Issuu on Google+

LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 29 JANUARY 11–17, 2012

FR

TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 11

CONTROLLING ANIMAL CONTROL Dog owners complain about off-leash tickets WEEK IN REVIEW 14

YOU MISSED IT BW’s all new A&E weekly review run down REC 22

OLYMPIC DREAMIN’ Idaho winter athletes look to 2014 FOOD 24

IT’S ALL ABOUT FOOD & BEER Willi B’s moves, Sockeye expands, downtown gets a brewery

“The hotel had been ‘regrettably targeted by a nasty bit of business.’”

SCREEN 20


2 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporters: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Stephen Foster Stephen@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Lisa H. Eller, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow, Ben Wilson CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue.

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

UNDER THE DOME AND UNDER REVIEW And so it begins: Legislature 2012. We sent a team of reporters—cameras and notebooks in hand—to cover Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s State of the State address on January 9, which publicly kicked off the 2012 lawmaking season. If you missed the speech and haven’t had a chance to catch the recap, visit boiseweekly.com and look for the Citydesk post titled “Live Coverage: State of the State Address 2012.” There, you’ll find text of the entire speech, an archive of our live blog during the speech, and a collection of video interviews offering post-speech reactions with lawmakers like Boise Rep. Brian Cronin and Nampa Rep. Brent Crane, as well as Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna, Idaho Freedom Foundation director Wayne Hoffman and Idaho Democratic Party director Shelley Landry. In Boise Weekly, this week kicks off Unda the Rotunda, our weekly column on the Legislature with News Editor George Prentice’s piece “Three Numbers to Watch During the 2012 Legislature.” Every week between now and the Ledge’s sine die, Unda the Rotunda will offer an alternative take on what’s happening under the dome. Brand new this week is an A&E column called Week in Review (Page 14). We spend a lot of time and space in print telling you what’s coming up on the A&E scene each week, but we don’t spend a whole lot of time or space telling you how those events went down. Though we’ve long published reviews online, we’ve decided it’s time to bring those elements into print. While we may still, from time to time, dedicate an entire space to a play or CD review, for example, the Week in Review will highlight a handful of the best—and when warranted, the worst—events of the past week in local A&E. And finally, do you know of an organization that regularly needs volunteer help? We’re putting together our annual volunteer guide and we’d be happy to list your volunteer opportunities. Email the info to Features Editor Deanna Darr at deanna@boiseweekly.com. —Rachael Daigle

Stay & Ski Free Package Person Double Occupancy January 3 – March 31, 2012* $139 Per

Stay in the Sun Valley Lodge or Inn for only $139 per person, double occupancy. The package can be booked multiple days and does not include tax. *A few restrictions and blackout dates apply.

Kids Stay & Ski Free One child (15 years of age and under) per parent stays and skis free. Must stay in same room as parent. Maximum, two children. For more information please call Sun Valley Lift Ticketing at 800.894.9931 or e-mail: lifttickets@sunvalley.com

Tom Wallisch Rail Jam

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Deborah Hardee TITLE: Boise Snow, 2009 MEDIUM: Ink jet photograph ARTIST STATEMENT: The unusual quality of the predawn light drew me outside to capture this dreamlike winter landscape.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

MATI YO UN G

SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE

Dollar Mountain / Saturday, January 14 SCOTT presents the Tom Wallisch Fantasy Rail Jam, judged by Tom Wallisch. Registration for Rail Jam is on-site and open to first 100 participants. The winner of the Rail Jam will receive a full head-toe (pants, coat, goggle, helmet) SCOTT get-up! Registration: 9–11am Poster signing: 10–11am Rail Jam: 1–3pm

For Reservations Call: 1.800.786.8259 or visit sunvalley.com

WELCOME TO

b TRADITION. BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 3


www.boiseweekly.com What you missed this week in the digital world.

inside Editor’s Note

3

Bill Cope

6

Ted Rall

7

Unda the rotunda The 2012 Idaho Legislature 8 by the numbers Citydesk8 News  The dog fight over Boise’s off-leash enforcement11

suspected vandal arraigned in federal court An Occupy Boise protester is accused of defacing the Federal Building with spray paint, but Occupy says his actions were not sanctioned by the group. BW has video of the crime and an update on the suspect’s arraignment.

Treefort Blows Up Treefort Music Fest may be a few months off, but the first tier of tickets— bargain priced at $49—sold out in less than two minutes. Hot. Damn.

Reliving Fiction 101 If you missed BW’s Fiction 101 winners reading their entries at Rediscovered Bookshop last First Thursday, we’ve got your back. Listen to it at Cobweb.

On Camera At video.boisweekly.com this week, you can catch an interview with BW Fiction 101 winner Sarah Masterson and the interesting sights of the GOP’s Idaho straw poll, including the shaking—and we mean shaking—band.

BW Picks

12

Find13 8 days Out

14

Week in Review

14

Sudoku16 Noise Taking the pulse of Nurses 17 Music Guide

18

Screen The Iron Lady20 Rec Checking in with Idaho’s Olympians22 Food Big moves for local eateries24 Beer Guzzler

24

Classifieds25 NYT Crossword

28

FreeWill Astrology 30

4 | January 11–17, 2012 | boiseweekly

www. b o i s e we e kly. c o m


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 5


OPINION/BILL COPE

ANOTHER REBOOTETH? What hath Bob wrought this time? In the beginning, there was an endless universe of cold, lifeless subatomic particles, drifting through unfathomable darkness, heading toward the next Big Bang. It would take another 15, 16 billion years for a Word to show up. —From “Badger” Bob Berzerquierre’s rendition of the Book of John U (Ring, ring) “You’ve reached the number of Robert Berzerquierre. If whatever you have to say is important, say so right now and I’ll call you back when I get good and ready. If it’s not important and you want to piss away my time with some irrelevant horsecrap about something you saw on your damn television or something you heard one of those Republican creeps in Iowa say, let me know that, too, so’s I can forget I ever knew you and not feel guilty about it!” (Beep) “Hey, Bob. I thought you were coming over for some ham and green beans on Christmas. Didn’t you get the message my wife left? Uh … you there? Okie-doke, I’ll try back later. And hey, if I don’t talk to you in the next day or two, remember you’re invited for New Year’s Eve. Don’t bring anything. I bought one of those party trays with cheese and sliced meat on it and I picked up a couple of six packs of some pretty good beer. Oh, and I got a box of fruity sangria. It should be fun. That woman my wife works with … the one with no eye brows? ... well, she’ll be there and the couple who live down the street are coming with their Scattergories game. I’ll let you choose whether we watch Anderson Cooper or Ryan Seacrest come midnight. And if you’re worried about driving home with a fruity sangria buzz on, you can sleep over here, ha ha. See you then.” (Ring, ring) “You’ve reached the number of Robert Berzerquierre. If whatever you have to say is important, say so right now and I’ll call you back when I get good and ready. If it’s not important and you want to piss away my time with some irrelevant horsecrap about something you saw on your damn television or something you heard one of those Republican creeps in Iowa say, let me know that, too, so’s I can forget I ever knew you and not feel guilty about it!” (Beep) “Hey Bob. We missed you last night. We got so wrapped up in Scattergories that it wasn’t until about 10 p.m. my wife said I oughta give you a call. Which I did. But it sounded like you had the phone off the hook. We also played some Pictionary but not for very long because the woman my wife works with … you know, the one with no eye brows? ... got sick and spent about an hour hunkered down with the toilet, and by the time we got her on her feet again, it was almost 1 o’clock and we’d missed New Year’s totally. I should have noticed she was hitting the fruity sangria pretty hard. Anyway, hope everything is OK and you have a Happy New

6 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Year, OK? Give me a call?” (Ring, ring) “You’ve reached the number of Robert Berzerquierre. If whatever you have to say is important, say so right now and I’ll call you back when I get good and ready. If it’s not important and you want to piss away my time with some irrelevant horsecrap about something you saw on your damn television or something you heard one of those Republican creeps in Iowa say, let me know that, too, so’s I can forget I ever knew you and not feel guilty about it!” (Beep) “Hey, Bob, you need to change your message. Those Republicans have all moved on to New Hampshire now and what’s up, anyway? Are you still around? Did you leave town or something? I must have called you about a thousand times by now and haven’t heard a peep back. Gosh, is it something I said? Are you mad at me? Hope you didn’t fall and break a hip or something. Maybe I oughta just drive over there and see if you’re OK. Yeah. That’s what I’ll do. I have to go to that side of town in the morning anyway, so I’ll drop by and check up on you. Jeez, I hope I don’t find you laying on your camper floor, all starved to death with that cat of yours gnawing on your nose, ha ha. See you tomorrow.” (Ring, ring) “Hello. This is the Copes. We’re unable to come to the phone now, but it you leave a message, we’ll get back to you.” (Beep) “Cope! Pick up! I know you’re there. You just f***ing called. Look, I don’t want you coming ov ...” “Hey Bob. Sorry I didn’t pick up first thing. Had to go to the bathroom. Anyway, it’s nice of you to call back. Finally. Gosh, what the heck’s going on? My wife went out and bought you a tin of those smoked oysters you like so much, and you can’t even call and to tell us you can’t make it?” “OK goddammit, if you want me to say I’m sorry, I’m sorry. Tell your wife I’m sorry. I should o‘ called, yeah. It was rude I didn’t. But I’ve been busy. Busier than hell. I meant to call back, but I just got busier and busier and forgot. OK? Tell your wife I’m sorry. That I didn’t mean to be rude. Now I gotta go. I’m still busy. And I’ll be busy all day tomorrow, too. And every day after that. So don’t come over. I’m fine. No broken hip or nothing like that. Just busy, that’s all. Got a lot to get done and I ain’t getting any younger.” “Hey, Bob, what’s got you so busy? Gosh, you’ve been retired ever since I’ve known you. So what are you doing? You didn’t get a job saying ‘howdy’ to shoppers coming into the Walmart, did you?” “Can’t tell you what I’m doing, Cope. I’ll tell you about it when I’m done. And that won’t be for a long, long time. A real long time. So don’t call me. I’ll call you. Good-bye now.” “Hey Bob, that’s no fair. I’d tell you if I were ...” (Click) WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


TED RALL/OPINION

SUICIDAL RULING CLASS Will the rich and powerful try to save themselves? I spent last week at Occupy Miami and Occupy Fort Lauderdale, Fla. One question came up several times: What if the system responds—or pretends to respond—to our demands? What if the political class agrees to create more jobs, help the unemployed, let distressed homeowners keep their houses? Then the Occupy movement (and American progressivism) will be out of business. “President Obama could finish us off overnight,” I said. “A speech would be enough. He wouldn’t even have to do anything.” President Barack Obama could announce a big jobs bill, knowing full well that Congressional Republicans would kill it. It would probably increase his re-election prospects. But don’t worry, he won’t. America’s corporate rulers and their pet politicians know people are furious. They know history. Sooner or later, the downtrodden rise up. There’s no doubt about the nature or scale of the problem. Economists from left to right agree that the United States suffers from high structural inequality. “At least five large studies in recent years have found the United States to be less mobile than comparable nations,” reported The New York Times on Jan. 5. According to a Swedish study, 42 percent of American boys raised by parents whose incomes fall in the bottom 40 percent of wage earners remain in the bottom 40 percent as adults—a much higher rate than such nations as Denmark (25 percent) and England (30 percent). Half of Americans live under two times the poverty line. But the persistence of poverty in America is unique among developed industrialized nations.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

“Miles Corak, an economist at the University of Ottawa, found that just 16 percent of Canadian men raised in the bottom 10th of incomes stayed there as adults, compared with 22 percent of Americans. Similarly, 26 percent of American men raised at the top 10th stayed there, but just 18 percent of Canadians,” writes the New York Times. When family background determines your fate, you look for other options. Like getting rid of the system that makes things that way. There is no better predictor of revolution than an absence of economic mobility. During the 1930s and 1960s, liberal leaders ended street protests by promising change. Why not now? Why isn’t anyone promising to address income inequality? First, the rich are feeling squeezed. The global capitalist system no longer has much room to expand. Feeling squeezed, our rulers aren’t in the mood to be generous. Second, the ruling classes have fooled themselves into believing they no longer need to exploit workers to extract surplus value. Third, the rich think they can insulate themselves from the masses of the dispossessed, behind high-tech alarm systems inside their gated communities. Finally, there has always been a division within the elites between enlightened liberals and hardass thieves. The liberals don’t like us; they fear us. So they try to keep us satisfied enough not to revolt. The thieves count on brute force to keep the barbarians at bay. The balance of power has shifted to the thieves, which is why figures like Obama can’t even pretend to care about the issues most important to the great majority of people.

We are located right around the corner from BSU Stadium.

