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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 43 APRIL 18–24, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 7

HEALTH CARE BEHIND BARS Questionable practices in Idaho’s prisons FEATURE 10

VOLUNTEER, NOW! How and where to go to lend a helping hand PICKS 18

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING TO DO? How about Earth Day, Saturday Market, Ignite and salsa? SCREEN 26

DAY-O! BW on the new Belafonte flick

“It’s hard to smoke crack in moderation.”

ASTROLOGY 34


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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporters: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com April Foster April@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Interns: Amber Clontz, Annette Rincon Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, David Kirkpatrick, Chris Parker, Ted Rall, Carissa Wolf ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow, Cal Werry CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE VALUE OF A VOLUNTEER Recently, I was an audience member at a panel discussion centered on volunteerism and one of the speakers threw out this figure: The value of a volunteer hour is worth $20 to the organization that benefits from it. A quick fact check: Indeed the national, nonpartisan coalition of nonprofits, Independent Sector, is slightly more specific, reporting that $21.79 was the value of the volunteer hour in 2011 on a national level. And that number has tripled from 1980’s estimated $7.46. What that means overall, the organization writes on its website, is that “according to the Corporation for National and Community Service, about 62.7 million Americans, or 26.5 percent of the adult population, gave 8.1 billion hours of volunteer service worth $173 billion in 2010.” That’s a whole lot of free labor that’s absolutely essential to the success of thousands of organizations. On a state level, the numbers vary slightly, and in 2010, the most recent year for which figures are available, the value of one hour of volunteer time in Idaho was $15.93. For an organization on a shoe-string budget, that kind of savings means the difference between success and shuttering. For a local organization, say for example, the Boise Rescue Mission, which relies on volunteers to pump out nine meals a day across its three shelters, that savings means feeding hundreds more hungry men, women and children. This week’s main story is our second-annual Volunteer Guide, with a laundry list of volunteer opportunities available across the city in a variety of organizations. Though it is long, the list is but a fraction of the places where you can donate your time as a volunteer in the valley. This year, in addition to the printed version of this volunteer guide, we’ve launched on online database of volunteer opportunities that we’ll maintain as part of our events listings. Event-specific volunteer opportunities are currently listed there (the Race for the Cure is looking for 195 volunteers), as well as ongoing needs with organizations that rely on volunteer support year round to accomplish their missions. To add your volunteer needs to that page, email calendar@boiseweekly.com. To peruse the opportunities posted there all year long, visit boiseweekly.com and click on the “Volunteer Guide” button. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Jaki Katz Ashford TITLE: Blood Brothers MEDIUM: Acrylic on canvas ARTIST STATEMENT: I have always been attracted to the spirituality and color of Native American culture. For me there’s nothing more artistically inspiring than tribal music and dance. I love to paint from my photographic images of the Seven Arrows Powwow held every year here in Boise. Don’t miss Seven Arrows Powow Saturday, April 21-Sunday, April 22, at Boise State.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. C AL W ER RY

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Into the depths of the Idaho prison health-care report 7 Boise leaders consider new panhandling/graffiti ordinances 8

PARTY DOWN WITH BW Thanks to Rocci Johnson, the crew at Humpin’ Hannah’s, our friends at 44 North Vodka, and the BW/44 North swag girls for a raucous good time at BW’s second-annual Restaurant + Bar Guide release party. We immortalized the night in photos for those of you who might have had too good of a time to remember the details. Check it out at Cobweb.

ART. BEER. REPEAT. Sonny and Cher. PB&J. Beer and art. Crooked Fence Brewing and a troupe of local artists celebrated the last of those winning combinations over the weekend and BW was there to record it in digital history. See the video at Cobweb.

BISTERFELDT STEPS DOWN Veteran public servant and current Ada County Commissioner Vern Bisterfeldt announced April 15 that he’ll leave his post on the commission early because of health issues. More at Citydesk.

PICK A PACK OF DEMS The state’s medical marijuana advocates had better luck at the Democratic Caucus than at the Republican Caucus. Surprised? Neither were we. See what other (non) surprises the caucus held at Citydesk.

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE BW’s annual Volunteer Guide

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Catching up with Damien Jurado

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Sing Your Song

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REC Idaho Stampede’s Antoine Walker

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

THE MISFITS

Small tokens of their own disrespect “Do not attend events likely to draw a lot of blacks. ... Do not settle in a district or municipality run by black politicians.” —From John Derbyshire’s essay “The Talk: Non-Black Version.” U Does anyone out there know Clarence Thomas personally? Maybe Michael Steele? Herman Cain? How about Armstrong Williams or J.C. Watts? See, I’m trying to reach all or any of those prominent AfricanAmericans who have cuddled up to the right. In light of recent developments, I have a question for them that seems pertinent, and of the few black people I know personally, not a one of them is a rightie. So if you happen to know any of the gentlemen I’ve listed, or any conservative blacks I’ve left out, please pass my question on, will you? Here it is: Clarence (Michael, Herman, et al), when you’re lying in that strange bed with those people who 50 years ago opposed (or would have opposed, had they been operative at the time) any change in the status of your civil rights … who to this day display a seething resentment of having to let you into their clubs, organizations and even their consciousness … who, when they aren’t openly attributing your achievements to affirmative action or political correctness, are thinking it … who stretch the Second Amendment to grotesque lengths in what is an implicit insistence that your brothers and fathers and sons are too dangerous to be around unless we are carrying something capable of killing them … who always seem to be one sneer away from growling out the “n” word … how do you sleep? I mean, are you comfortable with yourself, spooning with that crowd? Or do you keep one eye open because you can’t be sure what’s coming next? I need an answer because it is increasingly beyond my understanding how you can continue to associate yourselves with a community that so obviously detests the reality that people of your ancestry are even here in America. At least, it’s obvious to me. I’m willing to consider the possibility that you have some sort of self-preserving blind spot that stops you from seeing the vitriol, the venom, the vindictiveness, the spittle flying from tea baggers’ lips when they accost black congressmen, the utter lack of respect and courtesy they give our president and his family, the way they so eagerly line up in support of the accused murderer of a black kid. I’m also willing to consider the possibility you are so dedicated to conservative values that you’re willing to let a little racism pass. But what if one of those conservative values to which you’re so enamored happens to be that black people are of less value than white people? That at the heart of conservative ideology lies a conviction that this nation and its advantages were never meant WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

to be shared with people like you? That your very presence here is a mistake? Consider John Derbyshire. Surely, as agents for the conservative cause, you must know about Derbyshire. He wrote columns for that bible of conservative opinion, the National Review, for years before he put something online two weeks ago that was so disturbingly bigoted that the NR fired him over it. The essay was printed in another conservative clustercluck, Taki’s Magazine, and it outlined a talk Derbyshire claims to have had with his children, alerting them to the perils of being in the company of blacks. I consider what he wrote a specialized form of pornography, intended to get hardcore racists hot, bothered and off—and I was pleased to hear Derbyshire is out of a job. Cohorts of his at the NR were quick to disassociate themselves from him once the filth of his attitudes became widely known. Yet where were they before the filth of his attitudes became widely known? After all, he had been writing for the NR for more than a decade, and there was no shortage of filth in his previous work. From June 2008: “[President Barack] Obama’s negritude will help him with a lot of politically vague types ... who have been oriented the Obama way by decades of watching Numinous Negro types saving the world (in movies and on television).” And with that, Derbyshire implies that those of us who voted for Obama did so because we’ve seen too much of Morgan Freeman and Will Smith. Or this, from August 2011: “Following the black riots of the 1960s, non-blacks have seen these concessions (civil rights) as an implicit contract or treaty—as non-black America saying to black America: ‘We’ll give you this stuff if you promise not to break our windows.’” With the National Review reeking with that sort of scorn and contempt, is it any wonder the right threw its combined weight behind the argument that a 17-year-old boy carrying candy and a soft drink was a deadly threat to a hulking sociopath with a gun? Isn’t it even possible they defend George Zimmerman because somewhere in their tribal brains, they agree with the president’s statement about Trayvon Martin—that the boy did indeed look like he could have been Obama’s son—and that alone made what Zimmerman did OK? So Clarence (Michael, Herman, et al), if I have any advice for you, it would be this: Whenever you’re heading out to one of those Republican fundraisers they trot you out for, or maybe somewhere to kiss the ring of one of the conservative leaders you admire so much, make sure you call ahead to let them know it’ll be you who gets out of the car. And for God’s sake, don’t get lost in their neighborhood.

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OPINION/TED RALL

COP KILLING ON THE RISE Tough sentencing laws provoke violent reactions

Violent crime in general is decreasing. But more cops are being killed in the line of duty. According to the FBI, 72 police officers died under fire in 2011. That’s up 25 percent from 2010 and up 75 percent from 2008. “The 2011 deaths were the first time that more officers were killed by suspects than car accidents, according to data compiled by the International Association of Chiefs of Police. The number was the highest in nearly two decades, excluding those who died in the Sept. 11 attacks in 2001 and the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995,” reports The New York Times. According to a study by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice, “In many cases, the officers were trying to arrest or stop a suspect who had previously been arrested for a violent crime.” Why this spike in cop killing? Experts blame a variety of factors for the carnage: the economic depression, low manpower due to budget cuts, policies that assign more cops to the most dangerous neighborhoods, and more aggressive patrolling of those areas, including “stop and frisk” stops of people the police deem suspicious. Maybe. I think something else is missing in analyses: the motivation of the shooter. Harsh sentencing laws are killing police officers. Imagine that you’re on parole in California, one of 24 states with “three strikes” sentencing laws. Let’s say you have two prior felony convictions. It doesn’t take much. One California man earned a “strike” for “violent assault”; he landed 25 years to life for stealing pizza from some kids. In Texas, a handyman who refused to refund $120.75 for a shoddy

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air conditioning repair landed his third strike; the U.S. Supreme Court upheld his sentence to life in prison with possible parole. So imagine yourself in this situation: Maybe you’ve got drugs in your automobile. Or you’re clean, but you’re not sure about what your passengers might be carrying. (In a car, one person’s contraband is everyone’s.) When you see flashing lights in your rearview mirror, you must choose: Pull over and cooperate, knowing that you’ll get life behind bars? Or do you take a terrible chance, shooting the officer and making a run for it? Harsh mandatory sentencing laws like “three strikes” make killing a cop a free gamble. Who knows? You might escape. If you get caught, the sentence will be no worse than if you’d done the right thing. A joint study by the Long Beach Police Department and California State UniversityLong Beach found that “in the Los Angeles area (where there is a higher concentration of repeat offenders and three-strikes prosecution has been more actively pursued), there is a notable increase in … resisting and assaulting officers, and a significant increase (113 percent between 1996 and 2001) in two- and threestrikes crimes with a police officer victim.” A 2002 study by the National Institute of Justice found that three-strike laws “increase police murders by more than 40 percent.” Remember this article the next time you get pulled over. Ask yourself: How do I feel? Odds are, the answer will involve a mixture of fear and contempt. Then imagine what you’d do if you were one arrest away from life in prison— and you had a gun.

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NEWS IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

CRUEL AND UNUSUAL Report: Inmates were denied human and constitutional rights CARISSA WOLF The State of Idaho didn’t want the public to read it, claiming a report on health care at an Idaho prison included “inflammatory and unsupported legal findings.” But U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill said the public’s right to know about conditions at the Idaho State Correctional Institution outweighed concerns from the Idaho Attorney General’s Office. The 94-page jaw dropper, written by Dr. Marc Stern, a court-appointed health-care expert, pulled no punches, documenting “serious problems” that, according to Stern, violated “the right of inmates at ISCI to be protected from cruel and unusual punishment.” Few, if any, elements of health-care for inmates escaped Stern’s wrath. Non-urgent care was poor and emergency care was “troubling,” according to Stern. In one instance an inmate, whose X-rays discovered a lesion on his chest, was not informed of his condition for seven months thus denying him “his basic human right to participate in his care.” “It really gives you goose bumps,” said Lea Cooper, American Civil Liberties Union of Idaho staff attorney. “The way we treat the least powerful members in our society says a lot about our society.” Attorneys representing the Idaho Department of Corrections wanted to keep Stern’s report sealed, arguing the findings would cause “unjustified public scandal.” But Winmill ruled otherwise. “The [U.S.] Constitution provides human rights for all citizens,” said Boise attorney Walt Sinclair. “We’re not talking about providing nice living conditions for these inmates. We’re trying to provide them with basic care and living conditions.” Sinclair represents inmates in a decadesold class-action federal suit that began with one prisoner, Walter Balla, who alleged overcrowding and poor access to medical care at ISCI. A wave of similar allegations from other prisoners followed Balla’s suit, threatening to clog court dockets. The complaints were folded into one class-action lawsuit, now known as the “Balla Case.” Over the next three decades, several rulings against the State of Idaho were handed down, with different federal judges ordering a stop to prison overcrowding and violence. The case also prompted a federal court injunction tasking IDOC with improving mental health-care and medical conditions at the prison. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

A 94-page independent review found non-urgent care to be “poor” and emergency care to be “troubling” in Idaho’s prison system.

