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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 39 MARCH 21–27, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! INSIDE

YOUR GUIDE TO TREEFORT What bands to see, where to go and what you need to know NEWS 10

BULLYING BEATDOWN Anti-bullying legislation makes a last stand FEATURE 15

PIED PIPER Boise’s hard-working music scene earns some respect at SXSW REC 37

TARGET PRACTICE Airsoft devotees take aim

“It was very, very, very loud. Extraordinarily loud.”

NOISE 27

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporters: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com April Foster AprilK@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Interns: Amber Clontz, Annette Rincon Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Randy King, David Kirkpatrick, Andrew Mentzer, Taylor Newbold, Ted Rall, Carissa Wolf ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, James Lloyd, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Jason Brue, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Elaynea Robinson, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE STRIKE UP THE BAND It’s all about music in downtown Boise this weekend and, as you’ll notice, it’s all about music in this edition of Boise Weekly. Between the 15th annual Gene Harris Jazz Festival and the inaugural Treefort Music Fest, the city will be crawling with out-of-town musicians, and it’s do-or-die time for the City of Trees’ music scene, which was recently ranked the sixth best in the world. Yeah: No. 6. So how the heck did Boise go from being the kind of place where not even the local daily newspaper’s music writer had much interest in the scene to the kind of place the whole music industry seems to be watching? Luck? Talent? A piss-poor economy? Some unparalleled combination of them all? We think so, and New Media Czar Josh Gross tells that story in this week’s edition on Page 15. Gross just returned from Austin, Texas, where he spent a week reporting on SXSW and the Boise showcase that went down at Vice Bar. If you’ve missed his blog posts, video reports and photo slideshows, log on to boiseweekly.com and click on the Treefort button. That’ll take you to a page where his SXSW reporting is archived, as well an archive of our reporting on Treefort thus far. Inserted into the print edition this week, you’ll find a schedule for Treefort and a guide to Boise for the visitors among us. And in the issue proper, in addition to Gross’ “Long and Winding Road,” is a heap of music content— from the out-of-town bands you shouldn’t miss to the locals we want everyone to know about. Finally, during Treefort, we’ll have a small army of reporters and editors attached to mobile phones, iPads and laptops, who will be documenting every move the festival makes via Twitter, Facebook and blog updates at Cobweb on boiseweekly.com. Want to know how crowded a venue is, how good or bad a show is, or where your favorite band is after partying? Follow us at @boiseweekly.com or Tweetstalk any of the following staffers: @thejoshgross, @tarabreemorgan, @andrewcrisp or @AprilFoster10. You can also follow #Treefort. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Karelia Dubkowski TITLE: You’re a Different Bird MEDIUM: Acrylic and found objects ARTIST STATEMENT: Flap your wings to your own beat.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

SO YOU WANNA BE A WRITER Boise is home to some seriously talented writers who are pretty darned generous when it comes to sharing their time and knowledge. BW checked in with author Mitch Wieland at the Boise Library’s Spring Authors Series. Find out what advice he had to offer aspiring authors at Cobweb.

BOISE ROCKS A passel of Boise bands did the city proud at the Boise Showcase at SXSW. Check out Boise Weekly’s on-the-ground coverage of the mega music festival, along with everything Treefort by scanning the QR code.

I’M YOUR HUCKELBERRY What do George Clooney, the stars of British television phenomena Downton Abbey and Idaho huckleberries have in common? The White House. Intrigued? Get the details at Citydesk.

INHUMANE HEALTH CARE Prison is no vacation, but a report released March 19 compares health care at the Idaho State Correctional Institution south of Boise to cruel and unusual punishment. Check it out at Citydesk.

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MAIL

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Anti-bullying legislation makes a last stand

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CITYDESK

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ROTUNDA

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Long and Winding Road

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE From The Crazy Horse to the Red Room

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NOISE TREEFORT You don’t want to miss these bands

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN John Carter

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REC Airsoft takes aim

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FOOD Quelling the late-night hunger

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WINE SIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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MAIL

RE P U BLI CA NS : TIR ELES S LY WOR K ING TO RE DU CE THE S IZ E OF B IG GUB ’MINT. AND THE Y WON’ T STOP UNTIL IT FITS INTO A U TE RU S. ” —Mark Middleton (Boiseweekly.com, Citydesk, “Monday at the Statehouse: Monty Pearce’s Ethics and Ultrasound Bill,” March 18, 2012)

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I attended the Senate Affairs Committee hearing on mandated ultrasounds for women seeking an abortion. While sitting through the two hours of testimony, I slipped into daydream imagining a similar mandate for women seeking to carry pregnancy to full term, so they, too, can give fully informed consent. Don’t stop with the ultrasound picture. Follow up with pictures of each successive developmental stage from birth to 18 (or 22 if college is desired). Also supply expense information for each stage from diapers to designer jeans. And don’t forget information about the parental challenges at every stage, from a 2-year-old’s temper tantrums to worrying about the 16-year-olds every time they’re “out with friends.” My daydream stopped abruptly when the public testimony ended and the nine senators turned to decision-making time. With no discussion amongst themselves at all except for comments by the two Democrats raising questions and concerns, they proceeded to roll call vote. Seven to two in favor of the mandate and off to the Senate floor went the bill.

Thunk! The boulder of despair dropped ... again. “That’s it! I’ve had it! I’m tired of being on the losing team.” My silent scream until the insidious thought: If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em. Moments later I was carving out an idea for my future as a model red state citizen. But before I tell you what that looks like, let me tell you a story about a woman named Eliza. She was born with Down syndrome. In her 40s, when Eliza’s aging parents could no longer take care of her, her sister and brother-in-law took her in. Once settled in her new home, Eliza wanted to have her best friend Jamie come for a sleep over. They’d known each other since they were children and they were decidedly boyfriend and girlfriend. Beset by questions of what they knew about “sex,” Eliza’s sister proceeded as best she could to arm Eliza with information about birth control. In truth, though, intercourse was not even close to being on Eliza and Jamie’s radar. Theirs was the love of sweet innocence. Nevertheless, Eliza was always proud to announce that she was a woman, and she practiced “birth patrol.” That’s it—the source of

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S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6 | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

my future role in the rising tide of redness. I am going to launch the Birth Patrol Force. Its mission is to put sex in its proper place— for procreation alone. Think of it. We will no longer need abortion laws—they will be obsolete. We will eliminate those unplanned or surprise pregnancies. Insurance policies will not have to pay for those unnecessary old-fashioned birth control pills and devices. Then there’s the economy-bolstering factor of creating hundreds, maybe thousands of new jobs in Idaho. After all, we’ll need lots of Birth Patrol Officers 24/seven to burst into bedrooms and parked cars on lovers lane and well just about every place imaginable to accost anyone caught in the act. “Stop, in the name of the law! Do you have a permit stating this activity is for the express purpose of procreating?” Yeah, I can see there’s a fun and exciting future in red. —Nadine York, Boise It should be clarified that the ultrasound bill currently in the Legislature effectively requires the majority of women to undergo a trans-vaginal ultrasound, an uncomfortable and intrusive medical procedure, without medical justification. The bill claims to allow a woman and her physician to choose the best method of performing the required ultrasound. However, such is not the

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MAIL case. The majority of women undergo the termination of a pregnancy between six and 12 weeks of pregnancy—the first trimester. Medically, this is the optimal time frame for the procedure resulting in the smallest odds of encountering complications. The current proposed legislation requires that the physician determine the gestational age of the fetus via ultrasound. Gestational age during the first trimester cannot be determined by a regular ultrasound but can only be determined by transvaginal ultrasound. So for any woman desiring a legal abortion during the first trimester, the trans-vaginal ultrasound is mandatory. —Barbara Maxwell, Boise

to the area they manage? Why restrict their ability to protect the people who voted them into office? Why take ground water protection away from them? Why are you going to allow Class II injection wells by an industry that would inject toxic chemicals into the ground for storage or just to get rid of it? I do not believe that is why you were elected to serve as a senator. I believe that all voters would want you not to protect one industry that is wanting to come into Idaho but I believe the voters would want you to protect all the things the Land Use Planning Act mentions. —Claudia Haynes, Nampa

STOP STRIPPING LOCAL AUTHORITY

SAME OLD SMALL GOVERNMENT TALK

House Bill 464 provides legislative intent to occupy the field of the regulation of oil and gas exploration and production, to provide an exception and to provide provisions limiting local restrictions relating to oil and gas. House Bill 464 gives the authority to the Oil and Gas Conservation commissioners ... it takes it away from the local county commissioners, who have always made land-use decisions. Why would you take away the rights of the local county commissioners? Local county commissioners apply the Land Use Planning Act, which protects the health, safety and general welfare of the people of the state of Idaho. Local county commissioners all over Idaho protect property rights, make sure there are adequate public facilities to serve the population, protect the environment and prime agricultural land. They avoid undue concentration of population and overcrowding of land, protect fish, wildlife and recreation resources, avoid undue water and air pollution. Why take away the right to limit what an oil or gas company can do

Ah, yes. “Less government.” Again. Reading in this week’s paper Anthony R. Benson’s rather lengthy diatribe (BW, Mail, “Dear Bill Cope,” March 14, 2012) railing against one of Bill Cope’s equally lengthy diatribes (admittedly much-loved by people of the liberal ilk like me) regarding conservatives, I am stunned once more by the blind spot that I see repeated constantly by those who apparently feel that the capitalist system here is working just fine, thank you. Each time I hear the Repubs and/or Tea Partiers going on about how much better it would be for us all if we had the “lowest level of governance possible,” I think of the poor citizens of say, Denmark, and other countries who don’t get to call themselves the Greatest Country on Earth. Their “outrageously high level of governance” provides them with: medical benefits for all residents, free education, maternity leave, day care, job retraining, rent subsidies, rehabilitation care and care in old age. Their average work week is 35 hours. All wage earners get five weeks paid vacation a year.

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Do they pay higher taxes? Yes. But look what they get. And everyone is covered. What a concept. People cared for and educated by their own government ... instead of said government trying to subsidize and run the rest of the world. Perhaps the problem is not whether a country has government programs, but what programs that government is supporting and whether the lawmakers in that country care enough about the welfare of its citizens to make them work. —M. A. Wuebker, Hailey

PROTECT THE CLEARWATER A diverse group is gathered to protect North Central Idaho’s Clearwater Basin, today and for future generations. The Clearwater Basin Collaborative exemplifies the best in modern land protection coalitions. In a CBC meeting, loggers sit next to conservationists who sit next to tribal members who sit next to political representatives who sit next to agency folks, and so on. It is a formidable group, doing formidable work. They’ve come together to create solutions amidst compromise, and to set direction, all in the name of economic and environmental well being for the region. As an avid hiker, I applaud the CBC for working to permanently protect the most amazing and pristine places in the Clearwater Basin, while working to make sure that folks who recreate differently than I do also enjoy places designated for access. Now is the time to protect the Clearwater Basin, and I am grateful for the CBC’s efforts. It’s important to me that one of the last best wild places receives protection, and that the region’s wildlife, water and communities are safeguarded for future generations. —Aimee Moran, Boise

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OPINION/BILL COPE

2C FLAKES An ill wind blows from the west This happened on the Saturday morning before the school bond elections. I was sitting at one of Meridian’s busier intersections when I saw three guys—all about my age, I’m guessing—each holding a brightly colored placard big enough to be read easily by passing motorists. As I spend somewhere between 95 and 98 percent of my time within a half-mile radius of my favorite sofa in Meridian, I can’t say for sure that you Boise folks saw the same placards leading up to Tuesday’s elections, but I bet you did. I can’t remember exactly what they read, but the message was clear. “Vote NO on the School Levy.” All the placards read the same, with big bold letters in vivid colors on a heavy, stiff stock. Those babies didn’t come cheap. I had seen what I believe to be the same placards before—last May when the Meridian School District tried to get an earlier version of the levy passed, but failed. One of the reasons it failed the first time—if not the primary reason—was that then, as now, there were all these guys standing around at busy Meridian intersections, flashing placards to passing motorists: “Vote NO on the School Levy.” I’d heard stories that those guys with the placards were not from Meridian, but were in fact shipped in from Canyon County to screw with our school district. This infuriated me to no end—that the intellectual and moral mange which has infected Canyon County for decades was spreading outside the dumpy confines of Nampa and Caldwell, across the line into my town. It made me even more angry to hear rumors that the Idaho Freedom Foundation—that mysteriously wealthy source that has been slopping out pre-fab legislation for our governor and Legislature to wallow in—was behind the effort to defeat the levy. After all, just how do a pack of guys—all of whom have the free time to stand around on street corners flashing placards— get a hold of the same expensive posters unless somebody is coordinating the event, eh? And isn’t it possible, even probable, that someone was even slipping them a few bucks to stand out on street corners and screw with our school district? Anyway, last May, when I saw those ... uh, what might we call them? ... outside agitators? ... Canyon County head lice working their way onto Ada County heads? ... bums putting in a few hours for Thunderbird money? ... flashing their imported placards on Meridian’s streets, I seethed silently and drove on by. Not this time. On the morning in question, a mere 72 hours until the polls would determine whether the Meridian and Boise school districts would remain viable entities in which our communities could trust to provide a decent education to future generations of Meridianaters and Boiseists, I decided not to drive on by. I pulled in behind the three placard flashers and approached them.

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“Where the hell you guys from?” I asked. And it’s entirely possible I came across a tad confrontational when I asked it, for within seconds, they were as defensive as guilty teenagers. “What’s it matter where we’re from?” bristled one, as another went into what sounded like a rehearsed soliloquy on what portion of the property taxes we pay goes into public education. Things pretty much went downhill from there. To the one who asked “What’s it matter ... ,” I said something to the effect that I didn’t appreciate right-wing dipwads from Nampa coming over here messing with our school system, and to the soliloquizer, I said it would be fine and dandy with me if all of my property tax dollars went to education. In response, one of them called me an idiot and I returned the insult by calling him an idiot, and after that, it was all “You’re an idiot!”/“No, you’re the idiot!” etc., etc. After maybe a minute of such scintillating repartee, I left. As I walked away, I said with all the confidence I could cough up, “You’re going to lose this one.” But truth is, it felt like an empty promise even to me. In my heart, in my soul, in my gut, I didn’t trust the fine, fine voters of the Meridian School District. My instincts were telling me these anti-public school bumpkins were probably going to win this one, just as they’d won the last one. Yeehaw, you can’t imagine how happy I was Wednesday morning to learn they had indeed lost this one. That the fine, fine voters of the Meridian School District had come through for future generations of Meridianaters, just as the fine, fine voters of the Boise School District had come through for future generations of Boiseists. Frankly, I was never as worried about the Boise voters as much as I was about the Meridian crowd. Boise voters are ... uh, how shall I put this? ... let us say, noticeably more sophisticated than their commuter cousins in Meridian. It’s a sad thing to admit about my own old ’hood, but I must often face the reality that the difference between so many Meridian voters and so many Canyon County voters is a lot less than the five-minute drive to the county line. But this time, Meridian swung to the light. All of Ada County went for more enlightenment, in fact, while all of Canyon County—with one exception, and bless you for that, Caldwell—went darker. The county that has cursed Idaho with the likes of Steve Symms, John McGee, Ralph Smeed, Butch Otter, Wayne Hoffman and his Koch-funded IFF (tell me I’m wrong, Hoffman) have cursed their children to an even more inferior future. Too bad, and not just for the kids, either. It’s a shame we can’t come up with some sort of quarantine. A wall, maybe, or dome. You know what I mean … some way keep their degeneracy in one place. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

TED RALL/OPINION

PRO-WAR TO PEACENIK Susan Collins and the precautionary principle Susan Collins is a Republican U.S. senator who represents the people of Maine. She voted for the invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan. In 2007, four years into the Iraq War, when at least 100,000 Iraqis had been killed and the hunt for Saddam Hussein’s nonexistent weapons of mass destruction had been called off, Collins nonetheless voted to extend the war. In 2008 she voted the same way. More deaths followed. Late last year, 1 million or 2 million dead civilians later, most U.S. occupation troops finally pulled out of Iraq. Remember the main argument for staying there, that we were fighting “them” over “there” to avoid having to fight them in the streets of American cities? It’s only been a few months and anything can happen, but no one—not even Republicans like Collins—seems worried about hordes of Iraqi jihadis rampaging through Baltimore. Obviously, they were wrong. The danger was false. Thus the war was unjustified. “Despite the extraordinary heroism of our troops and the brilliance of our military leaders,” she wrote in a March 13 letter, “one has to wonder whether the corrupt central government [of Hamid Karzai] and with the history of Afghanistan, whether we can truly achieve the goal of a secure country.” The letter called for a speedier withdrawal than President Barack Obama has announced. Too bad it comes a decade late for the peoples of Afghanistan and Iraq. Back in 2001, when she cast votes in favor of dropping cluster bombs, full of brightly colored canisters designed to attract and blow up curious Afghan girls and boys by the thousands, Collins had a choice.

She could have listened to the experts. People who had been to Afghanistan. People on the left. After 9/11 the left—which does not include Democrats who were so eager to be seen as “tough” on terrorism that they willingly went along with a war—was against invading Afghanistan. After the Taliban were driven into the mountains and/or melted into the population, Republicans like Collins thought they’d been vindicated. The Taliban are not really gone, we on the left said. They’re just waiting. Then we installed Hamid Karzai. Those of us on the left, who had actually been to Afghanistan, warned that Karzai had no political base. That his regime was hopelessly corrupt. That he was putting warlords, who ought to have been in prison for crimes they committed during the civil war, into positions of power and influence. That his government was universally despised. We said that stuff 10 years ago. So it’s a little galling to hear warmongers like Collins talk about Karzai’s corruption as if she were reporting information that came to light recently. Collins violated the precautionary principle—a precept enshrined in the law of various countries, including in Europe. A politician who proposes an action that might cause harm is obligated to present concrete evidence that it won’t cause harm. If she fails to meet that burden of proof, the proposal is rejected. In the case of Collins and the other Republican and Democratic legislators, all the evidence they needed that the wars against Afghanistan and Iraq would do more harm than good was as close as their computer or nearest bookstore.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | 9

CITYDESK/NEWS NEWS

GBAD GETS NEW BOARD MEMBER AND NEW DIRECTION Rob Perez was rarin’ to go March 19. He was the first person in the room for the monthly meeting of the Greater Boise Auditorium District Board–ready to use his business acumen (as CEO and director of Western Capital Bank) as GBAD’s newest board member. He was armed with plenty of notes and questions. Only the small matter of being elected to the board stood in his way. But that didn’t take too long. The first order of business was the acceptance of Board Member Mike Fitzgerald’s resignation. For the better part of a year, Fitzgerald had been balancing his GBAD duties with a job as an Eastern Idaho restaurant manager (BW, News, “Home Away From Home,” Aug. 24, 2011), but ultimately decided that it was inappropriate to hold a Boise-based elected position while living and working on the other side of the state. Less than a minute later, Perez’ name was put into nomination as Fitzgerald’s replacement. “He has even agreed to stand for election once this term has expired [in mid-2012],” said Board Member Judy Peavey-Derr. But that’s not entirely accurate. “I would consider it,” Perez told Citydesk later. “Look, I’m a numbers guy, and right now, I want to make sure that ever ything we do is based on the fact that we can afford it.” And at the top of the “ever ything” list is a new convention center. GBAD board members decided not to further explore land east of Capitol Boulevard as the site for a new convention facility. For more than a year, GBAD had mulled over the possibility of negotiating with landowners bordered by Myrtle, Front and Sixth streets and Capitol Boulevard. “But there would be significant design and operational challenges there,” said Don Knickrehm, legal counsel to the GBAD board, who explained that the two blocks would only accommodate four acres of development. The GBAD board chose to return its focus to a parcel of land (already owned by the agency), near Boise’s connector, bordered by 11th, 13th, Front and Myrtle streets, which would accommodate five acres. The board also wants to consider a new study on the possible construction of a new 156,000-square-foot convention facility, which could cost approximately $37 million. GBAD currently has more than $9 million in tax receipts and fee collections. —George Prentice

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PATR IC K S W EENEY

Rob Perez, GBAD’s newest board member, is CEO of Boise-based Western Capital Bank.

