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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 21, ISSUE 06 AUGUST 1–7, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! INSIDE

WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE Five ways to spend a day in Sun Valley NEWS 8

EARTHQUAKE Natural gas drillers plan to shake Payette County 1ST THURSDAY 19

ART ATTACK Plan your route with a map and guide

FOOD 32

SOME LIKE IT COLD Soups that don’t steam

“Gun control talk is cheap. A mental-health care system that works would be expensive.”

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BW STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporter: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Interns: Tabitha Bower, Christina Marfice, Amy Merrill Contributing Writers: Jaclyn Brandt, Bill Cope, Randy King, Andrew Mentzer, Ted Rall, Catie Young Advertising Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Karen Corn, Karen@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Brenda Stroud, Brenda@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales Classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Jennie Jorgenesen, Jennie@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, James Lloyd, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. Editorial Deadline: Thursday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. Boise weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

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NOTE INTERNS: WE WANT YOU A few months back, I heard News Editor George Prentice tell a group of journalism students at Boise State that an internship is a great way to know what you don’t want to do for a living. And while he got a laugh out of the room, he wasn’t kidding. I thought back to my own internship experiences in college and realized he was right. I spent a semester as a teacher’s aid in an English class and a semester as an assistant to a grant writer at a local educational museum. Guess what I never want to do for a living: teach and/ or write grants. Three times a year, we solicit internship applications from undergrads who want to test-drive journalism. I know a few have left grateful for their experience at Boise Weekly but decidedly turned off from journalism. But I know it’s gone completely the other direction for most. On July 30, the fall application process opened for prospective interns. Applicants must be college students seeking credit and they must commit to working August through December. This isn’t your typical coffee-fetching, data-entry, filing-busy-work internship. We expect you to report, write, produce slideshows and video reports, and attend editorial meetings. If we do our job right, when students complete their internship with Boise Weekly, they’ll have a portfolio of print and digital clips showing off their blogging skills, as well as their writing skills on the printed page. If you’ve never read a Boise Weekly, don’t even bother to apply. If swearing offends you, BW ain’t for you. If you’re all business and no fun, might we suggest you look elsewhere. If you’re fearless, know what a dangling modifier is and how to edit it, want a trial-by-fire kind of internship experience but want to have a little fun, we’re your internship destination. To be considered send a resume and a 500-word nonfiction writing sample (published or not) to editor@boiseweekly.com before 5 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 9. Interviews will be conducted Monday, Aug. 13, through Thursday, Aug. 16. The final word for this week: go forth and vote. Best of Boise voting is under way at boiseweekly.com. Click on the banner under the nav bar to get to the online ballot. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Ben Wilson TITLE: Customary Greeting MEDIUM: Mixed media on matte board ARTIST STATEMENT: This is the sixth installment in a series titled Feelings. The rest of the series and much more are currently on exhibit at the Basement Gallery through Saturday, Sept. 8. Find more details at basementgalleryboise.com and benwilsonart.blogspot.com.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 3


WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. PATR IC K S W EENEY

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE BILL COPE TED RALL NEWS Natural gas drilling company wants to shake Payette County

RIDING THE WAVE Got four minutes? Check out a handful of videos shot at the new River Recreation Park—catch the flips, turns, a few misses and one pretty spunky surfer.

A SIGN OF THE TIMES Ralph Smeed may have passed on, but his billboard is still hard at work in Caldwell. A recent message compares President Barack Obama to alleged Colorado theater shooter James Holmes. Get the story at Citydesk.

JUST KIDDING, GLOBAL WARMING IS REAL One of the most-outspoken climatechange skeptics—one whose work is funded by the notorious climate change-denying billionaire Koch brothers—recently published a very public reversal in an op-ed in The New York Times. Best –of–

BOISE

VOTE, DAMNIT

Voting is happening this very second at boiseweekly. com for the city’s only Best of Boise contest. Vote for your favorite restaurant, shoe store, grocery store, or even your favorite politician. Don’t bitch if you don’t vote.

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10 Barrel Brewing vs. Idaho liquor laws CITIZEN BW PICKS FIND 8 DAYS OUT SUDOKU FIRST THURSDAY Ben Wilson heads to the Basement FIRST THURSDAY LISTINGS Map and guide NOISE Punk rock and children’s music find a home in McCall MUSIC GUIDE ARTS Empty Boat Theatre Company heads to the tunnels SCREEN Take this Waltz REC Fishing for cats FOOD Summer’s cold soups BEER GUZZLER CLASSIFIEDS NYT CROSSWORD FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 5


OPINION/BILL COPE

SHOT IN THE DARK Yet another outbreak of gun love I still have enough faith in the humaneness of the average human to trust that when breaking news starts with “There’s been a shooting,” most of us experience a familiar clench in our essence—an instinctual tremor which traces back to the terror in our apemen ancestors’ hearts upon hearing the snarl of a leopard in the night as it carries away the young. For a day or two after each unthinkable episode, there is the impression that we are as close to a communal empathy as we ever get anymore. We are struck with nothing to say beyond, “How horrible ... how awful ... those poor people,” but we keep to ourselves because we assume everyone is thinking the same thoughts. But do we all think and feel the same after each event? Is everyone’s first thought “Those poor people”? What follows is a conversation which may or may not have taken place in the halls of the National Rifle Association on the morning after the midnight carnage in Colorado. I don’t insist this conversation really happened. But then, again, I don’t pretend that something close to it couldn’t possibly have taken place. The NRA has shown many times and in many ways it is capable of a vulgarity far more profound than this exchange of imaginary dialogue. U “Sir, have you seen any news yet?” “Why?” “There’s been another shooting. They’re still counting the dead.” “Didn’t you get my email about this sort of thing?” “Um, which email?” “Where I said that we would no longer use the word ‘shooting.’ I’ve decided it puts too much emphasis on the fact there’s a firearm involved.” “Then what are we supposed to call them, sir?” “‘People-killing-people events,’ that’s what. If there are more than two or three people who get killed, we call it a ‘mass people-killing-people event.’ Now, we have to move quickly on this. First, you need to get out a press release pronto. Say something like, ‘It would be disrespectful and untimely to suggest this tragedy is an opportunity to debate any further erosion of our Second Amendment rights … blah blah blah.’ You know. The usual. And get on the horn to our flunkies in Congress and remind them that if they find themselves in front of a camera to never refer to this as a ‘shooting.’ Understand?” “But sir, won’t the media be calling it a ‘shooting?’” “Of course they will. We count on that. It’s our opening. Anytime some reporter or commentator says ‘shooting’ or ‘gun violence’ or ‘stricter regulations’ we jump

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in and announce, ‘We’d like to remind the liberals who control the mainstream media that guns don’t kill people. People kill people. Whatsmore, it is usually a gun that stops people from killing people. And that’s why this organization continues on ... to protect the God-given right of people to own whatever sort of gun it takes to stop people who are killing people.’ Write that down for me, would you? I’d like to say it just that way when Fox News asks me for a comment. And one more thing ... see if you can get one or two of our congressional toads to declare this wouldn’t have happened if somebody in the crowd had been carrying a gun.” “Sir, has that ever actually happened?” “Has what happened?” “Where somebody with a gun ... somebody other than a cop, I mean ... stopped a mass shooting ... uh, pardon me. I mean, stopped a ‘mass people killing people event.’” “What does that have to do with it?” “Sir, gun laws are the weakest they’ve been in a century, especially in places like Colorado, thanks to our efforts. More people than ever are carrying guns. Yet not once has there been a case of a random gun owner stopping one of these atrocities.” “That’s just bad luck, isn’t it? Trust me, if we scare enough citizens into buying a gun, and if we bully enough politicians into relaxing the laws even more, and if we convince enough hero wannabes into believing they could be the one to blow away the next lunatic if they are in the right place at the right time with the right weapon, then the odds are with us. There is no reason to think these people-killing-people events are going to end, so it’s only a matter of time until one of them comes out the way we wish it would. We just need to do our job and it will eventually turn out our way.” “Sir, to be honest, I’m losing track of what our job is.” “To sell guns. Do I need to send out another memo?” “But aren’t we selling those guns to the lunatics, too? Aren’t we nurturing the very evil we claim to be the solution to?” U Ah, but I must end this imaginary conversation here, before Sir has a chance to answer. Further, I repudiate the whole exchange as too wildly unrealistic to be considered seriously. No, I still believe such a conversation may well have occurred within the NRA after the Aurora incident—or the Tucson incident, or the Virginia Tech incident—but it would hinge on one of the participants having a functioning conscience. And I cannot stretch my imagination far enough to imagine that any employee of today’s NRA could possibly have any conscience left. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


TED RALL/OPINION

TALK IS CHEAP A sane mental-health system is not It is, unfortunately, necessary to state the obvious after America’s latest mass shooting in Colorado. We don’t know why James Holmes, the 24-year-old suspect, shot up that movie theater. We don’t know his mental state. Given the legal presumption of innocence, we shouldn’t write with certainty that it was him. Given how the 24-hour news cycle has expanded the American media’s love of speculation, however, the Batman Bloodbath became fodder for political policy prescriptions the moment the first round left the chamber. We saw it after Columbine, when conservatives blamed goth, video games and the so-called “trenchcoat mafia.” Liberals (me included) set their sights on bullying jocks. Both sides were wrong—Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold were probably mentally ill—yet the political debate ultimately prompted schools to adopt increased security measures and zero-tolerance policies against bullying. State legislatures passed minor gun-control laws. The gun-control debate took center stage after student Seung-Hui Cho shot 32 people at Virginia Tech in 2007. Liberals said people with a history of mental-health issues shouldn’t be able to buy guns. Arguing the victims would have been able to defend themselves, right-wingers pushed to allow students to carry weapons on campuses. Setting aside the caveat that we still don’t know why it happened, the big guns/crazy young white guy dynamic leads to two obvious policy prescriptions: gun control and improving access to mental-health care. Post-Aurora, we’re seeing a lot of the former but relatively few of the latter. David Brooks, a conservative columnist at The New

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York Times, is an interesting exception. “These killers are primarily the product of psychological derangements, not sociological ones,” Brooks wrote. “The best way to prevent killing sprees is with relationships—when one person notices that a relative or neighbor is going off the rails and gets that person treatment before the barbarism takes control. But there also has to be a more aggressive system of treatment options, especially for men in their 20s.” But not everyone has a relative or a concerned neighbor. Without a real commitment to treating mental illness, they’re empty words. A 2008 study found that 6 percent of Americans suffer from serious mental illnesses, which resulted in an estimated economic loss of $200 billion annually in lost earnings. Sixty percent of people with mental illness seek no treatment. Americans with limited funds must make do with a hodgepodge of options when they feel themselves going off the rails: suicide prevention hot lines, support groups, and absurdly low allocations of shrink visits under group insurance plans. Along with vision and dental, mental health is an ugly stepsister of the frayed health-care infrastructure. If it isn’t overturned by a Romney administration, Barack Obama’s Affordable Care Act will help make “mental health parity,” forcing insurers to treat mental illness at the same priority level as physical ailments. Gun control talk is cheap. A mental-health care system that works would be expensive. Would either prevent the next shooting spree? Maybe. Like zero tolerance for bullying, they might be a good idea no matter what—but we won’t be any closer to a solution.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 7


CITYDESK/NEWS NEWS

GOOD VIBRATIONS? Geologists invoke babies, dynamite and tremors in new gas exploration effort GEORGE PRENTICE The average ďŹ ne in Boise has held steady at $120.

BOISE TRAFFIC CITATIONS DROP, SO DO REVENUES Either Boiseans have quickly become some of the safest drivers in the nation or Boise police ofďŹ cers have stopped handing out as many trafďŹ c citations—maybe a little of both. As a result, during Fiscal Year 2011, the City of Boise saw a 15 percent decline in ďŹ ne collections, resulting in a revenue shortfall of approximately $320,000. In a cash strapped economy, the sudden drop in trafďŹ c ďŹ ne revenues triggered an analysis from the City of Boise’s OfďŹ ce of Internal Audit. The review was deďŹ ned by the period of October 2008 through January 2012. In particular, auditors drilled into the number of citations handed out by Boise Police Department and subsequent court actions. Among the ďŹ ndings in the audit: UĂŠ Ă›iĂ€>}iĂŠÂ“ÂœÂ˜ĂŒÂ…Â?ÞÊw˜iĂŠĂ€iĂ›iÂ˜Ă•iĂƒĂŠÂ…>Ă›iĂŠ declined from an average of $173,572 per month in FY 2010 to an average of $125,957 per month for the ďŹ rst four months of FY 2012, a 19 percent drop. UĂŠ /Â…iĂŠÂ˜Ă•Â“LiĂ€ĂŠÂœvĂŠVÂˆĂŒ>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂƒĂŠÂ…>˜`i`ĂŠÂœĂ•ĂŒĂŠLÞÊ BPD between October 2008 and January 2012 dropped 22 percent. UĂŠ ĂŠĂ€iĂ›ÂˆiĂœĂŠÂœvĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠÂœĂ•Ă€ĂŒÂ…ĂŠĂ•`ˆVˆ>Â?ĂŠ ÂˆĂƒĂŒĂ€ÂˆVĂŒĂŠ Court, encompassing Ada, Boise, Elmore and Valley counties, indicated a 29 percent drop in DUI citations, a 15 percent drop in motor vehicle violations, and a 13 percent drop in driving without privileges citations. UĂŠ /Â…iĂŠ>Ă›iĂ€>}iĂŠw˜iĂŠÂŤiÀÊ * ĂŠVÂˆĂŒ>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂœ>ĂƒĂŠ $120, holding steady with recent history. The report, authored by Steven Rehn, Boise’s director of Internal Audit, points to what he called a primary driver behind the shrinking court ďŹ ne revenues: fewer citations being handed out by BPD. In fact, during FY 2011, citations dropped by as many as 1,000 per month. “It is important to note that, during this time period, the number of police ofďŹ cers deployed primarily to duties involving the issuance of citations dropped from a high of 244 ofďŹ cers [in December 2009] to a low of 231 [in December 2011], representing a 5 percent reduction,â€? wrote Rehn in his memo to city ofďŹ cials. “The total number of ofďŹ cers with citation-writing authority fell during this period from 296 to 285-—a 3.72 percent reduction.â€? Rehn also concluded that the ďŹ ne amounts, a changing mix of the population or even performance from third-party collectors, were signiďŹ cant factors in the decline. Simply put, fewer ofďŹ cers are handing out fewer tickets, generating less revenue. —George Prentice

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Images of fetuses have appeared in the oddest of Idaho locales in 2012. Four months after anti-abortion activists shocked more than a few Statehouse pundits by performing a live ultrasound demonstration, an audience of Idaho farmers and ranchers witnessed larger-than-life images of fetuses July 25 in an equally surreal backdrop: a presentation on natural gas exploration. “It’s like a sonogram,â€? said engineer Brent McNeill, standing behind a slide projector beaming an image of a fully-developed fetus alongside a seismic image of the Earth’s crust. “The picture of this unborn baby uses the same type of seismogram as we use in creating the 3D images of the subsurface,â€? he said. “We record sound waves the same way.â€? For more than an hour, Payette County landowners heard about babies, sound waves and even explosives, all designed to lead speculators through the tricky thicket of drilling for gas in Idaho—an effort that has led to a number of headlines over the last three years. Headlines the newest gas speculators want to forget. In fact, the name Bridge Resources, the Canadian-based company that ran into ďŹ nancial trouble at the height of its drilling operations (BW, News, “Bridge Under Troubled Waters,â€? Oct. 5, 2011), wasn’t uttered once during the July 25 presentation. “We’re here to talk about seismic operations,â€? said project manager Rod McLeod. “We’re not going to talk about ‌ â€? After an awkwardly long pause, McLeod never ďŹ nishing his sentence. McLeod, of Louisiana-based Cajun Exploration, and McNeill, of Texasbased Gulf Coast Permits, have set up shop in Payette, hoping to get under way with seismic operations by the third week of August. But the ďŹ rst step, they said, was to bring their earthshaking story to the community via a town hall meeting in the Payette High School auditorium, which doesn’t see much activity this time of year. But dozens of landowners, engineers and at least one lawmaker— Midvale Republican Rep. Judy Boyle, a proponent of gas exploration—showed up on the blisteringly hot evening. The vibration created is

the equivalent of a garbage truck driving by, said McLeod. But a lot more than garbage trucks will be involved in the two-month operation during which planners will shell out more than $300,000 in payments to landowners for the right to shake their ground. McLeod wouldn’t say how many individual deals he had struck with landowners but did conďŹ rm to BW that he was in the process of striking a ďŹ nal deal with one last holdout. “This project will be spread out over 50 square miles, more than 31,000 acres,â€? said McNeill. “But our intention is to leave as small a footprint as possible on your ďŹ elds.â€? McNeill then described a process involving something called “geophones,â€? long, black cables attached to 12 metal stakes driven into the ground. When bunched together, the cables resemble a tangle of Christmas tree lights. A separate set of seismic cables, crisscrossing the geophone cables, send the sound waves into the Earth’s crust. The cables are fed the seismic waves from a “vibe truck,â€? about the size of a ďŹ re engine, which drops 3- by 6-foot metal pads to the ground that shake, or vibroseis, the Earth.

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“The vibroseising will last approximately 10 seconds. We’ll pause for three seconds and then start shaking again,â€? said McNeill. “We probably won’t run these in intervals more than three minutes each.â€? The sequential sound waves shake the ground and dart through the Earth’s crust, each wave bouncing back when it hits a formation. The images are then transmitted to a separate receiver truck, parked on an elevated parcel of land and connected to an antenna similar to a radio tower. The receiver truck collects the signals, creating the sonogramlike images. “Some waves could go down to limestone and bounce back. A few more sound waves go down to rock formations and bounce back,â€? said David Hawk. Hawk was introduced to the town hall simply as a geologist. But the former director of energy for the J.R. Simplot Company was also a vice president of several exploration companies and contributed to much of Idaho’s rule-making process, crafting the recently enacted regulations governing the oil and gas industry. “There’s a big difference between twodimensional seismic imaging and the new three-dimensional surveys,â€? said Hawk. “With 2D technology, we used to have success with one out of every nine wells. Using 3D, we could see success with four out of nine wells.â€? But Hawk was quick to caution against over exuberance. “Does all of this mean 3D guarantees that we’ll ďŹ nd gas? No,â€? said Hawk. “This imaging will not say, ‘Drill here.’ What it will say is, ‘There’s an opportunity here.’â€? Hawk also insisted that the collected data will be quite secret—unavailable to the media, the public or the government, without a direct order or subpoena. “Maybe it will be available to purchase at some point in the future,â€? said Hawk. The vibrations aren’t foolproof, and the seismic UND

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NEWS GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

Geophone listening devices, attached to long cables, will detect sound waves sent through the ground by a separate set of seismic cables, crisscrossing each other over 50 square miles.

team also unveiled a Plan B to capture subsurface images, just in case the sonograms don’t produce a clear picture. “My guess is that 85 percent will be vibroseised,” said McLeod. “We’ll dynamite the rest.” Anyone who may have nodded off during the presentation quickly snapped awake when McLeod and McNeill began describing an explosive scenario where “shot holes,” 4 inches in diameter and 40 feet deep, will be drilled and loaded with dynamite. “You’ll feel a thump,” said McLeod. “Each charge is approximately 2.2 pounds.” Explosives and earth-shaking equipment resulted in more than a few questions, primarily regarding safety, from the landowners. “Don’t worry, the dynamite can’t be set off by a fire or anything else. It can only be set off electronically,” said McNeill. When pressed on a hypothetical scenario in which the dynamite could not even detonate electronically, McLeod conceded that unused dynamite would “probably dissolve into the ground.” “But if we encountered a series of problems with the detonations, we would probably shut down temporarily and re-drill the holes,” said McLeod. Thumping aside, farmers wanted a clearer idea of what kind of vibrations they and their livestock would be feeling from the seismic waves generated through the geophone cables. “If the Earth moves more than half-an-inch per second, that’s usually enough to break up some drywall,” said McNeill. “Our cut-off point is one-third of an inch per second.” McNeill said his crews would not be hauling much of their seismic equipment in and out of Payette farmland with any regularity. “The major equipment will be dropped in by helicopter and then flown out when we’re done,” said McNeill. “You’ll be seeing our helicopter quite a bit instead of us driving all over the place.” McNeill also insisted that the seismic operations would be what he called “a safe disWWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

tance away” from public and private utilities. “For example, we’ll be a minimum of 300 feet away from dams and water wells, 150 feet away from roads and power lines, and 100 feet away from telephone lines,” he said. Lyla Scheihing had both personal and public concerns. She’s not only a Payette County Planning and Zoning commissioner but also negotiated a personal lease for possible gas exploration on her property. “What if there was any crop damage during the seismic operation?” asked Scheihing. “I have never, ever been on a job where something damaged wasn’t paid for,” answered McNeill. Safety concerns aside, Richard Brown, president of Snake River Oil and Gas, was upbeat. Brown’s company has signed scores of leases with Payette County landowners in hopes of drilling for gas once his team completes its 3D imaging. “We want people to smile about this, not grimace,” said Brown. “This is a very risky business for us but we’re very excited. We’re as passionate about this as anything we’ve ever done.” McNeill assured landowners that the seismic operation would bring a major financial shot-in-the-arm to Payette County. “We’re guessing that $596,355 will be pumped into your local economy,” he said. “Our crew members will probably spend $10,000 a week in your town.” McLeod said approximately 100 jobs would be generated by the eight-week operation but things can’t get under way until the Idaho Department of Lands completes the appropriate paperwork. “We’ve received some of the application but not the whole thing,” said Eric Wilson, IDOL mineral programs manager. “The permits will need to be in place before they begin their shoot.” “You mean before they begin their vibroseising,” said Hawk. “Oh, yes, vibroseising,” said a corrected Wilson.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 9


NEWS

NOT QUITE READY TO ROLL OUT THE BARREL 10 Barrel Brewing runs into Idaho’s complex license rules ANDREW CRISP In January, Bend, Ore.-based 10 Barrel Brewing Company tapped plans for a downtown Boise satellite, originally slated for a summer opening, to become the first American craft brewery of its size to attempt an expansion into another state. But 10 Barrel, which has already pushed its opening back once, has run into a major snag. “We have a situation that’s revolving around getting a license for our retail establishment,” coowner Garrett Wales told Boise Weekly. 10 Barrel wants to continue shipping its Bend-brewed beer into Idaho while operating a Boise brewpub, but Idaho law says that business model is a no-go. “We’re optimistically working toward a solution,” said Wales. The non-starter involves the part of Idaho State Code related to alcohol sellers, distributors and breweries. 10 Barrel, as an out-ofstate company, currently holds a certificate of approval from Idaho’s Alcohol Beverage Control, a license to bring beer into the state. However, 10 Barrel has also signed a lease for 803 W. Bannock St., for a small brewing operation with food, beer sales and tastings. “The brewery wouldn’t be the problem,” said Idaho State Police Lt. Robert Clements, ABC’s chief. “[The problem is] that they have the retail license with the brewery.” The retail license would allow sales of 10 Barrel products, such as a new black ale and IPA, on-site. But a Boise brewpub, according to Clements, could only sell Idaho-made beer. Wales insists that wouldn’t be enough for his business. “The brewhouse that we have going in [Boise] isn’t big enough to support the pub entirely,” he said. “It’s critical to be able to bring that beer across state lines.” But Clements explained that Idaho maintains what it calls “a three-tiered system where we keep the manufacturer, retailer and distributor separate.” The three-tiered system was designed to keep any tier from dominating the market: breweries and distilleries make alcohol, middlemen (wholesalers) distribute it and retailers sell it.