In 2011, Winmill pegged Stern, a physician from Washington State, to be a court-appointed watchdog to oversee IDOC compliance. Stern’s scathing report outlined a litany of inadequacies, including the neglect of patients who were sometimes left unfed, in soiled bed linens and without medical treatment. Stern also reported a host of shortfalls in mental-health treatment at the prison. In one case, a mentally ill prisoner had scored high on an intake assessment for suicide risk, and contrary to protocol, he was never referred to mental-health professionals. Eleven days later, fellow inmates found him hanging in his cell. He later died. “We knew what the report was going to say,” Cooper said. “We’ve been getting letters from prisoners for years about the inadequate medical treatment they’ve been receiving. And we also have been contacted by healthcare providers who work at the prison who are really conflicted ethically. And then the care they are forced to provide is in direct conflict with their Hippocratic Oath.” Stern’s report noted that it sometimes took as long as 15 days before prisoners’ medical complaints were reviewed by a health care provider and that medical assessments, diagnoses and treatments were prescribed by licensed practical nurses in capacities that were beyond the scope of their training. In yet another case, Stern noted that a patient, who later died, was left unattended by a nurse during cardiac arrest, and in at least one instance, care was provided by a nurse who was “indifferent and hostile” toward prisoners. “Our primary concern has always been with providing our clients, the plaintiffs, access to the report,” said Stoel Rives attorney Jason Prince, who, along with Sinclair and a third attorney, Allison Blackman, represent

prison inmates in the case. Prince said that Stern’s report speaks for itself and is accurate. But IDOC officials challenged Stern’s investigation, claiming he cherry-picked his findings. State attorneys argued the report should stay under wraps, saying the findings were inaccurate and could cause potential embarrassment to IDOC. Stern’s report actually commended IDOC for its cooperation in the investigation, but prison officials withheld comment, issuing only written statements. In a joint statement, IDOC and Corizon, the company contracted to provide healthcare services at the prison, noted that, “while a few of the allegations raised in the report sent to the court report may be well founded but unfortunate anomalies, most of them have been or are being addressed.” IDOC did not respond to requests for information about health-care management plans that are currently in place or the review and accreditation findings of those plans. Cooper said that prisoners who file complaints against IDOC for inadequate medical care face a host of challenges, not the least of which is legal expense. “Most of these cases are out of reach for the average person unless they can find an attorney who is willing to cover the costs up front. And that’s pretty rare,” said Cooper. “At the end of the day, we have to go home and feed our family, too. So these are pretty hard cases to try and win. It’s not that they’re not winnable. It’s just that the cost involved with them, especially the medical cases, are just so exorbitant.” While the inmates’ attorneys said that Stern’s report could help defend their clients’ constitutional rights, Cooper said the report could help IDOC prisoners with other cases challenging inadequate medical care. “It can be used as evidence,” she said.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | 7


NEWS

NEW RULES Proposals on graffiti, panhandling being discussed GEORGE PRENTICE Citydesk has learned that law enforcement, legal staff and city officials have been huddling over the possibility of putting forth new ordinances regarding two very different but extremely high-profile issues: graffiti and panhandling. “The graffiti ordinance is still in discussion between legal and the mayor and council,” said Adam Park, Mayor Dave Bieter’s communications director. “[A proposed ordinance] will likely be advanced sometime this summer to help reduce the increased number of graffiti incidents that we have seen in the city over the last few years.” When Boise Police Chief Mike Masterson presented his department’s annual crime statistics, there was much to praise—the city’s overall crime rate has continued to drop—but Masterson is also the first to point to what he calls a “skyrocketing” problem: graffiti. In 2011, Boise saw a 34 percent increase in reports of graffiti, following a 2010 increase of 39 percent. “This is something that the [police] department and the city have been working on for a number of years,” said Lynn Hightower, BPD spokeswoman. “Graffiti increases the public’s perception of fear and crime. It’s not only ugly, it makes people feel unsafe.” Hightower said that graffiti, while not usually associated with other crimes, “degrades property values and creates an atmosphere of

fear and security among residents.” Park said more details on a proposed graffiti ordinance are expected in the coming months. Park also confirmed that the city’s legal department has forwarded information that could lead to a possible panhandling ordinance. Sources told Citydesk that the mayor and City Council will soon consider a packet of information including a legal review of how panhandling may or may not infringe on the First Amendment. Section 6-01-07 of Boise City Code states that a person who begs in a public place with the intent to intimidate another into giving money or goods or obstructs a pedestrian or vehicular traffic in a public place is guilty of a misdemeanor. In December 2010, city officials launched a voluntary “Have a Heart. Give Smart” campaign, asking citizens to avoid giving to panhandlers. At the time, city officials conceded that asking for money in a public space is legal but they were intent on advancing the issue. “If someone is demonstrating threatening behavior, that would be prosecuted,” said Park in December 2010. “There are some discussions about revising the ordinance.” For now, however, proposed legislation has yet to surface for either issue.

RE-CYCLED Bike share program could roll soon ANDREW CRISP A bike share program in downtown Boise is moving forward. The effort includes the Central District Health Department and Capital City Development Corporation as partners. The project could put as many as 140 bikes at 10 stations throughout the downtown area. “We’re a bike-friendly city,” said Karen Sanders, Downtown Boise Association’s executive director. “It makes sense to offer bicycles.” With a green light, which could come as soon as May, Boiseans could rent a bike, ride to their destination, and then park the bicycle at another station. Ideally, the rental would be free for the first 30 minutes, with membership plans available, said Dave Fotsch, CDHD’s public relations officer. “Most systems have an annual membership between $55-$75 a year,” he said. “We’ll be somewhere in that range.” The bikes would be similar to those offered by B-Cycle in Denver. Those cruiser-style bikes

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feature a basket and a “relaxed-ride height.” “We want to start in downtown Boise,” said Fotsch. “[Downtown] has the occupational and residential density to support that.” After conducting a study, researchers from Boise State’s Community and Regional Planning Department suggested multiple locations for bike stations, with the aim of linking Boise’s transit options. “I see bike share as A: a great contribution to health and B: a great opportunity to connect these modes of transportation in a very convenient way,” said Thomas Wuerzer, a researcher at Boise State. Currently two grant proposals have been written by CDHD requesting funding from the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration. “The first grant, something we should hear back about sometime next month, would purchase all of the infrastructure [including bikes],” said Fotsch. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


CITIZEN

KERRY LAWSON New Les Bois manager says the track is a sure bet GEORGE PRENTICE horses moved in that week. We’re currently at 400 head. We’ll have all of our 820 stalls filled. We had over 1,300 apply to come here this season. How early in the morning are you at your desk? I’m here by 6:30, but our track crew is out by 4 a.m. Horses and trainers are out on the track from 6 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Then the track crews are back. You’re always having to finetune the track—put down an ideal blend of soil, sand and bark, but it goes away. You have to work it every day to keep that bounce in it and keep the track safe.

You’ve trained and owned horses most of your life. Did you ever see yourself doing something like this? Not at all.

You have 36 racing dates this year. We’ll open the Wednesday before the Kentucky Derby. I think because of the area we live in, so many people have things to do on weekends. That’s probably why Wednesdays have been very good for us. We’ll run Wednesdays and Saturday, and beginning in mid-June, we’ll go to three days a week, adding either Fridays or Sundays to the schedule.

When Les Bois is going full-tilt, mid-season, how many people are working here? We’re looking at almost 160-180 people.

Isn’t it very difficult for a live racing operation to be profitable? That’s correct.

Is your operating budget more than $1 million? Oh, yes. More than $1.5 million? It could be that number real easy, but we’re trying to keep it down.

Are the simulcast operations the main revenue generator? Most of the money at the simulcast operations goes to other tracks, but we get a percentage of that and it can add up over the year. All of that goes to the horsemen for their purse accounts [winnings for live racing].

You’re a few weeks away from opening day, but it appears as if there are a lot of horses here already. We opened up March 1 and close to 150

Will you be able to attract a higher caliber of horses as you build your purses? Right now, when we have a purse between $2,500-$3,000, most of the horses and train-

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JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Kerry Lawson’s new office isn’t inside the Turf Club at Les Bois Park or in the grandstand for that matter. The new Les Bois general manager said he’s more comfortable in a small building nestled near the backstretch of the racetrack. His office is a furlong away from hundreds of stables where horses, owners, trainers and jockeys are all anxiously awaiting Wednesday, May 2—pending day of the track’s first full season in four years. The Garden City track held an abbreviated 15-day schedule in 2011. Lawson, 51, has spent his entire life around horses. His dad, a sugar beet farmer from Grand View, also raised horses. “I remember always coming to race tracks in Idaho and California when I was a kid,” he said. Lawson even recalled training and racing his first horse, Rocky Mist, back in January 1982. He came in second.

ers are local. But some of the quarter horse races, like the Bitterroot Futurity—that will be about $100,000. That’s big time. What’s the difference between a good racehorse and a great one? Breeding, heart and determination. You can have a horse with a lot of talent, but on race day, he just doesn’t have the desire or the heart. Isn’t it true that the athletic prowess of a jockey is usually underestimated? These horses are powerfully strong. The more you try to strong-arm a horse, the tougher the horse can get. But it’s amazing what some of these little guys can do. What kind of tips can you give us at the betting window? You know, I read the form and think I have a race figured out, but then I end up looking at the horse, trainer and jockey in the paddock and I change my mind. It’s a gamble. Is there any part of this operation that’s a gamble? It’s a sure bet. You just can’t do it without support and strong partnerships. Everybody needs to know that we’re going to be here a long time, and we’re going to supply a great product. We’re pretty excited. And for me, it’s a lot of fun. I’ve been around it my whole life.

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+HHG DOO & THE

Agency for New Americans

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rothers and sisters, it’s time you started listening to the good word. Not a word from on high. No, the word from deep inside your very being. You know which one we’re talking about: That nagging feeling it’s about damned time you left your selfish ways behind and started giving back to others. Rejoice, brothers and sisters, Boise Weekly is here to help you find your socially conscious salvation. And being the charitable souls that we are, we’ve even done the hard work for you. Here in BW’s annual Volunteer Guide, you’ll find a list of Treasure Valley organizations that routinely work with volunteers to accomplish their missions. From nonprofits that bring the arts to children, to groups that help refugees get their bearings when they come to this country, to crews that help keep the environment clean, there’s something to fit every interest, ability and time limitation. This is by no means a complete list of organizations that need a little extra help, but we’re hoping it helps readers see the light and find true inspiration. For even more volunteer opportunities, visit BW’s new Volunteer page at boiseweekly.com, where you can find information on volunteer projects throughout the year. If you represent an organization that needs volunteer help, the Volunteer page will also be a resource you can use to rally the troops.

New arrivals in the United States need a little help getting settled, and that’s where the Agency for New Americans comes in. The nonprofit works to support refugees as they transition, and it takes a lot of volunteers to pull it off. Volunteers are needed to help with job coaching, English language classes, working with families, mentoring refugees on the culture and daily life, as well as doing office work and fundraising. Anyone interested can start by filling out a volunteer application available online and attending an orientation. There is additional training for some positions.

A.L.P.H.A. Allies Linked for the Prevention of HIV and AIDS is a driving force behind education about HIV and AIDS—as well other sexually transmitted diseases—in the Treasure Valley. But volunteers are needed to do a little bit of everything and anything, from office work to staffing outreach events. Volunteers are also needed at Exposure A.L.P.H.A. Interchange, the nonprofit’s retail thrift store. New volunteer orientation is held every other Thursday.

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INDOORS

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OUTDOORS

BY DEANNA DARR | ILLUSTRATIONS BY ADAM ROSENLUND

Boise Art Museum

It’s a tough job bringing beauty to the world—seriously, it takes a whole lot of work and a small army of volunteers to keep the doors of Boise Art Museum open and to bring an array of art and programs to the public. Volunteers greet patrons, take admissions, work the museum store and provide information. They also work in the administrative office and help with programs. If you’re more interested in a concentrated effort, the museum’s largest fundraiser of the year, Art in the Park, requires hundreds of volunteers to help with every aspect from setting up to final accounting. Check BAM’s website and request a volunteer application for all positions. Contact: Visitors’ Services, Shauna, Ext. 34, shauna@boiseartmuseum.org; Office, Hana, Ext. 10, hana@boiseartmuseum.org; Education, Drew, Ext. 36, drew@boiseartmuseum.org; Art in the Park, Mary Corrock, Ext. 14, marycorrock@boiseartmuseum.org Website: boiseartmuseum.org Phone: 208-345-8330

Contact: Yasmin Aguilar, yaguilar@mtnstatesgroup.org Website: anaidaho.org Phone: 208-338-0033, Ext. 269

Contact: Scott Weisenberger, scott.weisenberger@alphaidaho.org Website: alphaidaho.org Phone: 208-424-7799

KIDS

VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL

LABOR

Boise Bicycle Project

lead kids’ bike-safety programs, help out during community bike drives and represent the organization at numerous events throughout the year. Volunteers just need to have a love of bikes and, more importantly, the community. Contact: Jimmy Hallyburton, boisebicycleproject@gmail.com Website: boisebicycleproject.org Phone: 208-429-6520

Boise River Volunteers Boise has a lot of things going for it, but the members of Boise River Volunteers help make sure that the thing going through Boise is as clean as possible. BRV is the group dedicated to making sure the beloved Boise River stays nice and clean throughout the busy summer floating season. The group conducts weekly cleanup floats to pick up any trash left in or near the river. Volunteers have even been known to rescue a forlorn boater or two. Anyone interested in joining can contact the group via its website and click on the contact link. Contact: Chris Crawford Website: riverhelpers.com

In the few short years of its existence, Boise Bicycle Project has become one of the most beloved nonprofit organizations in the Treasure Valley. Whether the crew is helping fix up old bikes to be donated to area children and those in need or running a bicycle safety program for kids, BBP is one busy group of people. It’s also a community-driven group that depends on volunteers. BBP volunteers help fix up donated bikes, teach others how to care for their own bikes,

ENVIRONMENT

ARTS

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Boise Watershed We’ll admit it, “waste water treatment” doesn’t usually make people want to jump in and help, but Boise’s WaterShed isn’t your typical waste water treatment facility. While yes, the city’s waste water treatment facility is on site, WaterShed focuses on public education, where people can go to learn more about conservation or join in one of the many educational events. Teens can join the Green Teen Program, giving them the chance to spend a summer doing indoor and outdoor conservation projects. Adult and college-aged volunteers are also needed to help with the numerous group field trips that take advantage of the interactive programs at WaterShed. Contact: Cindy Busche, boisewatershed@cityofboise.org Website: boiseenvironmentaleducation.org Phone: 208-608-7300

Boys and Girls Club It’s all about the kids at the three Boys and Girls clubs in Ada County—as it should be. The clubs offer a positive and fun place where kids of all ages can hang out, par ticipate in activities, play spor ts or games, or do their homework. Adult volunteers are always needed to help the nonprofit by working directly with the kids and helping staff members. Volunteers help lead field trips, assist with lunch and snack times, and give a little one-on-one time to club members who need some attention. Volunteers are also particularly needed to work as tutors for club members or to help them with their homework. Volunteer orientation is held every Wednesday at 6 p.m. at the Garden City location, but contact each club to find out its specific needs and schedule. Volunteers can get an application form on the website. Contact: Tim Whipple or Camilyn Elison, moseleyv@adaclubs.org Website: mybgclub.org Phone: Volunteer coordinator, 208-639-3170; Garden City club, 208-321-9157; Meridian club, 208-888-5392.