1021 Brodway Ave. Boise ID 83702 (208) 385-9300 newtandharolds.com Follow:

HAPPY NEW GEAR! Winter discounts NOW.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 7


CITYDESK/NEWS NUCLEAR DEVELOPER SUED AGAIN

8 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

THREE NUMBERS TO WATCH DURING THE 2012 LEGISLATURE Revenues, unemployment and exports numbers will be key GEORGE PRENTICE Previewing the Idaho Legislature is a bit of a cottage industry—with five legislative previews scheduled in early January, each offering insight from self-promoted insiders over breakfast, lunch or cocktails. But one need look no further than a few select numbers to keep tabs on whether lawmakers will either pull Idaho out of its worst recession in a generation or mire the state in partisanship in a run-up to what is surely to be a bruising election season.

1. THE REVENUE NUMBER: KEEP AN EYE ON SEN. DIANE BILYEU’S PROJECTION Contrary to popular opinion, the State of the State address is not the starting pistol to the legislative session. In fact, lawmakers began meeting a full week before Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter laid out his vision before the legislature on January 9. The Legislature’s Economic Outlook and Revenue Assessment Committee—18 bi-partisan members of the Idaho House and Senate—sat through marathon hearings while debriefing analysts, managers and economists about each of Idaho’s big-ticket industries: agriculture, construction, health care, forestry, real estate, technology, you name it. The information was not simply anecdotal. EORAC members were tasked with the first critical homework assignment of the legislative year: to come up with a best guess of what Idaho’s general fund revenue will look like for Fiscal Year 2013, which begins July 1, 2012. And there is some gamesmanship involved. Legislative

BEN WI LSO N

Alternate Energy Holdings, the wannabenuclear developer, wasted no time in the new year boasting to media and shareholders of its intentions to AEHI executives say they still move forward intend to build a $10 billion with a nuclear nuclear facility in Idaho. power plant in Southwest Idaho. In a Jan. 3 press release, AEHI said it was ready to move toward site approval work in advance of a nuke site in Payette County. But neither Alternate Energy CEO Don Gillispie nor any of his underlings sent out a press release when they were slapped with a class-action lawsuit, filed Dec. 20, 2011, in federal court, accusing Gillispie of securities fraud. Lead plaintiff Lance Teague filed the suit, alleging the company “engaged in a scheme to manipulate and artificially inflate the market prices of Alternate Energy stock by paying stock promoters to create artificial demand in the marketplace.” The suit also alleged that Gillispie and his AEHI officers “misrepresented the company’s true financial condition.” Gillispie also hasn’t sent out any press releases updating investors on behindclosed-door mediation with the Securities and Exchange Commission under way at Boise’s federal courthouse. AEHI still has to answer the SEC’s 27-page complaint, alleging that the company defrauded the public. The parties have been meeting since September 2011 in confidential settlement conferences with U.S. Magistrate Judge Larry Boyle serving as a mediator. The SEC said AEHI’s tax filings for fiscal year 2010 indicated the company had “minimum liquid assets and would be reliant upon stock and/or debt offerings to fund any kind of nuclear operations.” A Citydesk review of AEHI’s most-recent quarterly financials indicated that the company operated at more than a $1 million loss for the quarter ending Sept. 30, 2011. AEHI also hasn’t sent out any recent press releases to the media or investors representing the company’s stock performance, which has lost half of its value since August 2011. As BW was going to press, AEHI was being traded for 6 cents a share in OTCQB markets. But AEHI’s Jan. 3 statement indicated that company officials are ready to move forward, filing a 60-day notice with Payette County, which it called a “key prerequisite for the next phase of the project.” The company said the legal filing was prior to what it called “official work, including core boring, environmental study and installation of meteorological survey towers.” “We have waited a long time to get to this phase,” said Gillispie. “In part because of several other steps that had to be accomplished first.” —George Prentice

NEWS/UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

budget analyst Keith Bybee quickly invoked a popular game show in “awarding” last year’s best guesser. “Sen. Diane Bilyeu was the Price is Right winner,” said Bybee. “She came closest to last year’s real revenue collections without going over.” In January 2011, Bilyeu, a Democrat representing Pocatello’s District 29, estimated that last year’s general fund revenues would come in at $2.42 billion. Her guess was quite impressive, considering that when the books were closed, Idaho’s actual FY 2011 collections totaled $2.44 billion. Otter made a $100 wager with former

Gov. Cecil Andrus last year regarding revenue projections for FY 2011. Ignoring his own chief economist Mike Ferguson’s revenue forecast of $2.43 billion, Otter and the Legislature instead chose to craft a budget based on a much lower estimate of $2.29 billion. Andrus called out Otter, saying the real number would come in much closer to Ferguson’s guess. Otter lost the bet, paying Andrus $100. Ferguson has since stepped away from his state job, and is now heading the Idaho Center for Fiscal Policy, a non-profit group analyzing tax and budget policy.

2. IDAHO’S UNEMPLOYMENT: WHAT’S THE REAL NUMBER? Revenue collections—corporate taxes, individual taxes, sales taxes—all point in one direction: employment. The more Idahoans employed, the healthier the economy. It’s that simple. It’s also that complex. “The economy simply isn’t producing jobs fast enough,” state economist Derek Santos told EORAC members. “There’s a great amount of uncertainty.” The recession devastated Idaho. In statistics unveiled January 5, Idaho Department of Labor spokesman Bob Fick said at the height of the recession, the Gem State experienced the second-worst job loss in the region, second only to Nevada. “We lost more than 8 percent of our workforce,” said Fick. Compare that to Oregon’s loss of 6.5 percent, Washington’s loss of 4.2 percent and Utah’s loss of 3.8 percent. Post-recession (November 2010-November 2011), Idaho has gained only .2 percent in jobs. “This last year [2011], we saw the same economic malaise that we experienced in the final nine months of 2010,” said Fick. Lawmakers, heads in hands, listened intently to Fick’s news but not all of the headlines were 10 terrible. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 9


NEWS/UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA CON’T “More recently, our unemployment 3. BILLIONS IN EXPORTS, rate has fallen,” said Fick. “And if our MILLIONS IN PAYROLL TAXES: most recent jobless rate [8.5 percent] THE ASIAN SOLUTION holds, that would be the largest drop In 2010, Idaho reported $5.15 billion in Idaho unemployment since the in export commodities. Food, agriculture, double-digit recession of the 1980s.” transportation products, minerals and fertilBut without missing a beat, Fick cautioned izer all paled in comparison to electronics. legislators to consider the new complexion of In fact, 58 percent of all Idaho products Idaho’s unemployed, underemployed and just- sold overseas were electronics. That doesn’t plain frustrated. necessarily mean the electronics are shipped The “frustrated,” according to Fick, are from Idaho, but they are certainly sold from the approximately 1 percent of the potential an Idaho company: Micron. workforce that “has become discouraged “There are some people out there who are about the job market and not convinced that we’re selling on any official chart. They’ve Idaho to China. I can assure dropped out. you that we’re not,” said Jeff CRITICAL DATES OF THE “Add that 1 percent to an Sayer, the Eastern Idaho busi2012 LEGISLATURE approximate 9 percent unemnessman who recently took Joint Finance-Appropriations ployed,” said Fick. “And then over as director of the Idaho Committee Budget Hearings on top of that is another 6.4 Department of Commerce. Jan. 16-Jan. 19: Idaho percent of Idahoans underemBut Sayer wasn’t completeDepartment of Health ployed. These are the tens-ofly correct. In fact, Micron’s and Welfare thousands who have taken revenue for Fiscal Year 2010 Jan. 23-Jan. 25: Higher edupart-time jobs when they are in indicated that a whopping 70 cation including Boise need of full-time employment.” percent of its revenue came State, University of Idaho Combine all three and from Asia, 21 percent came and College of Western Idaho you have more than 100,000 from the Americas and 9 people looking for jobs. percent from Europe. Jan. 26-Jan. 27: K-12 public education “And that doesn’t include “There’s a tremendous people who have full-time jobs amount of business in Asia,” Jan. 31: Idaho Department who feel that their salary is said Sayer. “We’re going to of Fish and Game inadequate, or that they aren’t spend a lot more time there. Feb. 1: Departments of being put to best use considerWe’re going to make sure Agriculture and Environmental Quality ing their skills” he said. we’re a great trading partner In other words, the next for them.” Feb. 3: Public Hearing on Fiscal Year 2013 Budget time you read Idaho’s unemSayer pointed to Idaho’s ployment figures, you may as top export destinations in Feb. 7: Idaho Department of Correction well tack on at least 7 percent. 2010: Singapore ($792 mil“It will take at least to the lion), China, Hong Kong and Feb. 10: Idaho Transportaend of 2014, and possibly into Macau ($657 million), Taiwan tion Department 2015, before Idaho recovers ($627 million), South Korea Feb. 13: Tax Commission the nearly 60,000 jobs that ($601 million), and Japan Feb. 20: Begin budget the recession took from us,” ($273 million). setting said Fick. It’s estimated that a March 9: Complete budget While Canyon County minimum of 5,000 Idahoans setting Republican Sen. Curt McKare employed by Micron enzie, representing District (Micron’s government affairs 12, expressed concerned over manager Mike Reynoldson the labor statistics, he said he was even more wouldn’t give exact payroll numbers when frustrated over what kind of salaries might he spoke to EORAC members on Jan. 6). emerge in a post-recession economy. Thousands more jobs hang in the balance “Our general fund is going to reflect more when considering Micron’s tangential ecoof what people are making rather than what nomic impact. the unemployment rate will be,” said McKenAs an example, Reynoldson pointed zie. “For example, a college graduate asking to Micron’s current construction of a me if I want fries with my burger.” 175,000-square-foot research and developFick unveiled a much-anticipated analysis ment fabrication facility on its Boise campus. of what kind of jobs might await the eager“About 550 local jobs can be attributed to-be-employed. According to a Labor to the construction,” said Reynoldson. “Plus Department survey, Idaho is expected to see I can tell you that we have about 5 million the greatest growth in health care and social pounds of steel in that construction and a lot assistance—as many as 4,700 new jobs in a of the fabrication was done in Middleton.” two-year period. Other significant growth Reynoldson did make a point of saying is projected to occur in retail (1,200 jobs), that Micron recently added approximately construction (600 jobs) and the generic cat12 percent to its Idaho workforce. Payroll egory of professional and business services taxes contribute significantly to Idaho’s (800 jobs). On the downside, the analysis general fund revenues, but Micron pays little projected further shrinkage in federal govern- to no corporate income taxes because of an ment jobs in Idaho (a loss of more than 600) agreement with the state that allows the corand mining, forestry and/or logging jobs (a poration to carry forward its financial losses 230 deficit). against any company profits. 8

10 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

DOG FIGHT Dog owners complain about animal control’s aggressive behavior ANDREW CRISP Damiana Uberuaga lives across the street from Manitou Park, where she likes to take her pooch to one of Boise’s pilot off-leash areas. But based on what she heard from three other dog owners, she’s wary of how the city’s dog park rules are being enforced. “My neighbor Shelley—she was telling me to beware of the dog police, they’re vicious here. They come around in a white van or on a bicycle and try to fine people,” said Uberuaga. Uberuaga fired off a letter to Mayor Dave Bieter, Boise City Council members Maryanne Jordan and Elaine Clegg, as well as the City Clerk’s Office, expressing her concern with the officers’ conduct, but a spokesman for the Mayor’s Office said the city stands behind the officers’ actions. “Three separate women have been treated poorly by plain-clothes dog officers,” Uberuaga told Boise Weekly. “Threatened, berated— it’s totally unneeded to treat them like that.” On Dec. 29, 2011, Sherry Gorrell was walking her rottweiler, Gus, through Boise’s Memorial Park. It’s Gorrell’s first pup in 18 years, and like most dogs he had to answer the call of nature while visiting the park. According to Gorrell, she let go of Gus’ leash while he was mid-bowel movement, and hurried to grab another green bag from a nearby dog bag receptacle. Gus finished his business and she turned to leave. “Just as I was leaving the park ... I hear some really loud voice,” said Gorrell. “I turn around and there’s this guy behind me and he’s walking toward me. Then I hear clear as a bell, ‘Don’t make me have to chase you.’” Gorrell said she went into “a fight or flight mode.”

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Sherry Gorrell received two tickets from animal control for an incident involving her dog Gus.