A (VERBAL) TUSSLE OVER BULLYING LeFavour’s anti-bullying bill may be her last GEORGE PRENTICE The struggle over bullying in Idaho schools may not be a knock-down, drag-out brawl, but it’s a fight nonetheless. In fact, the toughest scrap over bullying is expected to occur in the next few days–not on a playground but at the Idaho Capitol. But Boise Democratic Sen. Nicole LeFavour has seen this tussle before, particularly in the Idaho House. That’s where previous anti-bullying efforts have died and that’s where LeFavour is prepared to make her last Statehouse stand on the matter (LeFavour has announced her retirement at the end of the 2012 session in anticipation of her run for U.S. Congress). “We’ve worked on this for the last yearand-a-half,” said LeFavour, addressing her colleagues March 15 on the Senate floor. “We have reached a point in our state where harm is being done to young people, and we have an obligation to make our anti-bullying laws more effective.” The six-page Senate Bill 1358a defines bullying and includes references to cyberbullying, but its most important element includes requirements for educators to be adequately trained on how to intervene in bullying or intimidation. “When parents send their kids to school, they need to know if that school is doing everything in its power to make their kids safe,” said LeFavour. “Many schools do a wonderful job. But I have to say, unfortunately, there are some schools in our state that don’t.” One of LeFavour’s major challenges while convincing her fellow legislators to support the measure was that she was unable to present any empirical data to support the need for change in Idaho code. “Could you cite a study or survey that shows us that bullying is on the rise in Idaho?” asked Boise Republican Sen. Mitch Toryanski. “I have never said that bullying was on the rise,” answered LeFavour. “But I can tell you that the State Department of Education gets at least one call a week from parents who are concerned that their school isn’t doing anything about the bullying that their child is experiencing.” But Toryanski pressed LeFavour. “Is it entirely possible that incidents of

Karen Echeverria, executive director of the Idaho School Boards Association: “Our school districts said to us over and over, ‘This is not necessary legislation.’”

bullying in Idaho could be going down?” “We hear stories all the time about a lot of [bullying] incidents,” LeFavour responded. A 2009 survey of Boise State freshman from Idaho high schools taken by the Safe Schools Coalition found that 87 percent of self-identified heterosexual students and 92 percent of self-identified LGBT students had witnessed bullying. Additionally 36 percent of heterosexual students and 25 percent of LGBT students witnessed it often or very often. LeFavour also pointed to this year’s Idaho Youth Risk Behavior Survey, released by the Idaho Department of Education, which indicated that nearly 23 percent of Idaho high schoolers surveyed reported being bullied or harassed on school property in the past year. “Those numbers,” recalled LeFavour. “They are quite sobering.” But when Boise Weekly asked Karen Echeverria, executive director of the Idaho School Boards Association, to provide any recent statistics on bullying in Idaho schools, she said there weren’t any that she knew of. “I don’t have a sense for it, and that tells me something,” said Echeverria. “We provide policy services to more than 80 of Idaho’s 115 school districts and about half of the charter schools. We also provide legal services. I’ve been here for almost five years now and I can tell you that I’ve never had a school district contact me on the topic [of bullying].” Echeverria said she didn’t know where the legislation was stemming from. “That was one of the things that our school districts said to us over and over,” said Echeverria. “They said, ‘This is not necessary legislation.’” But LeFavour couldn’t disagree more. “We’re receiving emails from across the state and it’s heartbreaking,” said LeFavour. “We have a role in the public safety of our

children and parents need to know that schools are safe,” said LeFavour. Echeverria said the biggest pushback from Idaho school boards was that the bill’s fiscal statement had no dollar figure attached to it. “It is the intent of this legislation that this statute be carried out within the existing framework of the State Department of Education and State Board of Education,” reads the Statement of Purpose. “Thus there should be no impact on the state’s General Fund.” But Echeverria said that’s bad math. “First of all, the required training would have to include not just certificated staff–who are the teachers–but the classified staff as well. It covers all employees,” Echeverria said, “With the reductions in budgets, most, if not all, of the professional development days have been removed from school calendars. The only way to provide this new professional training, which would be required by this bill, is to either reduce student-teacher contact time even more, or add a half-day or even a full-day back to the calendar.” LeFavour responds by saying the alternative would be worse. “If a district doesn’t do the work of preventing bullying, they open themselves up to lawsuits,” said LeFavour. “Lawsuits have been filed all across the country against schools that have failed to protect kids.” Ultimately, LeFavour convinced enough of her senate colleagues to pass S.B. 1358a, but she knows that the hardest task is ahead. She faces a more-conservative House, which nixed a similar bill last year. Plus Echeverria said she’ll be there to counter LeFavour’s arguments if, or when, it comes before the House Education Committee. “We’ll work against it on the House side,” said Echeverria. “There may not even be any time to consider it. But if it goes over to the House, we’ll be there to discuss our same concerns.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NEWS TAYLOR NEW B OLD

Add the Words advocates held their last protest of the legislative session on the steps of the Idaho Statehouse March 15.

LAST WORDS Add the Words campaign holds its final 2012 protest TAYLOR NEWBOLD Supporters of the Add the Words campaign, seeking to add “sexual orientation and gender identity” to Idaho human rights protections, spent a cold night on the steps of the Idaho Statehouse March 15, during an all-night vigil–a protest that would be the group’s last during the 2012 legislative session. “The vigil tonight is to show the Legislature how heartless it has been” said Add the Words spokeswoman Mistie Tolman. More than 70 participants ignored a late-winter blast of cold and threat of rain to mark a session that saw Republican members of the Senate State Affairs Committee refuse to have the bill printed or debated. Yet campaign leaders said they were still resolute that the end of their efforts has not yet come. “As we light up the night at the end of this dark legislative session, we’re sending a message that it is wrong to interfere with an open process of dialogue and democracy,” Tolman said solemnly to those gathered, some carrying flashlights or glow sticks. “We will not let [the Legislature] leave us hopeless.” The vigil featured remarks from bill sponsor Pocatello Democratic Sen. Edgar Malepeai, who will not be seeking re-election after this year. “What can be accomplished with just four words?” asked Malepeai. “‘In God we trust;’ ‘With justice for all;’ ‘Endowed with inalienable rights;’ ‘I have a dream;’ I believe as a society working together, we can move mountains with words. We have lost the battle, this time around, but we have not lost the war.” The gathering also heard from Boise Democratic Sen. Nicole LeFavour, another WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

of the bill’s sponsors. LeFavour will also be stepping away from the State Senate in order to launch a campaign to challenge Republican Congressman Mike Simpson. While LeFavour conceded to a number of frustrations in the past three months, she also said the 2012 session has been the best she’s ever had. “You have changed the Statehouse forever. It will never be the same,” she said. “People have advanced in their understanding of the issue and their awareness that the state supports what we’re asking for, and that their colleagues believe in this. They now understand that.” The vigil concluded with Add the Words organizer Lisa Perry telling the crowd that, for months, they had gathered peacefully to ask state lawmakers to give their legislation a hearing and a vote. “We have been respectful. Where is our respect?” asked Perry. “We cannot wait for next year. Our friends, families and neighbors are being harmed by discrimination now.” Perry then asked for volunteers to participate in an act of civil disobedience by sleeping on the Statehouse steps. Statewide coordinator Cody Hafer said that about 20 people committed to spending the night at the Capitol despite concerns about possibly being cited by State Police for trespassing. “We will stay until our lawmakers come to work in the morning and see our peaceful, persistent request for a hearing and a vote to add the words,” Perry said. Tolman told BW that as many as 14 activists endured the entire night on the steps of the Capitol, with no interference from law enforcement.

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UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

23-12 mind

body

(Most) Idaho GOP senators move controversial abortion bill forward CARISSA WOLF

spirit

health

Three Oaks Academy & Integrative Therapy Clinic 211W. State St. Boise, Idaho 208.342.3430 info@threeoaksacademy.com threeoaksacademy.com

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The Republican-driven Idaho State Senate voted 23-12 on March 19 to advance a measure that could force women to undergo ultrasounds prior to having an abortion. Five Republican senators crossed the aisle to join all Democratic members of the Senate in opposing the bill. The legislation has already garnered national media attention from commentators and pundits who noted that “things had gone from bad to worse for Idaho women.” “It’s enough to make you want to grab one of those magic transvaginal ultrasound wands and jam it deep into the ear of the bill’s author, [Boise Republican] Sen. Chuck Winder, to see what, exactly, is going on in that head of his,” wrote commentator Cassie Murdoch on the female-based website Jezebel.com. Lawmakers heard similar sentiments from a packed committee hearing room on March 14. “This is for less government intrusion in the lives of women,” Sue Philley told lawmakers, presenting a petition signed by 4,000 Idahoans in opposition to the measure. “They want you to focus on jobs, the economy and the environment, not their bedrooms and most personal decisions.” The audience erupted into applause. “Please do not disparage the committee members,” State Affairs Committee Chair Nampa Republican Sen. Curt McKenzie said. Philley’s testimony was interrupted a second time after she likened efforts to pass the law to those of oppressive totalitarian regimes such as the Taliban. “We stop listening when you take that approach,” Idaho Falls Republican Bart Davis said. Susan Young, of the anti-abortion organization Life Choices, said the bill enhanced existing informed-consent laws and gives women a chance to understand the progress of fetal development. “They say a picture is worth a thousand words. This bill would allow women to see a picture with sound of the fetus she is about to have removed from her body,” Young said. Backers of the bill that shadows legislative efforts in Virginia, Oklahoma and Texas largely represented anti-abortion pregnancy crisis centers, saying they spoke for the unborn and challenged the morality of abortion. Critics of the measure called on lawmakers to trust the intelligence of women and physicians to make personal health-care decisions and reminded the committee that passage of the law would constitute undue burden and government interference in the

lives of women. One physician said the measure would set precedence in mandating a medical procedure. “We must call this what it is–a deliberate attempt to weaken our constitutional rights,” said Adrienne Evans with United Action for Idaho.“This is the very definition of government intrusion. Idaho lawmakers should not interfere with medical decisions that should be left up to health-care providers and women.” In support of the measure, Julie Lindy of Cornerstone Family Counseling said it was “irresponsible to keep information from women who are sexually irresponsible.” “The baby in my opinion is a citizen. So when government steps in … that certainly is appropriate,” Lindy said. The bill offers provisions for a Health and Welfare-managed referral system for free ultrasounds. But those free ultrasounds would be offered by anti-abortion groups that don’t always have a physician on staff or abide by federal confidentiality rules. Monica Hopkins with the American Civil Liberties Union of Idaho noted that the law requires a doctor to sign off on the ultrasound, but abortion providers don’t offer free ultrasounds. She said the redundant measure could force women to undergo two ultrasound procedures, adding delay and expense to health-care decisions. “Every woman already has the right to review an ultrasound as part of this informed consent,” said Hopkins. The bill also requires doctors to document the date and time of the abortion, along with the gestation of the pregnancy and the number of fetal heartbeats, then provide the information to the patient. Hopkins said the requirement could violate HIPPA guidelines and expose patients’ information through public records. “It may not only violate the privacy of the woman, but also the physician,” Hopkins said. “These are private decisions that should be made between a physician and a patient.” The measure would allow a doctor to choose what kind of ultrasound to use but Ketchum Democratic Sen. Michelle Stennett noted that transvaginal ultrasounds are often the only way to gauge gestation prior to 10 weeks of pregnancy, when about 80 percent of abortions occur. The committee’s decision to send the bill to the Senate met a collective roar of gasps from the roughly 250 audience members. “What a bunch of fascists!” one person yelled to the committee as members quickly exited the room. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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CITIZEN

MERRITT PAULSON Portland soccer mogul with some major goals GEORGE PRENTICE

Were you any kind a jock as a kid? I played everything. Baseball, tennis, basketball, and I first put on a pair of skis when I was 2 years old. I was certainly athletic, but I was really short until my senior year of high school. I was an extreme example of being a late bloomer. I’m 6-feet, 4-inches now. I would be remiss if I didn’t ask you about your dad [Henry “Hank” Paulson was the assistant secretary of defense in the early 1970s, CEO of Goldman Sachs in the 1990s and Secretary of the Treasury under President George W. Bush]. What was it like having such a high-profile figure for a father? Through many of his years at Goldman Sachs, he was well-known in the business community, but none of my friends knew what my dad did. We lived a very modest life. That’s just the way my parents are. Why did you set your sights on Portland? It was a city with a broad population of 2.4 million people with only one major league sports team. It was a very unique opportunity.

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When you’re assessing a sports market, how much of it is a science and how much an art? There’s definitely a science to it–everything from looking at the market on an analytical basis to the facility, the leases and everything that comes with the deal. And of course, the art is all about your gut feeling and what ultimately makes sense. Everything I’ve read about the first season of the Timbers was that it was a huge success. It was a very long haul to make MLS happen in Portland, and far from a certain thing. But I can tell you that out of the gate, we had one of the best expansion team launches in any sport that you’ll ever see. On the field, we came very close to making the playoffs. Off the field, I would be hard-pressed to say what could have gone better. You sold out every home game, even before your season started. It was a lot of hard work with a great staff– putting everything together from our marketing, to our ticket sales, to putting a great team together on the field. And you have a significant waiting list for season tickets. About 7,000 people. How do you manage a waiting list that size? We sell 15,000 season tickets. We need the ability to do some group sales and some game-day sales, but season tickets are your life-blood. What’s the chance of 500 people from that list getting season tickets next year? We actually had a lot more than that get them this year, because we increased our

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Merritt Paulson, 39, is one of the fastest-rising sports executives in the nation. Named to the exclusive Forty Under 40 class by Sports Business Journal, Paulson is the owner and president of the Portland, Ore., Timbers; a success on and off the field not only in Major League Soccer but professional sports overall. On Wednesday, March 21, Paulson will be the guest of the City Club of Boise to share his story of how an East Coast executive (he was top management with the NBA and HBO) became a West Coast sports mogul. Prior to his Boise visit, Boise Weekly spoke with Paulson about soccer, his well-known father and being a late bloomer.

stadium capacity from 18,000 to just over 20,400. What’s your season ticket holder retention rate? Ninety-seven percent renewal. That’s really good in the sports word, even by NFL standards. Scarcity is a powerful thing. While we would love for our facility to get even bigger, right now, I like the fact that it’s a really tough ticket. There is clearly a generation gap when it comes to interest in soccer. Most young adults grew up around a soccer field, but older folks usually have little to no interest in the sport. I get approached by older folks that tell me, “I’m a huge sports fan; I never liked soccer and had no interest in checking out a Timbers game until somebody dragged me to it and it’s the coolest atmosphere I’ve ever seen.” We have thousands of fans on their feet throughout the whole game, chanting and singing. And the energy and electricity comes completely from the fans, not some music or video that’s being produced like you see in many other sports. Pardon the pun, but what are your goals for the next few years? To become an elite sports franchise, not just in Major League Soccer, but any sport. We’re off to a good start, but complacency is our worst enemy. We take nothing for granted and continue to improve.

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by Josh Gross

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Road

If Travis Ward, singer and guitarist for Hillfolk Noir, is aware that the collective hopes of a mid-size American city are riding on him, he isn’t showing it. He and his band lounge on the streets of Austin, Texas, as the madness of SXSW, the World’s Fair of music, explodes around them in every direction. They just had sandwiches from a street cart. “Gotta eat something,” he said. “This is going to be a marathon.” The “this” Ward was talking about was the first-ever official showcase at SXSW to exclusively feature bands from Boise. Hillfolk Noir, along with Le Fleur, The Brett Netson Band, Finn Riggins, Youth Lagoon and Built to Spill were are all about to show the gathered culturati that Idaho has more than potatoes. Far from being tucked away in a back alley dive, the showcase took place in the Independent Film Channel’s Crossroads House at Vice Bar, a high-class three-level venue with a capacity near 1,000 located directly on the main SXSW festival strip. To up the ante, the entire showcase was filmed for broadcast on the IFC. These weren’t the only bands from Boise at SXSW this year. Three others—Teens, Jumping Sharks and RevoltRevolt—played the festival as well. A week after the Wednesday, March 14, showcase, Boise will host the inaugural Treefort Music Fest, a four-day multi-venue cultural festival modeled after SXSW running Thursday, March 22-Sunday, March 25, made possible by the amount of bands heading home from SXSW. The festival will feature more than 130 touring and local bands and more than 40 national media outlets have already confirmed they will be in attendance. Call it one heck of an after-party. Both these events could mean major exposure and a boost to the economy for a city whose residents have long insisted their home is far greater than its reputation. But then again, they could also be another in a series of giant flops that lead nowhere.

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To make a baseball metaphor: Boise and the Boise music scene have been called up to the majors and Hillfolk Noir is batting first. But that Boise—a geographically isolated B-market in a state whose reputation as a haven for right-wing extremists overshadows its contributions to the arts—made it to this point at all is a story unto itself, and one that begins with a joke. In a stand-up special, comedian John Oliver spoke of his reaction to seeing the exclamation point on the sign for the Boise Library! while filming a segment for The Daily Show with Jon Stewart. “I was surprised they had a library, too,” he said. That slightly derisive jab best summarizes the way the national press reacted to the seem-

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ingly overnight success of Boise band Youth Lagoon. Media outlets like Pitchfork, NPR and Nylon Magazine heaped praise on Youth Lagoon’s debut album, The Year of Hibernation, but seemed shocked that the band had the audacity to record such a gem in its hometown. In interview after interview, Trevor Powers, singer and keyboard player for Youth Lagoon, was asked some variety of the same question: “What the heck is even in Boise?” His answer was always the same: “Plenty.” And articles examining the up-and-coming Boise scene as a whole were never far behind. Powers had somehow fallen into being Boise’s cultural ambassador, a job that the City of Boise has given Trey McIntyre Project thousands of dollars in grant funding to do.

But what those media outlets seemed not to understand was that Boise has always had an “it” band, the great white hope that made a potato-shaped dent in the world. Before Youth Lagoon came Finn Riggins, Marcus Eaton, Curtis Stigers, Built to Spill, Caustic Resin and Fat Chance. It goes all the way back to the city’s settling, when one of the first things residents did was set up an orchestra, according to Terri Schorzman of the Boise Department of Arts and History. What is different now is that instead of a single band that finds success elsewhere and treats Boise as a bedroom community, or a single group that fills local bars for a year or two until the novelty wears off, there is the emergence of a broad self-sustaining community of musicians that feed one another creatively and

seeds the next generation of talent and fans. If that community flourishes, it could compel the economy-driving creative class to stay in Boise rather than search for greener pastures closer to the coast. That is the hope anyhow, and it is by no means a sure thing. But it hasn’t always been back-patting and schmancy industry showcases. Eric Gilbert, keyboardist for Finn Riggins, owner-operator of Helibase Booking, host of Antler Crafts Radio on Radio Boise, soundman for Visual Arts Collective and the artistic director of Treefort Music Fest, remembers pretty clearly when things were different. Gilbert and his band relocated to Boise from Hailey in 2009, partially so Gilbert could be closer to his parents and partially so the band, which routinely toured the nation but lived in something of isolation, could be a part of a scene. Though there were bands and clubs to play in Boise, Gilbert was somewhat disappointed with the scene itself. “There was an underlying pessimism from older folks who had survived the ’90s and didn’t see anything come of it,” said Gilbert. “But I don’t fault them for it.” So, Gilbert, who is an almost pathological optimist about music, set himself about playing shows, doing sound and using the connections he had made from several years of national touring to bring bigger and better bands to Boise. Gilbert was not alone in his quest and the list of attaboys that could be handed out is extensive though he is the person Boise musicians most commonly point to as the tipping point for the local scene. Gilbert, however, points somewhere else altogether: an event staged at Visual Arts Collective in 2009 by musician and artist Elijah Jensen called Rotating Tongues. “I’d been involved in the Boise music scene for quite a few years and was friends with people who played music, but what I found was that people wouldn’t go to their shows because you’d heard their songs a hundred times,” Jensen said. “It was hard to support local artists because you felt like you had their routine memorized. I felt like people weren’t pushing themselves.” Jensen’s solution was to book 20 bands to play over two days at VAC. The catch? They were only allowed to play two songs each and both had to be new material. The performances were recorded live and released as a compilation CD. Though the event had an audience only a fraction the size of the average Knitting Factory concert, it was a slow-moving smash success. Gilbert said he could see lights going off in local musicians’ heads as they all stood in one room for the first time and took stock of how much talent was right beneath their noses. “It was almost like a corporate teambuilding seminar,” he said. Those weren’t the word in Jensen’s mind when he conceived Rotating Tongues—he said he just wanted to illuminate all the talented people in the city and hopefully light a fire under them—but he agrees it is an excellent analogy to how Rotating Tongues played out. “I have heard people say that it started things in a new direction,” Jensen said. “[Since then] I have watched things explode in exposure. I’ve seen more local music showcases at bars than I ever have. These bands WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

LA UR IE

were part of the festival were wildly under are taking themselves seriously enough to put attended. on their own shows, rather than just opening “We expected more people to want to utifor touring bands.” lize the discount you got with the wristbands,” Jensen saw a disorganized and curmudsaid Brandt. “But they seemed to want to just geonly group of naysayers lined up like bowling pins, so he rolled a snowball at them. And pay $5 to see one show. At the time, I thought people didn’t want to spend that much just a few years later? “It’s a vibrant scene where people are really money,” Brandt said. “But seeing Treefort, I guess that isn’t true.” pushing themselves,” said Jensen. Instead, Brandt sees it as a mindset, that As great a story as it would be for Boise’s people just aren’t used to the concept of a fesrise to be solely from hard work and talent, there were also global factors at play. The big- tival and either only went out for one night or attended a single venue rather than bouncing gest of them being the great recession. around. She said that, in retrospect, she could A study recently released by the Pew have done more to break genres up at different Research Center backed up what was already venues to encourage migration. something of folk wisdom: that people aged Brandt said she didn’t lose money on the 18-34 are those hit hardest by the economy. festival, but has since decided to put “The share of this age group who were promotion on the promotio employed is the smallest that it it’ss been since back burner and bur nment started the government take a full-time fu collecting job with Journal this data Broadcast Broadca Group. back in She will, will how1948,” ever, be working Kim as a venue ven manParker, as-ager for fo Treefort sociate di-Music Fest. th rector with “I think it al Pew Social can’t just be and Deone person,” p mographicc Brandt Bran said. ld Trends told “If it’s it a udie NPR’s Audie community com Cornish. effort, it can effo iHistoribe a labor of ng cally, young love because lov creatives fled it’s not Boise for the anybody’s an ities opportunities full-time fu ral and cultural job. jo And I acceptancee nor o think we th h nd, of Portland, o t y a best w be the main have the h ttle; Ore.; Seattle; nd the w u o o t  f UW s ro a R d I n H ha sband RU%RLVH›V7UH WLYDO u kind of k Lori Sh h cisco; San Francisco; e t la r V e DFNHUI 0XVLF)H ccommuexas; Austin, Texas; ßQDQFLDOE nity that n er. Boise and Denver. can c do may have cost less that, because they care so much to live in, but they about the arts and community.” community ” ng what were getting But even in the face of Promenade’s they paid for, until they could fizzle, it could not be denied that bands no longer find jobs to pay for it, that is. were everywhere. One of them that played When the economy tanked, Boise’s native as part of Promenade was a fairly unresons and daughters flocked home and their markable act called Your Friend Peter Giles. younger siblings started staying put. Faced Even friends quietly admitted attending with the choice of wallowing in collective the band’s shows was an act of charity that ennui or riding the wave created by Rotating showed how tight-knit the community of Tongues, they chose the latter. Boise musicians had become. It didn’t hurt that new computer technolSo Trevor Powers, aka Peter Giles, decided ogy was making music production more accesto scrap the project outright and start from sible than ever before. Spotting the growing trends, Boiseans tried scratch. When he emerged from his year of to make something of the scene with new ven- hibernation with the recordings he called Youth Lagoon, Boise’s already growing musiues and festivals, all which were billed as the cal landscape had been given a shot of turbo missing link. It was almost as if they formed from Radio Boise, which, after years of work, a line and took turns putting on a helmet to was finally ready to go live on air. charge headlong into a wall with the hopes of Youth Lagoon debuted as a live act at a breaking through. Radio Boise fundraiser at Visual Arts CollecOne of those helmet-wearers was Jaclyn tive in March 2011. Brandt, marketing director for Promenade More than just a new band, Youth La(and occassional Boise Weekly freelance writer), a multi-day, multi-venue music festival goon’s heart-warming electro ballads shattered the idea that Boise bands had to ape the indiein Boise that went off with a thundering fizzle rock sound of Built to Spill to get attention in in 2010. On paper Promenade seemed to have it all: Boise. The phrase: “This is the first local band a wide variety of touring and local acts, plenty I’ve genuinely liked in a long time,” was whispered ear to ear like a game of telephone and of press coverage and the collective enthusia wave of electronic bands practically leaped asm of the music community. Brandt worked from the woodwork. for two years to put it together. Within a few months, Youth Lagoon’s But in practice, the majority of shows that PE AR M AN