Capital City Public Market Most Boiseans know the market by a much simpler name: the Saturday Market. This popular farmers market is where you’ll spot nearly all of the city every weekend throughout the summer and fall, when the streets are closed down and pedestrians and veggies rule. But a successful market needs some volunteer help to stay that way. Volunteers are needed to do everything from manning the information and veggie valet booth to helping WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

to process EBT and credit card transactions. Time commitments and skills required vary, but check out the website for more info. Contact: friendatthemarket@gmail.com Website: seeyouatthemarket.com

Children’s Home Society of Idaho The Children’s Home started off as an orphanage, but in the last few decades, its mission has been to provide counseling and therapy for children who have been through some serious challenges. No child in need is ever turned away from getting help regardless of his or her family’s ability to pay. The nonprofit works with groups of volunteers on specific projects. This year, Children’s Home Society is looking for a few groups willing to help with events, do a good spring cleanup of the society’s grounds and even help paint inside. Contact: Joanne Taylor, jtaylor@childrenshomesociety.com Website: childrenshomesociety.com Phone: 208-343-7813, Ext. 1510

City of Boise Parks and Recreation In the days of shrinking budgets, public parks need a little extra help from the public. The Department of Parks and Recreation already depends on the more than 60,000 hours of volunteer labor donated by city residents, labor that fills the work load of 26 full-time employees. If you’re interested in getting your hands dirty, Parks and Rec is all about physical labor with projects that range from weeding and painting to building picnic tables and planting trees. There are also a couple of big community projects each year, including cleanup days along the Boise River and in the Foothills, as well as the Rake Our Parks event in the fall. Volunteers are always needed to help with youth programs at the city’s neighborhood centers, as well as with the Adventure Program, which helps disabled residents get involved in outdoor recreation. Check the website for specific volunteer opportunities. Contact: Jerry Pugh, jpugh@cityofboise.org Website: cityofboise.org/Departments/Parks Phone: 208-608-7617

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Community Cakes You know that warm fuzzy feeling you get when your friends and family give you a birthday cake to celebrate the day you arrived on Earth? Well, imagine giving that feeling to patients in area hospices and elder-care facilities and local foster children. Community Cakes (formerly known as Angel Cakes) is a group of volunteer bakers who make birthday cakes for those who might not get one otherwise, as well as supporting events like National Adoption Day, Valentines for Vets, and baking monthly at the Boise Ronald McDonald House. Volunteers are asked to bake and deliver one cake per month. Anyone interested in joining the baking army can fill out a volunteer application online. After submitting the application, a recruitment officer will call to set up a time for a home visit and orientation.

Nampa is a haven for migratory birds and other wildlife, but refuge staff need a lot of help keeping it that way. The expansive refuge is dealing with a major invasive species problem, meaning staff needs volunteers willing to go out and get rid of some unwanted plants. If you’re more into the fauna than the flora, Deer Flat holds regular wildlife surveys in which volunteers help keep track of what critters are spending their time at the refuge. Of course, the refuge also needs help from volunteers doing things like manning the visitors’ center and picking up trash. Anyone interested in volunteering—whether an individual or a group—can start by filling out a volunteer application available online or at the refuge headquarters. Contact: Kash Anderson, kash_anderson@fws.gov Website: deerflat@fws.gov Phone: 208-467-9278, Ext. 24

Website: communitycakes.com

Eagle Bike Park The Community Center The Community Center is Idaho’s only facility that focuses on LGBT issues, and volunteers are needed to help staff the center, maintain the database and assist with various office duties. Contact: Rick Ramos, info@tccidaho.org Website: tccidaho.org Phone: 208-336-3870

Create Common Good From growing food to getting a job, Create Common Good helps refugees get on their feet once those feet hit Boise. The nonprofit offers job skills classes and training that is vocationally focused, including culinary training, classes on filling out applications and interviewing, as well as opportunities to work on a small local farm growing vegetables that are sold to support the organization. Volunteers are needed to help with oneon-one tutoring, as well as working in the classroom, manning the group’s farm stand and working on the farm. Contact: Megan John, megan@createcommongood.org Website: createcommongood.org Phone: 208-991-3799

Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge The wildlife refuge along Lake Lowell in

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The Eagle Bike Park has become a favorite of mountain bikers who like to escape to the trails in the Foothills bordering Eagle. All those trails are the result of a whole lot of volunteer hours spent both creating and maintaining them. And with big plans for the area comes the continuing need for volunteers to put their backs where their wheels are and help with trails. To get on the volunteer list, check out the website. Contact: Boise Area Mountain Bike Association, bamba.imba@gmail.com Website: eaglebikepark.org

Exergy Tour Idaho is about to hit the big time in the world of women’s road bike racing. The inaugural Exergy Tour will bring some of the biggest names in cycling to Idaho for a multi-stage race Thursday, May 24-Monday, May 28. But to pull off the event, organizers are going to need some help. Volunteers are needed to act as course marshals and help with security, media, volunteer check-in, parking and staff assorted events. Topping the sought-after list of positions are the 20 traveling course marshals, so be ready to fight for one of those. Anyone interested in volunteering can sign up online. Contact: Laura Nichols, volunteer@exergytour.com Website: exergytour.com Phone: 208-608-3963

Family Advocates This nonprofit organization stands firmly in the corner of at-risk families in the Treasure Valley, with a focus on foster children. The organization is particularly in need of people willing to work as court-appointed special adWWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


vocates. CASA program volunteers represent the interests of foster children in all court cases, trying to ensure that the needs of the children take the forefront. A legal background is not required but a significant time commitment is: Volunteers must undergo a 12-hour training course, then dedicate at least 10 hours a month to the work, which includes meeting with children, doing background research and making official recommendations to the court. If your time is more limited, Family Advocates always needs help with basic office duties. The organization is also in need of someone who can serve as a data analyst on Tuesdays, as well as volunteers for two major fund-raising events. All volunteers must undergo a background check and fingerprinting, which costs $30. Anyone interested in helping out must start by filling out a volunteer application form, available on the website.

Habitat for Humanity

Idaho Botanical Garden

Idaho FoodBank

Habitat for Humanity is busy raising the roof—or rather roofs—over the heads of Treasure Valley families in need. Volunteers are the backbone of the organization dedicated to providing affordable housing to families who both need it and are willing to help work for it. Volunteers do everything from working on construction sites to helping in the ReStore, where donated construction materials are sold to the public.

Idaho Botanical Garden is more than just a place where plants grow. It’s a hub of the community with a full schedule of events—from concerts to educational classes. Volunteers are needed to do everything from getting their hands dirty in the garden to helping staff public events and gatherings. Volunteers staff the summer concerts and also serve as guides for garden visitors. Anyone interested in volunteering must fill out an application, which are available at the garden office and online.

To make sure families across the state get the help they need, the foodbank is in constant need of help itself. Volunteers are particularly needed to sort and repackage food donations. Help is also needed in the warehouse. There are also volunteer opportunities for groups and families, depending on the project, and foodbank staff is willing to help organizations put on their own food donation drives. Following the success of the Picnic in the Park summer program, the foodbank is looking for volunteers to help with the project, which helps make sure children have a good lunch when schools are on summer break. Organizers are also focusing on gathering

Contact: Construction, Sarah Waltman; Habitat ReStore, Tod Wingfield, info@hfhboise.org Website: hfhboise.org Phone: Construction, 208-331-2916, Ext. 315; ReStore, 208-375-5256

Contact: Karen Christeson, karen@idahobotanicalgarden.org Website: idahobotanicalgarden.org Phone: 208-343-8649

Contact: Megan Bates, information@familyadvocate.org Website: familyadvocate.org Phone: 208-345-3344

Foothills Learning Center The Foothills Learning Center is all about celebrating not only the Boise Foothills but the environment as a whole. Families and children are the focus of the center’s numerous educational programs and classes held throughout the year, all done with the goal of getting people in touch with the natural world. Volunteers of all ages are needed to help with the center’s programing, doing ever ything from working on a newsletter, to helping with educational events, teaching programs and even weeding the native plant garden. Log on to the website to download a volunteer application. Contact: Kristin Lundstrom, klundstrum@cityofboise.org Website: bee.cityofboise.org/foothills Phone: 208-493-2535

Giraffe Laugh Early Learning Centers Giraffe Laugh is a nonprofit that helps provide childcare regardless of a family’s ability to pay. The center also works with the Marian Pritchett School, allowing teen mothers to continue their education while their children are cared for. The organization is always looking for volunteers to help with everything from rocking babies to organizing some of the group’s fund-raising events. The group also needs volunteers to do various tasks around the center, including reading to children, working in the gardens of its various locations and transporting materials between sites. The crew at Giraffe Laugh has recently set up a new online system allowing volunteers to create user profiles for themselves and view all the volunteer opportunities available through the organization. To check it out, or to create your profile, visit giraffelaugh.org. Contact: Amber Murray, amber@giraffelaugh.org Website: giraffelaugh.org Phone: 208-424-3387

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the roughly 300 volunteers it takes to staff Post Office locations across the valley for the National Association of Letter Carriers Food Drive on Saturday, May 12. Contact: Cathe Scott, volunteerservices@idahofoodbank.org Website: idahofoodbank.org Phone: 208-577-2720

Idaho Historical Society History is a living, breathing thing, and to keep it vital, the Idaho Historical Society is always looking for some history-loving volunteers to help at any of the society’s facilities. If you don’t mind the slightly creepy, you can lead tours at the Old Idaho Penitentiary. If you love a traditional museum, help with collections at the historical museum. If you prefer some dirt under your nails, you can work in the native garden in the Pioneer Village area of the museum. Those who prefer their history bound can work at the historical library and archives collection. Check the website for a volunteer application. Website: history.idaho.gov Phone: Idaho State Historical Museum, 208-334-2120; Idaho Historical Society, 208-334-2682; Old Idaho Penitentiary, 208-334-2844

ing at the opportunity to spend an evening in the outdoor amphitheater, catching a free show. Of course, the real cost of admission is helping out taking tickets, handing out programs, ushering and picking up trash at intermission and after the performance. So, why would we tell you about a volunteer program that’s filled up? Because ISF has a waiting list for volunteers willing to step in at the last minute if someone can’t make their assigned night. It might be a long shot, but at least it’s a shot. Contact: Chandra Woodward, chandra@idahoshakespeare.org Website: idahoshakespeare.org Phone: 208-336-9221

Idaho State Capitol Tours History buffs can get in on the action as a volunteer tour guide at the recently restored and expanded Idaho State Capitol. Volunteers are needed to lead hour-long tours—don’t worry, training and a script are included— throughout the year, not just during the legislative session. Contact: capitoltours@lso.idaho.gov Phone: 208-332-1012

Idaho Humane Society The Idaho Humane Society is often the last stop for animals that need new homes, and the nonprofit organization’s resources always seem to be being stretched further. Volunteers are a key part of keeping the doors open and pets going to new homes. Volunteers are needed to help in a wide variety of ways, from walking, bathing and grooming dogs, to playing with the cats. Volunteers are also needed to serve as adoption assistants, answering questions and helping to match people with prospective pets. If you’re willing to do a little digging, people are also needed to help maintain the grounds of the facility, making sure the animals have as nice of a home as possible until they are adopted. Visit the website to fill out a volunteer application before signing up for an orientation. Contact: Melanie Larson, volunteer@ idahohumanesociety.org Website: idahohumanesociety.org Phone: 208-331-8553

Idaho Shakespeare Festival Idaho Shakespeare Festival is always one of the biggest summer artist draws in the area—and that includes volunteers. In fact, volunteer slots for the 2012 summer season are already full. It’s hard not to blame people for jump-

14 | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | BOISEweekly

YOUR FACE HERE

Interfaith Sanctuary As Boise’s homeless population has grown in recent years, the Interfaith Sanctuary has become even more important, and so too have the volunteers who help the nonprofit. Volunteers do a variety of duties, but are especially needed to fill nightly shifts to check in people staying at the shelter, getting them settled, and serving food. They are also needed to help clean in the morning, as well as to help organize activities, programs and group volunteer efforts. A volunteer application is available on the website. After submission, staff will contact potential volunteers. Website: interfaithsanctuary.org Phone: 208-343-2630

