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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 25 DECEMBER 14–20, 2011

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 9

BOISE BUTTS OUT The last smoking tour of Boise FEATURE 13

MOVING THE NEEDLE The war over vaccinations heats up in the north NOISE 26

THE STATE WE’RE IN The Internet allows bands to collaborate across state lines FOOD 31

THAT’S NUTS Idaho farmers help resurrect the American chestnut industry

“Billions of bilious blue blistering barnacles.”

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporters: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Stephen Foster Stephen@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Copy Editor: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Talyn Brumley, Bill Cope, Guy Hand, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Julia Green, Guy Hand, Glenn Landberg, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE STUFF JOURNALISTS LIKE During a marathon time-wasting web session last weekend I stumbled upon a blog called Stuff Journalists Like. The entry that really got me rolling: “Checklist for being a ‘real’ journalist.” The highlights, with my own commentary in parentheses: 2. Corrected a loved one’s grammar in a greeting card. (Yes, I’m guilty.) 3. Replaced one of the major food groups with coffee. (I’ve replaced one with coffee and a second with whiskey.) 9. Learned that being told to “fuck off “ and “go to hell” is part of the job. (Especially if “editor” is in your title.) 16. You think it’s normal to work 16 hours a day for eight hours pay. (Doesn’t everyone?) 17. Have conducted a phone interview while completely naked. (Not guilty, but probably only because I hadn’t thought of it until now.) The official list ends at 20, but I’d propose a few additions: 21. You’re not offended when a total stranger calls you a complete moron or an incompetent poopstick. 22. Mysteriously, when deadline is approaching, you tend to “drop” your editor’s call, “lose” your thumb drive and suffer computer “malfunctions.” 23. You keep a bottle of hard alcohol in your desk and your boss knows it because she gave it to you. 24. You’ve accidentally worn the same clothes to work two days in a row. 25. You’ve had breakfast, lunch and dinner at your desk after it was delivered to your office. So why the list? Because after a week in which I may have heard more than my typical fair share of static, I got a good laugh out of it. And because it’s a bit of preemptive stress relief for the static I’m going to take this week over “Idaho’s Outbreak of Fear” in which George Prentice takes on a very touchy subject: childhood vaccinations. Though the media’s interest in the debate over the safety of childhood vaccinations seems to have waned since it was disclosed the research linking autism to vaccinations was fraudulent, the number of parents who are choosing not to vaccinate their children is on the rise—at least in North Idaho. Get the full story on Page 13. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Susan Valiquette TITLE: en pointe MEDIUM: Giclee on pearl ARTIST STATEMENT: “If I could tell a story in words, I wouldn’t need to lug a camera around.” —Lewis Hine Visit treymcintyre.com/art to view all of the 10+1 artwork.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 3


WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. LAU R IE PEAR M AN

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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MAIL

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Light ’em if you got ’em—a final smoking tour of Boise 9 CITYDESK

HEY YOU: WIN FREE STUFF We’re giving away tickets to Idaho Botanical Garden’s Winter Garden Aglow and Boise Contemporary Theater’s A Permanent Image. Visit promo.boiseweekly.com for a full list of events you can win tickets to.

RIFT DESIGNER ON MMOS MMOs—or massively multiplayer online for you videogame squares—are big biz. World of Warcraft squeezes $15 a month out of 10.3 million players. We chatted up the designer of popular MMO Rift about what goes on behind the scenes of an MMO.

IT WAS THE BUTLER IN THE OFFICE WITH THE KNIFE If the editorial department at BW goes missing, DNA test the House of Hades tiles, which may be “made from the bones of dead journalists.” More at Cobweb.

GIVING WITHOUT GOD The holiday season is all about giving, regardless of religious bent. Last week, a few thousand atheists pumped $180,000 into Doctors Without Borders, reminding everyone that giving ain’t just about God.