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“That’s been modified by the brewpub system,” said local attorney Bill Roden, former head of the Idaho State Wholesalers and Distributors Association. But the current system, as written, would still place 10 Barrel in all three tiers. “There’s nothing to prevent a brewery from being its own distributor,” said Roden. “I think what’s happening is it’s getting mixed up in this brewpub situation.” The laws were implemented after Prohibition was repealed, said Clements. “Breweries used to have exclusive control over the retailers and how they could control the product,” he said. The three-tiered system, Clements said, was designed to keep breweries from low-balling their prices through their own retailers. “It’s unlawful for any brewer to have any financial interest in any licensed retailer’s business,” said Clements. “[10 Barrel] can have a certificate of approval like they’re doing and then bring in their product for a distributor or wholesaler, who would then sell it to the [Boise] establishment.” But while it hammers out the licensing issue, 10 Barrel has already signed a 15-year lease for its Bannock Street location. Ironically, the State of Idaho—as managed by the

Idaho Department of Lands—will be the brewpub’s landlord. According to 10 Barrel’s Facebook page, opening day has been set back several months. “It really has to do with a technicality in the statute, something we’ve been working on diligently,” said Wales. The same statute created trouble for Fred Colby, co-founder and co-owner of Laughing Dog Brewing Company in Ponderay. During the 2012 legislative session, Colby wanted to partner with Post Falls brewer Selkirk Abbey, but was limited to having financial interest in one brewery. “You could own two breweries, but neither one of them could have a tap room,” said Colby. “It was against the law to have separate wholesale licenses and retail licenses on different breweries.” But the law’s revision now allows Idaho microbrewers to have an interest in one other operation. “I had a bit of opposition on this from the Idaho Distributors and Wholesalers,” said Colby. “Rather than fight them, I worked with them, and said, ‘Tell me how you would be OK with this change.’” Colby said changing Idaho statute was difficult but he was guided by Dover Republican Rep. George Eskridge, Priest Lake Republican Rep. Eric Anderson and Sandpoint Republican Sen. Shawn Keough. Wales said Oregon law has seen changes of its own in the past few years. “In Oregon, we’ve continued to update the code to increase the access of craft brewers and promoting craft breweries, without stripping the necessity of the distributors.” said Wales. Though Clements said Idaho’s three-tier system was devised to protect price points and public safety, he conceded that it’s causing problems for some in the craft brewing community. “As far as changing the laws, [Oregon] is probably four or 10 years ahead of Idaho,” said Wales. For now, 10 Barrel continues talking with ABC about a solution. Meanwhile, its license to sell beer at a retail location has yet to be approved. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


CITIZEN

ZACHARY HAUGE IACI’s new political director loves the action GEORGE PRENTICE

Do politics run in your bloodline? Not exactly. My dad teaches political philosophy and history, but I had zero interest in politics growing up. I was more into sports. I was pretty good at math, so I went to the University of Idaho to be an accountant. But after two years, I realized that was the exact opposite of what I wanted to do for a living. So I changed my major to communications. But you took a side step in 2006. By my fourth year in school, I decided I wanted to go into politics. The Idaho Republican Party was looking for somebody to run their front office. I did that for four weeks, and then I quickly got offered the opportunity to run State Controller Donna Jones’ re-election campaign. I accelerated much quicker in politics than I ever expected.

the governor, lieutenant governor and several state legislative races. In 2010, I went to work full-time to manage Rep. Mike Simpson’s campaign. You stayed on in that position after the 2010 election. How soon after the vote does a candidate need to begin working on his or her next campaign? It’s a year-round effort if you want to be successful. And there’s a benefit to that; you’re constantly communicating with constituents.

Do you know how Jones is doing? (Jones was critically injured in a May 25 car crash.) She’s recovering at home now. I think it took everyone a while to truly understand how serious her accident was.

When you were hired to be the organization’s new political director, what did IACI President Alex LaBeau tell you the group was looking for? IACI has done quite a bit with its political action committee, the Idaho Prosperity Fund. They want to take it to the next level: recruiting candidates, finding businessfriendly candidates on both sides of the aisle in national races, state races and even local elections.

When you managed Jones’ campaign in 2006, were you a fish out of water? Absolutely, but we were successful. Soon after, I got involved in the ballot initiative to establish the College of Western Idaho. Later, through a company called Meridian Resources, I managed fundraising for campaigns for

How do you handicap the 2012 races for the Idaho House and Senate? There’s a lot of opportunity. In the Senate, up to a third of the body is new. And three or four chairmanships are going to be up for grabs. I’m sure you’ve read that House leadership is in a bit of turmoil.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Zachary Hauge doesn’t like to lose; he played every sport imaginable growing up. He’s also pretty good at crunching numbers; he began college as an accounting major. But soon enough, his two passions collided and he concluded that he wanted to help manage political campaigns. With his taste for winning still very much alive, Hauge rarely backs losers. He assisted the campaigns of Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter, Lt. Gov. Brad Little and State Controller Donna Jones, as well as running the year-round campaign office for Rep. Mike Simpson—all Republicans. On Wednesday, Aug. 1, Hauge began running an even bigger campaign, in a new position as political director for the Idaho Association of Commerce and Industry.

How politically independent is IACI? IACI is governed by a 39-member board. It’s an organization not beholden to the state legislature. And every single segment of Idaho’s business community—large and small—is represented in IACI’s membership. How important is the Affordable Care Act to its membership? IACI was pretty instrumental in trying to implement an Idaho health-care exchange, but the state decided not to do anything during the last legislative session, so we’re at a crossroad. Conventional wisdom is that IACI is one of the most-powerful organizations at the Statehouse. I’ve read that. When it comes to business policy, IACI has been extremely influential. I’ve seen what they’ve done and it’s impressive. Would you ever run for office? Absolutely not. But you know how to win better than almost anyone. Exactly, and that’s why I have no interest in being on that side. Would you recommend it? It takes a certain personality and that’s not me. But you like the action. It’s fantastically fun.

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Forget chicken soup—feed your soul barbecue, collard greens and gumbo at the 20th annual Soul Food Extravaganza.

SATURDAY AUG. 4 delish SOUL FOOD EXTRAVAGANZA

The sesquicentennial celebration of the gold pan will span three towns and provide plenty of fun.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY AUG. 2-5 history GOLD DISCOVERY CELEBRATIONS Idaho City may exist today as a quick 40-ish minute escape from Boise, filled with neat old buildings and events like street dances, but 150 years ago, it was gold central. The town fell victim to the boom-bust fate of many Western places, with gold hunters making it the most populous city in the Northwest territory, and then leaving when the precious metal was gone. You can celebrate the role gold played in creating the Boise Basin with the Sesquicentennial Celebration of Gold Discovery, featuring events in the historic town, as well as Placerville and Centerville. Things kicked off July 28 with opening ceremonies in Centerville and continue through Saturday, Aug. 4, in Idaho City and Placerville with plenty of partying. Here are highlights of some of the happenings: Partake in gold panning, music, dancing and plenty of food at the Highway 21 Flea Market at Tom’s Service Station Thursday, Aug. 2-Sunday, Aug. 5. Call 208-866-8454 for more info. A Friday night shindig featuring lots of brats and beer will fill John Brogan park in Idaho City from 5-8 p.m., and a dance party will keep gold lovers on their feet until the wee hours of the night at the Community Hall, beginning at 8 p.m. Idaho’s High Street Band will bring the party with its 10-piece band, five-piece horn section and colorful zoot suits. Tickets to the dance are $25, and the party is for the 21-and-older set. Call 208-392-4558 or visit boisebasin.lili.org for more info. Saturday’s events will include a costume parade, plein air painting and living histor y enactments in John Brogan Park from 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Closing ceremonies for the gold celebration will be held in Placer ville, where Saturday will be packed with events beginning at 1 p.m., including tours of the Placer ville Masonic Lodge, old-fashioned games, a pig roast potluck and music. Various times and locations. Visit idahocityevents.com for more info.

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If you’re venturing to Julia Davis Park Saturday, Aug. 4, be ready for the intoxicating smell of mouth-watering soul food to fill the air. The Boise Soul Food Extravaganza will celebrate its 20th anniversary of good cookin’ and fun, beginning at 11 a.m. An all-day live entertainment schedule will feature a car show, music by Exit Prose, Nono Lobos, Hambones on the Beach and many, many more with QS “The Soul Brother” hosting. But the festival is, of course, about the food. Soul food is a term that was popularized in the 1960s and is described as a distinctive and traditional Southern style of cooking, which means you can stuff your face with smoked turkey legs, collard greens, baked beans, seafood gumbo, Cajun chicken wings and oh-so-much more. When thirst ensues from all that better-for-your-soul-than-your-body goodness, the 21-andolder set can meander to the beer garden while the kiddos get their faces painted from 11 a.m.-7 p.m., or shake up all the good stuff in their guts in the jump house. Take a break from the booze and food to peruse merchandise from a wide variety of vendors, then ready the wet napkins and be prepared for faces full of barbecue sauce when Famous Dave’s barbecue puts carnivores to the test in its rib-eating competition at 4:50 p.m. Finally, work off those worth-it calories by dancing to live music until 8 p.m. 11 a.m.-8 p.m., FREE admission. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., boisesoulfoodfestival.com.

FRIDAYWEDNESDAY AUG. 3-AUG. 8 theater THE WINTER’S TALE There are a few sure things when it comes to any Shakespearian romance: Things will never go smoothly; someone will end up running around in the woods; people will jump to conclusions like it’s an Olympic sport and identities will be

hidden and/or mistaken to the point that no one is quite sure who anyone else is. And when it comes to meeting these very Shakespearean conditions, The Winter’s Tale is at the head of the class. Idaho Shakespeare Festival will officially open its production Saturday, Aug. 4, with a preview night Friday, Aug. 3. The play will continue its run through Sunday, Aug. 26. The play is not commonly seen on the modern stage, yet it has all the elements that have made Shakespeare’s works so

omnipresent. Here’s how it breaks down: A king convinces himself that his wife and his best friend (a king from a neighboring land) are having an affair and that the child his wife is pregnant with is not his own. Cue the murder plot, the fleeing into the woods, the imprisonment and a whole lot of ill will and, of course, quite a few untimely deaths. Despite the fact that the king is proven wrong, he declares that the newborn be abandoned. Of course, the child is WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


B AM JAM B AS K ETB ALL

FIND YELLOWJACKET PHONE CASE

C HR IS M AC K ENTHU N

Boise basketballers of all ages will take to the streets with Bam Jam.

Catch mesmerizing moves—like this one by Jason Hartley and Frank Affrunti—at the inaugural performance of the Boise Dance Co-Op.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY AUG. 4-5

SATURDAY AUG. 4

ballin’

dance

BAM JAM

BOISE DANCE CO-OP

Bam Jam—the huge basketball competition in downtown Boise now in its fifth year—brings a whole new meaning to the phrase “takin’ it to the streets.” After outgrowing its BODO digs, the 2012 Bam Jam three-on-three tournament moves to city streets, blocking off asphalt for basketball courts near the State Capitol Saturday, Aug. 4, and Sunday, Aug. 5. This year, the plan is to take over the streets of eight city blocks with more than 20 basketball courts placed side-byside, adjacent to center court at the intersection of Sixth and Bannock streets. With more than 300 teams registered for last year’s event, Bam Jam has historically drawn as many as 10,000 people, according to event organizers. B-ball events include the three-point challenge, half-court shoot-off and slam dunk challenge, requiring a mix of panache and skill. But the main event at center court is the three-onthree, with adult teams for women, men 6-feet and taller and men less than 6-feet tall. There’s also a co-ed adult team, and kids’ teams are divided by grade and gender. Teams will be put in brackets, with a three-game guarantee and a champion named for each division. According to Bam Jam’s Vince Hordemann, the three-point and slam dunk challenges will take place on the steps of the Capitol. Hordemann said the flat concrete had to be measured to ensure there’s enough space for all the action. Proceeds from the tournament benefit the Idaho Select Player’s Fund and the Boys and Girls Clubs of Ada County, with Bam Jam raising thousands of dollars for local causes in its five-year history. Basketball enthusiasts can bask in all the chances to watch games, and even the non-sporty can enjoy the bustling, lively weekend in downtown. Want to get involved? Hordemann said volunteers are needed down to the last second. See the website for more info. Various times, FREE to watch. Downtown Boise. More info at bamjamboise.com.

saved and grows up not knowing her royal heritage, falls in love with the son of falsely accused king/best friend and craziness ensues. ISF Director of Marketing Hannah Read said the production will have the distinct feel of a fairy tale— neither modern nor period but a bit dreamy. For fans of

S U B M I T

traditional Shakespeare, this is definitely a production to catch. Friday, Aug. 3-Saturday, Aug. 4, and Tuesday Aug. 7-Wednesday, Aug. 8, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Aug. 5, 7 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Boise must have been blessed by the fouette fair y; the city boasts myriad dance companies, which provide enthusiasts with a healthy dose of dance. And while pop culture would have us believe that dance is a world of conniving, competitive, creative types looking to stab each other in the back, Boise dance companies are bringing about a different perspective. The Boise Dance Co-Op is a new project founded by Ballet Idaho principal dancer Phyllis Rothwell Affrunti and former Trey McIntyre Project dancer/rehearsal director Jason Har tley, featuring talent from many of the city’s dance companies. The co-op will give its inaugural per formance Saturday, Aug. 4, at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. at the Esther Simplot Per forming Ar ts Annex Auditorium. In the roughly five-month-long off season, Boiseans have been left anticipating the arrival of new work from the companies, and apparently, dancers have as well. According to Har tley, “There is quite a large amount of ar tists out there that are hungr y … the co-op really came out of need. … I’m discovering hidden talent that for no reason should be hidden. These ar tists have a lot to offer.” Har tley said audiences can expect “quite a variety of a show,” with ever ything from classical ballet to brandnew work. “It’s ever ybody that you’ve already seen in the dance community coming together,” Hartley aid. “It’s not just Idaho Dance Theatre dancing its part, then Ballet Idaho— we’re mixing together all these dancers. It’s a melting pot.” But what happens when companies begin their next season? “We continue,” Har tley said. “You can work your full-time job and still want to do more. These kids are what, 21? They have plenty of energy. They’re hungr y.” The biggest challenge, Har tley said, was learning the “other side of the ar ts,” such as marketing and adver tising. The group took the ever-popular Kickstar ter campaign route and exceeded its $5,000 goal. As for future per formances, Har tley said the sky is the limit, and welcomes ideas and feedback from Co-op members and audiences. “There’s 1,000 ways it could go. We can put on anything. We can mold into any avenue that is needed,” Har tley said. Purchase tickets by calling 208-867-3275. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m., $10 general admission, $20 reser ved seating. Esther Simplot Per forming Arts Auditorium, 516 S. Ninth St., 208-345-9116.

Anthropologist Amber Case has made a career out of studying the ways people interact with technology. She claims in Ted Talk that since the smart phone is essentially an augmentation of our mental selves, smart-phone users are now cyborgs. If that’s so, then it’s now time to realize the dreams of sci-fi nerds everywhere and weaponize our cyborg selves. How? Meet the Yellow Jacket, the world’s first iPhone case that doubles as a stun gun. The case dispenses yellowjacketcase.com 650,000 volts of electricity, enough to drop a fully drunk Russell Crowe. That is like putting the power of Zeus in your iPhone. No longer just a cyborg, you can now be a god. For those worried about putting that much juice next to your noodle, the case comes with a double-safety. “In less than two seconds, both safety mechanisms can be deactivated and the Yellow Jacket stun gun is ready for action. Compare this to a regular stun gun, which can take five to 10 seconds to find and deploy,” reads the Yellow Jacket website. In a product demo video, Yellow Jacket’s inventor says it is most effective as a self-defense tool because it’s something people almost always have within reach. And if that wasn’t enough, Yellow Jacket’s battery will also provide one complete charge for an iPhone 4. The Yellow Jacket hasn’t actually been released yet but is available for pre-order online. Android models are also on the way. —Josh Gross

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 17


8 DAYS OUT WEEK IN REVIEW C HR IS TINA M AR FIC E

WEDNESDAY AUG. 1 Festivals & Events SPLASH BASH POOL PARTY— Eat, drink, swim and relax at the weekly pool party. Featuring a poolside bar, special appetizers and live music by the Amy Weber Quartet. Open to the public. All ages welcome. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com.

On Stage LEGALLY BLONDE—The hilarious MGM film is now a smash hit musical. When sorority queen Elle Woods gets dumped by her boyfriend she is determined to get him back. So she grabs her Chihuahua, puts down her credit cards, hits the books and sets out to go where no other Delta Nu has gone before: Harvard Law. 8 p.m. $10-$18. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

peare hakesStars S UNDER THE

THERE’S CHINESE TUNNELS UNDER BOISE!—This play from Empty Boat Theatre Company is a revamp of a previous production by the same name. Two 20-year-old metal-heads are cooped up in a late-’80s basement and embark on a journey not unlike the Zelda video game. Neurolux will offer a full bar at the venue during intermission and the hour prior to show time. Tickets are available in advance at online. See Arts, Page 28. 8 p.m. $15 adv., $18 door. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise, emptyboattheatrecompany.org.

Workshops & Classes CREATING LETTERS AND RESUMES WITH MICROSOFT WORD—Learn how to create professional-looking letters and resumes using Microsoft Word. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995, boisepubliclibrary.org.

THE IMAGINARY INVALID

Freely adapted from Molière by Oded Gross and Tracy Young. Originally produced by Oregon Shakespeare Festival. Sponsored by Holland & Hart LLP and Boise Weekly

Calls to Artists

THE WINTER’S TALE

By William Shakespeare. Sponsored by 200 Teachers, UBS Financial Services, Inc., and Boise State Public Radio

NOISES OFF

By Michael Frayn. Sponsored by Stoel Rives LLP, and 107.1 KHITS SEASON SPONSOR

SEASON PARTNERS

SEASON MEDIA PARTNERS

Ryan David O’Byrne*, The Mousetrap (2012). *Member Actors’ Equity. Photo—DKM Photography.

GET YOUR TICKETS & GIFT CERTIFICATES ONLINE AT

WWW.IDAHOSHAKESPEARE.ORG OR CALL 336-9221 M–F, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

14 | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOISEweekly

208 MUSIC VIDEO FESTIVAL— The third installment of the 208 Music Video Festival seeks to expose Idaho bands and musicians to a wider audience as well as expand Idaho’s growing film and video community. Video submissions for the festival may be submitted through Thursday, Aug. 16. Submissions made before Thursday, Aug. 2, will not be subjected to the $5 entry fee. Up to three videos may be submitted per contestant and must have been made after September 2011. Drop off or mail videos in DVD format to Neurolux, attention Kathy O/Tiger Spittle. Selected videos will be played at Neurolux during First Thursday, Sept. 6, and posted to the 208 Music Video Festival Facebook pages and YouTube. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Boise, 208343-0886, neurolux.com.

Models strutted their stuff at the inaugural Boise Fashion Week.

FROM THE CATWALK TO THE CRAPS TABLE No one knew quite what to expect from actor Crispin Glover’s two-night projection bonanza at the Egyptian Theatre. But even the most outlandish predictions were surpassed July 26 as Glover, bathed in the glow of a red spotlight, recited from a technical manual for concrete inspection that he’d tricked out with elephants and swastikas before pressing play on a bizarre film he produced and co-directed, It is Fine! EVERYTHING IS FINE. In the film, “a hair fetishist with severe cerebral palsy goes on a fantasy rape and murder spree,” wrote BW New Media Czar Josh Gross. After the film, Glover answered audience questions and spoke about the “moral issues” he’d had starring in Back to the Future: “At the end of the film, there was a reward to the characters that was monetary,” Glover said. “I told Robert Zemeckis, the director, that the reward should be that the characters are in love.” Glover was not rehired for either of the film’s sequels. Moving across the color spectrum from red to purple, the Powerhouse Event Center was bathed in violet light for the inaugural Boise Fashion Week kick-off event July 26. Models scampered down the runway clad in feathers, leather, beads and refashioned furry toys to beats by Boise’s DJ Myko. According to BW freelancer Christina Marfice, designer Levi John stole the show: “With designs made mostly from stuffed animals and, according to John, ‘a little bit of magic,’ the neoncolored collection ranged from full-length coats constructed with a rainbow of stuffed animal heads to tiny bikinis complemented by furry, knee-high kicks. By the time John danced down the runway at the end of his show, the audience was on its feet and many attendees danced with him.” And speaking of fashion, heavily frilled dresses and pinstripe suits were the costumes of choice July 27 for the adults-only Prohibition Underground event at Idaho State Historical Museum. Attendees posed for photos with a Thompson machine gun and a Hudson Essex Super Six before whetting their whistles at the event’s multiple bars. According to BW Staff Writer Andrew Crisp: “The upper level of the museum beckoned ‘Saints’ with a colorful sign, where bingo, Charleston lessons, a raffle and beer sales took place. ‘Sinners’ were directed to the much-busier lower level, which included a roulette wheel, craps and a speakeasy complete with live entertainment.” And moving from speakeasies to public speaking, Story Story Night hosted its monthly live storytelling event July 30 on the theme Outsider: Stories of Strangers in Strange Lands. Clad in a plaid kilt, featured storyteller Arlen Andrew Donald told a touching and hilarious tale of moving to Boise from his native Scotland, and learning to love his new home despite a few frustrating customs. The story slammers were apparently so inspired that they launched into a range of similar British travel tales. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT CARNEVALE CALL TO ARTISTS—Idaho Botanical Garden is seeking performing and visual artists for Carnevale. This outdoor, ticketed event is hosted by Refinerii and will be held at the garden Friday, Sept. 14. Unique, fun, upbeat and creative artists are asked to apply by Friday, Aug. 10. Artist placement fees are $75. To learn more call IBG or visit the website. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden. org.