International Rescue Committee When refugees arrive in Boise, they often face an alien world. But the folks at the IRC are there to help with the transition, supporting refugees and their families for their first eight months in the United States with things like job placement, housing, English classes and various programs. IRC is always in need of volunteers who do everything from clerical duties to working as mentors directly with refugees. Volunteers are also needed to work one-on-one with refugees in jobs classes, helping with resumes and interviewing skills and working in the IRC’s women’s program that works on life skills with high-risk women. Anyone interested in working with the group should start by filling out an application. A background check is required, and IRC staff will work with volunteers to find a position that works for their time constraints and skills. Contact: Shannon Davis-Jones, shannon.davis-jones@rescue.org Website: rescue.org/us-program/us-boise-id Phone: 208-344-1792, Ext. 20

Peregrine Fund World Center for Birds of Prey Think volunteering is for the birds? You’re right—kind of. The World Center for Birds of Prey is one of the centerpieces for raptor conser vation, with an array of educational opportunities that go hand in hand with its recover y work. And while the center is known around the world, the nonprofit still needs help carrying out its mission. Namely, it needs people to work as tour guides and Interpretive Center ambassadors, who work in the gift shop and greet visitors. No prior experience with either birds or retail is required, but volunteers do need to fill out an application online and then go through both orientation and training. Contact: Nick Piccono, npiccono@peregrinefund.org Website: peregrinefund.org Phone: 208-362-8257

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9:30AM - 1:30PM 8th Street from Bannock to Main Street & on the Grove Plaza

SAVE THE

DATE

2012 MARKET SEASON BEGINS THIS SATURDAY

APRIL 21 - 9:30 - 1:30

A Free Service of the Market! *FRESH LOCALLY GROWN* PRODUCE, HERBS & FLOWERS *IDAHO SPECIALTY* FOODS & WINES

Chef Abbigail Carlson Cooking with fresh, seasonal produce from the Market Saturdays Q 10am to Noon

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*SELECTED WORK BY* LOCAL ARTISANS

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WORLD PREMIERE

tickets: start at $15 $10 if you are under 30

OFF THE RECORD

phone: 331-9224 x205

BY LYNN ALLISON APRIL 4 - 28, 2012

online: BCTheater.org 854 Fulton St. Downtown Boise, ID

Public Library

Stage Coach Theatre

For the people, by the people could well be the motto of the public library system. While libraries serve as hubs of the community, tight budgets mean that wrangling all those books, videos, computers and public programs require some serious volunteer hours. Public libraries across the Treasure Valley need people to help prepare and shelve books, prepare donations for annual book sales, organize public events and help with summer reading programs. The Boise Public Library has even more need for volunteers at each of its branch libraries across the city. The library bases its volunteer effort around its website, which posts volunteer opportunities as they become available. Would-be volunteers are asked to fill out an online form and be ready to undergo a background check. Volunteers are also needed with Friends of the Boise Library, which puts on used book sale fundraisers and runs the book store.

The actors may get all the glor y, but it takes an army to mount any successful theatrical production. Stage Coach Theater-—one of Boise’s longest-running community theater companies-—is looking for some front-of-thehouse help. Volunteers are always needed to help with the customer-ser vice side of the arts by selling concessions, cleaning, stocking supplies, ushering, taking tickets and other assorted duties. Ages 12 and older are welcome (as long as minors are accompanied by an adult).

Website: Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org; Garden City, notaquietlibrary.org Phone: Boise, 208-384-4076; Garden City, 208-472-2941; Friends of the Boise Library, 208-384-4198

Maintaining the trees in the City of Trees is no small task. That’s why the City of Boise’s Community Forestry crew needs the help of volunteers to keep the trees filling the city’s right-of-way areas and parks healthy and maintained. Tree Stewards join city crews one morning a week to help prune public trees. But joining the pruning brigade takes some planning: Volunteers must complete a series of tree-care classes held every Wednesday in March in order to be certified to be a steward.

Ridge to Rivers It takes more than the adoration of a community of outdoor-oriented folks to keep trails along the extensive Ridge to Rivers trail system in shape. But luckily, there seems to be no shortage of volunteers willing to step up and break a sweat in the name of their favorite trail system. In fact, there’s a waiting list for those who want to help maintain and expand one of Boise’s most-popular attractions. Opportunities to work on the trails are project dependent but usually involve trail construction and the best chance to work on a trail is during specific large-scale projects. Watch the website for new projects. Contact: David Gordon, dgordon@cityofboise.org Website: ridgetorivers.cityofboise.org Phone: 208-493-2531

Special Olympics Idaho Special Olympics Idaho jumped in the public spotlight when Boise hosted to the 2009 World Winter Games, and since then the organization has kept growing. But as is the case with most nonprofits, Special Olympics Idaho depends on the kindness of volunteers. The organization has volunteer opportunities year round, with enough variety to match just about anyone’s time constraints and interests. Volunteer jobs include serving as coaches and mentors, helping with the logistics at events, fundraising, serving as medical staff at events and acting as management and sports management team members. The first step to volunteering is to fill out an online application form. Anyone who wants to work closely with athletes will have to have a background check.

Contact: Kim Librum, stagecoachtheatre@gmail.com Website: stagecoachtheatre.com Phone: 208-342-2000

Tree Stewards

Contact: Ryan Rodgers Website: cityofboise.org/forestry Phone: 208-384-4083

TRICA Schools may be forced to cut funding for the arts, but the Treasure Valley Institute for Children’s Art is doing everything it can to make sure kids across the valley have access to an array of arts programs. The nonprofit never turns any child away because his or her family can’t afford tuition. TRICA depends heavily on volunteers, who do everything from data entry to helping staff the multitude of events the organization is involved with to helping fix up the old Immanuel Methodist Episcopal Church in Boise’s North End—the site of the group’s future home. Helping with fundraising for the group’s capital campaign so TRICA can move into that site is also a main focus of volunteer work. TRICA is closing in on the final $600,000 it needs to complete the second phase of renovations, which will allow it to move into its homebase. Contact: Meshel Miller, meshel@trica.org Website: trica.org Phone: 208-344-2220

Contact: Dallas Leatham, dleatham@idso.org Website: idso.org Phone: 208-323-0482, Ext. 11, or 1-800-915-6510

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United Way of Idaho OK, so you want to volunteer somewhere, doing something, but you’re really not sure where or what. Don’t let your indecision scare you away. The crew at United Way of Idaho works to match volunteers with organizations spanning a broad spectrum of needs and interests. United Way also hosts numerous groups of its own, offering ways for people to get involved in the community with various levels of commitment. The organization has partners in education, youth, health and finances and it serves as a clearinghouse for volunteer work. It works with individuals, as well as sets up projects for groups, companies and schools. The best way to get started is to create a user profile online. United Way also facilitates several service groups. The Junior Service Club is for junior high school students and offers a hands-on, year-long project driven by students. High school students can join One Stone, a similar group that has numerous projects. Working professionals with limited time can join DIRT, a group that meets to do one-hour projects over the noon hour. Projects nearly always are physical, giving those usually tied to a desk a way to blow off some energy. Adults who want to get more involved can join LEAP, which is more focused on specific issues and works to engage more in the community. United Way has also started a reading initiative at Morely Nelson Elementary in Boise, where tutors, readers and mentors are matched with students who need a little extra help. Volunteering for this project requires a background check. Contact: Neva Geisler, ngeisler@unitedwaytv.org Website: unitedwaytv.org Phone: 208-336-1070, Ext. 122

Veterans Affairs Medical Center In order to provide the best care possible for our military veterans, the Boise VA works with hundreds of volunteers each year in a variety of jobs. Volunteers are particularly needed to drive a van used to transport patients from Canyon County to the hospital. Help doing clerical duties is also a priority, but jobs range from stocking shelves, teaching vets a how to use a computer program to aid in their health care, working in the hospice program, serving as couriers and visiting patients in the hospital. Anyone interested should call the volunteer coordinator to pick up an orientation packet. Volunteers must undergo a background check.

Women’s and Children’s Alliance The Women’s and Children’s Alliance has been fighting domestic abuse for more than 20 years, helping women, men, children and families who have faced domestic violence or sexual assault. The nonprofit organization is always in need of volunteers to do an array of jobs, from clerical work to working in the crisis shelter, manning the hot lines and staffing special events. WCA is also looking for people to join the Ambassador Program, which deals with community outreach. Anyone interested in volunteering can schedule a tour of the facility by visiting the WCA’s website. After a tour, would-be volunteers can meet with staff to find a job that best suits them. Contact: Tami Fisher, tfisher@wcaboise.org Website: wcaboise.org Phone: 208-343-3688, Ext. 41

Zoo Boise Want to explore your wild side? Zoo Boise is always looking for volunteers to work with its ever-growing collection of animals, but keep in mind that it can get quite competitive to land a spot as a volunteer at the zoo. To focus its efforts, the zoo does volunteer inter views twice a year, with training done in May and September. Anyone looking to land a summer volunteer slot needs to have an application in ASAP, since interviewing will only be done through the end of April. This year, volunteers are needed to work as Conservation Cruise boat drivers, captaining a boat across the zoo’s lagoon. Zoo Naturalist volunteers are also needed to work in the educational aspects of the zoo, including the giraffe feeding station, Wallaby Walkout exhibit, the butterfly exhibit, Zoo Farm and introducing visitors to the animals. Finally, Animal Care volunteers work with zookeepers on the care and feeding of the animals. You can start the process by filling out an application available on the zoo’s website, or call or email for more information. Contact: Tracy Bryan, tbryan@cityofboise.org Website: zooboise.org Phone: 208-384-4125, Ext. 206

Contact: Sharon Clark, sharon.clark@va.gov Website: boise.va.gov Phone: 208-422-1176

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INTER IOR DES IGNER S OFIDAHO.OR G

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events S TEPHEN NIPPER

Take a seat at the 20th annual Chair Affair trade show and gala.

FRIDAYSATURDAY APRIL 20-21 design ANNUAL CHAIR AFFAIR

Ignite Boise presenters might just keep audience members out of all sorts of hairy situations.

THURSDAY APRIL 19 lightbulb IGNITE BOISE EIGHT On Thursday, April 19, the Egyptian Theatre will host one of the most popular events in the city, one in which presenters can dish on any topic that tickles their fancy. The rules are simple: 20 slides, five minutes and presenters can’t sell anything. Soon after the crowd takes its seats for the eighth installment, an Ignite veteran will kick the evening off: 12-year-old Mia McLenna, aka @ionchild on Twitter. McLenna will break it down during “the 101,” which gives the audience a basic overview on how the night will play out. At Ignite Boise 5, McLenna became the second-youngest presenter with tales of her clay monsters’ activities while she’s at school. Other presenters include Brook Oswald on sharing the road with cyclists, Tim Milburn giving a lowdown on how not to use the four-way stop like a moron and Amy Pence-Brown will help you learn to accept the big ass. Local author Alan Heathcock and interior designer Kirsten Grove will present as well, bringing the total to 15 brave souls who will take center stage. The evening is all about communication and community and to that end, cellphone use is encouraged to join the conversation in the Twittersphere, hashtag #IB8. Ticket holders will be allowed in the theater at 6 p.m., general admission begins at 6:30 p.m. Visit igniteboise.com for more info. 7 p.m., FREE. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net.

WEDNESDAYSUNDAY APRIL 18-22 green EARTH DAY CELEBRATIONS Get ready go-greeners, it’s almost Earth Day, that special time when even the gas-guzzling, plastic bag-loving lumberjack takes a moment to reflect on

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environmental issues. This year, Earth Day has morphed into more of an Earth week, taking up far more than just the 24hour span of Sunday, April 22. Boise State kicked off its sustainability celebrations April 16, and will continue with a slew of events, including a vegan cooking demonstration and a garden par ty and “trashion” show that will run Saturday, April 21. The events are free and coordinated by the university’s Sustainability Club. Visit

boisestate.edu for more info. Feel like doing something good and green? Head to the MK Nature Center on Saturday, April 21, at 9 a.m. and take a ride to Blacks Creek Bird Reserve, where you can spend some time outdoors and help clean up the space. Register by emailing blackscreekbirdreserve@gmail. com. The first 50 people to do so will get a free T-shirt or sagebrush bird field guide. Since water is such a big par t of the great green and blue

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Interior Designers of Idaho gala, tradeshow and lecture series Chair Affair. For two days, design enthusiasts, architects and students gather to talk shop. Friday, April 20, is an all-day trade show at Boise State. Admission is free, but $25 gets you lunch and presentations by two industry heavy hitters. This year also brings back the Re:Use Cup Challenge, which asks intrepid designers to fashion miniature furniture out of a coffee cup. On Saturday, April 21, a semi-formal gala will serve as the coup de grace where the design community and designcurious can to peruse the yearly furniture design competition entries. Past entries have included an old vacuum cleaner transformed into a decadent table, and this year’s competition features what’s being called a martini chair. Trade show, Friday, April 20, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE, $25 vendors, Boise State, 1910 University Drive; Gala, Saturday, April 21, 7 p.m. $20 adv., $25 door, $15 students, $10 children 13 and younger, 301 S. Capitol Blvd. (Colliers building); interiordesignersofidaho.org.

marble, it’s fitting the Boise WaterShed would celebrate Ear th Day in a big way. It will fight “nature deficit disorder” with informational, fun activities like make-your-own green household cleaner, nature-themed crafts for the kiddies and birding walks. It’s all happening Saturday, April 21, from 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Visit bee.cityofboise.org/ watershed for more info. Want to celebrate the globe by swigging back beer and swinging to music? Head to the WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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PETER S C HAAF

FIND BREWER’S COW ICE CREAM

Orchestra Zarabanda is going to make you move at the Salsa Idaho Festival.