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Internet-released single was written up in Pitchfork, and the band was signed to Fat Possum Records and sent on a national tour that promoted Boise as much as it did the bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s album. That was about the time that Gilbert booked some friends that heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d met on the road for a show at VAC after they had performed at SXSW. He called it the Post-SXSW Mini-fest. Though the name wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t much more than branding, as the show was a single night with a single band from the festival, it was packed. That gave Gilbert an idea: If he could pull in one band on the road home after playing in Austin, why not more? Why not a lot more? But that would require resources. And Gilbertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s resources were limited to a musicianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s salary augmented by a night job slinging pizza at Pie Holeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;hardly what was required. And thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s when something very strange happened: Someone came to him with money she wanted to put into music, and she needed his help. Lori Shandro doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look the type to go all in on a music festival. The Boise mother dresses business casual, with a minimum of band T-shirts or tattoos. She speaks plainly and calmly about what most would consider a foolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s errand: investing six ďŹ gures in a music festival in a B-market that has rejected the concept in the recent past. But for Shandro, live music is a deep and abiding passion, and one she is tired of having to leave town to indulge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to move,â&#x20AC;? Shandro said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All my friends are here. But something that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t here is the kind of show I want to see.â&#x20AC;? Shandro said that every time she would ďŹ nd a band that really got her going, she would check its tour schedule and ďŹ nd nary a stop in Boise. Her solution was that she and her husband, an amateur pilot, would hop in his Cessna and ďŹ&#x201A;y to concerts in other cities. But that all ended with her husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s untimely death. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a working mom, he was a stay-athome dad,â&#x20AC;? said Shandro. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That means I had to give up the luxury of going to see shows out of town.â&#x20AC;? Instead she decided it was time to start bringing them to her, something a friend attributed to her being the kind of woman that â&#x20AC;&#x153;grabs misfortune by the balls.â&#x20AC;? Shandro had one friendâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Drew Loronaâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; who knew how to make the contract side of things work, and the two approached Gilbert for his contacts. Their pitch was a series of shows that could lead to a new high-quality venue that houses 400-600, something like the Doug Fir in Portland, Ore. Gilbert pitched them on his idea for a multi-day festival and they bit. Shandro hopes that the festival will help agents and bands see Boise as a place worth stopping for a show instead of just gas. If that happens, then she hopes to use the festival as a launching pad for the venue. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Treefort is almost like a giant focus group,â&#x20AC;? said Shandro. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The venue] will either happen in the next two years or it wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t.â&#x20AC;? Shandro said she thinks Treefort will succeed where others have failed because it is the right time for it to happen; that all the pieces are ďŹ nally in place. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Boise has the infrastructure. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got the desire, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got people who donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to drive to another town every weekend to see something,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My only fear is that

weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re too early, and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re the only ones to recognize that.â&#x20AC;? She added that she is also the tiniest bit worried sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be so busy putting on the festival that she wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get to enjoy any of it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But as long as someone else is having fun and really getting what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing, that will be enough,â&#x20AC;? Shandro said. A music festival that rallies the community is a great thing. But some of Idahoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lessbohemian circles might wonder why some angsty teens banging out rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; roll is any of their concern. The answer is a page straight out of the Bill Clinton playbook: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the economy, stupid. The more than 130 bands playing at Treefort and the hundreds upon hundreds attending will be staying in hotels, eating out, feeding parking meters and more. They may stop for gigs or food in Pocatello or Sun Valley. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A 2005 study found that economic impact of the arts locally was something like $38 million,â&#x20AC;? Schorzman said. But more than that, a thriving nightlife and culture attracts young people with disposable income and businesses that want to use the city as a lure for quality employees. Study after study has shown that cities live and die not by their suburbs but by the strength of their urban core. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We need to have more than parking lots; things that are really engaging and interesting to people,â&#x20AC;? said Schorzman. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Things like a vital music scene.â&#x20AC;? Having recently read articles about Boiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rock scene in her daughterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s copy of Nylon Magazine, Schorzman is excited about the potential and is planning to include it in the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s territorial sesquicentennial celebration next year. Even Gilbert said that he jokes with real estate agent friends that they, not any of the musicians, will be the real beneďŹ ciaries of Boiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s music scene blowing up. But scenes are ďŹ ckle. And while Boise musicians are gunďŹ ghter-quick to pat each other on the back, the question remains whether the rest of the world will care if Boiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s scene remains trapped beneath a glass ceiling. And that brings us back to the IFC Vice Bar at SXSW, an event that didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go off without a hitch. The Brett Netson Band had to stop in the middle of its ďŹ rst song after the bass amp cut out. The batteries in Youth Lagoonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s beat machine died onstage and there was a painfully awkward pause as they were changed. Wardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guitar strap broke in what seemed like every single song. But the thing that stood out most clearly is that the show was packed. More than 200 were through the door at 7 p.m. for Hillfolk Noirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s set and hundreds more piled in as the evening progressed until there was barely room to move. Many of the attendees had the same story: They wanted to see Built to Spill and were afraid it would be full, so they came early and were pleasantly blown away. An audience member approached a member of Le Fleur and offered up a gig in Chapel Hill, N.C. A girl in the front row repeatedly shrieked â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love youâ&#x20AC;? at Powers. But most importantly, a young man approached Gilbert after Finn Riggins stepped off stage and said: â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew Idaho had a lot of whitewater, but I had no idea it had so many killer bands.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here,â&#x20AC;? Gilbert responded. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | 19

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Maybe eating dessert before bed is what keeps Mike Birbiglia sleepwalking?

Jazz saxophonist Rich Perry will keep it smooth at the Gene Harris Jazz Festival.

FRIDAY MARCH 23 funny

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY MARCH 21-22

MIKE BIRBIGLIA’S MY GIRLFRIEND’S BOYFRIEND TOUR

jazz THE GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL As if Boise does not have enough musical events going on this week, on top of the shiny new Treefort Music Fest, the old—yet beloved—Gene Harris Jazz Festival will take place at Boise State Wednesday, March 21-Thursday, March 22. This 15th installment of the annual jazz-palooza features jazz bassist Lynn Seaton and his trio as headliner. Seaton will perform in the Jordan Ballroom at 7 p.m. both evenings, and his second performance will feature collaborations with jazz saxophonist Rich Perry and the Boise State Jazz Ensemble. Seaton started playing bass at the ripe old age of 9, and since his young beginnings, he has gone on to perform with legendary jazz maestros including Woody Herman, the Count Basie Orchestra, Tony Bennett and George Shearing, among others. He’s performed on more than 100 records, including one Grammy winner and five nominees. He now teaches at the University of North Texas’ highly regarded jazz program, where his focus is jazz improvisation and tours and records with the popular Vanguard Jazz Orchestra, the Christian Finger Band and John Fedchock in the New York Big Band. Other Festival performers include the Boise Modern Jazz Ensemble and the winners of the Student Showcase competition. As always, the festival will put a big emphasis on jazz education, with clinics and workshops, student jam sessions and performances from various local high schools. Evening concerts: 6:15 p.m. doors, 7 p.m. concert, $15 per day. Workshop and competition schedules vary. Boise State Jordan Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, geneharris.org.

FRIDAY MARCH 23 glorious goggles CLOCKWORK CARNIVAL STEAMPUNK MASQUERADE BALL What’s that, you say?

You have no idea what the hell this steampunk thing is that the kiddos are talking about? Well, learn all about it at the Clockwork Carnival Steampunk Masquerade Ball at Liquid on Friday, March 23. Ready yourself for an evening of fortune tellers, dancers and music, not to mention some pretty freakin’

20 | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

sweet get-ups. Find a top hat, some golden goggles, a corset and a past-meetsfuture-meets-machine type ensemble and get ready to have an unusual, yet awesome night on the town. The evening will feature music from Lithium Dolls and DJ Bones. At midnight, punk/goth/steampunk aficionado Aurelio Voltaire

Mike Birbiglia doesn’t have a problem with intimate details, as anyone who’s heard his skit on his sleepwalking problem can attest to. He’s appeared on a book jacket and on posters in his pajamas, and now the comedian also wants to tell you about his girlfriend’s boyfriend at the Egyptian Theatre on Friday, March 23. What we don’t know about Birbiglia is when he finds time to sleep or sleepwalk—he’s one busy dude. You may have heard of his book/off-Broadway smash Sleepwalk With Me, which has since morphed into a film written, directed by and starring the 30-something funny man. The film became an official selection at the SXSW Film Festival, and was featured at the Sundance Film Festival. When he’s not earning accolades for plays, movies and books, Birbiglia makes people laugh. He has starred in three Comedy Central Presents specials, been a guest on nearly every late-night talk show, and is a frequent contributor to This American Life and the Bob and Tom Show. And now he’s on a national tour with his latest stand-up show, My Girlfriend’s Boyfriend, which bears the curios tagline “in the end, everyone makes out.” The show includes tales of Birbiglia’s romantic blunders and opened off-Broadway at the Barrow Street Theatre in New York City on March 18, 2011. After more than 80 performances, Birbiglia has taken his show on the road to more than 20 cities, including a stop in Boise. If you’re lucky, you could even win a pair of tickets on the Promo page at boiseweekly.com. 7 p.m., $35. The Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Hernandez will make his entrance. He’s somehow found time for a tour between making films, singing songs, writing books, delighting in diseased brain segments on the Discovery Channel’s show Oddities and making Fox News anchors uncomfortable. This is the second year Liquid has hosted the ball, and Liquid/Solid owner Jeremy Aevermann said roughly 300 people partied last year. Tickets are conveniently available at the Costume Shop, which is probably where you’ll need to go if

you plan to arrive in style. 10 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

MONDAYFRIDAY MARCH 26-30 kiddos SPRING BREAK ACTIVITIES Tired of hearing, “I’m

bored” every Spring Break? Treasure Valley parents hoping to avoid such complaints have plenty of options to keep their unoccupied adolescents busy. Kids age 5-12 can learn to ice skate with the pros at Idaho IceWorld. Even if the kids don’t find their hidden talent, they can still enjoy a week of skating, snacks, games and fun. The camp takes place from 8:30-11:30 a.m. daily and requires a single fee of $100. IceWorld is also hosting a hockey camp for ages 7-18. This competitive learning experience reWWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FIND

Spring is ready to bloom at the Boise Flower and Garden Show.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY MARCH 23-25

Fox Street All-Stars better bring their jackets to Sol Fest in Sun Valley.

pretty posies BOISE FLOWER AND GARDEN SHOW The City of Trees dispels the late-winter, early-spring blahs each year when the Boise Centre swings open its doors to the annual Flower and Garden Show. The 16th annual affair is scheduled for Friday, March 23-Sunday, March 25. Walking through the annual bloomfest usually provides a major rush of colors and aromas. Organizers told Boise Weekly that the 2012 edition has a “definite post-recession feel.” “We definitely have a lot more vendors compared to the last couple of years,” said Karen Siegle, the show’s producer. “A good deal more sellers are coming back to the show and that’s a great sign.” More than 90 vendors will line the aisles of the Boise Centre, featuring landscape designs, mini-greenhouses, yard and deck furniture and thousands of fresh flowers and plants. Siegle said this year’s showcase will feature a lobby garden designed by Franz Witte and two wine and jazz nights (Friday and Saturday) sponsored by BW. You can even win tickets to the event by checking out the Promo page at boiseweekly.com. “And every year, we usually unveil a few items that people have never seen before,” said Siegle. “I’m pretty excited about something that I just saw called the Tower Garden. It’s a stateof-the-art vertical aeroponic system that allows you to grow a tower of vegetables.” More than 20 new companies from throughout the Northwest will join Treasure Valley exhibitors. Zamzows is offering $3 discount coupons at any of its retail locations. Friday, March 23, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.; Saturday, March 24, 10 a.m.–8 p.m.; Sunday, March 25, 11 a.m.–5 p.m.; $8, $3 ages 12-17, FREE for children younger than 12. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., 208-336-8900, gardenshowboise.com. quires full hockey equipment along with a $125 fee. The camp will take place from 8:15-11:15 a.m daily. Register for either skate camp at idahoiceworld.com or by calling 208-331-0044. If your youngins are looking to get on the trails, they can try out a mountain biking camp. Children ages 9-12 take the early portion of the day from 9 a.m.-noon, while the 6- to 8-year-old set begins at 1 p.m. and

S U B M I T

ends its ride at 4 p.m., and meet at the Fort Boise Community Center. Cost is $63.50 for Boise residents or $97.88 for nonresidents. Register at cityofboise.org. The Spring Break Camp put on by the Wings Center includes swimming, a treasure hunt and rock climbing. Campers are split into age groups by grade, ranging from pre-kindergarten to eighth grade, and activities take place daily from 7 a.m.-

FRIDAY-SUNDAY MARCH 23-25 spring break SOL FEST As winter winds down, spring break can be prime skiing season—the weather is warmer, freeing snowboarders and skiers of those cumbersome heavy jackets, and college students actually have time to hit the slopes. The folks in Sun Valley know this, so they’re launching the inaugural Sol Fest spring celebration in partnership with the Sun Valley Resort. The bash runs from Friday, March 23-Sunday, March 25, and it will turn the entire resort into an end-of-winter party replete with libations, tunes and snow sports. The riotous fun will take place in bars, in the streets and on the mountain, with a family friendly event Sunday, March 25, featuring a Slide, Glide, Ride relay on Dollar Mountain. If your snow sports skills are more expert level than a slapdash race, the 511 Building in downtown Ketchum will host a rail jam for you to show off your tricks. The festival is designed to be a Spring Break escape, with Sun Valley Resort offering discounted package deals on lift passes and accommodations, including big deals for fulltime college students with valid ID. Music lovers can catch performances by Old Death Whisper, Bermuda Cowboys, Fox Street All Stars and a bunch more bands. Treefort Music Fest will even share talent with the event. The Sun Valley folks have borrowed Portland, Ore., indieAmericana band Blitzen Trapper. The rockers will headline a free show on Saturday, March 24 in the middle of Main Street in Ketchum. Put down the books and enjoy a weekend’s worth of music, sunshine and Idaho’s remaining bits of snow. Kick-off party Friday, March 23, 5 p.m., various times and locations. Check out visitsunvalley.com/events/solfest for times, prices and discounted lift ticket/lodging info.

6 p.m. Prices range from $34-$155. Visit wingscenter. com or call 208-376-3641 for more info and to register. Amateur actors can get dramatic at Boise Contemporary Theater. Kids ages 6-12 can take part in the Theater Lab Spring Break

RECORD PLACE MATS If you’ve always wanted to operate a turntable but you’re about as hip as an aging barfly trying to belt out Mariah Carey after too many mojitos at a karaoke bar, fret not. Now you can live out your record-spinning dreams without having to stay up until 3 a.m. with the cool kids, all while simultane$18.99 per set of two ously serving up tasty meals. mats, Record Exchange, Gamago’s record placemats gama-go.com add style and silliness to otherwise drab dinners. Not only do the mats carry a healthy dose of kitsch, they’re pretty darn practical, too. Made of silicon, the placemats can fit in the smallest of storage spaces, are dishwasher safe and virtually indestructible. They’ll make great gifts for those who lived through the analog era and encourage dinner-party guests to channel their inner DJs—especially after a few bottles of wine. But perhaps the best part of Gamago’s mats is the number of puns they inspire. With these stylish dining accessories, you can transform your table into a turntable, put a new spin on your favorite dishes, rock ’n’ dinner roll, remix your meals or, as the record-sleeve package suggests, “if you’re serving fish, be sure to turn up the bass.” —Sheree Whiteley

Camp, with classes taking place from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Participants can show off their new talents Friday, March 30, in a cumulative performance. The cost for the week is $250. Visit bctheater.org for more info and to register.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | 21

WEEK IN REVIEW TAR A M OR GAN

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY MARCH 21 Festivals & Events

It has been a banner year for Sun Valley with the premiere of SVFF.

SWOONED AND FESTOONED This week, Boise Weekly hit the road to soak in some out-of-town festivals. BW New Media Czar Josh Gross chronicled his journey down to Austin, Texas, for the Boise showcase at SXSW on March 14. (You can read more about that on Page 15). While in Austin, Gross also attended a number of music industry panels, including one that made the case that small markets, not high-profile big city performances, were the key to financial success for touring acts. “The money is better in small markets,” said Tim Drake, president of The Roots Agency. “There is a lower overhead. Not only can you build a career in small markets, you can make a better living.” Gross also attended Bruce Springsteen’s flowing half-hour keynote address on March 15 that was “part slam poetry, part personal history and part singalong.” According to Gross: “Springsteen expounded his opinion that pop music has fractured itself into endlessly exclusive sub-genres. He rattled off a list of them that sounded like the shrimp speech from the Tom Hanks film Forrest Gump that concluded with ‘Nintendo-core.’ Springsteen finished the keynote by saying, “So rumble, young musicians, rumble. Open your ears and open your hearts. Believe you are the badest ass in town, but doubt. It keeps you honest.” In a stroke of luck, Gross’ name was plucked from the proverbial hat to see Springsteen perform later that evening at the 2,700-capacity Moody Theater. According to Gross, “Springsteen strutted and crooned, climbed atop and leaped from a grand piano to rally the crowd. The man even stagedived. Three times.” Then things took an even swoonier turn: The Animals’ Eric Burdon, reggae legend Jimmy Cliff and Rage Against the Machine’s Tom Morello all joined Springsteen on stage. And for the show’s grand finale, Arcade Fire emerged to join the rest of the gang in a version of “This Land is Your Land” by Woody Guthrie. In a less musical but similarly star-studded event, Sun Valley hosted the inaugural Sun Valley Film Festival March 15-18. Though the town wasn’t noticeably overrun with festival attendees, there was still a palpable buzz as folks flashed their passes in line at the Magic Lantern Cinema and chatted excitedly about films in the Coffee Grinder. At the VIP Red Carpet party on March 16, Producer Heather Rae hob-nobbed with Magic Valley Writer/Director Jaffe Zinn at Ketchum’s Cornerstone Grill while a raucous crowd downed free Tito’s vodka drinks. Magic Valley’s sold out premiere at the snow-blanketed Sun Valley Opera House on March 17 was similarly packed. You can read more about the SVFF in Screen on Page 35. —Tara Morgan

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GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL—The 15th annual Gene Harris Jazz Festival will feature jazz bassist Lynn Seaton and his trio, saxophonist Rich Perry, the Boise State Jazz Ensemble and the Boise Modern Jazz Orchestra. Student winners from each day’s competitions also will perform. Adjudicated performances, jazz clinics, workshops and the popular student jam sessions will once again take place. Visit geneharris.org for more info. See Picks, Page 20. $15 daily all-event pass. Boise State Campus, 1910 University Drive, Boise.

On Stage ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD—The Boise State Theatre Arts Department presents its rendition of this absurdist play that follows two minor characters from William Shakespeare’s Hamlet. 7:30 p.m. $15; $12 seniors, Boise State alumni and non-Boise State students; FREE with valid Boise State ID. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208426-3980, theatre.boisestate. edu.

Talks & Lectures CANADA WEEK AT BOISE STATE: THE BORDER—Dr. Geoffrey Hale, associate professor of political science at the University of Lethbridge, will address the content and importance of the Beyond the Border agreement, explaining what Americans should know and why the agreement is important to understand. 2:30-4 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union, Simplot Grand Ballroom, 1910 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu.

Green CONTINUING EDUCATION: TREE AND SHRUB PRUNING BASICS—Certified arborist Dwight Allen will teach participants the basics of pruning, including tool selection and when to prune. Reference materials will also be provided. Pre-registration required. 7 p.m. $15, $10 IBG members. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. SELECTING AND PLANTING TREES—Learn how to pick the right trees and plant them correctly with the certified arborists of Boise Community Forestry. To register, send your name, email address and phone number to Community Forestry via email at forestryinfo@cityofboise.org or call 208-384-4083. 6-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Concerts BOISE ROCK SCHOOL END OF WINTER SESSION GIG—Enjoy the sounds of Boise Rock School’s bands, a special joint performance with students of the Idaho Shakespeare Festival School of Theater and the first-ever compilation of original music from BRS bands. Pie Hole pizza will be served and a full bar is available with ID. 4 p.m. $5 suggested donation. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

THURSDAY MARCH 22 Festivals & Events GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL—See Wednesday. $15 daily all-event pass. Boise State Campus, 1910 University Drive, Boise.

artist named Sonny to find his voice, discover true love and build the world’s first roller disco (but not necessarily in that order). Purchase dinner/show tickets at least one day in advance at kedproductions.org. Show-only tickets available online or at the door. 7 p.m. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

for more info and a complete schedule. See Picks, Page 21. Various times and locations, downtown Sun Valley.

On Stage COLLEGE OF IDAHO PLAY READING SERIES—The College of Idaho’s inaugural play reading series continues with August: Osage County, written by Tracy Letts and directed by C of I admissions counselor and theater instructor Will Fowler. Proceeds help the theater department travel to the 2012 Kennedy Center/American College Theatre Festival conference. 7:30 p.m. By donation. Langroise Recital Hall, 2112 Cleveland Blvd., College of Idaho campus, Caldwell, 208-459-5011.

FRIDAY MARCH 23 Festivals & Events BOISE FLOWER AND GARDEN SHOW—Shop the 16th annual show for the latest in landscape design, garden art and decor, yard furniture, plants, decks and more. Discount coupons for $3 off adult admission will be available at Zamzows. See Picks, Page 21. Visit promo. boiseweekly.com to win tickets to the show. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. $8 adults, $3 ages 13-17, FREE for children 12 and younger. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre. com.

