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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 28 JANUARY 4–10, 2012

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

TAXI TALES Drivers weigh in on new city regs

FEATURE 11

SUCCINCT INK Fiction 101 winners inside

1ST THURSDAY 15

MAP AND GUIDE INSIDE Where to find the shows, the wine, the readings and the fun

FOOD 25

WRAPPED UP Bidding adieu to the Year of Idaho Food

“You can live in the history books or you can decide to live in the present.”

CITIZEN 10


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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporters: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Stephen Foster Stephen@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Guy Hand, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Guy Hand, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Erin Ruiz, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE OVER, BUT NOT FORGOTTEN In this edition of Boise Weekly, a yearlong project comes to a close. This time last year, we made some drastic changes to our Food section, discarding the double restaurant reviews and turning our attention to the Year of Idaho Food, a yearlong examination of what local food is in Idaho—beyond the potato. Boise Weekly’s coverage was spearheaded by writer Guy Hand, who ultimately became a driving force behind the Year of Idaho Food with his work not only in Boise Weekly, but also on his blog, Northwest Food News and his Boise State Public Radio segment Edible Idaho. When Hand and I sat down over breakfast at one of Boise’s most-local-centric restaurants one Saturday morning in the fall of 2010 to game plan BW’s Year of Idaho Food coverage, we fretted that we wouldn’t have enough material to make it through 52 weeks of original content. A year later, the list is as long as it was when we started. Certainly, the more we report on the local-food movement, the more stories we turn up. Although Boise Weekly officially wraps up the Year of Idaho Food with this week’s story on Page 25, we have no intention of simply moving on. Throughout 2012, Hand will continue to follow the stories of local food wherever they lead. Also in this week’s issue, I’d point your attention to Citizen. Recently, I found myself breaking down just what the role of the Capital City Development Corporation is for a Boise transplant. Given some of the large-scale projects on the drawing board for the city, it’s an interesting time for new leadership at CCDC. BW sat down with the organization’s new director, Anthony Lyons, who at first blush, couldn’t be more different than his predecessor, Phil Kushlan. Read that interview on Page 10. Finally, congratulations to the winners of Boise Weekly’s 10th annual Fiction 101 contest. Your lovely, short-short prose is evidence of the talent that Boise tends to foster, particularly in literary circles, and we’re quite happy to share your stories. To our judges, once again, thanks for your time and thoughtfulness. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Eli Craven TITLE: Film Still from “Rescue” MEDIUM: Acrylic medium image transfer on canvas

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

ARTIST STATEMENT: “Canoeing”, a collaborative project between Eli Craven and Maria Chavez, will be on display this month at Bricolage. Stop by the opening reception First Thursday. elicraven.com, mariachavez.net.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

SUBMIT

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Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS

TO GRANDMA’S HOUSE The latest edition of Scenes From a Scene is out, and this time BW caught up with emotional songstress Grandma Kelsey. Get to know the thoughtful musician by scanning the QR code at the right.

SNUFF ‘EM OUT Boise’s tough new smoke-free ordinances went into effect on Jan. 2. What does this mean for smokers in the capital city? Check out the details at Citydesk.

Taxi drivers weigh in on proposed regulations

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CITYDESK

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Fiction 101

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BW PICKS

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FIRST THURSDAY A look inside Fiction 101 15 FIRST THURSDAY LISTINGS Map and guide inside 16 FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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MUSIC GUIDE

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TWITTERGEDDON What’s it take to bring down Twitter? Try 16,000 tweets per second. That’s what happened as the new year rolled across the world. Read what happened as the ball dropped in Japan at Citydesk.

LAUGHING MATTER Have you heard the one about the comedy club in Boise? No, seriously, Boise is slated to get its first dedicated comedy club in years. Check out what the owners have in store for Boiseans’ funny bones at Cobweb.

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FOOD Saying goodbye to The Year of Idaho Food

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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OPINION/BILL COPE

ETERNAL PUPPY The tao of Molly Were I allowed to pick one, and only one moment to relive, over and over, for all the rest of time—the happiest, most perfect moment of my life—I have no doubt which I would chose. It came on Christmas Eve 1995, at my folks’ place. My dad had another year-and-a-half to live, Mom had just more than eight, and a couple of months earlier, my daughter had turned 6, the consammate age for Christmas. Before 6, I suspect kids still aren’t sure what’s happening. (It must be like going to the circus for them, only their parents are the clowns). After 6, it’s one illusion after another peeled away, year by year. At that age, they’re developed enough to memorize those great songs—the ones about Frosty and Rudolph and who’s coming to town—but they’re not yet commercialized enough to expect their gifts to require batteries. They have developed no immunity to the Christmas-magic bug and they’re feverish with symptoms—the laughter, the anticipation, the delight of being surrounded by family—and no matter how hard we resist, we can’t help but catch it from them. As perfect as the girl’s age was, the gift I got her was even better. A puppy. For five years previous, I had repressed the urge to get her one. I gave other things instead: softedged toys, pop-up books and crayons, all of which she outgrew in slightly more time than it took her to unwrap them. Having come comparatively late to fatherhood, I wasn’t prepared for how quickly little kids move from one competence level to the next. One week, they’re playing happily with simple wooden block letters, spelling out “C-A-T” and “A-N-N-E,” dressed like a fairy princess in one of those other-worldly dresses Grandma came up with. The next, they’re ready for toy dinosaurs, the names of which they’ve already learned to spell, and can’t even get that princess dress over their expanding heads anymore. Still, even with what little I knew about children, I knew a thing or two about puppies. And I knew you could hardly go wrong by combining the two. A week before Christmas, I went to the Humane Society shelter and found Molly, maybe 1-month old and eager to be taken home. (I lied and told my daughter the pound had given Molly her name and that, by law, we had to stick with it. I should have let her name her own dog, of course, but I was fearful that she’d come up with something only a 6-year-old could think was a good dog’s name. In another decade, I didn’t want to be standing out in the night, calling for “Starbright” or “Jasmine” to come inside while the whole neighborhood listened.) My dad looked after Molly in the days before Christmas Eve. He didn’t mind. He’d had dogs all of his life, and besides, I think he welcomed the distraction. It kept his mind

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off the reality that all the cancer treatments he was getting were doing little good. Taking care of Molly gave him something to find pleasure in, and he was looking forward as much as I to the presentation. I lined up a big box—big enough that our girl might think she was being given her first five-horse-power lawn mower—wrapped the lid separately so it would pop off easily, and arranged ahead of time for Molly to be hidden when we arrived on Christmas Eve. Under normal, more sedate circumstance, the kid would have undoubtedly heard a yip or two coming from the basement. But with the entire family gathered, Mom’s carols playing in the background, with the clatter of food being prepared, glasses clinking and eight different conversations going on at once, those yips went unnoticed. As the family started to distribute the booty from under the tree, I slipped out. When I returned with the big box, she was on her knees in the center of the room. My wife had cleared a space in front of her without being too obvious, and she had no idea what was coming. She was excited merely by the size of the gift. As soon as she ripped into the wrapping, Molly went to wriggling. The box wriggled with her. The kid froze, a bow in her hand and a hint of terror on her face. A second or two passed and I thought my heart might explode. Dad laughed. It was such a good thing to hear him laugh again. With that laugh, Molly pushed the lid off with her head and stood up on two legs, tongue out, ready to go to licking. She grinned a big puppy grin to my daughter and let out an excited yelp. It was puppy talk for, “Here we go, you and I. We’re gonna have some fun, aren’t we?” And that’s the moment I want to relive until the end of time, should it turn out the afterlife works in such a way. To have made my daughter weep for pure joy may be the highest thing I will have ever accomplished. But then, I didn’t do it by myself. And for the next 16 years, Molly continued to make my kid happy, even when I, or the rest of her life, was unable to. U The day after this Christmas, my wife wrapped Molly in a blanket so she wouldn’t be cold, and we drove her to a vet to be put down. By the time we finally did it, it was clear we’d avoided it longer than we should have. At first, we waited until her friend and master got home from school to say good-bye, and after that it became a matter of wishing she’d slip away quietly in the comfort of her own surroundings. But by Christmas Eve, 16 years to the day from when she wriggled out of that big box, it was obvious what had to be done. How pleasing it would be to imagine Molly in her rest, experiencing that same moment, excited as a loved puppy, over and over and over. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


TED RALL/OPINION

PHONING IN CARTOONS An art form in crisis ignores the rot within “Ted Rall, mop-headed antiestablishment political cartoonist, has abundant talent, a 1,400-drawing portfolio, seven years’ experience, the acclaim of peers and the approval of newspaper editors who, every so often, print his work. What he lacks is someone who will hire him full-time.” That’s from The New York Times. In 1995. Editorial cartooning was in big trouble then. Newspapers were closing and slashing budgets. Those who survived were timid— cowardly editors rarely hire, much less retain, the controversial artists. Things are worse now. Hard numbers are difficult to come by, but the number of full-time professional political cartoonists now hovers around 30. In 1980, there were about 300. A century ago, there were thousands. Cartoonists blame tightfisted publishers and shortsighted editors. Many decry news syndicates for charging low rates for reprints. “If an editor can get Walt Handelsman and Steve Kelley for 10 bucks a week, why would he pay $70,000 a year for a guy in his hometown?” asked Handelsman, then the cartoonist for The New Orleans Times-Pacayune, in the 1995 Times piece. There’s also the Internet. The Web created more disruption than opportunity as dozens of cartoonists tried to sell animated editorial cartoons to websites. Two succeeded. Digitalization decimated the music business, savaged movies and is washing away publishing. If multinational media conglomerates can’t figure out how to stem the tide, individual cartoonists don’t stand a chance. We can only control one thing: the quality of our work. It pains me to admit it, but to say

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we’ve fallen down on the job would give us too much credit. Editorial cartoonists have been churning out a blizzard of hackwork. Generic pabulum relying on outdated metaphors—Democratic donkeys, Republican elephants, tortured labels. Cut-and-paste art lifted from older cartoonists. The work is so bland that readers can’t tell if the artist is liberal or conservative. In the end, it’s up to the members of any profession to police themselves. No one can publish your crappy cartoon if you don’t draw it in the first place. Amazingly, my colleagues have chosen to ignore the existential crisis that faces American political cartooning. Moreover, we cartoonists are failing to hold one another to basic journalistic standards. This year, political cartooning has been hit by two scandals. David Simpson, a longtime Tulsa, Okla., political cartoonist, was fired after he got caught tracing old cartoons by the late Jeff MacNelly. Jeff Stahler, a cartoonist familiar to readers of USA Today, was forced to resign by The Columbus Dispatch after rumors of stealing ideas exploded into a series of too-close-for-comfort pairings of his work and classic material from The New Yorker. They’re only the tip of the iceberg. Within the mainstream of the profession, the general consensus is that we should keep quiet and wait for the storm to pass. Cartoonists make excuses. “This is bad for the profession,” I heard from more than one colleague after the Stahler story broke. “Let’s be quiet.” No. What’s bad for the profession is bad work. How can we expect editors to respect us unless we respect ourselves?

