiter. 8 p.m., $7. Red Room, 1519 W. Main St., 208-331-0956, redroomboise.com.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 25


NEWS/SCREEN SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

THE FILM TO BEAT This documentary’s motto is: “You can’t be what you can’t see.”

Argo recounts the most incredible rescue you’ve never heard of GEORGE PRENTICE

MISS REPRESENTATION IS A BLISTERING, BIPARTISAN LOOK AT MEDIA PORTRAYALS OF WOMEN IN POWER Ask toddlers if they would like to be president and most say, “Yes.” Ask them again 10 years later and researchers say a larger group of boys continue to say, “Yes” while more girls say, “No.” Dozens of studies routinely point to a gender gap in positions of power and influence in America. While women represent 51 percent of the U.S. population, a mere 17 percent of the U.S. Congress is female. Simply put, you can’t be what you can’t see. Miss Representation, a fast-paced documentar y that wowed attendees at the 2011 Sundance Film Festival, lays a lion’s share of the blame at the feet of mainstream media, which stokes the fires of sexually offensive por trayals of women and focuses on youth and sexualMonday, October 8, ity rather than 7 p.m., FREE talent or ideas. EGYPTIAN THEATRE Producer-direc700 W. Main St. tor Jennifer Siebel 208-345-0454 egyptiantheatre.net Newsom will bring her film to Boise’s Egyptian Theatre, Monday, Oct. 8, at 7 p.m. The screening is hosted by Boise State’s College of Social Sciences and Public Affairs and Go Lead Idaho, which is committed to increasing female engagement in leadership and civic par ticipation. “Media helps create the consciousness,” says Oscar winner Jane Fonda in the film. “And if what is being put out there through the media is determined by men, then we’re not going to make any progress.” Fonda is joined by Katie Couric, Rachel Maddow and Condoleezza Rice in Miss Representation, offering a bipar tisan but blistering indictment of mainstream portrayals of women. The screening is FREE and open to the public, but because of limited seating, attendees are encouraged to register at goleadidiaho.org. —George Prentice

26 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Argo, a near-perfect thriller with a hard-tofathom-but-true back story, is the movie to beat for the Best Picture Oscar. With a bucketful of heart-in-your-throat moments, it’s also one of the year’s funniest films. If you think you know the story of how six Americans were rescued from the 1980 siege of the United States embassy in Iran, think again. This littleknown tale of a supposedly well-known rescue will throw you for a loop. History tells us that the Americans made it Ben Affleck shines as the director and star of Argo, a near-perfect political thriller based on a true story. out alive, but I must confess to feeling dread as I watched the final 20 minutes of Argo. I it’s Alan Arkin and John Goodman who steal Argo, the movie, is about Argo, the movie bought this film—hook, line and sinker—enthe show as a pair of grizzled Hollywood vetthat never was. Concocted with just enough tirely to the credit of director and star Ben Affleck, who needs to make some room on his phoniness to pass as a “legitimate” Hollywood erans recruited to front the phony Argo. Here’s a bit of their repartee: film, the CIA used the guise of a faux-movie mantel for a second Oscar. “Oh well, history begins as farce and ends to scout shooting locations in Iran. The plan, Argo is being launched into theaters at as tragedy,” says Arkin’s Lester Siegel. ridiculous at best, was to smuggle the six a time when we know all too well how bad “I think you have that backwards,” rethings can go at an American embassy. In fact, Americans out as members of the film crew. sponds Goodman’s John Chambers. “History “This is the best less than 12 hours pribegins as tragedy and ends as farce.” bad idea we have,” or to its premiere at the “Really? Who said that?” says CIA boss Jack Toronto International ARGO (R) “Marx.” O’Donnell (Breaking Film Festival, four Directed by Ben Affleck “Groucho said that?” Bad’s Bryan CransAmericans, including Priceless. If it weren’t for such comic relief, ton) before sending the U.S. ambassador to Starring Ben Affleck, Bryan Cranston and John Goodman operative Tony Mendez Argo would be almost uncomfortably taut. Libya, were killed in an Instead, it’s a fluid story with heart and humor (Affleck) on a fool’s attack on our Benghazi Opens Friday, Oct. 12, at The Flicks that also happens to thrust its audience into a errand. In Mendez, consulate. geopolitical hell. whose identity was With emotions so Along with Silver Linings Playbook and only recently declassiraw, I risked either a the much-anticipated Lincoln from Steven fied, we are introduced to an unlikely hero of miserable or exhilarating experience in watchSpielberg, Argo needs to be at the top of your the highest order. ing Argo at TIFF. I’m happy to report that it must-see list. Right now, I’m betting that Argo Affleck and Cranston are supported by a was the latter. It turns out that Argo is indeed wins Best Picture. Hollywood loves a happy superb cast, including Victor Garber (Alias) an important film, asking us to consider valor, ending, especially when it is the hero. and Kyle Chandler (Friday Night Lights). But sacrifice and duty to foreign service.

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings THE INVISIBLE WAR—Oscar and Emmy award-nominated filmmaker Kirby Dick presents this documentary about rape in the U.S. military. Sunday, Oct. 7. 7-9 p.m., $15. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208342-4222, theflicksboise.com. MISSREPRESENTATION—See Screen News, this Page. Mon., Oct. 8, 7 p.m. FREE, donations accepted. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FESTIVAL—Film lovers across the world will unite during the 15th annual Manhattan Short Film Festival and vote on their favorite film. The victorious film will be announced Sunday, Oct. 7. See Picks, Page 12. Thursday, Oct. 4. 7-9:30 p.m. $9, $7 students and ages 65 and older. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

TAKEN 2—Liam Neeson returns as a CIA agent who has to defend his family when the kidnappers he combatted come to take revenge. (PG-13) Opens Friday, Oct. 5. Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22

WILD HORSE WILD RIDE—This documentary tells the story of the Mustang Makeover Challenge, an annual contest that dares 100 people to tame a wild mustang in order to find it a home. (PG) Opens Friday, Oct. 5. The Flicks

Opening FRANKENWEENIE—This animated Tim Burton film tells the story of a boy who brings his dog back to life. (PG) Opens Friday, Oct. 5. Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


REC/NEWS REC

Don’t tempt Yogi to raid your picnic basket.