“He’s walking up and he’s in just regular clothes,” she said. “And I noticed that he had this ID thing hanging around his neck, like an office worker would wear.” The man, one of two animal control officers who patrol Boise parks, told Gorrell that he would have to cite her for having her dog off-leash. Ultimately, Gorrell was issued two tickets—one for $75 for not having Gus’ leash in-hand and a second for $65 for not having a dog license. Later Gorrell contacted Bieter’s office, voicing her concerns about what she called the “aggressive” treatment she had received. The animal control officers report to Stuart Prince, a supervisor in the City Clerk’s Office. Officers submit a monthly brief to Prince detailing the tickets they’ve issued. Gorrell arranged a meeting with Prince and two animal control officers (one male, one female) about their conduct. “The woman officer was very receptive,” said Gorrell, who said she works as a

mediator. “But this guy could not shut up. He always has an excuse, a reason, and his whole behavior is reprimanding and frankly patronizing.” Adam Park, spokesman for the Mayor’s Office, has since responded to the complaints of the three women mentioned in Uberuaga’s email. But Gorrell told BW that she had yet to be contacted by anyone from the city. Park said that the tickets were issued fairly but also indicated some procedural changes may arise in the wake of the incidents. “Animal control has adjusted its contact procedures based on input received from one of the complainants so that officers will now immediately identify themselves,” wrote Park. Park also said the officers will wear brighter uniforms starting later this year, again in an effort to better identify themselves. Gorrell eventually paid the off-leash ticket. By submitting a newly purchased dog license, she avoided any penalty for her pooch being unlicensed.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 11


BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events M AX PU C C IAR IELLO

Help spring Bill Coffey from the slammer at the Old Idaho Penitentiary.

FRIDAY JAN. 13 Watch the Momix dancers bend it like Botanica.

ESCAPING HUNGER CELEBRITY LOCK UP

FRIDAY JAN. 13 dance MOMIX: BOTANICA There’s more to dance than just ballet. The avant-garde troupe Momix proves that with per formances that push the boundaries of modern choreography. While Cirque du Soleil is often the modern dance inception point for most, Momix’s production Botanica does it one better, taking the movements of dance and bringing them back to nature. Botanica morphs the human body into organic forms—the dancers become the building blocks of plants, animals and other natural, living things. In provocative costumes with color ful props, their bodies become the ribs of leaves and trumpets of daffodils, and float with butterfly wings. The company operates under the tutelage of renowned choreographer Moses Pendleton and associate director Cynthia Quinn. The pair have crafted numerous other performances, directed dances for national and international feature films and won an International Emmy for Best Performing Arts Special. Their work was broadcast in 55 countries on PBS’s Dance in America series. Botanica dancers were recently featured in a Target commercial that aired during the 2010 Golden Globe awards, their movements blending with the stage in a fluid tapestry of red and white. They’ve also done commercials for Mercedez Benz and Fiat motor companies. Using lighting, shadow, minimal props and the malleable forms of the human body to create its illusions, Botanica defies what is normally thought possible with dance. The motions become shrouded in mystique as they move through beams of light and pockets of shadow, pulling the audience into whimsy. 8 p.m., $29.50-$39.50 plus service fees. Morrison Center, 2201 W. Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

MONDAY JAN. 16 MLK MLK DAY OF GREATNESS It began at Boise State in 1989 as a day of civil disobedience to call for a real Idaho commemoration of Dr. Martin

12 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

the clink

Luther King Jr. It’s now a rally that draws thousands to the university to march through downtown. This year, the event is refocusing on giving back to the community. On Monday, Jan. 16, Boise celebrates the spirit of the late, world-renowned civil-rights leader. His legacy calls citizens of all colors and creeds to a day of

A gang of local celebrities are about to pay their dues. On Friday, Jan. 13, at the Old Idaho Penitentiary, a few of Boise’s finest are going into lockup to feed the hungry. Inmates including musician Niccole Blaze, Idaho Steelheads’ mascot Blue, KTVB Channel 7 reporter Ty Brennan, musicians Bill Coffey and Nate Fowler, KBOI Channel 2 news anchor Natalie Hurst and Boise Rock School CEO Ryan Peck will do some hard time to raise money for the Idaho Foodbank, as well as a scholarship fund that contributes to field trips for local school kids. While on the inside, the inmates will pass the time by fashioning shanks, fermenting pruno and trying to acquire as many food and monetary donations as possible. The convict that takes in the largest cache will win the prestigious Warden’s Cup and a heaping dose of extra prison cred. Once they complete their time, the celeb jailbirds will be let out of their cells, paroled back into society and sent off to resume their lives as local luminaries—with a few less hungry bellies in the city. The event is sponsored by the Idaho State Historical Society and the Friends of the Historical Museum. These two history-loving organizations would appreciate some canned food items or a couple bucks to donate to the cause. To catch a preview of these grisly felons, head over to the penitentiary’s Facebook page. 6-7 p.m., donations encouraged. Old Idaho Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, 208-334-2844, history.idaho.gov/old-idahopenitentiary.

community volunteerism, a Day of Greatness. Past guest speakers with the Living Legacy showcase have included the Rev. Jesse Jackson, Dr. Cornel West and King’s son, Martin Luther King III. These tireless advocates and others have dedicated their lives to the pursuit of justice and equality. The formula of years past will still be followed. After 9 a.m. poster-making, the group will march down Capitol Boulevard for a rally on the steps of the Idaho State Capitol building. From the steps, Boise State students and guest speakers will commemorate the history of civil rights in America. But this year, the day doesn’t end at the Statehouse steps.

For those with time to give, local nonprofit organizations will recruit for afternoon volunteer opportunities. Participators can choose just to march, or turn the entire day into a communityoriented day of action, designed to foster the lasting tradition King emulated. “Everybody can be great, because everybody can serve,” King once said, and that motto serves as the core of the event. The Day of Greatness serves as a living tribute. 9 a.m. poster making, FREE. Boise State Student Union Hatch Ballroom. 11 a.m. march down Capitol Boulevard and rally at Statehouse steps, FREE. For more information, visit mlk.boisestate.edu. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


JON M AR GOLIS

TAR A M OR GAN

ANDY HOLLINGWORTH

FIND

March Fourth takes it from the street to your seat at the Egyptian.

BROADWAY VINTAGE Wide-eyed weirdo Emo Philips will grace the stage at Liquid Laughs.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY JAN. 13-14 comedy EMO PHILIPS After the closure of the Funny Bone in 2008 and the subsequent failure of its successor, Hijinx, comedy went into hibernation in Boise. But during the next two years, it simmered as a DIY movement and slowly built enough momentum to support a dedicated club. That club, Liquid Laughs, is starting its new program of comedy four nights a week strong, with one of the world’s most legendary weirdos—Emo Philips. Those who have seen Weird Al Yankovic’s movie, UHF, might remember Philips as the clumsy falsetto-voiced woodshop teacher who severs most of his fingers in the course of a single project. “Just call me Mr. Butterfingers!” goes his catchphrase. But Philips was legendar y as a stand-up comedian for more than a decade before his appearance in that film. And for good reason. With his pageboy haircut, clothes picked from Calvin Klein’s colorblind lunatic collection and mannerisms that seem attributable to a severe head injury, Philips would be hysterical simply reading the phone book. But when you stack his twisted comic writing on top of it—bizarre riffs about his religion of eating coleslaw or the importance of opening car doors for ladies on dates instead of just swimming for the surface—the whole package is a unique and iconic act that leaves audiences in stitches. Philips has appeared numerous times on Late Night with David Letterman, The Weird Al Show and Friday Night Live in the United Kingdom. This week, he’ll be in Boise. Unless you genuinely hate the sound of laughter, make sure to be there. With Ryan Wingfield. 8 p.m., $15. Liquid Laughs, 405 S. Eighth St., 208-941-2459, liquidlaughs.com.

FRIDAY JAN. 13 theater BOISE LITTLE THEATER’S OUT OF ORDER Boise’s favorite little theater company is prepping a production of the awardwinning farce Out of Order.

S U B M I T

The play will run for most of January and features a collection of some of the city’s best amateur thespians. Out of Order was written in 1990 by English playwright Ray Cooney, and BLT’s version of the comedy is directed by Kevin Kinsey. In this story, a government junior minister cheats on his wife with the opposition’s typist, Ms. Jane Worthing-

WEDNESDAY JAN. 18 music MARCH FOURTH In a recent appearance on NPR’s Fresh Air, Family Guy creator Seth MacFarlane said the reason he insisted his show have a theme song is that it’s just good showmanship, something that really hasn’t changed in hundreds of years. But in an age of musical introversion, showmanship is something that is frequently discounted. Music is only one element of a stage performance and arguably the one least responsible for the total atmosphere. This week, Boise will host two musical acts for whom showmanship is key—bands whose music, while fantastic, is just the tip of the iceberg: March Fourth Marching Band and Diego’s Umbrella. March Fourth, which are unofficial mascots of Portland, Ore., features a rotating cast of dozens of musicians playing loud brassy marches and Sousafied reboots of pop music styles, while a circus rages onstage. Stilt-walkers perfect complex acrobatic moves, as dancers perform on strings as marionettes and hula-hoopers whirl. All of them are dressed in the sort of marching band regalia you’d expect to see in the LSD Mardi Gras scene from Easy Rider. It’s a spectacle that has earned March Fourth appearances at what the band describes as nearly every freak festival on Earth, including Bumbershoot and Tour de Fat. Opening the show are the San Franciso-based gypsy rockers Diego’s Umbrella, who bring a rare form of fiddle-fueled polkafied chaos to the stage, and The Pimps of Joytime, who performed a dancetastic set at last summer’s Tour de Fat. All these bands get showmanship. And if you check them out, you’re going to get a helluva show and help the Boise Bicycle Project in the process, since the nonprofit will receive a portion of the proceeds. With Diego’s Umbrella and The Pimps of Joytime. 8 p.m., $22 advance, $25 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

ton. His personal secretary tries to help him navigate the messy situation but things just get more tangled up as the events unfold. Variety described the play as, “A textbook model of pyramiding lunacy.” Boise Little Theater is run solely by volunteers, and the nonprofit organization has been putting up shows for more than 60 years.

Joel and Rebecca Wolfe recently purchased a mid-century home. Not content to fill it with microfiber sofas and cheap Ikea shelving, the two set out to find mid-century modern furniture to match the house’s vintage aesthetic. And that’s how they met Mike Templeman. A recent Boise transplant, Templeman briefly ran an appointment-only vintage store on Broadway Avenue. “I actually moved from Portland, [Ore.], to here hoping to start something with furniture,” said Templeman. “I’ve always had the passion for it.” After selling the Wolfes a few BROADWAY VINTAGE pieces of furniture, Templeman 1524 S. Broadway Ave. 208-392-7247 became fast friends with Joel. broadwayvintage On a road trip to pick up more @hotmail.com vintage goods in Salt Lake City, Joel made a business proposal. “He brought up the idea of us maybe going in together and getting a place,” said Templeman. “A week later, we did.” That place, Broadway Vintage, opened its doors in December 2011. Brimming with sleek couches, starburst clocks and amoeba-shaped coffee tables, the store is an affordable haven for vintage furniture enthusiasts. Broadway Vintage will host a grand-opening party on Friday, Jan. 13, in collaboration with neighbor Devotion Tattoo. “Devotion Tattoo is doing their Friday the 13th event, when they have $13 tattoos and body piercings, and they’re having a taco truck and stuff,” explained Rebecca. “So we’re kind of piggybacking with them.” —Tara Morgan

Out of Order will continue through Saturday, Jan. 28. Friday, Jan. 13, and Saturday, Jan. 14, 8 p.m. $12.50 general admission, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St. For more information call 208- 342-5104 or visit boiselittletheater.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 13


8 DAYS OUT 8 DAYS/WEEK IN REVIEW TAR A M OR GAN

WEDNESDAY JAN. 11 Workshops & Classes SNOWSHOEING BASICS—Join REI expert Nancy Rollins for a class on the basics of snowshoeing. Registration required. Visit rei.com/boise to sign up. 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald, Boise, 208-322-1141, rei.com/ stores/boise.

Art WORKING WITH CHARCOAL— Learn the basics of working with charcoal pencils in this twosession class (also on Jan. 18). Fee includes paper and board. Starter kit for $10. Instructor: Ginger Lantz. 6:30 p.m. $45$50. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Talks & Lectures WINTER WEDNESDAYS LUNCH AND LEARN—Learn all about critters and the signs they leave in the snow. Lunch catered by Open Table Catering. For more information, call 208-334-2225. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $16.50. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-334-2225, fishandgame.idaho.gov.

THURSDAY JAN. 12 On Stage LAUGH OUT LOUD TOUR—Chicago’s legendary comedy theatre company The Second City returns for the ninth consecutive year. 7 p.m. $25-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools. org. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW-RECYCLED MINDS—Enjoy the talents of this improvisational comedy troupe. Tickets can be purchased at Liquid or Solid, at liquidlaughs.com or by calling 208-941-2459. 7 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

FRIDAY JAN. 13 Festivals & Events 2012 WESTERN IDAHO FLY FISHING EXPO—Featuring seminars and speakers for all types and levels of fly fishers. Check out the Expo Facebook page. Email: labrecque24@yahoo. com. Noon-9 p.m. $5, free for kids under age 14. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com.