Art

Literature

ENABLE 2.0 ART SHOW—The exhibit features the results of the Artist Master/Apprentice Program, created to provide opportunities for artists with disabilities to develop new skills to pursue the arts as a source of sustainable employment. Presented by Idaho Parents Unlimited-VSA Arts Idaho. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Creative Access Arts Center, 500 S. Eighth St., Boise.

THIS LITTLE PIGGY WENT TO THE LIQUOR STORE—Celebrate the release of Amanda Turner’s new book, This Little Piggy Went to the Liquor Store, at the premiere party on the terrace of Chandlers Steakhouse. Visit akturner.com for more info. 6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse, 981 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-383-4300, chandlersboise.com.

Literature

Kids & Teens

GHOSTS AND PROJECTORS WITH FENG SUN CHEN—Feng Sun Chen and Charles Gabel will read original poetry. Feng Sun Chen’s first book is Butcher’s Tree from Black Ocean. She is currently a graduate assistant and MFA student at the University of Minnesota. Gabel is the author of the poetry chapbook Pastoral. He studied classical civilization at Loyola University Chicago and poetry at Boise State. $2 donation. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

TANG SOO DO SUMMER CAMP—See Wednesday. 2-3 p.m. $25-$30. Nampa Recreation Center, 131

Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

FRIDAY AUG. 3 Festivals & Events 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF GOLD DISCOVERY CELEBRATION—See Thursday. Idaho City and Placerville. 208-392-9766, boisebasinboosters.org.

Kids & Teens TANG SOO DO SUMMER CAMP—Learn basic selfdefense and awareness of strangers. Coordination, balance and teamwork will be enhanced in this fun camp. For ages 5-12. 2-3 p.m. $25-$30. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. TEEN OPEN STUDIO: ART AS FASHION—Express your own style in a wearable work of art. Find inspiration in artist Nick Cave’s wearable sculptures called Soundsuits, or bring your own ideas. Local artists from Coup Clothing and the Design Bandits will help make your ideas reality. 1-4 p.m. $10. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

THURSDAY AUG. 2 Festivals & Events 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF GOLD DISCOVERY CELEBRATION—Celebrate Idaho’s history of gold mining in the Boise Basin with a variety of activities, including museum tours, a dance, party with brats and beer, costume and historic transportation parade and much more. See Picks, Page 16. Idaho City and Placerville. 208-392-9766, boisebasinboosters.org.

On Stage CINDERELLA—Broadway’s magical musical comedy about a working girl who can’t catch a break comes to life in this enchanting version of one of the most-beloved fairy tales of all time. 8 p.m. $10-$18. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre. com. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: DANIEL DUGAR— Laugh at the funny stylings of this comedian then dance the night away with DJ Mike. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: ROY JOHNSON—Also featuring Patrick Melton and hosted by Olek Szewczk. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs.com, by calling 208941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. Buy one ticket, get one free. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THERE’S CHINESE TUNNELS UNDER BOISE!— See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 adv., $18 door. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise, emptyboattheatrecompany.org. WIZARD OF OZ—Hampstead Stage, a national touring children’s theater company, presents The Wizard of Oz. Go to the library for an exciting opportunity to see this family classic performed live. 2 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900; 6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise; boisepubliclibrary.org.

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8 DAYS OUT BOISE SALSA AND BACHATA FESTIVAL—International dance champions will perform and teach classes. Visit boisesalsafestival.com for more info, or email cmarquez70@hotmail.com. 8 p.m. $50. Red Lion Downtowner, 1800 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-344-7691. CELEBRATE GOOD NEIGHBORS—Enjoy the end of the summer reading program with a neighborhood block party. 6 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996, boisepubliclibrary.org. HOKUM HOEDOWN SQUARE DANCE AND OLD-TIMEY MUSIC SERIES—Enjoy music from the Hokum Hi-Flyers while you learn square-dance moves, followed by an old-time hootenanny featuring a cast of callers. Pie Hole pizza will be served and a full bar is available with ID. 7 p.m. $5, $15 per family. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. KUNA DAYS—Enjoy a parade, goodies from vendors and lots of fun at this annual event. Visit kunadays.com for more info. Noon-11 p.m. FREE. Bernard Fisher Memorial Park, Swan Falls Road and Avalon Street, Kuna. SENIOR CITIZENS ARTS AND CRAFTS FESTIVAL—This annual festival features photographs, jellies and jams, dolls, books, furniture and more. For information, contact Sara Crawford at scrawford@cityofboise.org or call 208-608-7652. 7 a.m.-3 p.m. Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson St., Boise. SUMMER PARTY AT FUSIONS GLASS STUDIO—Featuring glass demos, food and homemade root beer from Delicious, live music by Greg Bridges and awesome prizes. See the website for event details. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 S. Edgewood Lane, Ste. 120, Eagle, 208-938-1055, fusionsidaho.com.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: DANIEL DUGAR—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com. JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT— Starlight Mountain Theatre presents its rendition of this classic tale. Dinner is available Thursdays-Saturdays for $14 per person. 8 p.m. $10-$18. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: ROY JOHNSON—See Thursday. Buy one ticket and get one free for the 10 p.m. show. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THERE’S CHINESE TUNNELS UNDER BOISE!—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 adv., $18 door. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise, emptyboattheatrecompany.org. WESTERN ACTION ADVENTURE SHOW AND DINNER—The night begins with a scenic covered wagon ride through the 60-acre ranch located in Meridian. The play, Is True Love a Con or Am

16 | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOISEweekly

I Just Too Far Gone?, can be enjoyed with a full barbecue buffet dinner with reserved dinner and show seating, or tickets can be purchased for the show only. Advance reservations are required. Group discounts available. 6 p.m. $15-$45. Coolwater Creek Event Center, 7355 S. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-887-7880, coolwatercreekevents.com.

THE WINTER’S TALE—Idaho Shakespeare Festival presents its rendition of the Bard’s romantic fairytale. See Picks, Page 16. 7 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

ARTS/BOOK REVIEW A NATURAL BORN CITIZEN The conflict surrounding President Barack Obama’s birth certificate has been an absurd circus. But for local writer Don Rosebrock, it was also the germ of an idea. What would happen if a president legitimately didn’t have a birth certificate? That question formed the spine of his debut book, A Natural Born Citizen. Elena de Leon was a fast-rising star of the Democratic Party. Her hardnosed work in the Texas legislature and inspiring personal story helped propel her to the vice presidency. But when the president suffers a fatal heart attack two years into his term, she is sworn in as Commander-inChief. Within days, the speaker of the House launches a strategic political assault to install himself as president. The cornerstone of his strategy is an affidavit from de Leon’s ex-husband that says she was born on the Mexican side of the border town she grew up in, not the Texas side. And as de Leon was born in a rural church, she has no official birth certificate to prove otherwise. And if that wasn’t enough, de Leon’s daughter is kidnapped by white supremacists who want to force her out of office. The book plays out the subsequent legal, political and tactical maneuvers of the two weeks after the president’s death. A Natural Born Citizen is not going to be a best seller. The exposition at the book’s front end is not fast-paced enough, nor are the characters finely developed enough. But once the groundwork is laid, A Natural Born Citizen hits its stride as a plot-based thriller for policy wonks. Rosebrock expertly lays out courtroom processes, political strategies and media figures, all with the practiced cynicism of a career reporter. Both the moves and justifications made by federal judges and the internal monologue of the White House press secretary as he leads the press around by the nose are refreshingly cynical toward the political process. Even the president, a grab bag of leftie causes on the surface, is something of a foul-mouthed a-hole whenever the cameras are off. In the end, A Natural Born Citizen reads all too real, even if the exposition makes that reading a bit clunky. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT Art GAIA OPEN HOUSE—New works of fine art, sculpture and jewelry by established Idaho artists. Demonstrations by Dwight Williams, Linda Aman and Joyce Green, as well as refreshments. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Gaia Studios and Gallery, 237 N. First St., Eagle.

Kids & Teens DREAM BIG—Boise Public Library invites families to a funfilled puppet show to learn how Oliver the puppy can give wings to his big dream of being able to fly. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org. MICRON MATH NIGHTS— Enjoy free admission for the entire family, math challenge tables and an interactive math presentation as part of Micron Foundation and Discovery Center of Idaho’s Math Fun d’Mentals program. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, scidaho.org. FAMILY SNOOZE AT THE ZOO OVERNIGHT—Zoo Boise guides will provide your family with evening and early morning treks through the zoo to investigate animals, as well as their habitats, behavior and care. Activities, games, art projects and upclose animal encounters are also

part of the adventure. Evening snack, continental breakfast and indoor/outdoor sleeping area provided. Intended for children age 6 and older. Parent must be present throughout the entire program. One adult per four children. Register online through Fort Boise Community Center. 7 p.m. $40-$50. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208384-4125, zooboise.org. TANG SOO DO SUMMER CAMP—See Wednesday. 2-3 p.m. $25-$30. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

SATURDAY AUG. 4 Festivals & Events 150TH ANNIVERSARY OF GOLD DISCOVERY CELEBRATION—See Thursday. Idaho City and Placerville. 208-392-9766, boisebasinboosters.org. BEACH PARTY—Say aloha to summer with music by surf band Suns of the Beach and food from Kanak Attack Catering. Noon-4 p.m. FREE. High Desert Harley-Davidson, 2310 Cinema Drive, Meridian, 208-338-5599, highdeserthd.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

BOISE SALSA AND BACHATA FESTIVAL—See Friday. 8 p.m. $50. Red Lion Downtowner, 1800 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-344-7691. KUNA DAYS—See Friday. 7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Bernard Fisher Memorial Park, Swan Falls Road and Avalon Street, Kuna. TREASURE VALLEY VINTAGE MOTORCYCLE SHOW—Ultra cool vintage motorcycles, restorations, cafe bikes, bobbers, rat bikes and survivors. Food by Free Range Pizza and music. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Big Twin BMW Cycle Center, 2816 S. Orchard St., Boise, 208-336-0367, bigtwincycles.com.

On Stage BOISE DANCE CO-OP—Dancers from Ballet Idaho, Off Center Dance Project, the Trey McIntyre Project and more combine their talents during their off season in this inaugural performance. See Picks, Page 17. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, Ballet Idaho Annex, 501 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-0556. COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: DANIEL DUGAR—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LEGALLY BLONDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com. LIQUID LAUGHS: ROY JOHNSON—See Thursday. Buy one ticket, get one free for the 10 p.m. show. 8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. THERE’S CHINESE TUNNELS UNDER BOISE!—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 adv., $18 door. Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., Boise, emptyboattheatrecompany.org. THE WINTER’S TALE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Auditions

| EASY |

MEDIUM | HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW— Stage Coach Theatre will bring back its popular Rocky Horror Show Friday, Oct. 5-Saturday, Oct. 27, with a midnight performance Wednesday, Oct. 31. Three women and seven men with acting, singing and dancing skills are needed, as well as Transylvanians who can sing and dance. Actors should be prepared to sing a song of their choosing from the show, as well as do a reading with other actors. Music will be provided. For more information, please call director Ian Taylor at 208713-5531. 2 p.m. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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8 DAYS OUT Food & Drink SOUL FOOD EXTRAVAGANZA—The 20th Boise Soul Food Extravaganza includes live music, a car show, comedy and tons of food vendors. Visit boisesoulfoodfestival.com for more info. See Picks, Page 16. 11 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise.

THE WINTER’S TALE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

MONDAY AUG. 6 On Stage LEGALLY BLONDE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$18. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

Kids & Teens YOUTH STORYTELLING AND ART PRESENTATION—Youth from the Boys and Girls Club of Ada County, Boise Urban Garden School and Global Gardens Refugee Community Agriculture will share stories and art about their connections to water and the Boise River. Hosted by Idaho Rivers United and Boise City Department of Arts and History. Light snacks and beverages will be available. 7-8 p.m. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, cityofboise.org/bee/watershed.

Kids & Teens DREAM BIG—See Friday. 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Odds & Ends IDAHO PIECEMAKERS ANNUAL QUILT SHOW—View more than 150 quilts with the theme quilted barns. The best of show will be voted on by the public and win a hand-crafted end table. Bring two cans of food for the Kuna Community Food Bank and receive a raffle ticket for a Baby Lock Ellure Plus sewing and embroidery machine. Visit idahopiecemakers.com or call 208-922-1906 for more info. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. $5. Kuna High School, 637 E. Deer Flat Road, Kuna, 208-955-0231.

SUNDAY AUG. 5 Festivals & Events BOISE SALSA AND BACHATA FESTIVAL—See Friday. 8 p.m. $50. Red Lion Downtowner, 1800 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-344-7691.

On Stage LIQUID LAUGHS: ROY JOHNSON—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Workshops & Classes SAMPLER CAMP—Use various techniques and media to create your own masterpiece while learning about African art, nature and more. For ages 6-12 through Wednesday, Aug. 8. 1:30-4 p.m. $62-$67. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

WEDNESDAY AUG. 8

TUESDAY AUG. 7

On Stage

Festivals & Events

JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT— See Friday. 8 p.m. $10-$18. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

PAMPERED CHEF FUNDRAISER FOR HOPE’S DOOR—Cooking party to support the Advocates Against Family Violence and Hope’s Door. Taste some delicious food and purchase products to donate to Hope’s Door, or to keep for yourself. Help the community overcome domestic abuse. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Caldwell Memorial Park, Kimball and Grant, Caldwell.

THE WINTER’S TALE—See Wednesday, Aug. 1. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

On Stage CINDERELLA—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10-$18. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

THE WINTER’S TALE—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Auditions THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW— See Saturday. 2 p.m. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 W. Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Odds & Ends IDAHO PIECEMAKERS ANNUAL QUILT SHOW—See Saturday. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $5. Kuna High School, 637 E. Deer Flat Road, Kuna, 208-955-0231.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

18 | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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1ST THURSDAY

Ben Wilson commemorates his mother’s North End childhood in a new exhibit at Basement Gallery.

FROM THE ATTIC TO THE BASEMENT Ben Wilson resurfaces with a solo show at Basement Gallery CATIE YOUNG The mixed-media installation includes Ben Wilson is something of a downtown stamany of the objects from the attic arranged ple. He’s been a prominent figure in the Boise on tables and along the floor beneath the six art community for more than a decade and paintings depicting them. Among the items his work has graced the walls of downtown are old children’s books, eyeglasses, Wilson’s galleries, filled the pages of Boise Weekly, mother’s well loved dolls, black-and-white adorned Record Exchange swag and flashed photos and a Boise High Courier from 1963. by on the side of the eye-catching Hyde Park Feelings, another series created for the Plumbing truck. show, hangs on an adjacent wall. The style is Wilson’s art is fantastically quirky and quintessential Wilson, with paintings explorcharming. It exudes narrative—as Basement ing extremes of emotion using the kind of Gallery co-owner and devoted Wilson fan whimsical characters he’s best known for. Jane Brumfield pointed out—and combines While Feelings takes second chair to Mema painterly quality with good composition. ories In Analog, together they create a well These traits elevate his work from graphic balanced dynamic within the gallery. Feelings illustration into the fine art realm. is bright and easy to look at with calm colors “He moves paint around a surface really and light framing, while Memories In Analog well,” Brumfield said. “He knows color. He is more like being inside a North End house uses bizarre colors, [but] doesn’t make it too at dusk, dark hardwood underfoot, windows difficult for other people to get a key into the obscured by foliage. work. It’s still very approachable.” But this isn’t the first time Basement GalIt has been almost two years since Wilson lery has shown images of Wilson’s mother has had a solo show in Boise, and Baseas a child in the North End. Wilson created ment Galley will host his reemergence with a two paintings using the same concept for his commissioned exhibit of new work that runs last Basement Gallery through Saturday, show. The paintings Sept. 8. immediately caught The theme of the The Art of Ben Wilson will be on display through Brumfield’s eye. show is particularly Saturday, Sept. 8, at: “I just fell in love fitting for a man with BASEMENT GALLERY with them,” she said. such downtown ties. 928 W. Main St. “They’ve got a feeling Memories In Analog 208-333-0309 basementgalleryboise.com of nostalgia. They’ve is an unapologetically still got this oddness personal installation with all of these little inspired by a box of characters that he has.” items Wilson found while poking around When Brumfield approached Wilson about his mother’s North End attic. He asked his expanding the series, he was hesitant at first, mother to tell him her memories about the not having planned to continue it. But now things in the box, then Wilson ran those he’s glad to have done it. stories through his own lens to create six “It has been a really rewarding experience. new works. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

… It definitely took me into some places I probably wouldn’t have gone otherwise,” Wilson said. “I’ve taken a more loose painterly approach with some of the pieces and a couple of pieces use a collage technique that I haven’t ever used before. I also learned new things about my family, which is always fascinating.” Already proud owners of various Wilson pieces, Patrick and Kelly Price were the first to purchase one of the series at the show’s opening July 21. “We made up our minds that we were going to buy a piece within about a minute of when we walked in the door,” Patrick said. Their chosen painting, “Ghost In The Valley,” shows Wilson’s mother with one of her dolls near Castle Rock. “That’s one of my favorite parks,” Patrick said. “I was drawn immediately to that piece. I like seeing [Boise] in his work.” Aside from decking out industrial-grade trucks and crafting concert posters, Wilson said his focus over the past couple years has been on client work—which has ranged from wedding invitations to advertising and branding. He’s had an increase in demand for commissioned pieces, as well, and spent a semester teaching art at Boise State while fellow illustrator Bill Carman was on sabbatical. Wilson has also participated in smaller group shows outside of Boise—places like Tokyo, England, Portland, Ore., and San Francisco—but he said this exhibit at Basement Gallery features the largest body of new work he’s created in years. “I really enjoy how my career is a mixed bag in the creative industry … but it can obviously be difficult to support a family as an independent creative professional,” Wilson said. “I’m a family man and I love it that way.”

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS East Side BASQUE MARKET—Start your First Thursday at the Basque Market with tapas, wine and refreshing frozen sangria blanco. 608 W. Grove St., 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket. com. BASQUE MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER—Enjoy gallery tours for the exhibit Hidden In Plain Sight: The Basques and tours of the Jacobs/Uberuaga House every half hour from 6:30-8:30 p.m. Dr. Mark Warner will discuss findings from the

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archaeological dig of the house’s well and porch area at 5:30 p.m. and the Basque music jam session will feature local musicians playing lively tunes. 6:30 p.m. 611 Grove St., 208343-2671, basquemuseum.com.

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BOISE ART GLASS—Make your own paperweight for $40 per 30-minute session, or watch artist demos while enjoying snacks. 5-11 p.m. 530 W. Myrtle St., 208-3451825, boiseartglass.com.

BRICOLAGE—For this show, each 3 artist was given an 11-inch by 14inch wood panel and a metal school

compass and asked to interpret the theme Navigate in his or her own way, using any medium, but incorporating the panel and the compass. See Downtown News, Page 22. 5-8 p.m. 418 S. Sixth St., 208-345-3718, bricoshoppe.com. THE DISTRICT COFFEE HOUSE— Have you ever wanted to try what they do on the TV show Whose Line Is It Anyway? Try it out and have some family friendly fun with hosts Recycled Minds improv troupe. 110 S. Fifth St., 208-343-1089, districtcoffeehouse. com.

FLATBREAD COMMUNITY 4 OVEN—Check out Amber Grubb’s photographs while enjoying happy

GOLDY’S CORNER—View the work of 6 featured artist Crystal Parsons, along with 10 other local artists. 625 W. Main St., 208-433-

hour featuring $6 deals. Bottles of wine are $20, and kids 12 and younger eat FREE with purchase. 615 W. Main St., 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com.

3934, goldysbreakfastbistro.com.

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE—View 5 work by featured artist of the month Nicolet Laursen, including original illustrations from her new children’s book Ana the No-toed Sloth. 500 W. Idaho St., 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com.

INDIE MADE—View the work of more than 50 local kid crafters and artists, ages 8-17, who will set up shop in pop-up tents in the Pioneer Building. Enjoy face painting, chocolate fondue from the Melting Pot and drink specials from Wise Guy Pizza. 108 N. Sixth St. MELTING POT—Enjoy two glasses of wine and one cheese fondue for $22. 200 N. Sixth St., 208-383-0900, meltingpot.com. SPA URBANA—Check out the newly opened spa, take a tour of the facility, enjoy a chair massage, wine tasting from Vale Wine Co. and local music. A spa treatment will also be raffled off. 602 W. Idaho St., 208-639-5335, spaurbana.com.

South Side 8TH STREET MARKETPLACE AT BODO— 7 Featuring work by Artist in Residence Star Moxley. Mercantile Building, 404 S. Eighth St., 208-338-5212, 8thstreetmarketplace.com. ATOMIC TREASURES—Enjoy a mix of retro, 8 found objects and art that are sure to make unforgettable gifts. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-3440811, atomictreasures.com. BOISE ART MUSEUM—Design a sculpture 9 from beads, buttons, sequins and fabric after exploring the exhibit Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth. Art talk begins at 5:30 p.m. and will feature Laura Peterson of Laura Peterson Choreography and Leah Clark of Balance Dance Company, who will discuss the connection between visual and performing arts as demonstrated by Nick Cave’s Soundsuits. 5-8 p.m. 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. CHIC BRIDAL BOUTIQUE—The boutique has expanded into the old Miss Molly’s space. Check out its selection of beautiful wedding gowns. 404 S. Eighth St., 208-424-8900, chicbridalboutique. com. THE COLE MARR GALLERY/COFFEE 10 HOUSE—View photos of different birds and sip on wine samples from Bitner Vineyards. 6-9 p.m. 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, 208-3367630. FETE STYLE BAR—Celebrate Fete’s first anniversary with refreshments and gourmet cupcakes. 110 N. Eighth St., 208-344-3559. HAPPY FISH SUSHI AND MAR11 TINI BAR—Check out photography from Charles Beck and Kenneth Koslov. 855 Broad St., 208-343-4810, happyfishsushi.com. HELLY HANSEN—Purchase a backpack and get 20 percent off anything else you purchase at the same time. 860 W. Broad St., 208-342-2888.