DANGERS OF THE SEASON

The best video games of 2012 may be yet to come: (left to right) Assasin’s Creed, Call of Duty: Black Ops II, Starcraft II and Halo 4.

WORTH THE WAIT In video games, the best may be yet to come MICHAEL LAFFERTY So far 2012 has had some pretty impressive video game releases. We have great sequels and new franchises. Among the games topping the sales lists have been Diablo III, Mass Effect 3, UFC Undisputed 3, Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning, Street Fighter X Tekken and SSX. There’s definitely a little something for every taste, from the fighter fanatic to the sports fan and role-playing fantasy enthusiasts. And don’t forget Borderlands 2, which has been flying off the shelves, and Guild Wars 2, which brings back the lands of Tyria but with new races and updated graphics. All in all, it’s been a pretty solid year, but the best video game releases may be yet to come. Let’s run down some of the more anticipated games left to release in 2012. HALO 4: Set for a Tuesday, Nov. 6, release, this 360-degree first-person shooter game takes place almost five years after the events of Halo 3. Master Chief is back, and this has been touted as the beginning of a new sci-fi franchise. The developers have also added to the multiplayer element, introducing the Halo Infinity Multiplayer, named for the starship that acts as a hub for the multiplayer careers of created characters. ASSASSIN’S CREED III: This multiplatform release is slated to hit retailers Tuesday, Oct. 30. The timeline progression for the flashbacks to the master assassin character, and the conflict between the assassins and templars, hits the American Revolution and introduces an assassin of mixed heritage. RESIDENT EVIL 6: Coming very soon to a 360, PC or PS3 near you, this Oct. 2 release visits Raccoon City 10 years after the last release. The president of the United States is hit with a bioterrorist attack and transformed into … well, if you know the series, you get an inkling of what is to follow. For the first time in the series, Leon Kennedy and Chris Redfield come face-to-face to confront the terror in what is certain to be yet another survival horror classic. CALL OF DUTY: BLACK OPS II: You gotta love November because that usually means a CoD release. Black Ops II, on the Wii U, 360, PC and PS3, will hit store shelves Tuesday, Nov. 13. The game’s setting is 2025, and WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

for multiplayers, that means newly imagined weapons for multiplayer action. And yes, there will be zombies in multiplayer, according to the latest press releases. The developer this time is Treyarch. DISHONORED: For the PC, PS3 and 360, this is a new title from Arkane Studios with Bethesda set as the publisher. The setting is steampunk with arcane forces flittering about and is a first-person action game in which the central character, once a personal guard for the empress, is framed for murder and becomes an infamous assassin. The release date is Tuesday, Oct. 9. NEW SUPER MARIO BROTHERS: Nintendo has a new system, the Wii U, and what would a new system be without a Mario Brothers game to play on it? This is a side-scrolling adventure and this game allows your Mii character to step into the world and adventure alongside Mario and Luigi. Expect this title to launch around mid-November. MEDAL OF HONOR WARFIGHTER: There are a lot of MOH fans out there, and they are all likely eager to get their mitts on Warfighter. The game follows Tier 1 Operators on missions inspired by real life in real-world settings. Beta testing for the 360 version begins in early October and the game is slated for release Tuesday, Oct. 23, and will be available on the 360, PC and PS3 platforms.

FAR CRY 3: The nice thing about Far Cry 3 is that it gives players the freedom to pick their battles, choose their allies and decide whom to fight and how to fight those enemies. This is not a true sandbox, because there are objectives, but it is pretty close within the structure of the game. The game is from Ubisoft, has a release date of Tuesday, Dec. 4, and is slated for the 360, PC and PS3 platforms. STARCRAFT II: HEART OF THE SWARM: Currently in beta testing, this expansion has one of those “to be determined” release dates that drives fans buggy. According to the Blizzard press release: “Each chapter of Starcraft II focuses on a specific faction of the Starcraft war. By splitting the game, players will access more story content, more characters, and more customization as they explore each side of the conflict.” This game will release on PC and Mac.

There are also a wide variety of add-ons and games for every platform and taste, from titles geared for the young to the young at heart. WWE has a release coming out and Pro Evolution Soccer is already in release. That said, though, the end of 2012 has some tasty video game treats that should sit well with gamers transitioning from the warmer days of fall to the chilling, “let’s-just-stay-indoors” weather of winter. Keep an eye out for FireFall, from Red 5. The story has been penned by sci-fi writer Orson Scott Card and the dev team includes four World of Warcraft guys. The game is an online title, inviting players to team up and protect the remnants of Earth against an enemy called The Melding.

Ah fall, when the mornings are crisp, the leaves are tinged with color and the lingering wildfires send up billowing clouds of smoke making us gasp for air and pray for a little rain. As much as we’d like it, the change of seasons doesn’t signal an end to wildfires burning across the region, and while fire crews are getting a handle on most of the blazes, officials are reminding the public to pay attention to area closures and restrictions. Some roads around the Trinity Ridge Fire near Pine and Featherville have been reopened, but officials are warning that they may be forced to close them again if people don’t follow the rules. The roads are open to through traffic only, which means no stopping, no passing Go and no collecting firewood. Fire officials have seen people not only getting out of their cars, but riding ATVs, going off road and cutting firewood. All those activities are prohibited along with hiking, hunting and fishing. Basically, just keep on driving if you’re in one of the closure areas. This is more than just a request—violating the closure order can carry a fine of up to $5,000 for an individual or $10,000 for an organization. Get more info on the exact closure areas online at inciweb.org. And it’s important to be careful even in areas that aren’t on fire this fall. This is the time of year when bears are bulking up for hibernation, and the drought and fires have made it even harder for them to find food. That means your food may be even more tempting. Wildlife managers are reminding people to be aware of their actions in bear county, including securing all food and garbage when camping. Never store food or personal hygiene products in your tent—keep them in bearresistant containers or hang them at least 10 feet off the ground and four feet from the nearest tree trunk. Also be sure to secure pet food, don’t leave food bowls outside, and avoid filling bird feeders. Bears that become habituated to humans are often deemed nuisance bears and relocating them doesn’t work, so they must be put down. It’s best to avoid the problem altogether. If you do have a problem with an aggressive bear, contact the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. —Deanna Darr

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 27


NEWS/FOOD FOOD GU Y HAND

Suds-lovers will be on Cloud 9.