14 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Broken Puppy was a humourously minimalist event with not-so-minimalist food.

WEEK IN REVIEW: THE FIRST INSTALLMENT Covering the arts in Boise isn’t all free theater tickets and shooting the shit with our favorite musicians. After a full day of eyestrain and early onset arthritis, we drag our butts out to the late-night concerts and art openings that we spend our days telling you about. Then we wake up, throw back a couple Advil and an EmergenC and do it all over again. But we keep at it because you trust us to be your eyes and ears in the Boise arts scene. And though you’ll find full coverage of the week’s A&E events at boiseweekly.com, we decided it was high time we brought that coverage low tech. This week we’re proud to welcome a new A&E column, Week in Review, where you can find all the dirt we kicked up at local arts and music happenings over the past week. On Jan. 3, former A&E Editor and current freelancer Amy Atkins swung by Cirque du Soleil’s larger-than-life Michael Jackson: The Immortal world tour at Taco Bell arena. Dazzled by acrobats in glittering bodysuits and a full-sized replica of the gates to Jackson’s Neverland Ranch, Atkins hummed along to classics like “Wanna Be Startin’ Something.” Though the production squeezed in a few overly saccharine moments—like when a performer dressed as Jackson’s chimpanzee Bubbles skittered around the stage on all fours—Atkins said it was nonetheless a thrilling evening. While BW’s Fiction 101 Reading on First Thursday, Jan. 5, was sadly lacking in acrobats in cheesy chimp suits, it did offer plenty of thrills. Rediscovered Bookshop hosted the packed event, which featured this year’s winning 101-word scribes. Winner Sarah Masterson described her distrust of the ocean before recanting “Big,” which snagged the top $500 prize. In a video interview with BW’s Josh Gross, Masterson said, “I’m really hoping that I can put [the money] towards something in the arts, even if it allows me to survive, not work and write for a few months—or a week given how much I eat.” On January 6 at Neurolux, Mozam Beaks played its first official live show with cardboard-cut-out-loving loop master James Orr. Mozam Beaks’ Christopher Smith and Trevor Kamplain tweaked knobs, pounded synths and bobbed their heads to an array of lengthy looping beats. The vibe was an unexpected mash-up of old school hip-hop and drugged-out chill wave. We’re looking forward to hearing more from these guys. Moving from Mozam Beaks to broken puppies, on January 7, Black Hunger Gallery hosted a one-night-only exhibition of a broken Jeff Koons balloon sculpture. The exhibit was humorously minimalist—a scratched puppy rested on a duct taped mirror plate under a plastic box with the words “Broken Puppy” strung up in gold lettering. But the real party was in the back studio space, where Black Hunger artists circled the room chatting about overpriced art and offering shots of Patron and truffled mac and cheese bites. All in all, pretty fancy for a quiet night in the North End. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT ESCAPING HUNGER CELEBRITY LOCK-UP— A gang of local celebrities will hit the clink in an effort to raise funds for the Idaho Foodbank. See Picks, Page 12. 6-7 p.m. Old Idaho Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Rd. Boise, 208-334-2844, history.idaho. gov/old-idaho-penitentiary.

On Stage IMPROVOLUTION BATTLEPROV—Improvolution comedy troupe celebrates its one-year anniversary at the Linen Building. Audience involvement will get a sweet reward. More info at boiselaughs.com. 7 p.m. $7. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. LAUGH OUT LOUD TOUR—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $25-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW-EMO PHILIPS—Enjoy the comedic stylings of Emo Philips and Ryan Wingfield at this grand-opening show for the Liquid Laughs comedy show series. Tickets can be purchased at Liquid or Solid, at liquidlaughs.com or by calling 208-941-2459. See Picks, Page 13. 7 p.m. $15. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

MOMIX: BOTANICA— This internationally known company of dancer-illusionists will present work of exceptional inventiveness and physical beauty. Tickets available at the Morrison Center box office, Select-A-Seat outlets and at idahotickets.com. See Picks, Page 12. 8 p.m. $29.50-$39.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu.

Workshops & Classes

OUT OF ORDER—When Richard Willey, a government junior minister, plans to spend the evening with one of the opposition’s typists, things go disastrously wrong. See Picks, Page 13. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Sports & Fitness

UNNECESSARY FARCE—Two cops. Three crooks. Eight doors. Go. In a cheap motel room, an embezzling mayor is supposed to meet with his female accountant, while in the room next door, two undercover cops wait to catch the meeting on videotape. But there’s some confusion as to who’s in which room, who’s being videotaped, who’s taken the money, who’s hired a hit man and why the accountant keeps taking off her clothes. 8:15 p.m. $15. 251 N. Orchard St., Boise. 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

IDAHO STAMPEDE BASKETBALL—Vs. Los Angeles D-Fenders. 7 p.m. $7-$20. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com/home.aspx.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

NEW TELESCOPE FOR CHRISTMAS—Got a new telescope? Wanna learn how to use it? Members of Boise Astronomical Society will be available to help you and give information on astronomy classes for beginners, as well as club info. 7 p.m. FREE. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-3439895, scidaho.org.

CLIMBING BASICS—An introductory class designed to teach the basics needed for fun and safe climbing. For ages 14 and older. 7-8 p.m. $15-$17. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

SATURDAY JAN. 14 Festivals & Events 2012 WESTERN IDAHO FLY FISHING EXPO—See Friday. Noon-9 p.m. $5, free for kids under age 14. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com. BROKEN RESOLUTIONS BALL—Enjoy music by Interstate and Mike Quinn, as well as stand-up comedy by Sean Hancock while you celebrate your already-broken 2012 resolutions. All ages are welcome, a full bar is available with ID, and Pie Hole Pizza will serve up slices. 8 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. SQUARE DANCE—Bring the whole family and dance ‘till you drop. No smoking or alcohol. For more info, email tvcwda.idaho@ gmail.com. 6:30-11 p.m. FREE. Boise Valley Square and Round Dance Center, 6534 Diamond St., Boise, 208-342-0890, treasurevalleycwda.org.

On Stage LAUGH OUT LOUD TOUR—See Friday. 7 p.m. $25-$35. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools. org.

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

UNNECESSARY FARCE—See Friday. 8:15 p.m. $15. 251 N. Orchard St., Boise. 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com. LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW-EMO PHILIPS—See Friday. 7 p.m. $15. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 15


8 DAYS OUT Workshops & Classes INTRO TO BATIK—Learn traditional and contemporary hot wax resist techniques with ancient methods and fun alternative tools. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. $35-$65. Sage International School, 457 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-343-7243, sageinternationalschool.org. MELANGE DANCE WORKSHOP—High-energy, 90-minute workshop includes a dance combination broken down stepby-step mixed up with pilatesstyle strengthening moves. No experience necessary. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $12. Ophidia Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com. OUT OF ORDER—See Friday. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Sports & Fitness IDAHO STAMPEDE BASKETBALL—Vs. Los Angeles D-Fenders. 7 p.m. $7-$20. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com/home.aspx.

SUNDAY JAN. 15 On Stage LIQUID LAUGHS COMEDY SHOW-RECYCLED MINDS—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Kids & Teens

MONDAY JAN. 16

PRESCHOOL NATURE CLASS— Designed for children ages 3½ to 7 years, each class will include a story, craft, song and/or a game. Pre-registration required at 208-608-7300. 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. $18.50 for Boise residents, $28.13 nonresidents. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, cityofboise.org/Bee/WaterShed.

Festivals & Events MLK CELEBRATION— This annual celebration will include a Day of Greatness, modeled after King’s example. Poster making to be followed by a march down Capitol Boulevard, ending with a rally on the statehouse steps. Nonprofit organizations will be on hand to offer volunteering opportunities. See Picks, Page 12. 9 a.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, sub.boisestate. edu.

WEDNESDAY JAN. 18 Concerts MARCH FOURTH MARCHING BAND— This circus-style show also features Diego’s Umbrella and Pimps of Joytime. Beer and wine will be available, and proceeds from the raffle and bar sales benefit the Boise Bicycle Project. See Picks, Page 13. 8 p.m. $22 advance, $25 door, Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Literature 5X5 READING SERIES— Catch five exciting new plays in their raw stages, and join a discussion with the actors and directors. 7 p.m. $12. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Sports & Fitness

TUESDAY JAN. 17

INTRO TO ARGENTINE TANGO—Boise Parks and Recreation and the Boise Tango Society present this free introductory class to Argentine tango. This class will include instruction on the basic body mechanics, beat, and rhythms used by all tango dancers. Open to everyone ages 18 and older. For details, contact Clay Lee at clee@cityofboise. org or call 208-608-7684. 7:158:30 p.m. FREE. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise, 208-384-4486, cityofboise.org/parks.

Workshops & Classes BASIC SEWING SKILLS—In this four-week class, learn how to use a sewing machine, select and purchase fabric and more. Three projects will be completed during class. Machines and sewing tools provided. For more info, email rec@cityofnampa.us. 9:30 a.m.-noon. $50. Bluebird Quilt Studio, 1309 Second St. S., Suite A, Nampa, 208-467-4148, bluebirdquiltstudio.com.

Food & Drink A MAD HATTER’S TEA PARTY— Join Shangri-La Tea Room and Cafe and Idaho Dance Theatre for tea, light snacks and a preview of IDT’s Winter Performance. Favorite Alice in Wonderland characters will be in attendance, and prizes will be given out for creative costumes. Purchase tickets at idahodancetheatre.org. 2-4 p.m. $25. Shangri La Tea Room, 1800 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-4240273, shangri-la-tea.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Sports & Fitness TRY CURLING—Ready to try a new winter sport? Learn about curling and throw some stones with the Boise Curling Club. Space is limited; visit boisecurlingclub.org to register online or for more info. 6:45 p.m. $20. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-3310044, idahoiceworld.com.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

16 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NOISE

CARE TAKERS Nurses craft layered, experimental pop ANDREW CRISP John Bowers of Nurses called Boise Weekly from his coastal retreat in Astoria, Ore. The backup vocalist and keyboardist was taking a break from his hectic life in Portland, Ore., crafting new music to bring back to his bandmates Aaron Chapman and James Mitchell. “It’s somewhere between a creative retreat and a lifestyle change for me,” Bowers said. “I’m definitely not taking a hiatus from music. In fact, I brought a bunch of instruments out.” But this isn’t Bowers’ first seaside sojourn. Nurses retreated to the Oregon Coast in winter 2010, where it recorded and created the album Dracula in a cabin by the ocean. There band members honed the sound they’re known for: colorful experimental pop, syrupy with Portland, Ore.’s Nurses will make your pulse race and your temperature rise at Neurolux. electronics and drums. “It felt like a release,” said Bowers. “We’d The band was intent on using an old VHS background, the three refocused on rhythm. been bottling up all these ideas for so long. camera to capture the video the first time, We could finally be us three working on music The jamming they were doing was a far cry producing something akin to a home movie. from the band’s 2009 sophomore release, instead of trying to pull our lives together beChapman, his face covered in fluorescent paint, tween trying to make a living and live a normal Apple’s Acre. warbles into a light bulb in the video. “I guess Apple’s Acre was more like a life and have girlfriends.” “We … produced this weird universe that dreamlike solitary experience,” said Bowers. Armed with iPhones, MacBooks and we thought the song existed in,” said Bowers. “While we were making Dracula, it was more Garage Band, Nurses turned the cabin into a “You can kinda see that character that Aaron about the body and moving the body, and we recording studio, waking up early to record is portraying as the character that sings the got really into basketball. We got really into old tracks and build new ones, taking things song, the universe that the song exists in.” the movements of the body.” slowly, soaking in the ocean and the forest. Nurses talks about all its projects this From Hangin’ Nothin’ But Our Hands “I think we talked about music a lot of the way: crafting little microcosms rather than Down (2007), to Apple’s Acre, and now to time in visual terms,” Bowers said. “Maybe playing music. This is the same band that that’s our substitute for some technical knowl- Dracula, the band’s sound has morphed in a played a live concert on the webcam sharing edge of written music? We speak more in terms different direction. What used to be ethereal site Chatroulette in collaboration with Portindie jam tracks have become nuanced, layof the landscape it paints in our heads.” land’s Into the Woods project. ered productions. Nurses has always seen things a little dif“We got a bunch of MacBooks—25 Mac“It’s definitely more beat- and grooveferently. The band formed when Bowers and Books or something—and used video screen heavy,” Bowers said. Chapman met more capture,” explained Bowers. “The audience is “We got a lot more than a decade ago as anonymous and they don’t know they’re hapelaborate on this students at Idaho Falls Nurses with Le Fleur and Storie Grubb pening upon it.” album.” High School. In the and the Holy Wars. Into the Woods’ Jordan Kinley directed That depth also desolate high desert Friday, Jan. 13, 7 p.m., $5. comes from something the video. In a room lit with Christmas lights, landscape of SouthNEUROLUX Nurses played a graceful acoustic set. the band has dubbed east Idaho, the band 111 N. 11th St. “We made the video out of three or four 208-343-0886 “the pile”—a heap crafted its own realineurolux.com performance angles, and we kinda just pulled of electronic equipties with music. the best reactions,” said Kinley. ment all tacked onto a Bowers and ChapOne particularly great reaction involves a board. man nursed their wancute girl who randomly clicked into the perfor“Some sound guy coined the phrase when derlust in California and Illinois before finally mance. Her face lights up with a smile, and she we were starting up. He asked me to sound settling in Portland, Ore., in 2009. But it was sits forward in her chair as she realizes what check my ‘pile’ when we were on stage,” said while they were crashing on Mitchell’s couch she’s witnessing. Bowers. that they made a fortuitous discovery. Bowers “Unedited it’s pretty awesome. ... She’s reThe name stuck, though he says the pile has and Chapman had recently parted ways with ally freaking out,” said Kinley. evolved into more of a workstation. half the founding members of the band. With The girl’s reaction, amid the less-enthused “It’s kind of just a large instrument made an approaching gig, they asked Mitchell if he hecklers and occasional phallus, elicited a out of tons of different parts,” Bowers said. knew anybody who played percussion. strong response from the band. They were “Those parts are everything from a toy key“He said, ‘You guys know that I play “stoked,” to use Kinley’s word. board to a sampler to a synth or something.” drums, right?’” Bowers laughed. “It was kind You can freak out on Nurses sans webcam Four months ago, the trio crafted a music of perfect.” at the band’s Ida-homecoming show at Neurovideo for the song “Fever Dreams,” the first And the current incarnation of Nurses lux on Friday, Jan. 13. track off Dracula. was born. With Mitchell’s drum and beat WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 17