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Idaho’s Outbreak of Fear 13 BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Bands across borders

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN The Adventures of Tintin 30 FOOD Reviving the American chestnut

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WINE SIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 5


MAIL

MY DA RLI NG S HEES H. HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE A BSOLUTELY PER FEC T? ...” —boiserobert (boiseweekly.com, Citydesk, “Mega-Load Crash Brings Shipments to Halt,” Dec. 10, 2011)

STOP THE MEGA-EXCHANGE Now that we have kicked Exxon/Imperial Oil out of the Clearwater Basin, it’s time to show the door to Tim Blixseth, and Western Pacific Timber. The public needs to be aware of the land grab about to take place in the upper Lochsa. Rick Brazell and the Forest Circus just released a supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Upper Lochsa Land Exchange, a hell-bent land grab that would put tens of millions of dollars into the pocket of one of the most controversial individuals in the West and simultaneously rob and ruin valuable public lands in the South Fork Clearwater drainage and across the Nez Perce National Forest. Never mind that an acre-for-acre exchange is illegal, nor the fact that the land currently being proposed for the swap contains important wildlife and fishery habitat, including fishing holes, hunting spots and family camping destinations. Never mind that the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, the same group that screams bloody murder over wolves “wiping out the elk herds,” thinks that giving away prime elk wintering grounds for clear-cut parcels is a good idea. Completely ignore the fact that the U.S. Forest Service is operating under an expired forest plan, that

the agency has no restoration plan to restore the Upper Lochsa, and that until King Blixseth purchased those hacked-over 39,000 acres, the Forest Service wasn’t doing squat to bring those lands back into public ownership. The Upper Lochsa Land Exchange must be stopped, and the Forest Service must be forced to choose No Action in its final decision. You have until Saturday, Jan. 17, 2012, to submit a written or electronic comment. It’s time to hit the reset button. —Brett Haverstick Moscow

KNOCKED OUT The following comments were left at facebook.com/ boiseweekly regarding “Skinhead Knocked Out by Victim Now Faces HateCrime Sentence,” Citydesk, Dec. 9, 2011. I thought they got rid of all those scumbags up north. Idaho is too great of a state to be infested with racism. I don’t like violence but I have to admit, I feel he got what he was asking for. —Evelyn Allred Stodard As Walt Kowalski put it, “Ever notice how you come across somebody once in a while you shouldn’t have fucked with? That’s me.” —Patrick McKeegan Ignorant fella gets hurt by his ignorance. —Steve Guild

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

CHEMICAL REACTION The following comments were posted at boiseweekly.com on the story “Two More at the Table: New Chemical Elements Named” (Citydesk, Dec. 2, 2011). Chuck Norris only recognizes the element of surprise (Sp). He will not be pleased. —Chuck’s Mom “Difficult-to-understand periodic table”? What exactly does the author find difficult to understand about the periodic table? Every school kid in America learns how to use the periodic table before they finish high school, and in many schools, the periodic table is introduced to students in middle school. I personally have never spoken to any child who had any serious confusion about how to use the periodic table. And how does adding a few new elements make the periodic table harder to understand? The author is playing into the stereotype of Idaho having less intelligent or knowledgeable people than East and West Coast states. We all know that the average child from Idaho is every bit as smart as the average kid in NYC. —captbilly Are people who read the Boise Weekly just meaner than other people, or what? If you met the author at a barbecue or some such, would you say, “You, sir, are a fucking moron?” I hope not. Please have a little common civility. If you can do better, please start your own newspaper or blog, etc. —pash WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BILL COPE/OPINION

