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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 12 SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

TEMPORARY FIX Immigrant youths look at Deferred Action as sign of hope FEATURE 11

GOP CAGE FIGHT Infighting in Idaho’s dominant political party SCREEN 26

IN A TIFF BW on location at the Toronto International Film Festival FOOD 28

TALKIN’ TURKEY Whole Foods courts vendors before November opening

“Citizens shouldn’t have to prove they are not committing a crime.”

COPE 5


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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Sarah Barber, Bill Cope, Zach Hagadone, Nathaniel Hoffman, Chris Parker, Ted Rall Intern: Jordyn Price Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Adam Rosenlund, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2012 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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NOTE NEWS FLASH: STORIES NOT FOR SALE Shortly after this issue hits stands, I will have had three opportunities to get in front of journalism students since the beginning of the semester several weeks ago. Over the years, I’ve visited college classrooms not just at Boise State but also at College of Idaho, and I’ve spoke in front of journalism students as well as upper division English and communications majors with an emphasis in public relations. One question comes up without fail, regardless of the college or the area of study: How does Boise Weekly support itself without charging for subscriptions? I wish I could say the consistent question was more probing or philosophical about the state of media, but while those do come up—and with some regularity—it seems like what everyone really wants to know is how can we give away a product and still keep the doors open? In fact, I was on a panel discussion earlier this year when someone in the PR industry asked if Boise Weekly would consider an online paywall anytime soon. The obvious answer is that we give away our print product so why would we charge for our online content? How do we do it? I thought the traditional revenue model of journalism was obvious. Apparently it’s not, because it’s not just students who ask me this question. The answer is: advertising. Advertisers buy space in our paper to have access to our audience. Part two of that answer is that advertisers do not buy editorial content; to reiterate, they buy our audience. The latter is something advertisers are prone to forgetting; more than one has pulled their ad space upon disagreeing with editorial content. Readers, however, should expect that our editorial content is never dependent on who buys ad space in our pages. As the editor of a newspaper, someone who has been immersed in media for a decade, I forget that not everyone understands the separation of church and state, of editorial and advertising. I’ve written about it numerous times during my time as editor and yet, the question still comes: How do I buy an article in Boise Weekly? Related to advertising, I have one thing to pass along to readers on the publisher’s behalf this week: shopboiseidaho. com has been discontinued. Thanks to those of you who supported it and shopped it. If you have any questions about its termination, please contact Publisher Sally Freeman. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Bill Carman TITLE: To Be a Milker of Giant Bees One Must Be Well Armored MEDIUM: Ink, acrylic and digital. ARTIST STATEMENT: Drawing across the curriculum. billcarman.com

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Idaho immigrant youth hopeful for Deferred Action

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CITIZEN

THE YEAR’S BEST IN FILM Boise Weekly film reviewer George Prentice has been at the Toronto International Film Festival since it opened Sept. 6. Get the photos and reviews at Cobweb all this week.

STUDENTS GET LESS IN IDAHO According to a report released Sept. 4 by the Center on Budget Policy and Priorities, per-student spending is down from last year in 26 states. Per-student funding in Idaho, adjusted for inflation, has decreased $1,083 since FY2008. Details at Citydesk.

GUNS, BOOBS AND BATHROOM TRIPS Boise Weekly New Media Czar Josh Gross hung out at the 208 Music Video Fest on First Thursday and put together a music video using random footage from attendees’ phones. You’d be surprised what kind of video is walking around town in people’s pockets.

BE A DO-GOODER Got some time on your hands? Volunteer. Check out BW’s Volunteer Guide for a few places looking for an extra pair of hands.

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FEATURE A Grand Old Punch-Up

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Changing hip-hop’s Atmosphere

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Trio of films at TIFF tackle attitudes toward disabilities

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REC Wakeboarding sans boat 27 FOOD Local producers eye Whole Food’s shelves

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BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

DEVOLVING THE VOTE Part Two: Don’t need no steenking photo ID “To vote you must either present a photo ID or sign a Personal Identification Affidavit.” —From Idaho Votes, a voters’ guide issued by the Idaho Secretary of State’s Office Last week we first heard the word “traitoring,” a verb I concocted to describe what Republican legislatures and governors across the land are doing to suppress the vote of certain Americans, to discourage citizens from going to the polls in November, and in some cases, blatantly deny qualified people the right to vote. In Ohio, Pennsylvania, Florida, Michigan, Arizona—the list goes on, and yes, it includes Idaho—Republican power-mongers fear they can no longer win elections if specific varieties of Americans are allowed to enter a voting booth freely. The tactics they have used vary from state to state. In some they are simply purging the rolls of registered voters. In others they are restricting the hours and days that people might vote early or making it outrageously difficult to get registered, particularly in minority neighborhoods. But common to all of the states in which Republicans are trying to squelch the turnout of African-Americans, Hispanic-Americans, oldfolk-Americans and youngfolk-Americans is the requirement that all voters carry a government-sanctioned photo ID with them to the polls. They insist these efforts are to stop a crime so rare in reality that if we gathered together all the people who attempted to vote under a false identity, anywhere in America, over the last decade, they would all fit on the same bus. That’s how feeble the threat of voter fraud is. Yet the insatiable plutocrats of the right would make it impossible for millions of Americans to vote, using this strawdog as their excuse. And most galling of all: We know they are lying about it, they know we know they are lying about it, but they’re pushing on and doing it anyway. I guess for shame to be a deterrent, you have to have some. I’d say, “Stop me if you’ve heard all this before,” if I didn’t believe there is no such thing as hearing too many times that the very foundation of this democracy is at risk. All other rights hinge on the freedom to vote. Without it, the Constitution—all constitutions, everywhere—are little more than scrap paper. The ability of human beings to take part in shaping the futures of themselves and their communities—from Golden Age Athenians scratching their vote on pottery shards to Third World hopefuls trekking miles and miles to leave a thumbprint on their ballots—may well be the most impressive and inspiring accomplishment we, as the most communal of animals, have achieved in our social evolution. Millions have died to protect the vote. Millions more have died to spread it. There is no part of the human WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

family that hasn’t struggled to get it. Yet here we have the most powerful, wealthiest political bloc in the world today, tearing at that essential first step to selfdetermination. In recent days, judges in Florida, Texas and Ohio undid the right’s perfidious scheme by varying degrees. But even if those judgments survive the inevitable appeals, there are still many states in which arbitrary voting restrictions are going unchallenged. And thanks to the clutch of rubes that controls our State Legislature and the Governor’s Office, Idaho is one of them. U Also from last week, I wrote how I planned to go to my polling place Tuesday, Nov. 6, without identification, and that I would still be able to vote, in spite of the new Republican edicts that now control voting in almost 30 states. I told you about the stipulation in Idaho’s law that allows me, or you, to fill out an affidavit if there is no photo ID available. (I have been assured by both the Ada County Election Office and the Secretary of State’s Office that there will be plenty of affidavits to go around at each polling place, should there be a sudden rash of misplaced drivers licenses.) The document is a simple thing to complete; a signature and address is about all it requires. But be aware: There is a penalty of some sort to be paid for anyone who says they are someone they aren’t. What I haven’t told you is my reason for doing it. I have a photo ID. I could easily obey the Republican decree with no need for the extra 30 seconds it will take to fill out the affidavit. But the photo ID requirement should not exist, period. Citizens shouldn’t have to prove they are not committing a crime before there is any indication a crime is being committed. These odious laws were enacted for one reason only, no matter how many lies the rotten bastards tell to justify them. With the affidavit, I intend to leave behind something to register my protest and disgust—a paper handprint on the stonewall to advise the creepy operatives of Idaho’s controlling cartel that I, for one, will not be submitting to this oppressive directive they have imposed upon the citizens of Idaho; something that insists I am a legitimate citizen whether or not I’m carrying a scrap of plasticized paper with my mug on it; something that shows them no matter what sneaky shit they pull to swing the results to their favor, I will chip away at their voting restrictions in any way I can, no matter how insignificant each separate chip may be; that I will never stop resisting their loathsome attempts either in Idaho or any other region of this grand democracy of ours to keep people from having a say in their own destiny. But as I said last week, far be it from me to suggest anyone else do as I do.

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OPINION/TED RALL

THE REBRANDING OF OBAMA, 2012 Why is Obama running on his record?

e a p r s e e k a h Stars S UNDER THE

“It’s not clear what [President Barack Obama] is passionate to do if he is elected for another four years,” writes David Brooks, conservative columnist for The New York Times. “The Democratic convention is his best chance to offer an elevator speech, to define America’s most pressing challenge and how he plans to address it.” Addressing the DNC Sept. 5, Bill Clinton came as close as any Democrat has this year to answering Brooks: “In Tampa, the Republican argument against the president’s re-election was pretty simple: We left him a total mess, he hasn’t finished cleaning it up yet, so fire him and put us back in. I like the argument for President Obama’s re-election a lot better.” Nicely done—though this argument only works for voters stuck in the two-party trap. But the biggest piece is still MIA: Obama’s domestic and foreign policy agenda for a second term. Two principal arguments are being advanced in favor of Obama’s re-election: first, that he “took out” Osama bin Laden; second, that we are “absolutely” better off economically than we were four years ago. These arguments, if they continue to be the Democrats’ main talking points, will lead Obama to defeat this fall. U.S. history shows that the candidate who presents the most optimistic vision of the future usually prevails. The future he sells doesn’t have to be specific (Mitt Romney’s 12 million new jobs, say). Ronald Reagan, who projected vague aw-shucks optimism reflected

by a 100 percent-pabulum campaign slogan, “It’s Morning in America,” defeated Jimmy “Malaise” Carter and Walter “Let’s Tell the Truth About Taxes” Mondale. (Never mind that Carter and Mondale were more honest, smarter and nicer.) Obama followed the Reagan model in 2008: hope, change, charming smile, not a lot of specifics. And it worked. (It didn’t hurt to run against John McCain, the consummate “get off my lawn, you damn kids” grouch.) So why is Obama trading in a proven winner? Why is he running on his first-term record? Obama’s entourage has obviously talked themselves into believing that the president’s record is better than it really is—certainly better than average voters think it is. Grade inflation is inevitable when you evaluate yourself. (In 2009, at the same time the Fed was greasing the banksters with $7.77 trillion of our money—without a dime devoted to a new WPA-style jobs program—he gave himself a B-plus.) First, the extrajudicial assassination of bin Laden, an act of vengeance against a man in hiding who had been officially designated to pose no threat since at least 2006, makes some people queasy. Sure, many voters are happy— but getting even for crimes committed more than a decade ago still doesn’t spell out an optimistic vision for the future. Similarly, and perhaps more potently since jobs are the most important issue to Americans, claiming that we are 10 better off than we were four years ago,

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NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

END OF A NIGHTMARE Young immigrants embrace temporary status, short of Dream Act NATHANIEL HOFFMAN Almost two years ago a high school student from the Magic Valley told Boise Weekly: “Inside, I want to say I am American. But in reality, I’m not American because of my legal status in the United States.â€? BW chose not to name him in the article because he was a minor and brought to the United States illegally from Mexico when he was in the second grade. Now that young man, Aaron Ramirez, is almost 19, a freshman at the College of Southern Idaho, and will most likely be authorized to work in the United States in the next few months. Ramirez is among the ďŹ rst of a group of young immigrants to apply for Deferred Action, an immigration procedure that the Obama administration expanded in a June 15 memo to include “childhood arrivals.â€? It will provide temporary, two-year protection from deportation to some immigrants who were brought to the United States as children. The application form was published Aug. 15 and

Immigrant communities across the country greeted the program with great enthusiasm. Tens of thousands of people attended application workshops in Chicago, New 9ÂœĂ€ÂŽĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂœĂƒĂŠ˜}iÂ?iĂƒĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ`>ĂžĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ>ÂŤÂŤÂ?ˆV>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠV>“iĂŠÂœĂ•ĂŒÂ°ĂŠĂ•Â˜`Ă€i`ĂƒĂŠÂœvĂŠÂŤiÂœÂŤÂ?iĂŠÂ…>Ă›iĂŠ attended information sessions across Idaho in the last few weeks. ÂœĂ€iĂŠĂŒÂ…>Â˜ĂŠÂŁĂ¤Ă¤ĂŠÂŤiÂœÂŤÂ?iĂŠwÂ?i`ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŒÂœĂŠ>Â˜ĂŠ>ÂŤÂŤÂ?ˆV>tion-processing workshop Sept. 7 at the Boise *Ă•LÂ?ˆVĂŠˆLĂ€>ÀÞ]ĂŠĂƒÂŤÂœÂ˜ĂƒÂœĂ€i`ĂŠLĂžĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ ÂœÂˆĂƒi‡L>Ăƒi`ĂŠ Centro de Comunidad y Justicia. ,ÂœLiĂ€ĂŒÂœĂŠ Ă•Â˜iâ]ÊÓä]ĂŠÂ…iÂ?ÂŤi`ʓ>ÂŽiĂŠÂ…Ă•Â˜`Ă€i`ĂƒĂŠ of photocopies and also began his own application. Âş½ÛiĂŠ}ÂœĂŒĂŠĂ“Ă¤ĂŠĂži>Ă€ĂƒĂŠÂ…iĂ€i]ĂŠÂ?ÂˆĂ›ÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠ>ĂŠViĂ€ĂŒ>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ life,â€? Nunez said. “You have a name, but you can’t really put it up to anything. Your name doesn’t count.â€? Nunez and many of the other young immigrants present echoed the language of the Dream Act, a proposal that would give them

LAURIE PEARMAN

Julio Juarez, 23 (left), and brother Edgar Juarez, 19 (center), ďŹ ll out a screening worksheet for deferred action as their mother looks on. Youth rely on their parents’ memories and troves of documents to prove when they entered the United States, how long they have lived here and their school history.

Ramirez applied ďŹ ve days later. “It was straightforward,â€? Ramirez said. “I looked at all the precautions. It seems pretty safe.â€? Ramirez’s parents were excited for him, but made him show his application to an immigration attorney before he submitted it. Ramirez had done such a thorough job that the lawyer did not even charge him to review the forms. Deferred Action applies to undocumented immigrants who: UĂŠ Ă€iĂŠLiĂŒĂœiiÂ˜ĂŠÂŁxĂŠ>˜`ÊÎäÊÞi>Ă€ĂƒĂŠÂœÂ?`° UĂŠ >“iĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ1Â˜ÂˆĂŒi`ĂŠ-ĂŒ>ĂŒiĂƒĂŠLivÂœĂ€iĂŠĂŒÂ…iÂˆĂ€ĂŠÂŁĂˆĂŒÂ…ĂŠ birthday. UĂŠ ÂˆĂ›i`ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠVÂœĂ•Â˜ĂŒĂ€ĂžĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠ>ĂŒĂŠÂ?i>ĂƒĂŒĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠÂ?>ĂƒĂŒĂŠwĂ›iĂŠ years. UĂŠ Ă€iĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?ĂŠÂœĂ€ĂŠwÂ˜ÂˆĂƒÂ…i`ĂŠÂ…Âˆ}Â…ĂŠĂƒV…œœÂ?ĂŠÂ…iĂ€i° UĂŠ >Ă›iĂŠÂ˜ÂœĂŒĂŠVÂœÂ“Â“ÂˆĂŒĂŒi`ĂŠĂƒÂˆ}˜ˆwV>Â˜ĂŒĂŠVĂ€ÂˆÂ“iĂƒÂ°

8 | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | BOISEweekly

permanent status but that has not passed Congress, saying that now they can at least start dreaming. Nunez, who was brought to the United States before his ďŹ rst birthday, wants to become an architect. ĂŒĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ-iÂŤĂŒÂ°ĂŠĂ‡ĂŠĂœÂœĂ€ÂŽĂƒÂ…ÂœÂŤ]ĂŠ>LÂœĂ•ĂŒĂŠĂŽĂ¤ĂŠÂŤiÂœÂŤÂ?iĂŠ were able to complete their applications. Others had to gather more evidence, proving their continuous presence in the United States and their clean record. Some had to speak with attorneys to prepare more detailed applications, excusing smoking infractions or minor crimes. Catholic Charities of Idaho and the Community Council of Idaho are also conducting public workshops to help immigrant youth ďŹ ll out Deferred Action paperwork. According to an estimate by the Immigration Policy

iÂ˜ĂŒiĂ€]ĂŠĂƒÂœÂ“iĂŠĂŽ]Ă“ĂŽĂ¤ĂŠÂˆÂ“Â“Âˆ}Ă€>Â˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ`>Â…ÂœĂŠ>Ă€iĂŠ eligible for Deferred Action now and another

Roberto Nunez, 20, volunteers for the Centro de Comunidad y Justicia and is applying for Deferred Action so he can study architecture.