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IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM— The Idaho State Historical Society is a system of cultural and historic resources comprised of the Idaho State Historical Museum, State Archives, State Historic Preservation Office and Historic Sites Program. See what it has to offer. 5-9 p.m. Donation. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, 208334-2120, history.idaho.gov. JULIA DAVIS PARK—Did you know that Julia Davis Park receives 1 million visitors each year? Or that Tom Davis reportedly made a profit of more than $10,000 on his 1872 apple crop on the future park site? And just who were Tom and Julia Davis—and what part did they play in creating Boise? If you love local history, take a docent tour of Julia Davis Park on First Thursdays. Meet at the Sacajawea monument in the Idaho State Historical Museum Plaza at 5:30 p.m. and take a self-guided tour using the app for iPhone and iPod, bicycle tour or walking tour with a docent. For additional information about the program or if you would like to be trained as a docent, contact Kathleen Barrett at 208-338-9108 or kathleenbarrett@cableone.net. 5:30 p.m. 700 S. Capitol Blvd.

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2 | 2012 WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE | BOISEweekly

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BOISE WEEKLY’S 2012 WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE Face it, you need a vacation. The prospect of spending one more day in the daily grind has you clenching your jaw involuntarily. But the realities of a getaway—the expense, the travel time, finding something everyone in the party wants to do—has you equally frustrated. But rather than throwing in the towel and settling on a weekend in a kiddie pool in your back yard, all you need to do is look toward the central Idaho mountains. Nestled among the peaks, you’ll find a valley destination that is not only a quick drive away but a world apart from your daily life. The Wood River Valley is ideal for a quick getaway for just about any interest/activity level/budget, and we’re making it even easier with Boise Weekly’s fourth-annual guide to the area. Whether you’re into outdoor adventures or would rather just eat your way through a weekend, we have insider tips for you. Need a perfect day filled with art or just a perfect day on the cheap? We have that, too. We even have suggestions on what to do when you have the whole family in tow. Check out the extensive calendar in the center of this section to help you plan your late summer and fall adventures in the Sun Valley area, from great concerts to some of the best community festivals around. Now go forth and plan your escape—for the good of everyone around you. —Deanna Darr

TABLE OF CONTENTS 4.................................................................................... A Day for Art 5 ......................................................................... A Day for Families 8 .......................................................................Calendar of Events 10 ........................................................A Day for Penny-pinching 12................................................................... A Day for the Foodie 14 ..................................................................A Day for Recreation

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BOISEweekly | 2012 WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE | 3


A DAY FOR ART Recommended daily dose of Sun Valley art

From a wild creature totem in a skateboard park to a chance encounter with a symphony musician on the bus, Ketchum melds the magic of art, travel and summer in a phenomenon akin to the mysteries of Higgs Boson—one never knows exactly what effects fine art may have, but something wonderful is surely waiting for people paying attention. The pursuit of art, at least its appreciation, can change even one’s concept of something as seemingly mundane as a spatula. Just as massive thunderstorms can move miles of earthworms onto the cool pavement, a relentless stream of arts offerings—many of them free—pull people out of the woodwork for summer in Sun Valley. For first-time visitors seeking guidance for a day chasing art, a smart place to start an art quest anywhere in the Wood River Valley is at the Sun Valley Center for the Arts’ headquarters in Ketchum, where exhibits rotate regularly. The center’s front desk staff is as prepared as the sharpest Four Seasons concierge and ready to point visitors in the right direction for exhibits, performances or even a performanceenhancing latte, one of the best

of which is available around the corner at the bakery location of Rolling in Dough. For glutenfree foodies, and those trying to steer clear of Idaho’s finest chocolate croissant, just up the street is Tranquility Tea House, one of the best spots in town for a healthy spot of tea. Before you know it, you’ll be ready for your next dose of art, perhaps on a guided tour with former state Rep. Wendy Jaquet. The center’s current exhibition, Making Camp, includes four wall tents artfully embellished and installed on a Simplotowned lot across from the Ketchum Post Office, property slated as a future home for fine art and theater. Still on exhibit there is the willow stick centerpiece by Patrick Dougherty that sports its own cooling climate during summer heat—a wonder by one of the most famous artists in the country. For installations both indoors and out, the Sun Valley Gallery Association has a useful online guide for planning a walking

4 | 2012 WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE | BOISEweekly

route in Ketchum for those who won’t be around for the monthly gallery walk on the first Friday of the month. For those who don’t make it to the valley before September, never fear, a fairy-tale exhibit is in the works for the fall, pre-

Gail Severn Gallery 400 First Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-5079, gailseverngallery.com Northern Rockies Folk Festival northernrockiesfolkfestival.com Rolling in Dough 520 Washington Ave., Ketchum Sun Valley Center for the Arts 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum; 314 Second Ave. S., Hailey, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org Sun Valley Gallery Association svgalleries.org Sun Valley Summer Symphony Orchestra svsummersymphony.org Tranquility Tea House 580 Washington Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-0095, tranquilityteahouse.com

MATT FURBER

ceded by a free showing of The Princess Bride Friday, Sept. 21, at the center’s arts extension property, lovingly referred to as the “Hailey House” in the county seat. The center offers a number of art and literature classes at the historic location. Beyond still art and moving pictures is a long list of concerts in the Sun Valley summer offing. A new exhibit at the Gail Severn Gallery features work by Hung Liu, one of the most well known Chinese-American artists around. Liu is known for her paintings that integrate historical Chinese photography. It is compelling to view how she overlays traditional Chinese insects, birds, flowers and dragons in her works, regarded as representations of “social realism” derived from the era of real socialism that was the cultural revolution in China. Deep summer is a time to dream and wonder and one that brings people together at events like Ketchum’s free Arts and Crafts Festival Friday, Aug. 10-Sunday, Aug. 12,

hosted by the Sun Valley Center for the Arts. It includes hands-on art projects for children, demonstrating artists and performances by local and regional musicians playing everything from American folk-rock to blues. Local vendors will serve fresh fare. The Sun Valley Summer Symphony Orchestra season—which continues through Tuesday, Aug. 14—offers free picnic seating on the Sun Valley Pavilion lawn to go along with the beautiful music made by the orchestra’s professional musicians. Get a full rundown of the concerts at svsummersymphony.org. Other performances include the center’s Summer Performing Arts Series, which brings world-class musicians to the valley, including Bonnie Raitt on Thursday, Aug. 30. Another Wood River Valley tradition not to be missed is the Northern Rockies Folk Festival set to kick off Friday, Aug. 3-Saturday, Aug. 4, in Hailey’s Hop Porter Park. If your Sun Valley visit is only for a day, and you still have a gap in your arts hunting schedule, a quick reference to see what you might be missing at any given hour can be found on the events link at visitsunvalley.com. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


A DAY FOR FAMILIES Keeping everyone happy

PATTI MURPHY

BLUEBIRD DAY CAFE If past trips with the kids have been set to the nasally soundtrack of “We’re boorrred,” you likely won’t hear that when you visit the Sun Valley area. With its sunny days, cool nights, rushing rivers, mountain trails and excellent dining, a trip to the Wood River Valley has enough to keep kids—and adults who want to act like kids—happy and busy all day long. Start your day with a hearty breakfast at one of the cozy Ketchum eateries. Suggestions include the rustic Kneadery or Bluebird Day Cafe, known around town as the home of the bottomless mimosa. Breakfast and a good cup of Joe can also be had at local coffee shops Java and Tully’s, located conveniently in the Ketchum Sun Valley Visitor’s Center, as well as The Coffee Grinder. There’s nothing like a good mountain hike to start the day, and there are a multitude of trails to pick from. Adams Gulch is an easy family favorite, with its Sunnyside Trail that takes you up and down rolling hills through aspen groves and sage, and Shadyside Trail, which winds through pine trees and forest. There also are cold-flowing creeks for dunking your toes. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Biking is also big, and the miles of paved bike paths and countless single-track trails in the hills make it a cycling heaven. There are even a couple pump track parks in Ketchum and nearby Hailey. If you’re more about catching fish than catching air, check out the free flycasting classes on the front lawn of the Sun Valley Lodge. You can also get your younger kids a rod, reel and bobber, and head over to fishplanted Penny Lake, where they are likely to have some angling luck. Lunch in Ketchum is as easy as climbing the little hill on Main Street and getting a hot dog or polish sausage with the works at Irving’s Red Hots, or as entertaining as lunch at Gretchen’s Cafe on the Sun Valley Lodge terrace, where you can watch the ice skaters on the outdoor rink. Or, simply pack a sandwich, wrap or other take-out meal, and cop a squat by the river, in a park or at a nearby lake. Don’t forget dessert—Leroy’s Ice Cream Shack in the Ketchum Town Plaza serves locally made Toni’s Sun Valley Ice Cream, and all profits 6 are donated to local schools, the Sun

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Valley Ski Education Foundation and the Ketchum Parks and Recreation 5 Department. After you cool your innards, take the kids to cool their outers with a splash in the fountain in Memory Park on Main Street. Jazz in the Park The valvisitsunvalley.com ley is full of history, so be Ketch’em Alive sure to visit visitsunvalley.com the Ketchum Sun Valley Ski Sun Valley Summer Symphony and Heritage 208-622-5607, Museum, svsummersymphony.org where ancient ski equipment, vintage skate costumes and historic photos Ketchum Sun Valley of local past Ski and Heritage Olympic and Museum world-class 180 E. First St., Ketchum, 208-726-8118, skiers and ksvhs.com skaters tell the history of Ore Wagon Museum winter sports 200 10th St., Ketchum in the area. At the Ore Wagon Museum, get up close and perSun Valley Ice Shows 888-622-2108 sonal with the sunvalley.com/thingsBig Hitch ore to-do/iceshows/ wagons, which have 7-foottall wheels and carried up to 12 tons of ore. Adam’s Gulch There is also a trails.bcrd.org/ fascinating exadamsgulchloop.php hibit on local legend Ernest Hemingway. Speaking of Hemingway, visit the Ketchum Cemetery just north of town on Highway 75 and take part in a longstanding tradition by tossing a few pennies onto his grave. Some say it’s for luck and favor, and

LISTEN

LEARN

WATCH

GO

others say, with a wink and a nod, that the pennies help pay his bar bill in heaven. There is plenty to do in the evenings as well, including free music concerts each Tuesday in Ketchum’s Forest Service Park; Thursdays in Town Plaza across from Atkinsons’ Market; and Bluebird Day Cafe Sunday jazz in 700 N. Main St., Rotary Park at Ketchum, Warm Springs 208-928-6410, and Saddle bluebirddaycafe.com Road. And don’t The Coffee Grinder 421 E. Fourth St., forget the Ketchum, free Sun Val208-726-8048 ley Summer Symphony, a Gretchen’s Cafe full orchestra Sun Valley Lodge featuring 100 208-622-2800 of the nation’s finest classical Java musicians, 191 Fourth St., performing Ketchum, 208-726-2882, nightly on javabowlofsoul.com the grounds of Sun Valley The Kneadery Lodge. The 260 Leadville Ave. N., lodge also Ketchum, hosts the star208-726-9462 studded summer ice skatLeroys Ice ing shows, Cream Shack Town Plaza, which are across from great family Giacobbi Square fun and feature Olympic Tully’s medalists and 601 Sun Valley Road, national- and Ketchum, world-champi208-622-3288 on skaters. Finally, when the day is done and the kids are passed out, step outside into the cool night air, look up at the sparkly Milky Way splashed across the sky, and realize that there’s plenty more to do tomorrow.

EAT

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The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame rhythm section from the legendary group Creedence Clearwater Revival will perform live CCR hits at the Sun Valley Pavilion Tuesday, Aug. 28. Tickets $29-$79, sunvalley.com.

BONNIE RAITT

Held in conjunction with the Northern Rockies Folk Festival, featuring plenty of arts, crafts and activities Saturday, Aug. 4-Sunday, Aug. 5, in Hailey, haileyidaho.com.

JOHN CLEGG AND LADYSMITH BLACK MOMBAZO

Three-day concert festival featuring members of the musical family, their bands and friends playing to a packed

BRAUN BROTHERS REUNION

Catch a team-roping progressive, ATV and motorcycle rodeo, wild cow race and much more at the Blaine County Fairgrounds in Carey Wednesday, Aug. 8-Saturday, Aug. 11, blainecountyfair.com.

BLAINE COUNTY FAIR

Celebrate Idaho’s mining heritage Friday, Aug. 31-Sunday, Sept. 2, wagondays.org.

WAGON DAYS

Sample the wares of more than 50 vendors selling antiques, linens, country home decor and more from Friday, Aug. 31-Sunday, Sept. 2. Main Street, haileyidaho.com.

LABOR DAY HAILEY’S MAIN STREET ANTIQUE AND ART SHOW

The Grammy Award-winning singer, songwriter and guitarist will perform with legendary gospel and rhythm-andblues singer Mavis Staples, on Thursday, Aug. 30, at the Sun Valley Pavilion at 7 p.m. Tickets $30.50-$40.50, sunvalleycenter.org.

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVISITED

NORTHERN ROCKIES ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR

The South African superstar will perform with his sevenpiece band and Ladysmith Black Mombazo. Monday, Aug. 6, River Run Lodge, 7 p.m. Tickets cost $30-$85, sunvalleycenter.org.

This festival begins with the Shoshone-Bannock tribal blessing and continues with entertainment for the whole family, crafts and a salmon dinner with full spread. The festival is located off Highway 75 at the Stanley Museum on Saturday, Aug. 25, stanleycc.org.

SAWTOOTH SALMON FESTIVAL

This second-annual festival features the work of local artists and lots of live music Friday, Aug. 24-Sunday, Aug. 26, west of the Mountain Village Mercantile on Highway 21, stanleycc.org.

STANLEY ARTS FESTIVAL

Free concerts every Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. at the Forest Service Park in downtown Ketchum, through Aug. 21, sunvalley.com.

KETCH’EM ALIVE

Music festival at Hop Porter Park in Hailey Friday, Aug. 3-Saturday, Aug. 4. $15-$35, northernrockiesfolkfestival. com.

35TH ANNUAL NORTHERN ROCKIES FOLK FESTIVAL

Local merchants bring their wares to weekly markets in Ketchum on Tuesdays and Hailey on Thursdays through mid-October, wrfarmersmarket.org.

WOOD RIVER FARMERS MARKET

Free admission orchestra and chamber music concerts at the Sun Valley Pavilion and lawn outside. Season runs through Tuesday, Aug. 14. Concerts begin at 6:30 p.m., svsummersymphony.org.

SUN VALLEY SUMMER SYMPHONY

Watch as world-class ice skaters perform on the ice rink every Saturday through Sept. 1 at the Sun Valley Lodge. Tickets $16-$99, sunvalley.com.

SUN VALLEY ON ICE

AUGUST

On Monday, Oct. 29, and Tuesday, Oct. 30, the Howard Preserve in Bellevue is transformed into a spooky

BELLEVUE HAUNTED FOREST

This group of musicians will make you re-evaluate what you think of chamber music. The group will perform at Zankel Hall on Saturday, Oct. 27, sunvalleycenter.org.

SYBARITE5

Plenty of suds at the beer festival in Old Cutters Park in Hailey, with lots of cyclocross and live music. Friday, Oct. 26-Saturday, Oct. 27, crosstoberfestidaho.com.

CROSSTOBERFEST

Thursday, Oct. 18-Sunday, Oct. 21. Nexstage Theater, nexstagetheater.org.

THE KING AND I

The fourth-annual Ernest Hemingway Symposium will focus on Hemingway and Politics, investigating how Hemingway’s life and writing were influenced by the world in which he lived, and how he may have used his writing to change that world. Thursday, Oct. 18-Saturday, Oct. 20, thecommunitylibrary.org.

ERNEST HEMINGWAY SYMPOSIUM

This acclaimed play partners the power and intensity of live theater with a cinematic quality inspired by the world of film noir. Prepare to be scared when Company of Fools presents its rendition Wednesday, Oct. 17-Nov. 3. Liberty Theatre, Hailey, companyoffools.org.

THE WOMAN IN BLACK

Forty bands will play 260 shows in five days. Wednesday, Oct. 17-Sunday, Oct. 21, sunvalleyjazz.com.

23RD ANNUAL SUN VALLEY JAZZ JAMBOREE

SUN VALLEY HARVEST FESTIVAL— Bask in all things culinary Friday, Sept. 21-Sunday, Sept. 23. The festival includes cooking demos, wine tasting, chefs’ dinners and more, with a focus

2012 WAGON DAYS—A celebration of Idaho’s mining history with parades, antique shows and more, from Friday, Aug. 31-Sunday, Sept. 2, in Ketchum. wagondays.org.

35TH ANNUAL NORTHERN ROCKIES FOLK FESTIVAL—Music festival at Hop Porter Park in Hailey Friday, Aug. 3-Saturday, Aug. 4, featuring Carrie Rodriguez, Rosie Ledet and the Zydeco Playboys, and Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit. Tickets $15-$35, northernrockiesfolkfestival.com.

FESTIVALS

CALENDAR OF EVENTS


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The skies over Sun Valley will be filled with colorful paragliding wings as pilots race to check points and eventually a daily finish line. More than 100 of the world’s best paragliding pilots will compete in Sun Valley this summer as part of the 2012 Paragliding World Cup from Saturday, Aug. 18-Saturday, Aug. 25, sunvalley.com.

The longtime New York Times columnist and New York Magazine writer at large will discuss the upcoming presidential election Sunday, Oct. 14, sunvalleycenter.org.

FRANK RICH LECTURE

Marking the valley’s sheep-ranching history. Thursday, Oct. 11-Sunday, Oct. 14, trailingofthesheep.org.

TRAILING OF THE SHEEP

Talks, panels and readings led by distinguished writers from Friday, Aug. 17-Monday, Aug. 20. Tickets, $850, svwc.com.

PARAGLIDING WORLD CUP

A CHRISTMAS STORY

OCTOBER

SUN VALLEY WRITERS’ CONFERENCE

Celebrate the season with an ice show and all things holiday Monday, Dec. 24. Sun Valley Resort, call 208622-2135 for more information.

CHRISTMAS IN SUN VALLEY

This classic tale will be performed at the Nexstage Theater Wednesday, Dec. 19-Monday, Dec. 24. nexstagetheater.org.

Company of Fools presents this musical, comprised of memorable moments from the life of the beloved Peanuts character, from Wednesday, Dec. 12-Sunday, Dec. 30. Liberty Theatre, Hailey, companyoffools.org.

YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN

Catch the company’s winter performance Friday, Dec. 7-Sunday, Dec. 9, at the Nexstage Theater, nexstagetheater.org.

SUN VALLEY BALLET

Plenty of hiking and biking events for kids and adults all taking place Saturday, Sept. 29, svsef.org.

BALDY HILL CLIMB

Celebration of all things food. Friday, Sept. 21-Sunday, Sept. 23, throughout Ketchum, sunvalleyharvestfestival. com.

SUN VALLEY HARVEST FESTIVAL

Catch the who-done-it Friday, Sept. 21-Saturday, Sept. 22, at Nexstage Theatre, nexstagetheater.org.

MURDER MYSTERY THEATER

Hosted by the Sawtooth Mountain Mamas, this festival celebrates the traditions of the American West and the working cowboy through poetry, stories and music Friday, Sept. 14-Saturday, Sept. 15. Info at stanleycc.org.

STANLEY SAWTOOTH COWBOY GATHERING

HAILEY HOMETOWN HOLIDAYS This celebration includes a tree-lighting ceremony with Santa and carolers. Saturday, Dec. 1, haileyidaho.com.

DECEMBER

Swing to the beats of live music, cruise vendor booths, enjoy plenty of kids’ activities Sunday, Sept. 2, and again Monday, Sept. 3, when a parade will also be held. Memorial Park, Bellevue, bellevueidaho.us.

A local tradition fun run/walk on Thanksgiving, Thursday, Nov. 22. haileyturkeytrot.com.

TURKEY TROT IN HAILEY

As a part of the Sun Valley Center for the Arts’ Happily Ever After? exhibition, the creator of Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events book series will discuss why fairy tales and dark stories have been told for centuries Sunday, Nov. 18, sunvalleycenter.org.

LECTURE WITH DANIEL HANDLER

Dala will work in schools that day and will bring their enchanting presence to the Opera House Thursday, Nov. 1, sunvalleycenter.org.

DALA IN CONCERT

NOVEMBER

Hailey transforms into a Halloween haven Wednesday, Oct. 31. Children can trick-or-treat at downtown businesses. 3-6 p.m., haileyidaho.com.

HAILEY HALLOWEEN HOOPLA

haunted forest, bellevueidaho.us.

BELLEVUE LABOR DAY CELEBRATION

Plenty of rodeo action will be had Saturday, Sept. 1-Sunday Sept. 2, at the rodeo grounds in Hailey. Visit intermountainprorodeo.com for more info on the organization.

INTERMOUNTAIN PROFESSIONAL RODEO ASSOCIATION RODEO FINALS

SEPTEMBER

The Sun Valley Gallery Association hosts nine free walks of member galleries, featuring new work and openings with dates through December. 5-8 p.m., svgalleries.org.

GALLERY WALKS

The multi-platinum country music quartet celebrates its 20th anniversary with a tour, including a stop at the Sun Valley Pavilion Wednesday, Aug. 15, at 8 p.m. Tickets $50-$250, sunvalley.com.

LONESTAR

The Boise dance company will host a workshop and performances in Sun Valley and Ketchum beginning Monday, Aug. 13, culminating with a performance at the Pavilion Friday, Aug. 24, treymcintyreproject.com.

TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT

The group of 12 musicians draws inspiration from music all over the world and will perform with singer China Forbes Monday, Aug. 13, at River Run Lodge. 7 p.m. Tickets $35-$85, sunvalleycenter.org.

PINK MARTINI

Celebrate the 13th-annual festival with productions of Twelfth Night and The Bible: The Complete Works of God Abridged, from Thursday, Aug. 12-Sunday, Aug. 26, at the Nexstage Theater and Forest Service Park in Ketchum. Tickets cost $15-$20, nexstagetheater.org.

SUN VALLEY SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL

This 50- or 100-mile bicycle ride begins and ends in downtown Ketchum Saturday, Aug. 11. Registration is $75 for the 100-mile course, or $65 for the 50-mile course, and includes a specialized water bottle, socks, post-tour food and beverages, spondoro.com.

SAWTOOTH CENTURY RIDE

Best of the best of bull riding at the rodeo grounds in Hailey Saturday, Aug. 11, haileyidaho.com.