SATURDAY APRIL 21 dance SALSA IDAHO FESTIVAL The City of Trees may not exactly exude Latin flare, but there will be plenty of it when MJ3 Productions puts on the sixth annual Salsa Idaho Festival. The event will include live music, performances by professional salsa dancers and lessons for beginning salsa-ers. MJ3 Productions was formed by Laura “Lolita” Johnston in order to bring Latin entertainment to Idaho. Johnston teamed up with Guatemala native DJ Giovanni to provide the Boise area with a taste of Latin music and dance instructions. Merengue, bachata and salsa are the cultural dances taught by Johnston and will be featured at the festival. Don’t worry if you are not up to par with the sophisticated moves seen on Dancing With the Stars. This event doesn’t require any experience—dances will be broken down to the basics and taught in a fun, energetic atmosphere. Orchestra Zarabanda, a Cuban band hailing from Seattle, is set to play along with Salsa Con Rumba Dance Company, so you can learn some slick moves sans the CD player. This occasion is one of few late-night events available for those too young to imbibe adult beverages but old enough to technically be deemed “adults.” The more mature crowd can partake in the full bar. Visit salsaidaho.com for more information. 9 p.m.–2 a.m., $18. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

Nor th End Organic Nurser y from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, April 22, for a local beer-tasting festival, music, grub from food trucks, and a photo op with Mother Nature. Proceeds benefit Greenworks Idaho. Visit greenworksidaho.org for more info. More celebrator y suds are available at Edwards Greenhouse on Sunday, April 22. From noon-5 p.m., you can enjoy Payette Brewing Co.’s beers, a raffle hosted by the Treasure Valley Roller Girls, and chat up representatives from local businesses that promote green living.

S U B M I T

SATURDAY APRIL 21 shop CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET Well, it’s that time of year again. The time when people-watching in the City of Trees is at its best, buying local is at its easiest, and Saturday mornings are a lot less dull. The Capital City Public Market will kick off Saturday, April 21, and the 2012 season will feature 140-160 farmers, artisans and local businesses that will line Eighth Street from Bannock

Behzad Ranjbaran might not fight any windmills, but his work does share the bill with Boise Philharmonic’s performance of Don Quixote.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY APRIL 20-21 philharmonic DON QUIXOTE It’s good to see the world through rose-colored glasses— the idiom implies abandoning pessimistic tendencies and enjoying life. But a better saying may be seeing the world through Quixote lenses. The slightly off-balance gentleman from La Mancha sees the world through lenses that are downright fantastical. While Spanish author Miguel de Cervantes’ kooky hero comes to a somewhat dismal end, his optimism is still infectious. So infectious, in fact, that the 17th century novel caught the eye of Richard Strauss in the 19th century, and was adapted into a symphonic poem, which Boise Philharmonic will perform as part of its 50th season Friday, April 20, at College of Idaho’s Jewett Auditorium, and Saturday, April 21, at the Morrison Center. Guest composer Behzad Ranjbaran will be featured, along with Claude Debussy’s Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun and, of course, Quixote. Friday, April 20, 8 p.m., $23-$43. Jewett Auditorium, 2112 Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell; Saturday, April 21, 8 p.m., $25.50-$76.50. Morrison Center, 2201 Caesar Chavez Lane, boisephilharmonic.org.

Street to the Grove, and Idaho Street between Capitol Boulevard and Ninth Street. Every year, the market is the perfect place to stroll, mingle, pick up fresh produce and something unique for your home, and then head to lunch—and have pretty much the most-lovely Saturday mornings ever. The market includes performances by local

Ice cream has hopped up children on sugar for a long time. But now the tasty indulgence is incorporating hops that have more in common with the bitter variety found in favorite brews. Sure, Guinness floats have been around for a while, and you can buy Bailey’s ice cream in the frozen foods aisle, but Brewer’s Cow offers somethebrewerscow.com thing unique. Its ice cream is made from 16 percent butterfat cream that’s slowchurned and flavored by premium, big-name brews: Sam Adams, Ten Penny Ale, Thomas Hooker Chocolate Truffle Stout, and black-and-tan varieties can be purchased in sixand 12-pack formats. The hardcore beer-and-ice cream fuser can purchase a handy float gift set for $42. But before you alter your pre-funk plans and put down your 40, read the itty-bitty print on the website: “Contains no alcohol. All alcohol is evaporated in the cooking process.” The good news: Anyone can enjoy a beer and ice cream concoction. The bad news: It won’t get you drunk. And now for more bad news. The Brewer’s Cow is an East Coast business. Meaning you’ll have to salivate while your dessert is shipped across the United States. Or if you find yourself in New England, Whole Foods offers pints in-store. The company offers $12 shipping on its six packs and $18 on 12 packs to anywhere in the Lower 48, and it’s guaranteed frozen. —Sheree Whiteley

musical acts, a veggie valet service and token system, which enables attendees to use food stamps, as well as credit and debit cards. The market runs from 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. every Saturday through December. For a list of vendors and more info, visit the website. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., FREE. 208-345-9287, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEEK IN REVIEW LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

WEDNESDAY APRIL 18 On Stage BLUE TURF COMEDY—Laughs, gaffs and spontaneous, extemporaneous zaniness during the maiden voyage of Boise State’s newest improv comedy troupe. 7:30 p.m. $3, $5 for two. Boise State Student Union Forum, 1910 University Drive. DOV DAVIDOV—The Comedy Central and HBO star presents his comedic stylings. 8 p.m. $15. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. DANGEROUS CURVES AHEAD: BURLESQUE ON THE GO-GO— With Anita Cookie, Clams Casino, Darlinda Just Darlinda, GiGi La Femme and Minnie Tonka. They’ll be joined by Mimi ma Shuga of Hot Mess Burlesque and Anne McDonald of Red Light Variety Show. 8 p.m. $8 at brownpapertickets.com or $10 door. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, drinkfattys.com. OFF THE RECORD—A member of the U.S. Senate, an undercover cop and a tape recorder. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208331-9224, bctheater.org. VERONICA LIVINGSTONE, I PRESUME—Homegrown Theater presents this comedy by BW staffer Josh Gross about a millionaire who passes away and leaves her estate to her cat, Veronica Livingstone. 7:30 p.m. $8-$10. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-3850111, thelinenbuilding.com.

Green BOISE STATE EARTH WEEK—See Picks, Page 18. Boise State.

Citizen V-DAY BOISE STATE 2012— Presenting a production of Any One of Us: Words from Prison by Eve Ensler as part of V-Day, a global campaign to end violence against women and girls. Tickets at the door only. 7 p.m. $8. Boise State SPEC, 1800 University Drive, sub.boisestate.edu.

THURSDAY APRIL 19 Festivals & Events IGNITE BOISE EIGHT—See Picks, Page 18. 7 p.m., FREE. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., egyptiantheatre.net.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: JACK WILHITE—Nationally touring comedian. 8 p.m. $4, FREE with college ID. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, 208-9060658, varsitypubmeridian.com.

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Noble Hardesty churns out new sketches at the Artist Sweatshop.

BURGERS, BEER AND BABY DOE The food truck trend shows no signs of waning. On April 15, Fox’s popular animated series Bob’s Burgers lampooned the mobile eateries when the sardonic, burger-flipping family bought a beat-up truck to sling “grass-fed, cruelty-free” burgers to hipsters at the “Lolla-Pa-Foods-A” truck rally alongside other trucks like Eclipse of the Tart and Justice of the Quiche. A couple days prior, on April 13, Boiseans packed into the similar (but much less punny) monthly Food Truck Rally. After March’s rally ended in somewhat of a bottleneck, organizers decided to move April’s event to the MK Nature Center, a location with more space and more seating. But according to BW’s April Foster, “lines were still an issue for many rally-goers.” As attendee Pete Schimpf remarked: “We need either fewer people or more food trucks.” But Foster added, “the long lines didn’t stop people from having a good time. Payette’s beer line moved along at a faster clip, providing people with cold brew to nurse while waiting for food.” After the rally, Foster swung by the two-thirds-full Egyptian Theatre for Opera Idaho’s premiere of the Douglas Moore classic The Ballad of Baby Doe. According to Foster: “Soprano Rebecca Davis performed the lead role of Baby Doe, and belted out the character’s five arias with impeccable precision and wonderful emotion. Constantinos Yiannoudes played the role of Horace Tabor and gave an equally moving performance with passionate acting and soaring baritone.” Around the corner at Humpin’ Hannah’s, BW staffers were less doe-eyed at the BW Restaurant + Bar Guide launch party. The theme of the evening was demons and divas, and Hannah’s Rocci Johnson played both parts—slinking around onstage in a red velour devil’s costume while 44 North ladies poured vodka samples. For a slideshow of the debaucherous event, visit boiseweekly.com. Crooked Fence Brewing toned down the debauchery on April 14 for a late afternoon art event, dubbed Artist Sweatshop. Nine local artists—including Julia Green, Noble Hardesty and Kelly Knopp—pumped out live sketches in front of brewerygoers, who then purchased the pieces for $5-$10. BW New Media Czar Josh Gross sat down with artist and event organizer Knopp to get all the deets. According to Knopp, Crooked Fence’s goal is to continue fusing art with beer. “We definitely feel like there’s a bit of romanticism when producing beer. … You really want to please people as far as the beer tastes,” said Knopp. “That’s the same thing with art: You’re creating something from your vision and your tastes and your sharing it with people.” You can check out the full video at boiseweekly.com. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: CHRIS FONSECA—Also features Jeff White. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, 208-287-5379, liquidboise. com. OFF THE RECORD—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. RABBIT HOLE—Boise Little Theater presents its rendition of the 2007 Pulitzer Prize-winning drama by David Lindsay-Abaire. 7:30 p.m. $12.50, $9 seniors and students. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org. VERONICA LIVINSTONE, I PRESUME—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $8-$10. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-3850111, thelinenbuilding.com.

Green BOISE STATE EARTH WEEK—See Wednesday. Boise State.

CHAIR AFFAIR TRADE SHOW AND LECTURE SERIES—See Picks, Page 18. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Trade show: FREE; Keynote Lecture: $25. Stuckle Sky Center, 1910 University Drive. PARTY 4 THE PLANET—Celebrate Earth Day with live music, painting, local and recycled art, eco-education, belly dancing, vendors and face painting at this all-ages art and music fest. Visit toentertainu.com for info. 7 p.m. $8, $6 students. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-3671212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

KIPP SHERRY: MAGIC AND MENTALISM—This three-hour dinner/show event features mystical displays by magician Kipp Sherry. All ages welcome. 7-10 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door; $5 adv., $7 door for children ages 12 and younger. The Open Space, 12 N. Fisher Park Way in Eagle Island Crossing, 208-9386128, theopenspacevenue.com.

OFF THE RECORD—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Festivals & Events

Talks & Lectures JOHN GAMBLER—The Native American scholar will present We’re Not Homing: We’re Home. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Student Union Lookout Room, 1910 University Drive, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-2468.

Green

On Stage

LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: CHRIS FONSECA—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

FRIDAY APRIL 20

RABBIT HOLE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 seniors and students. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org.

BOISE STATE EARTH WEEK—See Wednesday. Boise State.

Citizen DENIM & DIAMONDS SIXTH ANNUAL GALA—The Boys and Girls Club of Nampa fundraiser with a deluxe dinner, complimentary wine and a live auction. Wear your denim and your diamonds and kick up your heels for the kids. 6 p.m. $100 per person. Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208468-1000, idahocenter.com.

SATURDAY APRIL 21 Festivals & Events

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

BLAST FROM THE PAST SPRING FLING—The El Korah Shriners host a Spring Fling, featuring music by JR and the Stingrays with the Stingettes. Dinner from 6-7:30 p.m., followed by dancing until midnight. Also features costume and dancing contests, and a silent auction. 6 p.m.-midnight. $25. El Korah Shrine Temple, 1118 W. Idaho St., Boise, elkorah.org. CHAIR AFFAIR GALA—Mingle with designers, view the entries, and help choose the Peoples’ Choice Award winner. See Picks, Page 18. 7-11 p.m. $10-$25. 301 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. MASQUERADE BALL—This elegant fund-raising event is designed to raise awareness about domestic violence in Idaho. Includes dinner, online, live and silent auctions. Masks, music, a no-host bar and more will be available. 6-11 p.m. $50. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com.

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

SALSA IDAHO FESTIVAL—Enjoy music from Orchestra Zarabanda and performances and workshops from Salsa Con Rumba Dance Company. See Picks, Page 19. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $20. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo. knittingfactory.com. SEVEN ARROWS CONTEST POW WOW—Enjoy entertainment featuring colorful regalia, song, dance, traditional craft vendors, storytelling and demonstrations. Noon and 7 p.m. $5, FREE for students, children and seniors. Boise State Student Union, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-5800, boisestate.edu.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | 21


8 DAYS OUT Farmers Markets CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—The beloved Saturday Market is back. See Picks, Page 19. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Eighth Street from Bannock Street to the Grove, and Idaho Street between Capitol Boulevard and Ninth Street, 208-345-9287, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

Scott Simon, journalist, author and host of NPR’s Weekend Edition. 7:30 p.m. $12-$55. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., egyptiantheatre.net.

SUNDAY APRIL 22 Festivals & Events SEVEN ARROWS CONTEST POW WOW—See Saturday. Noon and 7 p.m. $5. Boise State Student Union Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, 208-4265800, boisestate.edu.

TUESDAY

On Stage

RED MOTHER—This one-woman play documents native women’s experiences through storytelling, dance and multimedia. Tickets at idahotickets.com or 208-4261766. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise State SPEC, 1800 University Drive.