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: RON OSBOURNE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. HAMLET—Boise State’s Theatre Arts Department presents this classic Shakespearian tale. Tickets available at idahotickets. com and Select-A-Seat outlets. For more info, visit theatrearts. boisestate.edu. A free ticket may be obtained at on-campus ticket offices with a valid Boise State ID. 7:30 p.m. $15; $12 nonBoise State students, alumni and seniors; FREE with valid Boise State ID. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208426-3980, theatre.boisestate. edu.

CLOCKWORK CARNIVAL STEAMPUNK MASQUERADE BALL—The second annual Steampunk Masquerade Ball features music by Voltaire, DJ Bones and Lithium Dolls along with gypsy fortune tellers and dancers. Tickets available at the Costume Shop. See Picks, Page 20. 9:30 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SHAYMA TASH—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

SOLFEST—Enjoy a spring break weekend filled with snow, sun and rock ‘n’ roll, featuring Blitzen Trapper. See visitsunvalley.com

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Calls to Artists BOSCO MEMBERSHIP APPLICATIONS—Boise Open Studios is accepting applications for membership. BOSCO is a volunteer group of professional artists that hosts a giant open studio weekend annually, in addition to various other activities. Visit boiseopenstudios.com, email bosco.membership@gmail.com or call Marianne at 208-8666306 for more info and to apply. Applications are due by Sunday, April 1. Boise Open Studios Collective Organization, 3527 S. Federal Way, Ste. 103, Boise, boiseopenstudios.com.

Literature SPRING AUTHOR SERIES—Aaron Patterson will discuss his writing process in the adult mystery, thriller and suspense and young adult fiction genres. Noon. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-5706900, boisepubliclibrary.com.

On Stage COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: RON OSBOURNE—Catch the comedic stylings of national headliner Ron Osbourne. 8 p.m. $4. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SHAYMA TASH—This installment of the Liquid Laughs comedy series also features Heath Harmison. Purchase tickets at liquidlaughs.com, 208941-2459 or at Liquid or Solid. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com. ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $15; $12 seniors, Boise State alumni and non-Boise State students; FREE with valid Boise State ID. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3980, theatre. boisestate.edu. XANADU—This musical follows the beautiful Kira, who travels to Earth to inspire a struggling

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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8 DAYS OUT MIKE BIRBIGLIA: MY GIRLFRIEND’S BOYFRIEND TOUR—The frequent This American Life contributor and star of three Comedy Central Presents specials brings his one-man show chronicling his romantic past and sure to include awkwardness to Boise. Visit birbigs.com for more info. Purchase tickets at Boise Co-op and the Record Exchange, charge by phone at 208-3871273, or the Egyptian Theatre Box Office. See Picks, Page 20. 7 p.m. $35. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net.

208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Kids & Teens IMPROVISATIONAL THEATER CLASS—Instructor Steven Zunich will offer classes in two sessions for children ages 6-8 and 9-12. Zunich has performed improv for years and studied at The Second City, one of the most well-respected improvisational theater companies in the world. Classes meet Friday afternoons for one hour for eight consecutive weeks. Register online at cityofboise.org/parks. Contact Clay Lee at clee@cityofboise.org or Zunich at stevenzunich@gmail. com for more info. $41 Boise residents, $63 nonresidents. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise, 208-384-4486, cityofboise.org/ parks.

XANADU—See Thursday. 6:30 p.m. dinner, 8 p.m. show. $15$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

SATURDAY MARCH 24 Festivals & Events BOISE FLOWER AND GARDEN SHOW—See Friday. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. $8 adults, $3 ages 13-17, FREE for children 12 and younger. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com. SOLFEST—Enjoy a spring break weekend filled with snow, sun and rock ‘n’ roll, featuring Blitzen Trapper. See visitsunvalley.com for more info and a complete schedule. See Picks, Page 21. Various times and locations, downtown Sun Valley.

On Stage

Literature

Odds & Ends

LITERATURE FOR LUNCH BOOK CLUB—This monthly book discussion group supported by the Boise State Department of English will look at 20th-century narratives about midlife. This month: Bliss by Peter Carey. For more information, contact English professors Carol Martin at carolmartin@boisestate.edu or Cheryl Hindrichs at cherylhindrichs@boisestate.edu. 12:10-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise,

BOISE ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY MESSIER MARATHON— Share the wonders of the night skies with the Boise Astronomical Society at the Eagle Cove Campground. For more info, email treasurer@boiseastro.org. 5 p.m. FREE, but regular State Park camping fees apply. Bruneau Dunes State Park, 27608 Sand Dunes Road, Mountain Home, 208-366-7919.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

COMEDY AT THE VARSITY: RON OSBOURNE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Varsity Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-906-0658, varsitypubmeridian.com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SHAYMA TASH—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. ROSENCRANTZ AND GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $15; $12 seniors, Boise State alumni and non-Boise State students; FREE with valid Boise State ID. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3980, theatre. boisestate.edu. XANADU—See Thursday. 6:30 p.m. dinner, 8 p.m. show. $15$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Auditions AUDITIONS FOR OPEN SPACE—The Open Space performance venue will hold auditions for actors, musicians, singers, etc. interesting in filling its 2012 calendar. By appointment only, call 208-841-8797 or email shelly@theopenspacevenue.com for scheduling. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. The Open Space, 12 N. Fisher Park Way in Eagle Island Crossing, Eagle, 208-938-6128, theopenspacevenue.com.

Concerts

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

BOISE PHILHARMONIC: GERMAN REQUIEM—This event features Boise Philharmonic Conductor Robert Franz with Mary Wilson and Grant Youngblood. Free conductor’s talk at 7 p.m. for all ticket holders. Visit boisephilharmonic.org for more info and tickets. 8 p.m. $25.50$76.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | 23

8 DAYS OUT Kids & Teens

ARTS/ART REVIEW

SPRING BREAK WITH BIRDS OF PREY—A discounted family admission price and special activities make this a great spring break destination. The Feathered Friends Experience will give visitors the chance to draw a live bird of prey. Sketching sessions held at 10 a.m., noon and 3 p.m., with prizes for top drawings. Kids can also enjoy a scavenger hunt, videos, live bird demonstrations and tours of the Archives of Falconry. $5 single, $20 for two adults, up to six kids. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-362-8687, peregrinefund.org.

SUNDAY MARCH 25 Festivals & Events BOISE FLOWER AND GARDEN SHOW—See Friday. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $8 adults, $3 ages 13-17, FREE for children 12 and younger. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com. MIRADA QUINCEANERA EXPO 2012—Cruise a variety of quinceanera and wedding vendors and enjoy a fashion show at 1:30 p.m. and 5 p.m. The Miss Mirada Cover Girl will be selected and featured on the April issue of Mirada Magazine. Noon-6 p.m. FREE. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. SOLFEST—Enjoy a spring break weekend filled with snow, sun and rock ‘n’ roll, featuring Blitzen Trapper. See visitsunvalley.com for more info and a complete schedule. See Picks, Page 21. Various times and locations, downtown Sun Valley.

On Stage HAMLET—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $15; $12 non-Boise State students, alumni and seniors; FREE with valid Boise State ID. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3980, theatre. boisestate.edu. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW: SHAYMA TASH—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $8. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Kids & Teens SPRING BREAK WITH BIRDS OF PREY—See Saturday. $5 single; $20 for two adults, up to six kids. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-362-8687, peregrinefund.org.

24 | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Raymond Pettibon’s work celebrates the glory days of punk.

PUNK MEMORIES: RAYMOND PETTIBON AT BOISE STATE Raymond Pettibon: The Punk Years, 1978-1986, is a trip down memor y lane to a specific time and place in American post-Vietnam pop culture. The Southern California punk-rock scene, centered in Los Angeles, owes a good part of its notoriety (and following) to the graphic, illustrative efforts of artist Pettibon, patron saint of seminal punk bands like Black Flag. It was a singular merging of malaise-fueled musical and visual expression in which attitude trumped aesthetics. This touring exhibit, on display at Boise State’s Visual Arts Center through Wednesday, March 28, underscores how Pettibon deser ves the credit. Given the diversity and scale of the 200 works, a conventional line-up exhibit format would have proven too fast-paced. Instead, Gallery Director Kirsten Furlong cleverly created four large clusters of his work, tightly bunching together fliers, stickers, 45s and album covers, artist books and posters as they might be displayed in a fan’s bedroom, or on the front windows of Neurolux. Each group is a mix of the above, with larger, more colorful pieces anchoring the center. It forces the viewer to spend time discovering the numerous gems buried within while coming face-to-face with the general helter-skelter ambience of the scene. The majority of the work in the show is in good shape, not faded or too beat up, but still bold and authentic—the fliers still sport the pinholes from public postings. One reason they have held up is that most are not photocopies but offset printed and screenprinted productions, which is pretty remarkable for a subculture cottage industr y. The only disappointment is the audience’s inability to investigate the interiors of the books. Pettibon worked in pen and ink, and his dark insistence is epitomized in the Black Flag name and logo, which is ever ywhere in the show. The explicit, depraved, often-violent imager y strikes one as movie stills from “B” horror films or porn flicks. Many could be low-budget film noir advertisements. The influence of these film genres is undeniable when seen in the flesh. It is worth taking your time with each group in the exhibit. Hidden among the Black Flag overload are less-intense, but edgily entertaining vignettes, like the Minutemen single and album called Paranoid Time, whose Oriental stereotypes are actually quite funny. Pettibon’s flier The Circle Jerks at the Fleetwood is a nice nod to R. Crumb. Evidence of Pettibon’s fascination with Charles Manson can be found, as well, with Manson depicted in the company of his female followers, who carve his trademark X into each others’ foreheads, or literally nail him to a cross (see Black Flag at the Starwood [Christ]). Curiously, Pettibon signs the Manson pieces “St. Pettibon” as if bonding with Manson’s perverted sense of sainthood. —Christopher Schnoor WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

MUSIC FEST

T R O F E E R T 20

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o, you made it to Boise with a duffel bag stuffed with undies, a pair of jeans, a Moleskin notebook and a carton of American Spirits. But wait just one minute before striking that match, friend. Do you know where itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s legal to light up in Boise? Or where to ďŹ nd a quiet coffeeshop to journal all your Treefort exploits? Or where to procure another pair of pants should you wake up in your skivvies? We do. And weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re happy to share. This is Boise Weeklyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s truncated guide to everything you need to know about the City of Trees: To begin, here are some fun local semantic factoids: Natives insist the town is pronounced Boi-See not Boi-Zee. Fun fact No. 2: All jokes involving Idaho and potatoes are dumb. So is the phrase, â&#x20AC;&#x153;No, Udaho.â&#x20AC;? In fact, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to place a moratorium on any insult gleaned from an Urban OutďŹ tters T-shirt.

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THURSDAY, MARCH 22 - SUNDAY, MARCH 25, 2012

10 P.M. – 10:40 P.M.

3:30 P.M. – 4:10 P.M.

11:30 P.M. – 12:30 A.M.

SHADES

WILD ONES

BRETT NETSON BAND

11 P.M. – 11:40 P.M.

4:40 P.M. – 5:20 P.M.

12:50 A.M. – 1:30 A.M.

FLASHLIGHTS

THE JOHN STEEL SINGERS

MICROBABIES

MIDNIGHT – 12:50 A.M.

5:50 P.M. – 6:30 P.M.

BIG UPS

MWAHAHA

LINEN BUILDING

1 A.M. – 1:50 A.M.

7 P.M. – 7:40 P.M.

5 P.M. – 5:40 P.M.

ARAABMUZIK

TENNIS

LOST LANDER

2 A.M. – 2:50 A.M.

8:15 P.M. – 9:45 P.M.

6 P.M. – 6:40 P.M.

ZACKLANDER

OF MONTREAL

FIRST BORNS

3 A.M. – 3:50 A.M.

REFLEKTION

NEUROLUX

7 P.M. – 7:40 P.M.

ART FAD

6 P.M. – 6:40 P.M.

8 P.M. – 8:40 P.M.

SAUNA

5 P.M. – 5:40 P.M.

STORIE GRUBB & THE HOLY WARS

HOLLOW WOOD

7 P.M. – 7:40 P.M.

THE SHIVAS

THE CRUX 6 P.M. – 6:40 P.M.

LEARNING TEAM

SOLOMON’S HOLLOW

8 P.M. – 8:40 P.M.

9 P.M. – 9:40 P.M. 10 P.M. – 10:40 P.M.

7 P.M. – 7:40 P.M.

DEATH SONGS

KOKO & THE SWEETMEATS

THE ARCHER’S APPLE

9 P.M. – 9:40 P.M.

11 P.M. – MIDNIGHT

8 P.M. – 8:40 P.M.

MOTOPONY

BLASTED CANYONS

THE BARE BONES

10 P.M. – 11:15 P.M.

9 P.M. – 9:40 P.M.

THE CAVE SINGERS

THE CRUX

HAPPY NOOSE

11:30 P.M. – 12:20 A.M.

6 P.M. – 6:40PM

10 P.M. – 10:40 P.M.

LERK

SUN BLOOD STORIES

NIGHT GENES

12:30 A.M. – 1:45 A.M.

7 P.M. – 7:40 P.M.

PAT BENOLKIN

RUN ON SENTENCE

11 P.M. – 11:40 P.M.

MICKEY THE JUMP

8 P.M. – 8:40 P.M.

MIDNIGHT – 1 A.M.

THE RED ROOM

A SEASONAL DISGUISE

6 P.M. – 6:40 P.M.

9 P.M. – 9:40 P.M.

DARK SWALLOWS

ROMPER

7 P.M. – 7:40 P.M.

10 P.M. – 10:40 P.M.

CERBERUS REX

SPELL TALK

8 P.M. – 8:40 P.M.

11 P.M. – MIDNIGHT

DOWNSIDED

MAX PAIN & THE GROOVIES

SUNDAY, MARCH 25 MAIN STAGE 2:20 P.M. – 3 P.M.

ATOMIC MAMA

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

9 P.M. – 9:40 P.M.

BLACKCLOUD

UINTAHS

MAP MAIN STAGE 1 1201 W. GROVE ST.

LINEN BUILDING 5 1402 W. GROVE ST.

NEUROLUX 2 113 N. 11TH ST.

6

1010 W. MAIN ST.

THE RED ROOM 3 1519 W. MAIN ST.

7

1109 W. MAIN ST.

THE REEF 4 105 S. SIXTH ST.

THE CRUX 8 1022 W. MAIN ST.

THE BOUQUET OWYHEE PLAZA

10:10 P.M. – 11:10 P.M.

WOLVSERPENT

BOISEweekly | TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2012 | 5

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Boise is full of lush green spaces, and unlike Portland, Ore., you can stretch out without sinking into a swamp of damp, muddy grass. Also, you can tip one back while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at it, just keep outside the 250 foot riverbank zone and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be crass and drink from glass. Nearby parks include:

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DRIVER the ďŹ rst hour and $2.50 per hour after that. There are also some patches of free twohour parking littered around the outskirts of downtown and the Linen District. And you can ďŹ nd free street parking in the neighborhoods bordering downtown, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re up for a stroll.

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re looking for places to park your beat-up van downtown, metered street parking is free for the ďŹ rst 20 minutes if you push the tiny button or 25 cents for ever y 15 minutes after that from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., Monday-Friday. Parking garages are free for

,({2(.Â&#x160;+{'(-{ Take too many pulls off your pocket buddy to drive back to the pull-out couch youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re calling home this weekend? Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got cabs. Lots of â&#x20AC;&#x2122;em. In fact, there are currently 70 licensed taxi companies in Boise, which means weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got niche ďŹ&#x201A;eets like the â&#x20AC;&#x153;always rollinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Chronic Cab company.

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Though all Treefort venues are walking distance from one another, with around 140 acts, festival attendees are guaranteed to encounter some scheduling conďŹ&#x201A;icts. But if arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t down for sprints between sets with a belly full of microbrews, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in luckâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Boise is a great place to ride a bike. Here are a few things to know if you plan on cycling: UĂ&#x160;/Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;iiĂ&#x160;>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Street in between Main and Idaho streets. UĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Â?i}>Â?Â?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;}Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160; at least 3 feet of passing distance but that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mean they will. If you prefer to be safe use the bike lanes on Grove Street, which run the whole length of the Treefort strip. UĂ&#x160;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;}iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;y>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;ii`Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;iÂ?Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; your bike repaired, the closest shop is Idaho

6 | TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2012 | BOISEweekly

Mountain Touring at 1310 W. Main St. Or head across the river to the Boise Bicycle Project at 1027 S. Lusk St., where a team of mechanics will help you repair your bike for far less. UĂ&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;ivĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;iÂŤÂ&#x2C6;`iÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;`Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;town Boise, but as with all things, the potential for stupid increases dramatically when you factor in hundreds and hundreds of drunks. So use a lock. UĂ&#x160;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;>Â?Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;ÂŤi>VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;`Â&#x2C6;`Â&#x2DC;½Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; bring a bike with you, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t worry. You can rent one from Bikes 2 Boards at 3525 W. State St., or Idaho Mountain Touring, which is offering free bike rentals to bands performing at Treefort. Also, if you are staying at The Modern Hotel or Boise Guest House, both have a selection of bicycles for guests.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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Did you dance your pants off at an afterpar ty after an afterhours DJ set? If the harsh light of midday makes you grimace at the grime on your get-up, you can get some new duds without cutting into your drinking fund at any of these inexpensive downtown stores. And if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re searching for new pants because you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t remember whose bed your old pair is balled up under, A.L.P.H.A. also offers free STD testing.

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CAFFEINE

Speaking of free, most downtown coffeeshops offer free Wi-Fi with a purchase of some sort. Here are some of our faves:

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You rolled into town all stoked to rock the bejesus out of Treefort only to discover that a piece of heavy equipment shifted during your drive and wrecked a piece of fragile equipment. Well, fret notâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Boise has plenty of music supply stores to keep you in guitar strings and ampliďŹ er tubes: UĂ&#x160;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;`Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;½Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;`Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;i>`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;Â?iĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Music on Capitol Boulevard and Broad Street, just a few blocks from the Treefort strip. It specializes more in orchestral instruments than rock but has an ample selection of basics like strings, drums sticks and patch cables.

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UĂ&#x160;Â?Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;`Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;i`]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;,Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160; Guitars at 515 W. Main St. UĂ&#x160;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;ii`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂŤÂ?>ViĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;ÂŤiVÂ&#x2C6;wVĂ&#x160;ÂŤi`>Â?Ă&#x160; or keyboard or drum head, there is a Guitar Center at 5761 W. Fair view Ave., which is a ďŹ ve-minute straight shot out of downtown. UĂ&#x160;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;ii`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x152;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂŤ>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; to browse a selection of vintage instruments, head to Gigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Music at 611 N. Orchard St. Another good supply of strange and vintage instruments is available at Doyleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Music on 1747 W. Broadway Ave.

TREEFORT

Your ears are ringing, your liver is writing its congressman and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve sworn off live music for the rest of your life. Where can you go to get away from all the racket? Here are some of Boiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best quiet respites: UĂ&#x160;/Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;*Ă&#x2022;LÂ?Â&#x2C6;VĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;LĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x20AC; Ă&#x17E;tĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;ÂŁxĂ&#x160;-°Ă&#x160; Capitol Blvd. Wanna know whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up with the exclamation point? Ask John Oliver. UĂ&#x160;`>Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160; >ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;ääĂ&#x160;7°Ă&#x160;ivviĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160; St. Chill out undaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; the rotunda and clandestinely play the spot-a-Republican drinking

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#/

game. Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be sauced in no time. UĂ&#x160;i>`Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;`Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;LÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Â?Â&#x2C6;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160; Trip Taylor at 210 N. 10th St., Rediscovered Bookshop at 180 N. Eighth St., or Hyde Park Books at 1507 N. 13th St. UĂ&#x160;/>Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x17D;i°Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;`i`Ă&#x160;LĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160; rolling foothills that offer lovely panoramas of the valley. Visit ridgetorivers.org for up-todate info on accessible trails. UĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x2026;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;VÂ&#x2026;°Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;i`Ă&#x20AC;>Â?Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; 775 N. Eighth St. is a stained glass haven.

BOISEweekly | TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2012 | 7

8 | TREEFORT MUSIC FEST 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT MONDAY MARCH 26 Literature STORY STORY NIGHT—This installment of Story Story Night features tales on the theme of Betrayed: Stories of Et Tu, Brute. Visit storystorynight.org for more info and advance ticket sales. 7 p.m. $5. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483, parklaneco.com/roseroom.

Kids & Teens

THEATER LAB SPRING BREAK CAMP FOR KIDS—Children ages 6-12 will learn about acting and play-making during this five-day workshop, which concludes with a performance at 5:30 p.m. on Friday, March 30. See Picks, Page 20. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $250, scholarships available. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

TUESDAY MARCH 27 Concerts MUSIC FOR THE CURE—Miss Idaho USA 2012, Nightology Entertainment and Idaho Central Credit Union have teamed up to help fight breast cancer. Hosted by Rick Moorten of Wild 101, the evening features performances by Shwayze Cisco Adler, Dunson, Silver Medallion, Boise musicians Marcus Eaton, James Orr and Soul Serene. 6-11:30 p.m. $25. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

Citizen ADA COUNTY DEMS LEGISLATIVE LUNCH—Join Idaho’s Democratic legislators to talk about what’s happening in the Legislature. Featuring Rep. Grant Burgoyne and Sen. Les Bock. Tickets available at the door or online at secure.actblue.com/ page/2012leg.lunch. RSVP at 208-331-2128 by Friday, March 23. 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. $15. Berryhill & Co. Restaurant, 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3873553, berryhillandco.com.