GIFTS FROM THE NORTH Part one

who order non-controlled prescription drugs from Canada or other foreign sources (up to a three-month supply) for their own use are not being pursued or prosecuted. However, it is technically not legal for individuals to import most prescription drugs.” /…iÀi°Ê œÜÊޜÕÊV>˜ÊÌ>ŽiÊ̅>ÌÊÃÌ>Ìi“i˜ÌÊ under consideration to whatever extent you feel it deserves. U Lest you think this is all about breathing `ÞÃv՘V̈œ˜Ã]ʈ̽ÃʘœÌ°ÊÊÃÌ>ÀÌi`Ê܈̅Ê>Ã̅“>É COPD medication simply because that is what got me started. An uninsured friend admitted he’d been buying the stuff his doctor prescribed for his COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) from Canada because he didn’t want to see his retirement savings disappear down the Big Pharma sump. /…iÊŜVŽˆ˜}Ê`ˆvviÀi˜Viʈ˜ÊVœÃÌÃʜ˜Ê̅>ÌÊ one medication he is taking put me to wondering how much disparity there might be between other drugs. I researched the brand names we see >`ÛiÀ̈Ãi`ÊiÛiÀÞÊ`>Þʜ˜Ê/6]Ê}œˆ˜}Ê̜ÊÃiÛiÀ>Ê Internet sources, but ended up using only a few because of the convenient way they listed the prices. For the U.S. sources, I used the costco.com pharmacy section and online pharmacy drugstore.com. In Canada, I chose medisave.ca and pharmacychecker.com. In both countries, the figures I chose for this article were consistent with other prices within that country. Also, I compare the same dosages from Canada to the United States—i.e., UÊ/…iÊÃ>“iÊ-«ˆÀˆÛ>Ê̅>ÌÊÀ՘ÃÊfÓÇÎÊvœÀÊ>ÊÎä‡ >Ê£äʓ}Ê`œÃiʈ˜Ê >˜>`>ʈÃʏˆŽi˜i`Ê̜Ê>Ê£äÊ day supply at a Costco pharmacy (might mg dose here. A few of the drugs I include be marginally more or less from other U.S. have gone generic, but that generic price is ÜÕÀViîÊV>˜ÊLiʅ>`ÊvœÀÊf£Ó™ÊvÀœ“Ê >˜>`>°Ê not considered here. I have used only brand œÀÊ>ʙä‡`>ÞÊÃÕ««ÞÊvÀœ“Ê̅>ÌÊÈ`iʜvÊ̅iÊ names, and if you have been prescribed those LœÀ`iÀ]ʈ̽ÃÊfÓ£™°ÊÀœ“Ê̅ˆÃÊÈ`i]ʈ̽ÃÊfǙn° medications, you will likely know if it has a UÊ"˜iÊ >˜>`ˆ>˜Ê`Û>ˆÀÊ`ˆÃŽÊ­ˆÌ½ÃÊ>˜Êˆ˜…>iÀ®ÊˆÃÊ generic replacement. But enough explaining. fn™Ê­Ì…ÀiiÊvœÀÊf£Ç™®]Ê܅ˆiÊ>Ê1°-°Ê`Û>ˆÀÊ More drugs! `ˆÃŽÊˆÃÊf£™xʭ̅ÀiiÊvœÀÊfxÇÇ®° UÊʙä‡`>ÞÊÃÕ««ÞÊ ÀiÃ̜ÀÊ­>ÊÃÌ>̈˜ÊvœÀʏœÜiÀUÊÀœ“Ê >˜>`>]Ên{Ê-ˆ˜}Տ>ˆÀÊÌ>LiÌÃÊV>˜ÊLiÊ ˆ˜}ÊV…œiÃÌiÀœ®ÊˆÃÊf£{Îʈ˜Ê >˜>`>°Ê/…iÊ …>`ÊvœÀÊf£xÇ]Ê܅ˆiʙäÊÌ>LiÌÃÊÃiÊvœÀÊ Ã>“iÊ̅ˆ˜}ʈÃÊf{ÓÇʈ˜Ê̅iÊ1˜ˆÌi`Ê-Ì>Ìið f{ǙʅiÀi° Uʈ«ˆÌœÀÊ­>˜œÌ…iÀÊV…œiÃÌiÀœÊw}…ÌiÀ®ÊˆÃÊf£Î™Ê UÊ-ޓLˆVœÀÌÊ­>˜œÌ…iÀÊ>Ã̅“>É "* ÊÀi“i`Þ®Ê vœÀʙäÊÌ>LiÌÃʈ˜Ê >˜>`>Ê>˜`ÊfÎnxÊvœÀÊ£ääÊ ˆÃÊf{ÇÊvœÀÊ>ÊÈä‡`œÃiʈ˜…>iÀÊÕ«Ê̅iÀi°Ê/…iÊ in the United States. Ã>“iÊ̅ˆ˜}ʅiÀiʈÃÊf£™È° UÊ*>ۈÝÊ­Ài`ÕViÃÊ̅iÊÀˆÃŽÊœvÊÃÌÀœŽiÃÊ>˜`ʅi>ÀÌÊ UÊ ÕiÀ>Ê­>Ã̅“>]Ê>}>ˆ˜®ÊˆÃÊf£Î™Êˆ˜Ê >˜>`>Ê >ÌÌ>VŽÃ®ÊˆÃÊfn™ÊvœÀÊÓnÊ«ˆÃʈ˜Ê >˜>`>Ê­n{Ê vœÀÊ܅>ÌÊfÓ£™Ê}iÌÃÊޜÕʈ˜Ê̅iÊ1˜ˆÌi`Ê vœÀÊfÓÎx®Ê>˜`Êf£™xÊvœÀÊÎäÊ«ˆÃʈ˜Ê̅iÊ States. 1˜ˆÌi`Ê-Ì>ÌiÃÊ­™äÊvœÀÊfxÈx®° Having trouble catching a decent breath? Asthma, maybe? COPD? And the doctor says you need Spiriva? Maybe Advair? Singulair? But that goop doesn’t come cheap, does it? I can imagine what you were thinking when you came out of CostWalRiteGreenMartCo’s Pharmacy after picking up your first prescription. And it didn’t help knowing that the amount you just paid would be a monthly expense for the rest of your life or until the product goes generic, which ever comes first. You don’t know which is worse, do you? ... the fact that you are now at the mercy of the pharmaceutical pirates,or that you have no insurance to pad the blow. No pharmacy policy, no co-pay, and you aren’t old enough for Medicare. You’re on your own, pal. Out of pocket. Dipping into what’s left of that IRA you carried out of the last job you had or worse. Gad, I hope it’s not to the point that you’re eating cat food in a creme of Ensure sauce just so you can afford your inhaler. So if you’re that person I’ve been describing, or someone with any number of other health problems, I have an Xmas present for you. A big one. Certainly, the most substantial gift I’ve ever handed out in this column. You don’t necessarily have to be uninsured to get it, but the uninsured—which is more than 50 million Americans at this point—are those I have most in mind. Now let’s open a few of the presents. I think you’ll see right away how they might help.