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CITYDESK/NEWS

Mulligans is no longer the smokiest pub in Boise. Neither is Neurolux, 10th Street Station nor nearly 30 other taverns that have had to tell customers to take their butts elsewhere—their cigarette butts, that is. “I put all the ashtrays out in storage this morning,” Mulligans bartender Katina Nelson told Citydesk on January 2. “Actually, I put about 10 of them outside in the alley. We’re one of the luckier places in town because we have a back alley where people can step outside to smoke.” But smokers aren’t allowed to light up in front of Mulligans or within 20 feet of the door. Boise’s new anti-smoking ordinances require Mulligans, along with every other bar, restaurant and private club in Boise to be smoke-free, along with sidewalk cafes, bus stops, the Grove Plaza and Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets. “The best thing about the ordinance is that it’s citywide,” said Nelson. “I don’t think we’re going to lose too many customers, because it affects everyone.” But Nelson didn’t soft pedal the smoking ban’s impact on her customers. “It’s a little like us taking PBR [Pabst Blue Ribbon] off draft,” she said with a laugh. “Yeah, it’s a big deal to our customers.” Boise Police have opted to ease citizens into the new ordinances rather than begin handing out a flurr y of citations. Focusing on Boise’s downtown core, police have promised not to write tickets for violating the smoking ban for approximately one month. Instead they said they will “educate and warn.” After a 30-day grace period, according to a statement from Mayor Dave Bieter’s office, police “will base their response to citizen complaints on the individual situation. For instance, if the person extinguishes the cigarette prior to police arrival, no enforcement action will generally be taken. If the smoker persists after a warning, however, he or she may be cited.” Smokers are also not welcome in any of Boise’s public parks. Only two small designated areas of Ann Morrison and Julia Davis parks have been set aside as smoking zones. On January 2, when Citydesk asked Pete Niemiec, a Parks Volunteer Patrol cyclist, about the new rules, he wasn’t exactly sure where the smoking zones were (you can VIDEO: Gauging see them on a map reaction in Boise parks and pubs to at boiseweekly.com), the new anti-smokbut was confident that ing ordinance, there shouldn’t be too much of an issue with compliance. Ironically, we were standing a few feet away from one of the designated smoking areas when we spoke to Niemiec. “I think it’s a lot like the off-leash dog issue,” said Niemiec. “Ninety-nine percent of the people are going to comply with it.” —George Prentice

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NEWS LIZ Z Y DU FFY

NO BUTTS ABOUT IT: BOISE INTRODUCES NEW ANTI-SMOKING RULES

ALL’S FARE BW rides shotgun to hear feedback on Boise’s proposed taxi ordinances GEORGE PRENTICE AND SHEREE WHITELEY Boise Mayor Dave Bieter was pleasantly surprised when he received some early positive feedback on his newest initiative: improving the level of taxi service in Boise. “It appears that we have more consensus on this than I had originally thought. I’m quite pleased,” said Bieter on Dec. 20, after listening to a briefing from city staff detailing early feedback on proposed taxi ordinance amendments. The changes Fifty-eight one-car taxi companies currently operate in Boise. include a requirement to accept debit and/ or credit cards, improvement of vehicle McGhan isn’t too upset with the proEnglish language requirement, Honestly, I quality, limiting personal use of taxis and a don’t know how difficult it is. You see I only posed ordinances but can see how a credit/ new rule that drivers be able to understand learned English once in my life,” said Shealy debit card requirement could cut into cab English. drivers’ profits. McGhan already accepts with his typical dry wit. “And it was a very The “English only” requirement was the credit cards for fares but worries that it will gradual process.” result of several complaints over the course become increasingly expensive for drivers. Stakeholders even had some initial of a few years to the mayor’s hot line. “I think the city should be partly responconversation about installing GPS systems “We had a number of people call us to sible for supplying [card machines] to taxi in each cab but according to McLeod they say they weren’t able to fully communicate companies,” said McGhan, who sometimes “weren’t comfortable with the expense.” with their driver,” said Adam Park, comhas to pay 3 percent in fees per card transacIn fact, an informal survey of stakemunications director for the mayor. “As a tion. “We pay enough in fees. They should holders taken by city staff indicated that result, passengers were taken way out of provide [the machine] so we don’t get ripped 92 percent of those asked supported the their way and had to pay extra.” off in the process.” “English only” requirement. But some of But rather than appear heavy handed Christensen echoed McGhan’s feelings on the other ordinances might be a tougher with a change that seemed to be targeted sell, at least to some of the taxi drivers who the credit/debit card requirement. at new Americans with limited English “You shouldn’t be able to tell somebody spoke to BW. skills, Bieter’s staff reached out to groups that they have to take a 2- to 5-percent ding “We’re not being inclusive, we’re being serving as advocates for refugees, who quite exclusive with these laws,” said John Chris- on their hard work,” said Christensen. “If often turn to taxi driving for their first tensen of Gold Taxi, one of the city’s smaller somebody got in my cab and wanted to go American jobs. from Boise to Five Mile [Road] and they cab companies. Christensen is one of only “We were very impressed by the level gave me cash, it would be $15. If they gave two drivers for Gold. of cooperation from the me a credit card, it’s not $15 to me, it’s The City Clerk’s Office agencies,” said Theresa more like $12.50 because I have to pay the counts 58 taxi companies in McLeod, assistant to Bieter. bank and credit card processing fees. We Boise that have only one car Through dialogue with several The City of Boise currently charges $73.75 per taxi can’t charge extra. No matter what I do, it in the fleet. Ten companies refugee resettlement agencies, license annually. cuts in and I’m not getting my fair and equal have two to four cars, one McLeod said the “English fare based on the Boise City rates.” company has seven cabs, and only” ordinance would be reChristensen said rather than the city three companies have 10 or vised to require taxi drivers to requiring a taxi operator to accept credit more cars in their fleets. “understand” English, rather and/or debit cards, it should ultimately be a “I do believe the market is over satuthan “read and write” English. rated,” said Christensen. “But obviously, the business decision. “Quite often, they can speak English “I don’t have a problem taking credit marketplace has deemed that it’s worth it before they’re able to read or write. That’s cards but making somebody take credit why we’re inclined to make the test verbal,” to have this many cabs. If we’re not making cards—that decision should be made by the money, we’re not going to do this.” said McLeod, referring to a licensing test to business, not the city of Boise,” he said. Christensen is a father of one and enjoys be administered by the city. “The English The month of January will be critical the flexible schedule that driving affords. He Language Center [on River Street] will be in the professional lives of Christensen, has a fair amount in common with Dereck very helpful and, of course, drivers will be able to utilize the English language resources McGhan, another driver competing for fares McGhan and scores of other Boise cab drivers. The first reading of the newly revised who is also a dad and drives for ABC Taxi. at the main library.” taxi ordinance amendments is scheduled McGhan describes himself as a tradesman Outgoing City Council Member Alan who worked in construction for years before for Tuesday, Jan. 10, and a second reading Shealy said he liked what he heard at the is slated for Tuesday, Jan. 24. If all goes as he began driving a cab eight months ago. Dec. 20 meeting. As of January 1, Shealy planned, a third reading, public hearing and “The economy is tough, and it’s difficult stepped down, meaning he won’t have a to find work right now,” said McGhan, who ultimate vote by the City Council is schedfinal vote on the proposed changes. uled for Tuesday, Jan. 31. pays ABC $200 per week to lease a cab. “My main concern here was about the WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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CITIZEN

ANTHONY LYONS CCDC’s new boss talks sawhorses, triathlons and selling burgers to classmates GEORGE PRENTICE

What was the big dream for you when you were in high school? I started my own business. I was attending a boarding school. A friend of mine would pick me up after classes and we would drive into town and buy about 100 McDonald’s hamburgers and sell them for a buck apiece to my classmates. In what corners of the world have you lived? Here in the states, I lived in New Hampshire, Vermont, Rhode Island, Chicago, Boston, Santa Fe, [N.M.], Hilton Head, [S.C.], and Gainesville, [Fla.]. Overseas, I lived in the Hague, Netherlands. I attended Indiana University to study art history. While I was in college, I lived in Athens, [Greece], for two different years. That’s where I met my wife, Wendy. She was also studying abroad at the time. We’ve been married 17 years. Is your wife a professional? She’s a trained anthropologist. She’s in the

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JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Anthony Lyons is a bit of an enigma. The new director of the Capital City Development Corporation is an intellectual, businessman, public servant and a top athlete—though he would probably push back at any of those labels. Without question, he is a free thinker. Embracing his entrepreneurial spirit while still in high school, Lyons has lived and worked around the world and helped craft community development in Claremont, N.H. Most recently he was the director of the Community Redevelopment Agency in Gainesville, Fla. But now, he was quick to remind BW, he and his wife Wendy and their 6-year-old son, Asher, are Boiseans.

process of writing a book. Did she show you some of her chapters or were you inclined not to read them until she’s finished? At the beginning, we talked quite a bit about it, but I think it’s best that she retain it. It’s really her work. What do you do to recreate? I have three things: family, work and then something else. My something else last year was participating in triathlons, something I got deeply into. I competed in the national championships in Burlington, Vt. Going forward, I’m not sure what I’ll do. Can you leave something that dramatic behind you? Absolutely. It’s our understanding that there were more than 100 candidates for your job. What did the CCDC board tell you they were looking for? Not to boast, but in my kind of role, I’m often recruited, but I actually found this opening on my own. After reading the recruitment brochure, I turned to my wife and said, “I found it.” It was just like that. What were they looking for? I think it was me. If I remember the short list of finalists for your position, there were a few candidates who lived in Boise or were from the Northwest. Is there an advantage to coming to this job as an outsider? I don’t look at it as being internal or external. It’s neither here nor there. It’s all stuff. You can live in the history books, or you can

decide to live in the present and think about helping the city for its future. Your office is quite bare. My desk is on its way. I travel with my own desk. What’s so unique about it? Back in 1995, I opened my first office in an old warehouse outside of Boston. I bought two bright-orange sawhorses and some weather stripping. And I walked by a windshield repair shop that had a huge piece of glass with a sign saying, “Take it now for $5.” I put it together and that’s my desk. I’ve had it ever since. I’m a minimalist. You’ll never see my degrees or awards on my office wall. Are they in boxes at home? Yes. It’s all in the past. There’s something to be said for not surrounding yourself with a bunch of stuff. It gives you an ability to think through things. Would we be terribly surprised if you were still in this position 10 or 15 years from now? The last thing I’ve ever done is chart my career. My expectations are to be here, period. Time to get your sawhorses set up. Absolutely, and let ’er rip. This feels really good here.

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hoosing the right word is an art form. Whether it’s conveying shock, the depths of despair or the heights of joy, a single word can be deceptively weighty. Now, consider only having 101 words to create an entire world. That’s just what the legion of authors who entered this, the 10th annual Fiction 101 Contest, did. More than 130 stories spanning the comic to the heartbreaking vied for the title and again proved that Boise has an impressive literary foundation. This year’s winners are true artists of word choice, and the worlds they created are worth taking the time to explore. —Deanna Darr

2012 JUDGES Rick Ardinger Executive director of the Idaho Humanities Council and owner of Limberlost Press

Laura DeLaney Owner of Rediscovered Bookshop

Alan Heathcock Board member of The Cabin, professor of English at Boise State and author

FICTION 101 READING AND RECEPTION Please join the Boise Weekly crew and the Fiction 101 winning authors for a reception and reading on First Thursday, Jan. 5, at Rediscovered Bookshop. Celebrate the winners’ victories and learn about their inspirations. The reading begins at 7 p.m. For more info, check out the story on Page 15.

Michael Faison Executive director of the Idaho Commission on the Arts

STORYTELLING 101 WORDS AT A TIME

Mitch Wieland Editor of The Idaho Review, professor of English at Boise State and author

VIDEO: What were the Fiction 101 judges looking for?

ERIN RUIZ

I FIRST PLACE, $500

SARAH MASTERSON, BOISE

married the strongest man in the world. On our first date he bit a quarter in half and we took the two chewed pieces down to the river. It was October and the water was a silver tongue. I imagined jumping in, letting the river carry my party dress, a sinking pink balloon. He would have to save me. Dipping his giant paws into the polished water and sifting me out, a wet petal. “I’ve never liked the ocean,” he said softly. “My wishes always end up back on shore.” I reached for his hand. It felt like a fisherman’s.

HONORABLE MENTION, $75

HONORABLE MENTION, $75

GREG LIKINS, NAMPA

MICHAEL HOPKINS, BOISE

BOOM TOWN

GRANDPA’S TOOL BOX

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ractors exhumed the mound where we buried Sweet Maggie, and a strip mall bloomed. Streets uncoiled. Rows of houses blighted our fields. Stand your ground, Pa commanded, and we hurled prayers and threats as families swarmed in—city folk, pale, with pupils wide as moons. They scurried indoors and pretended not to see us, told each other we were ghosts startled from a waking dream, pieces of the past receding. By autumn we were gone. Sweet Maggie’s laughter beckoned us into the hills. Nights, you’ll hear our voices on the storming sky; the thunder is our cursing, the rain our tears.

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ime beaten now, worn and weathered, I unclasp this wooden memory box and the aroma of leather and dust releases his ghost. There are the gloves he wore, the hammer he wielded. There the dirt floored, sagging, rickety workshop. The anvil stand, workbench, branding irons hooked, dangling from rafters overhead. There the tools, the tangible testaments of his genius to survive harsh, brutal northeastern Montana winters. Springtime again, warm chinook winds traveling down the east slope of the Rockies, cause for celebration. Saturday nights, some Sunday afternoons grandpa grabbed another tool box containing the fiddle. Spreading joy and merriment county wide.

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ER IN R U IZ

SECOND PLACE, $300 LUKE FELT, BOISE

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very autumn, mayflies paint our city black. They fog the streets, blanket every building, every wall. Sam tosses a tennis ball against them. Their bodies crack. Wings stick in the fuzz. At dinner, Sam butters corn, stares at the empty seat where Dad used to be. Mom chews cauliflower, tries not to do the same. “We’ll be alright,” she says. “Of course we will. Finish your broccoli.” Later, me and Sam count mayflies through our window. The air’s thick with them, can’t see much else. “Where they coming from?” Sam says. I shrug. “Don’t matter. Soon enough, they’ll leave us alone.”