IT’S GREAT TO SKATE SPRING BREAK CAMP—Boys and girls 5-12 years old may participate in this beginning skate camp held Monday, March 26-Friday, March 30 from 8:30-11:30 a.m. Fee includes skate rental, instruction, games and snacks. Register by phone or via the website. See Picks Page 20. 8:30-11:30 a.m. $100. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-331-0044, idahoiceworld.com. JR. NATURALIST CERTIFICATION PROGRAM—New program for fourth-, fifth- and sixth-graders designed to stimulate children’s natural curiosity and sense of wonder, to help them learn about their natural environment and to become stewards of the Earth. It will be held over spring break, Monday, March 26-Friday, March 30, or after school on Mondays, from April 2-30. Contact Sara Focht at 208-287-2906 or sara. focht@idfg.idaho.gov for registration information. $75. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-334-2225, fishandgame.idaho.gov. KID CLIMBER—This introductory class is designed to teach the young climber ages 6-13 and their parent(s) the basics of safe climbing. A parent must participate in the class with their child. Fee includes both parent and child. 5-6:30 p.m. $15-$17. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. SPRING BREAK ART CAMP—Kids ages 6-12 will use Crayola Model Magic to sculpt a whole zoo full of animals and water-loving creatures. Learn interesting facts about animals, as well as how to use various tools to shape, texture and build your new friends. Dress for a mess, just in case. Additional days available for an extra $43. $62-$67. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. SPRING BREAK CAMP—Get tropical at Spring Break Camp with activities, including swimming, an island facts quiz show, treasure hunt, inflatables, Planet Kid playground, cliff climbing in the rock gym, team building, build-your-own pizza and Phillippi Park fun day. Monday, March 26-Friday, March 30. See Picks, Page 20. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. $155 for five days, $34/day with a two-day minimum. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, wingscenter.com. SPRING BREAK COLOR EXPLOSION ART CAMP— Children in first through fifth grades may attend this spring break art camp, which will involve lessons about the color wheel, tints, shades and color symbolism. Times vary per grade. Visit the website for more info. $65, $50 center members. Sun Valley Center for Arts—Hailey, 314 Second Ave. S., Hailey, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. SPRING BREAK HOCKEY CAMP—Boys and girls ages 7-18 years may participate in this hockey camp, which covers stick handling, power skating, edge work and passing. Camp takes place Monday, March 26-Friday, March 30 from 8:15-11:15 a.m. Full hockey equipment required. For more info, contact Jeremy Mylymok at jmylymok@cityofboise.org or 208-331-0044. See Picks, Page 20. 8:15-11:15 a.m. $125. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-331-0044, idahoiceworld.com. SPRING BREAK PROGRAMS—Drop in to these fun all-ages programs offered on school break days. Day-care groups, home schools and moms’ clubs welcome. No pre-registration required. FREE. Boise Watershed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-4891284, cityofboise.org/bee/watershed. SPRING BREAK WITH BIRDS OF PREY—See Saturday. $5 single; $20 for two adults, up to six kids. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-362-8687, peregrinefund.org.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | 25

8 DAYS OUT Kids & Teens SPRING BREAK ART CAMP— See Monday. $62-$67. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-4685858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. SPRING BREAK CAMP—See Monday. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. $155 for five days, $34/day with a two-day minimum. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, wingscenter. com. SPRING BREAK WITH BIRDS OF PREY—See Saturday. $5 single; $20 for two adults, up to six kids. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-362-8687, peregrinefund.org.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 28 Green PESTS AND PROBLEMS OF TREES—Learn how to identify and combat things that hurt your trees. To register, send your name, email address and phone number to Community Forestry via email at forestryinfo@cityofboise.org or call 208-384-4083. 6-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Kids & Teens SPRING BREAK ARCHERY— Children ages 7 and older can drop in and try archery. An instructor will be on hand, and a limited amount of equipment will be available, or bring your own. 10 a.m.-noon. $2. Nampa Bow Chiefs Indoor Range and Meeting Room, 222 W. Railroad St., Nampa, 208-466-4374, idahoarchery.com/nbc. SPRING BREAK ART CAMP— See Monday. $62-$67. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-4685858, nampaparksandrecreation.org. SPRING BREAK CAMP—See Monday. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. $155 for five days, $34/day with a two-day minimum. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, wingscenter. com. SPRING BREAK WITH BIRDS OF PREY—See Saturday. $5 single; $20 for two adults, up to six kids. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-362-8687, www.peregrinefund.org.

Odds & Ends WOMEN’S GARAGE PARTY— The spring Harley-Davidson Women’s Garage Party features Sunshine Gillett, Idaho STAR Program training manager, raffle drawings, snacks and drinks. 6:30 p.m. FREE. High Desert Harley-Davidson, 2310 Cinema Drive, Meridian, 208-338-5599, highdeserthd.com.

26 | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

ARTS/BOOK REVIEW LOW-BUDGET ROCKSTAR Thanks to file sharing, the days of musicians making rent by selling albums are quickly fading in the rearview mirror. There are other sources of revenue but the new media environment can make them trickier to search out, as the impetus is now on the musicians—whose specialty is making music, not marketing— instead of the record labels who previously did that legwork. Low-Budget Rockstar, a new book by independent touring musician Scott Ibex, aims to point artists in the right directions to make money on their own. To do so, it starts at the beginning. And don’t be confused about the severity of the term “the beginning.” The first opening sections of the how-to guide are devoted to things like making sure your instruments work and showing up on time. The following chapter is on how to set up a home office, including suggestions on calling plans and laser printers. This sort of stuff could easily be wrapped under the title, “Becoming a Musician for Dummies.” One would hope that people who can’t figure out that they should have extra strings and make sure their amps turn on aren’t likely to make it as musicians, anyhow. But dummies do buy books on how not to be dummies. The more interesting sections on more-complex topics come later in the book. Ibex, who has a degree from Whittier Law School, discusses issues like contracts and riders, and what sorts of insurance are worth considering. He offers his own as samples to work from. Those are the sorts of complex details musicians are notorious for avoiding outright and regretting later. Still, in many ways, the book is less a how-to guide than it is a checklist, as so much of what is covered should be obvious. Aside from having something to sell, the choice to put all of this information in a book instead of an app is somewhat curious. Once a book is printed, it is static. And so much of what is covered in Low-Budget Rockstar changes daily, as new websites and technologies emerge. Even the space-saving equipment section can become quickly dated. Ibex discusses the usefulness of roof racks for schlepping gear, but I once saw a band that toured with only a midi-controller plugged into an iPhone, a setup small enough that a Big Wheel could have served as the tour vehicle. Much of what is contained in Low-Budget Rockstar might work better as a smartphone app that bands could access from the road to get specific connections to specific needs as they arise. But the book does serve as an ink-and-paper primer on a wide variety of topics musicians are likely to face if they try to pursue their art as a career. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NOISE/TREEFORT NOISE DAVE S C HENK ER

SCENE CHANGE How The Crazy Horse evolved into Red Room ANDREW CRISP

Far from the chaos of Sixth and Main streets, wedged between a locksmith’s shop and a design firm, stands a two-story building in which the Boise music scene has thrived for more than a decade. Local musician Matt Hunter fondly recalls a show at the location’s first iteration—The Crazy Horse. “It was Assorted Jelly Beans and Guttermouth,” said Hunter. “We were drinking in the parking lot, so later I bought a 12-inch record and didn’t even have a record player.” Skyler Durton, Jen Kniss and Peter Schott prove that Bass Matters at Red Room. The Crazy Horse was Boise’s mecca for the punk scene before 2000. Mohawked of the venue isn’t easy. From 1991 to 1994, the space’s all-inclusive booking. Up until teens wore jean jackets as bishop’s robes, the venue became the jam band-heavy Terit was The Crazy Horse, then it became imbibing cheap beer or pulling from flasks rapin Station in 2005, it was not uncomJ.D. and Friends until Terrapin Station as an illicit sacrament before entering the mon for hip-hop shows or neon-heavy opened in 2005. In 2010, Terrapin shut its papal space. dance sets to follow sweaty punk shows. doors and the Red Room moved in early “It was the first venue I ever stage-dived “It seemed like a place where people 2011. While everyone agrees that the Crazy at, which was fun,” said showgoer Peter Horse existed years and hundreds of cans of from those scenes could go and not be Schott. “They had just really super-awePabst ago, memories are hazy regarding the judged. It was kind of punk-dominated, but some shows. Like the Dirt Fisherman, Built very open at the same time,” said Schott. specific details. to Spill I saw there, Sublime, Black Cathy, But as the scene grew larger, Boise The space hosted hundreds of bands stuff like that.” started to crack down on the all-ages aspect during its years: Swinging Utters, Youth Schott was one of the punk kids who of the venue, despite a chain-link fence crowded into the The Crazy Horse between Brigade, The Misfits, Prong, The Business erected to cage off the bar during the J.D. 1991 and 1994, the walls even then doused and more. and Friends era. “A zillion touring bands played there, in a bright shade of red. “There was a lot of underage drinking like Built to Spill’s first Boise show and a “It was hard to see anything—sweaty, outside the bar; kids coming to the show few others that ended up becoming real smoky, bad circulation,” said Schott. popular like Green Day,” said Allen Ireland, drunk,” said Hunter. “That’s the problem In 2011, the Red Room relocated from with J.D. and Friends. Every story is going owner of Neurolux and former owner of its Sixth Street home to its current location to implicate somebody in something illegal.” The Crazy Horse. after Terrapin Station closed its doors. The Perhaps that’s why J.D. and Friends The lingering rumors of greats who building’s exterior is still dumpy looking didn’t last, Hunter speculated. played there also make up an exhaustive and garishly painted. The top floor is a tat“I suspect that the city got wind of what list: Korn, Black Flag, 2 Live Crew, Subtoo parlor, the bottom a venue. was going down, and they thought it was a lime, The Flaming Lips. Schott, Hunter and thousands of others lot worse than it was,” said Hunter. “But, “It’s crazy to me how many bands who made the pilgrimage to the innocuous corI mean, they were telling punk rockers esmade something of themselves started ner of 16th and Main streets over the years sentially not to do punk-rock shit.” there,” said Schott. to catch everything from punk sets to hipMost agree with Hunter. They look back But perhaps most famously, Boiseans hop shows, and later colorful neon dance on their years in the space with a sigh-heavy claim that Nirvana played parties. From The Crazy reverence. Years later, Schott’s memory The Crazy Horse in its early Horse days on, the spot has at times is just blurs of the place, tagging touring days. The Neurolux always been home to music. RED ROOM along with his older sister and girlfriend for Message Board keeps the “I can’t think of a single 1519 W. Main St. his first concerts. Nirvana debate alive, relying other venue back in the day redroomboise.com “It was very, very, very loud. Extraordion burnt-out memories and that played good music narily loud. I don’t know if it was just being old show posters. shows. All my very favorite a kid or what, I just remember this was the “It was a long time ago bands back then just played loudest anything had ever been,” he said. and it might take me a while to search specifically there,” said Schott. For Schott, his new role managing the through my brain for your answers,” said Now Schott is part of Bass Matters, the shows at Red Room is close to his heart. Ireland. crew that stepped in to organize booking He’s tasked with integrating the past and After some reflection, Ireland said he’s for the Red Room in late February. present into what is now the Red Room. sure that Nirvana never played The Crazy “We’re trying to remember The Crazy “We’re just trying try to implement that Horse—it canceled. The band did, however, Horse, because that’s really the heart of open-minded, gritty, fun vibe that they used play at a different Boise venue, The Zoo, where the Red Room started. Everybody which was located at the corner of 12th and to have,” Schott said. “So that we can kind knows about it, from old-school to newof slowly transform it back to something that Front streets. school people,” said Schott. Hunter and others also made mention of was as legendary as The Crazy Horse.” Nailing down the exact dates and details WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THE MUSIC ISSUE Welcome to Boise, Treefortians. We’re psyched to have you. In honor of the caravan of musicians and fans that will be snaking into the Gem State for the Treefort Music Fest this week, we’ve decided to crown this our official Music Issue. In the following pages, you’ll find the history of one of Boise’s most-storied venues (this page), a guide to Treefort bands not to miss (Pages 28-31), an interview with Of Montreal’s Kevin Barnes (Page 32) and a guide to local bands to check out at Treefort (Page 32). And to top it off, we’ve also got a feature on the rise of the Boise music scene from Rotating Tongues through the recent Boise showcase at SXSW (Page 15). But if all this music-related awesomeness has your ears ringing, here are a few official Treefort happenings that are only loosely music related. On Saturday, March 24, and Sunday, March 25, Treefort will host a series of music industry panels at the Watercooler, at 14th and Idaho streets in the Linen District. The first talk, Music Journalism: Does it Still Exist?, goes down March 24 at 1:30 p.m. and features Boise Weekly New Media Czar Josh Gross, Idaho Statesman Entertainment Editor Michael Deeds, Seattle photographer Alex Crick and Editor of the Seattle music blog Sound on Sound, Josh Lovseth. At 2:30 p.m., a panel will explore social media and search engine optimization in How to Market Your Music Online. On March 25 at 1:30 p.m., you can check out a panel on DIY Touring, which features Finn Riggins’ Eric Gilbert alongside Typhoon’s Pieter Hilton, The Shivas’ Jared Wait-Molyneux, Neurolux’s Allen Ireland and the Visual Arts Collective’s Sam Stimpert. Finally, at 2:30 p.m., Keep It Legal will discuss safeguarding your rights and creative property with Gilbert, attorney and producer Art Hodge, new media lawyer Lisa McGrath and Radio Boise Music Director Kevin Moran. And if you need a break from both listening to and discussing music, don’t miss an array of free performance art happenings taking place at the Linen Building. “I think it’s a diverse, accessible and challenging group of artists, and that it will be a great ancillary activity to all of the rocking out that will be happening,” said organizer Elizabeth McSurdy. On March 24, you can catch the family friendly Tromping in the Treefort, featuring Open Arms Dance Project from 1:30-1:50 p.m., Off Center Dance from 1:55-2:30 p.m. and Balance Dance Company and Certified Rebellion from 2:40-3 p.m. On March 25, from 1:30-1:50 p.m., don’t miss Bronwyn Leslie’s interpretive movement and highfashion piece Evolution of Eyelash, which will be followed by performance art gallery installations from 1:50-4 p.m., featuring McSurdy and Catie Young’s Heimlich, Peter Max Lawrence’s Stations of the Loss, and work from artists Matt Truslow, Christopher Hunt and John Shinn. —Tara Morgan

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NOISE/TREEFORT BANDS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS

THURSDAY

BUSTER BLUE The Bouquet 9-9:40 p.m. WOODSMAN Neurolux 8-8:40 p.m. Denver-based psych quartet Woodsman has two drummers and two guitarists, all of whom create a sound that would fit perfectly in a late ’60s acid trip. The songs usually start from a place of calm meditation and then bubble up into lines of weaving, heady guitar with sturdy tribal drum rhythms that catapult the threedimensional tapestries forward. It’s often unclear whether the band is following a template or letting the music flow naturally. Occasionally the songs meander, but more commonly they build into trance-inducing psychedelic sections of blipping electronic noises, shamanistic drum beats and spiraling guitars. Think Animal Collective circa 20032005 but with more nature and less big city.

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Reno, Nev.’s Buster Blue is something of a speakeasy marching band. And not just because the dapper, vest-clad fivesome weaves sax, accordion, drums and megaphone chants into its raucous live shows. The group also tours tirelessly, marching into towns big and small up and down the West Coast, making friends and winning fans with its feverish, front-porch-stomping folk. And Buster Blue is no stranger to Boise. The band has busted out the buckets and chains and belted out Gothic-laced lyrics at floor-warping house shows and legit venues across the City of Trees.

DINOSAUR FEATHERS Red Room 11-11:40 p.m.

SALLIE FORD AND THE SOUND OUTSIDE Linen Building 11 p.m.-midnight

Though it features both surfer rock guitar and synth percussion, Brooklyn, N.Y.’s Dinosaur Feathers bears no vestigial instrumental elements. The band’s sound evolves from track to track with influences ranging from Paul McCartney to Animal Collective. The band is informed by a love of classic rock. Its debut album, Fantasy Memorial, is a culmination of online releases and hype the gang garnered playing shows in the New York City area. With an energetic vibe reminiscent of the Bee Gees, the track “Body Parts—Doing Things” is all good times dancin’ disco and the funky bass lines and synth beats ser ve that aim.

Sallie Ford is the definition of anachronism. The Portland, Ore.-based singer sports ’60s garb while banging out ’40s-style tunes on instruments from the ’70s making heavy use of ’90s cynicism toward modern pop. Her ode to the failings of commercial radio, “I Swear,” asks,“What have these people done to music?” in a nasal whine similar to the yodeling trills that used to dominate country music. It isn’t grandiose to call her band The Sound Outside. And yet, Ford is hardly an outsider. She performed on Late Night with David Letterman and will play a string of dates supporting rockabilly legend Wanda Jackson. Not too shabby.

MR. GNOME, Red Room, midnight-1 a.m. Husband-and-wife duo Mr. Gnome has figured out the delicate balance between whisper and wail. Singer and guitarist Nicole Barille lets loose a teeter-totter of ethereal coos and banshee screams, matched by equally mercurial guitar strums and wild shredding. Drummer Sam Meister backs Barille’s finely curated chaos with thunderous precision. The song “Bit of Tongue” off the Cleveland duo’s latest full length, Madness in Miniature, is perhaps the best example of this balancing act. The first half of the track is filled with breathy indie pop la-la-las, before squealing feedback signals the beginning of the distortion-filled, drumcrashing end.

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OWYHEE PLAZA TREEFORT AFTER-PARTY

TREEFORT/NOISE BANDS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS

FRIDAY WHY?, Main Stage, 8:30-10 p.m. The Berkeley, Calif., band WHY? is largely driven by the disturbed mind of frontman Jonathan “Yoni” Wolf, a fast-talking singer whose unemotional monotone conveys heavy lyrics involving death, sex and perversion. Other band members use guitars and synthesizers to craft the catchy pop. 2008’s Alopecia cemented WHY? as part of a genre-bending scene that blends indie rock and alternative hip-hop. From “Jerking off in an art museum john ’til my dick hurts” on “Good Friday,” to “Inhaling crushed bones through a dried up White-Out pen” on “Crushed Bones,” Wolf’s delightfully morose lyrics are laid atop reverent indie rock to make the songs stick. His delivery resembles the pace of rap, but with digital trickery, his voice can lapse into catchy choruses impossible to forget.

MOZAM, Linen Building, 9-9:40 p.m. Local space funk duo Mozam released an album last year on Barnowl Records called Creme de la Kremlin. It’s six songs of chilled-out electro with lots of exotic island flavors. Live, the band mixes it up a bit with faster with heavier beats taking its ambient jams out of the bedroom and transforming them into something more suitable for the club. Mozam will perform a set at the Deer Lodge Showcase on Friday, March 23 and local VJ king Tyler Bowling will produce the visuals. “The showcase is going to be a little more on the psychedelic side of music, a little more abstract, a little more avant garde. It’s not going to be everybody’s cup of tea, but if you like to see some good, loud, fun psych, that’s the place to be,” said Mozam’s Trevor Kamplain.

MATTHEWDAVID, Linen Building, 10-10:40 p.m. Los Angeles-based artist Matthewdavid (Matthew McQueen) is a young beatmaker who turns out patchwork collages filled with warm sounds, patient beats and lots of soul. His music is recognizably hip-hop-influenced with hints of English dubstep, funk, jungle and glitch. Matthewdavid travels through genres left and right, combining them into one smooth tapestry. Matthewdavid is sandwiched between Mozam and Sun Araw Band at the Linen Building, so if you enjoy blissing out to warm, ambient electronic beats, be sure to plant yourself front and center for a mind-bending Friday night.

BLITZEN TRAPPER, Neurolux, 10-11:15 p.m. The rainy urban ecotopia of Portland, Ore., is not the Old West. The state’s capital, Salem, is even less so. But you wouldn’t know it by listening to Blitzen Trapper. The Portland-by-way-ofSalem band’s songs often sound straight from a Louis L’Amour novel, weaving together folk and country song structures with dark lyrics about drifting from gunfight to gunfight and contemplating God along the way. Slide guitars and pianos make the music the sort that would be at home in a saloon. But what sets Blitzen Trapper apart from other Americana-ish acts is that rather than getting mired in the sounds of decades past, the band sounds wholly modern. Synths take the place of organs. Low-fi fuzz tones take the place of overdrives. Drums are clean and simple but tightly played and recorded. And when the band kicks it up a notch, it could give The Black Keys a run for its money with a grungy, retro sound.

SUN ARAW, Linen Building, 11 p.m.-midnight With lengthy liner notes, music videos and elaborate artwork, Cameron Stallones conceptualizes the entirety of a Sun Araw album from beginning to end. On stage, he is joined by a full band working with guitar and synth to create droning electronica. Sun Araw drifts between the concrete and the abstract at random, its music occupying the space between the cerebral and the corporeal, almost as though it is performance art. Yet the product is danceable and groovy at times, reverent and soulful at others—particularly with its most recent release, the eight-track Ancient Romans. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

TYLER KOLHOFF

Put on your cool “shoos” and dancing pants and head to the 100-year-old Owyhee Plaza hotel ballroom for an all-night dance after-party that goes down Friday, March 23, from 10 p.m.-4 a.m. The fuzzy electronica on Owlright’s album Cool Shoos Dood is sometimes frantic and sometimes chunky, creating a record that strolls down a labyrinth’s worth of avenues. Whether you call it “nu funk,” “turbo crush” or “blip-step,” Owlright’s claim to fame is pulse-pounding electronica that hammers the audience’s eardrums. Drum and bass electronic duo qp, comprised of Boise’s Peter Schott and Seattle’s James Stevens, work together from more than 500 miles apart to craft dark, high-speed beats with stripped back bass and jungle juke flavors. New York bass music duo Sepalcure made waves in the electronic music world with the release of its debut self-titled album last November. The record contains tints of house music, psych and dub, all under a relentlessly bouncy bass line. Picturplane, brainchild of producer Travis Egedy, is resident DJ at Denver’s notorious punk-rave-house club Rhinoceropolis, where he busts out DIY ’90s house and trance flavors to wriggling audiences on the reg. DJ Ryan Brackney recently moved from the Bay Area to Boise. When he moved here, he brought along his modern, smart and funky bass music. Pulling samples from U.K. garage, techno, house and more, his dance-inducing sets rarely contain a still body. If you’re still hanging around at 3 a.m.—which is ver y likely—solo artist Kasher (aka Robby DeBolt) will help keep things going with his funky mixes of hard house, dubstep and trance music.