PBR CLASSIC

The 44th installment of this annual festival will take place Friday, Aug. 10-Sunday, Aug. 12, in Atkinson Park. Free, sunvalleycenter.org.

SUN VALLEY ARTS AND CRAFTS FESTIVAL

crowd at the Challis Community Stage. Thursday, Aug. 9-Saturday, Aug. 11. Tickets cost $45 for a one-day pass, $15 ages 6-12, $71.95 two-day pass, $105.95 three-day pass, braunbrothersreunion.com.

SUN VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL—This film fest features independent films, premieres and more March 14-17, 2013. sunvalleyfilmfestival.org.

SUN VALLEY NORDIC FESTIVAL—The winter event includes clinics, demonstrations and races from Jan. 26-Feb. 3, 2013. svnordicfestival.com.

SUN VALLEY JAZZ JAMBOREE—This annual town-wide jazz fest is happening Wednesday, Oct. 17-Sunday, Oct. 21, and features 40 bands over the course of four days. sunvalleyjazz. com.

TRAILING OF THE SHEEP FESTIVAL—Celebrate the role of sheep in the history of the Wood River Valley with workshops, cooking classes, storytelling, a fiber fest and more, from Thursday, Oct. 11-Sunday, Oct. 14 in Ketchum and Hailey. trailingofthesheep.org.

on regional products. sunvalleyharvestfestival.com.


A DAY FOR PENNYPINCHING Stretching Sun Valley dollars

MATT FURBER

donate their proceeds to good causes— Whether you hitch a ride on a Learjet or homes for pets and books for the masses— emblazon some cardboard with a Sharpie so consumers can feel pretty good about with “Sun Valley” or “Ketchum or bust,” the purchase of a $4 baseball cap to shield there is much to be gained from a mountain themselves from the ever-present sun. town visit on the cheap. Consider the price The Wood River Valley is not really about of a small tank of gas. It’s not peanuts, by the shopping in summer. It’s more a matter any means, but for the cost of 15 gallons of of communing with nature, which is still fuel, there is much a budget traveler can do quite affordable. in Sun Valley. While merchants It’s free to climb will be happy to Dollar Mountain to Barkin’ Basement separate you from get the lay of the 111 S. Main St., Hailey, your savings, it’s land, and Baldy, 208-788-3854 still quite possible too, for that matter. to do Sun Valley At 3,000 vertical Blaine County Recreation District inexpensively. feet, that’s a big bcrd.org Shopkeepers bang for zero bucks are experts when it and a couple of Gold Mine comes to offering energy bars, and lift 331 N. Walnut Ave., Ketchum, advice and tools rides down are free. 208-726-3465 to help you follow Down to your Mountain Rides your recreational last dollar? Hiking mountainrides.org passion. Trail a ski-lift line in the maps—available summer can yield Sun Valley Center for the Arts at either end of the some unexpected 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum; valley—link visitors treasures that can 314 Second Ave. S., Hailey, to endless paths for equate at least to 208-726-9491, contemplation. Test another meal. A sunvalleycenter.org your muscle with hamburger at the miles of trekking Snow Bunny DriveSun Valley Summer Symphony Orchestra or simply to vex In at the gateway svsummersymphony.org fellow nature lovers to Hailey is only with your end$3.19. Snow Bunny Drive-In less knowledge of Shoppers looking 801 S. Main St., Hailey, wildflower names for a break from the 208-788-6464 and bird songs. sun can find barFor those who gains at the Barkin’ Wood River Farmers Markets schlep bicycles Basement thrift Ketchum, 2-6 p.m. Tuesdays through to Ketchum, the store in Hailey and Oct. 9, corner of East Avenue and Fourth Street; price for entry to at the Gold Mine Hailey, 2-6 p.m. Thursdays through the Blaine in Ketchum, where Oct. 11, between Carbonate and County one’s trash really Galena streets, Recreation can be another’s 13 wrfarmersmarket.org District bike treasure. Both stores

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Sun Valley On Ice runs Saturday nights through September 1 promising a dazzling new spin on our traditional outdoor ice show under the stars. For show tickets or buffet and show tickets go to seats.sunvalley.com or call 208.622.2135.

August 4

August 18

Johnny Weir

Evan Lysacek

World Bronze Medalist 3X US Gold Medalist

2010 Olympic Gold Medalist World Champion 2X US Gold Medalist

Gracie Gold 2012 US Junior Women’s Gold Medalist

August 11

Nathan Chen 2012 US Junior Men’s Gold Medalist

August 25

Ilia kulik

Brian Boitano

Olympic Gold Medalist World Silver Medalist 2X Russian Champion

Olympic Gold Medalist 2X World Champion 4X US Champion

Courtney Hicks 2011 US Junior Women’s Gold Medalist

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A DAY FOR THE FOODIE The scrumptious but not presumptuous Highway 75 Culinary Corridor

From Bellevue to Stanley, the kitchens of U.S. Highway 75 offer a feast for hungry tummies in the Wood River Valley. It is easy to work up an appetite with the miles of trails to explore and hours of entertainment to pursue during a summer’s day visit to Sun Valley, and cooks here seek to satisfy. Just how many meals can a person enjoy in one day anyway? Depends on one’s appetite, it seems. For some stick-to-your-ribs bacon and eggs with bottomless coffee that will get you down the trail, try Jesse’s Country Grill on Main Street in Bellevue. A slightly cheaper option, but still plenty rich for the long day ahead, is breakfast at the Big Belly Deli on Main Street in downtown Hailey. It has possibly the most-affordable breakfast in Blaine County—and one of the freshest. If mountain biking or fishing or any other invigorating activity keeps you in the south valley for the morning, try lunch at CK’s Real Food on its bountiful blooming patio—fresh, wholesome, affordable and made with love by one of the best chefs in the valley, Chris Kastner. A surprise perhaps even for the seasoned Sun Valley visitor is dinner at Cristina’s Restaurant in Ketchum. More renowned as a lunch and desert venue, the Ketchum classic is bringing its gourmet touch to dinner. For those on the fly or just coming from tying them, try La Cabanita Mex for some horchata as you sort through the extensive menu of Mexican specialties. The unassuming locale by the Ketchum Post Office has a great deck and some of

perhaps the only homemade ramen tablecloths and more than one fork, the best service in the valley. noodles in Idaho filled with ginger there are plenty of those, too. If you are lucky enough to be and mushrooms, try Dashi, two Boca and the Cornerstone Bar in town for lunch on Friday, race doors down from the Elephant’s and Grill serve up excellent cocktails local office workers to Rickshaw, Perch. and appetizers if you are looking for serving a variety of delicious Asian Della Mano, Vintage and Globus more than one stop in your evening. street food that includes green curry, all have their own flair and finely For steamed pork dumplings and pad thai and dandan noodles. If someone in your party is not a fan of spicy food, one of the great Ketchum standbys is Johnny G’s Subshack on Washington Avenue, directly across the street from Glow Cafe, which offers raw food for those seeking not only a smoothy, but something more substantial, perLA CABANITA DASHI haps a sandwich, ravioli, falafel, curry—all raw Glow Cafe Cristina’s Restaurant Big Belly Deli and artfully 380 N. Washington Ave., 520 Second St. E., 171 N. Main St., Bellevue, presented. Ste. 105, Ketchum, 208-726-4499, 208-788-2411, For those just 208-725-0314, cristinasofsunvalley.com feedyourbelly.com passing through glowlivefood.com with a single day Dashi Boca in Ketchum, there Jesse’s Country Grill 220 East Ave., Ketchum, 131 Washington Ave. S., are street vendor 401 N. Main St., Bellevue, 208-928-7703, Ketchum, tacos, a cabin 208-788-9002 dashisunvalley.com 208-928-7773, bocaketchum.com with ice cream, Johnny G’s Subshack Della Mano and if you are 371 Washington Ave. N., 260 Main St., Ketchum, CK’s Real Food there on Tuesday, Ketchum, 208-721-7351, 320 S. Main St., Hailey, you can eat 208-725-7827, dellamanorestaurant.com 208-788-1223, straight off the johnnygsubshack.com cksrealfood.com grill at the farmGlobus ers market. Ketchum Grill 291 Sixth St. E., Ketchum, Cornerstone Bar and Grill But if you 520 East Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-1301, 11 N. Main St., Ketchum, want a place for 208-726-4660, globus-restaurant.com 208-928-7777, lunch with white ketchumgrill.com cbgketchum.com

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MATT FURBER

crafted food made by chefs with distinct tastes. But if you are looking for Idaho trout or lamb and a meal to please anyone from an octogenarian with a sophisticated wine palate to a toddler with a hankering for ice cream, try the Ketchum Grill.

La Cabanita Mex 160 W. Fifth St., Ketchum, 208-725-5001 Rickshaw 460 Washington Ave., Ketchum, 208-726-8481, eat-at-rickshaw.com Vintage 231 Leadville Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-9595

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SUN VALLEY CENTER FOR THE ARTS path or the 400 miles of single track is exactly zero, leaving gourmands 10 more coin for local cuisine. When it comes to human entertainment, paying for anything is almost against local etiquette in summer. There are free concerts from rock to Rachmaninov, and free art to view both on the street and in the many galleries, especially in Ketchum. There is some street food during farmers markets and various festivals, and a quick and inexpensive picnic can be had at the Main Street Market in Ketchum en route to any adventure—like a fairly inexpensive

concert hosted by the Sun Valley Center for the Arts, which in August includes Ladysmith Black Mambazo, Pink Martini and Bonnie Raitt with Mavis Staples. Around town bus rides with Mountain Rides in Hailey, Ketchum and Sun Valley are free (one-way fares up and down the valley are $3, $2 for youths and seniors). It’s true that a single dollar in the Wood River Valley is quickly spent, but a good day can still be cheaper than a tank of gas, even for those who decide to stay the night. Camping in the public domain is, of course, free, although many of the improved sites in the Sawtooth National Forest have no cost.

FREE STUFF Â&#x160;&;.1.431&<38*&9.3,&99-* :3&11*>:22*7>25-43> 7(-*897&G Â&#x160;F;.8.994*2.3,<&>Y8,7&;*G Â&#x160;F'4&98-:991*'&(094*)+.8- &0* 4),*+7429-*'4&9)4(0&99-* 97&.1-*&)949-*&<9449-.1)*73*88 &3)-&3,7.1&G Â&#x160;*33.8435:'1.((4:798G Â&#x160;.).3,9-*'.0*5&9-G Â&#x160;.8-.3,9-*894(0*)543)&9 &<7*3(**&,1*&70.3&.1*>&3) *33> &0*4:9&7257.3,4&) .3 *9(-:2G WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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BOISEweekly | 2012 WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE | 13


A DAY FOR RECREATION

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around the geological matrix that can )4:8;.*<8BG include a stop by Craters of the Moon &1)>+47N;*79.(&1+**94+&)7*3&1.3*&3) east of Carey and Shoshone Falls by 411&7 4:39&.3<.9-&).??>.3,(-&484+9*77&.35&70 Twin Falls will satisfy the most avid 2&>-*2&7*)*+.3.9*1>5&794+9-*6:*89+479-*:19.angler, boater, bird watcher and photo 2&9*:3&11*>80.)&>G:9'>-44047'>(7440N94 *=5*7.*3(*9-*'*89:3&11*>-&8944++*7N&99*259 shooter. If one day is all you have in 94,*94++5.89*N8&>9-**=5*798<-4(&9*794&11&'.1Sun Valley this summer, the happy news .9>1*;*18G is that one is better than none. *99.3,4:98.)*7*,:1&71.3*8.8-4<80..3,'*,&3G The next level of support for a quick 3:3&11*>N)4.3,84.8&0*>94-4<9-*85479 recreational hit ,74<8N&3).9Y8349/:899-* in Sun Valley 5:7;.*<4+80.+.1289&78&3) is a connection Blaine County Recreation District &9-1*9*8<-4'*,&3'7*&9-.3, with a guide bcrd.org 834<&9&,*G-*7*&7*2&3> service. Galena 24:39&.3,:.)*8.39-*44) Galena Lodge Lodge, Sturte.;*7&11*>&3)9-*9&31*> 15187 Idaho Highway 75, Ketchum, vants Mountain &8.3<-4<.11,1&)1>9&0*&3>208-726-4010, OutďŹ tters and 43*4:9.38*&7(-4+,7*&99:738G galenalodge.com Sun Valley *,&7)1*884+80.11N&3&);*39:7* Trekking all 942&9(-43*Y8*=5*7.*3(*&3) Sawtooth Mountain Guides have permits for sawtoothguides.com 249.;&9.43&<&.98G guided mountain 3&'7.),*)N&<&>942&=.biking, whether Sturtevants Mountain Outfitters 2.?*&)&>80..3,.3:3&11*> sturtos.com you are a rov.894&77.;*9-*3.,-9'*+47*&3) ing expert or a 81**58*2.J4:9)4478G&1*3& Sun Valley Resort total beginner. 4),*-&89-7**>:7989-&9(41sunvalley.com 1*(9.;*1>(&381**55*451* For those who 5*73.,-9G:3&11*>7*00.3, can squeeze Sun Valley Trekking &))8)4?*38247*'*79-8&9 in a night in svtrek.com .988.=-:98.9*8N&3)&<9449- the mountains

4:39&.3:.)*8+.119-*'&1&3(* surrounding the Visit Sun Valley 4+4:9+.99*)'&(0(4:397>&((42valley, Coyote visitsunvalley.com 24)&9.438&99-*.11.&28*&0 Yurt above :79GF3&15.3*89&79&+9*7'*.3, Baker Creek 3*891*)+479-*3.,-9.39-* Canyon is a *2'7&(*4+9-*240>N.43**7N4:1)*7N-.9*14:) welcome respite for horse people, hikers &3)&<9449-24:39&.382*&389-&980..3,'*,.38 and mountain bikers alike. Sun Valley <-.1*9-*(4++**.889.11-49G Trekking outďŹ ts the yurt. 7*&284+80..3,&7*7*2&70&'1*<-*381**5.3, A visit to the â&#x20AC;&#x153;To Doâ&#x20AC;? list on the .3&>:79<.9-&<44)894;*G+(4:78*N)7.;.3,+742 Visit Sun Valley website will help

*9(-:2N&.1*>N*11*;:*479&31*>.8&184)4&'1*G9 travelers make the best use of their time /:892*&38)*5&79.3,&1.991*247*'1*&7>J*>*)+742 in Sun Valley. For example, horseback (4:(-8:7+.3,&3)&1.991*1*88.39:3*<.9-9-*834<riders can ďŹ nd half a dozen links to 5&(0G.9-*7<&>N(&9(-.3,&5489J'&(0(4:397>1.+9+47 outďŹ tters on the page dedicated to 9-*1&895&347&2.(1.,-943&1)>2&0*8&(1&88.(:3 equine adventure. The same goes for &11*>)&>(4251*9*G-*7*Y8&1<&>89.2*9481**5&9 the massive list of all kinds of recre-42*47&349-*73.,-9.3&>:79G

GALENALODGE.COM

Sun Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s softer season for the outdoorsy

GALENA LODGE The ďŹ rst step to recreation in the Wood River Valley is to kick open the door. The second step is just thatâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;walking, trotting or rolling on some form of wheel. Visitors to the valley can get all the way to Canada without much trafďŹ c. Even if your mission is just to soak in the pools at Sun Valley Resort and ride the gondola to Roundhouse for a meal on Baldy, a few hours spent in the fresh mountain air have a healing touch even for the one-day visitor. There may still be patches of snow hiding on north slopes in the ďŹ ve mountain ranges around Sun Valley and Ketchum, but summer and fall are about everything other than skiing. Golf, tennis, trail rides, shooting, even movies make the legend of a Sun Valley Summer. One of the best and most-economical ways to get a quick orientation to

Sun Valley is to pick up a copy of Matt Leideckerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waterproof book Exploring Sun Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;A Comprehensive Guide to the Boulder, Pioneer, and Smoky Mountainsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;a small, rich primer about the local trails, ecology and lore. With a little knowledge, however, comes the realization that one day in Sun Valley is a terrible tease. There are 400 miles of single-track trails beyond the ski resort offerings. Even if you are in town just to try the lift-accessed downhill challenges, explore the network beyond the hill. It is the cure for single-track deďŹ cit disorder. The evidence is all over YouTube. There are lifetimes of adventures up and down the Harriman Trail and beyond into the Sawtooth Valley over Galena Summit. Rivers running throughout and

14 | 2012 WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE | BOISEweekly

  F 

MATT FURBER

ation. Yes, even in summer, there is knitting.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Matt Furber

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BOISEweekly | 2012 WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE | 15


LISTINGS/1ST THURSDAY LISK GALLERY—Stop in 13 to view new works from oil painter Carl Rowe, images from landscape photographer Mark Lisk and Jerri Lisk’s acrylicon-aluminum paintings. Wine tasting available from Sawtooth Winery. 401 S. Eighth St., 208342-3773, liskgallery.com.

the Dead decor and cedar and leather sofas. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-385-9018.

SOLID—Enjoy live music 19 from Robert James, appetizers, spirit sampling from

R. GREY GALLERY 17 JEWELRY AND ART GLASS—View the jewelry show

Southern Wine and Spirits and the chalk art of Ed Anderson. Followed by Last Call Trivia at 8 p.m. 405 S. Eighth St., 208345-6620.

featuring botanical jewelry line Silver Seasons, handcrafted in the United States using bronze, sterling silver, pearls and other stones. Choose from new plants or see why everyone loves the pussy willows, pea pods and more. It’s like wearing a piece of nature. Prices start around $50. 5-9 p.m. 415 S. Eighth St., 208385-9337, rgreygallery.com.

NFINIT ART GALLERY— 14 Enjoy wine tasting by Woodriver Cellars, as well as complimentary tapas while you peruse work by Brian Kahn, Katy Johnson, Luis Funo and Mark Baccay. 5-9 p.m. 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 131.

15

NORTHRUP BUILDING—Featuring work from Kate and Sarah Masterson, Cassandra Schiffler, Theresa Burkes and the Idaho Book Artists Guild. Eighth and Broad streets, second floor.

ing wall fountains, silver, Day of

Central AMERICAN CLOTHING GALLERY—Check out 21 what’s new for the season and

shaw, mixed-media sculptor. 517 S. Eighth St., 208-338-5444.

view the photograph cards of Angeline Adams, who will be in the gallery. 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 121A, 208-433-0872, americanclothinggallery.com.

ART WALK Locations featuring artists

ARTISAN OPTICS—Stop by the annual Bevel Trunk Show and find eyewear for every occasion. 190 N. Eighth St., 208-3380500, artisanoptics.com. BARBARA BARBARA AND CO.—Check out Barbara Barbara and Co.’s new home. Store will be open late. 807 W. Bannock St., 208-342-2002. CHOCOLAT BAR—Brewer’s Haven will pair select beers with Chocolat Bar chocolates. 805 W. Bannock St., 208-338-7771, thechocolatbar.com.

JEFFERSON

CITY PEANUT SHOP—Enjoy City Peanut creations paired with Payette Brewing Co. beers, including Leaning Barn Farmhouse Ale with Chili Cherry, Pale Ale with Maple Syrup Bacon and Outlaw IPA with Ghost Nuts. 803 W. Bannock St., 208-433-3931.

BANNOCK

IDAHO

THE HUDDLE—Happy Hour all night, featuring two-for-one domestic pints, $1 off micro pints and 50-cent wings. 205 N. 10th St., Ste. 110, 208-338-5454.

GROVE

5TH

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

GROVE

6TH

CAPITOL

MAIN

13TH

evolution of paint over time. 733 Broad St., 208-336-3454.

RENEWAL CONSIGN18 MENT HOMEWARES— Featuring work by Adrian Ker-

SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Taste the new white table wine, enjoy a wine flight and popular wine Jello shots, as well as a 20-percent discount on all cases. 786 W. Broad St., 208-345-9463.

QUE PASA—Check out 16 the best selection of Mexican artwork in town, includ-

VAN DYCK FRAME DE20 SIGN—View the paintings of Tripp Moon, which explore the

FRONT BROAD MYRTLE

8TH B AT T E RY

1. Basque Museum

11. Happy Fish

2. Boise Ar t Glass

12. Idaho State Historical Museum

3. Bricolage 4. Flatbread 5. Flying M Coffeehouse

13. Lisk Galler y 14. NfiniT Galler y

21. American Clothing Galler y 22. Idaho Poster and Letterpress 23. The Press

15. Nor thrup Building

24. Thomas Hammer Coffee

6. Goldy’s Corner

16. Que Pasa

25. Alaska Center

7. 8th Street Ar tist in Residence Program

17. R. Grey Jewelr y and Ar t Glass

26. Ar t Source Galler y

18. Renewal

27. Basement Galler y

8. Atomic Treasures 9. Boise Ar t Museum 10. Cole Marr

19. Solid 20. Van Dyck Frame Design

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display its large collection of antique wood sign and poster type. Additionally, inspirational and humorous quotes printed on the 100-year-old presses and framed in repurposed thrift-store frames will be scattered about the shop. 280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 118, 208-761-9538, idahoposterandletterpress.com. LE CAFE DE PARIS—Enjoy a special tapas menu and wine tasting. 204 N. Capitol Blvd., 208-336-0889, lecafedeparis. com.

F U LT O N

RIVER

IDAHO POSTER AND 22 LETTERPRESS—Idaho Poster and Letterpress will

LUX FASHION LOUNGE—Enjoy ’80s and ’90s covers from the Sweettarts and 10 percent off when you show the First Thursday brochure. 785 W. Idaho St., 208-344-4589. THE MATADOR—Taste the Double Barrel Reposado, Matador’s private-label tequila recently developed by mater distillers with Herradura tequilas. 215 N. Eighth St., 208-342-9988, matadorrestaurants.com. MCU SPORTS—Cruise the annual football equipment swap and specials and partake in McU’s 40th anniversary celebration. 822 W. Jefferson St., 208-3427734, mcusports.com.

9:30AM - 1:30PM

8th Street from Bannock to Main Street & on the Grove Plaza Chef Abbigail Carlson - Cooking with fresh, seasonal produce from the Market - Saturdays Q 10am to Noon

This Week at the Market -

First of the Season Tomatoes!