UÊ6i˜Ìœˆ˜Ê­>Ã̅“>É "* ®\Ê/ܜÊÓää‡`œÃiʈ˜- UÊ*À>`>Ý>ʭ̜ʫÀiÛi˜ÌÊÃÌÀœŽiÃÊ>˜`ÊLœœ`ÊVœÌÃ®Ê …>iÀÃÊ>ÀiÊf{Çʈ˜Ê >˜>`>]ÊLÕÌʈ˜Ê̅iÊ1˜ˆÌi`Ê ˆÃÊf£Ç{ÊvœÀÊÈäÊ«ˆÃʈ˜Ê >˜>`>]ÊLÕÌÊÈäÊ«ˆÃÊ -Ì>ÌiÃʈ̽Ãʜ˜iÊvœÀÊf{Ç°Ê ˆÃÊfÓn{ʈ˜Ê̅iÊ1˜ˆÌi`Ê-Ì>ÌiðÊÊ But before we go any further, there’s this little issue I should tell you about. It has ultimately to do with people in America—pharmaceutical board-of-director types and their political toadies, in particular—who would rather you pay full price for the drugs you need. It’ll be quicker if I just quote something Ê̜œŽÊœvvÊ>Ê«…>À“>VÞV…iVŽiÀ°Vœ“\Ê“U.S. government officials have stated that individuals WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