ÞÀ`ĂŠÂŤÂœÂˆÂ˜ĂŒi`ĂŠÂœĂ•ĂŒĂŠĂŒÂ…>ĂŒĂŠ>ĂŒÂˆÂ˜ÂœĂƒĂŠ>Ă€iĂŠÂ˜ÂœĂŒĂŠĂƒÂˆÂ˜}Â?i‡ ÂŁ]nĂ‡Ă¤ĂŠĂœÂˆÂ?Â?ĂŠLiĂŠiÂ?ˆ}ˆLÂ?iĂŠÂœÂ˜ViĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂžĂŠĂŒĂ•Ă€Â˜ĂŠÂŁx°Ê/Â…iĂŠ ÂˆĂƒĂƒĂ•iĂŠĂ›ÂœĂŒiĂ€Ăƒp>ĂŒÂˆÂ˜ÂœĂƒĂŠĂœiĂ€iĂŠ>Â?ĂƒÂœĂŠÂ…>Ă€`ĂŠÂ…ÂˆĂŒĂŠLĂžĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ Immigration Policy Center estimated that 1.4 recession and the loss of jobs. million people could qualify for Deferred AcObama continues to support the Dream tion across the country. Act. Activist Benita Veliz spoke onstage Patrick Taurel, an attorney with Andrade at the Democratic National Convention, i}>Â?ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ ÂœÂˆĂƒi]ĂŠÂ…>ĂƒĂŠLiiÂ˜ĂŠVœ˜`Ă•VĂŒÂˆÂ˜}ĂŠÂˆÂ˜vÂœĂ€Â“>supporting Deferred Action and calling for tion sessions and is working with the Centro Obama’s re-election. de Comunidad y Justicia on Deferred Action For Ramirez, the Dream Act remains a ĂœÂœĂ€ÂŽĂƒÂ…ÂœÂŤĂƒÂ°ĂŠiĂŠĂƒ>ˆ`ĂŠÂˆÂ“Â“Âˆ}Ă€>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠ>ĂŒĂŒÂœĂ€Â˜iĂžĂƒĂŠ singular hope for permanent status. are always looking for ways to get undocu“That’s like the main goal,â€? Ramirez said. mented clients some kind of lawful status. In “This is basically just relief.â€? the past, he often ran into a roadblock and If granted Deferred Action, Ramirez will had to tell immigrant youth that there was be able to work legally and obtain an Idaho nothing to be done. driver’s license. Although he is attending “Now things have changed,â€? Taurel said. “Now I can provide them at least some way of college as an Idaho resident already, he will remain ineligible for federal or state ďŹ nancial coming out of the shadows and provide some aid under Deferred Action. relief of that threat of deportation.â€? To that end, the Centro de Comunidad y Deferred Action mended some fences beJusticia is putting half of the proceeds from tween President Barack Obama and immiits Deferred Action workshops into a new gration-minded voters but was also viewed scholarship fund for Idaho dreamers. as political pandering in the run-up to the “It’s been popular,â€? said Byrd. “The whole November election. idea is for them to continue their education.â€? “This made a difference,â€? said Sam Byrd, ,>Â“ÂˆĂ€iĂ˘ĂŠÂˆĂƒĂŠ`œˆ˜}ĂŠÂ?Ă•ĂƒĂŒĂŠĂŒÂ…>ĂŒÂ°ĂŠiĂŠĂŒÂœÂœÂŽĂŠVÂœÂ?director of the Centro de Comunidad y lege classes while in high school, taught himĂ•ĂƒĂŒÂˆVˆ>°ÊºÂœĂ€ĂŠ>ĂŠÂ?ÂœĂŒĂŠÂœvĂŠ>ĂŒÂˆÂ˜ÂœĂƒĂŠĂœÂ…ÂœĂŠ>Ă€iĂŠiÂ?ˆ}ˆLÂ?iĂŠ self several computer languages and is now to vote, this Deferred Action is certainly somestudying computer science in Twin Falls. In thing that is going to get some long play ... but a few years, anticipatObama is not believable ing passage of the ĂŒÂœĂŠ>ĂŠÂ?ÂœĂŒĂŠÂœvĂŠ>ĂŒÂˆÂ˜ÂœĂƒÂ°ĂŠiÂ˝ĂƒĂŠ Dream Act, he plans got a problem.â€? For more information on local deferred action to transfer to a fourWhile Deferred information sessions, contact: year university and Action will provide CENTRO DE COMUNIDAD Y JUSTICIA complete his degree. two-year, renewable comunidadyjusticia.org 208-378-1368 “The Dream Act work permits to young requires a four-year people like Ramirez, CATHOLIC CHARITIES OF IDAHO college or university,â€? it will not convey ccidaho.org 208-466-9926 Ramirez said. permanent residency or Nunez also hopes to provide a path to citiCOMMUNITY COUNCIL OF IDAHO communitycounciloďŹ daho.org leverage his temporary zenship. The Dream Act 208-454-1652 status into an educawould grant visas to tion. And though he immigrant youth who could apply for permisattend college or join sion to visit Mexico for the ďŹ rst time in his life ĂŒÂ…iĂŠÂ“ÂˆÂ?ÂˆĂŒ>ÀÞ°ÊĂŒĂŠÂŤ>ĂƒĂƒi`ĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠÂœĂ•ĂƒiĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ iVi“LiÀÊ if granted Deferred Action, he is not interested. Óä£äÊLĂ•ĂŒĂŠv>ˆÂ?i`ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠiĂ›iÂ˜ĂŠ}>Ă€Â˜iÀÊ>ĂŠ-i˜>ĂŒiĂŠĂ›ÂœĂŒi°Ê “I came to this side,â€? Nunez said. “I’m go>Â˜ĂžĂŠ>ĂŒÂˆÂ˜ÂœĂƒĂŠÂ…>Ă›iĂŠLiiÂ˜ĂŠ`ÂˆĂƒ>ÂŤÂŤÂœÂˆÂ˜ĂŒi`ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠ ing to stay and ďŹ ght here.â€? Obama’s failures on immigration reform but WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


CITIZEN

BRANDON LAMB Keeping the organic seal green ANDREW CRISP

You worked on air quality compliance at the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources before moving to Idaho. How does that translate to working in the national organics industry? It’s a little bit different. It’s the same in that you have a set of rules and you have to read and know those rules, and implement them and educate the public on what those rules are. There, we were a state agency implementing Environmental Protection Agency [rules] like the Clean Air Act of 1990. Here, we’re a state agency implementing USDA rules and regulations. I really hadn’t had that much experience with agriculture. That’s part of what makes this job so interesting and fun I’ve got plenty to learn and it never gets boring. Why organics? Organics is something that’s picking up and very current right now. My attitude was: Anything that’s related to stewardship and protecting the environment, that was something I wanted to be a part of.

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How large is your staff? We’ve have five to six state employees that do inspections for us, and then we contract one or two private contractors to inspect for us. They’re there to educate [producers] on the rules. They have an organic system plan that the producers fill out. They say what their practices and procedures are to prevent contamination and protect the integrity of the organic product. What’s the growth of Idaho’s organic industry? I think across the nation it’s growing at about 8 percent, and that’s consistent here in the state. I understand Idaho exports quite a bit of organic hay and other commodities. How about consumer goods? [Idaho is the No. 1 exporter of organic barley for grain and seed, as well as organic hay in the nation. Idaho also ranks No. 5 for organic potatoes and No. 10 for organic onions.] I would say that they’re both very strong; I think they both always have been. Definitely more people are expressing interest in getting certification for producing consumer goods.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Brandon Lamb didn’t grow up with organic produce in his hometown on the coast of North Carolina. “Really, fishing is what everybody does there,” said Lamb. But in July 2009, he and his wife and their five children left the ocean for Idaho, where he took a role in the agri-business industry at the Idaho State Department of Agriculture. As the new program manager for the state’s Organic Certification Program, Lamb now calls Boise home. “It’s a fact of the quality of living and health you can have just by living here—just by moving my family here, I could be a better father,” he said. “And my kids could have a better life.” His office within the Department of Ag is the only accredited organic certifying agent in Idaho and is responsible for making sure organic farms and producers stay in compliance with rules issued by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. “We’re accredited by the USDA and that’s really my whole job, to maintain our accreditation,” he said. “Everything we do, we do on behalf of the USDA national organic program.”

You said the European Union and the National Organic Program established an equivalency arrangement for organic products. How has that changed trade with the EU? Before, if you were a producer, you had to get certified through the National Organic Program and get certified in whatever country you are sending it to. So you may be holding two to three certifications to export, which could be a pretty big barrier for producers. Whereas now, as a certifier, I can fill out an import certificate to send to the EU. It’s a lot easier. It’s a huge thing, it’s great. It makes it easier for the certifiers and makes it easier to trade for the producers. Europe has always wanted a lot of our organic grain, so that’s something that’s really promising. When an organic producer or farmer is found non-compliant by your department, the USDA can level penalties [which can include fees and license revocations]. How do farmers and producers regain their organic status? We’re just the hand of them, writing letters for them, issuing the certificates for them. So if those operations are suspended, they would have to go to the USDA to request reinstatement, not to us. We wouldn’t have the authority. Since they’re certified by the USDA, and suspended by the USDA, only the USDA can let them in. The person that’s going to make that final decision would be the director of that national organic 10 program and not us.

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CITIZEN How did the organic program come together? 9 1990 was the Organic Food Production Act, which was finally written at the federal government level. That’s when the ISDA was able to take the bones of the skeleton of that and create a program. Then it took the USDA 12 years to actually write specific rules and regulations. They finally wrote the rules and regulations, got them published and outlined accreditation. That’s when states which had programs prior to 2002 were able to get accredited. USDA really took over everything, as far as this is exactly how you implement and this is exactly what organic will mean. What do people expect organic to mean? Do they have misconceptions? People expect us to say that it’s pesticide free. That’s really the one that I think people expect me to say. What are some pesticides allowed by the USDA? Natural pyrethrins from chrysanthemums. Vinegar that’s naturally fermented, that’s not fermented with genetically modified microbes or anything like that. Those do have EPA registration numbers, so technically they are pesticides. So to say it’s pesticide free, that’s not necessarily true; to say it’s fertilizer free, that’s not necessarily true. They do allow synthetic micronutrients. You said there are four levels of organic certification. Is it difficult to obtain the

USDA Organic seal? [“Less than 70 percent organic” and “made with organic” products cannot carry a USDA seal, while “organic” and “100 percent organic” can.] If the product contains only 94.99 certified organic ingredients, that puts them at a “made with” product and takes away the USDA seal. That’s what everybody really wants. It can be difficult for organic producers making a finished products to achieve 100 percent organic status. If you’re making beef jerky, the lubricant that you use has to be 100 percent certified organic animal fat. Even ingredients that are no longer in that product, or just had contact with the product, they also have to be 100 percent certified organic as well. That’s a tough one to meet, especially for processed products. It’s your job to make sure the green organic seal means something. Absolutely. That’s exactly why we’re here, is for the consumers to have confidence that when they see the seal, they know it’s organic. In your kitchen at home, would somebody find a lot of organic products or produce? We do. I think this is the consumer trend. People source organics for the kids: the grapes, the oranges, the apples, the strawberries. And for us, we sacrifice and eat what we have to, because we think it’s important for our kids to have that. For our kids, we try to buy as much organic as we can.

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10 | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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either personally, or nationally, is a dangerous argument for this president 6 to make. Four years ago marks the beginning of a financial crisis that continues today. GDP remains a low 1.7 percent. Credit remains so tight that it’s still strangling spending. Four million families lost their homes to foreclosure, millions more were evicted due to nonpayment of rent, and a net 8 million lost their jobs under Obama. Structural unemployment is rising. New jobs are few and pay little. Most Americans—by a nearly two-to-one margin—feel worse off now than they did four years ago. Coupled with the media’s ludicrous claim that the recovery began in mid-2009, Obama’s “who are you going to believe, me or your lying eyes” (or pocketbook) sales pitch is so insulting and reminiscent of George H.W. Bush’s tone-deaf attitude during the 1992 recession that it can only prove counterproductive. The historical lesson for Obama is 1936. Franklin Roosevelt is the only president in recent history to have won re-election with unemployment more than 8 percent, as it is

currently (it was 17 percent). Why? FDR’s New Deal showed he was trying hard. And things were moving in the right direction (unemployment was 22 percent when he took office). Fairly or not, Obama can’t beat Romney pointing to improvement that statistics don’t show and people don’t feel. Obama must articulate a new vision, relaunching and rebranding himself into something completely different—in other words, running as though the last three four years had never happened. Like this was his first term. New image. New ideas. New policies. New campaign slogan. Not only does Obama need to float big new ideas, he needs to convince voters that he can get them through a GOP Congress. Not an easy task—but there’s no other way. It isn’t enough to simply say that Romney will make things worse. Lesser-evil arguments are secondary at best. As things stand now, with people angry and disappointed at government inaction on the economy, Romney’s “Believe in America” meme—though stupid—is more potent than Obama’s reliance on fear of a Paul Ryan budget. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


AD AM RO SE NL UN D

D N A GR O LHD-UP PUNC

duke it s n a c i l b u Idaho Rep hemselves t t s g n o m out a AGADONE ZACH H

There’s something rotten in the party of Lincoln. For years now, a hard-right wind has been blowing through the Grand Old Party, and it has made for some strange currents in the traditionally stolid Republican weltanschauung. First, there was the great Tea Party uprising in 2008, followed by a long simmer fanned into a blaze by the likes of Glenn Beck and Rush Limbaugh. Flash forward to the debt-ceiling crisis of 2011, when the Republican Party literally held the U.S. economy hostage in order to wangle tax cuts for the rich, and then to 2012, when the party decided to time travel back to the 1960s and challenge women’s reproductive rights. Now, coming off the Republican National Convention in Tampa, it seems clear that the GOP is locked in a struggle for its own ideological identity, with a presidential candidate like Mitt Romney, who seems to have an inordinate amount of trouble not coming off like an ATM with a bouffant—forget his tax returns; more and more politics watchers want to see proof that Romney has DNA. And there’s vice presidential hopeful Rep. Paul Ryan, an Ayn Rand apostle whose convention speech was a litany of self-serving fictions. Even Clint Eastwood in his octogenarian rant against an empty chair couldn’t really find anything consistent to say about the direction of the party.

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PATR IC K S W EENEY

Rep. Christy Perry, Nampa When Herbert Hoover’s great-granddaughter wonders aloud, “What the *#@% is wrong” with the GOP—as Margaret Hoover, a CNN contributor, gay-marriage advocate and author of the book American Individualism: How a New Generation of Conservatives Can Save the Republican Party, did in August—you know something has gone deeply awry. Lucky for us, we live in one of the most solidly Republican states in the union, so case studies are more than readily available. The prognosis, it seems, in the wake of a historically fractious primary and a state convention reaffirming a raft of policy planks that would have made John C. Calhoun proud, is that the Idaho GOP has circled its wagons and started shooting inward. “It was a stunner. It was just a sad, sad thing, and I still don’t understand it,” said Rep. Maxine Bell, a 12-term Republican House member from Jerome, referring to a primary election wherein incumbents around the state faced a higher-than-usual number of challengers and some—including longtime sitting Republican lawmakers Sen. Shawn Keough of Sandpoint, Dover Rep. George Eskridge, Sen. Patti Anne Lodge of Huston, Rupert’s Sen. Dean Cameron and House Majority Caucus Chairman Ken Roberts of Donnelly—were targeted by political action committees supported by their own party leadership. “I don’t understand why we take after each other,” Bell continued. “We’ve always considered ourselves a large tent—I can remember them saying that. There was a place for the Smiley Republicans and there was a place for the George Hansen Republicans. ... I don’t quite understand what their fear is in this very, very red state.”

THE PRIMARY PARTY In Idaho, where Republicans take the permanence of their long-standing political hegemony as an article of faith, any hint of interparty rebellion—even a whiff of disunion—has traditionally been met with swift retribution or swift denial. You don’t dominate every level of state government for decades without keeping the reins tight on the rank and file. However, while the Idaho GOP prides itself on fronting a monolithic appearance, there are

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significant cracks in the facade—a fact made startlingly clear during the primary races. The Idaho Republicans’ tent is big enough; it’s just hosting too many circuses. “I’ve been saying for a while that Idaho is now basically a one-party state,” said Jeff Ward, who heads the Kootenai County Reagan Republicans, a grassroots organization that focuses on organizing local GOP volunteers. It has clashed particularly with other groups like RallyRight and the United Conservatives of North Idaho, which Ward said are too preoccupied with purging the party of moderates, rather than electing good candidates. “Anytime you have that kind of situation in history, in the South prior to the 1960s, basically, the dominant political party ends up having its own factions,” he said. “It’s the only game in town.” Hired hands at the party level are loath to admit that, of course. “As we look at our system, it’s made up to have differing opinions,” said Josh Whitworth, a 30-year-old Mackay native who took over as executive director of the Idaho GOP after this summer’s convention in Twin Falls. “I hope we have differing opinions and, as a party, that’s what the primary is about: to come out with the issues that we really think need to be brought forward. ... “After the primary, and as we go forward, it’s about bringing us together and going forward,” he added. “I think, as a whole, even though we may disagree and battle in the primaries, when we get to the generals we’re a solid team altogether. ... I think there are some things we need to work on and build us up, and that’s a very high priority for me: bringing us together. I really do see us coming together.” Ward agrees that the GOP is working to reconcile its primary season divisions, even going so far as to say that the healing process is going quicker this time than in election cycles past. “People recognize the importance of things and the Democrats have put up a bigger fight this time than last, other than in the Congressional race,” he said. “If we don’t want to take some losses, we have to unify and sort of circle the wagons.” Idaho Democratic Party Chairman Larry WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