* Fresh locally grown produce, herbs, & flowers * Idaho Specialty Foods & Wines * Great Selection of Local Artwork EVERY SATURDAY AT THE MARKET

28. The Crux 29. Galler y 601

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 21


FIRST THURSDAY AT

1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS THE PRESS—Jeri Ruth23 erford will display some of her award-winning art until 8

1ST THURSDAY/NEWS

p.m. and New West Spirits will conduct a wine tasting. 212 N. Ninth St., Ste. B, 208-336-9577. REDISCOVERED BOOKSHOP— Author Pauls Toutonghi will talk about his new novel Evel Knievel Days at 7 p.m. 180 N. Eighth St., 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

118 S 5TH ST. BOISE

SUPERB SUSHI—Enjoy sake tasting and smoked salmon sampling. 6-8 p.m. 208 N. Eighth St., 208-385-0123, superbsushidowntown.com. THOMAS HAMMER— 24 Featuring artist Paul Sloan’s landscapes. 298 N. Eighth St., 208-433-8004, hammercoffee.com.

West Side THE ALASKA CEN25 TER—Featuring Idaho, A Different Panoramic View by Eric Obendorf and Desert Visions by Chi E. Shenam. 5-9 p.m. 1020 Main St. ART SOURCE 26 GALLERY—Featuring Visions of Idaho: New Work in Oils by Fred Choate. Enjoy live music, wine from Indian Creek Winery and snacks. 5-9 p.m. 1015 W. Main St., 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. BASEMENT 27 GALLERY—Ben Wilson is perhaps best known locally for his illustrations in Boise Weekly and internationally for his band posters. He presents new work that shows the same unique perspective of life found in his illustrations, based on a found box of family memorabilia and his mother’s recollections of these treasures. See First Thursday, Page 19. 928 W. Main St., 208-333-0309. THE CRUX—The Crux 28 beer taps are flowing again and the Stumptown coffee is on ice. Enjoy a group art show featuring 10 local artists and music by Harry and the Potters from 7-10 p.m. 1022 W. Main St., 208-342-3213. GALLERY 601—Mosey 29 into the gallery for the annual Western show featuring the artwork of Nelson Boren, Charlie Russell, James Bama, Chris Owen and many others, as well as new rodeo images from Bob Coronato, including this year’s featured rodeo, Days of ’76 Rodeo. 211 N. 10th St., 208-336-5899, gallery601.com. OWYHEE PLAZA HOTEL—Featuring appetizer specials in the Gamekeeper Lounge. 1109 Main St., 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com. RADIO BOISE—Watch the live on-air DJ, tour the studio and step up to the mic and record a testimonial. Broadcasting on KRBX, 89.9 FM. Alaska Building, 1020 W. Main St., Ste. 200, 208-424-8166, radioboise.org. TRIP TAYLOR BOOKSELLER— Read your own work or another poet’s during the open mic poetry session, and browse the selection of books. 210 N. 10th St., 208-344-3311, downtownboise.org.

Erin Cunnigham will be among 24 local artists joining in a group show at Bricolage based on the theme of navigate.

NAVIGATING ART WITH A WOODEN PANEL Bricolage is collaborating with the Boise Guest House and 24 local artists to create a First Thursday exhibition exploring individual interpretations of travel. Each participating artist was given an 11-inch by 14-inch wood panel and a metal school compass and then invited to interpret the theme Navigate. “We provided the wooden panel for each artist to use to keep the size and scope similar,” said Chelsea Snow, owner of Bricolage. “I think some of the artists really didn’t want to be given the canvas. We had a lot of people extending it out, cutting it down, and that sort of thing so that was an interesting exploration.” Aside from the woodblock and compass, the mediums vary widely. While many are illustrations or paintings, others are abstract, encaustic, or utilize plastics or gouache. Artist Grant Olson’s interpretation of Navigate was created in gouache on paper and beckoned him to explore his own paths of travel throughout his life. “What I found was an entirely different world that was created in this piece that hearkens back to where I have come from but has a comfort in the opacity of its future,” Olson said. Artist and Neighborhood Allstars graphic designer Toby Robin got involved with Navigate as a way to take some time out of the daily grind. His work is made from wood cutouts. “I was excited to try and create a piece out of several cutouts,” he said. “I definitely enjoyed the process and think the piece came together nicely.” Other local artists involved in the show include Bingo Barnes, Heather Bauer, Laurie Blakeslee, Travis Campion, Cale Cathey (aka Meatbag), Erin Cunningham, Byron Folwell, Becca Fuhrman, Kirsten Furlong, Conrad Garner, Julia Green, Noble Hardesty, Elijah Jensen, Karen Lilly, Kyler Martz, Sarah Masterson, Brienne Oliver, Jeremy Oliver, Jon Sadler, Willow Socia, April Vandegrift and Ben Wilson. Navigate was born from a discussion between Snow and Eve-Marie Bergren, owner of the Boise Guest House. “Eve-Marie wanted ... to do a travel room so we thought we would ask artists to make artwork that is travel oriented.” Navigate will be featured at Bricolage in August before moving to the Boise Guest House in September. Originals are for sale, and prints will be created for the guest house. “We hope to make this an annual thing,” said Snow. An opening reception will take place at Bricolage First Thursday, Aug. 2, from 5-9 p.m, and again at the Boise Guest House First Thursday, Sept. 7, from 5-9 p.m. —Tabitha Bower

22 | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 23


NEWS/NOISE NOISE ANDR EW C R IS P

BOUNCING ALONG Workin’ on Fire burns rubber heading to Seattle.

FIRE, THUNDER AND RIOTS Local funky metal band Trikata is no more. The band played its last show at Knitting Factory July 26, opening for Floater. Trikata had to call it quits after the band’s chief songwriter and guitarist, Dave “Banana Hands” Clemens, decided to move back to the horse Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter wants to shoot (California, for those of you who don’t keep track of the ramblings of our fearless leader). “We wish Dave all the best in his travels back home, we love you and will miss you! Who knows, maybe a reunion will come together, someday?” the band posted to its Facebook page. Another band that just wrapped things up in Boise is Workin’ on Fire. The high-school all-stars are no longer in high school and have announced plans to collectively jet off to Seattle to enjoy all the rain and musical anonymity that Boise can’t offer the powertrio. Workin’ on Fire celebrated getting out of Dodge with a headlining show at Knitting Factory July 28. In a move in the opposite direction, local pop-punkers Hotel Chelsea is no longer bi-metro. The band’s frontman Ryan Sampson was living in Las Vegas for a job and commuting back to Boise for band practice, but it didn’t last. The Boise black hole strikes again. Another place that was struck, thunderstruck to be precise, was Iran’s nuclear facilities. Yahoo News reported that one of the symptoms of the malware that the nation has been battling is that infected computers start playing “Thunderstruck,” by AC/DC, at full volume and on repeat. Kudos to whatever night-stalking hacker genius slipped in that line of code. But would it be too cliche to get some Napalm Death in the playlist? Another international music shenanigan, though a decidedly less funny one, is going down in Russia, where the punk band Pussy Riot is currently on trial for a music video that featured the band dressed in colorful ski masks and causing a general ruckus inside of a Russian church as part of a “punk prayer” that was a fairly direct critique of the Putin regime. According to The Guardian, the women are being charged with “hooliganism motivated by religious hatred.” The video can be seen on YouTube under the headline Russian Riot Grrrl Protest. The three members of the band are facing up to seven years in prison. —Josh Gross

24 | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Pop punk icon and his wife channel creativity in McCall JACLYN BRANDT Just outside of McCall, a remote cabin sits on four acres overlooking the vast forests. Next to the home rests a guest house and an old barn, which recently underwent a major renovation. “At one point, we were taking care of retired race horses,” said Shanti Wintergate, whose parents built the cabin when she was a teenager. “Seeing these horses come out of the trailer, they wouldn’t even know how to walk on uneven ground.” Shanti Wintergate and Greg Attonito know the key to a lasting relationship: creative collaboration. Over the years, the Wintergates had many horses. But one in particular had a lasting influence on the peaceful mountain retreat. space where you can just walk through the both living in Los Angeles and crossed paths When a beloved horse named Puloma passed again. Attonito said one night they were stand- door and start being creative,” said Attonito. away recently, Wintergate and her husband, The project makes fun, upbeat music that ing outside the Capitol Records building and Greg Attonito, decided to convert the barn is also educational. Some song titles include he just knew she was the one. into a recording studio. The couple named the “Days of the Week,” “Flat Stanley,” “The “It was like fireworks, for me, anyway,” studio Puloma Studios in its honor. Number Song” and the title track, “Imaginahe said. “The horse lives on through the music,” tion,” which has lyrics such as: “We could Shortly after that night, Wintergate started Wintergate said. climb a tree or two / kick off our shoes / brush But the music that often pours from Puloma receiving drawings from Attonito in the mail. off those blues / I hear the sun might miss us / “When he was first making it known that Studios into the crisp mountain air doesn’t if we don’t send him kisses.” he liked me, he would draw me pictures from invoke images of galloping mares. Rather, it Play Date has performed at some of the the road,” she remembered. “That was almost inspires sweaty dudes to crash into each other same festivals as the Bouncing Souls, and since 15 years ago.” amid a sea of fist pumps. Attonito’s band, The Years later, and still madly in love, Attonito many of the group’s early fans now have their Bouncing Souls, has been making pop punk own kids, it has been an easy transition to play decided to put his illustration skills to use since 1989 and has sold more than 20 million for a new generation. once again. In 2007, the couple released an records worldwide. Imagination is the only album that has been illustrated children’s book, I Went For a Walk. The band has released most of its albums recorded in Puloma Studios thus far, but it’s Wintergate wrote the story, which follows on its own label, Chunksaah Records, but for not outside the realm of possibility to record a an unnamed narrator through a journey of the new album, Comet, the group signed with Bouncing Souls album there in the future, or at self-discovery while on a search for food. He Rise Records and producer Bill Stevenson. least parts of one. “It took 10 days to record,” Attonito said. travels all over the world and into space, as While Attonito’s band is constantly on well as two mysterious worlds. One of the “Just like an old-school Bouncing tour, especially following the release of a new worlds tries to feed him with music and the Souls record.” record, both he and Wintergate say they’re For Comet, band members holed themselves other tries to feed him with “moments which happiest staying at home. are abundantly good.” Attonito did all the up in Fort Collins, Colo., to record the album “The lack of accessibility here is what keeps drawings for the book. and were all pleased with the outcome. its mountain-town vibe,” Attonito said. “I “Six to nine months a year, I am on tour,” “It has an energy that was in their earlier records and has that emergency and urgency of Attonito said. “So I would bring it on the road don’t want that energy to change.” “Being able to make some toast ... can be and when I had the youth,” Attonito said. magic,” he added. time, I would draw. “The same sense of Though Attonito and Wintergate don’t have Shanti would choose urgency that is in these More info on Play Date at facebook.com/iloveplaydate. the pieces when I came kids of their own, they say they hope to exclassic recordings that pand on their children’s efforts. The next Play home.” we love.” The book consists of Date project will include turning each song on The new-old direcan album into its own mini-book. 40 whimsical illustrations and took about five tion paid off. After it dropped June 12, the “We have three nephews and a niece from years to complete. album landed at No. 110 on the Billboard “Our idea for doing kids music started then our siblings,” said Wintergate. “Although so 200 chart. many of our friends have kids now, we are Attonito first met Wintergate in 1997. Both and it’s just coming out now,” Attonito said. Auntie Shanti and Uncle Greg to many more The couple is also making original chilhad embarked to India at the same time, Winnieces and nephews.” dren’s music under the moniker Play Date. In tergate as a recent high school grad and the Attonito is preparing to leave the country their home studio, a white board sits on a desk band to meet with a spiritual teacher. scrawled with the track listing from Play Date’s with the Bouncing Souls in August, a tour “All of them were like brothers almost Wintergate will be joining him on. The couple first album, Imagination, which comes out immediately,” she remembered. “So we kept plans to continue making music for America’s Tuesday, Oct. 9, on Fun Fun Records. in touch.” youth, of all ages. “It’s nice having all the music stuff in one Shortly after, Attonito and Wintergate were WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 25


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY AUG. 1

THURSDAY AUG. 2

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring the Infamous Stringdusters with Willison Roos. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza

AMY WEBER—With the Ben Burdick Trio. 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ALMOSTMATOPOEIA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Sandbar CAMDEN HUGHES—With Bill Courtial. 6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

GILLIAN WELCH, AUG. 3, EGYPTIAN THEATRE After an eight-year recording hiatus, Gillian Welch and her guitarist and co-songwriter David Rawlings released their fifth studio album in 2011, The Harrow and the Harvest. That release brought back the duo’s earlier sense of melancholy by doubling down on the blues. The new tracks are reminiscent of the first song off Welch’s 1996 debut, Revival. Welch was adopted at three days old, and on “Orphan Girl,” she cries: “I know no mother no father / no sister no brother / I am an orphan girl.” If Welch’s hand in the Americana revival needed bona fide proof of its influence, the Coen brothers’ 2000 film O Brother, Where Art Thou? was it. Welch had a cameo in the film, and lent her pipes to the multi-platinum, Grammy Award-winning soundtrack, alongside Emmylou Harris and Alison Krauss. Welch and Rawlings will bring their sweetly somber sound to Boise’s Egyptian Theatre Friday, Aug. 3. —Andrew Crisp 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $32.50 adv., $35.50 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

26 | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOISEweekly

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DEAR LANDLORD—With Murderburgers, Hotel Chelsea and The Alltheways. 8 p.m. $8. Shredder

BARENAKED LADIES—With Blues Traveler, Cracker and Big Head Todd. 6 p.m. $45.50. Idaho Botanical Garden CONCERTS IN THE GARAGE— Featuring Travis McDaniel and Boise Rock School bands. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Rock School DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers HILLFOLK NOIR—9 p.m. FREE. Bittercreek

GIZZARD STONE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Curb

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

JOHNNY SHOES—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

LIKE A ROCKET—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

NAOMI PSALM—8 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s

THE PARIS FUND AND THE ROGUE GALLERY—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SUMMER BEACH BLAST—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s YANNI—7:30 p.m. $45-$125. Morrison Center

POSSUM LIVIN—7 p.m. FREE. Modern Hotel and Bar ROBERT JAMES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THURSDAY THUNDER—Featuring Pilot Error. 6 p.m. FREE. Edwards 22

WHITE DENIM—With Storie Grubb and the Holy Wars. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

FRIDAY AUG. 3 BAND OF BUSKERS—8 p.m. FREE. The Crux CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DANGERBEARD—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye DEACON 5—9 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FANG ISLAND—With Zechs Marquise. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid GILLIAN WELCH—See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $32.50 adv., $35.50 door. Egyptian Theatre HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HOLDEN YOUNG—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s IDAHO DOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL—Featuring Equaleyes, Innocent Man and more. 3 p.m. $30, $50 two-day pass. Brundage Mountain Resort

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers NORTHERN ROCKIES FOLK FESTIVAL—Featuring Rosie Ledet and the Zydeco Playboys, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit and more. 5 p.m. $15, $35 weekend pass. Hop Porter Park RED DOT WINDOW—9 p.m. FREE. New Frontier Club ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid TALLBOY—8 p.m. $8-$23. Knitting Factory WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

SATURDAY AUG. 4 BILLY ZERA—6 p.m. FREE. 36th Street Bistro THE CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid HILLFOLK NOIR—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s HOLLOW-WOOD—With Grand Falconer, Edward Romeo and

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE ALEX S OLC A

GUIDE The Mighty Sequoyah. 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux IDAHO DOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL—Featuring Equaleyes, Innocent Man and more. 3 p.m. $30, $50 two-day pass. Brundage Mountain Resort JOSH INGYU—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s JOURNEY—With Loverboy. See Listen Here, this page. 6:30 p.m. $39.50-$99.50. Idaho Center Amphitheater

SUNDAY AUG. 5 ALEX RICHARDS—With John O’Neil and Stephen Hayhurst. 8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s DEMON HUNTER—With Bleeding Through, Cancer Bats, The Plot in You and Willow. 6:30 p.m. $15-$30. Knitting Factory JASON ISBELL AND THE 400 UNIT—With The Futurebirds. 8:30 p.m. $18 adv., $20 door. Visual Arts Collective

Cortens. 8 p.m. FREE. Red Feather SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOHNNY CLEGG—With Ladysmith Black Mambazo. 7 p.m. $40, $30 Sun Valley Center members, $10 children. River Run Lodge TRAVIS WARD—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

JOHNNY SHOES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

TUESDAY AUG. 7

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BARBARA LAING—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

REBECCA SCOTT—With Debbie Sager. 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

MUSIC FROM STANLEY—Featuring Carrie Rodriguez. 4 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge

CARRIE RODRIGUEZ—8 p.m. $16 adv., $18 door. Visual Arts Collective

RED DOT WINDOW—9 p.m. FREE. New Frontier Club

PAT RICE—1:30 p.m. FREE. Solid

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

NORTHERN ROCKIES FOLK FESTIVAL—Featuring Rosie Ledet and the Zydeco Playboys, Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit and more.. 12:30 p.m. $15, $35 weekend pass. Hop Porter Park

THE HOLDEN YOUNG TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

MONDAY AUG. 6 COUNTING CROWS—With Kasey Anderson and the Honkies. 6 p.m. $45. Idaho Botanical Garden PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid RED FEATHER MONDAYS—Featuring Thomas Paul and Cameron

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TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

NEXT 2 THE TRACKS—8 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s STARGAZE UNLIMITED—With Champagne Leader and Sun Blood Stories. 9 p.m. $3. Shredder

V E N U E S

WEDNESDAY AUG. 8 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring Rory Block with Sun Blood Stories. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza GIZZARD STONE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HORSE FEATHERS—With Dark Swallows and Grandma Kelsey. 8 p.m. $12 adv., $14 door. Visual Arts Collective JOHN BERRYHILL—With Greg Martinez and Friends. 6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill KIX BROOKS—8 p.m. $12-$45. Knitting Factory RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid STEVE AND GRACE WALL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

Journey

JOURNEY AND LOVERBOY, AUG. 4, IDAHO CENTER Most bands will be forgotten. And even the wildly successful ones will have the bulk of their catalogs vanish into obscurity. But sometimes a band will have one song so iconic, so unforgettable, that it transcends the band itself and becomes a part of the cultural consciousness. That’s the case with Journey’s “Don’t Stop Believin’,” which is possibly the single-greatest power ballad of all time. The biggest reason to see Journey in concert is the thrill from that opening piano riff, reaching into your pocket for a lighter and shouting every word so loud that the band is lost in the noise. “Working for the Weekend,” by Loverboy, isn’t quite as powerful a tune, but it’s still a good singalong. You can dig back to your ’80s roots and belt out both this weekend at The Idaho Center. —Josh Gross 6:30 p.m., $39.50-$99.50. Idaho Center Amphitheater, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-442-3232, idahocenter.com.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 27


NEWS/ARTS READINGS AND RUSTY GEARS

28 | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOISEweekly

ARTS/STAGE THE EM PTY B OAT THEATR E C OM PANY

Like Idaho author Kim Barnes’ latest novel, In the Kingdom of Men—which follows “a barefoot girl from red-dirt Oklahoma” who moves to Saudi Arabia—Pauls Toutonghi’s latest book, Evel Knievel Days, also tells the tale of a small-town protagonist who heads east seeking answers. Khosi Saqr is an outcast from Butte, Mont., who spends his days working at a museum. But after Pop a wheelie and head to Rediscovered Bookshop. his longtime unrequited love drops the bomb that she’s engaged to marry someone else at the town’s annual Evel Knievel Days festival, Saqr makes the rash decision to travel to Egypt to find his father. Boise’s Alan Heathcock gushed about the book, saying: “In a novel of rare warmth and depth, humor and insight, Evel Knievel Days is a tale of daredevil leaps in a young man’s search for family and love. Quirky, often hilarious, deeply touching … thrilling from ramp to ramp.” Toutonghi’s first novel, Red Weather, was met with critical acclaim when it was published in 2006, and his work has since appeared in The New York Times, The Boston Review and Sports Illustrated. To publicize his new novel, Toutonghi will swing by Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Thursday, Aug. 2, at 7 p.m. For more info, visit rdbooks.org. Moving from oil-rich lands to oil on canvas, Boise artist Rick Walter will debut a series of new works at Visual Arts Collective Friday, Aug. 3, at 7 p.m. Formerly known under the moniker Paste Eater, Walter’s work has tended toward cartoonish, animal-filled pop-surrealism. But this new series features some less-whimsical subject matter like blurred landscapes and rusty gears floating in front of swelling clouds. The show will remain up through Sunday, Sept. 30. For more info, visit rickwalterart. blogspot.com. And from cartoon animals to real ones, the Idaho Humane Society is looking for local pets to grace the pages of its 2013 Friends for Life calendar. If your hamster likes to ham it up or you think your cat could strut the catwalk, you can enter your furr y friend into the competition through Sunday, Sept. 30. To enter the Friends for Life calendar photo contest, visit the Humane Society’s website at idahohumanesociety.org or pick up an entr y form and guidelines at 4775 Dorman St. Entry fees and proceeds help support the more than 13,000 animals the shelter cares for annually. —Tara Morgan