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE

With Shane Horner, Steady Rush and Kyler Daron. 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $6. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

18 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

SPEEDY GRAY—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BLAZE AND KELLY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

MESSENGERS—With Redeemer, Kublai Khan, Alive In Me and Sleeping Weather. 7 p.m. $7. Venue

CAMDEN HUGHES—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WARSAW POLAND BROS—9 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

DESIRAE BRONSON CD RELEASE PARTY—With Shane Horner, Steady Rush and Kyler Daron. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory

WINNIE COOPER BAND—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

THE BRETT NETSON BAND— With How’s Your Family. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

—Josh Gross

BIG WOW—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL— 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

Boise’s music scene may be best known for the mope-tacular indie-rock of Built to Spill, but the sonic landscape doesn’t end there. We got all kinds. This week, local artist Desirae Bronson will drop a new CD with a sound pretty far from Boise’s rep. Half of Bronson’s new disc, This is Me, is Meredith Baxtereqsue pop-rock—with swung tempos and strong downbeats beneath her strummed acoustic guitar and clean vocals. The other half—smooth-as-white-bread rock ballads, flourished with slide guitar and soaring harmonies. It’s a little bit country, a little bit rock ’n’ roll and a whole lotta nonthreatening pop. Bronson will celebrate her latest release with a special performance at The Knitting Factory on Friday, Jan. 13.

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

THURSDAY JAN. 12

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DESIRAE BRONSON, JAN. 13, KFCH

FRIDAY JAN. 13

WEDNESDAY JAN. 11

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri La RICO WEISMAN AND REX MILLER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadMeridian

NAOMI PSALM—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears THE NAUGHTIES—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s PEACE OFFICER WHISKEY BLANKET—10 p.m. $5. Reef RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge THE WELL SUITED—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid NURSES—With The Holy Wars, Le Fleur and Storie Grubb. See Noise, Page 17. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

ZAC TYR—6 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars

SATURDAY JAN. 14 DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DANNY DIAL—6 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

OLD DEATH WISPER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

EVOL G AND DJ MYKO—11 p.m. $2. Red Room

POLYRHYTHMICS—10 p.m. $5. Reef

ILLUSTRATIONS—With Tidemouth, Pig Moose and The Quickies. 7 p.m. $4. Venue

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

REILLY COYOTE—7 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

THE VANPAEPEGHEM TRIO—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

RIFF RAFF—9:30 p.m. FREE. Darby’s

JOHNNY SHOES—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE LETA NEUSTAEDTER—With Meghan K. Watters. 6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears OLD DOGS AND PUPPIES—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge RIFF RAFF—9:30 p.m. FREE. Darby’s

MONDAY JAN. 16 A LOT LIKE BIRDS—With Just Like Vinyl, I The Mighty, and The Deadlight Effect. 6 p.m. $10. Venue

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

BLUES JAM WITH RICHARD SOLIZ—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

STEADY RUSH—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WARSAW POLAND BROS—9 p.m. $5. Grainey’s

THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SUNDAY JAN. 15

TUESDAY JAN. 17

BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

FITZ AND THE TANTRUMS—With Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. See Listen Here, this page. 8:15 p.m. $17-$31. Knitting Factory

SUNDERGROUND—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

THE WORKING DJS—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

OLD-TIME JAM SESSION—6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

ROB FALER—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La

WEDNESDAY JAN. 18 ALLSTAR WEEKEND—With Before You Exit. 6:30 p.m. $14 advance, $16 door. Knitting Factory BEN BURDICK—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown CALI LOVE TOUR—Featuring Abstract Rude, Shames Worthy, Winstrong, Zoo Effort and DJ Zole. 8 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

MARCH FOURTH MARCHING BAND— With Diego’s Umbrella and The Pimps of Joytime. See Picks, Page 13. 7 p.m. $22 advance, $25 door. Egyptian PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri La RICHARD SOLIZ UNPLUGGED JAM—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge SPENCER BATT—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

STEADY RUSH—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL— 10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid HANNAH’S GONE WILD—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. $5. Humpin’ Hannah’s JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown WILSON ROBERTS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian WORK’N ON FIRE—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

FITZ AND THE TANTRUMS, JAN. 17, KFCH It began with an old electric organ. Michael “Fitz” Fitzpatrick picked it up on a whim, and in a fervor that evening, he wrote “Breakin’ the Chains of Love.” With a few phone calls, he had saxophonist James King, singer Noelle Scaggs, drummer John Wicks, bassist Joseph Karnes and keyboardist Jeremy Ruzumna all on board. Fitz had his Tantrums. The quartet band makes up a throwback funk ensemble a la James Brown’s old crew, paired with the soulful crooning of its two singers, Scaggs and Fitzpatrick. “Breakin’ the Chains of Love” became the band’s first hit single. From its humble Los Angeles debut through its meteoric rise, Fitz and the Tantrums has played with Maroon 5, at Lollapalooza, on myriad late-night talk shows and now on its own national tour. —Andrew Crisp

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

With Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. 7:30 p.m. doors, 8:15 p.m. show; $17-$31. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 19


SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

THE IRON LADY IS WEAK Underestimating Margaret Thatcher GEORGE PRENTICE I didn’t know Margaret Thatcher; she wasn’t a friend of mine. But Meryl Streep, you’re no Margaret Thatcher. Streep, considered by many to be the finest actress of her generation, portrays Thatcher in The Iron Lady. But the film is a pretender to the throne inhabited a year ago by The King’s Speech. No doubt, producers of The Even Meryl Streep couldn’t save this underwhelming Anglophile biopic. Iron Lady drooled over accolades and golden statues accumulated by last year’s Anglotably targeted by a nasty bit of business” due commuters would drive automobiles into phile biopic, but they have overreached for London and cause gridlock in the inner city, to an Irish Republican Army bomb threat. an Oscar with neither style nor substance to Thatcher dug in her high heels and ordered The IRA had detonated two other bombs keep them upright. In fact, The Iron Lady is the British army to serve as traffic cops, a celluloid masquerade ball, with the primary earlier that month in London’s Hyde and allowing people to park their cars on the Regent’s parks. As we huddled on the sidefocus on Streep’s imitation of Thatcher. The grounds of the 300-year-old landmark. walk in our pajamas, a limousine rolled up film, meanwhile, is a mess. Now, that’s the iron lady that I and to the hotel and out Director Phyllida countless others remember. And it’s the iron stepped Thatcher to Lloyd (who directed greet bleary-eyed hotel lady I desperately hoped to see in Streep’s Streep in Mama THE IRON LADY (PG-13) new movie. All politics aside (much of patrons, describing Mia!) unfortunately Directed by Phyllida Lloyd Thatcher’s ultra-conservatism was pretty the would-be bombpaints one of the Starring Meryl Streep, Jim Broadbent and draconian), the real iron lady was never to ers as “these callous 20th century’s most Richard E. Grant be disregarded. Unfortunately the movie The and cowardly men.” complex individuals Opens on Friday at Edwards 22 Thatcher glad-handed Iron Lady comes across like an over-extendas an unrecognizable ed, and quite tedious, SNL skit. each of us, as if she cartoon. Streep is surAt the recent Kennedy Center Honors was soliciting votes in rounded by secondary in Washington, D.C., comedienne Tracey the midst of an urban war. characters—not much more than window Ullman asked Streep, her good friend and Seven years later, during another London dressing—to frame her performance rather co-star in Plenty, “Is there anything you’re visit, I witnessed Thatcher’s political sinew than advance the narrative. crap at, Meryl?” again, this time facing off against labor My personal, yet remote, experience with The line got a big laugh—there is little unions that had brought the United Kingdom Thatcher decades ago confirmed for me that that the two-time Oscar winner doesn’t exto a halt with three weeks of transit strikes, the lady was never to be underestimated. cel at on screen. And for all I know, Streep’s shutting down subways, trains and buses. While staying in London’s Park Lane Hotel Thatcher did the unthinkable—turning Hyde performance in The Iron Lady may have in July 1982, I was awakened in the middle been swell, but I hated the movie too much Park into a parking lot. Refusing to bow to of the night by a cordial, yet rather urgent to notice. staffer. I was told the hotel had been “regret- the transit unions and knowing that more

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings INVASION AT THE RED ROOM, BUGS—Catch screenings of the cult films Microcosmos and Phase IV. Sunday, Jan. 15. FREE. The Red Room Tavern, 1519 W. Main St., Boise, 208331-0956, redroomboise.com.

Opening BEAUTY AND THE BEAST 3D—This beloved 1991 Disney tale was the first animated film ever nominated for an Academy Award for best picture, and now you can see it remastered in 3D. (G) Edwards 9, Edwards 14, Edwards 22

20 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

CARNAGE—Kate Winslet, Christoph Waltz, John C. Reilly and Jodie Foster star in Roman Polanski’s film adaptation of the award-winning play God of Carnage by Yasmina Reza. (R) Flicks CONTRABAND—Mark Wahlberg and Kate Beckinsale star in this actionpacked thriller about a man trying to protect his family from the world of international smuggling that he left behind. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 14, Edwards 22 THE IRON LADY—Meryl Streep channels former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher in this profile of the first and only female to hold that post. See review, this page. (PG-13) Flicks

JOYFUL NOISE—What do you get when you mix Queen Latifah and Dolly Parton? A musical about a church choir trying to win a national competition, that’s what. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 14, Edwards 22

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 21


REC Z AC HARY HALL

EYES ON SOCHI Idaho’s winter athletes set Olympic goals LISA H. ELLER As most people wait and wonder when the snow will arrive in Boise, the state’s Olympic hopefuls live and train in perpetual winter. Some have just begun the lifelong pursuit of one day competing in the games. Others have a specific goal in mind: to reach the 2014 Olympic Winter Games in Sochi, Russia. Among the hopeful include Boise natives Sara Studebaker and Hailey Duke, Nordic skier Michael Sinnott and the rest of Sun Valley’s training family. Studebaker competes in the biathlon, a sport combining Nordic skiing with rifle shooting that some compare to sprinting 100 meters and then trying to thread a needle. Studebaker is currently in Austria on the World Cup circuit, important qualifying events for the U.S. team. How athletes fare on the circuit can set the pace toward the Olympics, though the exact qualifying criteria haven’t been set. This year, the World Cup biathlon circuit started in Ostersund, Sweden, then moved to Hochfilzen, Austria. Though it was scheduled to head to France, there wasn’t enough snow and Austria ended up hosting the third week of the World Cup. “For us, World Cup standing overall [at the end of the season] and World Championships are definitely the goals,” said Studebaker. Still two winters away from the Olympic pre-qualifiers, she is focused on training and building on the gains of the previous event. She ranked 34th in the world at the end of last year. “Things have been getting better for me with each race,” she said. “In Sweden, I was struggling a little with my skiing but made both pursuits [Sweden and Austria] and was top 40 in the pursuit in Sweden.” Only the top 60 finishers from the sprints qualify to start the pursuits, and the top 40 from pursuits score World Cup points. The World Championships follow the World Cup in March. Skier Hailey Duke, who grew up skiing Sun Valley’s Dollar Mountain, competed in the 2010 Olympic Winter Games in Vancouver, B.C., finishing 30th in slalom. A member of the U.S. Ski Team, Duke is competing in the NorAm Cup, where she placed eighth in the first slalom race. The competition is important because title winners secure places in the World Cup. Duke has spent the past few months training hard after undergoing shoulder and knee surgery. She is “making it back up the food chain, taking it one race at a time,”