ICE BOUQUET WILL OPEN SOON First came news of Kilted Dragon, then Bogus Brewing, and now another nano brewery is bubbling its way onto the scene: Cloud 9 Brewery. Homebrewers Jake and Maggie Lake plan to open a small brewpub downtown that will operate on a four-barrel system. The couple is currently in negotiations with potential spaces but haven’t finalized anything yet. “We are going to be just selling local pints,” said Lake. Some beers listed on the brewery’s website include a blood-orange witbeer, a salted caramel stout and a honey basil ale. The Lakes plan to crank out food, too: housemade pretzels, salads and burgers. “We’re going to be as locally focused and sustainable and focus on organic as much as possible,” said Lake. For more info, visit cloud9brewery.com. And in other booze news, The Ice Bouquet officially announced Sept. 24 that the beleaguered former Blues Bouquet space at 1010 Main St. will soon transform into a high-end nightclub and music venue. “Everything you can think of that Boise doesn’t have, this is what it’s going to have,” said Tazz Weatherly, director of marketing and promotions. Nathan Gorringe, manager of Rockies Diner, is behind the new venture, which plans to open Saturday, Oct. 27, with a Halloween shindig. The revamped space will lean toward upscale but won’t be exclusive. “We don’t wanna just shun away from other audiences, it’s more of a welcoming environment for all,” said Weatherly. The Ice Bouquet will feature an array of different bar options—a $2 drink bar space, a “wining-and-dining” private area and a VIP lounge—to appeal to different crowds. “As soon as you walk in, you feel like you’re in Boise, and then by the time you walk through the back, you think you’re in Vegas,” said Weatherly. Moving from fancy to sloppy, Archie’s Place food truck will host its second annual Sloppy Joe Eating Contest at Payette Brewing Saturday, Oct. 6, from 4-10 p.m. The contest will be split up into two meaty heats: The Mere Mortal category, in which regular joes compete against each other, and the Big Hungry Challenge, in which serious sloppy slurpers face off against last year’s winner, The Big Hungry. Competitors must be 21 or older and must consume two, one-pound sloppy joes. Those who don’t want the bellyache can pay $5 to enter, or $15 for buffet access. For more info, visit archies-place.com.

Idaho is one of the leading growers of teff outside of Ethiopia.

WHAT THE TEFF? An ancient grain takes hold in Southern Idaho JAMES PATRICK KELLY

Wayne Carlson became enamored with the tiny teff grain while living in Ethiopia and working on a project to prevent waterborne diseases in the 1970s. He said that everyone he met in the country ate injera—a spongy, crepe-like bread made from teff flour—with almost every meal. “That’s about the only way they eat it over there, this delicious and nutritious flatbread,” he said. Carlson was the first person to introduce the idea of growing teff in the United States, around 1981, and now his Nampa-based Teff Company works with about 30 diversified farmers in Idaho who sell their grain to the domestic market for human consumption and livestock forage. “I’ve spent a lot of time evangelizing it in the last 30 years. Teff is a fairly unknown crop in this part of the world, but it’s starting to catch on,” said Carlson, whose company sells wholegrain and flour products. In recent years, farmers around the Inland Northwest have become hip to growing ancient grains like teff. Eastern Washington has fields of swaying emmer farro and spelt. Sorghum has replaced many alfalfa crops in eastern Oregon, and Idaho is one of the leading producers of teff outside of

Canyon and Washington counties. Ethiopia, where grain has Carlson said the Snake River Plain looks been a staple in the eastern similar to the areas in Ethiopia where teff is part of the African contigrown, and both places have nutrient-rich nent since prehistoric times. volcanic soil. One of the biggest challenges Teff, also known as loveghe faced, though, was choosing suitable rass, was first planted in Idaho varieties to grow in Idaho’s high desert. in 1986, yet it took a few years for “There are more than 1,600 types of teff. farmers to see the potential of growI wanted to find a distinctively different ing the grain along the western swath line that would fit into the shorter growing of the Snake River Plain. “The most essential reason for grow- season here,” Carlson said. Idaho farmers grow about 10 to 15 difing teff is the existence of a market for ferent kinds of the brown-and-white teff the grain,” Carlson said. “Without that, varieties, ranging in flavor from nutty to the production of teff becomes a botanical slightly sweet. Once the grain gets milled experiment.” into flour and cooked, it takes on a subtle, Even though several land grant universisourdough-like taste. ties had conducted agricultural research on Teff is a delicate crop that can be easily teff, during the 1980s, not many farmers had come to incorporate the grain into their wiped out by extreme moisture, especially crop rotations. Carlson saw a sliver of light near harvest time. It’s typically planted in early June and it comes up within 36 hours. and decided to open the door, creating a The verdant grass, which produces vibrant new agricultural niche by working directly crimson and purple flowers, with farmers to ensure the is cut about two times during crop’s success. the early summer months “A lot of farmers thought I In Boise, products from The Teff Co. can be purchased (think alfalfa), when it gets was joking, because Ethiopia in 1-pound bags and in bulk used as grass hay to feed wasn’t known for having at Boise Co-op, 888 W. Fort livestock. much food. People were St., and in 25-pound bags at In late summer after the starving to death,” the African Market, 561 N. Orchard St. grass comes up again, the he said. farmers let it go to seed, and While Idaho is that���s when it gets harvested drastically different than the equatorial climate of Ethio- for human consumption—long before the heavy morning frosts hit the valley. pia, this part of the state does offer the bright light and long, hot days it The harvestable parts of the plant are the seeds themselves, considered by takes to cultivate the grass-like crop, 29 which is primarily grown in Owyhee, many to be the smallest grain in the