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NOISE/TREEFORT BANDS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS

SATURDAY

SEPPI RAMOS

AU Main Stage 5:50-6:30 p.m. Like its name, Au is a stripped down band. The group has only two permanent members, Dana Valatka on percussion and Luke Wyland on a melange of instruments. If it weren’t for the rotating cast of Portland, Ore., peers the duo enlists to flesh out its tracks, one might think Au’s creations would fall flat. But that is dead wrong. The tracks featuring only Wyland and Valatka are just as rubbery and colorful as anything including the work of cohorts like Colin Stetson (Bon Iver, Arcade Fire), who provides sax and bass on Au’s most recent release, Both Lights. The album is a shimmery, soft heap of sonics, experimental and antique all at once. The qualities that best describe Au also describe the element on the Periodic Table after which it’s named, gold: malleable, shiny and lustrous.

TYPHOON Main Stage 7-8 p.m. Portland, Ore., indie-folk collective Typhoon is no stranger around these parts. The 10-plus

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member rock-and-roll orchestra has performed shows at Visual Arts Collective and Idaho Botanical Garden, as well as packed into the front of Pie Hole for a surprise late-night acoustic set. In an August 2011 interview with Boise Weekly, Typhoon multi-instrumentalist Devin Gallagher commented on the band’s relationship with Boise, stating: “I grew up thinking Boise was one of the Northwest’s places to play at because of Built to Spill.” It is fitting, then, that Typhoon is slated to warm up the main stage for Built to Spill at Treefort. The latest work from the band is 2011’s A New Kind of House, an EP that continues the band’s tradition of anthemic choruses, bombastic brass and fat layers of instrumental production. The songs build in intensity before finally bursting into glorious celebrations loaded with strings, horns, big drums and guitars.

ARAABMUZIK Linen Building 1-1:50 a.m. Providence, R.I., beatmaker Araabmuzik (aka Abraham Orellana) is going to throw down one of the must-see sets of Treefort. Araabmuzik patches together a wide variety of samples, including bits and pieces of trance, house, dubstep, soul and jazz. He mixes them all on an Akai Music Production Center, an electronic music maker and sampler, and occasionally, he’ll throw in a keyboard or two. When he’s on stage, he actually plays the MPC rapidly, with virtuosic skill, making him a DJ who’s entertaining to watch. In 2011, Araabmuzik released his debut album Electronic Dream. It received rave reviews, including an 8.2 Best New Music from Pitchfork, and made it on many end-of-the-year top album lists. Araab’s music is shadowy and viscous. He doesn’t build up to big cliffhangers or drops. Instead he maintains a high level of tension and intensity. His set starts at 1 a.m. Saturday night (or Sunday morning, rather) at the Linen Building. It’s going to be a wild late-night dance party, no doubt.

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TREEFORT/NOISE BANDS YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS

SUNDAY

BEN MOON

LOST LANDER Linen Building 5-5:40 p.m. Loop the beginning of Lost Lander’s “Cold Feet” and set up the DIY planetarium kit that comes with the band’s new album, DRRT. Then lose yourself in the Sigur Ros-meetsFleet Foxes sound that washes over you. Lost Lander is a collaboration between Matt Sheehy and Menomena’s Brent Knopf, who helped with production on the band’s 11song album. Lost Lander’s Portland, Ore.-grown sound doesn’t rub like a city sound—DRRT is an album for a coastal cruise.

TENNIS Main Stage 7-7:40 p.m. A few years back, husband-and-wife duo Alaina Moore and Patrick Riley set out in a 30-foot sailboat on a journey down the Eastern Seaboard. The trip lasted the better part of a year, and when the couple returned home to Denver, they channeled the experience into an album, 2011’s Cape Dory. Tennis’ album is comprised of breezy retro pop that is a throwback to the simple pop songs of the ’60s. Moore’s bright, sweet voice makes a perfect companion to Riley’s jangly, smooth surf-inspired guitar. Tennis is set to open for Of Montreal on the final day of the Treefort Music Fest. Even though the two bands take entirely different approaches to music, Tennis’ charming and agreeable stripped-down pop numbers will provide a nice palate cleanser for Of Montreal’s grandiose, over-the-top performance art.

KYLE JOHNSON

MWAHAHA Main Stage 5:30-6:30 p.m. The quartet behind Mwahaha has been playing in and around Oakland, Calif., for more than a decade. Brothers Nathan and Cyrus Tilton, along with Ross Peacock and James Murphy, command an army of synths and drums. The result is something like acid-dropping monks bellowing Gregorian chants tinged with a starburst of colors.

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KOKO AND THE SWEETMEATS Linen Building 10-10:40 p.m. Seattle psychedelic garage-rock band Koko and the Sweetmeats sounds dangerous. The band makes dark and spacious tunes, using grungy blues riffs dotted with sparse percussion and moaning laments to craft richly atmospheric music. If Black Sabbath were an indie band and fronted by a crooner instead of a wailer, it could well sound like Koko and the Sweetmeats.

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TREEFORT/NOISE NIC HOLAS C OLLIAS

NOISE/TREEFORT

Wolvserpent brings doom to the Red Room.

LOCAL BANDS NOT TO MISS The Treefort lineup is a buffet of bands you’ve probably been itching to see. But there’s also a dessert tray of fabulous local bands visitors should take the opportunity to become acquainted with. Here are a few of Boise Weekly’s top picks: OLD DEATH WHISPER: In less than an hour in any direction from Boise you may find yourself in a time warp back to the Old West. When you arrive, expect to see Old Death Whisper playing on a stoop. Its dark take on bluegrass and Americana is musical folklore and genuine Idaho. The Bouquet on Thursday, March 22, 11-11:40 p.m. IN THE SHADOW OF THE MOUNTAIN: After a two-year hiatus, the complex rhythms and sweeping pop of one of Boise’s most compelling bands has returned. Dreamy guitars and reverb-drenched vocals sit atop dynamic flowing beats for a driving and ambient sound. This band was going places before falling off the radar. Main Stage on Saturday, March 24, 2:20-3 p.m. RED HANDS BLACK FEET: With a complexly layered and atmospheric sound and a steadily growing fan base eager for its debut album, Red Hands Black Feet is summarized as explosions in the underground. It will warm your heart in one beat and kick your teeth in the next. The Linen Building on Saturday, March 24, 6-6:40 p.m. VAGERFLY: The all-girl electro punk duo Vagerfly is known as much for its costumes as it is for bitching tunes. The band drops wickedly danceable synth-bass and harpsichord beats topped with Bikini Kill-style vocals while topless with wizard beards and jogging shorts. Red Room on Saturday, March 24, 8-8:40 p.m. CHARLES ENGELS AND FAMILY MATTERS: Charles Engles busts rhymes over beats provided by a savagely funky live band. The bass, drums and turntables lineup is suitably sparse, pushing Engles’ aggressive polyrhymes to the forefront of the sound with an infectious stage energy. Reef on Saturday, March 24, 10:45-11:20 p.m. WOLVSERPENT: In the world of doom metal, Wolvserpent is legendary. Blake Green and Brittany McConnell compose album-length songs with the dynamic complexity of a film score and often bring props and special lighting to transform a stage into an alternate reality ruled by sound. In a musical landscape still dominated by the three-minute format, Wolvserpent is the rare band that will take its time, slowly building up layers of sound. Red Room on Sunday, March 25, 10:10-11:10 p.m.

MAKING OF MONTREAL HAPPY Kevin Barnes on Paralytic Stalks and alter egos APRIL FOSTER You might not catch it from his buoyant, celebratory records, but Of Montreal’s bandleader Kevin Barnes is kind of a depressed guy. While recording his most lauded record—2007’s Hissing Fauna, Are You the Destroyer?—Barnes created the flamboyant alter-ego/sexpot Georgie Fruit as a way to cope with his personal difficulties. “Georgie Fruit was a character I needed to create to get through a horrible depression period I experienced—to live in and create a false reality where I could exist on Of Montreal will show its true colors while headlining the Treefort Music Fest. a happier level and not be so devastated and crushed by my internal suffering,” Barnes tronic tour de force. The songs from this era spirits, to elevate my consciousness and not said. “So I created that character and sort just revel in the sadness of life,” said Barnes. are infectious, funky and envelope-pushing. of got swept up by that character and had a “But at the same time, there is a lot of sadThey move in random directions, shunning really good time as that character.” ness and there is a lot of pain. And I needed traditional formats and are full of beaming This strange being persisted throughout to express that lyrically. That’s always a synths, maniacal, jarring vocals and bright, the band’s next two full-lengths, often teststrange combination of me trying to lift electronic freak-outs. ing the patience of longtime fans, before my spirits through the music I’m creating On the band’s last couple of records, finally making an exit on Of Montreal’s but also trying to express what I’m going most notably 2010’s False Priest and Paramost-recent release, 2012’s Paralytic Stalks. through lyrically.” lytic Stalks, Of Montreal ratcheted up the “Now I think I’ve realized, slowly, that Although Barnes struggles to maintain a there’s no future in that. I need to keep mov- production, favoring bombastic orchestral positive state of mind, he’s still excited for arrangements, over-the-top antics and ating forward and developing as a human. I his band’s final-night headlining spot at the tempts to cram as many colors as possible don’t want to become a Lady Gaga charTreefort Music Fest. To make the show haponto a single slab of vinyl. This was quite acter. I don’t want to be something that’s pen, Of Montreal’s booking agents had to different from the calculated, thoughtfully totally fabricated and not something based go out of their way to pull some strings. composed tunes of 2005-2007, and Barnes on my personal life. I think all my art needs “Early on, when I reached out to them, is well aware of these differences. to have a direct connection to my personal they weren’t available,” said Treefort pro“To be honest, I’m in a weird place right experiences and not just be some caricature moter Eric Gilbert. “They were planning a now—mentally, emotionally, everything,” of a cartoon or something that I created.” bus tour and you can only drive so many he said. “And the last couple of records that Nonetheless, Barnes’ music is a reflecmiles before a driver gets burnt out. So they tion of his personality and where he’s at in a I made came from a very different place. I had to work out actually flying in an extra realized that when we played a recent show given head space or time. where we did Paralytic Stalks songs and then bus driver to Montana to help with the drivThe band started out in the late ’90s ing. They basically made a huge exception we played Hissing Fauna songs. It felt really as a member of the Elephant 6 Recording kind of bizarre to me, because I could totally to make it happen.” Company, an influential music collective Over the years, local fans have grumbled feel that the spirit of those two albums was that included Neutral Milk Hotel, The about Of Montreal’s tendency to skip Boise. so different, and it was so jarring in a way Olivia Tremor Control and The Apples in When the band takes its massive colorful to sing Hissing Fauna Stereo. In those days, production to Treefort’s main stage, all of songs after Paralytic Of Montreal was a this neglect will hopefully be forgotten. Stalks songs.” minimalist freak-folk Sunday, March 25, 8:15-9:45 p.m. And if enough people show up with enough On the surface, act, heavy on barenergy, the unexpectedly depressed Kevin Paralytic Stalks comes room piano, circus TREEFORT MUSIC FEST MAIN STAGE off as an upbeat party Barnes might even crack a smile. noise and dainty vocal 12th and Grove streets “This whole tour is really special,” he record. But underharmonies. For more information see the special insert in said. “What we’re doing visually is extremeneath the layers of Sometime around this week’s edition. ly complex and I hope the whole experience glam and glitz are 2004, the band went sincere expressions of will touch many people. It’s a big producelectric. That pissed tion. And we’re really excited, because hopeBarnes’ sorrow and off a lot of old fans depression. Paradoxi- fully there will be a lot of people and they’ll but many argue it be excited about what we’re doing. resulted in Of Montreal’s best work to date. cally enough, the record’s apparent happi“You know, we’re excited about it for 2004’s Satanic Panic in the Attic and Hissing ness is indicative of Barnes’ sadness. sure. Just to finally get to play Boise after all “If I’m in a really terrible state of mind, Fauna saw the group turn its rickety, innoof these years of driving through it.” I try to make happy music to elevate my cent parade music into a psyched-out elec-

—Josh Gross

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE DANNY VAS QU EZ

GUIDE WEDNESDAY MARCH 21 BEN BURDICK—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown BOURBON DOGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Reef DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LYNN SEATON TRIO—See Listen Here, Page 34. 7 p.m., $15, Boise State Student Union Building Jordan Ballroom PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock. Stock & Barrel

LYNN SEATON TRIO—See Listen Here, Page 34. 7 p.m., $15. Boise State Student Union Building Jordan Ballroom

PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

THE NAUGHTIES—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

REX MILLER AND SANDRA CAVANAUGH—7 p.m. FREE. Open Space

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

HANNAH’S GONE WILD—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. $5. Humpin’ Hannah’s

TYRONE WELLS—With Joe Brooks. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $15-$30. Knitting Factory

JAMES MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Boise JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KNUX—With J*Davey, The Vibrant Sound, Ainu Fires and Dedicated Servers. 9 p.m. $5. Shredder LANCE WELLS—7 p.m. FREE. Divine Wine Bar LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri-La

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LANCE WELLS—7:30 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews

THURSDAY MARCH 22 BEN BURDICK TRIO—With Amy Weber. 9 p.m. FREE. Reef BROCK BARTEL—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

FRIDAY MARCH 23 AUDIO MOONSHINE—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DOUGLAS CAMERON—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

HUNTER BRODT—With Jordan Mayer and Luke Brodt. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Wild West

SCOTT PEMBERTON TRIO— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

JEANNIE MARIE—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

STEVE EATON—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s Cellar

JIMMY BIVENS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

TOD PALMER—7 p.m. FREE. Open Space

NAOMI PSALM—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

TREEFORT MUSIC FEST—See Noise, Pages 27-32 and the special insert in this week’s edition.

NEW TRANSIT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

RAIN: A TRIBUTE TO THE BEATLES—8 p.m. $33-$48. Morrison Center

THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS— 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

Singer-songwriter Tyrone Wells’ most recent music video is set on a So Cal boardwalk, lined with palm trees and adjacent to surf and sunshine. Despite hailing from Spokane, Wash., this bald, guitar-toting songsmith pairs much better with warmer locales, as evidenced by the placement of his sunny songs in episodes of American Idol, One Tree Hill and Grey’s Anatomy, as well as his recent relocation to the Golden State. Wells’ success came while under a big-name label, but after its breakup in 2010, he started over, penning enough new tracks for his independent EP, Metal & Wood. That release went on to reach No. 1 on the iTunes singer-songwriter chart for almost a month. Now his rock-inspired sound is back on his fifth studio album, Where We Meet, released March 6. The hand-clapping pop number “Freedom” serves as the album’s single and a great introduction to the warmth of Wells’ music. —Andrew Crisp

DC3—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

TYRONE WELLS, MARCH 21, KFCH

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

With Joe Brooks. 8 p.m., $15-$30. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | 33

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE SHAUN BRAZELL QUARTET—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JUPITER HOLIDAY AND THE UMPHREY MCGEE AFTER-PARTY—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill TREEFORT MUSIC FEST—See Noise, Pages 27-32 and the special insert in this week’s edition.

LYNN SEATON TRIO, MARCH 21-22, BOISE STATE The Gene Harris Jazz Festival is a two-day dip back in time when swing was king and the leaders of big band jazz groups like Duke Ellington and Benny Goodman were gold standards. This year, audience members can experience the reunion of two friends who used to perform together on the New York City jazz scene, Lynn Seaton and Rich Perry. On Thursday, March 22, Perry will join the Lynn Seaton Trio on saxophone. Their set will bring together jazz standards while summoning original inspiration from Big Apple memories, where Perry is a major name in music. The Gene Harris Jazz Festival is as much about showcasing national talent as it is supporting Treasure Valley legends-inthe-making—modern day artists who uphold jazz in our community, like the Boise Jazz Ensemble and the Boise Modern Jazz Orchestra, which will also perform. —Amber Clontz 7 p.m., $15. Boise State Student Union Building, Jordan Ballroom, 1700 University Dr., 208-426-5800, geneharris.org.

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KELLY CLARKSON STRONGER TOUR—With Matt Nathanson. 7:30 p.m. $25-$55. Taco Bell Arena THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS— 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

VOICE OF REASON AND STEVE FULTON MUSIC—7 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s

THE WORKING DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

ZACH TYR—7 p.m. FREE. Open Space

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

SATURDAY MARCH 24

TREEFORT MUSIC FEST—See Noise, Pages 27-32 and the special insert in this week’s edition.

B3 SIDE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

UMPHREY MCGEE—8 p.m. $17.50 adv., $20 door. Knitting Factory

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

WORKING DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill NAOMI PSALM—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper NED EVETT—8 p.m. FREE. Lock. Stock & Barrel

SUNDAY MARCH 25 A.K.A. BELLE—With Reilly Coyote. 8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DESIGN THE SKYLINE—With The Browning, From Atlantis and Navigator. 6 p.m. $10. Venue LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

TUESDAY MARCH 27

MR. P CHILL HIP-HOP SHOW— 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

CHARLIE PARR—With Hillfolk Noir and Scott Knickerbocker. 7 p.m. $5 adv., $7 door. Payette Brewing Company

REHAB—8 p.m. $13. Knitting Factory

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

I SET MY FRIENDS ON FIRE— With Greeley Estates and Bullet For Pretty Boy. 6 p.m. $14. Venue

SUNDERGROUND—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement TREEFORT MUSIC FEST—See Noise, Pages 27-32 and the special insert in this week’s edition.

MONDAY MARCH 26 JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock. Stock & Barrel PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

REILLY COYOTE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye ROB FALER—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WEDNESDAY MARCH 28 BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Reef DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s LOST IN THE TREES—With Poor Man. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux For more live music events visit boiseweekly.com.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

NOT TOO BIG TO FAIL John Carter stinks up the screen in a huge way GEORGE PRENTICE John Carter is the worst movie ever made. Ever. Please understand what I’m saying: EH-VERR. It is not the stupidest film, though it insults anyone with an IQ higher than a soap dish. It is not the most-boring film, though I can tell you that I sat completely alone among 200 empty seats in a Boise cineplex one recent Friday evening. And John Carter is not the most pornographic film, though I desperately yearned for a shower thereafter (and I can still Disney flushed millions down the toilet with John Carter. vividly recall its rancidity). No, John Carter is everything a movie shouldn’t be: excessive, What truly makes John Carter the worst The inane practice wasn’t precedentexploitive and expensive. of the worst is its absolute callousness for its setting. Julie Salamon documented how the I’m seriously considering taking the Walt iconic flop Bonfire of the Vanities burned mil- audience and industry. The film has always Disney Company to small claims court over been on a fast-track to development hell, lions in her book, The Devil’s Candy. the price of admission. beginning with its director Andrew Stanton. The New York Times estimated that It’s estimated that John Carter cost the DisThough he has had success with animation ney studio north of $350 million to make and Disney might eventually need to write-off as (Wall-E), he had never previously stood much as $165 million in market. Accordbehind the lens of a live-action feature. I may losses. That’s real money, ing to industry be wrong, but Stanton may have a future even in Hollywood. analysts, when JOHN CARTER (PG-13) managing the overflow lines at Disneyland’s Recapping John folks from the Directed by Andrew Stanton Magic Mountain. Carter’s plotline is hardly Mouse House saw Stars Taylor Kitsch, Lynn Collins Ultimately, it is John Carter’s gluttony that worth the paper this some early footage and Willem Dafoe is so nauseating. This kind of budget could review is printed on, but of the film, they Now showing at Edwards 9, 12, 14 and 22. here goes: John Carter is a bankroll dozens of independent films that thought it was have character, style and entertainment. Civil War veteran who is so bad that they Years from now—let’s say a decade or magically transported to threw even more money at the project—and kept repeating the Mars, where he does battle with tusked mon- two—during some trivia contest, they’ll begin comparing the bad to the very worst. sters—all to win the love of a princess who process until what they had was one of the When they get to the bottom of the heap, the most expensive pieces of shit ever captured on is not much more than heavy eyeliner and conversation will undoubtedly turn to John celluloid. Lehman Brothers, you have nothing cleavage. There, I just saved you $9. You’re Carter, the worst movie ever made. welcome. on John Carter.

THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN But it was a couple of last-minute additions from The Weinstein Company that gave the festival a higher-profile edge: The Intouchables and Bully. A French film with beautiful cinematography, The Intouchables For a town so steeped in old-school Hollywood glamour, it’s a focuses on the true story of a quadriplegic white aristocrat and his caresurprise that Sun Valley has never had a taker, an unmotivated inner-city black kid. legitimate independent film festival until Thankfully, despite a potentially hokey plot, this year. And as one would expect from the film didn’t rehash the tired Blindside an inaugural effort, the Sun Valley Film trope. Instead, it documented a hilarious Festival had a heavily regional focus. and unlikely friendship that was refreshingly An afternoon screening of DeSiree’ free from moralizing or pity. Fawn’s The Phantom Wolves of Sun Bully, on the other hand, was full of pity. Valley at the Magic Lantern on March The documentary follows a handful of bully16, for example, drew such a large crowd ing victims and their families: a small town that organizers cobbled together another lesbian, an awkward kid with no friends, a showing in an adjacent theater. And the girl who pulled a gun on her harassers, and festival’s prize pony, Magic Valley—which the family of a teen who commitwas produced by native daughter Heather ted suicide. The film explores the Rae and directed by Jaffe Zinn—sold out contentious issue from a variety the much larger Sun Valley Opera House 36 of angles—interviewing clueless well in advance of its hyped premiere on The Intouchables is surprisingly touching. parents, apathetic school adminMarch 17.

DISPATCHES FROM THE INAUGURAL SUN VALLEY FILM FESTIVAL

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | 35

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE BODYGUARD—Re-experience one of the most-memorable movies of the ’90s starring Kevin Costner and Whitney Houston. Wednesday, March 28. 7:30 p.m. $12.50. Edwards Boise Stadium 22 and IMAX, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3779603; Edwards Boise Downtown Stadium 9, 760 Broad St., Boise, 208-338-3821; regmovies.com. THRIVE DOCUMENTARY FILM— This unconventional doc claims to lift the veil on what’s going on in our world by uncovering the global consolidation of power. Visit thrivemovement.com for more info. Saturday, March 24. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. $7 general, $5 seniors. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3450454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Opening BEING FLYNN—Paul Dano stars with Robert DeNiro and Julianne Moore in this film, which chronicles a renewed relationship with a long-absent father. (R) Opens Friday, March 23, at The Flicks. THE HUNGER GAMES—This film is based on the best-selling trilogy by Suzanne Collins and stars Lenny Kravitz and Woody Harrelson. (PG-13) Opens Friday, March 23. Edwards 9, Edwards 14, Edwards 21.