JUDGE’S PICK, MITCH WIELAND, $25

JUDGE’S PICK, LAURA DELANEY, $25

JUDGE’S PICK, RICK ARDINGER, $25

KARLA MILLER, MCCALL

MARY MOISO, NAMPA

MICHELLE BURNHAM, BOISE

SURE AS WOOL I

knit him a hat. Interwoven blues and greys—the colors before a snowstorm. Took 38 evenings, one stitch at a time, next to the wood stove. I knit his name—Ben—on the inside. I knew his mother would love it; his ex despise it. He’d wear it and think of me. Christmas morning, I wrapped it in glossy pages of SKI Magazine. He smiled, big as the future, when he saw it. But it didn’t fit right. I’d miscalculated the stitches, or something. Unraveling was difficult. Shades of blue and grey on my living room floor, January into spring.

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THREE IS A CROWD A MAN GOES OUT FOR A PACK OF R CIGARETTES

ecently, I had a friend over to visit. When I returned with drinks I saw she has brought along another friend. I recognized the girl although she was slimmer and had a new jacket. Each time I turned my back the two of them shared looks and giggled at inside jokes, chatting in code. The other girl kept chiming in with factoids and alerts, her face lighting up as she shared gossipy tidbits and meaningless comments. This girl was annoying and intrusive. I wish she hadn’t come, but how do you tell your friend to leave her cell phone at home?

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swooped up the dirty jeans and shirt before heading to the laundry room. Digging my hand into the pockets of the jeans, I pulled out a hand full of stuff and set it on the top of the washer, arranging the items in a line. A crumpled pack of cigarettes, three Canadian dimes, a day-glow domino, his wedding ring and a fortune from a cookie that read “Tell it like it’s a secret and everyone will be dying to know it.” I looked toward the bedroom where he slept for the first time in days. Love is a mystery.

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ER IN R U IZ

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reathless, she steadies herself against the front door, turns to survey all she’s done. A clear path shoveled through the snow. She realizes she’s smiling, unforced. Her son hoists the head onto a snowman, the ground around him rubbed with snow angels. “Good job, Mom!â€? he calls. She does a little bow. There’s nothing of the past in this moment. No fearful future. Just the truth of clean, right-angles of concrete; the V of winter geese barking overhead; sky, cloudless and shockingly blue; melting snow dripping off the rooine. Her heart, bucking hard inside her chest, reminding her she’s alive.

THIRD PLACE, $200 JENNIFER SANDERS PETERSON, BOISE

IDAHO NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATIONS Call 541-344-2739 (x203) for more info

/*/,"4*#3&8*/($0.t#3&8&%*/&6(&/& 03&(0/ JUDGE’S PICK, MICHAEL FAISON, $25

JUDGE’S PICK, ALAN HEATHCOCK, $25

PHIL A. MCCLELLIN, KUNA

JAMES MCCOLLY, BOISE

SUFFER THE REAPER

STRONGWILLED PIG

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palmed the buckling’s chin, he nuzzled my cheek; his coat stank of oats, urine. I smiled, pulled frost from his beard. The skeletal door clapped the house. Sister sobbed at the window; her breath frosted the glass and she wiped it with ragged white lace. Dad held a hand inside his patched jacket; his eyes heavy, worn. “Stop it,� he said. Then to me, “I’ll be in the barn.� I nodded, slipped a knot around the buckling’s neck. The goat shivered, bleated. I rubbed his nose, kissed his ear. Dad slouched, sighed. “Don’t tarry,� he said, and entered the barn.

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he pig woke to a world askew. His pen had collapsed, so he explored the jumbled farm at will. He saw no other animals, no farmer, no fences. Following the road into town, he found the city awash in rubble and pancaked buildings. The only sound was the soft click of his hooves on the broken road. He wandered the remains for days before he ďŹ nally caught the smell of rotting food, and ravenously ran to the scent. He found an overturned vegetable truck and two sows feeding. Suddenly he understood; this was the dawning of the planet of the pigs.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | 13


BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

There’s no elevator down from the top of Mt. Everest.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY JAN. 6-7 documentary Fall “cranium over Converse” for Sarah Tregay’s young adult novel Love and Leftovers.

SKIING EVEREST

FRIDAY JAN. 6 reading SARAH TREGAY LOVE AND LEFTOVERS READING Eagle resident Sarah Tregay didn’t have a TV when she was a kid. And contrary to most teenagers’ insistence that it would cause her to turn into some sort of hideously malformed cultural outcast with nary a catchphrase to sarcastically fling at their parents, she did all right. Tregay dug deep into the local library’s YA section, and when she’d finished all the books, she hunkered down and decided to write her own. Her debut novel, Love and Leftovers, is a YA novel in verse, meaning it’s a series of poems presented together to tell the story of a young girl from Idaho who finds herself on a vacation to New Hampshire that she’s beginning to suspect may be permanent. Lauren Myracle, The New York Times bestselling author of Shine, called it “the most delicious love story I’ve read in ages.” Kirkus Reviews said it had “real depth to accompany all that white space.” And while you could just go pick the book up at your local library Tregay-style this week, there’s a special opportunity to have lunch with the author and pick her brain about all things leftover. Friday, Jan. 6 from noon-1 p.m., Tregay will be at Rediscovered Bookshop having pizza with readers. At 7 p.m. that day, she’ll read from her book at the same shop. Noon and 7 p.m., FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., 208-376-4229, sarahtregay.com.

FRIDAY JAN. 6 glass FIRST FRIDAY AT FUSIONS GLASS Are you suffering a holiday hangover—that dull, lingering feeling that comes

after the excitement of the holidays is over, the decorations are pulled down and the parties are but a distant memory? You need to shake off the doldrums by getting out of the house and doing something creative. And if you need motivation, head to Fusions Glass Studio in Eagle for First Friday on Jan.

14 | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | BOISEweekly

6, when your inner glass artist can be fully realized. You can try your hand at creating your own stunning work of fused glass for little to no cost—making a pendant will cost you zip, while attempting a dream catcher will be $5. The crew at Fusions will lead visitors through the process of designing the glass,

Thrill-seekers adhere closely to the Billy Idol paradigm: more, more, more. They want their thrills to be a neverending crescendo, constantly growing bigger, faster and harder than those that came before. But at a certain point, they reach the limits. Not just of their bodies but of the physical world—that place where there’s no taller bridge to leap from, no environment more extreme to brave. For mountain climbers, it’s Mt. Everest. Though the world’s tallest mountain isn’t as technically difficult as K2, the second-highest, its summit sits at 29,029 feet above sea level, an altitude-sickness inducing height with air as thin as Rod Blagojevich’s defense. And though there’s no way for thrill-seekers of the world to climb higher, there’s a way for them to get down faster: skiing. And that’s exactly what adventure filmmakers Les Guthman and Mike Marolt decided to document in the simply named film Skiing Everest. Filmed during a 10-year period, the filmmakers and nine high-altitude skiers continuously challenged themselves to go bigger, faster and harder than anyone ever had before. They skied through the so-called “death zone” above 26,000 feet without oxygen. The film also delves into the history of high-altitude skiing. Though Skiing Everest was purchased for broadcast by ESPN, Boiseans have a special chance to see the film and meet the director this week. It will be screened at Boise Contemporary Theater on Friday, Jan. 6, and twice on Saturday, Jan. 7. Tickets are available at the BCT box office. Friday, Jan. 6, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 7, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; $10 adults, $7 18 and younger. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, skiingeverest.net.

then the pros will fire them in one of the studio’s seven kilns. You won’t walk away with your creation that night but it will be ready within a few days. The studio also hosts regular walk-in projects on Fridays, when visitors can attempt to make anything from plates and picture frames to night lights and pencil holders for $15-$35, depending on the project. All ages are welcome, so maybe it’s just the thing to snap the kids out of their

back-to-school funk. 4:30-8:30 p.m., prices vary. Fusions Glass Studio, 347 Edgewood Lane, Eagle, 208-938-1055, fusions-idaho.com.

SATURDAY JAN. 7 skiing IDAHO CITY FREE SKI DAY They say there’s no

such thing as a free lunch, but how about free snow sports? For the 26th year, the Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation is offering free snow fun. On Saturday, Jan. 7, parking at all State Parks and State Park ’n’ Ski locations will be free. That gives you free rein of 180 miles of marked trails at more than a dozen locations around Idaho. While there 19 aren’t a ton of places in the valley WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


1ST THURSDAY ER IN R U IZ

Erin Ruiz’s original Fiction 101 illustrations will infest Rediscovered Bookshop on First Thursday, Jan. 5.

TRIM THE FAT Local authors keep it brief with BW’s Fiction 101 contest TARA MORGAN or the scenery or whatever it might be,” said Not one to mince words, short story scribe Masterson. “Some of my favorite writers write Raymond Carver had this advice for budding authors: “Get in, get out. Don’t linger. Go on.” that way. … They make these really unbelievCarver’s decree is even more pertinent when able situations seem really human.” Masterson’s winning story, Big, centers on it comes to writing flash fiction—short stories the first date between a woman in a pink party ranging from six to 1,000 words. And with a dress and the strongest man in the world. 101-word cap, Boise Weekly’s annual Fiction “It was kind of dreamy and mysterious, this 101 is one of the flashiest out there. couple being together,” remembered HeathFor our 10th annual contest, local lit luminaries Mitch Wieland, Alan Heathcock, Laura cock. “But more than anything, it brought me into this dream in a way that I also absolutely Delaney, Rick Ardinger and Michael Faison thumbed through 131 submissions. This year’s believed it—it felt real to me, authentic.” Masterson, who recently moved back to winners and judge’s picks, which you can get Boise from San Francisco, decided to enter Ficacquainted with on Page 11, will all read their prose at a special event this First Thursday at 7 tion 101 after attending a reading by Heathcock, Wieland and Tony Doerr at Rediscovp.m. at Rediscovered Bookshop. ered Bookshop in November. According to Heathcock—author of “It was actually one of the biggest inspirathe short story collection Volt, which was tions I’ve had in a long time—not only how recently selected as a GQ magazine Best Book great Boise writers are, but the amount of of 2011—a great short story should be just as people that were in that space, the quesarresting as a longer novel. tions that were asked. … I was inspired and “The craft elements that make a 101-word I decided to go home and write something,” story successful is the same stuff that makes a said Masterson. 20-page story successful,” said Heathcock. But winnowing her story down to 101 And while every good story needs a few words was much trickier than she had thought. basic plot elements—setting, characters, con“It felt like working on a song or a poem flict—it also needs something intangible that where, if I took out brings the tale to life. one word or wanted “The story has to to change one image, somehow transcend Fiction 101 winners will read their entries on the whole cadence of words, that is, I have First Thursday, Jan. 5, at 7 p.m. at: the piece would just to forget that I’m actuREDISCOVERED BOOKSHOP completely change— ally reading something 180 N. Eighth St. sometimes for the and be brought into 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org better and sometimes an empathetic experifor the worse.” ence that is not mine,” Luke Felt, this year’s second-place winner, said Heathcock. echoed those sentiments: For this year’s first-place winner, Sarah “Writing at 101 words is a big challenge; Masterson, the key to breathing life into a it’s also really helpful because it teaches you character is to place them in a fantastical how to trim the fat off of a story and narrow setting, but zero in on the very miniscule, it down to just the core parts. … I think it’s human details. amazing that a story that’s only 101 words can “I like to create something really big—just have such a substantial emotional impact,” like an image—and then focus on these really said Felt. small features and elements or either people WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Felt, a mortgage company bookkeeper and Boise State English major, won first place in 2010 for his story The Swells. A few years back, Felt formed a Fiction 101 critique group with two of this year’s other finalists—thirdplace winner Jennifer Sanders Peterson and honorable mention author Greg Likins. “We try to get together a month or so before the contest and workshop our stories and pass around general ideas and that kind of thing,” said Felt. Felt’s piece, A Fog, portrays a family’s awkward dinner during a mayfly infestation. “I’m from a small town in Eastern Idaho called St. Anthony, and this actually happens there. Annually, these bugs called mayflies breed in the town and they stay there for a few days and they literally cover everything,” said Felt. “The way that a darkness falls on a town in that way and then disappears so quickly was really a powerful image. … It’s indicative of grief or having some kind of a terrible experience come over your family and then disappear.” Likins, a library employee who won third place in 2006 for Life With You Ain’t Worth the Money, enters Fiction 101 every year to stay connected with the local writing community. “It’s kind of a calling card into the local writing community,” said Likins. “I’ve never been part of an MFA program, but at the time when I moved here when I first started entering the contest, I didn’t know anyone in the writing community, that was really the only forum that I saw. … But in the years since, a lot has happened in Boise, it’s really built up into a much better artistic community and a lot more opportunities for writers.” Heathcock couldn’t agree more. “I’ve been interviewed several times about what’s been happening in Idaho,” he said. “What makes me happy is that the rest of the country is starting to notice what we’ve known for several years now.”