TUNNEL VISION Empty Boat debuts There’s Chinese Tunnels Under Boise! TARA MORGAN In a downtown warehouse lit only by the early evening sun, a pair of hairy ankles jutted out from under a projection screen meant to display Power Point presentations. The legs slid into a pair of skinny jeans and two hands dropped down to secure a pair of worn high-top Nikes. Actor Dwayne Blackaller emerged as if from a time machine, running his fingers through his thick black wig with the dopey swagger of Keanu Reeves in Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure. Blackaller was in the final week of rehearsDwayne Blackaller (left), John Adkins (right) and Anne McDonald (center) dive into Boise’s underbelly. als for Empty Boat Theatre Company’s latest original production, There’s Chinese Tunnels “We were so glad when that show was Under Boise!, which opens Wednesday, Aug. 1, trying to rescue the helpless princess. But when over; it was way too much and too dark,” Dwayne’s old flame Lina comes back to town, and runs through Saturday, Aug. 18. added Garcia. the boys decide to embark on an adventure His co-star, John Adkins, ambled out from But Chinese Tunnels! swings the pendulum that leads them deep into the bowels of Boise’s another corner of The Watercooler space in the opposite direction, highlighting comedy legendary Chinese tunnels. boasting aviator-style glasses and bandana“[Blackaller’s] character has read one thing and nostalgia over psychological terror. tamed red locks, while actress Anne McDonald “It’s got really, really goofy stupid humor strode over to join the duo in a black, full-body in a certain way for a couple of years and and really fantastic commitment to irreverhe’s made up his mind about how something unitard, lamenting the disappearance of her happened,” said Garcia. “We do that in life … ence … but it’s also got a really great heart to trench-coat coverup. it, which is exciting,” said Blackaller. “I think then, you see it suddenly in a different way.” The quartet was completed by playwright that’s something that’s new to me about the Though Garcia and co. were tight lipped and actor Nick Garcia, who corralled the when prodded for plot details, they agreed that project is Nick brought in some really touching group to go over lines from the late-’80sand tender moments in the midst of this really the play is sort of a mash up between Wayne’s inspired comedy, which was staged in another goofy comedy.” World and Scott Pilgrim vs. The World. form at Neurolux in 2000. Empty Boat co-founders Welsh and “What is different is the tone of the play “It’s only the same in structure, really,” really changes … where the play starts is vastly Garcia—who received Boise Weekly Cover explained Garcia. “There’s nothing that’s different from where it ends,” said Adkins. “As Auction grants for both The Acheri and really the same except for a massive spectacle There’s Chinese Tunnels Under Boise!— you start the play you would never guess that moment.” aren’t particularly interested in staging it’s going to be going where it goes.” The original production, There’s Chinese non-original work, but they don’t dismiss Blackaller added, jokingly: “There’s so Tunnels Under Boise! And Other Local Legthe idea, either. many secrets imbedded in this thing, and if ends, was written by Garcia, Tom Willmorth, “It’s funny because neither of us are super you play it backwards, it’s amazing because Ira Amyx and Dale Slack. Willmorth, half of inspired by a lot of contemporary works right Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s Green Show com- the whole Declaration of Independence is in now, or we don’t read enough of them,” said there.” edy duo The Fool Squad, injected the producWelsh. “I think for us, if we do take someBlackaller, who is co-directing Chinese tion with a hearty dose of political satire. thing that’s not original, we would probably Tunnels! with Garcia, also directed Empty “The first one was very much about Boise try to do some kind of original slant on the Boat’s other origiand its history,” said production of it.” nal production, The Garcia. “There was a And Chinese Tunnels! is nothing if not Acheri, a horror play lot of political jokes Wednesday-Saturday, Aug. 1-Aug. 18, 7 p.m. original. Garcia let the actors fine-tune his that took place in in the first one and doors, 8 p.m. show, $15-$18. script during rehearsals, dropping lines that an abandoned day locations of places that THE WATERCOOLER didn’t get a laugh and inserting some that did. care center in Victor. once were here and 1401 W. Idaho St. The result is a lewd farce Blackaller jokingly For that production, neighborhoods that theemptyboattheatrecompany.org Empty Boat converted dubbed a “charming irreverent comedy about used to be really diftruth in Boise.” the former Ceramica ferent.” “So the language is very foul … and the building at Fifth and This iteration of the subject matter is pretty adult, so we’re suggestplay drops characters John (played by Adkins) Main streets into an eerie haunted house. ing 16 and older,” noted Welsh. “The experience, I know it was tough for and Dwayne (played by Blackaller) into a base“My mother is coming, but I would not see the actors, it took a lot out of them, especially ment in the still “kind of dumpy” North End the show with my mother,” added Adkins. doing two shows a night, especially because in 1987. The fantasy/action-adventure video “It’s like a rated-R movie, but it’s inapprothey had to fully commit to the dark mategame The Legend of Zelda has just come out priate in all the right ways,” Blackaller said rial,” explained Hollis Welsh, co-founder of on Nintendo and the high-school grads pass with a wry smile. Empty Boat. their time vanquishing pixilated enemies and WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


SCREEN/LISTINGS THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

Special Screenings A BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION: THE GRATEFUL DEAD MOVIE EVENT—In celebration of what would have been the 70th birthday of the Grateful Dead’s Jerr y Garcia, viewers can watch the 1977 cinematic concert The Grateful Dead Movie, as well as a special birthday commemoration on Garcia directed by Justin Kreutzmann, featuring the Dead’s Bob Weir and other surprise guests. Tickets available at fandango.com. Wednesday, Aug. 1, 7 p.m., $12.50. Edwards Boise Downtown Stadium 9, 760 Broad St., Boise, 208-338-3821; Edwards Boise Stadium 22 and IMAX, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-9603; regmovies.com.

A SLOW, BEAUTIFUL DANCE Take This Waltz glides with passion and pain GEORGE PRENTICE Take This Waltz, the luminous portrait of dimming passion, would be a masterstroke from a veteran filmmaker. But the fact that it’s crafted with such skill by Sarah Polley in her second full-length feature makes it that much more impressive. Polley, already a fine young actress (The Sweet Hereafter, John Adams), is generous to a fault with her cast, showcasing Michelle Williams, Seth Rogen and Sarah Silverman in Seth Rogen and Michelle Williams portray a married couple suffering from the cancer of sameness. some of their best work. It’s criminal that this film, which debuted But Margot meets Daniel, a passion-on-hiscomfortable when they wed. Their five-year at 2011’s Toronto International Film Festival, sleeve artist. In short order, Margot recognizes marriage is solid, but only from afar. They was not given robust distribution. I counted that Daniel is the lust, and possibly the love, have arrived at the critical stage where a daily at least three Oscar nominations in Take This of her life. When they secretly rendezvous in Waltz, two for Polley’s script and direction and rhythm of companionship can be interpreted by too many couples as a neighborhood pool, their underwater dance another for Williams. oozes sensuality, yet they never touch. When a cancer of sameness. This is one of Williams’ his hand momentarily grazes her ankle, MarWe know where this best performances to TAKE THIS WALTZ (R) got jumps from the water and runs off. is heading. Unfordate in a white-hot Directed by Sarah Polley “Are you afraid of being afraid?” shouts tunately, when it is career that has already Starring Michelle Williams, Seth Rogen and Daniel. crafted with such degarnered three AcadSarah Silverman Margot rushes home to Lou, but concludes tail, watching Margot emy nods. Opens Friday, Aug. 3, at The Flicks her marriage is not so much on the rocks as on and Lou is a bit like But be forewarned: watching a car crash in the sand. If your heart has been Silverman is superb, playing Margot’s sister slow motion. We pray recently bruised by a Geraldine, a caustic alcoholic who speaks truth for someone to grab the wheel, but collision is relationship meltdown, this film might be too to Margot’s dilemma. Silverman, who we are its only course. difficult for you to enjoy. The exactitude of so accustomed to seeing as a snarky cliche, Margot and Lou are more partners than Polley’s dialogue shoots tiny arrows into your wears this role as a second skin. lovers, laughing their way through sleepy heart—not enough to mortally wound but Take This Waltz refers to the beautiful pillow talk moments but rarely approaching enough to make you dizzy. The lines strike Leonard Cohen ballad, which is part of the the awkwardness of natural expression. Their with patience and devastating rawness. film’s great soundtrack that also includes relationship is more defined by tickling and We instantly recognize Margot (Williams) rug-wrestling than long, defining silences. As a Cohen songs covered by Feist. Take This Waltz and Lou (Rogen). They are the young couple result, it feels as if they’re on an extended date. is one of the year’s best films. that was so adorable when they met and so

MOVIES IN THE GARDEN: THE GOONIES— Pack a picnic, bring a blanket and enjoy movies on the outdoor big screen. Food and beverage vendors will provide snacks and summer treats. Movies star t at dusk. Wednesday, Aug. 8, 7 p.m. $3-$5. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiar y Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Opening DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: DOG DAYS—This film, based on author and cartoonist Jeff Kinney’s fourth Wimpy Kid book, stars Zachary Gordon, Robert Capron, Rachael Harris, Devon Bostick and Steve Zahn. (PG) Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22

HOPE SPRINGS—Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones play a couple seeking to rekindle the fire in their relationship. (PG-13) Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22 TAKE THIS WALTZ—The wife of a cookbook author falls in love with an artist at an amusement park, whom she later discovers is her neighbor. (R) The Flicks

DVD/SCREEN BOISE’S FAVORITE DVD RENTALS THIS WEEK

1. THE THREE STOOGES First week at No. 1

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2. LOCKOUT First week at No. 2

—Source: Video Memories, 4504 Overland Road, Boise, 208-385-0113

3. GET THE GRINGO First week at No. 3

4. FRIENDS WITH KIDS First week at No. 4

5. INTRUDERS First week at No. 5

TOTAL RECALL—Colin Farrell and Kate Beckinsale star in this action-thriller loosely inspired by Philip K. Dick’s shor t stor y We Can Remember It For You Wholesale. (PG-13) Edwards 9, 12, 14, 22

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 29


NEWS/REC S C OTT M AR C HANT

REC JAM ES LLOYD

THE BIG ONE Fishing for catfish can mean a sizeable payoff for anglers Conquer Table Rock and help conquer cancer.

TALK A WALK Why don’t you take a hike? And while you’re at it, why don’t you take all those pent up philanthropic ideals and actually do something with them? No, seriously, why don’t you take a hike for a good cause? The annual Climb to Conquer Cancer is the American Cancer Society’s way of tailoring a fundraiser to Boise by combining a hike up Table Rock with raising money to fight cancer. Sound interesting? Well, you’d better get a move on—the hike is scheduled for Saturday, Aug. 4. Teams and individuals can still sign up in advance online, and day-of registration will be taken the morning of the event. The registration fee costs $200 per team and individual registration costs $30 for adults or $20 for kids. Cancer survivors can join the walk for free and will get to take home a special gift bag. Participants had already raised more than $10,000 by press time. Check-in and late registration begin at 7:30 a.m. at Quarr y View Park, with the hike starting at 8:30 a.m. Water stations will be staggered along the route and participants can write messages on special biodegradable memor y balloons at the top of Table Rock. A festival and barbecue—complete with food, a DJ and bounce house—and a celebration of cancer survivors will be held back in the park following the hike. For more information or to join, visit adaclimb.org. Idaho Master Naturalists have teamed up with the Boise National Forest for a free nature walk in the Shafer Butte area Saturday, Aug. 11. This will be the second in the series of walks, during which participants can learn about natural features of the area, including flora, fauna and geology. The walk will be roughly two hours long through moderately steep terrain. The hike will begin at 10 a.m. in the Shafer Butte Picnic Area, and kids are welcome—although everyone is asked to have sturdy hiking shoes, sunscreen, water and snacks. While the hike is free, there is a $5 per vehicle day-use fee in the parking lot and pre-registration is requested. For more info or to register, call the Mountain Home Ranger District at 208587-7961. Of course, these days, you have to know where you can walk in the Mountain Home Ranger District. The district has closed the area within the 403-acre Avelene Fire to the public. Grimes Creek and Clear Creek roads will remain open. —Deanna Darr

30 | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOISEweekly

RANDY KING The anchor was out on the small flat-bottomed boat that belonged to Ryan Scott. I let it loose in about 5 feet of water, and we drifted slowly downriver until the big weight found a solid hold on the soft river bottom. Looking at the fish finder, I could see that we had drifted just to the edge of a hole in the river. It was a section carved by two river currents colliding. It was three-times deeper than the normal stretch of river—and it had gobs of fish floating in it. We cast into the wide expanse of the Snake River laid out before us. One side was farmers’ fields between Homedale and Marsing, the other side was a stellar view of Idaho wine country. But this wasn’t a dainty wine sipping adventure. No, I was after the mighty and oft-overlooked catfish. It is a rite of passage for many an Idaho boy to sit around a fire along the Snake River and hope that a kitty fish tugs on the end of his line. But the drunken exploits of amateurs have ruined the reputation of this sport for many of the others. You see, fly fishers stalk pan-sized fish like deer in the small mountain streams and bass fishermen cast lures into reeds and muck in hopes of a tug. Casting and casting over and over again. Work, work, work. All in the hope they might land a fish that is just a few pounds in weight. In contrast, cat fishermen primarily use bait of some type—worm, rotten chicken liver or dead fish. They cast and let the fish come to them. Big fish, too. On good nights on the Snake River, if you are positioned well, you can pull in 20 to 30 fish ranging from 5 to 18 pounds each. If you get lucky, you can even haul in a sturgeon. Trout and bass fishermen decry the cat fishers as lazy and undisciplined in the ways of fishing. But not Scott. He is a man with a passion for catching big fish, no little pan fry was enough for him. A 4-pound bass was a bonus but an 18-pound catfish was a prize. The cats Scott catches are not from around these parts, however. According to Jeff Dillon, the state fisheries manager for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game, “there is no native catfish west of the Rockies.” So all that perfect habitat, the calm waters of the Snake River, was catfish-less until someone in the mid 1800s got the bright idea to introduce them to the river and badabing badaboom: catfish in the West. I relayed that tidbit of information to Scott and then explained that Idaho does not have any blue catfish, either. When I said that, his head cocked off to the side.

“That is a bunch of bull,” he said. I informed him that according to Dillon at Idaho Fish and Game, no blue cat has ever been reported in Idaho. “Well, that is silly,” he said breaking out his iPhone. “Here is a picture of one.” He pointed out over the water and said: “We caught him off that island about a mile up river.” Sure enough, it was a blue cat as far as I could tell. But, unfortunately, just because they have been introduced does not mean that they always bite. Though we could see plenty of fish in the hole where we’d anchored, more than an hour passed without a bite. The water temperature registered at 77 degrees and it was getting dark, so we moved on. We traveled slowly downriver in Scott’s flat-bottom boat, passing over spots that only registered 1-anda-half feet deep. At one point, Scott could tell that I was admiring the quality of his expensive fish finder while comparing it to that of his boat. “What I got here,” said Scott, “is $2,000 worth of rims on $1,000 car. It don’t make much sense but this little boat can go further into the muck and shallows than any of those fancy or bigger boats, and that’s how I get on the big fish.” And do catfish get big in Idaho. According the Idaho Fish and Game website, the state record channel catfish, the kind that Scott

catches most of the time, is more than 38 pounds. The record flathead catfish is 58.5 pounds, with a girth of 31 inches. The head of a fish that big wouldn’t even fit in a 5-gallon bucket. Eating a fish that large, however, comes with a cautionary warning. Recently the Idaho Center for Disease Control released a statement advising the limited consumption of catfish caught on the lower Boise River because of higher-than-normal levels of mercury. Catfish are predators and eating other contaminated fish increases their own contamination levels. Therefore the Idaho CDC recommends eating smaller catfish and cutting away the skin and fat before eating them. Scott and I fished for so long that night, it was actually early (as in morning), but we had yet to land a fish. Then there was the slightest of tugs on my line followed by a rod-bending pull. I grabbed my rod and set the hook; the fight was on. Five minutes later, I had a 6-pound catfish in the boat. We hung for an extra half an hour and landed an additional 4-pounder for the freezer. Cat fishing may not be as highly regarded as fly or bass fishing, but even small cats—like the two I caught with Scott—can ruin a guy on trout and bass. The size of the catfish alone makes this fisherman long for a late night, a flat boat and some cold beer. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


LISTINGS/REC PLAY/REC

Events & Workshops

ANDR EW M ENTZ ER

CHI RUNNING WORKSHOP—Jill Burchmore, chi running instructor and running coach from Colorado, will speak on the basics of chi running on Friday, Aug. 3, then discuss energy-efficient and injury-free running techniques on Saturday, Aug. 4. Register at 180healthwellness.com or call 970-708-5037. Friday, Aug. 3, 5:30 p.m. FREE; Saturday, Aug. 4, 8 a.m.-noon and 1-5 p.m. $145. Shu’s Idaho Running Company, 1758 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-6604, idahorunningcompany.com. FAST EDDY’S BAM JAM—Basketball players and enthusiasts convene for a three-on-three basketball tournament held throughout downtown Boise. See Picks, Page 17. Saturday, Aug. 4-Sunday, Aug. 5. Downtown Boise. Visit bamjamboise.com for more info.

WEISER RIVER TRAIL OR BUST Weiser: farming and fiddles, right? Sure, but this small town of 5,500 also happens to be the starting point of a nationally recognized trail system that showcases nearly every aspect of Idaho’s diverse landscape. In fact, Weiser and West Central Idaho’s 1,474-square-mile Washington County at-large also boast plenty of recreational outlets for folks looking to explore some new territory. Earlier this summer, I endeavored to ride a portion of the Weiser River Trail—a byproduct of the national Rails-to-Trails initiative that converted 84 miles of old Union Pacific rail line to wide open two-track trail between Weiser and Rubicon (near New Meadows). I only covered a short agricultural section of this longest trail in the state, but it still left me wanting for the multi-day trip needed to get a full taste. The trailhead begins on the eastern fringe of Weiser, where the quaint country residential For more info, visit weiserrivertrail.org. neighborhoods transition to sizeable agricultural acreages. The first few miles of the Weiser River Trail don’t leave much to the imagination, as it follows a flat, straight progression over gravel through rural farm land. The trail eventually meets up with the Weiser River, signifying the start of more-stimulating scenery. If you go by bike, plan on at least two nights and three days to get from start to finish. Shorter segments can also be accessed from towns along the way. According to the Railsto-Trails website, “Four communities along the trail provide services, including Weiser (the largest, with many restaurants, motels and shops), Midvale, Cambridge and Council. There is an annual spring bike ride along the trail, and in May, a four-day wagon train event beginning in Weiser and ending in Council.” As the trail enters Adams County and works away from Highway 95 north of Council, the open canyons and farmlands transition into the nice coniferous canopy of the Idaho mountains—with plenty of recreational options along the way. Fishing, hot springing and simply taking in the wildlife are the preferred extracurricular activities along the WRT. The trail is only open to bikers, horseback riders, walkers, and cross-country skiers, meaning you will never go toe to toe with anything motorized. The best time of year to attempt the entire WRT is late spring to early fall. Be sure to pack for all scenarios, as it can be a long way between services. —Andrew Mentzer WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

INFLATABLE KAYAK TRIP— Navigate the Main Payette in an inflatable kayak under the direction of Riverroots Ltd. Cost includes instruction, guides and all the gear. Transportation not included. Meet at Beehive Bend, six miles north of Horseshoe Bend on Highway 55. Saturday, Aug. 4, 1 p.m. $55. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Register BOGUS BASIN HILL CLIMB— Register through midnight Friday, Aug. 17, at spondoro.com. Categories include noncompetitive touring and competitive by age group. Limited to 500 participants. Call Mike Cooley at 208-343-3782 or Dave Landis at 208-860-5606 for more info. BOISE PARKS AND RECREATION VOLLEYBALL LEAGUES—Register from Monday, Aug. 6-Friday, Aug. 10, for men’s and women’s fall volleyball leagues. League play begins Tuesday, Sept. 4. Cost is $246 per team and $20 USSSA sanction fee. Nonresident fee is $14 per player. Late registration is $35 if openings are available after Monday, Aug. 13. Register from 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. at the City Recreation Office. For rosters and registration information, see the website. Boise City Recreation office, 110 Scout Lane, Boise, 208-384-4256, cityofboise.org/parks. TAMARACK SUPER D—Register at spondoro.com for the Super D bike race Saturday, Aug. 11, in Donnelly. Free kids race to follow. $20-$40. Tamarack Resort, 2099 W. Mountain Road (off Hwy. 55), Donnelly, 208-3251000, tamarackidaho.com. WILL THE THRILL’S FUN RUN— Register at bluecirclesports. com for this 1.5-mile fun run Saturday, Aug. 4. The run memorializes a young athlete who was hit by a car and killed while riding his bike July 5. Run departs from Rocky Mountain High School at 8 a.m. Packet pick-up will be Friday, Aug. 3, from 4-9 p.m. at the high school. Raffle to follow. $15, $10 children and students. Rocky Mountain High School, 5450 N. Linder Road, Meridian, 208-350-4340, rmhs.meridianschools.org.

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 31


BEER GUZZLER/FOOD A SUMMER WORLD BEER TOUR

FIRESTONE WALKER SOLACE, UNFILTERED WHEAT BEER This California brewery is known for its use of American oak barrels in the fermentation process, but to make this sessionable summer entry, it stuck with 100 percent stainless steel. The result is a hazy, lemon peel-colored pour with a quickly collapsing, frothy head. On the nose, the beer has floral hops and apple blossom notes with touches of sweet corn, grass and clove. This brew goes down smoothly with soft citrus, justsweet malt, spice and an off-dry finish. LEIPZIGER GOSE This exceptional German original—it first hit the valley in an oh-so-cool, and oh-soexpensive 25-ounce goose-neck bottle—is now available in a much more reasonable 11.2-ounce format. The brew pours a cloudy, soft gold with a thin head and offers mild aromas of pepper, coriander and yeast. The flavors are unique and easier to enjoy than to describe. There’s a just-noticeable thread of saltiness throughout, along with a smooth core of ripe lemon and a tart and lively finish. This beer is a must-try for all beer lovers.

32 | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOISEweekly

COLD COMFORT Cool off with a cold soup this summer TARA MORGAN Flecked with plump tomato chunks, fresh cucumbers, sweet onions and bold peppers, gazpacho is summer’s quintessential cold soup. Both the flavor and texture are refreshing alternatives to winter’s hearty hot stews and the soup’s familiar, salsa-like taste is palatable, even to the unadventurous. But gazpacho isn’t the only cool kid chilling on Soup Street. A number of Treasure Valley restaurants are now offering more eclectic chilled soups—everything from chilled cherry Sweet pineapple and creamy avocado swirl together in a cool summer soup at Jenny’s Lunch Line. to chilled curried carrot. “We’ve had a few people not necessarily Though Dalton said she occasionally gets a turn their noses up, but give us strange looks at peach soups or we’ve done chilled almond request to heat up a chilled soup, for the most soups,” said Leseberg. first, mainly with some of the soups we came part, customers have embraced the trend. Jenny’s Lunch Line is up with, like watermelon gaz“We do some that border on sweet and saalso leaning heavily on cold pacho,” explained Joe Leseberg, 36TH STREET BISTRO vory. Next month, one of our really popular soups this summer, serving a 36th Street Garden Center and 3823 N. Garden Center Way ones that we do at Alive After Five is mango rotating lineup that includes a Bistro chef. 208-8433-5108 gazpacho, and it has jalapenos and basil and pineapple and avocado soup But after preaching the cold36streetgardencenter.com/ Thai spices,” said Dalton. “We also do a with a pumpkin seed garnish soup gospel for the past couple the-bistro Thai watermelon that also has those hot and and chilled peach soup with a of years, Leseberg said his JENNY’S LUNCH LINE sweet flavors.” raspberry coulis. customers are now more willing 106 N. Sixth St. And while adding cold soups to the menu “Next month, we’re trying a to try whatever he whips up. 208-433-0092 chilled edamame and arugula— has allowed Dalton to stretch her creative “Cold soup has been one of jennyslunchline.com muscles, it’s also been a smart business move doesn’t that sound good? … those things where you have for a spot that is a go-to soup destination in It gets kind of creamy because to start slow, you have to do the winter months. something familiar, and then after you gain the of all the oils, and emulsifies, so it looks like “We’ve got to try to keep our business in a cream soup but there’s no cream in it,” said trust of your clientele, you can go off and do the summer,” noted Dalton. other things like chilled cherry soups, or chilled Diane Dalton of Jenny’s Lunch Line.