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code.

SCREEN/DVD

JACK AND JILL TOPS REDBOX RENTALS Boise movie buffs (at least those trekking to Redbox DVD kiosks) can’t seem to get enough of Adam Sandler and Adam Sandler. The SNL alum co-stars with himself in his comedy Jack and Jill. The new release was the most-rented Redbox film in the Boise metro area for the week ending March 11. The ridiculously silly (and sometimes outright hilarious) comedy has Sandler playing dual lead roles as Jack, a laid-back family man dreading his yearly visit from an obnoxious and demanding twin sister Jill, who becomes a permanent fixture in Jack’s household. The 21st century reboot of the musical Footloose also danced its way into many Boise homes, making it the second most-rented Redbox DVD for the week. This modern rendition features Julianne Hough from Dancing with the Stars, newcomer Kenny Wormald and veteran actor Dennis Quaid. When city boy Ren (Wormald) moves to a conservative town where rock ’n’ roll and dancing have been banned, he decides to shake things up. Local country girl Ariel (Hough) and friends join the dance revolution much to the dismay of her dad (Quaid). In Time, Hugo and Puss in Boots (all previous Redbox DVD top picks) remained popular choices, completing the top five. Newer selections rounded out the Top 10: The Big Year, Like Crazy, The Rum Diary, The Thing and Dream House. If you need a good laugh but Jack and Jill is all checked out, you may want to consider another Sandler option like Just Go With It or Funny People. If you’re a fan of Sandler’s older work, Redbox also offers the cute comedy hit Big Daddy. —Annette Rincon

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN istrators, exasperated victims and the bullies themselves. 35 Though it was both heartbreaking and enraging, Bully didn’t seem to warrant the controversy that has been brewing around it. Critics have chastised the MPAA for giving the film an R rating and precluding kids younger than 17 from viewing it. But with its slow, loose narrative, the film didn’t strike me as being particularly geared toward children in the first place—it felt more like a film trying to educate and provoke change among indifferent adults. The Sun Valley Film Festival wrapped up March 18 with an awards ceremony. Rae took home the Vision Award for Magic Valley. The film also took home the Zion’s Gem State Award for filmmakers living in Idaho, which carried a jury prize of $1,000, and the One in a Million Award for films with budgets less than

36 | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Researchers try to regain trust in War Elephants.

$1 million. The One in a Million Award also went to the documentary War Elephants. And Michael Fiefer’s Soda Springs snagged the The Sun Valley Film Festival Audience Award. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

REC/NEWS REC

TAKE AIM Airsoft attracts brigades of Boise players ANDREW MENTZER

SAVING SAGE GROUSE TAKES CENTER STAGE

JAMES LLOYD

Your daily life quickly falls away when you take the field. You stealthily navigate the scrub brush, trying to remain undetected, and begin to wonder if your team has what it takes to outsmart and outmaneuver the opposition. Then you contemplate the line between reality and simulation. This isn’t a role-playing video game, nor is it real battle—yet you can’t help but feel an exhilaration that could only come from playing a game that dabbles in several primal realities. Have you prepared enough? Are you positioned correctly? The intense feeling of vulnerability is both nerve-racking and empowering. Your commanding officer pipes through your headset and you begin shooting, consistent with the directives of the moment. Of all of Boise’s quirky game-sport outings, Airsoft stands on its own. To check it ious scenarios of their own creation. Many out for ourselves, Boise Weekly paid a visit games are derived from role-playing video to a large, organized contingency of gamers games like Call of Duty, while others are playing on a muggy Saturday morning near original. A referee determines the winner, the Boise River west of Star. typically after a two- to three-hour series of Paintball’s cousin, Airsoft has been mission goals. Every game has a different set around since the late 1970s and has international origins. The result of a firearm ban of rules, regulations and weapon requirements, ranging from capture the flag to in Japan and some creative interpretation, convoy games using automobiles in the field. Airsoft guns are replica weapons that shoot Getting shot feels like “someone snapsmall plastic BBs. With the evolution of the ping you with a rubber band,” according market for this lifelike hardware came a to Mount. Each game has velocity and desire to replicate real battle scenarios and BB weight restrictions to ensure the safety the game of Airsoft was born. Boise has a well established crew of folks of players. Weaponry ranges from 100-feet-perdedicated to the game—rain or shine—evsecond, short-range spring-powered guns to ery Saturday at locations throughout the 1,000-feet-per-second gas-powered sniper Treasure Valley. There are five established rifles. Guns cost between $100 and $800 Airsoft teams in the area: Mil-Sim Airsoft (although there are base models available for Group, Real World Airsoft, Alpha Omega far less), with inexpensive biodegradable BBs, Airsoft, Mike Force Irregulars and Blacklist making Airsoft a cheaper alternative to paintAirsoft—formerly a paintball group. ball. Of the most common is a classic Army MAG has been in Boise since 2005, and M4A1 replica, which starts around $150. now has about 20 regular members ranging With the exponential growth of the popufrom active-duty military to teenagers fascilarity of role-playing nated with battlefield war simulation intertactics. Camaraderie active video games, and teamwork are the For more information visit Airsoft has grown goals, and despite the magairsoft.com or combatsportsupply.com. leaps and bounds in potential impression recent years. Teams that it is a violent get together for undertaking, the sport appears to be more about tactics and social- regional and national meets from coast to coast, bringing in thousands of players from izing than anything else. all walks of life. Malloya Mount—call sign Bojo—of The appeal varies depending on who you MAG was quick to note that Airsofters are “not out there trying to pretend to be some- talk to but the game’s goal is universal: to have fun. thing we’re not. ... We just go out to have a Kalen Fairchild of Boise has been playgood time and enjoy the game [and] create a ing Airsoft for about a year and enjoys the positive environment.” inclusiveness of the sport. Dressed in full tactical fatigues, Boise’s “Airsoft is meant for anybody. We have Airsoft groups get together and play out var-

Move over Tweety Bird, here comes the next winged celebrity.

women and seniors that play with us,” said Fairchild. Airsoft revolves around seniority, leadership and strategy. The game has a distinct hierarchy that players follow closely. While most players participate just for the fun of it, Airsoft does have winners and losers—typically distinguishable by the number of welts covering the body at the end of the game. Afterward, players hang out for an hour or more to trade battle stories and talk about life, work and school. All things considered, Airsoft is as much a social gathering as it is military simulation. Justin Brown, owner of Garden City’s Combat Sport Supply, said that business is good these days. Formerly a paintball and Airsoft store, CSS has focused more on the latter in recent years because of market demand for guns that look and feel more like the real thing. Its global distribution has allowed it to plug into numerous networks that you might not expect to be involved with Airsoft. “We sell equipment to everyone from ditch diggers to brain surgeons,” said Brown of his clientele. He sees Airsoft as a great way to get some exercise and a sense of accomplishment that is both team oriented and primal at the same time. CSS has even expanded its customer base to include military and law enforcement agencies that use the guns for training. If you are looking to try your hand at the versatile and inclusive game of Airsoft, Boise’s groups are a dedicated and welcoming bunch. Rental guns are available and newbies are encouraged to jump right in. Parents can bring their kids—provided they are willing to sign a waiver and supervise.

For such a little bird, the sage grouse sure knows how to stay in the headlines. The species has long been under the careful eye of wildlife management agencies and conservationists who fear that development in the West has put the survival of the species in danger. While sage grouse has managed to stay off of the Endangered Species List—so far—populations are still being closely watched. In fact, when Bureau of Land Management Director Bob Abbey decided to join the world of Twitter, his first tweet concerned the extension of the public comment period for a proposed plan to address sage grouse conservation in 10 Western states. Idaho is on that list, with affected areas including the Boise, Salmon, Challis, Targhee and Caribou national forests and the Curlew National Grassland. The first tweet for @BLMDirector read, “People wanted more time to comment on #BLM’s #sagegrouse conservation measures, so we have extended comments for 45 days on.doi.gov/zHC89r.” That comment period is open to the public through Friday, March 23, and the plan can be viewed at blm.gov. Search for “Western sage grouse plan.” Even Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter has gotten on the sage grouse bandwagon. On March 9, Otter signed an executive order creating a sage grouse task force charged with helping to come up with a state-specific plan for dealing with the birds. “The Secretary of the Interior has provided the 11 Western states impacted by a potential listing under the Endangered Species Act the opportunity to develop state-specific plans,” Otter wrote in a press release. “The listing of the species would have a significant impact on Idaho’s customs, culture, economy and way of life. But I’m confident our Idaho stakeholders will be able to develop workable, reasonable and effective recommendations to conserve the species and preclude the need to list.” The task force, which will be lead by the Governor’s Office but assisted by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game and the Office of Species Conservation, is made up of representatives of industry, local working groups, legislators, local officials, conservationists, sportsmen and members of the public. The task force will be responsible for giving recommendations to Otter on both policies and actions that the state can use for a regulatory plan to help protect sage grouse and keep them off the ESL. —Deanna Darr

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | 37

REC/LISTINGS Events

REC/PLAY JU LIA GR EEN

IDAHO STAMPEDE BASKETBALL—vs. Fort Wayne Mad Ants. Friday, March 23-Saturday, March 24. 7 p.m. $7-$20. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com. STEELHEADS HOCKEY—vs. Utah Grizzlies. Wednesday, March 21; vs. Stockton Thunder. Wednesday, March 28, 7 p.m. $16-$50. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com. TRY THE SPORT OF CURLING—Boise Curling Club hosts Learn to Curl Open House. Attendees get 30 minutes of off-ice instruction on rules, etiquette and traditions, followed by an hour on the ice practicing throwing and sweeping and playing a short game. Sign up at boisecurlingclub.org. Thursday, March 22, and Sunday, March 25; 6:30 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. $20. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-3310044, idahoiceworld.com.

Register IDAHO BOCCE BALL CLUB— The Idaho Bocce Ball Club of Boise will start playing bocce on Wednesday, April 11, at 6 p.m. on the courts at Ann Morrison Park. The club is looking for members of all skill levels. For more info, call Lou Piccotti at 208-375-5228, Mike DeJulis at 208-376-3171, Judy Campbell at 208-890-4178 or go to idahobocceballclub.com. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard. PRIVATE ADULT SWIM LESSONS—Register online with the Boise State Rec Center at any time for a private swimming lesson. Single session: $17 members, $22 nonmembers; fivelesson package: $75 members, $105 nonmembers; 10-lesson package: $140 members, $200 nonmembers. Boise State Rec Center, 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5641, 208-4261131, rec.boisestate.edu.

Recurring THURSDAY NIGHT RUN/ WALKS—Join the group for 3-, 4- or 5-mile fun run/walks every Thursday night year round. All abilities are welcome. The group meets regardless of rain, snow, sleet or hail. The run/walk starts at 5:30 p.m. sharp. First-timers should come a few minutes early to sign up. Thursdays, 5:30 p.m. FREE. Shu’s Idaho Running Company, 1758 W. State St., 208-344-6604, idahorunningcompany.com. WHEELCHAIR RUGBY—Join in for an eight-week program or drop-in session of wheelchair rugby offered by Boise Parks and Recreation’s AdVenture program. All skill levels are welcome, you do not need to have a disability to play and wheelchairs are provided. For info or to register, call 208-608-7680. Sundays, 4-6:30 p.m. and Thursdays, noon-2:30 p.m. $24 for eight weeks, $5 individual sessions. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, 208-384-4486, cityofboise.org.

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IT’S SPRING, TIME TO CAMP Spring is just around the corner and, personally, I cannot freaking wait. This weather pattern of warm and sunny followed by snow is a buzz kill. Every time I think it is just about camping time, snow hits the valley and blankets the mountains. But I’ll be camping any day now, and being the good Boy Scout that I am, I want to be prepared for my outdoor excisions—both equipment wise and mentally. To prep for my springtime camping trip—during which I am going bear hunting—I called a good friend and Eagle Scout John “Mac” Christian. He’s an experienced backpacker and is the type of guy who will pull a French press out of his 27-pound four-day pack. I asked him the best way to prepare for spring camping. “One second, it is bright and sunny, then next, it is raining or snowing. Being prepared for those situations is critical. ... Water can be your best friend or worst nightmare,” he said. “A person just needs to be able to stay as dr y as possible. That is rule one.” Christian suggested that I invest in a rain poncho or even a big trash sack. Check. My poncho is packed and ready. So is a trash bag, just in case. While keeping dry is important, it is not everything. Comfort in camp is critical to a successful trip, so I called Kirk Hall, a camping specialist at REI Boise, for some gear recommendations. After a little waxing about the unpredictability of spring weather, Hall recommended a few things. “First is a good pad under your bag. … Without insulation between you and the ground—even in a great bag—you can have a cold night.” The dirt, or even snow, stays cold all night. To avoid the heat-sucking ground, using an insulation layer is ver y helpful. Hall also recommended a liner, which can add 10-15 degrees of comfort for a lightweight sleeping bag. “You’re going to spend six to eight hours in a your bag— you might as well be comfortable,” Hall said. (Liner prices run $40-$65.) His last recommendation was simple: “No cotton. Wear wool or some other synthetic.” Cotton does not dry well, it attracts moisture and it’s heavy, all of which is a bad combination for Christian’s first rule of spring camping. Finally, I called Connie Rule, president and CEO of Rocky Mountain Outward Bound School, for some mental preparation for springtime camping. Rule had brilliant insights concerning spring camping and the outdoors in general. “People spend the winter ‘boxed in’ at work, school and home. The outdoors, particularly in the spring, is about growth, renewal and revival. Nature is budding and ideas are blooming. Spring into the life you want to live,” Rule said. Get outside. With some new gear and some mental preparation under my belt, I’m ready for spring camping. And bear hunting. Camp safe, my friends. —Randy King WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FOOD LAU R IE PEAR M AN

FOOD

Quinn’s serves a breakfast of champ(agne)ions.

WHEN BLOODY MARYS BLEED INTO HAPPY HOUR

Pie Hole is the perfect place to stuff your face when you’re pie-eyed.

LATE NIGHT GRUB Where to get your after-hours fill BW STAFF | PHOTOGRAPHS BY LAURIE PEARMAN

Boise restaurants are notorious for closing up shop frustratingly early. But if you’re not a card-carrying AARP member with a penchant for early bird buffets, you can still fill your belly well into the evening at a few local eateries. Here are a some spots to snag a late-night bite. Hyde Park’s crowded 13th Street Pub and Grill (1520 N. 13th St., 208-639-8888) feeds the North End masses with a late-night menu that runs from 11 p.m. to midnight. The dark-wood space also features a killer selection of microbrews and a swank patio with heated floors. Boise’s beloved Basque Block eatery Bar Gernika (202 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-319-1063) allows you to sample specialties from the Basque Country like fried croquettas or chorizo sandwiches until 1 a.m. on the weekends. If you’re not feeling so adventurous, try the out-of-this-worlddelicious tuna melt on cheddar scallion bread. When you need to harness your hangries with a dash of class, Flatbread Community Oven (615 W. Main St., 208-287-4757) is a better bet than the sizzling street-meat carts that line Main Street. Flatbread slings pizza, flatbread, salads and soups Thursday-Saturday until 1 a.m., with a late-night happy hour that runs from 9 p.m. until close. Or if you want a slice that goes nice with a microbrew, swing into the Front Door Northwest Pizza and Taphouse (105 S. Sixth St., 208-2879201) on Friday and Saturday for the full menu until 11 p.m. and slices only until 2 a.m. Ha’ Penny (855 Broad St., Ste. 250, 208WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

343-5568) may be an Irish pub, but it makes piled high with halibut bites until midnight on damn-good nachos. With bands, karaoke and Friday and Saturday. food served until midnight on the weekends, Ha’ If it’s fried morsels you’re craving, swing Penny will fill your stomach and your appetite for into Mulligan’s Golf Pub and Eatery (1009 W. entertainment. Main St., 208-336-6998) for a pile of tater tots If you’re jonesing for a breakfast burrito the or chicken strips covered in pink fry sauce. The size of an infant, make your way to Los Betos kitchen at Mulligan’s stays open until 2 a.m. (5220 W. Fairview Ave., 208-658-1185; 6906 W. With options like potato-bacon or mac ’n’ State St., 208-853-1494) for a delicious gutbomb cheese pizza, Pie Hole (205 N. Eighth St., 208that you’ll undoubt344-7783; 1016 edly regret in the Broadway Ave., morning. Los Betos 208-424-2225) is the serves it up fast and place to be after last greasy 24 hours a day, call on the weekends. seven days a week. Plus you can play Speaking of 24some old-school video hour eateries, after the games and eavesdrop bars close, grab a cab on some crazy converto State Street and hit sations while waiting up Merritt’s Country in the often-lengthy Cafe (6630 W. State line. Pile Hole serves St., 208 853-9982) for up slices Sundaya warm, buttery scone. Thursday until 3 a.m. But don’t think you’re and Friday-Saturday Most late-night meals at Los Betos are a blur. getting a rock-hard until 4 a.m. British pastry; this After a night Boise institution serves imbibing liquids, up soft, savory and sweet scones the size of plates you’ll probably want some Solid (405 S. Eighth in a roadside shack that feels like a trashier verSt., 208-345-6620) grub to line your belly. Solid’s sion of your grandma’s house. famous chicken and waffles is a favorite, as are Another grub option outside of downtown is other potato-and-egg breakfast-y options. Solid’s the North End’s O’Michael’s Pub and Grill (2433 kitchen is open Sunday-Thursday until 1 a.m. and Bogus Basin Road, 208-342-8948.) Get a plate Friday-Saturday until 4 a.m.

Day drinking can be dangerous. Nothing takes the edge off a grumbling hangover headache like a little liquid dehydration. But after you’ve thrown back that first flute and are staring into the bottom of a pulp-flecked empty mimosa glass, it’s time for the truly hard decision: Do you get another? If your answer is a resounding “Fuck, yeah,” but your budget is like, “Oh, fuck,” here are a few spots to score some daytime sauce on the cheap. Quinn’s (1005 S. Vista Ave.) For every two meals off the Sunday breakfast menu, you receive a free bottle of champagne. Though the term “champagne” should be interpreted loosely, what you’re given is bubbly and boozy. But there is one catch: If you want a mimosa, you have to pay a hefty up-charge for a glass of OJ. State Street institution The Lift (4091 W. State St.) serves up sinfully cheap mimosas ($1) and bloody marys ($3) on the weekends. The brunch will also help lift your spirits with biscuits and gravy and breakfast burritos served Saturday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and Sunday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. And don’t forget, there is primo patio seating out back. If you wanna get your day-drunk on closer to downtown, Cafe de Paris (204 N. Capitol Blvd.) offers $5 bottomless mimosas on Saturday and Sunday from 7 a.m.-3 p.m., in addition to its assortment of French pastries and fresh-baked bread. Though Red Feather Lounge (246 N. Eighth St.) doesn’t have bottomless mimosas anymore, it has the next best thing: mimosa carafes for $6.50. There’s nothing like topping off your glass periodically to create an illusion of alco-bundance. Not to mention, the spot has an eclectic bloody menu with options like heirloom tomato, verde or La Rojita, which includes tequila, bloody mary mix and smoked salt, served up. If you’d rather stick with suds, Parilla Grill in Hyde Park (1512 N. 13th St.) serves any microbrew (excluding Guinness) for the insanely cheap price of $1 from 10 a.m. to noon on both Saturday and Sunday. Now that you’ve whiled away the daylight, you can continue your bleary bender well into the evening at any of these happy hour hotspots: Mai Thai (750 W. Idaho St.) shakes it up with both an early evening and late-night happy hour featuring two-for-one drinks and cheap Izakaya plates. The happy hours run Monday-Thursday, 5-6:30 p.m. and 9-10 p.m.; Friday-Saturday, 5-6:30 p.m. and 9:30-11 p.m.; and Sunday 40 from 5-9:30 p.m. If you want another double two-

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FOOD LAU R IE PEAR M AN

FOOD/WINE SIPPER

SAUVIGNON BLANC: SPRING IN A BOTTLE Get your hands on some hot potatoes at Boise Fry Co.

for-oner, head to Solid (405 S. Eighth 39 St., Ste. 100) for happy hours that run Monday-Sunday from 4-6 p.m. and 10 p.m.midnight. You can also snag a snack from the happy hour menu. And continuing on the two-fer beat, the normally spendy Barbacoa (276 W. Bobwhite Court) offers a two-for-one happy hour from 4-6 p.m. seven days a week and a late-night happy hour from 10 p.m. to close with discounted drinks in its elaborate Parkcenter digs. If you want to kick up your heels and tip back a brew on a patio with a killer view, march up the escalator to Piper Pub and Grill (150 N. Eighth St.) for a happy hour that runs Monday-Friday from 3-6 p.m. and features twofor-one drinks. Or for a stiff margarita, twirl into Cafe Ole (404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 206) for half-off drinks in the cantina Monday through Friday from 4-6 p.m. and 9 p.m.-close. And if you want to wash back a cold one with some fried spuds, bike down to the Boise Fry Company (111 Broadway Ave., Ste. 111), for two-for-one small baskets of fries and draft beers from 4-6 p.m. Monday-Friday.