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS East Side BASQUE MARKET—Enjoy roscon de reyes, the traditional cake of Three Kings Day. If you get the slice with the bean in it, you’ll have good luck all year—and win a free T-shirt and lunch from the market. See Downtown News, Page 18. 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com.

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BASQUE MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER—Enjoy free gallery tours for the exhibit Hidden In Plain Sight: The Basques from 6:30-

8:30 p.m. and of the Jacobs/Uberuaga House guided every half hour. Local musicians will play Basque tunes during the jam session. 6:30 p.m. FREE. 611 Grove St., Boise, 208-3432671, basquemuseum.com.

BRICOLAGE—Tour Canoeing, 3 the new exhibition of mulitmedia works by Eli Craven and Maria Chavez

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BOISE ART GLASS—Student’s choice—make a pumpkin, ornament, paperweight, small bowl or cup during a 30-minute session for $40. Call to sign up or watch free demonstrations while snacking on crackers and cheese. 5-11 p.m. FREE. 530 W. Myrtle St., Boise, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com.

while enjoying complimentary snacks. 5-8 p.m. 418 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208345-3718, bricoshoppe.com. THE COTTON CLUB—Open to the public and showcasing Valentine quilts. 106 N. Sixth (in the basement of the Old Pioneer Building), Boise, 208-345-5567, cottonclub.com.

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THE DISTRICT—Watch a painting demonstration by Patcasso Art Movement’s Patrick Hunter and purchase an original piece. 110 S. Fifth

St., Boise, 208-343-1089, districtcoffeehouse.com. DRAGONFLY—Serving complimentary wine from 5-9 p.m. January clearance sale through Saturday, Jan. 7. 5-9 p.m. 414 W. Main St., Boise, 208-338-9234, dflyboise.com. FLATBREAD COMMUNITY 6 OVEN—Check out Amber Grubb’s photographs while enjoying happy hour featuring $6 deals. Bottles of wine are $20 and kids 12 and younger eat free with purchase. 615 W. Main St., Boise, 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com.

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE—View Sara 7 McDonald’s paintings and mixed-media work. 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com. GOLDY’S CORNER—View Jimbob’s photo8 graphs printed on sorted metal and the work of other local artists, including Austin Garrett. Happy hour from 5-9 p.m. and made-to-order dinner available. 625 W. Main St., Boise, 208-4333934, goldysbreakfastbistro.com. INDIE MADE—Local crafters and artists will set up pop-up shops in the Pioneer Building. Enjoy live music while you browse. Open until 9 p.m. 108 N. Sixth St., Boise. LE CAFE DE PARIS—Special tapas menu and wine tasting. FREE. 204 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-336-0889, lecafedeparis.com. MELTING POT—Enjoy happy hour and drink specials all evening in the lounge, including $4 martinis and cheese or chocolate fondues for $5 per person. 200 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-3830900, meltingpot.com. PENGILLY’S—The Frim Fram 4 will play at 8:45 p.m. 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344. WILLI B’S SANDWICH SALOON—Start or end your First Thursday trek at Willi B’s with $2.75 well drinks, $1.50 PBR cans and $3 Salmon Creek wine. Karaoke begins at 8:30 p.m. 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs.com.

South Side 8TH STREET MARKETPLACE AT BODO—The 9 Artist in Residence program hosts new work from 6-9 p.m. Featuring writers Amanda Turner and Mike Medberry, filmmaker Todd Joseph Lundbohm, painter and mixed-media artist Willow Socia, and painters Marcus Pierce and Cody Rutty. 404 S. Eighth St., Mercantile Building, Boise, 208-338-5212, 8thstreetmarketplace.com. ATOMIC TREASURES—Celebrate re-use 10 with an eclectic mix of vintage, retro, art and found objects. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208344-0811, atomictreasures.com.

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BOISE ART MUSEUM—Create a design for an installation after experiencing the large-scale sculpture by artist Mike Rathbun during Studio Art Exploration from 5-8 p.m. Art Talk is at 5:30 p.m. with Rathbun as he discusses his installation, The Situation He Found Himself In. 5-8 p.m. FREE. 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

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BROWN’S GALLERY—Enjoy a wide selection of fine art for casual shoppers and collectors. The gallery offers complete art services including framing, appraisals and restoration. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 408 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-6661. CASA DEL SOL—Enjoy $2 tacos, $2 Tecate drafts and $5 house margaritas on the rocks. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-3660.

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THE COLE MARR GALLERY/COFFEE HOUSE—Showcasing David Marr’s images of the Kootenai Valley. 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, Boise, 208-336-7630. HAIRLINES—Stop in and talk to Lui the Hair Whisperer. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3839009. HELLY HANSEN—Everything is 10 percent off; if you buy two items, you get 15 percent off; buy three or more items and get 20 percent off your entire purchase. 860 W. Broad St., Boise, 208342-2888. IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSE14 UM—Check out the newest exhibit The Casasola Archives: The Mexican Revolution and Beyond, as well as a traditional Mexican dance performance. Ballet Folklorico will portray the life events, emotion and history of Mexico. Performances at 6:15 p.m. and 7 p.m. Exhibit runs through Saturday, Jan. 14. 5-9 p.m. By donation. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov.

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LEE GALLERY BOISE—Explore the Flight of Possibility exhibition, featuring the work of Ginger Daugherty. 409 S. Eighth St., Ste 101, Boise, 208-345-1120, leegalleryboise.com.

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LISTINGS/1ST THURSDAY LISK GALLERY—Featur16 ing Carl Rowe, “the Foothills painter,” and his newest works done in oil. Photographer Mark Lisk has images on display, as well as acrylic paintings on aluminum by artist Jerri Lisk. Wine sampling by Sawtooth winery. 401 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-3773, liskgallery.com.

leather sofas. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9018.

Central

RENEWAL CONSIGN19 MENT HOMEWARES— The Artist in Residence program

AMERICAN CLOTHING GALLERY—Featuring after-Christmas specials. 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 121A, Boise, 208-433-0872, americanclothinggallery.com.

features new work from painter Anne Boyles. 517 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-5444.

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SOLID—Enjoy live music from Ryan Wissinger, free appetizers, spirit sampling including a tequila tasting provided by Youngs Market and tour the work of David Day Photography. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208345-6620.

THE MONOGRAM SHOPPE— Stop in to check out fantastic gift ideas. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, themonogramshoppe.com. NORTHRUP BUILDING— 17 View new work from the Artists in Residence. Featuring

SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Take a break from gallery hopping at the Snake River Winery Tasting Room. Check out the new selection of Languiole wood-handle wine openers, aerators, and gift baskets. As always, 20 percent discount on all case sales. 786 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-3459463.

video work from Amanda Hamilton based on Marilynne Robinson’s 1980 novel Housekeeping, as well as Arin Lindstrom and Meg Feldman. Eighth and Broad streets, second floor, Boise.

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QUE PASA—Check out the best selection of Mexican artwork in town, including wall fountains, silver, Day of the Dead decor, and cedar and

ART GLASS ETC.—New 21 Year’s sale—all pendants are buy one, get one half price. All 2011 glass is being cleared out. Meet artists and enjoy coffee and snacks. 5-9 p.m. 280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 138A, Boise, 208-794-3265. BACON—Featuring music from Brother Dan, half-price bloody marys and complimentary bacon bites from 11 different bacon selections. 915 Idaho St., Boise, 208-387-3553, baconboise.com. BERRYHILL & CO. RESTAURANT—Complimentary hot shots from 6:30-8 p.m. and live jazz. Also happy hour from 4-7 p.m. 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208387-3553, berryhillandco.com. DAN LOONEY UNDER22 GROUND ART—New paintings of Boise, the Saw-

ART WALK Locations featuring artists

JEFFERSON

tooths and McCall on display. Join the mailing list for a complimentary Lemhi Winter frameable card signed by the artist. 4-7 p.m. 816 W. Bannock St., Ste. E, Boise, 208-870-9589, imagemaker.org/artist/danlooney. GALLERY 601—Take 23 advantage of the framing sale and special First Thursday surprises. 211 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-336-5899, gallery601.com.

BANNOCK

MAI THAI—Start First Thursday with the $9.49 lunch buffet and two happy hours from 5-6:30 p.m. and 9 p.m.-close. Also izakaya appetizer plates available. 750 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208344-8424, maithaigroup.com.

IDAHO

GROVE

5TH

9TH

10TH

11TH

13TH

12TH

GROVE

6TH

CAPITOL

MAIN

FRONT BROAD MYRTLE

F U LT O N

8TH 1. Basque Museum 2. Boise Ar t Glass 3. Bricolage 4. The Cotton Club 5. The District 6. Flatbread 7. Flying M 8. Goldy’s Corner 9. Eighth Street Marketplace at BODO 10. Atomic Treasures

11. Boise Ar t Museum 12. Brown’s Galler y 13. Cole Marr Galler y and Coffeehouse 14. Idaho State Historical Museum 15. Lee Galler y 16. Lisk Galler y 17. Nor thrup Building 18. Que Pasa 19. Renewal Consignment Housewares

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OLD CHICAGO—Kids eat free. Karaoke from 10 p.m.-close in the bar. 730 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-0037, oldchicago.com. PIPER PUB & GRILL—Happy hour from 3-6 p.m. features two-for-one drinks and a special menu. 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-2444, thepiperpub. com. PLAN B LOUNGE—Happy hour all night long and plenty of liquor and leather. 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com.

B AT T E RY

RIVER

MASSAGE MATTERS—Purchase a 60-minute massage for $10 off regular price and get entered to win another 60-minute massage. Complimentary chair massages, refreshments and art by Cody Rutty. 816 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-315-0037.

20. Solid 21. Ar t Glass Etc. 22. Dan Looney Underground Ar t 23. Galler y 601 24. Thomas Hammer 25. Ar t Source Galler y 26. Basement Galler y 27. The Galler y at The Linen Building

REDISCOVERED BOOKSHOP— Listen to the finalists of Boise Weekly’s Fiction 101 contest read their work and answer questions about amazingly fast fiction. See First Thursday Feature, Page 15. 7 p.m. 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org. SEE JANE RUN—Stop in for champagne, a bite of chocolate and 20 percent off every item in the store. The new training schedule will be launched as well. 814 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-338-5263, seejanerun.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | 17


1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS 1ST THURSDAY/NEWS DAVE THOM AS

SUPERB SUSHI—Free wine and smoked salmon tasting. 6-8 p.m. 208 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-0123, superbsushidowntown.com. THOMAS HAMMER— 24 Featuring mixed-media art by Adam Downs. 298 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-433-8004, hammercoffee.com. TRIP TAYLOR BOOKSELLER— Bring your own work or someone else’s to read during this open mic poetry reading. 210 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-344-3311, downtownboise.org. TWIG’S CELLAR—Post-holiday wine sale. Taste before you buy, order and pick up the next day. 816 W. Bannock St., lower level, Boise, 208-344-8944, twigscellar.com.

West Side ART SOURCE GAL25 LERY—Opening reception for An Altoid Tinstallation. Members of BOSCO and Art Source artists, as well as TRICA, present art made from Altoid tins. Music by Dan Costello and wine from Indian Creek Winery. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

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BASEMENT GALLERY— Winter Show features young and up-and-coming Treasure Valley artists, as well as new paintings from Mike Flinn. FREE. 928 W. Main St., Boise, 208-333-0309. FOOT DYNAMICS—Step into the winter mood with $10 off your purchase when you mention this listing. 1021 W. Main St., Boise, 208-386-3338. THE GALLERY AT THE 27 LINEN BUILDING—View Dave Thomas’ Time Line Paintings series, which features four large mixed-media canvases and 20 mixed-media studies on polypropylene. Thomas is a Boise painter and teacher at Boise State. The exhibit will run through Monday, Feb. 20. See Downtown News, this page. 5-9 p.m. 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding. com. MODERN HOTEL AND BAR—Enjoy a cocktail and complimentary chair massage by Three Oaks Academy from 5-9 p.m. 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244, themodernhotel.com. OWYHEE PLAZA HOTEL—Live music by Amy Weber, $5 wine flights and food specials. 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com. RADIO BOISE—Watch the live on-air DJ, tour the studio and step up to the mic and record a testimonial. Broadcasting on KRBX, 89.9 FM. 1020 W. Main St., Alaska Building, Ste. 200, Boise, 208-424-8166, radioboise.org. THE RECORD EXCHANGE—Enjoy a free performance by Like A Rocket during the band’s album release party. Beer from Payette Brewing Co. and special sales throughout the store. 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com.