—Tara Morgan

28 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FOOD WINE SIPPER/FOOD

CRU BEAUJOLAIS Cru beaujolais is not beaujolais nouveau—that light and fruity red that’s released the third Thursday of November, just weeks after the harvest. With some 35 million bottles sold, beaujolais nouveau is something of a marketing marvel, accounting for more than one-third of the region’s total production. But nouveau’s very success helps make it one of beaujolais’s worst enemies. Many dismiss nouveau as “barely wine,” and equate it with the region as a whole, making real beaujolais a tougher sell. Made from the same gamay grape, the other beaujolais is still a very fruit-forward wine but definitely a more serious one. The 10 designated crus located in the foothills of the Beaujolais mountains—typically named for nearby villages—are a step up in quality. The top three wines this week are each from different cru, but each of the three typically produces fuller-bodied wines. 2011 DANIEL BOULAND MORGON, $23 This wine opens with lightly dusty, black cherry and cranberry aromas. The bright berry flavors are full and rich, colored by food-friendly acidity and a hint of leather. Smooth tannins come through on the velvety finish. 2009 HENRY FESSY JULIENAS, $16.99 The aromas in this wine are filled with a juicy core of sweet berry, backed by anise and dark chocolate. This pick is surprisingly big and bold for a beaujolais, but at the same time, it maintains an exceptional balance. Ripe blackberry and raspberry flavors play against tart cherry, while touches of thyme and mineral come through on the finish. 2009 POTEL AVIRON MOULIN A VENT, $20 The deep, dark blackberry aromas in this wine are enticingly supple and blend nicely with an earthy spice component. Tangy cherry up front gives way to silky berry, finishing with racy acidity. This is a well-structured wine that is drinking beautifully now, but with its core of ripe tannins, it will definitely improve with age. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

world. The conditioned seeds typically get milled into flour because there’s no way to separate the minuscule grain into different parts. “I think it’s a great product, a great crop for Idaho. It’s real healthy for everyone,” said Vince Holtz, a diversified farmer who grows teff for seed and flour in Sunnyslope. Because it’s glutenfree, teff has been gaining popularity in the United States as people with wheat-based allergies and aversions seek out other grains. Teff is also high in fiber and calcium, making it a good choice for anyone hoping to eat healthier. Carlson sells a lot of his products to ethnic markets in American cities that boast large East African populations. But home cooks and professional chefs with an interest in food archeology are also finding creative uses for the grain. “It can be used in all kinds of dishes. It adds a delicious, slightly sour taste to your recipes,” Carlson said. “Waffles and pie crusts made from the flour taste great.” Chef Jered Couch, executive chef at Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Nampa and former owner of SixOneSix in Eagle, uses teff on his seasonal menus and occasionally teaches classes about cooking with ancient grains. Couch also touts teff’s culinary versatility. “I like to reduce the grains with veggie stock until it becomes creamy like polenta,” he said. “Teff also works well for making savory little cakes to go with grilled fish and as crepe batter.” He added: “The story of teff is great. You’re actually eating a food that people ate way back when, prepared almost the same way.” 28

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 29


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

OFFICE HOURS Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Out to Lunch 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS

blocks from BSU. I am taking care of September rent so you are set! Come check it out. Just text Karrie at 406-360-0880. See pictures of complex & rooms at parkvillageboise.com

HOUSING BW ROOMMATES FREE SEPTEMBER RENT Looking for a female roomie to take over my lease. 4BD apt. 2

BW FOR RENT

CAREERS

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

$700 discount first month! 3BD, 2.5BA home near new waterpark in the Water Front District. Direct access to the Greenbelt. Two rooftop decks with great mountain views. 2372 sq. ft. First month is $1500. Two lease options: $2,215/mo. for 12 mo., $2,100/mo. for 18 mo. No smoking/no pets. More info. & photos at boise4rent.com

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX

NORTH END HOME WITH BACKYARD

(208) 342-4733

C A RE E RS BW CAREERS

LOW VOLTAGE ELECTRICAL TECH

Busy Electrical Contracting Company in need of a Low Voltage Technician. We are looking for an individual with experience working specifically on fire alarms, tele/data & security systems. We are looking for an individual who can work independently & efficiently. Pay will be based on experience. Please email resumes to: robert_bischoff@me.com or rob@ics-lv.com ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 /day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800-560-8672 for casting times /locations.

BW CAREER TRAINING

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY

BW CAREER TRAINING

MAKE $$ PLAY FAN FTBALL

Play Fantasy Football. New games every week. Sign up at fanduel. com Referral name rustypump. RIVERTOWN NEWSPAPER 4 SALE! If you are looking for a challenge or an escape this could be your ticket. If you look forward to spotty (but increasing) cellphone coverage, never having a concern for traffic and being rewarded for your own work, consider this opportunity. If you have skills to bring, writing, design and a good business sense, as well as some cash, let’s talk. This paper started from scratch is now a 16-24-32 page twice tabloid with 3600 circulation. Purchase the business with print and online presence for $37,500 —just reduced!. Add in world headquarters/home office and 2-bed home with big yard in Idaho river community for an additional $120k. Call 208-4690747 for more information!

2BD, 1BA, approx. 1200 sq. ft. Comes with W/D & refrigerator. Fireplace, hardwood floors. Very clean $775/mo. Pets ok with dep. 26th & Sunset. Contact Greg 916-704-3764.