It has been a mild winter followed by a wet prelude to spring. While those perpetually cloudy skies make for dreary weather, in this desert climate the rain is welcome. Still, if you were hoping for sunshine to chase away the winter blues, you’ll have to get that emotional lift somewhere else. How about a little springtime in a bottle? Put away those heavy reds of winter and pop the cork (or twist the cap) on a refreshing bottle of sauvignon blanc. Three very different wines topped this week’s tasting. 2010 CLIFFORD BAY SAUVIGNON BLANC, $10.99 This wine is an in-your-face (in a good way), quintessential New Zealand sauvignon blanc—it’s a pure expression of the variety. On the nose, you get a bright burst of grapefruit against an enticingly herbaceous backdrop. That grapefruit comes through with every sip, crisp and refreshing, along with intriguing touches of white pepper and orange zest. This wine is an exceptional bargain. 2010 CRAGGY RANGE SAUVIGNON BLANC, TE MUNA ROAD VINEYARD, $18.99 This vineyard’s name translates to “secret place,” which is fitting for a wine that opens with very ripe gooseberry, backed by undertones of basil and tarragon. On the palate, it’s an intriguing mix of sweet grapefruit, peach, apple and lime, with just the right hit of food-friendly acidity. This wine is on the restrained side of the New Zealand style and there’s a nice touch of mineral on the finish. 2010 KENEFICK RANCH SAUVIGNON BLANC, $24 This estate wine from Napa and Calistoga, Calif., illustrates how both locale and wine-making techniques can influence the final product. A California terroir, along with barrel fermentation result in a richly textured wine with good body and impeccable structure. The aromas are an unctuous melding of honeysuckle, peach, citrus and melon. In the mouth, ripe stone fruit plays against crisp citrus and the oaky finish is remarkably persistent with a nice bit of lemon zest.

—Tara Morgan —David Kirkpatrick

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R E A L ES TAT E BW ROOMMATES 28M LOOKING TO RENT ROOM I am looking for a room for rent, looking to pay anywhere from $200-400/mo. Email: paullann02@gmail.com, or call 541-337-1832, no txts please. Need a roommate for downtown Boise apartment. 343-5476.

BW FOR SALE NO MONEY DOWN? THAT’S OK! Did you know that even in today’s housing market there are still programs that offer 100% (no money down) loans and grant money to home buyers? That’s right! We have buyers who are getting into homes with no money down and their payments are typically way less than what they were paying for rent! No obligation or cost to see if you qualify. Just call today 208-440-5997 or 208-860-1650. info@challengerboisehomes.com Heidi & Krista of Silvercreek Realty Group are ready to work hard for you and there is NO CHARGE to you for our services when purchasing a home. All programs advertised here are subject to approval and program guidelines being met. Visit Challengerboisehomes.com & fill in the Dream Home Finder form! Let’s get started today.

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$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easyworkjobs.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net EARN $500 A DAY Airbrush & Media Makeup Artists For: Ads - TV Film - Fashion Train & Build Portfolio in 1 week Lower Tuition for 2012 AwardMakeupSchool.com RNS NEEDED (LOCAL HOSPITAL) Intermountain Hospital of Boise is seeking Registered Nurses who are interested in acute care psychiatric nursing. This is not an agency position. Qualified candidates must possess a current Idaho nursing license, 6 mo. acute care (or equivalent) exp. & a desire to begin a new adventure. Please e mail résumé to william.fullmer@uhsinc.com or call Bill at 208-377-8400 ext. 2285.

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boise’s organic skincare Facials and waxing By appointment only Gift certificates available Éminence organic skincare products 729 N. 15th St. 208 344 5883 remedyskincareboise.com

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Help Wanted!!! Make money Mailing brochures from home! FREE Supplies! Helping HomeWorkers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. theworkhub.net

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EASTER EVENT April 7, 1-3pm. A Community & Family Fun event at Christ Lutheran in Meridian. “The Easter Story” movie, crafts, egg hunt & refreshments. Christ Lutheran, 1406 W. Cherry Lane, Meridian.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

REAL ESTATE - SERVICES COMMUNITY

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Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Out to Lunch 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

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STEELHEADS SPECIAL DEAL Cystic Fibrosis Foundation Night with the Idaho Steelheads, Friday, March 30 at 7:10pm. $15 gets you a seat in the lower level, a hot dog, bag of chips, & small Pepsi product. The Steelheads will donate to the CF Foundation $5 from each ticket sold. Contact Andrea for a special to participate in the deal: boisescrawl@ gmail.com BSU SEEKS HOST FAMILIES The Boise State Intensive English Programs seek host families for Taiwanese graduate students who have 8-week internships with Boise companies. For more information, call Ajo at 860-1128.

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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B O I S E W E E K LY SERVICES BW CHILD PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois).

BW HOME RESIDENTIAL PAINTING We offer quality painting at a price you can afford. Interior or exterior, an entire repaint, or just a partial. Our experienced and friendly staff can solve all your painting needs! Call for a free estimate. 208-336-4660.

Fix up Paint up Clean up. Home Maintenance. Senior disc. Dave 484-7697. INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING Handyman’s services. Outside trim & stucco repair, deck & fence power wash, staining & sealing. 25 yrs. exp., dependable, clean, ref. Call Joe Bohemia Painting for a free estimate! 208-345-8558 or 208-392-2094. POOP PICKUP I will pick up your doggy’s doo doo for a very reasonable price, I also mow lawns. Prices: $15 to $25/wk. royaltcleaningnlawn@ yahoo.com WE SETUP/DELIVER ANYTHING We will help you every step of the way! We will pick up all your merchandise from the store, and deliver/setup anywhere you ask! Whether it be up 5 flights of stairs, or down 3 to the basement. We set up & deliver all your home furnishings, Rain or Shine! Need help moving any equipment/furniture? Call Perfect Assembly today! 208-631-3926.

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

SOLER PLUMBING Remodels & New Construction, licensed, insured & bonded. 3431307.

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BW HEALTH AND FITNESS ZUMBA CLASSES DOWNTOWN Zumba classes at the Powerhouse 621 S. 17th, Boise. Mon: 5:30pm, Wed: 5:30pm, 6:45pm, Th: 6:00pm. First class is free. 850-5838.

BW MASSAGE A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW HEALING ARTS TRANSFORMATIVE HEALTHCARE If you are suffering from chronic illness, digestive issues, high stress, obesity, mental conditions, & the like; you have come to the right place. I want you to experience better health & Ayurveda offers many transformational tools to get you there. Ayurveda, which literally means the “knowledge and wisdom of life,“ is the traditional healing system of India. It is a system of holistic healthcare that considers the uniqueness of each individual as it helps them to create a state of internal harmony and optimal health. steven@traditionsayurveda.com

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

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Aurora the way you are. Call for Happy Hour 24 hr. 7 days/wk. In & Out. 353-3327. RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231. FREE MASSAGE EVALUATION Apollo Therapy is offering a free Therapeutic Massage Evaluation. To help you find out what a Therapeutic Massage can do for you. So come into my office inside of Boise Pain Management located at 8950 Emerald St Suite 150 or call 724-7599 and ask for Aric. The evaluations are only on Tuesdays from 10-2 & Wednesdays from 3-8. There is no obligations expected with this offer. “U Deserve 4 Hands 4 U...” 208-463-8982. ULM 340-8377. Hrs. 8:30AM8PM.

BW YOGA ABC YOGA CLASS SERIES Never practiced yoga before? 4 wk. workshop series designed specifically for the absolute beginner or anyone wanting a stepby-step review of the basics! Be comfortable walking into drop-in basic or open level yoga classes. Class size is limited. Please register early! March 6th - March 27th. Tuesdays 10:30-11:30am. $30 at Muse Yoga, 1317 W. Jefferson St., Brittany McConnell, RYT.

BW PSYCHIC READINGS AT BELLA’S! Every Wednesday from 3:00 6:00. Psychic Readers at Bella’s Grove ~Tarot, Palm, Past Life, Runes, Chakra, etc...get a reading for you or a friend!

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BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 8662759.

KRIYA YOGA, APRIL 13-15 Learn the ancient, scientific teachings of Kriya Yoga. Yogacharya John Williams will visit Boise to train new initiates in the ancient method of living and meditation that cultivates body, mind, intellect and awareness of the soul using powerful meditative and yogic disciplines. A free preview to the weekend will be offered on Sunday, March 18, 6-8pm & again on Wednesday, March 21, 7-9pm. For more information: 853-1004 / info@kriya.boise.org

PETS BW PETS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

42 | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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M U S IC BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION LEARN TO PLAY THE DRUMS Drum Lessons for all ages. Adults welcome. Snare Drum - Concert Percussion - Marching Percussion - Drum Set. Private lessons are one on one, 1/wk. for a half hour. Lessons available M-F. Two Locations - Southeast Boise at Idaho Music Academy or ArtsWest School in Eagle. Call Frank 208-573-1020. www.mastromusic.com

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ROCK/ALT TRIO - TRIKATA Bringing back the heavy grooves & riffs of the best days of rock ‘n roll, & combining them with the best of today’s alternative stylings. It’s a sound everyone can move to and love! Find us at: facebook.com/trikataband or soundcloud.com/trikata

NOTICES BW NOTICES WIN $1,000 Free 500 Word Essay Contest! K-12, 31 cash prizes, $1,000 first place. May 20th deadline. We hope you have fun entering! For complete rules, go to TheAdventuresofDod.com

BW LEGAL NOTICES BW MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE BASS PLAYER NEEDED ASAP We play americana, rock, punk & country. Covers & some originals. We want to start doing gigs before summer. Harmonizing skills a plus. Email for an audition: sumhowe@msn.com

IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE Irina Haakonstad CASE No. CV NC 1202629 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Irina Haakonstad, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in District Court in ADA County, Idaho. the name will change to Gorobinskaya. The reason for the change in name is: divorce. I’d like to get my old last name back.

A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on April 12, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: April 12, 2012 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Beth Masters Deputy Clerk Pub. Feb. 29, March 7, 14, 21, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Christine Pearl Oria Case No. CV NC 1202849 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Christine Pearl Oria, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Salem Christian Djembe. The reason for the change in name is: commonly known by peers professionally & personally. Gender reassignment. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on April 19, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Feb. 24, 2012. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk Pub. March 7, 14, 21 & 28, 2012.

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Monica Ann Gillies Case No. CV NC 1202707 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Monica Ann Gillies, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Monica Ann Pursley. The reason for the change in name is: restore my maiden name. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on April 17, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change.

required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 7th day of March, 2012. Ms. Heather Scherer c/o Gary L. Davis Davis Law Office, PLLC 355 W. Myrtle, Ste. 100, Boise, ID 83702 (208) 424-9100

Date: Feb. 16, 2012. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Debra Urizar Deputy Clerk Pub. March 14, 21, 28, April 4, 2012. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF:

FOR SALE BW STUFF Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

TULLYJON J. MURRAY, Deceased Case No. CV-IE-2012-03579 NOTICE TO CREDITORS [I.C. § 15-3-801(a)] NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are DRAY: 1-year-old female Lab mix. Athletic and active. Needs plenty of exercise on a daily basis. Prefers to be an only pet. (Kennel 316#15517650)

BEETHOVEN: 1-year-old male Lab/Australian cattle dog mix. Loves to play with other dogs. Happy-go-lucky. Bonds easily to people. (Kennel 401- #11837625)

MAGGIE: 1-year-old female border collie mix. House-trained. Good with older children and dogs. Smart and active. (Kennel 416#15098655)

FABIO: 1-year-old male domestic longhair. Friendly, easy-going and social. Litterbox-trained. Seems to mind the company of other cats. (Kennel 5- #15611265)

MINNIE: 2-year-old female domestic longhair. Adorable, petite cat. Purrs loudly with any attention. Needs an indoor home. (Kennel 04- #15399499)

PICKLES: 3-year-old male Siamese mix. Extra-large boy. Very friendly with kids of all ages. Prefers a dog-free home. Indoor cat. (Kennel 15- #13964877)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

ADOBE: Big ol’ teddy bear is ready for his new family—make it yours.

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INDIE: Long-haired beauty waiting for her next adventure—will it be with you?

CORALINE: I’m as sweet and quirky as my name. Meet me today.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | 43

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B O I S E W E E K LY EAT HERE

Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $425! 888-1464. ELEGANT VINTAGE WOOL SUIT Never worn, Vintage - size 12 tags still on it. Orlando Rossi 100% wool - rich purple. Retailed for over $300. Will sacrifice for $75. I will provide detailed photos if you’re interested. 995-8031.

GARMONT TELE BOOTS Women’s Garmont Syner-G Tele Boots, G Fit liners, shell 25/26.5, liner 24.5, excellent condition, rarely used, $100. 208-338-0388. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643.

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MIXED BAG LATAH DETOUR SALE 50% off selected items. We appreciate your support of a small business at the mercy of torn up streets! 106 S. Latah St. 3679000. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

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NYT CROSSWORD | 100 YEARS AGO BY VICTOR FLEMING AND JOHN DUNN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 22 Give out one’s address? 23 Northern bird 24 ___ nerve 25 Quidnunc 26 Saunter with style 27 American millionaire lost with the 63-Across 29 Two-time All-Star Martinez 30 Like a friendly dog’s tail

ACROSS 1 “Hansel and Gretel” figure 4 Collection of sketches, for short 7 Kind of port 10 Like most of the Swiss flag 13 Kind of trail 18 Gobbled down 20 Provide for

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58 Generation ___ 60 Collect dust 61 Science fiction author Frederik 62 Start of a children’s rhyme 63 Theme of this puzzle 65 Transmitted, as an SOS 66 Wise off to 67 Landscaper’s buy 68 Monopoly token 69 Like tsunami-affected areas 72 Nobelist poet Neruda 73 Classic black-and-white film featuring gigantic irradiated ants 75 Peeved 77 Some tubes carry them 78 Arrive by plane 79 Prefix with plane 80 Gushes 81 Cartoon canine 82 Detective’s assignment 83 What scattered things are said to be all over 85 “Don’t think so” 86 Maritime danger 87 Radical ’60s org. 88 See 33-Across 91 Some reuniongoers 93 Summer cooler 94 “___ Walked Into My Life” (“Mame” song) 95 Moon feature 96 What the 63-Across crossed to begin her 88-/13-Down 103 Does the hair just so 106 Toast in Toledo 107 College voter 108 Birth announcement 109 Washington, but not Adams 110 Be behind schedule 111 Clinks 112 Bygone 113 Bowflex target 114 École ___ arts 115 “Piers Morgan Tonight” airer

116 Collecting a pension: Abbr.

DOWN 1 Unwelcome reception 2 Title girl on “Introducing … The Beatles” 3 2003 James Cameron documentary about the 63-Across 4 Ferris’s girlfriend in “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off” 5 63-Across’s destination on her 88-/13-Down 6 “Bad” cholesterol, for short 7 Not yet planted 8 “For example …?” 9 “Give me your best shot!” 10 Actress Lee of “Funny Face” 11 Novelist Ambler 12 1920s-’30s style, informally 13 See 88-Down 14 Kindergarten comeback 15 Big huff? 16 Hall-of-Fame QB Graham 17 Stern 19 For some time 21 Atlantic City casino, with “the” 27 Short outings 28 Banjoist Fleck 32 Some modern museum designs 34 One-named singer/ actress associated with Warhol 35 Continues 36 Frigid 37 Seaport in western France 38 1955 Walter Lord book about the 63-Across 39 Spaghetti sauce seasoning 40 ___ seas 41 It’s about 20 miles north of Lauderdale 43 Actress Skye

45 Permanent sites? 47 “Benson” actress 48 Work in wildlife preservation? 49 Put back, in a way 51 Second go-rounds 57 Comic actor Nielsen 59 Cry with the shake of a pompom 63 Close behind 64 Spends some time out? 65 Where the 63-Across’s 88-/13-Down began 66 Word with bar or fork 67 “60 Minutes” correspondent 69 Mrs. Dithers of “Blondie” 70 Professes 71 Director Fritz 72 Some basic training grads 74 Biblical kingdom where Moses died 76 Mole’s work 83 A lot 84 Newspaper or magazine offering 86 Early stage of a time capsule project L A S T B A S E H I T

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88 With 13-Down, disastrous event for the 63-Across 89 Distinguished 90 “___ the love?” 92 “The Far Side” cartoonist 93 Champagne holder 96 Canadian station 97 Like some parks: Abbr. 98 Joyful 99 Queen of myth 100 Wood or iron 101 Brooding types 102 Frequently injured knee part: Abbr. 104 Go (over) 105 Method: Abbr. 108 1887-1996 govt. watchdog Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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A M E I L L O C P I N G O S I N M A L I T I L L C R A D S A T E O C A N T L K S A I S T H O H M O O U R E A A M B U S B E E N T H A T T O N E E L S M E T A L I A L I T P A D

L L C U E O N A G L K L O Y A N R A Z Y E K E S O S I V E W D M I U S E M A I R L L Y M S O A S R H E W I A L O E C A R K I N G E N I R E N

A N S W E R S A L A S K A F I X A T E D O N O T T O

P R I M O R D A S S O F W T A S B B S B O U T Y L A N C O O I O S T H O U T A N N I D T S R O P E A N T H A S B O O S O L A E T A L K D U T Y W N I O T H E W O I M O D S U N

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Not bad for a few weeks’ work, or play, or whatever it is you want to call this tormented, inspired outburst. Would it be too forward of me to suggest that you’ve gone a long way toward outgrowing the dark fairy tale that had been haunting your dreams for so long? And yet all this may just be a warm-up for your next metamorphosis, in which you make an audacious new commitment to becoming what you really want to be when you grow up. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): This week, I’m taking a break from my usual pep talks. I think it’s for the best. If I deliver a kindhearted kick in the butt, maybe it will encourage you to make a few course corrections, thereby making it unnecessary for fate to get all tricky and funky on you. So here you go, Taurus: No. 1: The last thing you need is someone to support your flaws and encourage you in your delusions. True friends will offer snappy critiques and crisp advice. No. 2: Figure out once and for all why you keep doing a certain deed that’s beneath you, then gather the strength and get the help you need to quit it. No. 3: It’s your duty to stop doing your duty with such a somber demeanor and heavy tread. To keep from sabotaging the good it can accomplish, put more pleasure into it. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The German word “weltratsel” can be translated as “world riddle.” Coined by the philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, it refers to questions like “What is the meaning of existence?” and “What is the nature of reality?” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Gemini, you’re now primed to deepen your understanding of the world riddle. For the next few weeks, you’ll have an enhanced ability to pry loose useful secrets about big mysteries. Certain passages in the Book of Life that have seemed like gobbledygook to you will suddenly make sense. Bonus: Every time you decipher more of the world riddle, you’ll solve a small piece of your personal riddle. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore all progress depends on the unreasonable man,” George Bernard Shaw wrote in Man and Superman. You are now in an ideal phase to be the sort of unreasonable man or woman who gets life to adapt so as to better serve you and your dreams. Even if it’s true that the emphasis in the past has often been on you bending and shaping yourself to adjust to the circumstances others have wrought, the coming weeks could be different.

46 | MARCH 21–27, 2012 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In his book Word Hero, Jay Heinrichs offers us advice about how to deliver pithy messages that really make an impact. Here’s one tip that would be especially useful for you in the coming days: Exaggerate precisely. Heinrichs gives an example from the work of the illustrious raconteur, American author Mark Twain. Twain did not write, “In a single day, New England’s weather changes a billion times.” Rather, he said, “In the spring I have counted 136 different kinds of weather inside of four-and 20 hours.” Be inspired by Twain’s approach in every way you can imagine, Leo. Make things bigger and wilder and more expansive everywhere you go but do it with exactitude and rigor. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Liminality” is a term that refers to the betwixt and between state. It’s dawn or dusk, when neither night nor day fully rules. It’s the mood that prevails when a transition is imminent or a threshold beckons. During a rite of passage, liminality is the phase when the initiate has left his or her old way of doing things but has not yet been fully accepted or integrated into the new way. Mystical traditions from all over the world recognize this as a shaky but potent situation—a time and place when uncertainty and ambiguity reign even as exciting possibilities loom. You’re now ensconced in liminality. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The Argentinian writer Antonio Porchia said there were two kinds of shadows: “some hide, others reveal.” In recent weeks, you’ve been in constant contact with the shadows that hide. But beginning any moment now, you’ll be wandering away from those rather frustrating enigmas and entering into a dynamic relationship with more evocative mysteries: the shadows that reveal. Be alert for the shift so you won’t get caught assuming that the new shadows are just like the old ones. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Every winter, hordes of ants overrun my house. At least that was true up until recently. This winter, the pests stayed away and that has been very good news. I didn’t have to fight them off with poison and hand-to-hand combat. The bad news? The reason they didn’t invade was because very little rain fell, as it’s supposed to during Northern California winters. The ants weren’t driven above ground by the torrents that usually soak the soil. And so now drought threatens our part of the world. Water shortages may loom. I propose that this scenario is a metaphor for a dilemma you may soon face, Scorpio—except that you will have a choice in the matter: Would you rather deal

with a lack of a fundamental resource or else an influence that’s bothersome but ultimately pretty harmless? SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’re entering one of the most buoyant phases of your astrological cycle. Your mandate is to be brash and bouncy, frothy and irrepressible. To prepare you, I’ve rounded up some exclamatory declarations by poet Michael McClure. Take them with you as you embark on your catalytic adventures. They’ll help you cultivate the right mood. McClure: “Everything is natural. The light on your fingertips is starlight. Life begins with coiling—molecules and nebulae. Cruelty, selfishness and vanity are boring. Each self is many selves. Reason is beauty. Light and darkness are arbitrary divisions. Cleanliness is as undefinable and as natural as filth. The physiological body is pure spirit. Monotony is madness. The frontier is both outside and inside. The universe is the messiah. The senses are gods and goddesses. Where the body is—there are all things.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You know those tall, starched white hats that many chefs wear? Traditionally, they had 100 pleats, which denoted the number of ways a real professional could cook an egg. I urge you to wear one of those hats in the coming weeks—or whatever the equivalent symbol might be for your specialty. It’s high time for you to express your ingenuity in dealing with what’s simple and familiar ... to be inventive and versatile as you show how much you can accomplish using just the basics. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): As I was driving my car in San Francisco late one night, I arrived at a traffic signal that confused me. The green light was radiant and steady but then so was the red light. I came to a complete stop and waited until finally, after about two minutes, the red faded. I suspect you may soon be facing a similar jumble of mixed signals, Aquarius. If that happens, I suggest you do what I did. Don’t move forward—pause until the message is crisp and clear. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): A woman named Joan Ginther has won the Texas Lottery four times, collecting more than $20 million. Is she freakishly lucky? Maybe not, according to Nathaniel Rich’s article in the August 2011 issue of Harper’s. He notes that Ginther has a PhD in math from Stanford and wonders if she has used her substantial understanding of statistics to game the system. Be inspired by her example, Pisces. You now have exceptional power to increase your good fortune through hard work and practical ingenuity.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 39