I asked my source what he described as common questions he gets from everyone upon hearing he’s buying drugs through the “>ˆÊvÀœ“Ê >˜>`>\ʺ Ü]ÊޜսÀiÊ}iÌ̈˜}Ê`ÀÕ}ÃÊ from Canada? Aren’t you afraid they’re tainted somehow? How can you be sure of the quality of what you’re getting? And don’t you need a doctor’s prescription?” Next week, we’ll find out his answers.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 7


OPINION/TED RALL

DEMS OCCUPY OCCUPY MoveOn co-opts OWS rhetoric If Democrats were doing their jobs, there wouldn’t be an Occupy movement. The last 40 years have left liberals and progressives without a party and working people without an advocate. The party of FDR, JFK and LBJ abandoned its principles, embracing and voting along with Ronald Reagan and two Bushes. These new Democrats were indistinguishable from Republicans, waging optional wars, exporting jobs overseas and coddling corrupt CEOs while the rest of us sat and watched in silent rage. President Barack Obama is merely the latest of these phony Democrats. The Occupiers revolted under Obama’s watch for two reasons. The gap between the promise of his rhetoric and the basic indecency of his disregard for the poor and unemployed was too awful to ignore. Moreover, the economic collapse pushed a dam of insults, pain and anger past its breaking point. Haphazard and ad hoc, the Occupy movement is an imperfect response that fills a yawning gap in the American marketplace of ideas. Now the same Democrats who killed liberalism are trying to co-opt the movement. MoveOn.org, which began as a plea for the United States to “move on” during Clinton’s impeachment, claims to be an independent, progressive activist group. It’s really a shill for center-right Democratic politicians whom MoveOn endorsed in the 2008 primaries. MoveOn brazenly stole the movement’s best-known meme for its Nov. 17 “We Are The 99 Percent” event. Why didn’t MoveOn ask permission? Because it wouldn’t have gotten it. “We’re just days from the Super Committee’s deadline to propose more cuts for

8 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

the 99 percent or increased taxes for the 1 percent,” reads MoveOn’s ersatz event. “Come out and help increase the pressure on Congress to tax Wall Street to create millions of jobs.” Lobbying Congress contradicts a fundamental tenet of the movement that began with Occupy Wall Street. Occupy exists to figure out how to get rid of the existing system. On Dec. 7, another Democratic “Astroturf” organization, the American Dream Movement, lifted Occupy’s rhetoric to promote a very different, milquetoast agenda. The American Dream Movement was co-founded in June 2011 by former Obama political adviser Van Jones and MoveOn.org. A written statement for the ADM’s Take Back the Capitol threatened to “make Wall Street pay” for enriching the richest 1 percent and “track down those responsible for crashing the economy and causing millions of 99 percent-ers to lose their jobs and homes— while failing to pay their fair share of taxes.” Sounds like Occupy. Which is great. Somewhat less than awesome is the content of the Take Back the Capitol: begging Congressmen, who ought to awaiting trial, for a few crumbs. “Demonstrators visited the offices of about 99 House and Senate members, from both parties, and most were refused meetings with lawmakers,” reported NPR. If Congress were responsive, if Obama and his colleagues spent one-tenth as much time and money on the unemployed as they do golfing, invading and shoveling trillions of dollars at bankers, we wouldn’t need Occupy. But we won’t have one for long. Not if Occupy lets itself get occupied by MoveOn and the Democrats.