A show featuring vibrant mixed media on canvas from Dave Thomas opens at the Linen Building this First Thursday.

TIME LINES AND HIDDEN BEANS If you believe all that Mayan calendar 2012 hoopla, time is running out. So what better way to celebrate the end of times than by taking a gander at Time Line Paintings, Dave Thomas’ aptly titled new series at the Linen Building. Thomas’ four large mixed-media canvases dive deep into the color ful realm of abstract expressionism, utilizing a variety of textures and geometric shapes. According to his press release, Thomas strives to keep his art in the moment. “If I didn’t make this particular painting today, then it would never be made—my time I’m on the planet will end, but time itself will continue,” he said. Before your time on this planet ends, head over to the Linen Building at 1402 W. Grove St., on First Thursday, Jan. 5, from 5-9 p.m. for the opening reception of Time Line Paintings (with a full bar available). The exhibit will run through Monday, Feb. 20. Even if you don’t believe in 2012 apocalypse, it’s hard to ignore the destruction and trauma caused by war. Especially when those affected are young children. After Operation Cast Lead, Israel’s 23-day bombardment of the Gaza Strip in late 2008 and early 2009, children living in the area began to document their horrific war-time experiences via art. The drawings were completed by kids ages 7 to 14, and some of them were even scribbled on the back of used paper by candlelight. Some of these moving pieces have now been compiled into a traveling art exhibit called A Child’s View From Gaza. The show will have an opening reception on First Thursday at Dawson Taylor’s Coffee Roasters, 219 N. Eighth St., from 7-9 p.m. with free Palestinian food. The event is sponsored by Voices for Palestine and will remain on display through the month of Januar y. But fret not, Christians, this First Thursday has a little something for you, as well. Three Kings Day, also known as Epiphany, is the Jan. 6 celebration of the manifestation of Christ to the world. The Basque Market will be ser ving the traditional Three Kings Day cake, Roscon de Reyes, during First Thursday. According to The Basque Market, whoever finds the single bean hidden in the cake will have good luck throughout the year, starting with a free T-shirt and lunch. —Tara Morgan

18 | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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FIND SABRE RED PINK PEPPER SPRAY

See pointy raptor beaks at Deer Flat.

TUESDAY JAN. 10 Now you don’t have to sell your soul to see Faust at The Met.

bird watching WILD ABOUT LIFE LECTURE SERIES ON RAPTORS Of the estimated 10,000 species of birds, it’s estimated that few people see more than a fraction. Ornithologists brandish binoculars in an attempt to identify all of the species. Dr. Leon Powers of Northwest Nazarene University spends his time cataloguing and categorizing the world’s raptors. While the term “raptor” might conjure up images from Jurassic Park, Powers focuses on their Holocene Era cousins—all manner of herons, falcons, bluebirds and more. These relatives of the dinosaurs are a source of constant joy for Southwest Idaho bird watchers. Powers is professor emeritus at NNU, and on Tuesday, Jan. 10, he’ll teach aspiring birders how to identify the species found in Southern Idaho. The public lecture at the Deer Flat Visitor Center will cover the markings, colors and names of the many birds in the area. This time of year, thousands of birds flock to the Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge. By mid-December, more than 150,000 ducks call Lake Lowell their home. The large number of birds keeps much of the water unfrozen through the winter, and in the early morning, flocks of mallards and smaller numbers of northern pintail and American wigeon take to the skies to feed nearby. Bald eagles stand as sentries around the lake, looking to prey on weaker fowl. These movements provide birders with a visual feast. 7 p.m., FREE. Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 13751 Upper Embankment Road, Nampa, 208-467-9278, fws. gov/deerflat.

to get your powder on, Idaho City is just 14 a short jaunt away. And if you make the pilgrimage on Saturday, Jan. 7, you can join a free guided snowshoe tour at any one of the four Idaho City Park ’n’ Ski locations. This opportunity is open to people of all skill levels,

S U B M I T

but be sure to bring your own snowshoes or borrow a buddy’s pair. The Whoop-Um-Up, Gold Fork, Banner Ridge and Beaver Creek Summit spots are all located between 17 and 25 miles north of Idaho City on Highway 21. Each location has a backcountr y yurt available with reser vations,

WEDNESDAY JAN. 11 opera THE METROPOLITAN OPERA’S FAUST OK, so you’ve sold your soul to the devil in exchange for another shot at youth and passion, gotten your lover pregnant, inadvertently killed her brother, and now she’s headed for the gallows—what could you possibly do to lift your spirits before you’re subjected to the never-ending torment of hell? Why, you could sing about it, of course. It’s what the characters in Charles Gounod’s famous opera Faust have been doing for more than a century, and now Boise audiences have a chance to see some of the best vocalists in the world perform the opera. Edwards 9 will host an encore presentation of The Metropolitan Opera’s performance of Faust on Wednesday, Jan. 11. The performance—which runs roughly four and a half hours—features Jonas Kaufmann as Faust, Rene Pape as the devil and Marina Poplavskaya as Marguerite. The production is directed by Des McAnuff and conducted by Yannick Nezet-Seguin. The opera will be shown at theaters across the country, beginning at 6:30 p.m. in every time zone. Considering the length of the performance, that means opera lovers across the United States can all share a single operatic moment. Some people would sell their souls for that opportunity ... which might inspire a whole new opera. 6:30 p.m., $18. Edwards 9, 760 Broad St., 208-338-3821, regmovies.com.

but Whoop-Um-Up is the only trail that welcomes your canine. Whether you snowshoe or cross-countr y ski, Parks and Rec offers these groomed and ungroomed

It seems like everything under the sun now comes in the National Breast Cancer Foundation’s signature hue. Cat food bowls, sarongs, hair dryers and sporting tape are just of few drops in the tidal wave of pink merchandise that helps support the foundation. Now, you can add to that list Sabre Red’s pink pepper spray. This self-defense device is deceptively sweet looking—the eyeirritating substance is housed in a small .054 ounce bright pink case with a detachable keychain. But don’t be fooled—the supercute key bauble delivers up to 25 super-potent shots at a distance up to 10 feet. It’s like those little green wasabi peas you eat absentmindedly, only to have your taste buds accosted by an unexpected onslaught of heat. Not sure you have pepper spray skills? Visit the manufacturer’s website for an informational (and slightly hilarious) how-to video that will make you feel kind of bad for the mannequin with the drawn-on goatee getting blasted in the eyes. BOISE ARMY NAVY You can pick up your safety 4924 Chinden Blvd. device for roughly $10 at Boise Garden City Army/Navy, online, or in the 208-322-0660 boisearmynavy.org checkout line next to the magaor sabrered.com zines the next time you run to Rite Aid for toothpaste and beer. According to the website, a donation to the NBCF will be made with every purchase. —Sheree Whiteley

trails for free winter fun. FREE, Idaho City. For more information, visit http://parksandrecreation.idaho.gov and click on “recreation.”

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | 19


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JAN. 4 On Stage MY FAIR LADY—Hailed as the standard by which all other musicals are judged, the Fred Meyer Broadway In Boise series brings this international treasure—upon which the classic 1964 Audrey Hepburn movie was based—to the Morrison Center. Tickets available at idahotickets.com. 7:30 p.m. $30-$50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu.

Workshops & Classes

MY FAIR LADY—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $30-50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

BASIC DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY—Learn basic photography, including how to use your camera and compose a picture using lighting, angles, the rule of thirds and depth of field. Bring a digital camera. Five-week class, Thursdays through Feb. 2, with instructor David Gallina. 7-9 p.m. $75-$80. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Talks & Lectures

Kids & Teens

SUN VALLEY CENTER FOR THE ARTS LECTURE SERIES—Author Gretel Ehrlich will discuss her experiences in the Arctic. Her visit coincides with the center’s current multidisciplinary project Thin Ice: Journeys in Polar Regions. 6:30 p.m. $15 Center members, $25 nonmembers, $10 students. Church of the Big Wood, 100 Saddle Road, Ketchum, 208-7265123, brehmcenter.org.

Odds & Ends LIQUID LAUGHS OPEN MIC COMEDY—Try out your best comedy routine in front of a live audience. Sign-ups begin at 7 p.m. and the hilarity starts at 8 p.m. 7 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

THURSDAY JAN. 5 Festivals & Events SOLDIERSONGS KICK-OFF CELEBRATION—Soldiersongs. org reaches out to veterans by providing them with free music lessons and instruments when necessary. This inaugural event will feature great local, regional and national headline entertainment, along with food, beverages and a silent auction. Please join us to celebrate our veterans and officially kickoff SoldierSongs in Boise. For more info, email soldiersongs.boise@gmail.com. 6 p.m. $5 suggested donation. The Alaska Center, 1020 Main St., Boise.

string band, lots of dancing, a full bar with ID and slices from Pie Hole Pizza. 7 p.m. $5, $15 per family. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3850111, thelinenbuilding.com.

Art Workshops & Classes

SKI AND SNOWBOARD WAXING CLASSES—Learning to wax your skis or snowboard will increase your fun in the snow. REI master technician Brook Robinson focuses on the basics of waxing, including base preparation, structure, major and minor repair, and stone grinding. Robinson will present an in-depth examination of how and why waxes work. Registration required—visit rei.com to sign up. 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald St., Boise, 208-3221141, rei.com.

TANG SOO DO CAMP—Learn basic self-defense and awareness of strangers. Coordination, balance and teamwork will be enhanced in this fun program. Ages 5-12. 2-3 p.m., $25-$30. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

20 | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | BOISEweekly

On Stage

BROWN BAG LUNCH WITH ANNA MCKEE AND PETER NEFF—Join artist Anna McKee and glaciologist Peter Neff in an informal slideshow and talk about ice cores, art and ice-bound landscapes. McKee’s drawings are on display at the Center Gallery as part of the multidisciplinary project Thin Ice: Journeys in Polar Regions. Noon-1 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-7269491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Citizen 2012 DEMS UNDER THE DOME—Join the Ada County Democrats and Idaho’s Democratic legislators to discuss the 2012 legislative session. Music by Steve Eaton and Dan MacKay, light appetizers and beverages. Get your tickets online at secure.actblue.com/ page/2012demsdome, or contact Ada County Democrats at 208331-2128. 5-7 p.m. $25. Huntley Law, 815 W. Washington St., Boise, 208-906-8301.

Kids & Teens TANG SOO DO CAMP—See Wednesday. 2-3 p.m. $25-$30. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

FRIDAY JAN. 6 Festivals & Events HOKUM HOEDOWN SQUARE DANCE AND OLD-TIMEY MUSIC SERIES—This modern take on the old-time hootenanny features the Hokum Hi-Flyers acoustic

FIRST FRIDAY ART IN EAGLE—Take a stroll through downtown Eagle and visit local merchants and galleries along the way. First Friday invites the public to stop in to shops, enjoy a drink, art and music. See Picks, Page 14. 4:30-8:30 p.m. Downtown Eagle, Old State Street and Eagle Road, Eagle.

Literature FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE—Most sale items will be priced 50 cents or $1. Remaining books and media will sell for $5 per sack on Saturday after 4 p.m. Proceeds will help fund library programs and events. For questions, or more information on the Friends group, contact the Reference Desk at the Library, 208-362-0181, ext. 6. 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org. LOVE AND LEFTOVERS READING—Young Adult author Sarah Tregay will have pizza with fans and read from her acclaimed debut novel. Visit sarahtregay.com for more info. See Picks, Page 14. Noon and 7 p.m. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks. org.

Kids & Teens JANUARY PUPPET SHOW— Families with children ages 6 and younger can enjoy this 20-minute puppet show about two dogs’ adventures on a snowy day. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary. org.

Screen SKIING EVEREST— Catch this film about dare-devil skiers by filmmakers Les Guthman and Mike Marolt. See Picks, Page 14. 8 p.m. $10 adults, $7 18 and younger. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, skiingeverest.net.

SATURDAY JAN. 7 Festivals & Events WEDDING PARTY SHOW—Meet more than 100 area merchants who have the services needed to create a fabulous, yet affordable wedding. Fashion shows at noon and 3 p.m. For more information and a list of participating merchants, visit weddingparty-boise. com. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $5. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com.

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8 DAYS OUT Art JEFF KOONS OPENING RECEPTION—Black Hunger Gallery presents Broken Puppy, a onenight-only event centered on the exhibition of a limited-edition Jeff Koons sculpture. Refreshments will be served. For more info, email blackhunger@gmail.com. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Black Hunger Gallery, 2606 Breneman St., Boise, blackhunger.com.