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m.

SHOP HERE

* Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER

SHOP HERE

Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

30 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


COMMUNITY BW CLASSES

ITALIAN LESSONS IN BOISE

Learn from a native of Italy! Sign up for classes today... * Conversational approach - Learn to speak quickly! * Professional instructor with over 7 yrs. teaching experience. Learn to speak Italian for your next trip, or just for something fun to do! All levels, from beginner to advanced. Private or group classes. I am an Italian citizen who has been living in Boise for the last 8 yrs. I taught Italian for over 5 yrs. for Berlitz Language Center. I now teach Italian privately through my own company, Studio Italiano. I have a well-developed curriculum that will take you from beginner to an advanced speaker. Call or email today! 208-376-2226 or rgetzin@ usa.net

BEAUTY

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

BW LOST

Family Counseling Services in Meridian is now offering couples or family counseling for only $12. Please contact Brittany Whitman to inquire about services & to schedule your appointment today 830-0806. NEW COUNSELING PRACTICE Peter Wollheim, M. Couns, LPC, CCW Counseling Support for Individuals, Couples & Families Living with Severe & Persistent Mental Illnesses. Treating people as people, not diagnoses. Call 921-2027. Visit mhboise.com or peterw@mhboise.com

SILVER/AMETHYST BRACELET Lost at Art in the Park, Sunday afternoon, memory wire amethyst/ silver bracelet. My personal design, please return to Art Museum front desk or call 272-1673. Thank you!

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW BEAUTY

~HAIRCUT~FOILS~ STYLE $15

Looking for a little change, but not wanting to do too much? Let me help! Come in & take advantage of this awesome deal! Women’s Hair Cut, 5 Foils (placed in fringe/ bang area) style for $15! YES! Only $15...that is 50% off regular price! Hurry to schedule! This deal won’t last long & appointments will fill up quickly! MondaySaturday 9am-4pm (last appt taken at 2:30) Call/Text 353-0574. $10 CUT AND DEEP CONDITION See Katie at Plush Hair Lounge, llc and get your $10 hair cut and deep conditioning treatment! Your hair will love you! Call/Text 353.0574 to book an appointment today!

BEAUTY

~COUNSELING ONLY $12~

ADOPT-A-PET

BW COUNSELING FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

PEACH SPA O R I E NTA L M A S S A G E 322-0081 619 N. Orchard.

BEAUTY PEACHES: 3-year-old female domestic longhair. Sweet, inquisitive personality. Litterboxtrained. Needs regular brushing. (Kennel 17#17226000)

CHEVY: 1-year-old male German shepherd/ Lab mix. Energetic dog, needs regular exercise. Good with dogs and bonds quickly. (Kennel 319- #16785957)

SHELBY: 4-year-old female pointer mix. Confident and attentive, but needs to learn basic manners. Enjoys training. (Kennel 321#17215519)

TIM: 1-year-old male domestic longhair. Raised indoors. Good with other cats. Playful. (Kennel 02#17262283)

SAMUEL: 1-year-old male Siamese mix. Very handsome cat. Calm, easy to handle. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 18- #17089858)

PRINCESS: 4-year-old female border collie/ German shepherd mix. House-trained. Good with older kids, calm dogs and cats. (Kennel 303- #17156342)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

THUMBELINA: I’m a Pick of the Litter. Only $10 takes me home.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BONFIRE: Gorgeous, SATIN: Pretty kitten is kid-experienced girl will spayed, chipped and keep you warm this fall. vaccinated. Adopt me.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 31


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY BW HEALING ARTS

BW MASSAGE

ACUTONICS FACIAL This facial consists of a personalized European facial and incorporates sound healing using tuning forks on acupressure points. This vibrating facial will help calm, sooth and balance your body, mind, and spirit. Massage & Body Boutique. 841-9062. WANG MEDICAL ACUPUNCTURE Traditional Chinese acupuncture has been used to successfully treat diseases that have been chronic and hopeless. Dr. Wang was trained in China and has been practicing in Boise for almost 15 years. He offers free consultations. He won’t treat you if he can’t help you. Call to schedule today 208-321-7348. Same day appointments available. Some insurance accepted. Clean, private and comfortable treatment rooms.

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

RELAXATION MASSAGE Pamper yourself with a relaxing massage. I offer full body massage $40/hr. & $60 for 1.5 hours. I offer in & out services. I’m in SE Boise. Call or text Richard to schedule your massage at 208695-9492.

A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

*A MAN’S MASSAGE BY ERIC*

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com Embrace the moment with a sensual massage at ULM. Now accepting new clients. ULM 3408377. Hrs. 8:30AM-8PM. FULL ROOM MASSAGE Deep tissue Swedish. Full body: $50/hr., $40/half hr. Foot Massage: $25/hr., $20/half hr. 7 days a week. 9am-10pm. 626-3454266. 320 N. Orchard St. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231.

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio. Back in Boise after 5 weeks of training abroad. Tantra Massage by Jamie. 440-4321.

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759.

SPECIALIZING IN PAIN RELIEF

FREE Head & Should Massage with 1 hr. Chinese Reflexology Foot Massage at VIP Massage. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

ELECTROSMOG TESTING

SERVICES BW HOME

INTERIOR PAINTING

Journeyman 30+ yrs. exp. in the trade clean & courteous lic./insured. Call 463-7771. LAUNDRY & WET CLEANING Free Pick-up & Delivery. Wet cleaning is an environmentally friendly & toxin-free alternative to dry cleaning. Call 938-9539. Leathers, silks, wools, shirts, slacks, suits, unique items, restoration & preservation. Weekly fluff & fold laundry service only $2.75/pound. (Sign up for 6 wks. & receive 20% off all services). We are fragrance-free. Organic & biodegradable. No water pollution or hazardous waste is produced during the wet cleaning process. Uses 65% less energy 75% less water than traditional cleaning methods. Mention this ad and receive 50% off first order.