Grant doesn’t quite see it that way. He said Republicans are doing enough damage to themselves with legislation, while most people couldn’t care less about their intra-party spats. “It’s no secret that there’s an internal struggle in the Republican Party, basically between what I’ll call the Raul Labrador group—the old Bill Sali, Lou Esposito group— and the governor’s group,” Grant said. “One of the things that the ultra-conservatives, the extremists, want to do is close the primary, supposedly to keep Democrats from hijacking their candidates. ... It’s just more of this ideological purity that the extremists in the Republican Party are attempting to enforce [on] the party as a whole. This was not about Democrats, this was about Republicans purging Republicans. ... “I’m not ready to say that the infighting in the Republican Party is helping the Democratic Party,” he added. “I certainly think the closed primary is an issue that has hurt Republicans from the standpoint of the general public. I think the Luna Laws—the education issue—is another issue that has caught people’s attention, especially with school starting now. I think the ultrasound issue is another one. Not only are they not running away from their mistakes, they’re doubling down on them. ... “It’s not the fight itself that’s hurting us, it’s that the extremists seem to be winning,” he said. The Idaho GOP’s slide to the right and subsequent crackdown on Republicans deemed too moderate or too incompliant by certain factions was amply experienced by Rep. Christy Perry, a Nampa Republican running for her second term in the House. She, along with Keough, Eskridge, Roberts, Cameron and Lodge (who taken together have served more than 30 terms), found herself on the business end of a barrage of PAC money intended to make sure she didn’t return to the statehouse for the 2013 legislative session. “How I think that happened goes back to a divide in the Legislature: How should we really be operated and the direction of the state. It’s a matter of opinion on how leadership should operate,” said Perry, who won a four-way primary race for the newly redrawn District 11B House seat against Matt Dorsey, Ronalee Linsenmann and John Gough. She is unopposed in the November election. “It should not be operated on the good ol’ boy system. Legislation should rise and fall based on its merits—not who brought it or who supports it or not,” she added. “I was verbal about these things. I did not follow suit.” Turns out that being rebellious on the House floor is a good way to call down the wrath of the party bosses—specifically, Perry said, Speaker Lawerence Denney of Midvale and House Majority Leader Mike Moyle of Star. “What I witnessed and went through was, ‘Here’s what we’re going to do and you’re supposed to follow,’” she said, referring to the 2012 legislative session. “I questioned things, I brought up issues on some occasions and I didn’t vote with the Republican Party all the time.” In particular, Perry refused to vote with the GOP on House Bill 464, which drastically limited local governments’ ability to block natural gas drilling. That legislation, co-sponsored by Denney, ultimately passed, but Perry, along with Eskridge, also broke ranks with the party WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

to successfully kill another energy-related bill that would have established a moratorium on the development of wind power generation. “My vote [on the natural gas bill] was not going to change the outcome by any means, but I did not vote with them, and I did tell the speaker, ‘I cannot vote for this and here are my reasons,’” Perry said. “Well, it was his bill, and when their name is on it and you don’t go with the speaker, I don’t think that was appreciated.” Similarly, Perry said, the wind moratorium was also close to the speaker’s heart. “Again, that was a bill that the speaker wanted and some of us worked against it. We didn’t think it was a good bill for Idahoans,” she said. Neither Denney nor Moyle responded to requests for comment, though it has become clear in the months following the primary that there was definitely something concerted going on to unseat very specific members of the Legislature, and those efforts were being paid for—at least in part—by the House Leadership Victory Fund, which Denney controls as speaker of the House. According to press reports and campaign finance records released by the Idaho Secretary of State’s Office this summer, Denney transferred $10,000 from the fund into a group called GunPAC in April. That follows $5,000 paid out to political consulting firm Spartac and $15,000 to the Free Enterprise PAC in 2011. Moyle also contributed $5,000 to GunPAC during the 2012 primary season. (Ironically, in targeting Perry and Eskridge, the pro-Second Amendment GunPAC was going after the co-owner of a gun store and a Vietnam veteran, respectively.) Lawmakers routinely contribute to PACs and election campaigns, but this time around, it was different: GunPAC, the Free Enterprise PAC and Spartac, as well as the Idaho Land PAC and Greater Education Movement, are all owned by Lou Esposito, a Republican strategist picked by Denney to sit on the first—failed—2011 state redistricting commission. BW’s voice message to Esposito went unanswered. Looking at campaign finance reports, it becomes clear that there was a veritable whirlwind of money surrounding Esposito’s various PACs: more than $13,000 from the Idaho Land PAC, $4,500 from the Greater Education Movement and $1,500 from GunPAC all went to the interconnected Free Enterprise PAC. Spartac, of course, reaped several thousand dollars here and there, and money was flying out the door for direct-mail fliers denouncing the targeted lawmakers and into the campaign coffers of their challengers. All four groups funneled money—including cash from the House Leadership Victory Fund—to a slate of 40 candidates around the state, but most notably to the opponents of Cameron, Eskridge, Keough, Lodge, Perry and Roberts—the latter, as majority caucus chairman, is actually the treasurer of the fund but locked in a bitter contest for Moyle’s majority leader position—a fact that Moyle has been clear was his motivation for donating to GunPAC. “My goal is to make Ken’s life miserable because he’s making my life miserable,” Moyle told the Idaho Statesman’s Dan Popkey in a pre-primary interview in May. In the same article, Denney, who is also facing a challenger for the speaker position

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in Assistant Majority Leader Scott Bedke of Oakley, said that he didn’t know Republican incumbents were being targeted by Esposito’s PACs and maintained he’d never involved himself with races involving senators, calling it “poor form” for House members to go after fellow GOPers. Nonetheless, that’s exactly what happened. “Myself and others who were targeted remain astounded at what occurred, and we’re still scratching our heads over that,” said Keough, whose opponent, Danielle Ahrens, benefited from nearly $6,000 in contributions from sources including the Idaho Land PAC

the next in line,” she said. “I’ve never seen anything like it before. I think we all need to be very cautious and very careful and let the healing take place.” In the case of Keough, as with Perry, her willingness to buck leadership and vote against the party line has earned her the ire of those in power. Keough was among the very few Republicans to oppose the so-called Luna Laws, which enacted sweeping changes to Idaho’s education system and proved so controversial that they may be repealed in referenda in November. She has also stood in favor, along with Perry, for anti-bullying

We want the government out of our life, but we want the government to make people do the right thing at certain times. That’s where you get the split.” —Jasper LiCalzi, chair of Politics-Economics Department at College of Idaho

and Greater Education Movement, as well as Idaho Chooses Life, Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna, the unincorporated PAC Idaho Free Enterprise Association, Washington-based utility company Avista, and the Idaho Association for Good Government, which is owned by Republican Rep. Bob Nonini of Coeur d’Alene. “It was like national politics come to the state level,” said Keough, who despite the onslaught of negative campaigning still handily defeated Ahrens, “and I think—and I’ve heard people profess—that they don’t like what’s happening at the national level and it was frightening to see that at the state level.” Keough added that while she’s optimistic lawmakers can move past the contention of the primary season, she still has some unfinished business with a few fellow legislators. “My goal of serving in the Legislature has been to work to be professional and work with people I might disagree with and find common ground,” she said. “I hope that my colleagues will do the same, but that all remains to be seen. There are continuing discussions that need to occur between myself and certain people about what they did in the primaries.” Bell was likewise dumbfounded at Republican leadership’s full-frontal assault on its own colleagues but struck a less positive tone than Keough. “I don’t think any of us want to donate money to a situation like that,” she said. “Why Lou Esposito—whoever he is—was given the authority and why that money was used in the primary that way I don’t understand. ... I thought that we put money in our caucus to help those of us who have races in the fall against Democrats. That’s what I always assumed it was used for, and I think there were a lot more like me out there.” What’s worse, Bell added, the tactic of siphoning Victory Fund money through PACs to serve personal political goals bodes ill for the health of the Idaho GOP as a whole. “When they’re going after George, Christy, Shawn—Maxine Bell may very well be

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legislation and against the controversial antiabortion “ultrasound bill” fronted by Senate Assistant Majority Leader Chuck Winder of Boise. An eight-term senator and vice chair of the powerful Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee, Keough enjoys wide popularity among constituents for her level-headed approach and willingness to seek compromise rather than score ideological points. And for that, she has run afoul of increasingly hard-line party leaders before, even earning a vote of no confidence from the state central committee for a reapportionment map she co-submitted with former District 2 Republican Sen. Joyce Broadsword of Sagle, who decided not to seek re-election after the redistricting map that was ultimately adopted put her in District 1, forcing her to face off against Keough in the primary. Opponents charged that the map prepared by Keough and Broadsword disadvantaged Republican candidates elsewhere in the state. Defending against repeated charges that she is a “Republican in Name Only,” Keough bemoans the trend toward political rigidity coming from the far right wing of the party. “One person’s measure of purity is different from the guy across the street,” she said. “I think it’s unfortunate that we get tied into these litmus test-type things because we lose sight of the ball: making sure we’re maintaining the government and the republic that we all value. We win the battle but we lose the war.”

WE HAVE MET THE ENEMY, AND THE ENEMY IS US The acrimony of the primaries and attempted purge by party leaders are just symptoms of larger tensions within the GOP—both in Idaho and nationally, said Jasper LiCalzi, chair of the Politics-Economics Department at the College of Idaho and a 20-year observer WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


of Gem State politics. “There are political subcultures in the country and two of them are in Idaho and they are split. One is an individualistic side— that’s your northern Idaho Libertarians. Then there’s the moralistic side, and that’s more eastern Idaho,” LiCalzi said. “We want the government out of our life, but we want the government to make people do the right thing at certain times. That’s where you get the split.” For instance, he said, while the individualists are by nature opposed to measures like mandating invasive ultrasounds before an abortion can be performed, it fits with the moralists’ point of view. Likewise with things like loyalty oaths and closed primaries—institutions that play to moralistic politics by enforcing ideological purity over inclusivity. Since 2008—when conservatives lost control of Congress and the White House, and everyone lost control of the economy—the Grand Old Party has been flooded with firebreathing ideologues whose zealous hatred of liberals is outmatched only by their angst over infiltration by moderate Republicans. On the national stage, this tension reveals itself in situations like Ron Paul delegates walking out of the RNC convention in a huff, but the national Republicans have actual Democrats to contend with. Not so in Idaho. “This is what you get when you have more of a single-party state,” LiCalzi said. “There’s always going to be competition, and if it’s not going to be between two parties, it’s going to be within the party. They’re going to break down into factions ... [and] that’s politics; there’s going to be conflict.” The result, according to LiCalzi, is that compromise and moderation are sidelined in favor of expanding and maintaining the party’s grip on power. Keough, and others like her who eschew purely ideological decision-making, increasingly find themselves on the firing line. “You used to have more comity amongst them—the legislators,” LiCalzi said. “You would see more, ‘I might not like you but we’re all senators or representatives.’ Now there seems to be more desire for competition; that you’re trying to beat the other guy more than say, ‘OK, well, instead of trying to beat Shawn Keough, I’ll work with her and find some kind of compromise.’” Likening it to the attitude of “I’d rather be right than president,” LiCalzi added that when a dominant party starts to devour itself, the institutions that it controls inevitably break down. “Because you know that you could lose and have to protect your flank—your right flank, basically—you can’t be pragmatic and come up with a solution because you’ll be penalized for that,” he said. “It’s like Oprah Winfrey politics: whatever’s important right now, boom, that’s what we’re upset about. ... No one’s looking long term.” According to Grant that super-partisan mentality will do more to help Democrats in November than any amount of infighting. “We’re working hard, and all I can say is, if they want to shoot themselves in the foot, we’re happy to supply the bullet,” he said. Bell, as well as Perry, also lamented the Legislature’s increasing fixation on measures meant as red meat for the right wing. “Let’s face it, I don’t think any of us are WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

able to take that long-term outlook that we should do because there’s the now. You’re there. You’ve got 90 days, you have those people who sent you and they have those issues that are really short term; it’s that pothole in the road that’s the issue, not a whole other road,” she said, adding that while Idaho’s Legislature is more functional than that of most other states, lawmakers should be careful not to follow the example of the Congress. “I think that what may help us is when we see the debacle in the United States Congress and realize that we can’t allow that to happen here,” she said. “They’ve drawn those lines in the sand and no one’s willing to step over it.” The lines in the sand are getting deeper, though; the hardening of the Idaho GOP’s ideology is amply evidenced by its platform,

adopted in June at the party convention in Twin Falls. Among the usual language about small government and property rights, the party’s planks include traditionally fringe issues like the abolition of the Federal Reserve and nullification of federal laws and mandates that Republicans deem unconstitutional under the 10th Amendment. “What we’re really seeing is an influx of Libertarian-leaning Republicans. Libertarians and Republicans are different creatures, really, and I think that’s creating a divide,” Perry said, adding that ending the Fed and calling for the repeal of the 17th Amendment, among other stands, are “types of things that aren’t normally Republican mantras.” “Some don’t sit right and feel right,” she said.

Ultimately Perry said the leadership struggle in the House—and the “vindictive” tactics used to either punish independent-minded lawmakers or those who support other candidates for positions of power within the caucus—are most damaging to the Legislature. “You can look at the people next to you and know they tried to unseat you, and you can either act the way they acted or you can be a better person,” she said. “If I could change it, I would like to get the GOP in Idaho as a whole to focus on the best interests of the voters. I think there is that faction of the GOP that has begun to focus solely on their ideology, and they’ve lost sight of the best interests of Idaho and Idahoans, and they need to get back to that. ... You can’t lead in a vacuum.”

BOISEweekly | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | 15


BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events TAM I R EED

Idaho Botanical Garden goes steam punk for Carnevale.

Get initiated in the ways of cyclocross.

FRIDAY SEPT. 14 eclectic

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 12

CARNEVALE

bikes CYCLOCROSS CLINICS Has road biking gotten a little mundane? Does mountain biking make you yawn? Do you sometimes yearn for a challenge that will throw mud, sand, pavement and assorted obstacles at you while a rowdy group of spectators hoots and hollers from the sidelines? Then we have the sport for you: cyclocross. It’s already one of the fastest growing segments of cycling, drawing on the appeal of an almost obstacle course-like route that combines various riding surfaces and features that have to be negotiated by riders. While it’s a blast for those in the sport, it can be a little intimidating for the curious. But no fear—you can learn the sport from the experts with a series of free weekly cyclocross training clinics. Ron Miller and Tim Kelley host the clinics every Wednesday night, beginning Sept. 12, at Quarry View Park in Boise. Clinics begin at 5:30 p.m. with an open practice and some one-on-one time with the instructors, followed by a formal clinic beginning at 6 p.m. Topics will vary each week but will cover the basics of cyclocross, including riding on various surfaces, bike-carrying techniques, dismounts and remounts. At 6:45 p.m., participants will spend 10 to 15 minutes doing hot lap sessions to practice what they’ve learned. For more info on the clinics, email Miller at ronmillerpt@yahoo.com. 5:30-7 p.m., FREE. Quarry View Park, 1250 E. Old Penitentiary Road, idahocyclocross.com. The location will change weekly and will be emailed to participants each week.

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 19 theater LES MISERABLES Broadway and Boise go nicely together—not just because of the catchy alliteration, but because Treasure Valley residents continually snap up tickets to the productions in Fred Meyer’s

Broadway in Boise series right quick. According to the Morrison Center’s website, the series brought the most successful production in the center’s more-than-20-year history to the stage with a 16-performance, sold-out run of Wicked in March. The series’ latest production, Les Miserables, will kick off its eight-performance run Wednesday, Sept. 19, and continue through Sunday, Sept. 23.

16 | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | BOISEweekly

As of press time, many showings only had uppermezzanine or limited seating available, and the Friday, Sept. 21, performance is already sold out. The version of Les Miserables that will take to the Morrison Center stage is presented by legendary theatrical producer Cameron Mackintosh, who crafted a special 25th anniversary edition of the beloved musical in 2010. The new rendition

Lush greenery and perfectly tended plants make the scenery at Idaho Botanical Garden something to behold on the regular. And Friday, Sept. 14, that always-lovely landscape will be filled with gasp-inducing performance artists with the second installment of Carnevale. The event is hosted by industrial recycled-art purveyor Refinerii and will employ a Venetian carnival-steam punk theme. Think feathers, masks and elaborately embellished attire mixed with goggles, top hats and industrial items. Attendees are encouraged to don costumes and prizes will be given out for best mask, top hat, overall costume and more. Last year’s inaugural event featured aerial acrobats, fire and belly dancers, hula hooping and more. This year’s lineup will include equally astounding performances with the ladies of the Red Light Variety Show exhibiting their myriad talents, a fashion show featuring local designer Nena Earl, fortune tellers, temporary tattoos, hair and makeup artists, games, door prizes and more. Artists have tailored their performances for a mixed-generational audience so that the whole family can attend. A full bar, food and local wine and beer will be available. Tickets are available at idahobotanicalgarden.org or at the gates. 6 p.m., $10, $7 IBG members, $6 youth ages 5-12. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 Old Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

of what has been dubbed “The show of shows” has been met with a barrage of rave reviews from media outlets, and was part of a theatrical first in its 2010 anniversary year, with three different productions taking place at the same time in one city. Audiences can expect all the drama of Victor Hugo’s 19th-century novel, which was re-engineered for the stage by Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg and made the names Cosette and Jean Valjean famous. Wednesday, Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m.; Thursday, Sept. 20, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.;

Friday, Sept. 21, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 22, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 23, 1 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.; $27.50-$82.50. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

SATURDAY SEPT. 15 fanfare BOISE STATE BRONCOS VS. MIAMI (OHIO) REDHAWKS NFL fans may be asked weekly if they’re ready for

some football, and they may have rejoiced Sept. 5 with the inaugural game of the new season. But for many a Boisean, football won’t really begin until the Boise State Broncos journey to their home blue turf and the city shows up in full force for a day of partying, tailgate style. Although Boise State’s homecoming festivities won’t technically take place until Monday, Oct. 15—paradoxically surrounding the football team’s fourth game at Bronco Stadium—anxious football fans can get their blue-and-orange fix at the first home game Saturday, Sept. 15, at 2 p.m. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


PATR IC K S W EENEY

FIND C AM PB ELL’S S OU P C OM PANY

ANDY WARHOL-INSPIRED CAMPBELL CANS Henry Rollins is never shy about getting in your face.