22 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Sara Studebaker is already aiming at a return trip to the Winter Olympics on the U.S. Biathlon Team.

said her father, Larry Duke, who coaches the Bogus Basin junior ski team part time. “Her surgeries went extremely well; her doctors are awesome,” he said. “She worked her rear end off to get back on the snow. Now she’s healthy and feeling good. She’s strong and good to go.” Duke has already overcome other hurdles, including meeting her fundraising goal of $20,000 to support training and competitions. Still, she continues to work with donors and sponsors—including the World Cup Dreams Foundation—to raise additional funds to cover other expenses. The shoe company Todi USA gave 30 percent of sales made through Dec. 31, 2011, to the foundation. “They just have to continue to prepare and have a strong mindset and focus on the next race because it’s all performance based and results based,” Larry Duke said of the Olympic hopefuls. Sun Valley’s team knows this. The group created a slogan to live by: “Six to Sochi,” or send at least six athletes to compete in the 2014 Winter Olympics. The Sun Valley Ski Education Foundation sent three athletes to the games in Vancouver. “Those athletes can be Nordic, Alpine, snowboard, freestyle, whatever—but we are making an effort as a community to have as many athletes in place for a shot at the Olympics, with at least six going all the way,” said Nordic skier and Sun Valley native Michael Sinnott. So far, the prospects of meeting “six to Sochi” appear solid. An Olympic contender, Sinnott won the men’s 1.4 K sprint at the NorAm Cup opener in British Columbia last month. His fellow Sun Valley team members are also performing well. Tai Barrymore won the U.S. Grand Prix Halfpipe and Kaitlyn Farrington placed fourth in the competition. Sinnott said his plans for the immediate

future are very much fluid and dependent on performance. He headed to the U.S. nationals in Maine just before the New Year, which will be followed by trips to Milan, Italy, and Otepaa, Estonia, for World Cup racing. While he cautions that the Olympics are still some time off, and that the details of how and how many athletes will qualify hasn’t been determined, his outlook remains enthusiastic. “As for my potential to make the team, I think it’s quite good,” Sinnott said. “I have a new wax tech and coach this year who have helped me make huge strides and start this season with some big wins. “We will need to carry that momentum for a couple more years, building and building to a strong 2014. There are politics involved in sport that I hope are not an issue, but if I keep racing fast, I see a very good chance of being in Sochi,” he said. The latest batch of aspiring Olympians is part of a long line of homegrown athletes. Sadly, Idaho lost one of its most well-known skiers, Boise native Jeret “Speedy” Peterson, earlier this year. Peterson’s accomplished career included winning the silver medal in the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. As in seasons past, this winter promises to be an exciting one with much local talent to follow—many have their own websites and are on Facebook and Twitter. But nothing is certain. Generally, qualification for U.S. teams is based on ranking—the top results from the previous 12 months. The system is designed to favor more recent races, explained Sinnott. There is no one specific race, like how track and field chooses their team. Skiing has too many external variables—like weather, wax and distance fluctuations. “This system has its positives and negatives, but I think it’s important to know the system and use it to your advantage in making the team,” said Sinnott. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 23


BEER GUZZLER/FOOD EARLY SPRING RELEASES

DESCHUTES RED CHAIR NORTHWEST PALE ALE This brew pours a cheery reddish orange with a thin head and aromas marked by floral hops, citrus and smooth malt. It’s a beautifully balanced brew with a lovely mix of toffee, cherry, mango, citrus, light resiny hops and caramellaced malt. It’s a solid effort in what could become something of a benchmark for the style. SAMUEL ADAMS ALPINE SPRING This beer is a hazy straw color in the glass with a thin white head, but it offers a lively bouquet of soft hops, herb tea and citrus. It is definitely a refreshing quaff that goes down oh-so-easily. Of the three brews here, it most makes me think of spring. The crisp citrus flavors are backed by notes of yeast, wheat, tangerine and subtle but creamy malt. Here comes the sun. SIERRA NEVADA RUTHLESS RYE Sierra Nevada’s dark copper-hued ale throws a thick off-white froth with good retention. It’s a bit reserved on the nose, but you do get nice hits of citrus, resiny hops and, as you would expect, rye. Things amp up considerably on the palate with a very forward and persistent hop bite blending smoothly with rye cracker, sweet malt, spice and orange zest.

FOOD/NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

It’s the middle of January, the official start of winter is only a few weeks past and already the spring beer releases are starting to roll in. While it has been a mild winter with its share of surprisingly warm and sunny days, we’ve also had the usual run of dreary, overcast inversions. Those gray days might make you want to curl up with a good book and a hearty winter brew, but here’s an alternative: Break out one of these new spring offerings and with its help let your imagination wander toward spring.

WILLI B’S IS MOVING Plus info on 10 Barrel, Wiseguy, North Shore, The Taphouse and the Winter Ale Fest TARA MORGAN One of downtown Boise’s quirkier restaurants, Willi B’s Sandwich Saloon, is packing up its full bar and trotting down the trail to Chinden Boulevard. Steve Carper is ready to trade in the shoebox saloon for the more spacious former Nuthouse location on Chinden past Cloverdale Road. “There’s two reasons: We got five caterings in one week. When you don’t have a walk-in and a real kitchen in which to prepare stuff, it was horrifying. It was hell, but it was a good problem to have because we were in demand,” said Carper. “And we have a liquor license here, which is a tool that I’m not utilizing to the best of its ability.” Though Carper is currently mired in plan-review bureaucracy, he said he hopes to be open in the new location by February 1, though it might be March. Carper plans to expand the restaurant’s lunch hotplate specials into the evening, and create an atmosphere that is more comfortable for drinkers, so he can sell more cocktails. “Downtown has a daytime crowd that goes home, it has a nighttime weekday crowd of young kids and a nighttime weekend crowd of people who live downtown but work elsewhere,” said Carper. “So, there’s three different crowds, and of the crowd that we’re most successful with, I feel a good portion of them live in the MeridianEagle area. I know they’re comfortable with us and they’ll help us in our evening hours.” In other downtown restaurant news, North Shore Hot Dogs opened on Dec. 6 at 904 Main St. The colorful, Hawaiianthemed spot features ample bamboo and a handmade surfboard table, and focuses mainly on island-style hotdogs. For those unfamiliar with the concept, here’s an explanation from North Shore’s Facebook page: “These dogs are quite unique because they are slid into a flavorful Hawaiian bun that is not slit. The bun is toasted from the inside out by sliding them over stainless steel heated spires, but not all the way. … Therefore your dog is in its own lil’ sleeve so eating it on the run is no problem.” North Shore is open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information, call 208-308-7907. Another newbie on the downtown Boise scene is Ketchum-Hailey pizza purveyor Wiseguy Pizza Pie, which took over the former Chronic Tacos location at 106 N. Sixth

Northshore Hot Dogs: taking the hot dog from horizontal to vertical.

St. According to owner Erik Heiden, the expansion will allow the pizza company to get more creative with its offerings because of increased foot traffic. “All of us kind of like Boise, and it was just an excuse to spend more time there,” said Heiden. “We do hand-tossed New Yorkstyle, stone-deck oven pizza by the slice or by the pie. We’ll be doing Philly cheesesteaks, chicken parmesan sandwiches—traditional New York pizzeria-style items.” In addition to the pie, Wiseguy plans to stay open until 1 a.m. on Friday and Saturday nights to cater to the late-night crowd. “We’re going to offer some Northwest craft microbrews and we’ll probably have a pretty extensive bottle collection of that, too,” said Heiden. And there’s more big news on the downtown brews front. Two new beer-centric spots are slated to open in the coming months. 10 Barrel Brewing Co. out of Bend, Ore., is opening a satellite location in Boise at Ninth and Bannock streets. “It’s taken a long time and a lot of trial and error to really nail down our pub here in Bend, as far as the culture and feel and all that good stuff,” said 10 Barrel co-owner Garrett Wales. “Definitely, the goal is to really transfer our existing model and what we have in place here over to there.” 10 Barrel in Boise will feature a large onsite brewery and an airy, open restaurant. Award-winning brewer Shawn Kelso, former brewmaster at Barley Brown’s in Baker City, Ore., has been brought on to craft suds, which will include a number of original, pub-only brews. “I think there’s a lot of opportunity in the market,” said Wales. “The breweries that are there are great, we’re really excited to just join the scene and work with them. … There’s just a major untapped population of craft beer drinkers out there.” 10 Barrel’s menu will focus on classic pub fare, with an emphasis on quality

ingredients and simple preparation. Though Wales is just starting the process as far as architectural design, he hopes to be slinging S1nist0r Black Ales and Apocalypse IPAs by early summer. And just a couple blocks away, another suds spot is slated to open its doors in February at the space that formerly housed The Lobby, 760 W. Main St. True to its name, The Taphouse will offer 44 taps with rotating regional and local brews. Unsurprisingly, the menu will also follow the pub-grub trend, with a focus on local and organic ingredients. In other local brewery news, Sockeye Brewery officially broke ground Jan. 3 on its second location near Fairview Avenue and Cloverdale Road. The new facility and pub will allow Sockeye to more than double its current output, ramping up production of favorites like the Powerhouse Porter and the oh-so-popular Dagger Falls IPA. Continuing on the brew beat, Brewforia is gearing up to host another Barley Bros. beer fest, this time at the McCall Winter Carnival. The Winter Ale Festival will kick off on Friday, Feb. 3, with a charity snowball fight, live music and an outdoor ice disco. On Saturday, Feb. 4, from noon to 9 p.m., you can sample more than 100 porters, stouts, strong ales and other seasonal brews for $20. Idaho brews include a new barleywine from Salmon River, Laughing Dog’s Cold Nose Winter Ale and a four-year-old keg of barleywine, and Grand Teton’s Black Cauldron Stout. Other regional options include a double dry-hopped version of Ruination from Stone Brewing, Lindemans Faro Sour Ale, the Big Bad Baptist Imperial Stout and a special barleywine from Utah’s Epic Brewing. Speaking of Brewforia, the craft beer Mecca will be extending its boozy empire into sauces and spice rubs in 2012. A few options posted on its Facebook page include Bufalo, a buffalo wing sauce with a Southwest kick; Kingston, a Jamaican jerk seasoning; and Albuquerque, a Southwestern spice rub.

—David Kirkpatrick

24 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

REAL ESTATE

R E A L ES TAT E

CA REERS

BW RENTALS

BW HELP WANTED

BOISE 1BD house, fenced yd, pets ok. $450/mo. Studio space. 562-9150. LUXURY DOWNTOWN CONDO 2BD, 1BA. Hardwood floors throughout, granite, all stainless, cherry cabinets. W/D, A/C & elec heat. No gas ever! Walk-up street access. Gated secure parking. HOA inc. Call Don 880-2746. $985/mo. NORTH END CONDO 2BD, 1BA near Camel Back Park. Only pay electricity. Swimming pool, hot tub. $695/mo. Call 869-4633.

TECHNOLOGY Hewlett-Packard Company is accepting resumes for Systems/ Software Engineer in Boise, ID (Ref. #BOISSE21). Conduct or participate in multidisciplinary research and collaborate with equipment designers and/or hardware engineers in the design, development, and utilization of electronic data processing systems software. Design, develop, troubleshoot, and debug software programs. Mail resume to Hewlett-Packard Company, 5400 Legacy Drive, MS H1-6F-61, Plano, TX 75024. Resume must include Ref. #BOISSE21, full name, email address & mailing address. No phone calls please. Must be legally authorized to work in the U.S. without sponsorship. EOE.

COMMUNITY

BOISE W E E KLY AWESOME TRAVEL JOB!!! $500 Sign-on Bonus. Unique Sales team looking for 10 young minded guys/girls to travel the US. Cash Daily. Wendy 877-550-5025. $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience

required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES $500 WEEKLY ASSEMBLING PRODUCTS from home. For free information, send SASE: HOME WORKS-apBW, PO BOx 101, ROseville, CA 95661.