APRIL 24 On Stage

On Stage KIPP SHERRY: MAGIC AND MENTALISM—See Friday. 7-10 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door; $5 adv., $7 door for children ages 12 and younger. The Open Space, 12 N. Fisher Park Way in Eagle Island Crossing, Eagle, 208-938-6128, theopenspacevenue.com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: CHRIS FONSECA—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. OFF THE RECORD—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. RABBIT HOLE—See Thursday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. RED LIGHT PRESENTS ALTERED STATES—Exploring various forms of transformation—physical and metaphysical, natural and drug-induced. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: CHRIS FONSECA—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. RED LIGHT PRESENTS ALTERED STATES—See Saturday. 8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Literature

Green

BLIP PLAY READING SERIES— April’s selection is Lovesick Apocalypse by Kevin Nielsen. 7 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., hydeparkbookstore.com.

EARTH DAY CELEBRATION—See Picks, Page 18. Noon-5 p.m. FREE. Edwards Greenhouse, 4106 Sand Creek St., 208-342-7548, edwardsgreenhouse.com.

WEDNESDAY APRIL 25

EARTH DAY CELEBRATION AT NEON—See Picks, Page 18. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. North End Organic Nursery, 2350 Hill Road, northendnursery.com.

Festivals & Events ADULT NIGHT: THE SCIENCE OF BREWING—Ever wonder how that delicious brew you enjoy is made? 6-10 p.m. $8-$10. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., scidaho.org.

MONDAY APRIL 23

Concerts

Literature

MARIACHI JUVENIL DE MI TIERRA—Catch this talented group of mariachis comprised of local youth ages 13-19. 6 p.m. $6-15. Jewett Auditorium, College of Idaho, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-3405 or 208454-1376, caldwellfinearts.org.

THE CABIN PRESENTS SCOTT SIMON—The Cabin welcomes

On Stage OFF THE RECORD—See Wednesday, April 18. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., bctheater.org.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Green BOISE STATE EARTH WEEK—See Wednesday. Boise State. EARTH DAY CELEBRATION—Combat Nature Deficit Disorder with fun activities. See Picks, Page 18. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, cityofboise.org/bee/watershed. EARTH DAY CLEAN-UP AT BLACKS CREEK— See Picks, Page 18. 9 a.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., 208-3342225, fishandgame.idaho.gov.

Animals & Pets BOWLING FOR RHINOS—Join Zoo Boise for an evening of bowling in support of rhino conservation. 5-9 p.m. $20-$70. 20th Century Lanes, 4712 W. State St., 208-342-8695, 20thcenturylanes.net.

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NOISE/NEWS NOISE S AR AH JU R ADO

SCREW THE SIDE Damien Jurado brings weirdness to the center with Maraqopa CHRIS PARKER

Imagine you’re tooling down the highway and see subdued storyteller Damien Jurado in the woods by the side of the road wearing a tie-dye shirt and camouflage pants doing the Locomotive with drunk locals around a boombox. Jurado’s new album, Maraqopa, elicits exactly that kind of double take. In the 15 years since his Sub Pop debut, Waters Ave. S., Jurado has dipped this way and that but generally has stayed in the fairway of lightly textured, understated folkMove aside dreamy and downbeat, Damien Jurado favors expansive and psychedelic on his latest album. inflected rock. Though he’ll claim that each of his 10 albums is different—except, perhaps, 2002’s rocking I Break Chairs—the emotional plans,” he said. and Richard said, ‘That was perfect,’” Jurado tone and musical pitch of his keenly sketched At Swift’s prompting, Jurado delved into narratives are generally downbeat and dreamy. recalled. “He was just like, ‘Are you serious? That was just me messing around getting a feel some of his personal influences, which he’d That changed when Jurado joined songtypically shied away from sharing on previous writer and skilled producer/arranger Richard for it.’ ‘Nah dude, your feel was great.” Swift’s appearance in Jurado’s life proved a releases. He likens the album to a mixtape, a Swift in making 2010’s lush Saint Bartlett. tribute to his favorite sounds. fortuitous development arising out of misforTogether again, the duo one-ups that effort “We were using things like early Krautune. Jurado’s marriage ended around the time on Maraqopa. “St. Bartlett was expansive, but Maraqopa of 2006’s And Now That I’m In Your Shadow. trock, psychedelia, even some of the easylistening people I like so much like Ray was like outer-space expansive as far as sound Suddenly, he became a character in his own Conniff,” he said, citing Kraftwerk’s Radiosongs as he was writing 2008’s Caught in goes. Not only did it push me into new direcActivity as a favorite album. “It’s a mixture the Trees (see the haunting, adultery-themed tions but it pushed Richard in new directions “Dimes”). For someone who preferred to stay using whatever I love.” he had never gone to as a producer/engineer,” One of the most adventurous tracks is behind the scenes, this was a distressing deJurado said from his Seattle home. “It was an velopment. Add the fact that he had to cut his “Reel to Reel,” which features treated synths interesting record to make, for sure.” and an odd, spacey feel that’s part Radiohead, band loose, and Jurado was at a crossroads. Jurado opens the album with a shot part Krautrock. It’s quite outside anything that “I just wasn’t able to afford playing with straight into the stratosphere with “Notheither has done but nicely complements a hazy them anymore. It was really tough,” he said. ing Is the News.” He cited the influence of meditation on music, time, success and life’s “They asked, ‘What are your plans?’ and I’m post-Surrealistic Pillow Jefferson Airplane imperturbable course. Even more affecting like, ‘I’m still trying to figure it out. I have during our conversation, and this is undoubtthese songs ready to go is the pretty “Life Away from the Garden,” edly one of its landing which betrays a smoky hint of ’60s Burt but I don’t know how places. Rising organ Damien Jurado with Peter Wolf Crier. Bacharach-style pop, complete with angelic, I’m going to go about fills drift like sativa Thursday, April 19, 8 p.m., $8-$10. girlish backing vocals. it, or who I’m going smoke over strummy NEUROLUX “The song is about a loss of innocence— to work with.’ They acoustic guitars, cooing 111 N. 11th St. that’s why I brought in Richard’s daughters basically said, ‘Have background vocals and 208-343-0886 to sing on it. ... It worked out great,” you ever thought Jurado’s own ethereal neurolux.com said Jurado. about working with echo. Vetiver guitarist While he knows the experimentation on Richard?’” Daniel Hindman adds Maraqopa might not sit well with longtime Though Jurado thought they had very difa persistent, jammy electric solo running like fans, he’s unconcerned. Jurado traces this a thread from the Grateful Dead’s folk-ramble ferent musical styles, he was a fan of Swift’s desire to upset expectations back to his youth, solo and production work. And when they to Santana-like space-funk. finally got together, the chemistry was immedi- when he listened to new albums by his favorite Hindman’s performance was captured— envelope-pushing artists. ate. Perhaps it’s the mesh of Jurado’s minimallike everything in the project—from a raw “I would put them on and be like, ‘I don’t ist approach and Swift’s gift for ornate nuance. first-take perspective. According to Jurado, know if I like this.’ That was great. God forThey met in the middle on Saint Bartlett, they tracked the guitar and vocals for 18 bid they put out a record that I questioned,” a pretty album that didn’t make as much of a tracks (which was eventually culled to 10) in stir possibly because its Brill Building/chamber Jurado laughed. “I make the music I want about one hour and finished all the tracking to make these days. I think for a few years I and layering within 72 hours. Hindman hadn’t pop affectations are pretty au courant these wasn’t making the records I wanted to make. days. But even as they were working on that even heard the song when he laid down his I was making records that would please other album, Jurado knew he’d need to find a new guitar part. people—doing the weird things on the side. direction for their next collaboration. “He’s thinking, we’re just pushing play— Now it’s just like screw the side, let’s make it “How I was going to go about that— little did he know Richard has pushed record. the center.” I didn’t know and I’m not one to make He said, ‘Do you want something like that?’ WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

The Billy Goats gallop over to Grainey’s.

LOCAL RECORD BONANZA All good things must come to an end. The good thing in this case is Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats’ regular gig at Pengilly’s on Wednesdays. Instead, the local bluegrass group will now schlep its gear a block west to take up a regular Wednesday slot at Tom Grainey’s. The Wednesday gigs at Grainey’s will start at 9 p.m and are FREE. In other news, a few local records are set to drop soon. The first is from the omnipresent trio Finn Riggins. When these three found time to write and record a new EP in between organizing the Boise showcase at SXSW and Treefort Music Fest is a mystery to us, but the Benchwarmers EP will drop at a release party at 8 p.m. at The Linen Building on Friday, April 20, with Red Hands Black Feet and Pontiak. That show is a warm-up for Record Store Day, which takes place at The Record Exchange on Saturday, April 21. Another local artist performing for Record Store Day is Curtis Stigers, who will host a special album release concert at The Record Exchange at 8 p.m. on April 21. To get in the door, you’ll need a wristband, which comes with each pre-order copy purchased of Stigers’ new album, Let’s Go Out Tonight. The album can also be purchased on Record Store Day, three days before its official release, Tuesday, April 24. Dozens and dozens of other bands will also be releasing special and exclusive recordings that day—250 CD and vinyl titles total. Expect material from legends like Paul McCartney, Nirvana and Keith Richards, along with strange collaborations like those between Jack White and Insane Clown Posse, and Mastodon and Feist. A complete list of the new records, as well as the special lineup of in-store performances is available on the Record Exchange’s website. The line starts at 7 a.m. in the Rec Ex gift shop and the fun gets going at 9 a.m. Another local band with a newish album is doom-metal quartet Uzala. Its self-titled debut was released in March on At War with False Noise records. To promote that album, the band announced a series of tour dates that spans the West and South, from Washington to Texas. Uzala will kick off its tour with a show at Visual Arts Collective on Thursday, May 24, at 8 p.m. Some just-announced bands touring to Boise include alt-countr y supahstahs Wilco, set to play Idaho Botanical Garden on Tuesday, June 26, and the master of the mashup, Girl Talk, who will turn the Knitting Factor y into an epic dance party on Monday, May 28. —Josh Gross

BOISEweekly | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | 23


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE C HAS E ALLGOOD

GUIDE

PARTY 4 THE PLANET, APRIL 20, KFCH

WORKING DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

BEN BURDICK—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown BOURBON DOGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

THURSDAY APRIL 19

CHRIS GUTIERREZ—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

WILLISON. ROOS. CHARLIE BURRY—7:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

RAVENNA COLT—7 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper Lounge

2 BIRDS ON A WIRE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

FRIDAY APRIL 20

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BROCK BARTEL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

5 GEARS IN REVERSE—9 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

DAMIEN JURADO—See Noise, Page 23. With Peter Wolf Crier. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

BOSS HAWG AND THE SHORT BUS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

RISE AGAINST—With A Day to Remember and Title Fight. See Listen Here, Page 25. 6 p.m. $35. CenturyLink Arena

On Friday, April 20, the Knitting Factory is providing a night of jammy music. But the chill vibes of reggae-rockers Pause for the Cause, the smooth electro-funk of Bright Light Social Hour, the electrified reggae jams of Voice of Reason, even the loose alternative reggae of Actual Depiction, isn’t to celebrate the infamous stoner holiday. It’s an early celebration of Earth Day, which takes place Sunday, April 22. Party 4 the Planet pulls in four of Boise’s best reggae acts for a night of live-painting, bellydancing, hula-hooping and work from more than 30 local artists all in honor of Mother Earth. In addition to the above mentioned acts, Portland, Ore.’s Outpost will perform a set featuring its signature hip-hop-flavored altreggae. And if your night beckons for more, head over to Liquid for an after-party from 10 p.m.-2 a.m. featuring an additional set from Outpost, and a show from Portland, Ore. rock/funk/ soul band Scott Pemberton Trio. —April Foster

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

6:30-11:30 p.m., $6-$8. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, toentertainu.com.