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NEWS/CITYDESK ANDR EW C R IS P

NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

GOING UP IN SMOKE Boise butts out ANDREW CRISP, STEPHEN FOSTER, JOSH GROSS, TARA MORGAN, GEORGE PRENTICE, SHEREE WHITELEY On New Year’s Eve Boise will say goodbye, in whiskey, smoke and song, to 2011’s good times and bad. And it will also say goodbye to a significant part of its history. Like it or loathe it, smoking has been a part of Boise’s nightlife longer than most bars have been pouring. But come Monday, Jan. 2, smoking will be banned in bars, private clubs and sidewalk cafes as well as bus stops and transit centers. Entire sections of Boise, including much of the Grove Plaza and Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets will also be off limits to smokers. More than 30 bars in Boise currently allow patrons to light up, but with only a few days left before the ashtrays are cleaned out for the final time, BW visited some of downtown’s more popular smoke-filled rooms.

10TH STREET STATION In 1907, someone fired up a cigarette in a saloon tucked in the basement of the still-new Idanha Hotel at the corner of 10th and Main streets. Sometime around midnight on Jan. 1, 2012, someone is supposed to fire up the last. For more than a century, the location has been the site of a tavern (or saloon, or bar) and since 1982, it has been known as 10th Street Station. The subterranean haunt is known for affordable drinks and lively political conversations (presidents Teddy Roosevelt, William Howard Taft and Benjamin Harrison spent time in the Idanha). But the saloon may be best known for its smoky aura. “My customers have probably already been somewhere else for dinner, and now they want to come down here for a cigarette or cigar and a drink,” said Lynn Howell from behind the bar. “People don’t come in here to be entertained. They come here to relax, have a drink and smoke.” Howell has been behind the bar for 29 years and owned the bar with wife, Carol, for 14. He’s worried less about losing his customers due to the anti-smoking ordinance and more about them coming less often. “I’ll probably lose 25 percent of my business,” said Howell. “My folks come in three, maybe four times a week. Now, they’ll probably sit at home one of those nights, have a beer and smoke a cigarette.” Don Bennett, who could double for Santa with a half-face of white curls, piped up while ordering another Diet Coke and rum. “I’ve been coming in here since 1965,” said Bennett. “I remember when this place used to be a go-go joint. It was called The Weeds. There used to be a girl dancing in a cage over in the corner. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

The Quintana household boasts two winners.

BOISE’S NEXT BIG IDEA: REMEMBER THE NAME ‘FOLLOW AND FUN’

Jo’s Sunshine Lounge is one of more than 30 Boise taverns impacted by the no-smoking ordinance.

“Everybody here knows your name,” said Bennett. “But honestly, the reason people come in here is to relax and have a cigarette.” Bennett gave up cigarettes six years ago but has never minded being around smokers. “I probably couldn’t smell a skunk if he was standing on my foot,” he said. “I don’t care about that. This is the place I want to come.” The Howells both testified against the anti-smoking ordinances but to no avail. “I believe they already had their minds made up,” said Howell.

smoke on the sidewalk, then where are you going to smoke? The streets,” said Bowling. “If the cops have a problem with me walking in the middle of the street to smoke, then they might want to reconsider [this].”