TUESDAY SEPT. 18 politico HENRY ROLLINS Between music, film roles, poetry slams, a strange foray into stand-up comedy, being a radio host, authoring several books, being frighteningly well-muscled and scary-eyed, and spending time as one of the top four singers for Black Flag, Henry Rollins is perhaps best described as a polymath of rage, dishing out class and cultural critiques in whatever format he feels they are best suited to at the time. True to his formless form, his current tour is not a performance so much as a lecture tour. Rollins is rolling across the country in advance of the upcoming election, hitting up all 50 state capitals and dishing his thoughts on the soft, fuzzy, totally non-controversial topic of capitalism, which—spoiler alert—he takes some issue with. That tour will make a stop in Boise at the Knitting Factory Tuesday, Sept. 18. “This is the only beginning,” he wrote in an op-ed supporting the Occupy protests in the LA Weekly. “You don’t have to like it.” Rollins’ intensity and directness is the stuff of a punk-rock legend, something he has long employed as a tool to shake people free of apathy. No surprise his website sports a large “Rock the Vote” logo. His current tour will conclude in Washington, D.C., on election eve. 8 p.m. $20. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

The madness of tents, trucks and Bronco buses will inevitably fill the parking lot surrounding the stadium— including the Life’s Kitchen food truck, which will set up shop at the US Bank parking lot across from the stadium on Broadway Avenue and dole out all-you-can-eat-anddrink barbecue and beer provided by Brewforia for $20. Call 208-331-0199 for more info. The Broncos will take on the Miami (Ohio) Redhawks in a nonconference game, following their season opener at East Lansing, Mich., which resulted in

S U B M I T

Bronco Nation dealing with something that’s been rare in recent years—a loss. Those not wanting to deal with the treachery of driving near the stadium on game day can enjoy a free shuttle ride from downtown. Shuttles leave every 15 minutes beginning two hours prior to the game and ending one hour after the game ends. Visit boise-shuttlecharters.com for more info and pick-up locations. 2 p.m., $25-$60. Bronco Stadium, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-4737, broncosports.com.

Hikers give way to hippies, music and food for Hyde Park Street Fair.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY SEPT. 14-16 party HYDE PARK STREET FAIR North Enders—those folks living north of State Street on oak-lined streets—are renowned for being an eclectic bunch. That’s why each year Camel’s Back Park morphs from a quiet place for trail runners and Frisbee enthusiasts into a prime people-watching party: the Hyde Park Street Fair. Now in its 33rd year, the fair combines arts, crafts, food and music, drawing more than 30,000 visitors. Wares from more than 120 local artisans, craft-makers and nonprofit organizations include blown glass, tie-dye and more, along with a ton of food vendors. Attendees sip cold beer, eat fried foods and listen to local, live music for three days. The 2012 Hyde Park Street Fair will take place Friday, Sept. 14, from 4-9:45 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m.9:45 p.m.; and Sunday, Sept. 16, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday’s schedule kicks off with a parade down 13th Street, beginning at 11 a.m. Friday’s musical lineup includes Voice of Reason, A.K.A. Belle and Finn Riggins. On Saturday New Transit, Sherpa, Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats, and Matt Hopper and the Roman Candles will take the stage. And on Sunday, Bill Coffey and his Cash Money Cousins will finish off the weekend after Jeff Crosby and the Refugees and Reilly Coyote. A full lineup is available at northend.org. The street fair will also feature a new addition this year. The Sports Center, which will be located next to the main stage beer garden, will feature a big screen TV so Boise State fans can watch the Broncos on the blue turf without having to leave the park, thereby solving the “football or fair?” dilemma. Friday, Sept. 14, 4-9:45 p.m.; Saturday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m.-9:45 p.m.; Sunday, Sept. 16, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; FREE. Camel’s Back Park, 1200 W. Heron St., northendboise.org.

The iconic red-and-white packaging for Campbell’s tomato soup hasn’t changed much since it debuted in 1898. But the pantry staple did get a notable PR boost when pop artist Andy Warhol famously painted the cans in 1962. Now, 50 years later—as Campbell’s is trying to court TARGET younger, hipper consumers—it 633 N. Milwaukee St. has come up with a meta marBoise, 208-375-3275 keting ploy. 6280 N. Eagle Road, On Sept. 2, Campbell’s Boise, 208-938-8350 released 1.2 million specialedition cans of brightly colored tomato soup that pay homage to Warhol and are only available at Target stores nationwide. The cans, which come in four color schemes featuring bright blues, greens and oranges, cost 75 cents a pop and feature an assortment of Warhol quips on the back, like: “In the future, everybody will be world famous for 15 minutes.” According to an AP article, Campbell’s has sold similar cans on much smaller scales in the past: “In 2004, the company sold 75,000 four-packs of Warhol-inspired cans at Giant Eagle, a Pittsburgh-based supermarket operator. During the holiday season in 2006, the company sold 12,000 units at Barney’s, a high-end department store, in New York.” Boise’s two Target locations both confirmed that, as of press time, they had received shipments of the special cans and both had them in stock. —Tara Morgan

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | 17


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY SEPT. 12 On Stage NOISES OFF—Laughter abounds with Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s production of Michael Frayn’s farce about a company putting on a play that goes horribly—and hilariously—wrong. 7:30 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208336-9221, idahoshakespeare. org.

Food & Drink STUFFED TAPAS CLASS—Learn to make stuffed mushrooms, spicy tuna-stuffed eggs and spinach-stuffed piquillo peppers, all bit-sized and perfect for parties. Price includes wine tasting, tapas and cooking instruction. Pre-registration required. 6 p.m. $35. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com.

long event will feature two nationally renowned keynote speakers, Dr. Mike Myers and Dr. David Rudd, among other presenters. To register or view a full schedule, visit spanidaho.org or call 208860-1703. 8 a.m. $100. Boise First Community Center, 3852 N. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-9393141, bpmin.com.

On Stage BECKY’S NEW CAR—Becky’s New Car by Steven Dietz is a thoroughly original comedy with serious overtones, a devious and delightful romp down the road not taken. 7:30 p.m. $12.50, $9 seniors and students. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater. org. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: RICHARD VILLA—Enjoy some jokes at the comedy show followed by dueling pianos and dance music by DJ Mighty Delta One. 7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

LIQUID LAUGHS: MIKE WALLY WALTER—Also featuring Nathon Brannon. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs.com, by calling 208941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com. NOISES OFF—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Odds & Ends LADIES’ LOUNGE—Swig back some cocktails with the ladies of Boise Weekly and enjoy prize giveaways, drink specials and oh so much more. Visit BW’s promo page to get the 4-1-1. 5 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s Saloon, 12505 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3315666, willibs.com.

Rec BOISE CYCLOCROSS CLINICS—Those new to cyclocross can get learn the basics, and those needing to refine techniques can enjoy a refresher course during these weekly clinics. Open practice begins at 5:30 p.m., followed by a specific skill session, which will explore a different concept each week. Multi-lap training will begin at 6:45 p.m., in an attempt to integrate new knowledge in a race-like setting. See Picks, Page 16. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Quarry View Park, 2150 E. Old Penitentiary Road, Boise.

Talks & Lectures FDR AND OBAMA: THE CHALLENGE OF WINNING A SECOND TERM—Speaker Marc Johnson will look at the parallels between Franklin D. Roosevelt’s re-election bid in 1936 and President Barack Obama’s situation in 2012. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

THURSDAY SEPT. 13 Citizen SALVATION ARMY’S HARVEST GALA—Featuring live musical entertainment, a catered dinner and silent auction with Master of Ceremonies Vin Crosby from KBOI Channel 2. RSVP to salvationarmytv.org and click “Harvest Gala Event Page.” Benefiting the Marian Pritchett School at the Booth Memorial Campus. 6-8:30 p.m. $75. Stueckle Sky Center, Boise State football stadium, Boise. SUICIDE PREVENTION CONFERENCE—The Suicide Prevention Action Network presents its 12th annual Suicide Prevention Conference. This day-and-a-half

18 | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | BOISEweekly

NOISE/CD REVIEW THE XX, COEXIST The 2009 self-titled debut from British electro-pop trio The XX hit the music world like a gut-punch. Its combination of sparse, clean guitar lines and electronic beats filled in by oceans of reverb created a sound as dark and intimate as a secret whispered between friends. The band’s second album, Coexist, dropped Sept. 11. And those who liked the debut will likely find little to quibble with, primarily because it is nearly indistinguishable from the band’s debut. Coexist opens with a haunting two-note guitar line that leads to a washed-out march from a dreamy snare drum and a lover’s lament that others cannot understand the depth of her feeling. It is an emotional gravity well, drawing the listener down into its melancholy vibe. From there, it picks up a bit, tossing in snatches of steel drum or peppier tones that balance the dreamy ring of the guitar and the back-and-forth vocal murmurs. “Tides,” the eighth track, has a thumping hip-hop kick, and “Swept Away” is almost a dance track, with a peppy disco beat behind the luscious vocals. The album closes with “Our Song,” a smooth, drumless outro that eases the listener out the door like a goodnight kiss. Second albums can be a band’s best, once It has established itself and had a chance to grow but not yet sucked the creative well dry. But those same albums also can languish on the charts with a sound that feels a little stale the second time around. Time may prove Coexist a better album than The XX’s first, especially as the lyrics are more mature and the flow of the album slightly more balanced. But the thing about time is that it takes time. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


3 Days Only September 14 - 15 -16

Be part of the Stand UP Paddle Revolution Ehukai SUP Board Blowout

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Truck Load Parking Lot Sale! Over 50 SUP Boards Under $600! Factory Direct Prices!

Carbon Fiber SUP Paddles

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BOISEweekly | HYDE PARK STREET FAIR 2012 | 1


Welcome to the 2012 Hyde Park Street Fair! Greetings from The North End! Hyde Park Street Fair 2012 is going to be an amazing time, full of entertainment, culture and community. It’s always a great reason to come to Boise’s oldest neighborhood, but this year we’re giving you even more reasons to stay and enjoy our festival. “But I must watch the Boise State game!” you (and I) say. Well, we’ll have an area for that, where you can kick back with a refreshment and enjoy some hometown heroes on the big screen while still hanging out at the park. How cool is that? Have you been paying attention to Boise’s new food truck culture? There will be more food trucks than ever this year, including some of our newest and most innovative. And of course we’ll have the old standbys - funnel cakes and turkey legs. It wouldn’t be a fair without them! Also back and better than ever is the parade. Last year was great fun, and this year will be more fun and creative with the addition of prizes for best entries! Just remember, leave anything with a motor at home. Watch out for the North End Neighborhood Association (NENA) Board on a superspecial, human-powered vehicle. We’re a great team. But don’t forget - besides being loads of fun, the Hyde Park Street Fair carries a deeper purpose: it’s NENA’s sole annual fundraising effort. In 2012, we were able to help considerably as TRICA renovated some large, historic windows at the old church at 14th & Eastman, contribute $1000 each to our neighborhood public schools for various projects, and give $500 FINE Grants to several community projects like gardens and the arts. Thank you for enjoying the fair and helping us to raise these funds! So whether it’s the turkey legs or tie-dye, bounce houses or reggae, belly dancers or non-profits, beer or lemonade that bring you to the fair, this year will not disappoint! Don’t forget to stop by the NENA booth to say hello and grab some great swag. Cheers to a fun and successful Hyde Park Street Fair, Holli High Woodings, President North End Neighborhood Association

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BOB’S BLUE & ORANGE SPIRIT PARADE! Thanks to our friend’s and sponsors at BOBFM & News Talk KINF, our “people powered parade” now has a name and prizes! $100 dollars cash goes to the best 12 & under and adult walking participant, 12 & under kids and adult bikes and best group. Get into the theme and join our nonmotorized parade on Saturday, September 15th. Registration begins at 9:30am at North Junior High and the parade begins at 10:30, Proceeding up 13th Street to Camel’s Back Park. northendboise.org/hyde-park-street-fair-2012/parade

FREE VALET BIKE PARKING Parking spaces are rare around our neighborhood and the price of gas is…So, why not ride your bike? Our bike parking area is free and secure. When you park, You’ll be entered in a drawing for a new bike from Idaho Mountain Touring!

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


northendboise.org/hyde-park-street-fair-2012

MAIN STAGE LINEUP

SITE BASED ENERGY COMMUNITY STAGE LINEUP

Friday, Sept. 14th

Friday, Sept. 14th

5–5:45 PM 6–6:45 7–7:45 8:00–9:30

AKA Belle Like A Rocket Finn Riggins Voice Of Reason

Saturday, Sept. 15th 12:00–12:45 PM 1:00–1:45 2:00–2:45 3:00–3:45 4:00–4:45 5:00–5:45 6–6:45 7:00–7:45 8:00–9:30

Chris Gutierrez & Friends Jumping Sharks Thomas Paul New Transit Jonathan Warren & The Billygoats The jimmy bivens Band Rebecca Scott Jeff Crosby & The Refugees Sherpa

Sunday, Sept. 16th 11:30 AM–12:15 PM 12:30–1:15 1:30–2:15 2:30–3:15 3:30–4:15 4:30–6:00

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Ben Burdick Trio Blaze & Kelly Reilly Coyote The Brian Bateman Blend Matt Hopper & The Roman Candles Bill Coffey & His Cash Money Cousins

5:30 6:00 7:00 7:30 8:00 9:00

NIA Boys & Girls Club of Ada County Nejwah’s World Dance Irish Dance Idaho Mantra Duo Light & Sound out

Saturday, Sept. 15th 11:00 12:00 1:00 2:00 3:00 3:30 4:00 5:00 6:00 7:00 7:30 9:00

Global Village Jared Desert Dreams Dancers Global Village Raks Al Dunia Psychic Sheila Suga Shack Fleet street Klezmer band Cairo Fusion & Mazana Global Village Boise Hoopla Beltane Light & Sound out

Sunday, Sept. 16th 11:00 12:30 1:15 1:30 2:00 2:30 3:00 4:00 4:30

Global Village Starbelly School of Dance District 19 Flamenco Megan Nelson Raks Al Dunia Clint McCune 3 B’s Bagpipes by Bill Earley Marimbas Boise

EVENTS & SPACES The Busker’s Stage Open to all performers with scheduled performances from Mr. Tak, a skilled physical comedian, juggler, unicyclist, puppeteer and musician.

Global Lounge Located near the community stage, The Global Lounge brings it’s culture of inclusion through music, art and dance with workshops, craft booths and performances.

Chakra Activation The mind blowing merging mandalas can be found near the main stage beer garden. Enjoy the visual delights Friday and Saturday evenings after dusk.

Hyde Park Sports Center Thanks to Star Satellite and Direct TV, BSU fans can watch the game and enjoy the fair. Three large TV’s will be showing sports all weekend long, right next to the main stage beer garden.

BOISEweekly | HYDE PARK STREET FAIR 2012 | 3


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8 DAYS OUT FRIDAY

On Stage

Citizen

SEPT. 14

BECKY’S NEW CAR—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 seniors and students. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

SUICIDE PREVENTION CONFERENCE—See Friday. 8 a.m. $100. Boise First Community Center, 3852 N. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-939-3141, bpmin. com.

Festivals & Events CARNEVALE—Enjoy work from a slew of visual and performing local artists at this eclectic evening. See Picks, Page 16. 6-10 p.m. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: RICHARD VILLA—See Thursday. 7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208906-0658, varsitypubmeridian. com. LIQUID LAUGHS: MIKE WALLY WALTER—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

HYDE PARK STREET FAIR—This annual festival will fill the North End with food, entertainment, music and fun. See Picks, Page 17. 4-9:45 p.m., FREE. Camel’s Back Park, 120 W. Heron St., Boise, northendboise.org.

NOISES OFF—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org.

MERIDIAN BUSINESS DAY— Attend this FREE half day of education and networking hosted by the business community for the business community. Choose from a selection of local speakers and make plans to attend a hosted lunch featuring some of Meridian’s best restaurants. For more info, email information@ primaryhealth.com. 8 a.m.-noon. FREE. Meridian City Hall, 33 E. Idaho St., Meridian.

NOVEMBER—Daisy’s Madhouse presents David Mamet’s November, an over-the-top comedy about American politics. Advance tickets are available at brownpapertickets.com. This play contains adult language and is for mature audiences. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise, daisysmadhouse.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Concerts BOISE CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES: THE LINCOLN TRIO—The Chicago piano trio will perform. An abbreviated, FREE morning concert will take place at 10 a.m. as well. 7:30 p.m. $25, $20 students and seniors. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1609, boisechambermusicseries.org.

Food & Drink BOISE URBAN GARDEN SCHOOL HARVEST DINNER— This “food truck rally” evening includes dinner (food grown at the BUGS garden and prepared by local chefs), entertainment and a silent auction, with proceeds benefiting the Boise Urban Garden School. For more information and tickets, visit boiseurbangardenschool.org. 6:30 p.m. $60. Boise Urban Garden School, 4821 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-891-4769, boiseurbangardenschool.org. SUNNYSLOPE FOOD AND WINE FESTIVAL—Enjoy wine tasting, food and entertainment, including performances from American Idol’s Kimberley Locke, Hillfolk Noir and Frim Fram 4. Held in the Sunnyslope region of Caldwell. Noon-5 p.m. $30-$150. sunnyslopefestival.com.

Literature STANLEY-SAWTOOTH COWBOY POETRY AND MUSIC GATHERING—Celebrate the traditions of the American West with performances in the afternoon and at 6 p.m. each day. Performances will take place at RiverOne, the Stanley Museum, Redfish Lake Lodge and Mt. Village Restaurant. Evening performances will be held on the lawn area at Wall Street and Ace of Diamonds. Horseshoe pit barbecue will be available for purchase and vendors will set up shop. FREE, donations accepted. Downtown Stanley, 1-800-878-7950, stanleycc.org.