EMF, RF Testing & Consulting. Assess the safety of your home or office for dangerous electromagnetic fields. Protect your health & well being! Rebecca Saxon, RN, BSN, MA 703-9784. www.emfhealth.net

M U SI C BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION/OTHER GUITAR LESSONS Learn Guitar & Bass in my home studio. 40 + yrs. of professional exp. Beginners & intermediates welcome. Rate: $30/hr. Hear me on reverbnation Boise. Rick “Lika” Segoine. 922-7192 or 724-3297.

NYT CROSSWORD | BREATHTAKING BY MATT GINSBERG / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 13 Most excellent, in modern slang 20 Set forth

ACROSS 1 Lascivious 8 They have flat tops

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

20

21

23

24 26

30

10

32 39

40

44

34

63

82

90

91

83

84

92

102

113

108

70

71 76

80 85

86

87

88

93

103

97

104

98 105

109

110

114

115

89

94

96

107

59

75

79

101

50

65 69

95 100

49

55

58

74

81

19

43

64

68

78

18

37

54

57

77

17

48

53

62

73

16

47

56

99

36 42

67

15

29

35

52

66

14

25

46

61

13

28 33

45

72

12

41

51

60

11

22

27

31

38

9

24 *Male pattern baldness? 26 Content of a 2003 decryption 28 With 78-Down, character commemorated in the answers to this puzzle’s starred clues 29 Muddy 30 Japanese consent 32 *Baying? 36 Transfers, as funds

21 Kind of wine 22 Heir, usually 23 French farewell

116

117

111 118

121

122

123

124

125

126

32 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

106 112 119

120

38 Title words before “Easy” for Linda Ronstadt and “Hard” for John Lennon 41 Coach 42 Walk in the park, say 44 Menu heading 46 French 101 verb 47 Thumbing of the nose 48 E-mail address ending 51 *Cardiologist’s concern? 54 Bridge responses 56 Sen. Daniel Inouye, for one 57 Bridge response 59 Hit on the noggin 60 Saw to it 63 The Lion, not the Witch or the Wardrobe 65 Discovery medium 66 Fingers 67 *Caries? 71 VCR button 72 Pretty up 74 Tony’s relatives 75 Occupants of the lowest circle of Dante’s hell 77 Zig or zag 78 Had haddock, say 80 Dispenser item 81 Citation 83 *Marriage in 2004, divorce in 2011? 90 Mix (in) 91 Inventor after whom a Yale residential college is named 93 Soviet author Ehrenburg 94 View from a control tower 95 Sweet drink 96 They have pointed tops 98 Bel ___ cheese 99 Twist spinoff 102 *Conduct classes? 106 “What ___ thou art, act well thy part” 107 Heaps 108 “God helps ___ …” 110 Pitcher of coffee? 113 *Petrified wood? 118 Any of the Brontë sisters 121 Necessitates 122 Prime cut 123 Steep slopes

124 Application enclosures, often 125 Ecclesiastical council 126 Vituperates

DOWN 1 It’s a trap 2 Singer whose name sounds like a cry 3 *Endless bagpipe tune? 4 Item in a box in the basement 5 ___ a secret 6 Heir, often 7 St. Benedict, e.g. 8 Kellogg offering, briefly 9 Clint : the Good :: ___ : the Ugly 10 South of Mexico 11 Heaps 12 Con man’s plant 13 “We Shall Overcome” singer 14 *Stable hands? 15 Broadway bigwig: Abbr. 16 “This isn’t going well at all!” 17 Poetic ending 18 Catch on 19 Squeals 25 Passover month 27 Snowy Floridian? 30 Audible reproof 31 Rat-___ 33 Owns, in the Bible 34 It can be balanced and biased simultaneously 35 Fit to serve 37 Actress Sommer 39 French composer of “Vexations” 40 87-Down, e.g., by birth 43 Extinct emu-like birds 45 Frère’s sibling 47 Parade figure, informally 48 *Gold-plated forceps? 49 Man of the house? 50 Onetime Time competitor, briefly 52 Tighten (up) 53 Works (up) 55 See 103-Down 58 Work without ___ 60 Corrupting atmosphere 61 Like many a ditz 62 Prime Minister David Cameron’s alma mater 63 “There is ___ in the affairs of men . . .”

64 1965 title role for Ursula Andress 65 Birdsong 68 Supersized 69 Language from which “clan” comes 70 Dweller along the Volga 73 Abbr. after many an officer’s name 76 2001-02 Nickelodeon sitcom 78 See 28-Across 79 Dictator’s first words? 82 “Morning” person 84 Bigwigs 85 A.C. or D.C. 86 When repeated, a child’s taunt 87 Comedian Smirnoff 88 Job for the Hardy Boys 89 Actress Martha who played Sinatra’s love interest in “Some Came Running” 92 “S.N.L.” specialty 95 Gold prospector Joe with a state capital named after him 97 “Days,” for one 99 Nabisco offering 100 Agreeing (with) 101 They may produce suits

L A S T I B I S

L O S T C A B U I S B E T A B U

E T O N

I S M E L L T H E B L O O D

B A S I L

D A R E T O

E R N E S T

A S S A U L T F E E B L E A T T E M P T

103 Early hurdles for 55-Down members: Abbr. 104 Annual May event 105 2010 Nobelist Mario Vargas ___ 109 “Bonanza” role 111 Prefix with bel 112 Name dropper’s notation? 114 ___ card 115 Slip on 116 Musician Brian 117 Springfield’s Flanders 119 Steamboat Springs, Colo., for one 120 European streaker, once, in brief Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

Y E G G A L A I P I Z Z A D S E M C E F R O C E W I S R S I N H A L I P O Y T A C T E P E R H P O R T E P E I L A S I S I R G O L O C L U O N O U R T S E C U S P E N K S O C H A A T L A R O S E L L

A N S W E R S

P E P J A V A O V E N E E A F K A M O I A S A D N T M D A R A E A S T E R I T E O S H L B K E E L E M A A L O T A P U A R S T T I S C H U A L A R L O T T K S H A H E E

O L D T I M E R T E T E N D H E M P

F F D O U I O M A B L L I I E N A T M H O B E F B A B A N T L E U L N G R O L E N I D E S A R H A M T A E N

A S I A N S

Y E N T A

L I N G

E T A S

A L L S E A S O N

S O S

R O S E

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GRAPHICS BY TONI

Graphic artist with 15 yrs. exp., fresh from Maui. I specialize in CD design & layout for musicians. Also, CD duplication, 1 to 50. Reasonable rates. Check out my web site for samples: graphicsbytoni. net Call: 922-7192 or 724-3297.