Literature FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE—See Friday. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

Sports & Fitness ANNUAL GARDEN VALLEY SNO-GOERS FUN RUN—This snowmobile event includes a fun run, raffles and door prizes. Registration from 9 a.m.-noon. Proceeds support trail maintenance, grooming and community organizations. 9 a.m. $5. Terrace Lakes Resort, 101 Holiday Drive, Garden Valley, 208-462-3250 or 208-462-6058. IDAHO CITY FREE SKI/ SNOWSHOE DAY—The Idaho Department of Parks and Recreation is offering free parking at all Park N’ Ski

areas and State Parks. At the four Idaho City Park N’ Ski areas, free guided snowshoe trips will be offered for all abilities. You must provide your own equipment. For details or to sign up, contact jditto@idpr.idaho.gov or call 208-514-2418. See Picks, Page 14. FREE. Idaho City, Hwy. 21, 40 miles past Boise, 208-392-4159, myidahocity.com.

Kids & Teens JANUARY PUPPET SHOW—See Friday. 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org. PUPPET SHOW—Bring the little ones to the library for a puppet show on the first Saturday of the month. Noon-12:30 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2941, gardencity.lili.org.

Odds & Ends IRISH BEARD GROWING COMPETITION—Quinn’s Restaurant and Lounge is hosting a donegal (Irish beard) growing contest between Saturday, Jan. 7, and Saturday, March 17, (St. Patrick’s Day). Grand prize is $200. Those registering will be treated to a free glass of house wine, well drink or draft beer and a meal coupon for 10 percent off. For more info, call Nick Jones at 208-991-4865. 8 p.m. $5.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

Quinn’s Restaurant and Lounge, 1005 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208345-0135.

Screen SKIING EVEREST—See Friday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $10 adults, $7 18 and younger. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, skiingeverest. net.

SUNDAY JAN. 8 Festivals & Events WEDDING PARTY SHOW—See Saturday. Fashion show at 2 p.m. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. $5. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre. com.

Animals & Pets BLACK DOG WALK—Dogs of all colors will take a walk to bring awareness to the plight of black dogs in shelters, a phenomenon known as black dog syndrome. Also featuring music, a free raffle, dog-food samples, and dog-training tips. Event starts and ends in the parking lot next door to the Ram Restaurant. Noon. FREE. The Ram, 709 E. Park Blvd., Boise, 208-3452929, theram.com.

| SUDOKU MONDAY JAN. 9 Food & Drink INFORMATIONAL LUNCH—If you are interested in learning more about Life’s Kitchen, a local nonprofit that works with 16- to 20-year-old at-risk youth, then stop by for lunch and a tour. A wonderful resource for educators, social workers, volunteers and potential students. 11:30 a.m. FREE. Life’s Kitchen, 1025 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3310199, lifeskitchen.org.

Art

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

BASIC WATERCOLOR PAINTING—Learn to paint by breaking down the subject to its simplest form, beginning with a sketch and progressing to a complete picture in this four-week, demonstration-style class, which is open to all abilities, ages 18 and up. Instructor: Bob Fagan. 6-8 p.m. $60-$65. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | 21


8 DAYS OUT TUESDAY JAN. 10 Literature KAYAKING IDAHO’S WHITEWATER—Local author Rae Ann Norell will talk about her recently published book showcasing whitewater kayaking in Idaho. There will be a book signing and copies available for purchase. 7 p.m. FREE. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise.

Talks & Lectures WILD ABOUT LIFE LECTURE SERIES—Join Leon Powers of Northwest Nazarene University and learn all about raptors. See Picks, Page 19. 7 p.m., FREE. Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, 13751 Upper Embankment Road, Nampa, 208-467-9278, fws.gov/ deerflat.

Odds & Ends GAME NIGHT: PLAY WITH WORDS—Join in for a fun evening of word-oriented board games that will test your linguistic abilities. 7 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996, boisepubliclibrary.org.

WEDNESDAY JAN. 11 Festivals & Events TROUT UNLIMITED HOSTS MIKE LAWSON—The Trout Unlimited Ted Trueblood Chapter Writer Series presents an evening with Mike Lawson, author of Spring Creeks and Fly Fishing the Henrys Fork. Tickets for an optional early dinner starting at 5:30 p.m. are available for $35 at tedtruebloodtu.org through Paypal or call at 208-343-1510 to reserve a seat. Proceeds to benefit the Ted Trueblood Chapter. 6:30 p.m. $5. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza. com.

Art

Screen

WORKING WITH CHARCOAL— Learn the basics of working with charcoal pencils, as well as techniques for applying charcoal to create realistic impressions within your artwork in a twosession class. Fee includes paper and board. Starter kit for $10. Instructor: Ginger Lantz. 6:30 p.m. $45-$50. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

FAUST—Watch the performers of The Metropolitan Opera bring Charles Gounod’s famous opera to life. See Picks, Page 19. 6:30 p.m., $18. Edwards 9, 760 Broad St., 208-338-3821, regmovies.com.

Odds & Ends LIQUID LAUGHS OPEN MIC COMEDY—See Wednesday, Jan. 7. 7 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208287-5379, liquidboise.com.

Talks & Lectures WINTER WEDNESDAYS LUNCH AND LEARN—Learn all about critters and the signs they leave in the snow. Gain new skills in tracking animals from squirrels to larger game animals. Gourmet soup, salad and bread lunch by Open Table Catering. For more information, call 208-334-2225. 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $16.50. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-334-2225, fishandgame.idaho.gov.

Ongoing WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—The Idaho Botanical Garden is once again transformed into a majestic holiday wonderland with more than 250,000 lights. Continues through Sunday, Jan. 8. Win tickets at boiseweekly.com. FREE children younger than 3, $4 members and children ages 4-12, $8 general. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Kids & Teens POSITIVE ABOUT SELF GIRLS—This 11-week program for teen girls will focus on positive body image and selfesteem. The group will be led by Lisa Williams and Jennifer Ritter. Most insurance plans and Medicaid will be accepted and subsidies are available for those who qualify. For more information or to register, contact Amy Thompson at 208-343-7797, ext. 1211, or athompson@childrenshomesociety.com. 4-5 p.m. The Children’s Home Society, 740 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-343-7813, childrenshomesociety.com.

CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING—Christmas trees may be dropped off for recycling through Jan. 13. Trees must be free of stands, lights and all ornamentation. Trees will be turned into mulch and used throughout Nampa parks and trails. Through Friday, Jan. 13, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Kohlerlawn Cemetery, 76 Sixth St. N., Nampa, 208-4685898.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Workshops & Classes SNOWSHOEING BASICS— Join REI expert Nancy Rollins for a class on the basics of snowshoeing. Rollins will focus on the appropriate selection of gear, basics and where to go. Registration required—visit rei. com/boise to sign up. 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald, Boise, 208-322-1141, rei.com/ stores/boise.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

22 | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | BOISEweekly

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE M EGAN M ILLER

GUIDE WEDNESDAY JAN. 4

THURSDAY JAN. 5

FRIDAY JAN. 6

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

A TASTY JAMM—9 p.m. FREE. Brew 30

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

JAMES COBERLY SMITH—With Johnny Shoes. 6 p.m. FREE. Tablerock

CAMDEN HUGHES—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

HANNAH’S GONE WILD—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. $5. Humpin’ Hannah’s

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

REILLY COYOTE—7 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s

JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Curb

ROCKETS—6 p.m. FREE. The Blue Door Cafe

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club

PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri La RICO AND REX—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW—6 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadDowntown TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill WILSON ROBERTS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

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SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge THE WELL SUITED—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid WILLISON, ROOS, BURRY—7:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

DUTCHESS DOWN THE WELL—10 p.m. $5. Reef JIMMY BIVENS—9 p.m. FREE. Barb’s Barr JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—See Listen Here, this page. 10 p.m. $TBD. Grainey’s

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club SOUL SERENE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub THE VOICE OF REASON—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE WORKING DJS—9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS, JAN. 6-7, TOM GRAINEY’S

SATURDAY JAN. 7 BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

JOSHUA TREE—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

DC3—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MOZAM BEAKS—With James Orr and Ryan Peck. See Listen Here, Page 24. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux PETER SCHOTT—Featuring DJ Noah Hyde. 11 p.m. $2. Red Room

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FREUDIAN SLIP—8 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews RHYTHM RANGERS—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

The holidays are over but not for traveling musicians, apparently. There are practically zero touring bands coming to Boise. Fortunately local favorites Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats will fill the void with performances at Grainey’s on Friday, Jan. 6-Saturday, Jan. 7. And there’s no better way to let go of holiday stress than with a night of homegrown bluegrass music, or as the band calls it: “progressive psychobilly folk grass.” The Billy Goats have churned out feel-good, old-timey jams since 2007, when Warren moved to Boise from Knoxville, Tenn. Since then the band has grown into a five-piece and developed an impressive repertoire of bluegrass originals and cover songs. With Warren’s gritty voice and help from a talented cast of musicians, The Billy Goats have developed a reputation as one of the most soulful, dance-inducing folk acts in town. —Stephen Foster

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

Friday, Jan. 6, and Saturday, Jan. 7, 10 p.m., $TBD. Tom Grainey’s, 109 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-2505, tomgraineysboise.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | 23


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE SUNDERGROUND—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

WEDNESDAY JAN. 11

MONDAY JAN. 9

BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

ANDREW CORTENS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

HANNAH’S GONE WILD—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. $5. Humpin’ Hannah’s

BLUES JAM WITH RICHARD SOLIZ—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

MOZAM BEAKS, JAN. 6, NEUROLUX In an era in which anyone with a laptop can create, record and distribute music, success is as much about hype as it is about the sounds. Without hype, there’s a good chance new music won’t get to a listener’s ears in the first place but will be lost in the din of a million mash-ups. But hype only gets a band so far. At some point, it has to measure up, and the fun part is being there to see if it does. Boise band Mozam Beaks has certainly received a visit from the hype fairy. The new project from Trevor Kamplain, formerly of Boise band ATTN, debuted a single on the COT Mixtape and released a direct-to-web digital album of smooth, electronic textures through Barn Owl Records shortly after. Then, instead of playing its debut show at Neurolux in December, Mozam Beaks cancelled, upping the hype one more notch. But this week, the wait ends. Mozam Beaks is booked to play with James Orr and Ryan Peck at Neurolux. —Josh Gross With James Orr and Ryan Peck. 7 p.m., $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

24 | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | BOISEweekly

Ben Burdick JIMMY BIVENS—9 p.m. FREE. Barb’s Barr

THE VOICE OF REASON—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—See Listen Here, Page 23. 10 p.m. $TBD. Grainey’s

THE WORKING DJS—9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La

RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TUESDAY JAN. 10 LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s

SUNDAY JAN. 8

RYAN WISSINGER—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

OLD-TIME JAM SESSION—6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TERRI EBERLEIN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

TAUGE AND FAULKNER—9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

NATHAN MOODY—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri La RICO WEISMAN AND REX MILLER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadMeridian TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill THE VANPAEPEGHEM TRIO— 6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


YEAR OF IDAHO FOOD/FOOD

ONE YEAR LATER Musings on 2011: The Year of Idaho Food GUY HAND If Janie Burns and Amy Hutchinson hadn’t organized 2011: The Year of Idaho Food, I wouldn’t have had the opportunity to spend the last 12 months sipping gin at 8:30 a.m., foraging for stinging nettles in the forests of McCall, riding in a big-ass wheat combine on the Palouse, sampling more fermented foods than I thought humanly possible (or medically prudent), eating goat five ways, jet boating down the Salmon River in search of pioneer apples and sifting through the sands of the Snake River for a lunch of fresh-water mussels (not recommended). And that’s just for starters. My weekly collaboration with Boise Weekly and Boise State Public Radio to write food and farming stories under the Year of Idaho Food banner was just one part of the project’s broader agenda. “The Year of Idaho Food was envisioned as a means of engaging the public to think about their food,” Burns said of the statewide project she and Hutchinson dreamt up in March 2010 while driving back from a Moscow food conference. The two women wanted to create what Hutchinson called “a virtual table” at which Idahoans who normally didn’t have an opportunity to express their interest in food and agriculture could gather and publicly share their food and farming stories via a Year of Idaho Food website. Burns and Hutchinson also wanted to organize events—and encourage participants to organize their own events—so people could meet face to face. “A lot of people think about food and the issues surrounding it, but they’ve never had the opportunity or been empowered to do anything,” Burns said. “So we hoped that this would be some kind of organizing principle that would allow people to do something that they might not have had the courage to do otherwise.” In January, Idahoans from around the state began submitting their Year of Idaho Food stories to Northwest Food News (a web site I administer). The first, from Michele Murphree in Sandpoint, detailed Bonner County’s progress in creating school gardens. Some of the other 50 stories included lessons from an accidental chicken rancher, a child’s fascination with tractors, an ode to sorrel and a full-on Idaho-grown Thanksgiving. Melissa Frazier, for instance, took the opportunity to begin cataloguing the state’s growing number of community gardens, a project she plans to continue on Northwest Food News into 2012. And Casey O’Leary, who submitted several stories about the numerous epiphanies she’s experienced while WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Tyler Korn (left) enjoys a school garden carrot in Sandpoint, and Year of Idaho Food co-founder Amy Hutchinson (right) enjoys the successes of her year-long project.