SATURDAY SEPT. 15 Festivals & Events | EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

BEST OF BOISE WATERSHED— Learn how you can reduce your impact on the Boise River. Take the art podcast tour, go on a scavenger hunt or create eco-art. A wastewater treatment plant tour will take place from 1-2 p.m. Closed-toe shoes required for tour. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, cityofboise.org/bee/watershed.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | 19


8 DAYS OUT WEEK IN REVIEW ANDR EW C R IS P

CALDWELL’S INDIAN CREEK FESTIVAL—Enjoy FREE activities and entertainment. The highlight of the festival is the West Valley Medical Center Cardboard Kayak Race. If you would like to enter the race make a kayak out of cardboard and duck tape. For more information, contact Dawna Laird at Dawna.laird@hcahealthcare.com or call Shannon at 208455-3901. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. FIESTA FLAMENCA—Featuring music and dance performances by Luis de La Tota, Estefanía La Ishi, Dick Winegar and more. Proceeds benefit the Northwest Flamenco Collective. 7 p.m. $5-$10 suggested donation. Escuela de Ritmo Dance Studio, 4507 Alamosa St., Boise, escueladeritmo.com. HYDE PARK STREET FAIR—See Friday. 10 a.m.-9:45 p.m., FREE. Camel’s Back Park, 120 W. Heron St., Boise, northendboise.org.

On Stage BECKY’S NEW CAR—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 seniors and students. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: RICHARD VILLA—See Thursday. 7 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: MIKE WALLY WALTER—See Thursday. 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. NOISES OFF—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. NOVEMBER—See Friday. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise, daisysmadhouse.org.

Food & Drink LIFE’S KITCHEN BOISE STATE TAILGATE PARTY—Support Life’s Kitchen programs and cheer on the Broncos at this tailgate party. Featuring barbecue and beer by Brewforia. For more info about Life’s Kitchen, log onto lifeskitchen.org. See Picks, Page 16. Noon. $20. US Bank, 1000 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-383-7868. SUNNYSLOPE FOOD AND WINE FESTIVAL—See Friday. Noon-5 p.m. $30-$150, sunnyslopefestival.com.

Art SIMPLOT PERFORMING ARTS ACADEMY OPEN HOUSE— Boise Philharmonic, Ballet Idaho and Opera Idaho will open their academy doors and hosts minilessons, mini-performances and provide activities for the family. This is a great chance to connect with your local arts organizations. 1-4 p.m. FREE. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116.

Grant Olsen debuted a solo show at Bricolage First Thursday, Sept. 6.

GARAGES, GOATHEADS AND WINNING GENES Nampa cranked up the volume Sept. 5 when former Wolf Parade and Sunset Rubdown member Spencer Krug brought his latest project, Moonface with Siinai, to Flying M Coffeegarage. Unfortunately, show openers Sad Baby Wolf struggled to find an appropriate acoustic balance in the garage venue. According to Boise Weekly freelancer Catie Young: “The overwhelming amount of noise produced by the band’s instrumentation left the crowd wishing the sound technician would turn the whole thing down and wondering if Sad Baby Wolf really needs five members to create its blandly indie sound.” But, Young continued: “When Moonface and Siinai took the stage, all mediocrity was swiftly forgiven. The crowd gradually crept forward and, though sound issues continued, the volume was no longer offensive.” The vibe at Flying M Coffeehouse on First Thursday, Sept. 6, was notably more quiet, as people sat quietly sipping beverages and enjoying new work by John Warfel. According to BW’s Sheree Whiteley, the show featured “an array of colorful and imaginative pieces inspired by doodles. From people to monsters to a green, tentacled spaceship, Warfel’s artwork harkened back to high school days of sketching on notepads.” Down the street at IdaHostel, Boise artist Cory Maas worked with buckets of paint to complete a colorful mural, and at Bricolage, Grant Olsen debuted a collection of work that included a massive wool tapestry with a cloth star constellation. First Thursday revelers who needed to refuel swung by Fourth and Grove streets, where 17 local food trucks circled their proverbial wagons to celebrate the first anniversary of the Food Truck Rally. Though an ample dusting of prickly goatheads were a thorn in attendees’ sides, according to BW’s Andrew Crisp: “The rally was poppin’, with multiple rows of picnic tables packed full of people. A majority of the 17 trucks had lines, though not of the snaking, chaotic length seen in months past.” To cap off the evening, dozens of local bands and directors took part in the third-annual 208 Music Video Show at Neurolux. Attendees purchased votes for their favorite videos for $1 a pop. Boise lo-fi outfit First Borns took top honors for its video “Gene.” Second place went to Storie Grubb and the Holy Wars for “Time.” And third place went to Glenn Mantang for “Malt Licker.” At the event, BW asked audience members to hand over their iPhones to be raided for found footage. We took that footage and cut it into a crowdsourced music video that played at the end of the show. See Page 4 for details. And capping off the week, BW stopped by the community orgy of art, crafts, music and food known as Art in the Park. According to BW’s Deanna Darr, the three-day event “filled the park with 250 vendors from across the country, all displaying their wares for crowds eager to scoop up everything from jewelry and glass sculptures to pottery, paintings and handmade furniture.” For a photo slideshow of all the action, visit boiseweekly.com. —Tara Morgan

20 | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT Literature

Noon-5 p.m. $30-$150, sunnyslopefestival.com.

STANLEY-SAWTOOTH COWBOY POETRY AND MUSIC GATHERING—See Friday. FREE, donations accepted. Downtown Stanley, 1-800-878-7950, stanleycc.org.

Rec

SUNDAY SEPT. 16

BOISE STATE FOOTBALL—vs. Miami (Ohio). See Picks, Page 16. 2 p.m. Bronco Stadium, Boise State football, Boise, 208-426-1000, boisestate.edu.

Festivals & Events

Citizen

HYDE PARK STREET FAIR—See Friday. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., FREE. Camel’s Back Park, 120 W. Heron St., Boise, northendboise.org.

SHRINER’S MOTORCYCLE AND CLASSIC CAR RIDE FOR CHILDREN—Proceeds benefit the El Korah Shrine Patient Travel Fund, a nonprofit organization that helps Treasure Valley families with the travel expense of taking their children to the Shriner’s Hospitals for Children. Registration 9 a.m.-11 a.m., shotgun start. Includes barbecue, run card, five raffle tickets and ride pin for first 200. Afterparty features live music by Jimmy Bivens, beer garden by Victor’s Hogs and Horns, a silent auction and a raffle. 9 a.m. $25 rider, $10 passenger. Guerber Park, 2200 E. Hill Road, Eagle.

ROCK PARTY—This Rock Party features activity stations for children about mining, archeology and geology; hillside geology hikes; mineral identification; gold panning; info about mining history; vendors; food and more. Noon-4:30 p.m. $4 adults, $3 seniors, $2 ages 6-14, FREE ages 5 and younger and museum members. Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology, 2455 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208368-9876, idahomuseum.org.

On Stage

MONDAY SEPT. 17

BECKY’S NEW CAR—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $12.50, $9 seniors and students. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

Literature

LIQUID LAUGHS: MIKE WALLY WALTER—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

POETRY SLAM DELUX—Practice your word-slinging skills. Visit boisepoetry.com for more info. 8-10 p.m. $5. Pengilly’s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208345-6344.

NOISES OFF—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org.

TUESDAY SEPT. 18

Food & Drink

On Stage

SUNNYSLOPE FOOD AND WINE FESTIVAL—See Friday.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

NOISES OFF—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Talks & Lectures HENRY ROLLINS—The film star, radio host, author and singer will stop in Boise as part of a speaking tour about capitalism, during which he will visit all 50 state capitals. See Picks, Page 17. 8 p.m. $20. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

Kids & Teens COLLEGE NIGHT FOR KIDS— Led by Idaho State Treasurer Ron Crane, a panel of industry experts will discuss the benefits of higher education and overcoming financial challenges. To aid the college planning process, parents and grandparents with kids of all ages are invited to learn about the benefits of opening a 529 college savings plan, minimum contribution requirements of only $25 and financial aid and college tuition. Following the discussion, Treasurer Crane will host a question-and-answer session. Idaho Public Television will also stream the event over the Internet at idahoptv.org/leglive. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Renaissance High School, 1307 E. Central Drive, Meridian, 208-350-4380, meridianschools. org/renaissancehigh.

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 19 On Stage LES MISERABLES— Cameron Mackintosh presents the 25th anniversary production of the legendary musical. Part of the Broadway In Boise 2011-2012 season. See Picks, Page 16. 7:30 p.m. $37.50-$67.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc. boisestate.edu. NOISES OFF—See Wednesday, Sept. 12. 7:30 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Literature BOOKS TO FILM SERIES—Bring a snack and a movie based on the book Dune as part of the library’s series of films based on books. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Rec BOISE CYCLOCROSS CLINICS—See Wednesday, Sept. 12. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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BOISEweekly | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | 21


NEWS/NOISE NOISE

INTO THE ATMOSPHERE Underground hip-hop star Slug talks fatherhood and growing up CHRIS PARKER Curtis Stigers will unveil his new album to Boise audiences at the Egyptian Theatre.

GO OUT WITH CURTIS STIGERS Curtis Stigers’ latest album, Let’s Go Out Tonight, has been out since April. But other than an in-store with a pick-up band at The Record Exchange, he hasn’t done much to push it around town—or around America, for that matter. “If I play 10 gigs in the U.S. a year, that’s a lot,” Stigers said. The reasons are simple. The geography of Europe makes it easier to tour, and he has sold just as many records there despite much smaller populations. “Copenhagen is nicer than Kansas City— no offense to Kansas City,” he said. “OK, well, maybe a little offense to Kansas City.” But Stigers is still pretty pumped about his performance at the Egyptian Theatre Friday, Sept. 14 at 8 p.m. “This is the big unveiling,” Stigers said. The reason why the jazz star is so jazzed is that Let’s Go Out Tonight represents some decent-sized steps out of his comfort zone. “I was really clinging to the idea that I was a jazz singer,” said Stigers. “And I sort of let go of that and just became a singer.” The result is an album that Stigers said exists in a nether-region between genres. There are elements of soul and pop, rock and jazz. Another major step was Stigers’ decision to have the album produced by Larry Klein. It was the first time he let someone else produce one of his albums for more than a decade, since what he described as “being terrorized” by Arista Records founder Clive Davis. But Klein has produced some of Stigers’ favorite tunes, and after a dozen years of tossing the idea around, he was finally ready. It made a big difference. “I started off in 1981 over-singing ever ything because I wanted ever yone to know I listened to Ray Charles,” Stigers said. “On this record, ever y step of the way [Klein] said, ‘less,’ and that was a revelation to me.” Less is definitely more on Let’s Go Out Tonight. Instead of big, jazzy solos from overly qualified musicians, it’s a study in subtlety. And Stigers’ show at the Egyptian will be his first chance to showcase that newfound restraint. It will also be the last chance to see Stigers locally until his X-Treme Holiday X-Travaganza in December. But if you happen to be in Copenhagen … —Josh Gross

22 | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Fifteen years ago, Sean Daley officially became Slug. The hip-hop-loving music store nerd released his debut album Overcast!, taking the first step toward emerging as that era’s most successful underground rapper: Atmosphere. Shut out of the mainstream by gangsta rap, acts like Atmosphere formed their own scenes and their own sense of “real.” Atmosphere’s Sean Daley (right) and Anthony Davis (left) will showcase the fruits of their labor at KFCH. Instead of trite theatrical cops-and-robbers melodramas, their songs were heady, odd cues have stayed Slug’s hand in the past when that time in their life,” he said. and somewhat insular. The scene was led things in the lyrics got too personal. This time, Daley admits that since the 15th anniverby artists with idiosyncratic visions: Aesop that wasn’t the case. sary of his debut release, he’s been thinking a Rock’s florid rhymes, Cage’s surreal night“Maybe three to four bars into it, he mare visions, Sage Francis’ biting wit or Talib lot about the past and how far he’s come. He’s might’ve given me a look that intimidated me created seven albums, eight EPs and a successKweli’s Corinthian leather flow. ful hip-hop label. He also got married and had and made me not want to write it anymore,” By the mid-2000s, the indie rap or “backsaid Daley. “Whereas he didn’t get that a baby around the time he was recording The packer” community had fallen off. But while chance, so his first time hearing it ... he heard Family Sign. Definitive Jux—the label that housed much the whole song, and it was like, ‘Yeah, this is And reinforcing life’s yin and yang, while of the East Coast underground—was closing, Daley was bringing a new life into the world, right.’” Atmosphere and his label, Rhymesayers, were As Daley crests another milestone—he one close to him was checking out. Michael gathering steam. recently turned 40—he’s operating by a new Larsen, aka Eyedea, died in his sleep in Atmosphere redefined himself by adding a live band (alternating sets with his touring DJ), October 2010 from opiate toxicity at the age mantra: focus on the upside, not the downside. He’s intent on not giving life’s unsettling, of 28, casting a dark pall over Daley’s recent which attracted numerous late-to-the-party demoralizing side so much power. happiness. followers. These days, he’s sitting pretty—not “It’s funny, I was already heading in that “We were very close. I would say the bond on a big pile of cash, though he probably does direction. ... That’s what played into the I have with him was either older sibling-ish or OK—but on a legacy he’s proud of and a decision of me going, ‘You know what? Let’s even parental,” Daley said. “He was 10 years growing maturity, which was evident on last try to have a kid and let’s set a date and get my junior, so when I was touring with him, year’s very personal album, The Family Sign. married.’ ... Once we went ahead and did he was only 17. So me and his mom became “I shudder to think that we, by any it, it was like my muscles were ready. I had friends. ... I can’t compare it to anything else means, were lucky enough to be a part of a already done the warm-up. So when it was other than when my father passed.” movement or a scene,” Daley said. “When I time to jump in, I was able to jump in and And the pitched emotions of the time come started the band, it wasn’t like I was trying start writing about it.” through in his songs, making The Family Sign to go, ‘Oh, I gotta get out of this before the But the question is whether the music particularly personal—even for a guy whose backpackers dry up.’” Atmosphere makes is even hip-hop anymore. sound was once described as “emo-rap.” You But the effect was the same. His peers Sure, he still raps, but from Ant’s increasingly hear it on songs like “Became,” where he had begun losing themselves in idiosyncratic rock-inflected production to the tone and cocoons woven in thick strands of verse. Slug chases his absent friend’s footsteps into the spirit of the lyrics, Atmosphere’s music feels cold woods, where he’s lost to the wolves. Or swore off the self-consciously weird in favor different. the commitment ode, “She’s Enough,” which of stories and big-picture meditations. Once “Maybe I am 1998 hip-hop. You know? passionately reps the object of his affection. described as “emo-rap” for his self-indicting Because ... today’s hip-hop sounds different. But the most powerful track, hands-down, is bare-wire honesty, his songs turned more It’s like Clams Casino, as far as production the unblinking “The thoughtful and storystyle right now. Whatever Danny Brown’s Last to Say,” where based. Atmosphere with I Self Devine, Carnage and rapping over,” he said. “We had our time. I’m Slug’s matter-of-fact But it was really just DJ Just Nine. Friday, Sept. 14, 8:30 p.m., not trying to shuck the responsibility of still narration only makes circumstance, Daley $24-$50. representing what I believe in, by any means. the story of domestic explained. He wasn’t KNITTING FACTORY CONCERT HOUSE But I can’t get old and become one of these bitabuse more horrific. special, just a little old 416 S. Ninth St. ter dudes that says things like, ‘You kids don’t Daley said that for his class. 208-367-1212 track and others might know what you’re talking about.’ Because I “All those dudes I bo.knittingfactory.com remember when they said that shit to me. never have happened came up with in ’97 “I guess I’m taking a long way to say I’m were it not for his [Aesop Rock, Sage trying to stay humble. Let’s be honest, nothing Francis], they were all 20-22. I was 25 already. wife’s pregnancy. To be near her and the baby, is promised. It’s a crazy world we live in, so Daley did much of his writing at home rather It was more like life trends. At 27, it was time I’m really trying to do the day-to-day as much than at the side of longtime DJ/producer, for me not to be weird anymore; or at 32, it was time for me to start writing stories. It’s just Anthony Davis, aka Ant. While Ant is the man as possible, and enjoy as much of my time as possible because life is fragile and short.” behind Atmosphere’s music, his non-verbal like all these other dudes will when they hit WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | 23


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE NIC K C OLLIAS

GUIDE

WOLVSERPENT, SEPT. 14, NEUROLUX Wolvserpent—formerly Pussygutt—is a band out of a different time. And not just because of its clear fascination with druids. In an age of Twitter, flash-fiction and micro-pop, when albums are dead and three-minute singles are too effin long, Wolvserpent dares to take its time ... to stop and smell the dead, rotting flowers, if you will. The band’s shortest songs span eight minutes and generally begin with simple repeating riffs or drums and slowly add layers of spooky atmosphere until they peak with snarls of black metal guitar and drums like distant thunder, almost like sonic short films or long sessions of Castlevania. The Boise band doesn’t play at-home shows very often, preferring its performances to be events rather than mere gigs. It will make its first local appearance since Treefort Music Fest at Neurolux Friday, Sept. 14, with no other shows slated on the graying, dimly lit horizon. —Josh Gross With Phantahex. 8 p.m., $6. Neurolux, 111. N. 11th St., 208343-0886, neurolux.com.