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

ROCK BAND ORIGINALS Have songs written, want to practice & work on them for playing out. Wanted: singer, back up & lead, depending on the song; bass; drums; and saxophone or clarinet; and keyboards; fiddle violin player also if it fits. 208-936-1863.

NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES

BW INSTRUMENTS

GUITAR REPAIR

From basic set-ups to complete restoration. Prompt, professional service. Gary Santa, Idaho’s only “Gold Level” technician. Call for a free evaluation! 853-4141 Dorsey Music 5015 W. State. USED BASS CLARINET FOR SALE Lovely Used Bass Clarinet for sale. This instrument was given to me by my grandmother in high school. $1,500. Willing to negotiate. YCL220 Yamaha model Wooden 3 piece instrument . Contact: Erika: erika@onceuponareality.com YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

BW MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE

UPRIGHT BASS PLAYER WANTED:

Working/touring band is looking for upright bass player to join the team. Original music, country/ blues/punk in the vein of Nick Cave meets Merle Haggard. Band is about 4 yrs. old, play steady gigs, toured Europe with plans to do it again, making records, all that shiz...not for the weak. Must have chops & instrument. idahoband@yahoo.com

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estate of JAMES L. BOYER, Deceased. Case No. CV IE 1215567 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LuLu M. Boyer has been appointed personal representative of the estate of the above-named Decedent. All persons having claims against the Decedent or his estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. LuLu M. Boyer c/o IVER J. LONGETEIG 5304 N. Turret Boise, Idaho 83702 Personal Representative September 21, 2012. IVER J. LONGETEIG Pub. October 3, 10 & 17, 2012.

FOR SALE BW FOR SALE

MOUNTAIN HUCKLEBERRY SEEDS

Easy to grow & delicious. Great for container gardening. Packets come with instructions & are $3, $6 & $15. Also, have Huckleberry Bushes. Mail order or pick up available. Pick up prices: $2, $5 & $8. We are by Zion National Park, Hurricane, Southern Utah. 435635-7681 or 435-680-0167.

QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

VINYL CAR DECALS STICKERS

isymbolz offers hundreds of cut vinyl car decal stickers for your auto, truck, boat, or motorcycles. Ancient decals, native American symbols, Egyptian hieroglyphics, a large variety of animal decals & athletic sports decals. Only $4.49 for 5” decal. Variety of colors & sizes to choose from. Ship worldwide. Free shipping available. See Site For Details: isymbolz.com

BW ART, ANTIQUES & COLLECTABLES FLEA MARKET SALE The Treasure Garden at 6521 Ustick Road is reopening soon. Looking for Artists, Crafters and Vendors. Starting 9-15 Saturdays and Sundays 10 to 6. 10 x 10 Spaces $25 per weekend. Flea Market Style. Reserve your space now! 3440811 t-garden@live.com

BW WANT TO BUY CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

REAL DISCREET, LOCAL CONNECTIONS Call FREE! 208-287-0343 or 800210-1010. www.livelinks.com 18+. WILD LOCAL CHATLINE Send Messages FREE! Straight 208-345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-4722200. Use FREE Code 7886, 18+.

TO THE GUY AT 6TH & GROVE In the red SUV/Truck & crewcut on Friday, September 14th: You were screaming mad at me, so mad you couldn’t even tell me the problem. All you could muster

was, “I don’t talk to idiots.” From my point of view, I stopped to let 6 pedestrians cross the street at 6th & Grove. In the future, expressing yourself with explanations rather than anger will help you & society.

SERVICES - HOME

BW KISSES BILL COPE, Happy 65 years. Thanks for always being my support even from so far away. I love you dad. Annie. MAN ABOUT TOWN Rumor has it you are another year older? Who would believe it! All our Best. YOUR GUESS May be right. Your guess may be wrong. Either way, I’ll write you a song. DAVEY JOE Happy birthday. October is looking to be an amazing month.. DIEZ! Happy 10 months sweet girl… YOU’RE GETTING OLD, A! Happy birthday to you, Aaron! Let’s celebrate in style. New York here we come! Loads & tons of love. -j KISSES TO THE BAXTER FAM. I’ll miss our bloody Sundays and random happy hours. XOXO, RD Jed - I effing love you and your homemade peach pie! What an amazing surprise to come back to work and find it on my chair. – Heart Lezzie

ADULT

BW KICKS C O N N E C T IO N S E C T IO N BW CHAT LINES

HEY NEIGHBOR! Why is it that when we courtesy wave “hello” to you, you look right at us and never wave back? You don’t even crack a smile. rude.

CONNECTION SECTION - ENTERTAINMENT FUN LOCAL SINGLES Browse & Reply FREE! 208-3458855. Use FREE Code 7887, 18+.

IT’S PARTY TIME!

It’s party time! on TheChatHour local sexy singles hook-up tonight! Try4free! 18+ only 415-983-3177 or 510-986-5500 or 408-413-1688 or 888-565-6955. MEET GAY & BI SINGLES Listen to Ads & Reply FREE! 208472-2200. Use FREE Code 5988, 18+. RAW UNCENSORED PHONE SEX V/MC/AmEx/Disc,18+,$1/min. Call Jolene! 800-573-2995.