“Probably the biggest marker of success in working on her urban farm, Earthly Delights, the broader public sphere is having the Senate also plans to continue submitting stories. Agricultural Committee support a resolution Hutchinson, who also founded the Boise Urban Garden School, said she was pleased to supporting the Year of Idaho Food and the see how quickly participants put together their Day of Idaho Food,” Burns said. Senate resolution or not, as I toured the own grass-roots projects. state collecting stories, I was struck by how “In addition to potlucks and different deeply involved in food so many Idahoans alneighborhood gathers, there are now newsletready were. When Tara Kelly introduced me to ters, a compilation of titles of books about a science lab’s worth of fermented concoctions gardening and food. There have been baby lined up in glass jars on her suburban kitchen and bridal showers that have focused on local island, I knew I’d stumbled onto someone with food, as well as discussions and book clubs,” far more than a passing interest in food. And said Hutchinson. when Sadie Barrett shot down the Salmon Schools and universities got involved, too. River in search of abandoned pioneer apple “We’ve partnered with the University of orchards, her determination to save Idaho’s Idaho. College of Idaho has done a tremenheritage fruit trees was palpable. So, too, was dous amount around food this year, and also the determination I saw in Palouse wheat different schools from Council to the Boise farmers Wayne and Jacie Jensen, who were School District, which held a harvest day,” part of a group working to free themselves she said. from the dictates of international commodity Over the Labor Day weekend, Burns markets by selling their grain locally. and Hutchinson organized a “Day of Idaho The common thread running through the Food” celebration, which challenged Idaholives of all the people I met was this: They’d ans to create a meal made of Idaho-sourced become active participants in our food system foods. Participants were asked to send in as farmers, ranchers, gardeners, their resulting menus. People cooks or avid eaters. whipped up everything from In the culinary dark ages Chioggia beet salads to bear of the 1950s, when I was a meatloaf stuffed with garden To read the entire collection of 2011: The Year of Idaho child, American families gave chives and tomatoes. Food stories, visit up gardening and cooking for Mountain Home Republican boiseweekly.com. the packaged promises of a Sen. Tim Corder sent in this burgeoning food industry. At Day of Idaho Food menu: the same time, farmers and “We will be eating fresh ranchers gave up their independent, diversitomatoes, sweet potatoes, peas out of the fied lives to the singular dictates of industrialpod, some green beans, cantaloupe and ized, commodified agriculture. As a nation, it watermelon, crook neck squash, carrots and seemed we’d collectively drunk the Kool-Aid a salad right out of the garden. Perhaps even that scientists, technologists and the corporate an Idaho-grown steak on the grill. More is possible, but we will be full. We will eat Idaho and governmental agencies that employed them knew more about health, nutrition and cheese and I will drink a little Idaho wine, taste than we did. strawberries for dessert.” En masse, families and farmers surrendered The Idaho Legislature participated in the their daily intimacy with food to “experts��� Year of Idaho Food in another way.

who pledged freedom from kitchen drudgery and “better living through chemistry.” By the 21st century, ’50s futurists claimed, we’d all be popping perfectly engineered, nutritionally balanced pills rather than choking down that archaic collection of leaves, roots and muscle once called food. We all know where that led. But projects like the Year of Idaho Food are a course correction, a turning away from those technological pipe dreams toward a saner pursuit of something that defines us as human: the growing, cooking and conscious consumption of real food. Although 2011: The Year of Idaho Food has officially ended—and my food-centric contributions to Boise Weekly and Boise State Public Radio will be less frequent—that doesn’t mean that Burns and Hutchinson have quit making plans. “The Year of Idaho Food was actually year one of what we’re calling a 10-year campaign to get the percentage of local food that we eat to 20 percent by 2020,” said Burns. According to Burns, a recent University of Idaho and Urban Land Institute study found that Idahoans currently get a mere 2 percent of their food from local sources. Through a series of initiatives and partnerships with statewide organizations, Burns and Hutchinson hope to convince more of us to become active participants in our own food system. When I asked Hutchinson if this perceived sea change in the nation’s attitude toward food was actually a single cresting wave that would surely wane—a foodie fad rippling across the country—she was quick to reply: “Once you have experienced good food and good ingredients and you’ve learned more about how to prepare those things, there’s really no turning back,” she said. “Once good food becomes a part of your life, it becomes something people value more and more, not less and less.”

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | 25


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PHONE (208) 344-2055

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HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800532-6546 Ext. 97.www.continentalacademy.com STOLEN CAR A 1994 VOLVO 840 Wagon. White with a Borah HS Parking sticker on the windshield/drivers side, ID license plate number 1A2T425. If you see this vehicle, please call the Boise Police Department at 208377-6790. Last seen on Michigan St./Ave in Boise. ASAP! All of her school work (yes, everything from her senior year) is also in the car. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois).

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26 | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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*SPEND A DAY IN NAMPA*

At Nina’s A & C Salon. Senior haircuts $10, Sets $12. Inside Village Square, downtown Nampa, 1305 2nd St. South. Call Nina for an appt. 570-8526.

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BW HEALTH & FITNESS BOISE FIBROMYALGIA SUPPORT Elks Rehabilitation Hospital 4th Floor, Sawtooth Room (right next to the elevators) 600 North Robbins Road (behind St. Lukes) Boise. Meet: First Saturday of the Month 1pm-3pm. boisefibrosupport@gmail.com Next Meeting: January 7, 2012.

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BEEMER: 10-year-old male shih tzu mix. Gentle, calm dog. Prefers an adult-only home. Good with other dogs. (Kennel 321#14826137)

TOBY: 7-year-old male domestic shorthair. Large cat is shy, litterbox-trained and has lived with other cats. (PetSmart Adoption Center- #14876014)

NALA: 2-year-old female pit bull terrier mix. House-trained. Good with children, other dogs and cats. (Kennel 317- #14876026)

SHADOW: 10-year-old male Lab mix. Good with other dogs. Lively, mature dog. Knows several commands. House-trained. (Kennel 309- #14867844)

OREO: 5-year-old male domestic medium-hair cat. Large, affectionate and social. Litterboxtrained. (PetSmart Adoption Center#14904072)

PETER: 10-month-old male Chihuahua and dachshund mix. Active dog would enjoy a home with time to play and exercise. (Kennel 321- #14876725)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

GLORIA: Gorgeous, SARAH: Beautiful glorious girl will glamor- marbled tabby great ize your world. with cats and kids.

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SCARLET: Gone with the wind no more. Home is what I long for.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | 27


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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

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BUNNY NEEDS A GOOD HOME I need to find a good home for a 6 month old, male, sable (brown), rex (velveteen) rabbit. He is very playful and active and has a healthy appetite. Please contact me as soon as possible! autumntjohnson@gmail.com

PETS BW PETS

NYT CROSSWORD | AIN’T HE SWEET? BY ELIZABETH C. GORSKI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ 26 27 28 30 31 33

Approach like an eagle Baptism, e.g. Kid’s block Cozy footwear “I could ___ horse!” Japanese stringed instrument 34 Journalist Joseph 36 Clearly happy 39 Goes for the gold? 40 Spice organizers 43 Lose intensity 44 Fencing position

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91 With 100-Across, image revealed by connecting the circled letters alphabetically 95 Mozart’s birthplace: Abbr. 96 “Miracle on 34th Street,” e.g. 99 Medium skill 100 See 91-Across 101 Cold war fighter 102 2001 film in which 91-/100-Across is a character 104 Horsed around? 106 Shake up 109 Special ___ 111 Chess champ Mikhail 112 “Honey in the Horn” trumpeter 113 “___ framed!” 115 Some toy batteries 116 Beta preceder 119 Tone quality, in music 121 Stuck 123 Wall St. deal 126 Singer Mitchell 128 Bronx and Central Park attractions 129 ___ good turn 132 Prepare, as eggnog 133 Partridge’s preferred tree 134 Navigational aid 136 Fictional planet in “Flash Gordon” 138 “Incidentally …” 140 Drive-thru sandwich order 141 Crudités platter centerpiece 145 Delicious 146 Org. in Tom Clancy novels 147 Maternity ward figures 149 Coffee order 151 Stipulations 153 Pacino and Bundy 154 Eponymic town of Cambridgeshire 155 Mediterranean capital 156 Skip across the water’s surface 157 Certain pass: Abbr. 158 Radio abbr. 159 Guinness suffix 160 1-Down’s warning

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Hooded menace Benefit “Drat!” 91-/100-Across, often Nabokov novel Rock’s Jethro ___ Proficient Year in San Juan “The Little Mermaid” fellow 10 Cafeteria variety 11 Mineral in healing crystals 12 Rocker Brian 13 Video game island 14 W.W. II battleship 15 Ref’s decision 16 Aid for making a 91-/100-Across 17 Cyclist’s offer 18 Merge 19 Vintage records 21 Fan’s fixation 22 Popeye’s ___’ Pea 29 Fun-house sounds 32 Elves, to Santa: Abbr. 35 ___-12 37 Part of many a science course 38 “___ Misérables” 39 ’70s TV production co. 41 Mao contemporary 42 “Santa Baby” singer 45 Camaro ___-Z 46 Paradise 47 Bulbous plant part 48 Butter alternative 49 Actor Foxx 52 Bickering 53 High praise 54 Storage unit 57 Friend ___ friend 58 Deaf talk: Abbr. 61 You are: Sp. 63 Serving well? 64 Public health agcy. 65 French pronoun 66 Have 67 Composer Max 69 Sit still? 71 Calf-length dresses 72 Hawaiian porch

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Stormed Star of “Gunsmoke”? Cellar, in classifieds Get an ___ effort De ___ (anew) How Santa’s reindeer are harnessed 85 Slights, say 87 Buster? 88 Winter bird feeder food 89 Terse reproofs 92 Radiate 93 Mob turncoat 94 ___ B’rith 97 Cousin ___ 98 Californie, e.g. 102 Tunisian seaport 103 Males 105 16th-century monarch credited with presenting 91-/100-Acrosses to guests 107 Sr.’s test 108 Light head? 110 “The 91-/100-Across,” for one 112 “John Adams” airer 114 Plopped down on Santa’s lap, e.g. 116 Slumber party togs 117 Relaxer for Santa 118 Recovering after injury, say L A S T M A K E

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120 Swab 122 White lie 123 Small boat danger 124 Some pudginess 125 Arm extension? 127 Sale item abbr. 129 Fails to 130 Carry-___ 131 Spies, e.g. 133 Chem. class measures 135 Capital of Belarus 136 Boss’s notes 137 Bouquets 139 Iraq’s Aziz 141 Roman 950 142 Table d’___ 143 Nile deity 144 Baby boxer, e.g. 146 Bopper 148 Maven 150 Brit’s oath 152 Masseur employer Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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FREE YOUNG CATS I have been given several cats to help find homes for. Call for more information. 402-4081. LOOKING FOR A LOVING HOME My name is Federica, I go by Fede for short. I’m a 3 yr. old Terrier/ Dachshund female. My owners have recently had to relocate to an apartment where pets are not allowed. I’m potty trained, have been raised around small children, & overall I’m a great companion. We’re not asking for any kind of rehoming fee as we truly just want to find a new home for me. Please do let us know if you have any further questions or if you would like to meet me. mayaboisewhite@yahoo.com PEMBROKE WELSH CORGI PUPPY 7 wk. old, adorable, male Corgi Puppy. Purebred. Both the mother & father on site. $350. 208-8694358. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

M U S IC BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION/OTHER YAMAHA P2050 POWER AMP The rack mountable P2050 is low wattage power amp great for the monitor system. It comes with the manual, speaker cords and case. Very good condition. $100. Call 342-3286.