24 | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 12

THURSDAY SEPT. 13

SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring Trevor Green with Harpersman. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza

BRONCHO—With Bad Weather California and The Lovely Bad Things. 7 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

FRIDAY SEPT. 14

BOURBON DOGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BURLEY GRIMES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ARSONISTS GET ALL THE GIRLS—With Exotic Animal Petting Zoo and Hypnose. 7 p.m. $12. Venue

DAN COSTELLO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE—Featuring The Mystics. 6 p.m. $10, $7 IBG members, $6 ages 5-12, FREE ages 5 and younger. Idaho Botanical Garden

ATMOSPHERE—With I Self Devine, Carnage and DJ Just Nine. See Noise, Page 22. 8:30 p.m. $24-$50. Knitting Factory

HORSE THIEVES—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

BAND OF BUSKERS—8 p.m. FREE. Crux

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE BEST LYRES—10 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s

MANIMOU CAMARA—9 p.m. $3. Reef

BIG YUK—9 p.m. $5. Shredder

JAMES ORR—9 p.m. FREE. Reef JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JOHN BERRYHILL—With Greg Martinez and Friends. 6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s RICO WEISMAN AND REX MILLER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown STEVE EATON—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SUN BLOOD STORIES—With Brother Dan. 8:30 p.m. $2. Red Room VELNIAS—With Abigail Williams and Vesica Piscis. 9 p.m. $8. Shredder

MERCIES—With Grand Falconer, Hollow-Wood and Mickey the Jump. 8:30 p.m. $3. Red Room

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BRAD PARSONS BAND—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s BRENT MARCHBANKS—8 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe

REBECCA SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Buster’s

CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SPECTRAL TOMBS—With Tiamats Destroyer. 9 p.m. $5. Shredder

DOUGLAS CAMERON—5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

STATIC-X—With Winds of Plague and The Browning. 7 p.m. $20$35. Knitting Factory STEVE FULTON—7 p.m. FREE. Modern Hotel and Bar

REAL TIME TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE JACKS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye JIMMY BIVENS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m. $3. Kay and Traci’s 127 Club

WHALE!—11 a.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building WOLVSERPENT—With Phantahex. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $6. Neurolux

SATURDAY SEPT. 15 BRETT HAWKINS AND ANCIENT PSYCHIC TANDEM WAR ELEPHANT—8 p.m. FREE. High Note Cafe COBERLY AND TOWN—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s DAVE ALVIN AND THE GUILTY ONES—8:30 p.m. $17 adv., $20 door. VAC ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers HILLFOLK NOIR—8 p.m. $20. Boise Contemporary Theater THE JELLY PROJECT—With Deaf Kid, Lakefriends and URB. 8:30 p.m. $3. Red Room JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—10 p.m. $5. Reef

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE JOYRIDE—10 p.m. FREE. Big Al’s

ICONS OF COIL—With DJ Bones. 9 p.m. $10. Shredder

MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES—With Jeff Crosby and the Refugees. 10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

SOFIA TALVIK—8 p.m. $7. Venue

TUESDAY SEPT. 18

TERRY JONES—10:15 a.m. FREE. Berryhill

JAMI LYNN—With Palankeen and Lisa Simpson. 8:30 p.m. $3. Red Room

BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

VICCI MARTINEZ—With Rebecca Scott. 8 p.m. $15. Pengilly’s

JONAH SHUE AND THE COUNTRY CLUB—5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

DAVE MATTHEWS TRIBUTE BAND—8 p.m. $10-$22. Knitting Factory

LIKE A ROCKET—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

GAYLE CHAPMAN—With Robb Howell. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

ORGONE—With DJ Psycache. 7:30 p.m. $10 adv., $13 door. VAC

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

RASCO/CALI AGENTS—With DJ True Justice, Chew Gums, Wretchess Defynus and P-dirt. 9 p.m. $8. Shredder

THE JELLY PROJECT—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

SALLY TIBBS—With Kevin Kirk. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

PICKWICK—With Aaron Mark Brown. 8 p.m. $10. Flying M Coffeegarage

TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

WHITEWATER RAMBLE—With Ophilia. 10 p.m. $3. Liquid

REHAB—8 p.m. $13-$25. Knitting Factory

SUNDAY SEPT. 16

REPTAR—With Rubblebucket and Icky Blossums. See Listen Here, this page. 7 p.m. $12. Neurolux

BAND OF SKULLS—8 p.m. $15. Neurolux

VELVET LOUNGE FROGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

BILLY MITCHELL AND THE JAZZ ALLSTARS—1:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar

VIBRATORS—With The Akabane Vultures on Strong Bypass, Micheal Dean Damron, Chris Mcfarland and Piranhas. 9 p.m. FREE. Shredder

CHICAGO—7:30 p.m. $52$101. Morrison Center

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

PAUSE FOR THE CAUSE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s REPTILIAN SHAPE SHIFTER— With Cat Massacre and Art Fad. 8:30 p.m. $2. Red Room SHON SANDERS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 19

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring Diego’s Umbrella with Desirae Bronson. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza

TERRY JONES AND BILL LILES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

JAMES TAYLOR AND CARLY SIMON’S SON!

W/ BILL COFFEY & HIS CASH MONEY COUSINS

“ALVIN’S ELECTRIC GUITAR SOLOS -- CRISP, SHARP, AND BRACING -- ARE AS POTENT AS HE’S BEEN IN YEARS” -ALLMUSIC.COM

WILLISON-ROOS RELEASE PARTY—With Steve Fulton. 6:30 p.m. $5. Linen Building

NEWS FROM THE FRONT—With Skittish Itz and Jimmy Sinn. 8 p.m. $5. Shredder

ORGONE BEN TAYLOR AIMEE MANN W/DJ PSYCACHE

ADRENALINE-FUELED FUNK FROM EIGHT LA SOULS WHO WILL MOVE YOUR ASS AND MELT YOUR FACE.

“WITH HEART-MELTING HARMONIES, THE CRYSTALLINE, REVERB-DRENCHED, COUNTRY-ISH SPACE IS AS SWEET AS IT GETS.” – CHRIS JONES, BBC

“ONE OF THE TOP 10 LIVING SONGWRITERS ALONG WITH PAUL MCCARTNEY, BOB DYLAN AND BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN.”-NPR

REPTAR, SEPT. 17, NEUROLUX Between taking the name of a cartoon dinosaur from Rugrats and singer Graham Ulicny looking like he could be blown over by a stiff breeze, Athens, Ga.’s Reptar gives an underwhelming first impression. And that makes it all the more enjoyable when the band cuts into a track. Instead of anemic whinefests, it dishes dance-sized blasts of bouncy synth-pop fronted by the thundering boom of Ulicny’s inexplicably large vocals. The sound has strong elements of indie, disco and ’80s pop and is furiously danceable. With several national tours and the release of its debut LP, Body Faucet, on Vagrant Records, the band’s star has been on the rise over the last year. NME wrote that it was one of the biggest buzz acts at last year’s SXSW. Reptar stopped by Boise for a lonely Monday night show at Reef during that tour, but it has gained momentum since then and its performance at Neurolux Monday, Sept. 17, is sure to pack a bigger wallop. —Josh Gross With Rubblebucket and Icky Blossoms. 7 p.m. $12. Neurolux, 111. N. 11th St., neurolux.com.

BEACH HOUSE W/ POOR MOON

W/ FIELD REPORT

W/ GUEST TBA

TUE, SEPT 18 @ VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE

C FA

DAVE ALVIN & THE GUILTY ONES SAT, SEPT 15 @ VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE

M CO E C. IV SI OL U H EM A IV /ID OL OM H A C ID K. W. BOO W E W

RADIO BOISE TUESDAYS— Featuring The Green Zoo, Ninos Lobos and Hey V Kay. 7 p.m. $3. Neurolux

“... EACH SONG STARTING WITH THE SIZZLE OF A LIT FUSE AND AT SOME FINE MOMENT EXPLODING LIKE A FIREWORK IN SLOW MOTION.” 9.1 ON PITCHFORK!

DIEGO’S UMBRELLA & VOKAB KOMPANY SUN, OCT 14 @ VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE

MONDAY SEPT. 17

FRI, OCT 5 @ EGYPTIAN THEATRE

POSSUM LIVIN—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BOURBON DOGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

THUR, OCT 4 @ EGYPTIAN THEATRE

OLD DEATH WHISPER: REPRISE—With Chuy and Rico. 8 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

SAT, SEPT 22 @ EGYPTIAN THEATRE

MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m. $3. Kay and Traci’s 127 Club

BEN BURDICK—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

TICKETS ONLINE AT EGYPTIANTHEATRE.NET CALL 208-387-1273 EGYPTIAN THEATRE BOX OFFICE TU-SA 11A-6P & AT RECORD EXCHANGE

VOKAB’S HIP-HOP, SOUL, ELECTRO, FUNK AND DIEGO’S MARIACHI, GYPSY, FLAMENCO AND SKA ON ONE BLISTERING CO-HEADLINING BILL WILL MAKE FOR ONE BEER-SOAKED FIESTA!

BOISEweekly | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | 25


LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings BARBER OF BIRMINGHAM DOCUMENTARY— The Barber of Birmingham is a documentary centered on 85-year-old James Armstrong’s barber shop in Birmingham, Ala., which has been “has been a hub for haircuts and civil rights since 1955.” Tuesday, Sept. 18, 6 p.m. FREE. The Community Library, 415 Spruce Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-3493, thecommunitylibrary.org.

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

BODY AND MIND Three beautiful movies shine at TIFF GEORGE PRENTICE

BOISE CLASSIC MOVIES: THE PRINCESS BRIDE—Watch the classic film on the big screen as part of the Boise Classic Movies series. Beer and wine available. Visit boiseclassicmovies.com for more info and tickets. Thursday, Sept. 13, 7 p.m. $9 adv., $11 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net. MOVIES IN THE GARDEN: NAPOLEON DYNAMITE—Pack a picnic, bring a blanket and enjoy movies on the outdoor big screen. Food and beverage vendors will provide snacks and summer treats. Movies start at dusk. Wednesday, Sept. 19, 7 p.m. $3-$5. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Opening ARBITRAGE—Richard Gere and Susan Sarandon star in this film about a hedge fund manager trying to keep a detective from discovering that he has cooked his books. (R) The Flicks

FINDING NEMO 3D—Disney-Pixar’s 2003 Academy Award-winning tale about a fish on a big adventure is re-released in 3D. (G) Opens Friday, Sept. 14. Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22 LAST OUNCE OF COURAGE—This heart-warming film examines family relations surrounding a local war hero whose son goes to follow in his father’s footsteps. (PG) Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22

What we choose to see when we bear witness to a body or mind wrecked by disease has everything to do with how we define disability. Calling someone “disabled” is an ultimate injustice, because we opt to see a wheelchair or iron lung before acknowledging the person who requires such machinery. Additionally, we marginalize those with mental illness, taking note of physical ticks or lack of social barriers instead of accepting a freedom-aching spirit. Three life-affirming new films, part of a stellar lineup at this year’s Toronto InternaJohn Hawkes will likely get an Oscar nod for his role as polio victim Mark O’Brien in The Sessions. tional Film Festival, reminded me that attention must indeed be paid to a unique breed New York country home, prior to World War He first reaches out to a priest (William H. of heroes—not cape-wearing pretenders, but Macy) with a unique request: He desires carII. And with audiences already familiar with Earthbound mortals no less extraordinary. King George’s stuttering affliction, Hyde Park nal knowledge. When a sex therapist (Helen I’m happy to report that all three movies Hunt) enters O’Brien’s life, it’s impossible on Hudson now asks us to reconsider how will be coming to a cineplex near you this our polio-victim presi- not to be moved by a tenderness never seen fall and, if my guess is dent held an economi- before on film. What ensues is a very mature right, they’ll be greeted consideration of intimacy in its purest form. cally ravaged nation with critical and audiVisit boiseweekly.com/blogs/cobweb for TIFF One of my biggest surprises thus far at in his heart while ence acclaim. updates and interviews from the ground. TIFF 2012 is how much I unabashedly loved squeezing his limbs Like most baby TORONTO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL another film that examines disability with into a wheelchair. boomers, I loved Continues through Sunday, Sept. 16. Get genuine humor: Silver Linings Playbook. It Murray will need watching Bill Murray more information on the festival at tiff.net. to introduce himself to is, without question, the best film you’ll ever mug his way through see about mental illness, professional football John Hawkes. They’ll Saturday Night Live, both be vying for Best and ballroom dancing. Stripes and CadBradley Cooper and Jennifer Lawrence are dyshack. But in Hyde Park on Hudson, Mur- Actor at the Academy Awards. Hawkes stars ray portrays Franklin Delano Roosevelt with in The Sessions, a beautiful portrayal of poet- wonderful as two volatile young adults who hurt more than they can ever say, though journalist Mark O’Brien. so much charm and ease that audiences may In an odd bit of cinematic irony, polio also they can’t seem to stop talking. Directed by wrongly dismiss his precise performance. David O. Russell (The Fighter), Silver Linings Murray is more than a delight; he is pitch- is integral to this film. O’Brien, struck down Playbook reminds us that life—sometimes by the disease as a child, spent most of his perfect in a movie that is a natural companquite literally—is a dance and requires a bit ion piece to Oscar winner The King’s Speech. life in an iron lung. While O’Brien is an imof choreography. Some of us just take a little mobile man—he has no control over any of In fact, Hyde Park on Hudson chronicles longer to learn the moves. this body’s muscles—his dreams have wings. the visit of King George VI to FDR’s upstate

QUEEN OF VERSAILLES—This documentary tells a rags-to-riches—and possibly back to rags—tale of a wealthy couple. (PG) The Flicks RESIDENT EVIL: RETRIBUTION—The fifth installment of the successful action-adventure-fantasy franchise involves a deadly virus ravaging Earth. (R) Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22

SCREEN/DVD BOISE’S FAVORITE DVD RENTALS THIS WEEK

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. 26 | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | BOISEweekly

1. SAFE First week in release.

2. BATTLESHIP Second week at No. 2.

—Source: Video Memories, 4504 Overland Road, Boise, 208-385-0113

3. THE HUNGER GAMES Dropped from No. 1 on Sept. 5.

4. THE FIVE YEAR ENGAGEMENT First week in release.

5. THE LUCKY ONE Second week at No. 5.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


REC/PLAY PLAY/REC LAU R IE PEAR M AN

Jordan (left) and David Johnson, owners of Wake Central Cable Park know how to tow the line, but they don’t have to.

IN THE WAKE Cable wakeboarding don’t need no stinking boat JOSH GROSS it really sunk in, I felt the tug of the cable. I held my arms firm I started snowboarding in the infancy of the sport during the and dug in my heels. early ’90s and can cruise the slopes with ease. But with powSuddenly I was standing, skimming across the football erboats costing tens of thousands of dollars and my net worth field-sized pond at what felt like warp speed, though it’s more being much more in the neighborhood of $11, I have never likely the staff member controlling the speed of the motor been wakeboarding. from shore had it set to the lowest speed. But the staff at Caldwell’s new Wake Central Cable Park I quickly advanced on a series of permanent told me that was not a problem. People start slide boxes and kicker ramps that I wanted out at the park all the time, and they claim it’s nothing to do with so early in my wakeboardeasier to learn there rather than behind a boat WAKE CENTRAL ing career. They’d be there on the return pass. because the angle of the tow-rope naturally CABLE PARK 21780 Gravel Lane, Carving away from them was surprisingly easy. pulls you to a standing position—unlike being Caldwell, 208-589-0768 Suddenly, I realized the end of the pond dragged behind a boat. wakecentralboise.com was approaching and the cable would soon be Looking at the motorized cables strung 20 reversing direction. feet above the water, and the 45-degree pitch The staff told me to lean back like I was of the handle, I saw their logic, but I was still haunted by my years-long struggle to stand up on a surfboard. sitting down and it would naturally swing me around. What they didn’t tell me was that it would come with the centrifugal I was also still trepidatious after seeing another rider at the force equal to the business end of a game of crack the whip. cable park take a face plant. I went flying ass over teakettle—just like I was trying to avoid. I strapped my feet into the bindings and jumped into the But beyond a mouthful of water, it wasn’t so bad. water, sinking immediately and then let my feet bob as I laid The operator halted the cable and I awkwardly paddled back in the pond. Only 5 feet deep and under the relentless back to it. sun, the water was warm. Far warmer than the recent Once I grabbed hold, I gave him a thumbs up to sigfloat I took on the Boise River. nal readiness, a move I immediately regretted because A staff member told me to grab the handle, so I with only a single hand on the rope, it was nearly torn awkwardly paddled toward it then thrashed around from my clutches. trying to orient myself the way I was instructed to. But I grabbed hold again and was quickly cruising Knees up like I was squatting, board perpendicular to back the other direction. the path of the cable, arms firmly outstretched. Boats are for suckers, I thought with a giant They told me the secret is to push back with my VIDEO: Check out all smile. legs, like braking on a snowboard, and to let the the action at Wake Then I wiped out again on the turnaround. cable do the work standing up. They told me most Central Cable Park. There might be something to them after all. people pick it up after only a few tries. But before WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

MASTERS RACE AT NATIONAL CHAMPS You don’t so much ride a time trial as you fire your bike from the starting line across the finish line. It’s an explosion in every sense of the word, including the force, power and physical damage associated with a cannon. With that in mind, on Sept. 5, at 11:30 a.m., I lit my personal fuse, setting in motion the race of my life. It was USA Cycling’s 2012 Masters National Championships—the geriatric equivalent of the National Championship event that had occurred two months earlier in Augusta, Ga. The term “geriatric” exaggerates the reality. At almost 36 years old, I competed in the youngest age group, as eligibility rules require participants to be a minimum of 35 years old by the end of the 2012 calendar year. But participants in the 70-and-older age group defied the ordinary rules dictated by Father Time. Instead of overhearing conversations about Geritol and Metamucil, I was eavesdropping to learn whether deep-dish carbon clinchers had less rolling resistance on rough pavement than tri-spoked tubulars. These athletes could easily have been mistaken for being 20 years younger than they were. I’m not sure where I got the idea that I needed to revisit bicycle racing, an obsession that had finally released its grip on me three years ago. It might have had something to do with an injury that prevented me from pounding the trails on foot as much as I wanted. Perhaps it was a consequence of a certain local Olympic cyclist’s charging quest for a second gold medal. Either way, I had dedicated the summer to remembering how to pedal my bike faster than I ever thought I could. In June, the miles of training stretched endlessly ahead of me, but the weeks flew by and soon only hours stood between me and my goal race. I had taken the week off from work to travel to Bend, Ore., the perfect venue for an event of this caliber. Impressed by the tens of thousands of dollars worth of aerodynamically engineered bicycles, power meters and Lycra-clad figures parading through Deschutes County, I had to remind myself that most of the competitors were probably also working stiffs like me. They couldn’t be training full time. If they were, there was no way they could pay for such fancy equipment. Besides, when the rubber meets the road, the engine is what matters most. I had done all I could to ensure that my own diesel V-8 would churn out enough horsepower to overcome even the strongest head wind. The fast, non-technical course demanded laser-like focus. At 30K, it was long enough that errant thoughts could hinder performance but not so long that one could let up on the gas for even a moment. Routed south of Prineville, Ore., along the Crooked River, the magnificent scenery went largely unappreciated, as most of my sensory perception was focused inward. Heart pounding and lungs searing, lactic acid accumulated in my bloodstream faster than I could metabolically process it. In every moment, the question persisted: Could I maintain this pedal cadence and turn one gear harder? I was constantly asking myself to embrace a little bit more pain, dig a little bit deeper and hold on for a little bit longer. The whole experience lasted less than 45 minutes, which simultaneously felt like an eternity and a split-second, illustrating the concept of relativity better than anything Albert Einstein ever did. While I was suffering on the road, my legs and lungs maxed out and the finish line couldn’t come soon enough. But after I crossed it, I realized it had ended too soon. My whole summer was summarized in a matter of minutes and I hadn’t a clue as to what it all meant. Hours later, sweat long since washed away and celebratory beverages flowing freely, I stood on the third step of the podium and claimed my bronze medal. At that moment, it came to me with startling clarity: It wouldn’t have mattered whether I’d produced the fastest time of the day or finished at the bottom of the heap. Sure, it was nice to be somewhere near the top, but my purpose was in the process—not the end result. The process was the pedal strokes, not just during the race, but on every day that led to it, and I can say with confidence that I enjoyed the ride—every ride. —Sarah Barber

BOISEweekly | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | 27


NEWS/FOOD ANDR EW C R IS P

FOOD LAU R IE PEAR M AN

THE WHOLE PICTURE Cavemen only wish they ate this good.