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800532-6546 Ext. 97.www.continentalacademy.com

OFFICE HOURS Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Out to Lunch 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS

COMMUNITY

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER

EDUCATION

Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 25


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

BEAUTY

boise’s organic skincare Facials and waxing By appointment only Gift certificates available Éminence organic skincare products 729 N. 15th St. 208 344 5883 remedyskincareboise.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

BW CLASSES

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

SMOKE FREE

2012 FLY FISHING EXPO The Western Idaho Fly Fishing Expo is Jan 13th &14th at Expo Idaho. There will be great seminars & speakers to help all types of fly fishers including seminars for women, beginners & experts alike. An indoor casting pond will be available to try out that new rod you’ve been considering. We’ll have vendors, raffles & lots of fly tying! Check out our Expo website at www.BVFFExpo.com - and find us on Facebook! http://www.facebook.com/ events/201187196577383/

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW BEAUTY

*SPEND A DAY IN NAMPA*

510 eCigarette kit is $36.95. Vapoligy, 4935 N. Bradley St. Behind Boise Army Navy Store on Chinden. Call 906-2611 for info or www.vapoligy.com

BW MASSAGE A full body hot oil massage. In home studio/shower. $45 full hr. 841-1320. Terrance. A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

At Nina’s A & C Salon. Senior haircuts $10, Sets $12. Inside Village Square, downtown Nampa, 1305 2nd St. South. Call Nina for an appt. 570-8526.

BW HEALTH & FITNESS BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/ Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 8662759. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE Pamper yourself with warm relaxation massage. 1 hr. $30, 90 Min. $40. 322 Lake Lowell, Nampa. 1-10pm, Mon.-Sat. 283-7830. Betty. RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231. Tantra Massage by Idaho’s only nationally certified Dakini & Intimacy Coach. Men, Women & Couples. 440-4321. ULM 340-8377. Hrs. 8:30AM8PM.

BW CLASSES SACRED INTIMACY A Workshop for Women. January 15th - February 12th, 4:30- 6pm 100 W. Main Street, St. # 203 Cost $77 general , $65 students The body is sacred. Sexuality is sacred. Woman is sacred. Reconnect with this truth & celebrate the wonder of your entire being in this 5-week basic principles of tantra course. Through these practices you will learn how to celebrate your creative, sensual, embodied sexually & physically-alive self & rediscover your body as the greatest divine gift . Register here: http://sacredbodyproject.com/BasicTantra. html or call 208-761-6266 with questions.

PETS BW PETS FREE YOUNG CATS I have been given several cats to help find homes for. Call for more information. 402-4081.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - PILATES

26 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

BUNNY NEEDS A GOOD HOME I need to find a good home for a 6 month old, male, sable (brown), rex (velveteen) rabbit. He is very playful and active and has a healthy appetite. Please contact me as soon as possible! autumntjohnson@gmail.com LOOKING FOR A LOVING HOME My name is Federica, I go by Fede for short. I’m a 3 yr. old Terrier/ Dachshund female. My owners have recently had to relocate to an apartment where pets are not allowed. I’m potty trained, have been raised around small children, & overall I’m a great companion. We’re not asking for any kind of rehoming fee as we truly just want to find a new home for me. Please do let us know if you have any further questions or if you would like to meet me. mayaboisewhite@yahoo.com

SERVICES

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois). FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

BW STUFF

BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION/OTHER

BW 4-WHEELS

BW CHILD

FOR SALE

M U S IC

4-WHEELS

Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $425! 8881464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

YAMAHA P2050 POWER AMP The rack mountable P2050 is low wattage power amp great for the monitor system. It comes with the manual, speaker cords and case. Very good condition. $100. Call 342-3286. VIOLIN-VIOLA-FIDDLE Fiddlin Frog String Studio is now accepting new students. All ages are given for 30 minutes or one hr/wk. One on one with a private instructor. Beginning students will learn instrument basics and reading music. We have shows every month which give students the opportunity to play with a group once tunes have been learned. If you would information regarding available times, rental instruments or rates call us at 208-344-7297.

BW PROFESSIONAL

$12,500- 2001 CASE 580M Turbo Backhoe, 4X4, W/Cab Heat, 2202Hours, 4CYL Case 4-390 Turbo Diesel APPX 85HP, 4 Speed Syncro Power Shuttle Transmission, 14’3” Dig Depth, 1.25 Yard Front Bucket. 208-297-6656 or email GAS@KWSTY.COM $16,400- 2007 SILVERADO Chevrolet 2500 HD 4X4 LTZ Duramax Diesel, Allison transmission. 32,610 mi. DVD/Nav, Leather, Fully loaded. 208-297-6656 or email GAS@KWSTY.COM for info $15,600 FOR 1937 FORD COUPE 1160 mi. Orig. all steel body, 350 Ram Jet fuel injected motor, 700R4 Chevy A/T, Ford 9 inch rear end. Rack and Pinion steering. A/C. Call 208-297-6656 or email GAS@KWSTY.COM for info. The Boise Weekly advises readers to do business with or use printed information at their own risk. Thoroughly check out all purchases before payment.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

BW AUTO SERVICES

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/ Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-4203808 www.cash4car.com

SERVICES - HOME

EAT HERE

TIGER: 8-monthold male domestic shorthair. Robust, rambunctious young cat. Litterbox-trained lap cat. (Kennel 33#13493852)

BANDIT: 3-year-old male Siamese mix. A little shy, but sweet and warms up. Would do best in a mature home. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 01-#14947934)

GISELLE: 3-year-old female pit bull terrier mix. House-trained. Knows obedience commands. Well mannered. Good with other dogs. (Kennel 312-#14574517)

CHILLY: 2-year-old male rottweiler and basset hound mix. Good with other dogs. Happy attitude and loves company. (Kennel 308#9842295)

DORI: 8-month-old female Australian cattle dog/border collie mix. Sweet and well behaved. Good with dogs and older children. (Kennel 418- #14953465)

MABLE: 3-year-old domestic longhair. Enjoys attention. Curious and playful. Litterbox-trained indoor-only cat. (Kennel 17- #14969229)

SHOP HERE

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

JUNO: Staff Pick for January: Only $20 to adopt me.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

DASHER: Devilishly KODAK: Quiet and dashing dude deserves sweet, I’m the perfect a home. Will it be yours? addition to your family.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 27


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRCIT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Rebekah Marie Rich Legal name of child Case No. CV NC 1124088

A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on February 21, 2012 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Dec. 16, 2011. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEBRA URIZAR Deputy Clerk Pub. Jan. 11, 18, 25 & Feb. 1, 2012.

HOT GAY & BI LOCALS Browse & Respond FREE! 208-4722200. Use FREE Code 5914, 18+. MEET SEXY SINGLES Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7760. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. WHERE SINGLES MEET Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7759, 18+.

NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Rebekah Marie Rich, a minor, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Rebekah Marie Bauer. The reason for the change in name is:Petitioner has remarried and desires the child to have the same name as other members of her immediate family, which the child strongly desires as well.

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

CO NNECTION SECTION BW ENTERTAINMENT ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+.

BW CHAT LINES

BW I SAW YOU

BW I SAW YOU

ALL MALE HOT GAY HOOKUPS! Call FREE! 208-489-2162 or 800777-8000. www.interactivemale. com 18+.

AshleyMadison.com - 100% FREE for Women! Every 30 seconds another woman joins AshleyMadison.com looking to have a Discreet Affair. Try it FREE today. Featured in: TIME, New York Times & CNN. Have a Guaranteed Affair at AshleyMadison.com Stop having Sex with Escorts who’ve been with 1000s of other Men. Meet real women who are trapped in sexless Marriages and need to find sex on the side. Featured on: Ellen, Tyra & The View. Lonely Single Mom. Looking for a Mutually Beneficial Arrangement. ArrangementFinders.com - Featured in USA Today and MAXIM. Unique Arrangements. You reward Me, I’ll reward You. ArrangementFinders.com - Featured in USA Today and MAXIM.

BLUE EYES @ OLIVE GARDEN We saw each other at Olive Garden by the mall on Sunday, 12/18/11. You had the most beautiful blue eyes I’ve ever seen. You might have thought I was on a date, but she was my little sister! If you know who you are, please reply. <P>

EroticEncounters.com Where Hot Girls Share their private fantasies! Instant Connections. Fast & Easy. Mutual Satisfaction Guaranteed. Exchange messages, Talk live 24/7, Private 1-on-1. Give in to Temptation, call now 1-888-700-8511. MEN SEEKING MEN 1-877-4098884 Gay hot phone chat, 24/7! Talk to or meet sexy guys in your area anytime you need it. Fulfill your wildest fantasy. Private & confidential. Guys always available. 1-877-409-8884 Free to try. 18+. REAL DISCREET, LOCAL CONNECTIONS Call FREE! 208-287-0343 or 800210-1010. www.livelinks.com 18+.

BW KISSES HEY SOULMATE My goat cheese eating, tree climbing dopplegäanger. I can’t take my mind off of you. Kibosh Wonkiness. I know this great restaurant at the end of the universe. Love, Your Siren Goddess. CAL HAS A WIN Cal Surges Past Oregon, 77-60. Way to go Mike Montgomery! Thank you, Highlands Hollow, for letting me watch the game. I’ll be back.

NYT CROSSWORD | ADDENDUM BY PATRICK BERRY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 10 Sandwich choice, for short 13 Crosswise to the keel

ACROSS 1 Many college profs 5 Food preserver

1

2

3

4

18

5

6

7

8

18 Pool ball’s “Watch this!” comment? 21 Arles affirmative

9

19

10 20

23 27

30

31

32 36

39 43

44

54

34 38

46

47

61

49

70 77

67

72

74

79

82 86

84

87

99

100

104

105

109

110

114

115

117

118

53

85 88

95

96

101

97

102 106 111

75

80

83

94

52

68 73

78

93

51

63 66

71

50

58

62

65

92

48

57

64

91

17

41

60

90

16

29

37

56

81

15

22

33

45

76

14

25

40

55

59

89

13

21

28

35

69

12

24

26

42

11

22 Onetime first name in Israeli politics 23 High-mounted window you can’t stop looking at? 25 “Come ___?” 26 Steely Dan album featuring “Deacon Blues” 27 Traveled by bus 28 Thin blue line? 29 Resisted a job offer, say 30 Go downhill

112

103

107

108 113

116 119

28 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

98

120

32 Part of a watch touching the breastbone? 35 End of many a list 36 Camper’s canful 38 She’s entertaining 39 Heist planner’s concern 41 Wedding part 42 Ceiling 45 Strong winds 46 “You don’t have to be busy to look busy,” e.g.? 54 Squished bug, e.g. 56 [I’m so funny!] 57 Go all to pieces 58 Antipasto tidbit 59 Pill that relieves computer-related anxiety? 63 High 64 Bring in 65 History topic 66 “I think,” to texters 68 Empire State Building climber, for short 69 Holds under the tap 71 Inhuman group of golfers? 76 Behaved 77 1988 Summer Olympics site 79 Handbag monogram 80 “A Love Like ___” (Barbra Streisand album) 81 Sultan’s wife, perhaps? 83 Sends up 85 Thank you for waiting 86 Reed of rock 87 “1984” superstate 89 Desperately want 94 Bad experience 96 Late sixth-century year 99 Jungle king’s jeans and overalls? 102 Looked intently 104 Knocked on the noggin 105 Rainy day planner? 106 Twelve Oaks neighbor 108 Pac-12 athlete 109 Restaurant greeter’s option 110 Ennui among quantum physicists? 114 Go on a shopping spree

115 Savings plan, briefly 116 Dessert delivered over the Internet? 117 Brouhahas 118 Cowlick fixer 119 Monster of Jewish folklore 120 The Big Board, for short

DOWN 1 “What a load of hogwash!” 2 Jimi Hendrix’s debut single 3 Set out 4 Stray from righteousness 5 Refuse to release 6 Low-pH compound 7 Go to the tape? 8 “___ hath an enemy called Ignorance”: Ben Jonson 9 Negative conjunction 10 Conjecture 11 It’s good in Italy 12 Pal of Huck Finn 13 Swirly marbles 14 “The Big Sleep” co-star, 1946 15 Funny Boosler 16 They’re exchanged in France 17 Candy eaten in handfuls 19 “Praying” part of a praying mantis 20 Master 24 Pixar title character 29 Best-selling author who wrote “I did not write it. God wrote it. I merely did his dictation” 31 Downswing 32 They’re heavy during storms 33 Sample 34 Injury symptom 36 Reception room in a mansion 37 Rare craps roll 40 Sharp nails 41 Through 42 “The Big Bang Theory” network 43 Sports Illustrated’s Sportsman of the Century