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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

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QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

BW ART, ANTIQUES & COLLECTABLES ART CLASSES IN NAMPA Art classes starting in January in oil graphite, charcoal, or soft pastel. Location at the Hasbrouck House in Nampa. Call or email for more information: Ginger Lantz, 208466-6879. gdlantz@gmail.com

BARTER BW NEED

TRADE

Accepting Knickknacks for in store trade at A Thrift Store with a Twist. Jewelry, DVD’s, Clothes. 4610 W. State St. 429-1226.

4-WHEELS BW AUTO SERVICES CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com

BW FOR SALE CADILLAC SEVILLE 1997 SLS, Light Medici Red, Sedan, 32 Valve, 4.6 L, LD8 Northstar V8, 275 HP. Excellent condition. 82K mi., fully loaded, leather interior. Car cover included. $4,500 OBO. To view the vehicle, contact 208-8695666 to arrange an appointment.

CONNECTIO N SECTIO N FOR SALE BW STUFF Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $425! 888-1464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643.

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BW ENTERTAINMENT ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+. HOT GAY & BI LOCALS Browse & Respond FREE! 208472-2200. Use FREE Code 5914, 18+. MEET SEXY SINGLES Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7760. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. WHERE SINGLES MEET Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7759, 18+.

BW CHAT LINES ALL MALE HOT GAY HOOKUPS! Call FREE! 208-489-2162 or 800777-8000. www.interactivemale. com 18+. EroticEncounters.com Where Hot Girls Share their private fantasies! Instant Connections. Fast & Easy. Mutual Satisfaction Guaranteed. Exchange messages, Talk live 24/7, Private 1-on-1. Give in to Temptation, call now 1-888-700-8511. MEN SEEKING MEN 1-877-4098884 Gay hot phone chat, 24/7! Talk to or meet sexy guys in your area anytime you need it. Fulfill your wildest fantasy. Private & confidential. Guys always available. 1-877-409-8884 Free to try. 18+. REAL DISCREET, LOCAL CONNECTIONS Call FREE! 208-287-0343 or 800210-1010. www.livelinks.com 18+.

BW I SAW YOU BLUE EYES @ OLIVE GARDEN We saw each other at Olive Garden by the mall on Sunday, 12/18/11. You had the most beautiful blue eyes I’ve ever seen. You might have thought I was on a date, but she was my little sister! If you know who you are, please reply. <P>

I am currently in Ada County Jail and would like a pen pal to write to. Sarai Peterson 7210 Barrister Dr. Boise, ID 83704. 45 yr. old, divorced WM, 5’9”, 185 lbs., brown hair and hazel eyes. I’m a Gemini looking for adult F friendships and pen pals. I love history, collecting antiques, outdoors, sports, movies and most things that spark adrenaline. Hope to be out summer of 2012. Clint Frakes #84381 SICI Main dorm #2/22 PO Box 8509 Boise, ID 83707. Christian man seeks Christian woman for writing and fellowship. Joseph Plumley #19813 ISP PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I am 24 yrs. Old, WM, doing time at ICC. I’m 6’, 180 lbs., with brown hair and eyes. I am athletically built and in great shape. I’m outgoing, easy to get along with and I have a good sense of humor. I’m looking for people to exchange mail and pics with. I’m easy going and open-minded. You be too. Looking for pen pals, friends, and maybe more. Kegan Kilander #83882 ICC PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. Hello out there, Ron here. 50 yr. old new man for sure. Looking for a friend. HIV/AIDS Positive as I am also. Helps to have someone to write to. Ron Koranda #75039 IMSI B-3 Cell 82 PO Box 51 Boise, ID 83707. SWM, 5’10”,176 lbs. ISO SF ages 21-50. I am looking for someone who is honest, caring, respectable person. I like the outdoors, quiet nights in front of a roaring fire, BBQ’s, football fan a plus but not necessary. Lefty Brown #29751 ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I am 5’10”, with blonde hair and hazel eyes. I am 32 yrs. Old and from Boise. I am looking for someone to correspond with so if you would like to get to know me please write: Aimee Werry #61454 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204.

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I’m a SWM looking for SF pen pals/ friends ages 18-30. I have grey/ blue eyes and dark blonde hair. I’m very energetic and I love to read books. Fantasy, romance, si fi, graphic novels. I like to go fishing, swimming, movies, play video games and listen to music. I am 23 yrs. Old. Charley Fry #96589 ISCI 16B-7A PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. SWM, 52 yrs. Old, 6’1”, 250 lbs., with grey hair, green eyes. Looking for F pen pals any age. Kurt Wilkins #52020 SII ND-D-29 PO Box 8509 Boise, ID 83707. Looking for a pen pal? So am I! I am a 5’5, 170 lbs., SWF age 29 with blue eyes and blonde hair. I currently reside in Pocatello at the prison. I would like to have great conversations either with F or M pen pals. Your life will be better if you take the time to know me. Shandi Robinson #79315 PWCC Unit 2 5-A 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. I’m 5’9”, 185 lbs., all natural red hair, very well endowed, I’m looking for a pen pal or a sugar daddy or both. If you like what you read and want to know more write me. Denise Parks #91846 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. SM ISO BBW as pen pal. I’m lonely in Boise. Love to write, music and reading. Don’t know anyone in Boise. I will be living here and want to make friends. Whit Norlin #91515 P-3 ICC PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707.

Hello Ladies! This person, meaning me, would love to hear from you. I am not picky or choosy. I LOVE WOMEN! I have never been married and have no children. I am in my 40’s, hazel eyes and brown hair. I’m athletic as well. I’m bored to death here with no one to write to. I welcome all women 25+ to write me. I do not need the perfect lady. Just a good lady who would like to be with me. Earl Clark #69785 North Dorm A-55 PO Box 8509 Boise, ID 83707. 26 yr. old Boise native who loves fishing, football and reading. Very small family with nobody to write. Looking for F or M for a friend or pen pal. Chris Gustaves #82597 ICC T-8-C PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. SWF, blonde, very blue eyed and full life. Looking for gentlemen 4860 that would like to keep company with a lady whose smart, sensitive and spunky. Julie Joyner #28256 U-2 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83436. DWM, 37, Leo, 71”, 215, brown hair and hazel eyes. Father of three. Loving and compassionate. One woman man. Intellectual conversation, open minded, worldly opinions and views. I love the outdoors, rural living and family life. ISO eternal friendship with 18+ F with similar values. Race not important. Soy Bilingue, sinembargo, no hablo fluentemente. Chuck Betts #51147 ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707.

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BW KISSES HEY SOULMATE My goat cheese eating, tree climbing dopplegäanger. I can’t take my mind off of you. Kibosh Wonkiness. I know this great restaurant at the end of the universe. Love, Your Siren Goddess. MY BUTTER BUNS I know we’ve had our ups and downs but you truly are THE ONE and I wouldn’t change a thing. Your the BEST. Love your SWEET CHEEKS.

BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 4–10, 2012 | 29


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “It is surely a great calamity for a human being to have no obsessions,” said poet Robert Bly. That’s why he decided to learn to love his obsessions. I urge you to keep his approach in mind throughout the coming months, Aries. You are likely to thrive to the degree that you precisely identify and vigorously harness your obsessions. Please note I’m not saying you should allow your obsessions to possess you and toss you around like a rag doll. I’m not advising you to worship them like idols. Be wildly grateful for them; love them with your fiery heart fully unfurled; but keep them under the control of your fine mind. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “Everyone is a genius, but if you judge a fish by its ability to climb a tree, it will spend its whole life believing it is stupid.” Rumor has it that this pithy observation was uttered by Albert Einstein. I bring it to your attention, Taurus, because you’ll be smart to keep it in mind throughout 2012. According to my astrological analysis, you will have an excellent opportunity to identify, hone and express your specific brilliance. So it is crucial that you eliminate any tendency you might have to see yourself as a fish whose job it is to climb a tree. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In his book Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World’s Stolen Treasures, former FBI agent Robert K. Wittman tells the story of the world’s second-largest crystal ball. Worth $350,000 and once belonging to the Chinese dowager empress, it was stolen from a museum. Wittman never located the actual robber, but years later, he tracked down the crystal ball to a person who had acquired it quite innocently and by accident. She was a young witch in New Jersey who, unaware of its origins or value, kept it on her bedroom dresser with a baseball cap on top of it. I suspect you may have a comparable adventure in the coming months, Gemini. If you look hard and keep an open mind, you will eventually recover lost riches or a disappeared prize in the least likely of places. CANCER (June 21-July 22): It’s impossible for the human body to run a mile in less than four minutes—at least that’s what the conventional wisdom used to say. And indeed, no one in history ever broke that barrier until May 6, 1954, when Roger Bannister raced one mile in three minutes, 59.4 seconds. Since then, lots of athletes have done it and the record has been lowered by another 17 seconds. In fact, the sub-four-minute mile is now regarded as a standard accomplishment for middle-distance

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runners. I suspect that in 2012, you will accomplish your own version of Bannister’s feat—a breakthrough that once seemed crazy difficult or beyond your capacity. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Back in 1958, 17-year-old Bob Heft created a 50-star American flag for a high school project. Hawaii and Alaska were being considered for U.S. statehood at that time, and a new design was needed to replace the old 48-star flag. Heft’s teacher originally gave him a grade of B-minus for his work. But when his model was later selected to be the actual American flag, the teacher raised his grade to an A. I suspect that a similar progression is in store for you in the coming year, Leo. Some work you did that never received proper credit will finally be accorded the value it deserves. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Greek philosopher Plato suggested that we may become more receptive to spiritual beauty by putting ourselves in the presence of physical beauty. The stimulation we get when inspired by what looks good may help train us to recognize sublime truths. I’m not so sure about that. In my experience, people get so entranced by their emotional and bodily responses to sights and sounds that they neglect to search for higher, subtler sources of splendor. But I do believe you may be an exception to this tendency in the coming months. That’s why I’m giving you the go-ahead—indeed, the mandate—to surround yourself with physical beauty. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Before he died in 1902, Libran cartoonist Thomas Nast left a potent legacy. Among his enduring creations were the modern image of Santa Claus, the iconic donkey for America’s Democratic Party and the elephant for the Republican Party. I’m guessing that 2012 is going to be a Thomas Nast kind of year for you Librans. The work you do and the ripples you set in motion are likely to last a long time. I suggest you choose the influences you unleash with great care and integrity. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “If you’re in a good relationship, chances are you’re bored out of your mind,” spouts comedian Chris Rock in his show Never Scared. “All good relationships are boring. The only exciting relationships are bad ones. You never know what’s going to happen tomorrow when you’re in a bad relationship. You never know when they’re gonna walk through the door and say, ‘Hey, you gave me crabs.’ That’s exciting!” Rock is making a satirical overstatement, but it does contain grains of truth. Which is why, in accordance with the astrological

omens, I deliver the following request to you: In 2012, cultivate stable relationships that are boring in all the best ways. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Once every decade or so, you’re asked to make a special point of practicing forgiveness and atonement. According to my reading of the astrological omens, that time will be the next few months. I think it’ll be quite important for you to cleanse the grungy build-up of regrets and remorse from your psyche. Ready to get started? Compose a list of the sins you could expiate, the karmic debts you can repay, and the redemptions you should initiate. I suggest you make it into a fun, creative project that you will thoroughly enjoy. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Happiness isn’t a state you acquire by luck. It takes hard work and relentless concentration. You have to rebel against the nonstop flood of trivial chaos and meaningless events you’re invited to wallow in. You have to overcome the hard-core cultural conditioning that tempts you to assume that suffering is normal and the world is a hostile place. It’s really quite unnatural to train yourself to be peaceful and mindful; it’s essentially a great rebellion against an unacknowledged taboo. Here’s the good news: 2012 will be an excellent time for you to do this work. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): More musicians and authors are choosing to self-publish. That way they retain the full rights to their creative work. One example is singer-songwriter Terri Hendrix, who owns all 14 of her master recordings. She lives by the motto, “Own Your Own Universe.” I urge you to adopt her approach in 2012, Aquarius. The coming months will be prime time for you to do all you can to take full possession of everything you need to become what you want to be. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The coming months will be a time when you’ll thrive by seeking out novel ideas, using new words and regarding your imagination as an organ that’s as important to feed as your stomach. In that spirit, I’m offering you a slew of made-up terms that’ll help tease your brain in ways that are in alignment with the upcoming astrological factors. They all come from the very NSFW dictionary. 1. Assymectricity: energy generated by lopsidedness. 2. Enigmagnetic: a person who attracts mysteries. 3. Indumbnitable: incapable of being dumbed down. 4. Beneviolent: helpful chaos. 5. Fauxbia: a fake fear. 6. Craptometry: ability to see through all the BS. 7. Adoregasm: when you treasure someone to the point of ecstasy.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 28