PALEO SHACK AND SUNNYSLOPE Food truck fans tired of sliders and fried spuds now have a healthier option. The Paleo Shack debuted its mostly organic lean meats and local veggies at the first anniversary of the Food Truck Rally Sept. 6. “The whole idea is to give people the option to eat healthy when they’re on the run,” said Paleo Shack co-owner Brandon Rogers. “Especially for people that are trying to stay away from gluten and grains and dairy.” Paleo Shack’s menu is a three-step process. First, you select from an assortment of baked veggies like Brussels sprouts, kale, beets, parsnips or sweet potatoes. Then, you pick a protein such as grass-fed lean flank steak or wild Pacific-caught mahi mahi. And finally, you choose a sauce to drizzle on top, like coconut cream horseradish, Carolina barbecue or salsa verde. “Everything is baked, and then right before it’s served, it’s all flash-fried … on a grill with coconut oil,” said Rogers. John Tansey, Rogers’ business partner, will be manning Paleo Shack’s kitchen. “So far, we’re just doing events,” said Rogers. “We’re working on finding a permanent location but that might not happen until next spring.” Rogers and Tansey ultimately hope to have three kiosk-style Paleo Shack locations around the Treasure Valley and eventually expand into California. You can find the Paleo Shack at the Idaho Health, Beauty and Fitness Fair Saturday, Oct. 6, and Sunday, Oct. 7, at Expo Idaho. For more info, visit thepaleoshack.com. And moving from workout grub to wine, Caldwell is hosting the inaugural Sunnyslope Food and Wine Festival from noon to 5 p.m., Friday, Sept. 14, through Sunday, Sept. 16. The grape fest will feature three days of winetasting, local food and live music. Friday and Saturday tasting stops include: Huston Vineyards, Bitner Vineyards, HAT Ranch Winery, Williamson Orchards and Vineyards and The Spot Pavilion in Marsing. On both days at 6 p.m., there will also be special winemaker dinners offered. On Sunday, the party moves to Ste. Chapelle Winery for an afternoon of wine, local vendors, raffles and a performance by American Idol second runner-up Kimberley Locke. No parking is available at the wineries, but a free festival shuttle will transport participants from the Sienna Hills parking area, located off Karcher Road between S. Indiana Ave. and S. Florida Ave. Attendees can also buy a shuttle ride to Caldwell for $15 per day or $40 for the weekend. Tickets range from $30-$150 for all three days. For more info and to purchase tickets, visit sunnyslopefestival.com. —Tara Morgan

28 | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Whole Foods taps local producers for new Boise supermarket ANDREW CRISP Envision an undercover figure slinking into Bittercreek Ale House and gingerly navigating the surroundings in search of a table. The patron is an out-of-towner, a veritable foodie agent provocateur—and he’s eyeing a plate of local polenta fries. Before Austin, Texas, natural foods grocery chain Whole Foods opens a new location, it sends these “food foragers” on secret missions into the local market. “They come here and—kind of incognito—just kind of explore the food scene,” said Bruce Green, store team leader for Boise’s forthcoming Whole Foods Market. “They Store Team Leader Bruce Green spills the beans about Whole Foods’ new Boise branch. go to restaurants, go to farmers markets, go to the competition, and just ask, ‘What are I’ve asked that they just put a tap through the for a state agency to help wheel out the welpeople into here?’” come wagon in a new market. But that doesn’t wall.” Earlier this year, Green and these food Green said that Payette Brewing’s Outmean they weren’t pleasantly surprised. foragers visited the Boise area to research law IPA will be on tap. He also identified “When we walk into the stores, we want the prospective market and get a feel for the products like the aforementioned polenta to see local signage, we want to see the local population’s collective stomach. people demo-ing,” said Jessica Moore, Whole fries, Basque food offerings and green, raw “One of the first pictures I got back from garbanzo beans as unique to the area. Foods regional grocery buyer. “We’re comthat trip, which was last January, were the Pat Rice of Rice Family Farms said Whole peting in a chain-driven market, and we feel polenta fries at Bittercreek Ale House,” said Foods sent out a representative to survey his Green. “So I’ve had those about once a week like this sets us apart.” The Boise store, which is slated to open in operation. since I got here.” “They sent out their regional crop November, will be larger than Green’s previIn addition to the company’s own prowlmanager guy out of Colorado. He was just ous post at a store in Denver. The company’s ing, the Idaho State Department of Agriculvision calls for minimally processed products, looking at the farm, different things we were ture helped roll out the red carpet. growing, and giving us some idea of what many of them local. “They are very committed to having as “We were thrilled to see Boise as a unique would sell well in their stores,” said Rice. much local product in their stores as pos“They were interested in the head lettuce city, in the sense that Boise has a local focus sible,” said Idaho Preferred’s Leah Clark. and kale and chard, leafy greens and carrots. as well,” said Moore. “They’ve been very aggressive very early on Pretty much everything that we grow.” Idaho-grown poinsettias, locally brewed with meetings with prospective vendors, in Whole Foods favors organic products and beers, certified-organic squash and more may letting people know what they need to do to doesn’t carry genetically modified organisms. grace the shelves when Whole Foods’ doors sell products in their stores.” officially open. Local wineries, farms, cheese- They require producers to carry insurance Clark helped facilitate meetings to put and ban a lengthy list of ingredients with makers and more members of the Idaho multi-syllabic names, including high-fructose have already met Preferred program The Boise Whole Foods branch is slated to corn syrup. with the company. in touch with Whole open in mid-November. “It’s not something that we hadn’t already “We’re working Foods buyers. WHOLE FOODS-BOISE with a hummus com- been doing for the other grocery stores,” said Representatives from 401 S. Broadway Ave. Rice. “We sell to several Albertsons stores, pany there, a salsa Zeppole Baking Com208-287-4600 the Boise Co-op and the Saturday farmer’s company, there’s a pany, 3 Horse Ranch wholefoodsmarket.com/stores/boise market.” frozen wrap comVineyards, Owyhee However, not every organic farm in Idaho pany, Fit Wrapz. Also Produce, Ward’s can handle selling to Whole Foods. Acgarbanzo beans from a farm up in Northern Greenhouse, Crooked Fence Brewing, Payette cording to Bart Rayne of Next Generation Idaho, I believe,” Moore said. Brewing Company, 3 Girls Catering, Brick 29 Organics, it’s not in the farm’s future at the The idea is to see how Whole Foods can Bistro, Rollingstone Chevre and Ballard Family moment. cater its store to the market. Green said the Dairy Cheese gave presentations. “It’s not easy, and it can be expensive,” “She connected us with like 60 local farms company doesn’t have cookie-cutter stores. or producers, and then we came back [in] late Each is tailor-made, and that includes tapping said Rayne, standing next to his booth at the Capital City Public Market. “We’re too small January and just invited anybody that wanted local producers, farms and breweries. to really consider it.” “The Tap Room will be upstairs,” said to come from that group,” said Green. “They Helping a market-goer pick out fresh Green. “We’ll have a pub menu up there with just kind of showed up and gave presentachicken wings and pizza and things like that. carrots on a recent Saturday, Peaceful Belly’s tions.” Josie Erskine said she hadn’t yet made up her According to Whole Foods, it isn’t common My office is right next to the Tap Room, so WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BEER GUZZLER/FOOD FOOD mind about working with Whole Foods. “I’d like to,” she said. “I’m going to wait until it opens and see what that looks like.” Local company 3 Girls Catering hopes to provide some of its products to the store’s deli department, including sandwiches, soups, quinoa and hummus. “We submitted 10 items and they said they would carry them all,” said Gretchen Talbert, one of the three girls. Green said the deli is a department that changes throughout the year, shifting between local products, seasonal vegetable-based salads and other prepared foods. “You’ll see kind of a seasonal expansion and contraction of local foods in the deli,” he said. “There’ll be some things you’ll see year round, and demand will also be seasonal. Nobody wants soup right now. It’s kind of an ever-changing organic process for what the demand for local products is, too.” Some of these producers will need to expand production to meet demand for Whole Foods. Moore said they try to work with local producers to make that experience a positive one. Producers like Rice Family Farms said they’re just happy to have another outlet to sell their products locally. “I’m hoping they’ll increase the customer base that wants to shop and buy more of those types of things,” said Rice. The company also offers the Whole Foods Local Producer Loan Program, which identifies companies with goals for expansion and provides them with capital. Green said he’ll help announce an Idaho recipient at the Boise store’s grand opening. “There’s a company in Boulder, [Colo.] called Justin’s Nut Butter,” said Green. “He was in a tiny little warehouse spot making this awesome peanut butter, and he sold it to one store in Boulder, and that was all he could supply.” That is, until the Whole Foods loan program helped him expand his operation to supply the entire Whole Foods network. According to Moore, the Boise store could serve as a launchpad for regional distribution if the products are popular. “Once they’re on strong ground [in Boise], they can present regionally and I can put them in the plan. ... Colorado and New Mexico are really strong markets, as well,” she said. Moore said Utah would also be an easy transition for Boise companies, with its four Whole Foods locations. As for the “Whole Paycheck” nickname bestowed on the upscale grocer, Green said it’s best to “compare apples to apples” on price. “We feel like our value stands up to anyone around,” he said. Green said that for a $100 purchase of top items at a competitor’s store, the Whole Foods price stays within 5 percent—between $97 to $103—for the same items. Competitor’s prices are updated in a weekly database, a tool Whole Foods calls Bandwidth. “Brand X has avocados for 79 cents each, and at Whole Foods, they’re $1.29 each,” said Green. “So these are big, meaty avocados. You’re not getting these little ones that are 70 percent seed.” When Whole Foods set its sights on Boise before the 2008 recession, Green hoped he would eventually relocate to help run the store. Years later, with the economy looking up, he’s now busy assembling the store’s staff, which will number approximately 150. He’s shooting to hire 60 to 70 percent of the store’s employees from the Boise area. “As soon as I got the job—and I hadn’t yet posted any positions internally for Whole Foods—I got emails from 80 employees saying, ‘I want to go to that store,’” said Green. “It’s a desirable place to live.” WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

STONE BREWING CO. TOTAL TAP TAKEOVER Greg Koch, head honcho and co-founder of Stone Brewing Co., is bringing his Total Tap Takeover Tour to Boise. It’s your chance to meet the man, the myth, the legend, while you taste through his amazing lineup of brews. Things kick off at the Boise Co-op Wine Shop Thursday, Sept. 13, from 4:30-6 p.m., when Matt Gelsthorpe will offer samples of six rare and vintage Stone brews. No Koch at this one. Things really heat up Friday, Sept. 14, at Bittercreek Ale House. It’s the first of two tap takeovers, with 30-plus Stone kegs for sampling enjoyment. The party starts a 7 p.m. If you can’t make that event, there will be a reprise Saturday, Sept. 15, starting at 6 p.m. at Bier:Thirty in Bown Crossing with 20 Stone taps. Koch will be at both locations. Also on Saturday from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. across Ninth Street from Boise Co-op, you can get a copy of Koch’s book, The Craft of Stone Brewing Co.: Liquid Lore, Epic Recipes and Unabashed Arrogance, as well as sample rare Stone bottles. In the meantime, here’s my take on a special Stone 22-ounce bomber:

STONE 16TH ANNIVERSARY IPA This brew is an orangetinted, bright amber pour with a light tan head that leaves a good lacing. Meyer lemon colors the nose, backed by citrus zest, light hops and a touch of r ye. Beautifully balanced on the palate, this beer has more creamy malt than you might expect, along with fresh citrus and smooth hops that turn nicely bitter on the finish. —David Kirkpatrick

BOISEweekly | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | 29


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HOUSING BW ROOMMATES FREE SEPTEMBER RENT Looking for a female roomie to take over my lease. 4BD apt. 2 blocks from BSU. I am taking care of September rent so you are set! Come check it out. Just text Karrie at 406-360-0880. See pictures of complex & rooms at parkvillageboise.com

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C A RE E RS BW CAREERS MARKETING SPECIALIST The Idaho Small Business Development Center is seeking a Marketing Specialist to manage a website update & to strengthen internal marketing systems. PT temp. wk. avg. 18-30 hrs./wk. approx. 4 mo. Successful candidates will have a strong background in marketing; understand website design & operation; have project management experience; possess excellent communication skills; & be detail oriented. A graphic design background and/or experience are a plus. To apply for the position, please email a cover letter & resume to Loraine Hand, LoraineHand@ boisestate.edu Applications will be accepted through September 21, 2012. Salary range $18- $20/ hr. depending on qualifications.

EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV - Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool.com HELP WANTED!! Extra income! Mailing Brochures from home! Free supplies! Genuine opportunity! No experience required. Start immediately! www.themailingprogram.com $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay. com

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REACH 5 MILLION hip, forwardthinking consumers across the U.S. When you advertise in alternative newspapers, you become part of the local scene and gain access to an audience you won’t reach anywhere else. http://www. altweeklies.com/ads RIVERTOWN NEWSPAPER 4 SALE! If you are looking for a challenge or an escape this could be your ticket. If you look forward to spotty (but increasing) cell phone coverage, never having a concern for traffic and being rewarded for your own work, consider this opportunity. If you have skills to bring, writing, design and a good business sense, as well as some cash, let’s talk. This paper started from scratch is now a 16-24-32 page twice tabloid with 3600 circulation. Purchase the business with print and online presence for $37,500 —just reduced!. Add in world headquarters/home office and 2-bed home with big yard in Idaho river community for an additional $120k. Call 208-469-0747 for more information!

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A REWARDING CAREER that lets you earn money while helping others! Want to be your own boss, set your own hours? Independent Consultants needed for Restaurant.com. Unlimited Earning Potential. No previous sales experience req’d. Tools & full training provided. Learn more at http://sales.restaurant.com/nan. ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300 /day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks needed. 1-800560-8672 for casting times / locations.

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS COMMON GROUND CHORUS Open auditions for all vocal parts. Sept. 10, 17 & 25. For more information visit commongroundboise.org or phone Randy 208794-7839. LOCAL DUO’S NEW COMIC BOOK A local duo has put together a comic book that is titled The Legacy. They are currently in the process of spreading the news of their creation. Please support them in their endeavor to show off great writing and great art.

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NAMPA ART GUILD ARTIST CALL Nampa Art Guild is looking for submissions for its 27th Centennial Juried Art Show. The event runs Oct 24th - Oct 31st at the Nampa Civic Center. The show is open to all artists 18 & older with original artworks created in the last two years. Those works can be in oil, acrylic, watercolor, gouache, pastel, pencil, pen/ink & mixed media. Three-dimensional categories include: original, one-ofa-kind woodcarving, sculpture, & hand-thrown pottery. September 21st is the deadline for digital entries. Please see the show prospectus at www.nampaartguild. org for more information.

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boise’s organic skincare Facials and waxing By appointment only Gift certificates available Éminence organic skincare products 729 N. 15th St. 208 344 5883 remedyskincareboise.com

BW LOST WHITE CAT MISSING All white female cat with pink nose missing from Hillway Dr. toward Highlands Hollow since Tuesday, September 4th. She is friendly but not used to being outdoors. Please contact if you have any information. cyntihaabradbury@ gmail.com

BW CONCERT TICKETS LES MISERABLES TICKETS Two tickets to the upcoming Les Miserables Broadway at the Morrison Center on Sept 20, 2012 at 7:30pm. We won’t be available that night so these must sell!! Asking what we paid ($105 total, $52.50 each) OBO. SEC MID-MZ ROW H SEATS 29 and 30 Please contact me soon TXT 801-842-7755 or e-mail at lcavanaugh81@yahoo.com

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BW COUNSELING COUNSELING Matthew D. Geske LCPC. Treating addiction issues, relationship problems & difficulty with change through individual psychotherapy in a professional & confidential setting. 841-3000. matthewgeske.com PARENTING CLASS: QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS WITH DIRECTION 2-day workshop presented by Lorn Adkins, M.Ed., LCPC, LMFT & Shirley O’Neil, M.Ed., LPC. Friday, September 28th 6:30pm – 8:30pm & Saturday, September 29th 9:00am – 3:00pm., with follow-up groups on Tuesdays, October 9th, 16th & 23rd 7:15pm - 8:30pm. Please call 385-0888 or email jeffersoncounsel@cableone.net to reserve your spot. Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Call Boise Weekly to post your Yard Sale 344-2055.