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

HANNAH’S GONE WILD—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. $5. Humpin’ Hannah’s KATIE MORELL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La OLIVER THOMPSON AND DR. JOE BALDASSARRE—7 p.m. FREE. Open Space PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s

DOUGLAS CAMERON—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

ETERNAL AFFAIR—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JOHN JONES TRIO—With Mike Seifrit and John Hyneman. 8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE NAUGHTIES—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

SCOTT PEMBERTON TRIO— With Outpost. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

JOHNNY SHOES—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

THE SHAUN BRAZELL QUARTET—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LEE PENN SKY—7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

LOS PINGUOS AND ROS DOS VENTOS—10 p.m. $5. Reef

THE WHITE BUFFALO—8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement

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THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

JIMMY BIVENS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

H C IT

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SALLY TIBBS—With Kevin Kirk (6:30 p.m.). With John Jones and Jon Hyneman (9 p.m.). FREE. The Brickyard

FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

LIKE A ROCKET—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

SW

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

FINN RIGGINS RECORD STORE DAY KICKOFF/ EP RELEASE PARTY—See Noise News, Page 23. With Pontiak and Red Hands Black Feet. 8 p.m. $7. Linen Building

RE

SALLY TIBBS AND KEVIN KIRK—6:30 p.m. FREE. The Brickyard

RISE AGAINST—4:30 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange

CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

Follow:

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24 | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | BOISEweekly

PARTY 4 THE PLANET—See Listen Here, this page. 6:30 p.m. $6-$8. Knitting Factory

WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

SW

Outpost

WEDNESDAY APRIL 18

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE SATURDAY APRIL 21 5 GEARS IN REVERSE—9 p.m. $5. Grainey’s ATOMIC MAMA—8 p.m. $5. Neurolux BEST DAM LYRES—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s CURTIS STIGERS ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—See Noise News, Page 23. 8 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DC3—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers EARTH DAY CELEBRATION— With Fleet Street Klezmer Band. 7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FREUDIAN SLIP—8 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews HARVEST FEST PRESENTS THE REAPING PART I—Featuring Mortal Ashes, March of Martyrs, Passengers, 22nd Legion, The Maladroids and No Flash Photography. 7 p.m. $5. Venue HILLFOLK NOIR—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid LIKE A ROCKET—9:30 p.m. FREE. Crux POKE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper Lounge

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

WEDNESDAY

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s

THE WORKING DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

APRIL 25

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid SALLY TIBBS—With Kevin Kirk (6:30 p.m.). With John Jones and Jon Hyneman (9 p.m.). FREE. The Brickyard THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SOUL SERENE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub TAUGE AND FAULKNER—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid TRIPLE SHOT—9 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge WORKING DJS—10 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement YARDS—8 p.m. $5. Flying M Coffeegarage

SUNDAY APRIL 22 BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

MONDAY APRIL 23 JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock. Stock & Barrel

ANDRE NICKATINA—8:30 p.m. $16 adv., $21 door. Knitting Factory DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

IGNITE THE BOREALIS—With the Paris Funds, Bare Bones and Teton Ave. 6 p.m. $5. The Venue

RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

PAMELA DEMARCHE—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— 7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

TUESDAY APRIL 24 DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

RED HANDS. BLACK FEET— With Stargaze Unlimited and Fountains. 7 p.m. $3. Neurolux SPEEDY GRAY—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown THE VANPAPAEGHAM TRIO— 5:30 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadMeridian

SOUL SERENE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s THE SIDEMEN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

RISE AGAINST, APRIL 20, CENTURY LINK People have been saying punk is dead for years. But punk was birthed from the despair of the working class, first in the industrial wastelands of Detroit in the wake of the Vietnam War, then in the recession that settled over New York City in the mid-1970s, then in squatter communities in London. And as long as there is despair to be beaten back with a furious yawp, punk will never die. That is the secret to Chicago’s Rise Against: the cause. With songs that tackle the plight of the modern poor, refugees and even bullying of LBGT high schoolers in support of the It Gets Better Project, Rise Against is a thesis as much as a title. And it is one that comes with delightfully catchy shout-a-long choruses to serve as anthems. Rise Against will perform at the CenturyLink Arena on Friday, April 20, and do an in-store signing at The Record Exchange at 4:30 p.m. —Josh Gross With A Day to Remember and Title Fight. 6 p.m., $35. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., centurylinkboise.com.

BOISEweekly | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | 25


For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code.

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

A SONG OF LIFE Sing Your Song chronicles Harry Belafonte’s journey GEORGE PRENTICE Harry Belafonte is not simply a part of American history. In so many ways, he is an embodiment of American history. For the better part of a century, he has walked the walk—literally, like marching alongside Martin Luther King Jr. He has talked the talk, speaking truth to power. But most importantly, he has sung the song— songs of injustice and ignorance, and also songs of inspiration and unbridled joy. “Get them to sing your song, and they Harry Belafonte has sung his song for the better part of a century. will want to know who you are,” Belafonte recalled being told by Paul Robeson, legendBroadway’s Tony Award for Best Actor and “I was born into poverty, grew up in ary actor and activist. starred in major Hollywood films like Carpoverty, and for a long time, poverty was Sing Your Song is a new, electrically men Jones and Island In the Sun. all I thought I would know,” the singer charged documentary that will be shown I still recall, decades ago, watching remembered. at The Flicks on Sunday, April 22, with Belafonte’s silky voice and snake-like hips Born in Harlem, N.Y., Belafonte part of the evening’s proceeds benefitting spent his formative years in Jamaica, toiling piercing through a grainy, black -and-white the Idaho Black History Museum and the television set in 1963. The image of a black in the banana and sugar cane fields alongIdaho Peace Coalition. The screening’s timman cradling a national television audience side his impoverished relatives. The island ing couldn’t be better (or possibly worse). in his hand was unprecedented. There had nation was where Belafonte first heard the While the nation is tangled in a racially never been anything quite like him, and Sing songs of peasants that he would soon turn divided debate over the murder of Trayvon Your Song reminds us that there still isn’t. into popular songs of an American generaMartin, the black youth gunned down by “I was amazed at how, when I look back tion: “Day-o. Daylight come and me wan’ a neighborhood watchman, in Idaho, Boise on Belafonte’s life, how expertly he used his go home.” Democratic Rep. Belafonte’s calypso craft to move people,” said Mark Masarik, Cherie Buckner-Webb Sing Your Song will benefit Idaho Black of the Idaho Peace Coalition. “He always albums busted the recently reported that History Museum and Idaho Peace Coalition, seemed to inspire his audience note-perfect.” music charts and she had received an Sunday, April 22, 7-9 p.m., $10. Belafonte’s artistic triumphs were legion, Americans clamanonymous letter THE FLICKS but when we consider his political activism, ored for more. And containing a KKK 646 Fulton St. his is the ultimate measure of a man. His Belafonte was, if application. (Buckner208-342-4222 life paralleled the most important political anything, prolific. He Webb will lead a theflicksboise.com themes of four generations—from the Jim introduced American post-screening discusaudiences to new jazz Crow South to the Soweto ghettos of South sion of Sing Your Song at The Flicks.) The Belafonte biopic is standards, African folk ballads and in 1962, Africa, from the White House to impoverished African villages—Belafonte has been he employed an unknown musician to play not only highly relevant, it also chronicles there. And for one evening at The Flicks, back-up harmonica: Bob Dylan. Belafonte 85 years of one of America’s greatest, most his life will be here. sang in New York’s hottest nightclubs, won under-appreciated entertainers.

SCREEN/DVD BOISE’S FAVORITE DVD RENTALS THIS WEEK

1. WE BOUGHT A ZOO Second week at No. 1.

26 | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | BOISEweekly

2. WAR HORSE Second week at No. 2.

—Source: Video Memories, Overland Road, Boise

3. IRON LADY First week in release.

4. DARKEST HOUR First week in release.

5. HOP Dropped from No. 3 spot.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | 27


REC DAVID CALVERT/NBAE/GETTY IMAGES

SHOOTING STAR Former NBA-turnedStampede player steps out of the limelight BY ANDREW CRISP On a February weekend, Sports Illustrated writer Chris Ballard visited Boise on a topsecret assignment: to get the scoop on former National Basketball Association all-star and champion Antoine Walker. Since his rise to fame and career earnings of more than $100 million, Walker has lost his wife, the NBA and his fortune. This season, he was working for an annual salary of $25,000 playing basketball with the NBA’s Development League team the Idaho Stampede. However, he remained hopeful that despite his weight, 260-plus pounds, and his age, 35, he could make a comeback. Boise Weekly shadowed Ballard and the Idaho Stampede crew for the weekend, watching the SI reporter struggle for facetime with the bashful giant Walker. “Well, the biggest surprise was ’Toine, who missed the team flight and blew off interviews. Not what you’d expect from a guy trying to Antoine Walker, right, announced he would shimmy no more after the Stampede’s final season game. make the league,” said Ballard after his visit. Ballard lost a day with Walker because of “Boise State? Those guys could never play bigger contracts with NBA teams. his gaffe. While Ballard’s article, published at this level. Our guys—one day, they’re here. “We’ve been fortunate enough as a team in mid-March, didn’t hold high hopes for Next day, you’ll see them on TNT.” for the exposure on a national scale,” said Walker’s return to NBA glory, he said that Walker’s face is the most recognized of that Stampede President Steve Brandes in the having a name like Walker on a roster, a guy group. The team is also at a point where the team’s office below CenturyLink arena. who in the ’90s was talked about in the same NBA and the D-League are changing—perhaps “Sometimes we get more national exposure breath as Michael Jordan, can make the eyes to a more traditional one-to-one relationship, than local coverage.” of fans pop. which could put a bigger team in Oregon, NeThat’s something not lost on the business“He brings both a name presence and cuts vada or Utah in direct control of the Stampede, men owners of Block22, the company that across generations,” said Ballard. “People my controls both the CenturyLink arena and owns something organizers feel would be a boon to age, 37, get nostalgic when seeing guys like the state. the Idaho Steelheads hockey team, a team Antoine play.” “I think the D-League should feel lucky that nets many more fans per game than the Over drinks at Bardenay with Ballard the to have a franchise in Boise,” said Ballard, Stampede. Yet Stampede employees suggested week his was in Boise, a group of Stampede though he’s not an expert on the league. “I was it’s about those weekend schedules: They’re a employees focused on the main topic of the impressed with the franchise, the owner, the tenant, and the Steelheads seem to come first. weekend: Walker. organization, the arena and the fans. Espe“We work hand in hand with the SteelWalker’s career could be described as a cially compared to the other D-League game heads,” said Brandes. “We may see fewer meteoric arc, a denouement many thought weekends. They’re huge for any sports organi- I attended on the trip, in Frisco, it was night came too early in the athlete’s career. Now he zation. Attendees can take the kids—they don’t and day.” frequents Humpin’ Hannah’s bar and eats at At the team’s final game of the season have to worry about school the next day.” Boise’s Hooters. earlier this month, after the drama of Lady Meanwhile, this season’s wins, coupled Characteristic of Walker’s attitude after Houdini escaping from a water torture cell with SI’s article, has Stampede staff feeling tossing up a three-pointer was a backward at half-time, after the huge at-the-buzzer shot confident. For now, the team is overshadowed “shimmy” he did on the court to celebrate his by the blue and orange made by Paul Carter for the 97-96 win over shots. Ballard’s story behemoth just over the the Bakersfield Jam, the Stampede returned to —“If Antoine Walker the locker room. The win put its season at 21river. Shimmies, But It’s in Visit idahostampede.com for more 29. The team didn’t make the playoffs. Mega-fan Paul Boise, Is He Really information. Then, after more than a decade of play, Walden has had courtShimmying?”—was Walker officially announced his retirement. side seats since 1997. published March 19 “The overall atmosphere was great, and “This is the best and painted a less-thanwe’re glad everybody came out to support us,” rosy picture of Walker’s potential to rise again. game played from Salt Lake to Portland, [Ore.],” he said, sipping a beer from his seat at Brandes said afterward. “Our organization, But the exposure granted to the Stampede of course, wishes him the best of luck in his a recent game. Ballard sat just over a railing, by having Walker on the roster put it in the future endeavours.” his knees almost touching Walker. national spotlight at a time when it’s courting

28 | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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R E A L ES TAT E BW FOR RENT 1948 N. Carissa, Boise. Avail. early May. 3BD, 2BA. $950/mo. Drive by, do not disturb tenants. 3651200. 1BD, upstairs unit located on State Street. 495-2484. 3131 Jordan. Clean & nice. New remodel. 850 sq. ft., 2BD, 1BA. $555/mo. Call Fred 384-0438.

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PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

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BW T-SHIRT DESIGN CONTEST Want international exposure for Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

boise’s organic skincare Facials and waxing By appointment only Gift certificates available Éminence organic skincare products

your artwork? Enter the Exergy Tour-Boise Weekly T-Shirt Design Contest. Theme=Celebration of Women’s Cycling. But hurry, deadline for submissions is May 4th at 5pm at BW offices. Go to boiseweekly.com & click T-Shirt Design Contest box for guidelines.

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CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS Boise/Meridian Families. Interviewing families in this area interested in participating in a cultural exchange experience by hosting an international high school student for the coming academic year. For information call Sara Powell at 208-989-7044 or the PAX national office at 800-555-6211. HOW CAN I KEEP FROM SINGING Features the 40 voice Una Vocé singing a variety of delightful songs from many different styles. The Concert is Friday, May 11th, in the Swayne Auditorium at NNU. Treasure Valley Young Artists & Treasure Valley Children’s Chorus will begin at 5:30 pm, & Una Vocé concert will begin at 7:30 pm. Tickets can be purchased at the door. Adults $8, Students & Senior Citizens $5, & Family $25.

INTERNATIONAL MARKET AT THE WATERFRONT AT LAKE HARBOR Our goal is to represent many cultures, booth space now available. Accepting vendors: food, clothing, produce, crafts, jewelry, art. Saturdays 9-3. Contact: The Waterfront at Lake Harbor, 3050 N Lake Harbor blvd. Suite 120, 208-639-1441. OATH KEEPERS MEETINGS Oath Keepers is a non-partisan association of currently serving military, reserves, National Guard, veterans, Peace Officers, & Fire Fighters who will fulfill the oath we swore, with support of like minded citizens who take an oath to stand with us, to support & defend the Constitution against all enemies, foreign & domestic, so help us God. Please visit the OATHKEEPERS.ORG, then go to MEETUP. COM & search for Oath at your zip code. Sign up. RSVP to the next meeting.

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BW CLASSES INFERTILITY AWARENESS! 1 in 8 couples in the U.S. will struggle with infertility. In celebration of National Infertility Awareness Week, the Idaho Center for Reproductive Medicine is having a FREE Patient Education Seminar on

Thursday, April 26, 6-7pm. Come see our clinic, meet our staff, & take part in an educational discussion led by Dr. Cristin Slater. Bring your questions! All attendees are entered to win a FREE IVF cycle, & everyone gets $100 off their New Patient consultation! Please RSVP to 208-342-5900. ICRM is located at 111 Main Street, Suite 100, in downtown Boise.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

30 | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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B O I S E W E E K LY OIL PAINTING WORKSHOP FOR BEGINNERS

5 hr. workshops. 3rd Sat. of each mo. starting 4/21, 1-6 pm at LEE Gallery, 409 S. 8th Street #101, downtown Boise. Discount materials from Quality Art. French Impressionist painting style. Paris trained instructor, Antinon Passemard. Limited to 15 students for personal instruction. Learn the basics of composition, mixing color & brush stroke technique. Cost: $45. + materials. Call to register 208-830-2937.