DRINK HERE

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 33


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “In a full heart there is room for everything,” said poet Antonio Porchia, “and in an empty heart there is room for nothing.” That’s an important idea for you to meditate on, Aries. The universe is conspiring for you to be visited by a tide of revelations about intimacy. And yet you won’t be available to get the full benefit of that tide unless your heart is as full as possible. Wouldn’t you love to be taught more about love and togetherness and collaboration? TAURUS (April 20-May 20): As I turn inward and call forth psychic impressions of what’s ahead for you, I’m seeing mythic symbols like whoopie cushions, rubber chickens and pools of fake plastic vomit. I’m seeing popcorn shells that are stuck in your teeth, a dog that’s eating your homework and an alarm clock that doesn’t go off when it’s supposed to. But as I push further into the nottoo-distant future, exploring the deeper archetypal levels, I’m also tuning into a vision of fireflies in an underground cavern. They’re lighting your way and leading you to a stash of treasure.

BW EAT HERE

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.” That’s the opening sentence of Charles Dickens’ bestselling novel A Tale of Two Cities. The author was describing the period of the French Revolution in the late 18th century, but he could just as well have been talking about our time—or any other time, for that matter. Of course, many modern cynics reject the idea that our era is the best of times. They obsess on the idea that ours is the worst of all the worst times that have ever been. When your worried mind is in control of you, you may even think that thought yourself, Gemini. But in accordance with the current astrological omens, I challenge you to be a fiery rebel: Come up with at least five reasons why this is the best of times for you personally. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Art washes away from the soul the dust of everyday life,” said Pablo Picasso. That’s certainly true for me. I can purify my system either by creating art myself or being in the presence of great art. How about you, Cancerian? What kinds of experiences cleanse you of the congested emotions that naturally build up in all of us? What influences can you draw on to purge the repetitive thoughts that sometimes torment you? How do you go about making your imagination as fresh and free as a warm breeze on a sunny day? I urge you to make a study of all the things that work for you, and then use them to the max in the coming week.

34 | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Our culture peculiarly honors the act of blaming, which it takes as the sign of virtue and intellect.” So said literary critic Lionel Trilling. Now I’m passing his idea on to you, Leo, just in time for the No-Blaming Season. Would you like to conjure up a surge of good karma for yourself? Then for the next 10 days or so, refrain from the urge to find fault. And do your best to politely neutralize that reflex in other people who are sharing your space, even if they love to hate the same political party or idiot fringe that you do. P.S.: For extra credit, engage in speech and activity that are antidotes to the blaming epidemic. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): One reason platinum is a precious metal is that it is so infrequently found in the Earth’s crust. A second reason is that there are difficulties in extracting it from the other metals it’s embedded in. You typically need 10 tons of ore to obtain 1 ounce of platinum. That’s a good metaphor for the work you have ahead of you, Virgo. The valuable resource you’re dreaming of is definitely worth your hard work, persistence and attention to detail. But to procure it, you’ll probably need the equivalent of several tons of those fine qualities. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): While doing research in South America four decades ago, anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss found an indigenous tribe whose people claimed they could see the planet Venus in the daytime. This seemed impossible to him. But he later consulted astronomers, who told him that in fact, Venus does emit enough light to be visible by day to a highly trained human eye. My prediction for you, Libra, is that in the coming months you will make a metaphorically equivalent leap: You will become aware of and develop a relationship with some major presence that has been virtually undetectable. And I bet the first glimpse will come this week. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Whether anyone has ever called you an “old soul” before, that term will suit you well in the coming months. A whole lot of wisdom will be ripening in you all at once. Past events that never quite made sense before will more clearly reveal the role they have played in your life’s master plan. Relatively unimportant desires you’ve harbored for a long time will fade away, while others that have been in the background—and more crucial to your ultimate happiness—will rise to prominence. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In most of my horoscopes, I tell you what you can do to make yourself feel good. I advise you

on how you can act with the highest integrity and get in touch with what you need to learn about. Now and then, though, I like to focus on how you can help other people feel good. I direct your attention to how you can inspire them to align with their highest integrity and get in touch with what they need to learn about. This is one of those times, Sagittarius. I’m hoping you have your own ideas about how to perform these services. Here are a few of my suggestions: Listen with compassionate receptivity to the people you care for. Describe to them what they’re like when they are at their best. Give them gifts they can use to activate their dormant potential. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If you’ve ever watched tennis matches, you know that some players grunt when they smack the ball. Does that help them summon greater power? Maybe. But the more important issue is that it can mask the sound of the ball striking the racket, thereby making it harder for their opponents to guess the force and spin of the ball that will be headed toward them. The coming week would be an excellent time for you to hunt down a competitive advantage that’s comparable to this in your own endeavors. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Many people seem to believe that all of America’s Christians are, and have always been, fundamentalists. But the truth is that, at most 35 percent of the total are fundies, and their movement has only gotten cultural traction in the last 30 years. So, why do their bizarre interpretations of the nature of reality get so much play? One reason is that they shout so loud and act so mean. Your upcoming assignment, Aquarius, is to do what you can to shift the focus from smallminded bullies to big-hearted visionaries, whether that applies to the Christians in your sphere or any other influences. It’s time to shrink any tendency you might have to get involved with energy vampires. Instead, give your full attention and lend your vigorous clout to life-affirming intelligence. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): [WARNING: The following contains more than the usual dose of poetry.] Mirthful agitation. Surprising deliverance. I predict you will expose the effects of the smoke and mirrors, then find your way out of the labyrinth. Lucid irrationality. Deathless visions. I predict you will discover a secret you’d been hiding from yourself, then escape a dilemma you no longer need to struggle with. Mysterious blessings arriving from the frontiers. Refreshed fertility roused by a reborn dream. I predict you will begin to prepare a new power spot for your future use.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 3–9, 2012 | 35



Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 15