44 Creamy Italian side dish 46 One taking a bow in Japan 47 Smoothie ingredient 48 Homme’s partner 49 Travel by car 50 ___ Quijano (Don Quixote’s real name) 51 Deleting 52 “___ got a feeling …” 53 What’s in an Rx 55 Leaning 60 Words to live by 61 Garden spot 62 Lash of old westerns 63 Hides in the shadows 67 In olden times 69 When doubled, ardent 70 Diamonds, to a yegg 72 Einstein’s birthplace 73 NATO alphabet vowel 74 Hosp. diagnostic aid 75 Ability to identify Zener cards 77 Lacking a coat, maybe 78 ___ de vie 82 Fill, and then some 83 Big name in Champagne 84 Easily drawn gun 87 One of the music industry’s Big Four L A S T C O B R A

A V A I L

N E R T S

C O R M

O L E O

R E D D

B S M T

E F O R

N O V I O T T I N I A R C R A S T

P H J O S T M C I A L T K

T R E E O R N A M E N T

A T A D U B A L L L E P A C K C H I I T E A T R N E G R S A G E E T E D A L T I M Z O M A P I B N E W S T I K H Z

88 Kick out 89 If everything goes your way 90 Cut-rate 91 Fierce, as an argument 92 Weather Channel newsmaker 93 Wicked ones 94 About ready to drop 95 Square 97 Badly made 98 Says no to 100 Catch 101 R. J. Reynolds brand 102 Like three of golf’s four majors 103 “Philadelphia” director 106 Greenish blue 107 Having the knack 110 Chinese zodiac animal 111 Smoke 112 Sort who’s a natural leader, supposedly 113 Great time Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

G A S P S M I D I S H B O C M L

A G A Z I N R U I D O I T N O M O C L L S M I A B A T B Y T E O F A C T O A C D OW I C I N I N N G E R B P M A N A G I T A I R T I R E S D O A M O N G H E E S E O M S N T O N T E S T S

A N S W E R S E N S OW E L E E S A R S E L G E D R E M T E W A I N S O D I O S R I S S

M Y S A T S S I T R S O C L A B N A A D I G E S A F T I B P U G P O R

I T C H U O K O O N WO O P I A K O T M I N E X T E A M C A R N U T A A P T I V D O T T E U S E E R N S A U S H R E F F E C T A A S I X L B R P E A Y T H E B T A S T Y A R I F L I D A E Q E T

M O N O S S H E D T S K S O R Y S P A

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. Hi, I am a 49 yr. old woman looking for pen pals to find friendship or more. Looking for a little financial help. Blonde, blue eyes and I love to work out. Pennie Davis #49916 MCJ 15 N. 2nd E. Rexburg, ID 83440. 29 yrs. Old, looking for a sugar daddy that’s willing to send a little cash. The older the wiser. Shawna Mains #66755 MCJ 15 N. 2nd E. Rexburg, ID 83440. I’m looking to locate upon my release in June 2012. I have brown hair and eyes, 5’5”, very athletic, enjoy everything outdoors. Looking for some good friends to make. Charles Voorhess #77848 ICC P3-44A PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. Pretty – petite SWF, 40, wants lasting romance but needs financial help and a pen pal. Peggy Sue Neumeyer #1042817 1210 Barrister Dr. Boise, ID 83704. WM seeks friendship/correspondence with SF. Marvin Himmelspach #958227 Airway Heights Correction Center KB43 PO Box 249 Airway Heights, WA 99001. My name is Ron I’m 46 yrs. Old, 5’8”, 180 lbs., ISO companionship with special people. I like country music. I’m from California. Ron Dickinson #908690 AWHCC k-B53 PO Box 2049 Airway Heights, WA 99001.

PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

I’m 23 yrs. Old, SM, blonde hair, green eyes, 6’4”, 215 lbs., and athletic. I’m looking for a pen pal/ relationship with women ages 2035. White or oriental preferably. I’m from Coeur d’ Alene, ID. I have 34 months left before I’m done with my sentence. I look forward to moving on. My interests consist of going to college and rebuilding my life. Dale Rhea #89034 ISCI Unit 15A-23B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. SWM, 22 yrs. Old from Maui, HI in prison for burglary. Top out in 2/15/13. Looking for SF between 25-35 to write to and be my friend when I am released. I’m a Wiccan and enjoy moonlit walks on the beach, Enya, Enigma, Paul Oakenfold, Heavenshall Burn. I look forward to hearing form you. I don’t want your money and do not have any other motives. Just seeing warm words to carry me through the cold world. Mahalo. Zachary Dehart #94842 Unit 16A66B ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Fun & attractive SM looking for similar SF. I’m 5’10”, with salt and pepper short hair with a brown beard. I weight 165 lbs. Looking for F 21-50 for a pen pal and possibly more. Kristopher Jenks #61856 16B-13B ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Lonely Leo looking for SF pen pal. I’m 5’8”, 180 lbs., dark semi curly shoulder length hair, blue-green eyes, good build, nice sense of humor, I’m responsible and family oriented. Looking for SF 18-25 for pen pal first and then possibly more in the future. Richard Lee Cowan #95718 ISCI Unit 16B01B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. My name is Ray Alaniz. I’m looking for old friends. If anybody knows my friends, please advise them for me. All my documents and discovery’s with names are on my social network. Please, I need help with my appeal. If you know me please write me. Ray Alaniz #101162 ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707.

Expand your mind. Write a prisoner. SWF, 30 yrs. Old, outgoing, adventurous, caring, looking forward to hearing from you. Kristin Rainey #102245 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Got time? I do!! Anxious for a funloving caring guy to write to me while I’m in prison. SWF, 41 yrs. Old, would love to hear from you. Dawn Gill #99055 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Are you rollin’? Tatted and down to write a chick in prison? SLF, 23 yrs. Old, waiting to hear from you. Danyaelle Valdez #94149 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Bonnie...Searching for Clyde. Outgoing, adventure loving female. ISO carefree pen pal to write while I’m in prison. Anxious for your response. Jaime Rupp #75745 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Fun loving, outgoing WF anxious for a pen pal while I’m in prison. Like to laugh and welcome any and all conversation. Lucero Mitchell #53204 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Spunky, fun loving, intelligent cutie. I want you to write me. WF, 23 discover what your missing. Write a prison girl! Amelia Maki #96899 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Spicy, hot and full of fun. Bilingual F ISO some inspiring conversation while in prison. Write me today. Spanish & English! Victoria Ramierez #90348 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Tired of sending smoke signals in the dark? Tender hearted, adventurous, native F seeks pen pal to sweep me away while I’m in prison. Linda Gomez #38268 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Sexy, fun, carefree country girl seeks adventurous witty pen pal to stimulate the senses. Can’t wait to hear from you! Shannon Kildow #85061 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204.

ADULT ENTERTAINMMENT

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 29


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): The Sanskrit word “tapasya” is translated as “heat,” but in the yogic tradition, it means “essential energy.” It refers to the practice of managing your life force so that it can be directed to the highest possible purposes, thereby furthering your evolution as a spiritual being. Do you have any techniques for accomplishing that—either through yoga or any other techniques? This would be a good year to redouble your commitment to that work. In the coming months, the world will keep increasing its output of trivial, energy-wasting temptations. You’ll need to be pretty fierce if you want to continue the work of transforming yourself into the Aries you were born to be: focused, direct, energetic and full of initiative.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “A writer—and, I believe, generally all persons—must think that whatever happens to him or her is a resource,” said author Jorge Luis Borges. “All that happens to us, including our humiliations, our misfortunes, our embarrassments, all is given to us as raw material, as clay, so that we may shape our art.” I agree that this advice isn’t just for writers, but for everyone. And it so happens that you are now in an astrological phase when adopting such an approach would bring you abundant wisdom and provide maximum healing. So get started, Leo: Wander through your memories, reinterpreting the difficult experiences as raw material that you can use to beautify your soul and intensify your lust for life.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Live out of your imagination, not your history,” says Stephen Covey, author of The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. While that’s always true, it will be especially crucial for you to remember in 2012. This is the year you can transcend stale traditions, Taurus—a time when you can escape your outworn habits, reprogram your conditioned responses and dissolve old karma. You will get unparalleled opportunities to render the past irrelevant. The key to unlocking all the magic will be your freewheeling, yet highly disciplined imagination. Call on it often to show you the way toward the future.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Poetry is the kind of thing you have to see from the corner of your eye,” said the poet William Stafford. “If you look straight at it, you can’t see it. But if you look a little to one side, it is there.” As I contemplate your life in the immediate future, Virgo, I’m convinced that his definition of poetry will be useful for you to apply to just about everything. In fact, I think it’s an apt description of all the important phenomena you’ll need to know about. Better start practicing your sideways vision.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Comedian Steven Wright says his nephew has HDADD, or high definition attention deficit disorder. “He can barely pay attention, but when he does, it’s unbelievably clear.” I’m predicting something like that for you in the coming week, Gemini. You will encounter more things that are dull than are interesting, but those few that fascinate you will awaken an intense focus that allows you to see into the heart of reality. CANCER (June 21-July 22): As I contemplate the most desirable fate you could create for yourself, I’m reminded of a lyric from one of my songs: “We are searching for the answers / so we can destroy them and dream up better questions.” Here’s what I’m implying by that, Cancerian: This is not the right time for you to push for comprehensive formulas and definitive solutions. Rather, it’s a favorable moment to draw the incisive inquiries that will frame your quest for comprehensive formulas and definitive solutions. That quest is due to begin in two weeks. For now, raise your curiosity levels, intensify your receptivity, and make yourself highly magnetic to core truths.

30 | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | BOISEweekly

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A Swedish man named Richard Handl decided to conduct a scientific experiment in his kitchen. Would it be possible to split atoms using a homemade apparatus? He wanted to see if he could generate atomic reactions with the radioactive elements radium, americium and uranium. But before he got too far into the process, the police intervened and ended his risky fairy tale. I bring this to your attention, Libra, as an example of how not to proceed in the coming weeks. It will be a good time for you to experiment around the house—refining your relationship with your roommates, moving the furniture and in general rearranging the domestic chemistry—but please avoid trying stuff as crazy as Handl’s. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 1878, Thomas Edison perfected the phonograph, a machine that could record sounds and play them back. There had been some primitive prototypes before, but his version was a major improvement. And what were the first sounds to be immortalized on Edison’s phonograph? The rush of the wind in the trees? The cries of a newborn infant? Nope. Edison recited the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lamb.” When you make your own breakthrough in communication sometime soon, Scorpio, I hope you deliver a more profound message.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I suspect you may soon find yourself in a situation similar to the one that President Abraham Lincoln was in when he said the following: “If this is coffee, please bring me some tea. But if this is tea, please bring me some coffee.” In other words, Sagittarius, you may not be picky about what you want, but whatever it is, you’ll prefer it to be authentic, pure and distinctly itself. Adulterations and hodgepodges won’t satisfy you, and they won’t be useful. Hold out for the real thing. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Last summer, before the football season started, sports writer Eric Branch wrote about a rookie running back that San Francisco 49er fans were becoming increasingly excited about. The newbie had made some big plays in exhibition games. Would he continue performing at a high level when the regular season began? Were the growing expectations justified? After a careful analysis, Branch concluded that the signs were promising, but not yet definitive: “It’s OK to go mildly berserk,” he informed the fans. That’s the same message I’m delivering to you right now, Capricorn. The early stages of your new possibility are encouraging. It’s OK to go mildly berserk, but it’s not yet time to go totally bonkers. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In summer, the pickleweed plant thrives in the saltwater marshes around San Francisco Bay. In many places, bright orange patches of the dodder plant intermingle with the pickleweed’s sprightly jade green, creating festive displays that suggest nature is having a party. But there’s a secret buried in this scene. The dodder’s webby filaments are actually parasites that suck nutrients from the pickleweed. In accordance with the astrological omens, Aquarius, I’ll ask you if a situation like that exists in your own life. Is there a pretty picture that hides an imbalance in the giveand-take of energy? It’s not necessarily a bad thing—after all, the pickleweed grows abundantly even with its freeloader hanging all over it—but it’s important to be conscious of what’s going on. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “That in a person which cannot be domesticated is not his evil but his goodness,” said the writer Antonio Porchia. I invite you to keep that challenging thought close to your heart in the coming days, Pisces. In my astrological opinion, it is an excellent moment to tune into your wildest goodness—to describe it to yourself, cherish it as the great treasure it is, foster and celebrate it and express it like a spring river overflowing its banks.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 11–17, 2012 | 31



Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 29