SERVICES BW CHILD PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866413-6293 (Void in Illinois).

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These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

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HERCULES: 1-year-old male boxer/border collie mix. Fun, high-energy and needs training. Good with dogs that can handle his energy. (Kennel 305- #15687456)

BIG K: 7-year-old male great Dane mix. Housetrained. Good with children and dogs. Laidback and extra large at 110 pounds. (Kennel 315- #4386458)

JOE: 7-year-old male chocolate Lab. Prefers a cat-free home and calm canine companions. Energetic, active and happy-go-lucky. (Kennel 323- #15877649)

SHORTCAKE: 4-year-old female Siamese mix. Large girl with slightly crossed eyes. Would prefer a quieter home. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 17- #15897602)

CONNIE: 4-year-old female domestic longhair. Very petite, shy cat. Will blossom in a relaxed home. Will require regular brushing. (Kennel 15- #15948387)

JENNY: 2-year-old female domestic shorthair. Litterbox-trained house cat. Good with children. Would prefer a dog-free home. (Kennel 04- #14919623)

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ACOUSTIC GUITAR PLAYER Needed for local folk/rock band. We love to jam & gig. The band is almost complete with stand up bass, lap guitar, drums & vocalist! Please email if interested: rmrobertson33@Gmail.com

AMELIE: I’m a Staff SUNDAE: Summer is BENNIGAN: Sweet, shy Pick for April. $20 takes coming—adopt me for a boy needs patient loving me home. sweet treat. home. Is it yours?

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | 31


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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

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NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Call 344-2055..

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Billy Ransey Oldham III Case No. CV NC 1204817 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Billy Ransey Oldham III, now residing in the City of Kuna, State of Idaho. The name will change to Billy Ransey Korsen. The reason for the change in name is: Pulled over by police and have to sit longer because they get my fathers record. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on (date) May 24, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date Mar 22 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. April 18, 25, May 2 & 9, 2012.

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Jersie Grace Hardan Case No. CV NC 1205667 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Jersie Grace Hardan, a minor, now residing in the City of Kuna, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Jersie Grace Stinson. The reason for the change in name is: Stinson is her fathers last name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on June 5, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Apr 02 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. April 18, 25, May 2, 9, 2012.

NYT CROSSWORD | IN-NUENDOS BY DANIEL A. FINAN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 1 Split the tab 8 Left 15 McEnroe rival 19 Under development? 20 Put on microfiche, maybe 21 Golfer with an “army” 22 1997 Will Smith/ Tommy Lee Jones flick

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77 Misses part of a movie, maybe 78 Contortionist’s bendy part 79 Letter seen twice in Philadelphia 81 Stray sounds? 84 Blocks (up) 87 Masculine principle 88 “To be on the safe side …” 93 Bank take-back 95 Seasonal potation 96 Hook hand 97 Stone-pushing Winter Olympian 99 Japanese native 101 Golf ace 109 Rogers’s partner 112 Swiss cheese concoction 113 ___ driver 114 The Royal Game of India 117 Russia’s ___ Mountains 119 “There is ___!” 120 Refuges 121 One who looks friendly but isn’t 126 31-Across, for one 127 Like some bad language 128 Hammy, say 129 Compos mentis 130 Spouse’s acquiescence 131 Perched

DOWN 106

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60 Commercial suffix with Power 61 Baskin-Robbins unit 63 Smooths 67 Athlete wearing a calligraphic “D” logo 69 Lurid 1979 film about John Dillinger’s girlfriend, with “The” 76 Went downhill fast

40 Yesteryear 41 Huge, to Hugo 42 Prima donnas’ features 46 Skip over water, as stones 49 Some game 51 Headstone phrase 55 Camaro ___-Z 57 Fraction of a min. 59 Phony: Prefix

24 Van Gogh or Monet vista 25 “Frosty” air? 26 Knicks star Anthony, to fans 27 Hikers’ wear 29 General refusal? 31 Attention getter 35 Bishop’s locale 36 Preventive measure, proverbially

ACROSS

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Designer Versace Hoofing it Coercion Multipurpose Private investigator, in slang 6 Do a semester’s worth of studying in one night, say 7 Breakfast items often eaten with spoons

8 “Amscray!” 9 Total 10 “Bad Moon Rising” band, for short 11 Yellowfin tuna 12 OFF! target 13 Ex-senator Bayh 14 Reply to “Gracias” 15 Security crises 16 Where skaters skate 17 Where skaters skate 18 V components 21 Org. 23 Big name in the diamond business? 28 Set (against) 30 It’s often slanted 32 What [wink wink] may signify 33 ___ about (approximately) 34 Dungeons & Dragons figure 37 “Dianetics” author ___ Hubbard 38 “Want me to draw you ___?” 39 Bedews 43 Certain angel 44 ___ school 45 Canonized mlle. 46 45, e.g. 47 Western U.S. gas brand 48 Locale for many a lounge chair 50 Lounge lizard’s look 52 Sasquatch’s kin 53 Torpedo 54 Does some yard work 56 Pan handler 58 Virginia athlete, informally 62 Get ready 64 What a texter of “:-(” might be 65 “Xanadu” group, for short 66 “Oh yeah? ___ who?!” 68 Glimpse 70 Retainers, e.g.

104 Wiggle room 105 “Why not?!” 106 Quits, slangily 107 Not stay the same 108 Went back to brunette, say 109 Make ___ at 110 An Obama girl 111 Check for fit 115 Drink with a lizard logo 116 Slips in pots 118 Bar car? 122 Onetime aid in psychotherapy 123 “Bah!” 124 Gardner of “The Barefoot Contessa” 125 Tic-tac-toe winner

71 N.B.A. forward Lamar ___ 72 “Game of Thrones” protagonist ___ Stark 73 Father of a grand duke 74 Word on a cornerstone 75 Person with a safe job? 79 Sleepers 80 Run nicely 82 Home of the Texas Sports Hall of Fame 83 Leave thunderstruck 85 Tyrannosaurus rex, archetypally 86 Prepare, as cotton candy 89 “Wake up and smell the coffee!” 90 Not kosher 91 Cockney greeting 92 Head turner 94 Cross to bear 98 Dieter 100 Deutsch marks? 102 Percussion instrument with a pedal 103 Afore L A S T F A C T

A S H E

L E A N

L A N D C C A P R A L O A B Y E B L S T E S I A A C H A S I T P R O C A W R A M I S S N O T I S H A R G I J O T M A N

S H E I L A

G R A I N Y E L S O I P R E R E S P I N S O O N D E

C O O L I T B O N O U S C G I B I S

Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

A N M E F A D T I C O S I S V I E I R D C K S F F T E U R B L E P A P L I N L E E C W A C K S L I H E D

E A M S T E E S S T H T A O K E P E R L I G E P E O L D E A R A T E R T A R A A M I D R A T D P O R T O Y

A C D C

B A R K E T R W I E R W I H E O S U T N I K S A A N S E P S

E C O A L I B A B A C L E R K S

S T R A F E D

F O R E P L A Y

A V A N I C Y M E R U G B Y

A C L U E

S O L O C K R H A R Y O R O U N I N G O E C A R N E Z O N E I V E R E R I R O N

K E G S

T O D D S D S C S

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Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. Jesus Christ is lord. SWM looking for F friendship or relationships. Thomas Chew #99212 Unit 24 PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | 33


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): You had to take the test before you got a chance to study more than a couple of the lessons. Does that seem fair? Hell no. That’s the bad news. The good news is that this test was merely a rehearsal for a more important and inclusive exam, which is still some weeks in the future. Here’s even better news: The teachings that you will need to master before then are flowing your way and will continue to do so in abundance. Apply yourself with diligence, Aries. You have a lot to learn, but luckily, you have enough time to get fully prepared. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Let’s see if you know what these exquisitely individuated luminaries have in common: Salvador Dali, Martha Graham, Stephen Colbert, David Byrne, Maya Deren, Malcolm X, Willie Nelson, Bono, Dennis Hopper, Cate Blanchett, George Carlin, Tina Fey, Sigmund Freud. Give up? They are Tauruses. Would you characterize any of them as sensible, materialistic slowpokes obsessed with comfort and security, as many traditional astrology texts describe Tauruses? Nope. They were or are distinctive innovators with unique style and creative flair. They are your role models as you cruise through the current phase of maximum self-expression. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In December 1946, three Bedouin shepherds were tending their flock near the Dead Sea. They found a cave with a small entrance. Hoping it might contain treasure hidden there long ago, they wanted to explore it. The smallest of the three managed to climb through the narrow opening. He brought out a few dusty old scrolls in ceramic jars. The shepherds were disappointed. But eventually the scrolls were revealed to be one of the mostimportant finds in archaeological history: the first batch of what has come to be known as the Dead Sea Scrolls. Keep this story in mind, Gemini. I suspect a valuable discovery may initially appear to you in a form you’re not that excited about. CANCER (June 21-July 22): The devil called a committee meeting of his top assistants. He was displeased. Recruitments of people born under the sign of Cancer had fallen below projected totals. “It’s unacceptable,” the dark lord fumed. “Those insufferable Crabs have been too mentally healthy lately to be tantalized by our lies. Frankly, I’m at wits end. Any suggestions?” His marketing expert said, “Let’s redouble our efforts to make them buy into the hoax about the world ending on Dec. 21, 2012.” The executive vice president chimed in: “How about if we play on their fears about running out of what they need?”

34 | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | BOISEweekly

The chief of intelligence had an idea, too: “I say we offer them irrelevant goodies that tempt them away from their real goals.” LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “If you don’t run your own life, someone else will,” said psychologist John Atkinson. Make that your motto in the coming weeks, Leo. Write it on a big piece of cardboard and hold it up in front of your eyes as you wake up each morning. Use it as a prod that motivates you to shed any laziness you might have about living the life you really want. Periodically ask yourself these three questions: Are you dependent on the approval, permission, or recognition of others? Have you set up a person, ideology, or image of success that’s more authoritative than your own intuition? Is there any area of your life where you have ceded control to an external source? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Here are the last words that computer pioneer Steve Jobs spoke before he died: “Oh Wow. Oh Wow. Oh Wow.” I’d propose that we bring that mantra into as wide a usage as Jobs’ other creations, like the iPhone and iPad. I’d love to hear random strangers exclaiming it every time they realize how amazing their lives are. I’d enjoy it if TV newscasters spoke those words to begin each show, acknowledging how mysterious our world really is. I nominate you to start the trend, Virgo. You’re the best choice, since your tribe, of all the signs of the zodiac, will most likely have the wildest rides and most-intriguing adventures in the coming weeks. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A starfish that loses an arm can grow a new one. It’s an expert regenerator. According to my understanding of the astrological omens, you are entering a starfish-like phase of your cycle. Far more than usual, you’ll be able to recover parts of you that got lost and reanimate parts of you that fell dormant. For the foreseeable future, your words of power are “rejuvenate,” “restore,” “reawaken” and “revive.” If you concentrate really hard and fill yourself with the light of the spiritual sun, you might even be able to perform a kind of resurrection. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Too much of a good thing isn’t necessarily good. (Have you ever hyperventilated?) Too little of a good thing can be bad. (Have you ever gotten dehydrated?) Some things are good in measured doses but bad if done to excess. (Wine and chocolate.) A very little of a very bad thing may still be a bad thing. (It’s hard to smoke crack in moderation.) The coming week is prime time to be thinking along these lines, Scorpio. You will generate a lot of the exact insights you need if you weigh

and measure everything in your life and judge what is too much and what is too little. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sculptor Constantin Brancusi had a clear strategy as he produced his art: “Create like God, command like a king, work like a slave.” I suggest you adopt a similar approach for your own purposes in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. With that as your formula, you could make rapid progress on a project that’s dear to you. So make sure you have an inspiring vision of the dream you want to bring into being. Map out a bold, definitive plan for how to accomplish it. And then summon enormous stamina, fierce concentration and unfailing attention to detail as you translate your heart’s desire into a concrete form. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “If there is one door in the castle you have been told not to go through,” writes novelist Anne Lamott, “you must. Otherwise, you’ll just be rearranging furniture in rooms you’ve already been in.” I think the coming weeks will be your time to slip through that forbidden door, Capricorn. The experiences that await you on the other side may not be everything you have always needed, but I think they are at least everything you need next. Besides, it’s not like the taboo against penetrating into the unknown place makes much sense any more. The biggest risk you take by breaking the spell is the possibility of losing a fear you’ve grown addicted to. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When rain falls on dry land, it activates certain compounds in the soil that release a distinctive aroma. “Petrichor” is the word for that smell. If you ever catch a whiff of it when there’s no rain, it’s because a downpour has begun somewhere nearby, and the wind is bringing you news of it. I suspect that you will soon be awash in a metaphorical version of petrichor, Aquarius. A parched area of your life is about to receive much-needed moisture. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Forty percent of Americans do not know that the dinosaurs died out long before human beings ever existed. When these folks see an old cartoon of caveman Fred Flintstone riding on a Diplodocus, they think it’s depicting a historical fact. In the coming weeks, Pisces, you need to steer clear of people who harbor gross delusions like that. It’s more important than usual that you hang out with educated, cultured types who possess a modicum of well-informed ideas about the history of humanity and the nature of reality. Surround yourself with intelligent influences, please.

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BOISEweekly | APRIL 18–24, 2012 | 35



Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 43