BW HEALING ARTS ACUTONICS FACIAL This facial consists of a personalized European facial and incorporates sound healing using tuning forks on acupressure points. This vibrating facial will help calm, sooth and balance your body, mind, and spirit. Massage & Body Boutique. 841-9062.

BW MASSAGE A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

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1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

Back in Boise after 5 weeks of training abroad. Tantra Massage by Jamie. 440-4321.

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Embrace the moment with a sensual massage at ULM. Now accepting new clients. ULM 3408377. Hrs. 8:30AM-8PM. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

ESELAN STYLE MASSAGE The long slow t’ai chi-like strokes awaken awareness, and as the tissues open to the warm touch, the contact deepens. A sigh moves through the body as the practitioner responds with integration strokes into related areas. Each session is unique, 1.5 hrs. long, tailored by personal requests, comfort level, phycial tension. Licensed, 15 year practitioner. Derrick Gillikin L.M.T. Office in healing center. 208-9950179. FULL ROOM MASSAGE Deep tissue Swedish. Full body: $50/hr., $40/half hr. Foot Massage: $25/hr., $20/half hr. 7 days a week. 9am-10pm. 626-3454266. 320 N. Orchard St.

RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231.

SPECIALIZING IN PAIN RELIEF

FREE Head & Should Massage with 1 hr. Chinese Reflexology Foot Massage at VIP Massage. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

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www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

PEACH SPA O R I E NTA L M A S S A G E 322-0081 619 N. Orchard. TEX: 1-year-old male Dachshund mix. Good with other dogs. Puppy personality. Confident and spirited. Needs daily exercise. (Kennel 401- #17021496)

ZAMORA: 10-month-old female terrier mix. Playful dog. Rescued from neglect with many other dogs. Social but needs basic training. (Kennel 316- 16994197)

IRIS: 2-year-old female Siamese mix. Amusing expression. Hesitant in new situations but quickly warms up. (Kennel 01- #16980777)

ANNA: 5-year-old female domestic shorthair with a short, stubby tail. Easygoing. Litterbox-trained. Slightly aloof. (Kennel 05- #16817270)

CAMILLE: 2-year-old female Siamese mix. Has extra toes. Very sweet, gentle cat. Would thrive in a quiet home. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 105- #17145185)

JERSEY: 9-year-old female border collie mix. Terrific, active senior. Very attentive. Knows basic commands. Well mannered. (Kennel 311- #17065831)

BW BEAUTY $10 CUT AND DEEP CONDITION Come into see Katie at Plush Hair Lounge, llc and get your $10 hair cut and deep conditioning treatment! Your hair will love you! Call/Text 353.0574 to book an appointment today!

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These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

BRANN: Playful older CHEROKEE: Indepenkitten looking for loving dent declawed male home. Maybe yours? is full of personality. Adopt him today.

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JASMINE: Beautiful social girl is ready to show you a whole new world of love.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | SEPTEMBER 12–18, 2012 | 31


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B O I S E W E E K LY EAT HERE

NYT CROSSWORD | PARDON ZE INTERRUPTION BY JOEL FAGLIANO / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 9 1986 U.S.S.R. launch

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30 ___-Hawley Tariff Act of 1930 31 2012, por ejemplo 32 Promiscuous woman of the Far East? 36 Lets a ground ball go through one’s legs, say 37 Opposite of rises 39 Multitude 40 Announcement early in an inning, maybe 42 Suffix with legal 43 Sprint’s business 47 Part of w.p.m.: Abbr. 49 Like some kisses 51 Fey of “30 Rock” 52 Begin a game of “She loves me, she loves me not …”? 60 Blissful 63 Prefix with sexual 64 Diploma word 65 “The Addams Family” matriarch 66 Salad bar bowlful 68 Mark 69 Unveil, in poems 70 First-class piece of infant’s wear? 73 Word often shortened to one letter in text messages 74 Anchor’s place 76 Two-day trips, sometimes 77 Bargain hunters’ destinations 79 Form of Spanish “to be” 81 Verb for thou 82 Northern force 83 Everest? 86 Like many a forgetful actor 87 ___ Aviv 88 Nietzsche’s “never” 89 Pentathlete, at times 93 MI6 : Britain :: ___ : U.S. 96 Rhythm band instrument 101 Scepter go-with 103 Start of a tournament … or the end of a match? 104 “Laugher” 106 Where busybodies live? 111 Poetic praise

112 Tank top? 114 Ambience factor 115 Midwest native 116 At birth 117 Group that regularly plays a classic dice game? 119 Drop a hip-hop star from the festival lineup? 121 Lake at one end of the Welland Canal 122 “Small Craft on a Milk Sea” musician 123 Related 124 Pulitzer-winning James 125 Pathfinders, e.g. 126 Orch. section 127 Ad Council output, for short 128 Child’s room, often

DOWN 1 Patriots’ group 2 Cochran who defended O. J. 3 Mexican salamander 4 Losing tic-tac-toe line 5 “Now I see” 6 “Kiss of the Dragon” star 7 They might make your mouth water 8 Booker Prize winner Arundhati ___ 9 Taj ___ 10 “Likewise” 11 Spray alternative 12 He said “My reputation, Iago, my reputation!” 13 Soda bottle meas. 14 House work? 15 Scapegoat’s onus 16 “It’s not much of a tail, but I’m sort of attached to it” speaker 17 Shower items, maybe 18 African danger 24 Doo-wop syllable 26 Flabbergast 33 Informative 34 Scene-ending film technique 35 1930s world chess champion Max 38 Attack 41 “Bill & ___ Excellent Adventure” 44 Palindromic auto model

45 Like some garages 46 Salon treatment, informally 48 Fool 50 Torque symbols 53 Losers 54 Ian Fleming’s alma mater 55 Not cheating on 56 Burrito topper 57 Spear 58 Gooey treats 59 “Revolutionary Road” novelist Richard 60 “God willing” 61 1974 hit with a Spanish title 62 Applied, as paint 65 It may have a blinking light 66 Authority 67 Register 71 Ticked (off) 72 First name in cosmetics 75 “The Metaphysics of Morals” author 78 Gave a leg up 80 Musical note part 82 Powers player 84 Moore who wrote “Watchmen” 85 National park through which the Virgin River runs L A S T I T S L A T E

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90 It started around 1100 B.C. 91 1979 #1 hit for Robert John 92 Plucks 93 Wax cylinder 94 Honolulu’s ___ Palace 95 Period of George W. Bush’s presidency 97 Events for those who know the ropes? 98 “Hang on ___” 99 Rinse and dry 100 Come (to) 102 Town squares? 105 Cheerios 107 ___ Day 108 Fancy hotel features 109 Rock and roll, e.g. 110 Ball girl 113 Book before Nehemiah 118 Essen article 119 Fool 120 Basketball highlight, slangily Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

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BW MASSAGE New Client-Your First Massage $20. 322 Lake Lowell Ave. Nampa. Call Betty 283-7830.

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MUSIC BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION BASS LESSONS Pro Bass player offering bass lessons. Techniques, “finding the groove” song analysis. General music theory. Trouble shooting. $20/hr, $15/1/2 hr. I will also negotiate long & short term deals. I am mobile-I come to you. I offer a fun patient teaching method that moves at your pace. Thank you Sandy Sanford 208-392-5379. USED BASS CLARINET FOR SALE Lovely Used Bass Clarinet for sale. This instrument was given to me by my grandmother in high school. $1,500. Willing to negotiate. YCL220 Yamaha model Wooden 3 piece instrument . Contact: Erika: erika@onceuponareality.com

PARENTING CLASS The multi-faceted problems of today’s world seem overwhelming with the tools that we learn from our parents to answer the questions that our children face in the twenty-first century. 2-day workshop presented by Lorn Adkins, M.Ed., LCPC, LMFT & Shirley O’Neil, M.Ed., LPC. Friday, September 28th -Saturday, September 29th with follow-up groups on Tuesdays, October 9th, 16th & 23rd. Please call 385-0888 or email jeffersoncounsel@cableone.net to reserve your spot.

FLEA MARKET SALE The Treasure Garden at 6521 Ustick Road is reopening soon. Looking for Artists, Crafters and Venders. Starting 9-15 Saturdays and Sundays 10 to 6. 10 x 10 Spaces $25 per weekend. Flea Market Style. Reserve your space now! 3440811 t-garden@live.com

ADULT

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

CO N N E CT I O N SE CT I O N BW ENTERTAINMENT HOT GAY & BI LOCALS Browse & Respond FREE! 208-4722200. Use FREE Code 5914, 18+. MEET SEXY SINGLES Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7760. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+.

WHERE SINGLES MEET Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7759, 18+.

BW CHAT LINES ALL MALE HOT GAY HOOKUPS! Call FREE! 208-489-2162 or 800777-8000. www.interactivemale. com 18+. REAL DISCREET, LOCAL CONNECTIONS Call FREE! 208-287-0343 or 800210-1010. www.livelinks.com 18+.

BW KISSES SWEET PEACHES Kisses to the guys at the Fruit Stand on W. State St. Not only are they the nicest guys, but the local peaches from Emmett are perfectly delicious!

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*REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL! * Get a 4-Room All-Digital Satellite system installed for FREE and programming starting at $19.99/ mo. FREE HD/DVR upgrade for new callers, CALL NOW. 1-800925-7945.

EMF, RF Testing & Consulting. Assess the safety of your home or office for dangerous electromagnetic fields. Protect your health & well being! Rebecca Saxon, RN, BSN, MA 703-9784. www.emfhealth.net

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GETTING PAROLE IN IDAHO IS NOT EASY If you have a family member or friend who is trying, there are things they can & must do to help their cause. Contact Maloney Law on our 24 hr. line 208-392-5366 for a free consultation. Assistance available in parole & probation violations also. GRAPHICS BY TONI Graphic artist specializing in music CD layout & design. 15 yrs. experience. Very reasonable rates. Check out samples of my work on my web site “Graphics by Toni”. Call 208-922-7192. LEARN TO PLAY THE BAGPIPES The Boise Highlanders will be starting their annual Piping School in October. Lesson will run from October-May. For information on registering for lessons, please contact Ron or Joyce Lopez at 362-3144 or email jebl@mindspring.com

QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. SOFAS AND LOVE SEAT Beautiful Sofas (2) & loveseat (1). In wonderful condition. Beige micro fiber only 3 yrs. old. Must sell soon! $500 for all or OBO. Please contact Greta at 208-440-9029.

CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Debra Urizar Deputy Clerk Pub. September 5, 12, 19 & 26, 2012.

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A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on October 2, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: July 25, 2012. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA J. URIZAR Deputy Clerk IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Zachary Leonard Sodenkamp Case no. CV NC 1214599 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Zachary Leonard Sodenkamp, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Adrianna Elaine Sodenkamp. The reason for the change in name is: personal. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on October 16, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Aug. 21, 2012.

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BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Shane Michael Twiddy Case no. CV NC 1210820 ANOTHER NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Amended Petition to change the name of Shane Michael Twiddy, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Shane Michael Jiron. The reason for the change in name is: because my step-parent raised me.

All decor at Kahula’s Kloset. Consign, kids, adults, home furnishings, arts & crafts. Easy parking. Clean, quality merchandise. 1726 W. Main. 570-9740. PATIO FURNITURE FOR SALE 2 adorable patio chairs are available for $60 for the set. These chairs have a unique style & look fantastic as patio furniture or eclectic living room furniture. These pieces were originally purchased from the prop warehouse at Universal Studios and were featured in dozens of films & TV shows. Please email erika@onceuponareality.com if interested. Pricing is negotiable.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY COMMUNITY

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ARIES (March 21-April 19): You will never be able to actually gaze upon your own face. You may, of course, see a reasonable likeness of it in mirrors and photos. But the real thing will always be forever invisible to you. I think that’s an apt symbol for how hard it is to get a totally objective view of your own soul. No matter how sincere you may be in your efforts to see yourself clearly, there will always be fuzziness, misapprehensions and ignorance. Having said that, I want you to know that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to see yourself better than ever before. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I have four related pieces of advice for you, Taurus: 1. The most reliable way to beat the system is to build your own more interesting system. 2. The most likely way to beat your competitors is not to fight them, but rather to ignore them and compete only against yourself. 3. To escape the numbing effects of an outworn tradition, you could create a fresh tradition that makes you excited to get out of bed in the morning. 4. If you have a problem that is not only impossible to solve but also boring, find yourself a fascinating new problem that will render the old problem irrelevant. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Dear Doctor of Love: My heart is itchy. I’m totally serious. I’m not talking about some phantom tingle on the skin of my chest. What I mean is that the prickling sensation originates in the throbbing organ inside of me. Is this even possible? Have you heard of such a crazy thing? Could it be some astrological phenomenon? What should I do? —Itchy-Hearted Gemini.” Dear Gemini: I suspect that it’s not just you, but many Geminis who are experiencing symptoms. From what I can tell, you have a lot of trapped feelings in your heart that need to be identified and dealt with. CANCER (June 21-July 22): If you make a conscious decision to combine plaids with stripes or checks with floral patterns or reddish-purples with greenishoranges, I will wholeheartedly approve. If, on the other hand, you absent-mindedly create combinations like that, doing so because you’re oblivious or lazy, I will soundly disapprove. The same holds true about any hodgepodge, hybrid or mishmash you generate, Cancerian. It’ll receive cosmic blessings if you do it with flair and purpose but not if it’s the result of being inattentive and careless. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Should we boycott the writing of Edgar Allan Poe because he married his 13-year-old cousin when he was 26? Should anti-drug crusaders stop using their iPhones when

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they find out that Steve Jobs said that “doing LSD was one of the two or three most important things I have done in my life?” Should we stop praising the work of Martin Luther King Jr. because he engaged in extramarital affairs? Those are the kinds of questions I suspect you’ll have to deal with in the coming days, Leo. I encourage you to avoid having knee-jerk reactions. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Arthur Turner, a Virgo reader from Austin, Texas, is upset with my recent horoscopes. In his email, he wrote the following: “You’re making me mad with your predictions of non-stop positivity, Brezsny. I need more dirt and grit and muck. I’ve got to have some misery and decay to motivate me. So just please shut up with your excess projections of good times. They’re bringing me down.” Here’s my response to him and to any other Virgo who feels like him: I’m afraid you’re scheduled to endure even more encounters with cosmic benevolence in the coming week. If these blessings feel oppressive, try to change your attitude about them. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The humorous science journal Annals of Improbable Research published a paper entitled “The Effects of Peanut Butter on the Rotation of the Earth.” Signed by 198 Ph.D. physicists, it came to this conclusion: “So far as we can determine, peanut butter has no effect on the rotation of the Earth.” If possible, Libra, I suggest you summon a comparable amount of high-powered expertise for your own purposes. But please make sure that those purposes are weightier than the question of peanut butter’s role on our planet’s movements. Round up the best help you can, yes. Call in all the favors you’re owed and be aggressive in seeking out brilliant support but only for a truly important cause. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Sunday, Sept. 16, is the first day of Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year. So begins 10 days of repentance. Whether or not you’re Jewish, you are entering an astrological phase when taking stock of yourself would be a brilliant move. That’s why I invite you to try the following self-inventory, borrowed from the Jewish organization Chadeish Yameinu. 1. What would you like to leave behind from the past 12 months? 2. What has prevented you from living up to your highest standards and being your very best self? 3. What would you love to bring with you into the next 12 months? 4. Who served as a teacher for you in the past year? 5. Were you a teacher for anyone? 6. Is there anyone you need to forgive? 7. How will you go about forgiving?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If I’m accurately interpreting the omens, the coming months will be a soulful feast in which every day will bring you a shimmering revelation about the nature of your soul’s code and how best to activate it. Reasons for grateful amazement will flow so freely that you may come to feel that miracles are routine. And get this: In your dreams, Cinderella and Sleeping Beauty will get married, win the lottery and devote their fortune to fostering your spiritual education until you are irrevocably enlightened. (I confess there’s a slight chance I’m misinterpreting the signs, and everything I described will be true for only a week or so, not months.) CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): A reader named Marissa begged me to insert a secret message into the Capricorn horoscope. She wanted me to influence Jergen, a guy she has a crush on, to open his eyes and see how great she is. I told her I wouldn’t. Why? I never try to manipulate people into doing things that aren’t in alignment with their own desires. For another, I faithfully report on my understanding of the tides of fate and refuse to just make stuff up. I urge you to have that kind of integrity, Capricorn. I suspect you may soon be invited or coaxed to engage in what amounts to some tainted behavior. Don’t do it. Make an extra effort to be incorruptible. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The far away, the very far, the farthest, I have found only in my own blood,” said poet Antonio Porchia. Let’s make that thought your keynote, Aquarius. Your assignment will be to search for what’s most exotic and unknown, but only in the privacy of your own heart, not out in the great wide world. For now at least, the inner realm is the location of the laboratory where the most useful experiments will unfold. Borrowing from novelist Carole Maso, I leave you with this: “Make love to the remoteness in yourself.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): It would be an excellent time for you to elope, even if you do so with the person to whom you’re already mated. You might also consider the possibility of wearing a wedding dress everywhere you wander, even if there is no marriage ceremony in your immediate future, and even if you’re a man. And if neither of those ideas appeals to you, please at least do something that will symbolize your intention to focus on intimacy with an intensified sense of purpose. Fling rice at yourself. Seek out someone who’ll give you lessons in how to listen like an empathetic genius. Compose and recite vows in which you pledge to become an utterly irresistible and reliable ally.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 12