FOOD/NEWS an after-work destination for downtown denizens. She’s also working with specialty food purveyors to bring in hard-to-find imported cheeses If you’ve been lamenting the lack of fancy cheese and charcuterie opand meats. tions in Boise, you can soon get your morbier and pate fix at the former And in other opening news, State Street staple Montego Bay quietly Fixx location, 224 N. 10th St. shut its doors at 3000 N. Lakeharbor Lane July 21 to make way for a Sarah Kornfield and husband Dave Kelly will open Bleubird (like bleu new concept, The Drink. cheese) in mid-August. A long-time chef, Kornfield will whip up a smatterSpearheaded by Fatty’s owners Justin Zora and Clay Roman, along ing of sandwiches and small plates at the ex-coffeeshop. with new partner Steve Masonheimer, The Drink will feature three bars “It’s a specialty deli at lunchtime and all through the evening, and in one—a Vegas-style piano bar called then on top of it, it’s going to be every The Blarney Stone, a sports bar called day happy hour with beer and wine lists Whammy’s and a tiki lounge on the water. and fresh-squeezed sodas … Into the eve“We wanted to give people a place nings, we’ll do a lot of heavy cheese and to go and not feel like they had to go, A: charcuteries,” Kornfield explained. downtown or, B: bar-hop outside of this But Kornfield isn’t content to sling the one building,” said Zora. usual deli fare; her menu will feature a Zora said the menu will be “refreshing unique array of embellishments. and light” with an “island feel.” “Instead of just having a turkey sand“The menu will stay pretty much the wich, we’ll have a turkey, fig, sliced apples same throughout the venue … 99 perand taleggio cheese. … We want to do cent of all of our food will be under $10,” lots of pickled vegetables and preserves said Zora. and things like that,” Kornfield said. “So The Drink will open at 3 p.m., seven a lot of like jams and chutnies and farmdays a week, and the grand opening is fresh vegetables on sandwiches.” slated for Thursday, Aug. 16. With a happy hour lasting from 4-7 You can soon sing the bleus at the former Fixx location. —Tara Morgan p.m., Kornfield hopes Bleubird will become

BLEUBIRD AND THE DRINK WILL OPEN SOON

LE ILA RA MELLA -RA DE R

STERKENS WHITE ALE An incredibly pale straw in color, this Belgian brew is topped by a thick, egg-white froth that falls to a thin-but-persistent head. The coriander on the nose makes you think you’ve walked into an Indian restaurant, but it’s backed by subtle citrus and straw. More coriander comes through on the palate that has a rough but appealing texture. Smooth citrus and grainy malt flavors build in the mouth, with a bit of white pepper on the dry and refreshing finish. —David Kirkpatrick

FOOD LAU R IE PEAR M AN

If you’ve been retreating to lighter beers to slake your summer thirst, take a break from the mundane and get ready to awaken your palate. Each of this week’s brews has a refreshing quality that works when the sun is searing, but they are also unique, flavor-filled beers that will tantalize your taste buds.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FOOD LAU R IE PEAR M AN

Reel Foods will get an up-scale makeover at its new, larger location.

PRIME REEL ESTATE Reel Foods hooks a new location TARA MORGAN skills with ready-to-eat grub at the new store. Under a bridge at 304 S. Americana Blvd., a “What we can do is take our fresh fish and chain link fence wraps around a concrete skate cook it off and make things like ceviche or park where kids skid down rails and huddled different salads or roll sushi. We’re putting in a homeless clutch tattered brown paper bags in steam kettle so we can make fresh soups,” said their weathered hands. Blatz. “We have a lobster tank so we’ll have It’s an unlikely spot for a high-end, fresh live fresh lobsters, and our steam kettle also fish market. doubles as a lobster cooker.” But for the past 23 years, Reel Foods has Eventually, Blatz also hopes to stock local drawn in a loyal clientele of clam fans and ahi meats from purveyors like Black Canyon Elk aficionados looking to scoop up some of the Ranch, Double XL Ranch and rare game from valley’s freshest seafood. But later this month, Broadleaf. Blatz also plans to butcher meats that will all change. on-site to help bring down costs and provide “The retail store wasn’t performing super well ... so, we looked into possibly remodeling less traditional cuts and by-products, such as “a 5-pound block of buffalo bones to make the old location … but looking to do a redemi-glace at home.” model there was just cost proReel Foods is in the process hibitive. … So I started looking REEL FOODS of obtaining a beer and wine for properties in the downtown FISH MARKET license so it can sell grabarea,” said Peter Blatz, busi911 Capitol Blvd. and-go wine and beer. The ness development manager at 208-342-2727 space, which will keep the Ocean’s Beauty, a distributor reelfoodsfish.net same white-and-blue color that owns Reel Foods. scheme, will not offer seating Around the third week or dine-in options. But it will feature two of August, Reel Foods will close its current curved-glass display refrigerators that cost a spot and set up shop in a much more visible storefront at 911 Capitol Blvd. near Tablerock cool $40,000. “One of the things about Reel Foods is a Brewpub and Grill. The location’s large winlot of the equipment is kind of tired and old, dows will provide a welcome splash of sunshine across Reel Foods’ expanded selection of so we’ve really put a lot of money into new refrigeration and new appliances,” said Blatz. fresh fish, local meats and prepared foods. “Everything is going to be first rate.” “We really want to be able to become And as for the new location, Blatz hopes more of a one-stop shop so that it’s not just the increased traffic will help draw in families you go to the fish market and get your fish on their way to the nearby Boise Zoo or Julia and then go somewhere else to get the rest of Davis Park—a far cry from the attractions that your ingredients,” said Blatz. “We’re going to border the current location. try to feature some of the things that would “We have a very loyal, hearty clientele,” accompany fish well—sauces and salts, wild said Blatz. “They put up with it. They visit us, mushrooms and things of that nature.” so we want to make the experience just a little Blatz, the former owner of Cottonwood Grille, hopes to showcase some of his culinary more pleasant and convenient for people.” WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 33


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MU S IC BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION/OTHER TAKAMINE ACOUSTIC GUITAR Early 80’s vintage Takamine G-series acoustic guitar (Martin copy). Very good condition, with one minor chip on the front. Plays & sounds great. Includes soft shell case, strap & an extra set of strings. All for $100. Call Rich at 208-515-9575.

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These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

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www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

SHASA: 4-year-old female Siamese mix. Cross-eyed, outgoing, indoor cat. Litterboxtrained. Good with kids, cats and dogs. (Kennel 16- #16811641)

ANGEL: 2-year-old female Persian mix. Only has one eye. Litterbox-trained. Talkative. Requires regular brushing. (Kennel 104#16496975)

LUNA: 2-year-old female domestic shorthair. Raised three kittens in foster care. Good with kids, cats and dogs. (Kennel 2#16375267)

CHARLIE: 6-year-old male Jack Russell terrier. House-trained. Good with older kids. High energy, can be independent. (Kennel 426- #16668755)

KANGA: 5-year-old female pit bull terrier mix. Playful, attentive. Good with other dogs and older children. Bonds quickly. (Kennel 419- #16459470)

KOBI: 5-year-old male Lab mix. Big dog, happy attitude. Knows basic commands. Great family dog. House-trained, friendly. (Kennel 400#16711735)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

JIMMY JOHN: A cat so cool you’ll freak. Adopt him today.

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SPIRIT: This feisty spirit needs an adultonly home. Is it yours?

MANGO: Super playful boy longs for a fun friend. Make it you.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 35


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BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Linnea Serendee Morris Case No. CV NC 1222220 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Linnea Serendee Morris, now residing in the City of Boise,

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State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Seren Morris Clancy. The reason for the change in name is: marriage and to have consistency because my name is different on my birth cert. & social security. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) August 23, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Jun 26 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. July 11, 18, 25 & Aug, 1, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Jennifer Rae Frost

A Petition to change the name of Jennifer Rae Frost, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Jennifer Rae Taylor. The reason for the change in name is: because I divorced my spouse. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) August 30, 2012 at the ADA County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Jul 06 2012 CLERK OF THE COURT By Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk Pub. July 18, 25, Aug. 1 & 8, 2012. IN DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA WINDSTREAM HOMEOWNERS ASSOCIATION, INC, an Idaho Nonprofit Corporation, Plaintiff, v. CRAIG MARTIN, an individual, Defendant. Case No. CV OC 1210263

Case No. CV NC 1211692 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult)

NYT CROSSWORD | A.A. MEETINGS BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 27 Dons for the first time 29 Indulged in some capers? 30 Hovering falcon 33 Some cake slices 36 “I can see Mexico’s southernmost state from this ship!”? 41 Tapas bar order 43 Quixote’s pal 44 Art philanthropist Broad 45 Lend for a short while

ACROSS 1 During which 7 Chooses 14 Unlike terra incognita, say 20 Olive oil alternative 21 Sexual drive 22 “Me! Me!” 23 Like the winner of the Miss Influenza pageant? 25 “Blast!” 26 Tiki bar order 1

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Some Kellogg grads Literally, “fire bowl” Stand sales ___ dish Before, to a poet Article in Hoy With 41-Down, Ford part 72 Like the Battle of Trafalgar 74 Kick oneself over 75 Kabayaki base

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76 Entertainer with a Mandinka warrior haircut 77 French verb with a circumflex 79 Pro accompanier? 80 Guts 82 Danish Nobelist 84 Cousin to “Roger that” 86 Target of thieves who do card skimming 88 Some trailers 89 Vanidades magazine reader 91 Words before and after “what” 92 They vote first 94 “Look who’s back!” 98 Brings out 99 “___ like a Maelstrom, with a notch” (Emily Dickinson poem) 101 Old Polly Holliday sitcom 102 Company with the slogan “At the heart of the image” 103 Is mannerly 105 Funding for a Spanish seafood dish? 108 Lucidness 110 “Babette’s Feast” author 111 Gas pump abbr. 112 North by northwest, e.g. 115 For years on end 120 Game whose lowest card is the 7 123 Far Easterners signed to a St. Louis ball team? 127 Bleach 128 Top to bottom, say 129 Lick but good 130 Philosopher forced by Nero to commit suicide 131 Kids’ summer activity center 132 Like mushroom heads

DOWN 1 Wee rooms, for short? 2 Onetime teen idol Corey 3 Their empire was the Land of the Four Quarters 4 “The Avengers” villain 5 Furniture piece 6 Tomoyuki ___, creator of Godzilla 7 Mel who was portrayed in “Field of Dreams” 8 N.L. East team, on scoreboards 9 Venice’s La Fenice, for one 10 Fringed carriages 11 Easily injured 12 Double curve 13 Some M&M’s 14 Steam bath enjoyed just before bedtime? 15 Nabokov novel 16 ___ ejemplo 17 Dos Equis-filled item at a birthday party? 18 Poet Sitwell 19 Is grandmotherly, in a way 24 Pump choice 28 Wine: Prefix 31 McDonald’s offering since 1985 32 Dashiell Hammett’s last novel, with “The” 34 “Rhoda” co-star David 35 “___ where it hurts” 36 Estate-planning pro 37 Place for a band 38 Gridiron stat. 39 Hyundai model 40 Style 41 See 71-Across 42 World ___ 46 Pork-on-a-stick? 48 Came close to 49 Line in the 1950s 52 Scent coming from a Netflix envelope?

104 Eustacia ___, “The Return of the Native” woman 106 Chest pain 107 Historical records 108 Rappers’ posses 109 Café additive 110 Like some tricks 113 Many a prep sch. 114 Funny Carvey 116 “This is a priority!” 117 Copter’s forerunner 118 Make 119 Tight 121 A U.P.S. driver may have one: Abbr. 122 Private eye 124 N.L. East team, on scoreboards 125 Stage item 126 Dangerous job

56 Answer to “Did you see which Greek goddess walked by?”? 59 Doughnuts, mathematically 61 Kind of pie 62 Foray 63 Filthy kid’s laconic question? 64 Calvary initials 66 Actress ___ Marie Saint 68 Like some Facebook friend requests 73 Visa charge 78 1% group 81 Moving 83 Baby food preparation device 85 Ravens’ cries 87 Store keepers? 90 Soda with a Blue Cream flavor 93 Sun, on the Riviera 95 Jamaican music 96 Jamaican fellow 97 Adenoidectomy specialist, for short 100 P.R. pro

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SUMMONS NOTICE: YOU HAVE BEEN SUED BY THE ABOVE-NAMED PLAINTIFF. THE COURT MAY ENTER JUDGMENT AGAINST YOU WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS. READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO: DEFENDANT, CRAIG MARTIN You are hereby notified that in order to defend this lawsuit, an appropriate written response must be filed with the above designated court within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons on you. If you fail to so respond, the court may enter judgment against you as demanded by Plaintiff in the Complaint. A copy of the Complaint is served with this Summons. If you wish to seek the advice or representation by an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be filed in time and other legal rights protected. An appropriate written response requires compliance with Rule 10(a)(1) and other Idaho Rules of Civil Procedure and shall also include: 1. The title and number of case. 2. If your response is an Answer to the Complaint, it must contain admissions or denials of the separate allegations of the Complaint and other defenses you may claim. 3. Your signature, mailing address, and telephone number or the signature, mailing address, and telephone number of your attorney. 4. Proof of mailing or delivery of a copy of your response to Plaintiff’s attorney, as designated above. To determine whether you must pay a filing fee with your response, contact the clerk of the above-named court. DATED this 06 day of June, 2012. CHRISTOPHER D. RICH CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By Jeri Heaton Deputy Clerk Pub. July 25, August 1, 8 &15, 2012. SUMMONS CASE NO.CVOC1108168 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA PALOUSE SUB. TOWNHOUSES, INC. (THE), a Idaho Nonprofit Corporation, Plaintiff -vs- GENEVIEVE A. EVANS, an individual, Defendant. NOTICE YOU HAVE BEEN SUED BY THE ABOVE-NAMES PLAINTIFF. THE COURT MAY ENTER

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JUDGMENT AGAINST YOU WITHOUT FURTHER NOTICE UNLESS YOU RESPOND WITHIN 20 DAYS READ THE INFORMATION BELOW. TO: DEFENDANT, GENEVIEVE A. EVANS You are hereby notified that in order to defend the lawsuit, an appropriate written response must be filed with the above designated court within twenty (20) days after service of this Summons on you. If you fail to so respond, the court may enter judgment against you as demanded by Plaintiff’s the Complaint. A copy of the Complaint is served with this Summons, If you wish to seek the advice or representation by an attorney in this matter, you should do so promptly so that your written response, if any, may be filed in time and other legal rights protected. An appropriate written response requires with Rule 10(a)(1) and other Idaho Rules of Civil Procedure and shall also include: 1. The title and number of the case. 2. If your response is an Answer to the Complaint, it must contain admissions or denials of the separate allegations of the Complaint and other defenses you may claim. 3. Your signature, mailing address, and telephone number or the signature, mailing address, and telephone number of your attorney. 4. Proof of mailing or delivery of a copy of your response to Plaintiff’s attorney, as designated above. To determine whether you must pay a filing fee with your response, contact the clerk of the above-named court. DATED this 27th day of April, 2011. Christopher D. Rich, Clerk of the District Court, by Patricia A. Dwonch, Deputy Clerk Shane O. Bengoechea, ISB#2945, BENGOECHEA LAW OFFICE, PLLC, 671 E. Riverpark Ln., Suite 120, Boise, ID 83706, Tel: 208424-8332, Attorney for Plaintiff Pub. July 25, August 1, 8, & 15, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Victor Raul Olivarez Case No. CV NC 1211312 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Victor Raul Olivarez, a minor, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Victor Raul Vasquez. The reason for the change in name is: I want my children to have the same last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on Sept. 6, 2012 at the Ada Coun-

ty Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show a good reason against the name change. Date Jul 06, 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE DEPUTY CLERK Pub. August 1, 8, 15 & 22, 2012.

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BW KISSES A.D. BLISS Did you get Bible? If so, WWJD? Call me! G. AWESTRUCK WITH THE PASSION In your words. The seed of love you nurture continues to grow stronger within my heart. The storm has passed & now is the time for our love to outshine the heavens above as they have bestowed a blessing of safety upon us. R. GRATEFUL So what, then, do you propose? Despite my efforts to forget, not one day passes where I don’t think of you. TO SHOTSIE’S PUB & EATERY Congrats on your 1st Anniversary. We appreciate your great service & all the smiles. WASN’T YOUR POETRY TO ME? I always liked the poetry in “kisses.” Nice 28 SWF, unfortunately in Jail but could sure use a nice letter or two. Write me? Sarah #658027, C/O Ada County Jail, 7210 Barrister DR., Boise, ID, 83704.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 37


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): The astrological omens suggest you now have a lot in common with the Most Interesting Man in the World—adventurous, unpredictable, interesting, lucky, one-of-akind. To create your horoscope, I have therefore borrowed a few selected details from the ad campaign’s descriptions of him. Here we go: In the coming weeks, you will be the life of parties you don’t even attend. Astronauts will be able to see your charisma from outer space. Up to one-third of your body weight will be gravitas. Your cellphone will always have good reception, even in a subway 100 feet underground. Panhandlers will give you money. You could challenge your reflection to a staring contest—and win. You’ll be able to keep one eye on the past while looking into the future. When you sneeze, God will say, “God bless you.” TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Psychologist Bruno Bettelheim said the dreams we have at night are “the result of inner pressures which have found no relief, of problems which beset a person to which he knows no solution and to which the dream finds none.” That sounds bleak, doesn’t it? If it’s true, why bother to remember our dreams? Well, because we are often not consciously aware of the feelings they reveal to us. By portraying our buried psychic material in story form, dreams give us insight into what we’ve been missing. So even though they may not provide a solution, they educate us. Take heed, Taurus. Your upcoming dreams will provide useful information you can use to fix one of your longstanding dilemmas. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When French composer Georges Auric scored the soundtrack for Jean Cocteau’s movie Blood of a Poet, he produced “love music for love scenes, game music for game scenes and funeral music for funeral scenes.” But Cocteau had a different idea about how to use Auric’s work. For the love scenes, he decided to use the funeral music; for the game scenes, the love music; and for the funeral scenes, the game music. In accordance with the current astrological omens, Gemini, I recommend that you experiment with that style of mixing and matching. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Piglet was so excited at the idea of being useful that he forgot to be frightened any more,” wrote A.A. Milne in his kids’ story Winnie-the-Pooh. That’s my prescription for how to evade the worrisome fantasies that are nipping at you, Cancerian. If no one has invited you to do some engaging and important labor of love, invite yourself. You need to be needed—even more than usual.

38 | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ve been making pretty good progress in the School of Life. By my estimates, you’re now the equivalent of a sophomore. You’ve mastered enough lessons that you’re no longer considered a freshman, and yet you’ve got a lot more to learn. Are you familiar with the etymology of the word “sophomore?” It comes from two Greek words meaning “wise” and “fool.” That’ll be a healthy way to think about yourself in the coming weeks. Be smart enough to know what you don’t know. Cultivate the voracious curiosity necessary to lead you to the next rich teachings.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For a while, French writer Honore de Balzac (1799-1850) was very poor. He lived in a place that had no heat and almost no furniture. To enhance his environment, he resorted to the use of fantasy. On one of his bare walls, he wrote the words, “rosewood paneling with ornamental cabinet.” On another, he wrote “Gobelin tapestry with Venetian mirror.” Over the empty fireplace, he declared, “Picture by Raphael.” That’s the level of imaginative power I encourage you to summon in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. So much of what you’ll need will come from that simple magic.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A few years ago, a Malaysian man named Lim Boon Hwa arranged to have himself “cooked.” For 30 minutes, he sat on a board covering a pan full of simmering dumplings and corn. The fact that no harm came to him was proof, he said, that Taoist devotees like him are protected by their religion’s deities. I advise you not to try a stunt like that, Virgo— including metaphorical versions. This is no time to stew in your own juices. Or broil in your nagging doubts. Or be grilled in your self-accusations. You need to be free from the parts of your mind that try to cook you.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s an excellent time to overthrow false gods, topple smallminded authorities and expose fraudulent claims. Anyone and anything in your environment that does not fully deserve the power it claims should get the brunt of your exuberant skepticism. When you’re done cleaning up those messes, turn your attention to your own inner realms. There might be some good work to be done there. Can you think of any hypocrisy that needs fixing? Any excessive self-importance that could use some tamping down? Any pretending that would benefit from a counter dose of authenticity?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): On a spring day in 1973, an engineer named Martin Cooper debuted the world’s first cellphone. He placed a call as he walked along a New York City street. The phone weighed 2.5 pounds and resembled a brick. Later, he joked that no one would be able to talk very long on his invention, since it took a lot of strength to hold it against one’s ear. Think of how far that amazing device has come since then, Libra. Now imagine some important aspect of your own life that is in a rather primitive state at this moment but could one day be as natural and fully developed as cellphones have become. Are you willing to work hard to make that happen? Now is a good time to intensify your commitment. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the coming week, you will lose some clout and self-command if you’re too hungry for power. Likewise, if you act too brazenly intelligent, you may alienate potential helpers who are not as mentally well-endowed. Don’t be so fiercely reasonable that you miss the emotional richness that’s available. In saying these things, I don’t mean to sound as if I’m advising you to dumb yourself down and downplay your strengths. Not at all. Rather, I’m trying to let you know that the best way to get what you really need is to tailor your self-expression to the unique circumstances you find yourself in.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In old China, people used to cool themselves by sipping hot drinks. After taking a bath, they buffed the excess water from their skin by using a wet towel. When greeting a friend, they shook their own hand instead of the friend’s. To erect a new house, they built the roof first. You’re currently in a phase of your astrological cycle when this kind of behavior makes sense. In fact, I suspect you’re most likely to have a successful week if you’re ready to reverse your usual way of doing things on a regular basis. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m really tired of you not getting all of the appreciation, acknowledgment and rewards you deserve. Is there even a small possibility that you might be harboring some resistance to that good stuff? Could you be giving off a vibe that subtly influences people to withhold the full blessings they might otherwise confer upon you? According to my analysis of the astrological omens, the coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to work on correcting this problem. Do everything you can to make it easy for people to offer you their love and gifts.

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BOISEweekly | AUGUST 1–7, 2012 | 39



Boise Weekly Vol. 21 Issue 06