LIQUID

Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Joni Mitchell, Keith Richards, Frank Sinatra, Eddie Vedder, Amy Winehouse, Frank Zappa: Got the picture? They usually didn’t have a cigarette too far from their microphone. It only goes to prove that those who see themselves as wannabe Dylans or Sinatras would light up NEUROLUX as well. Neurolux has next to nothing in Liquid’s Tuesday night karaoke common with 10th Street Station, usually packs in the patrons and with one big exception: a fairly plenty of warblers. constant smoky haze. Jared Maylin, who belted out a “I get a smoke hangover from ballad, recognized that Dec. 6 would working here,” said Mat Thompson be one of his last opportunities to a seven-year Neurolux bartender sing karaoke with a cigarette in and nonsmoker. “I’ll wake up the VIDEO: hand. next day and my eyes will be all Smoking “It’s infringing on my rights,” puffed up, so I guess I’m all for it.” tour of boise said Maylin. “It’s like french fries Thompson puts in 20-plus hours and ketchup. Smoking and drinking a week, so the smoking has done a go hand in hand.” number on his lungs and his wardrobe. Maylin said that if lawmakers were so “I definitely have a closet where my work bent on banning smoking in public places, clothes go when I get home. They’re all they may as well eliminate it all together. stinky, smoky clothes,” said Thompson. “It “They should just make it illegal if they’re will be nice to wear some nice clothes and going to do this,” he said. “It’s definitely a not have to worry about stinking so bad.” Thompson even finds solidarity with Neu- healthy decision.” Jade Welch, a fellow smoker and singer, rolux’s many smokers. said the anti-smoking ordinance was too “I’m a smoker. Don’t get me wrong, I much like her native state. love it. Love smoking cigarettes,” said Tyler “In California, you can’t even walk down Bowling, a Neurolux regular who works at the street while smoking,” said Welch. another downtown bar. “But what it comes down to is the fact that I will now go out and “We’re not a Los Angeles community. We’re a rural community.” walk into any bar and know that I will be The following night, Liquid turned the same smoke free.” But how Boise Police are expected to man- stage it uses for karaoke over to comedians as part of its new Wednesday night endeavor. The age the ban, said Bowling, is another story. comics smoked, most of the audience smoked, “If you can’t smoke in here and you can’t

Boise’s best reality show was nowhere near a television camera on Dec. 7. But the excitement at the B-Launched competition was tangible—contestants broke into spates of nervous laughter awaiting an announcement that could redefine their professional lives. “And the winner is …,” said Bill Connors, president and CEO of the Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce who had everyone’s attention. “Follow and Fun!” The room burst into applause, as 10 men and women on the winning team, members of Boise Young Professionals, hugged and high-fived. Their germ of a business idea instantly took a huge step toward reality. The competition, a program of BYP, may have been the best-kept secret in town. B-Launched pitted five teams of 10 participants each in a three-month race to discover a good idea and develop it into a really, really good idea. The competition’s panel of judges included Connors; Boise Mayor Dave Bieter; Dr. David Pate, president and CEO of St. Luke’s Health System; Elizabeth Marshall of Marshall and Associates; and Rick Belluzzo, former chief operating officer of Microsoft. “It was tough picking a winner,” said Belluzo. “I really struggled. They were all very good.” Citydesk was hard-pressed to get too many details regarding the companies— each contestant was bound to a non-disclosure agreement. “What we can tell you is that our mission is focused on education,” said Christine Quintana, one of the winning presenters. “We want to empower higher-ed students to redefine the way their education is funded. Isn’t that intriguing?” The Follow and Fun team won a $15,000 first place prize to move closer to formally launching their idea into the marketplace as soon as May 2012. “We’ll use the money to hire developers and build a prototype. That will happen between now and March,” said Quintana. Quintana has a day-job as a product marketing analyst for Hewlett-Packard. Her teammates include a teacher, musician, banker, attorney, software engineers and nonprofit manager. The year 2012 will be busy in the Quintana household. While Quintana helps build what could be Boise’s next big business, her husband, Ben, will be sworn in as Boise’s newest City Council member. —George Prentice

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 9


NEWS GLENN LANDB ER G

Smoking has been allowed at 10th Street Station (and its previous incarnations) since 1907.

the people in the sound booth smoked, the comedy organizers smoked, and a good many of the jokes were smoking-related (you can listen to some of them in our video report at boiseweekly.com). “Why don’t you get the sand out of your vagina and let us smoke inside?” asked comedienne Stephanie Anne Mason.

THE BALCONY Owners and operators of The Balcony are pretty certain that they’ll cruise right along, allowing their smoking patrons to use their…well … balcony. “You’ll still be able to smoke. It’s not going to affect our business at all,” said bartender Cameron Smith. “Obviously smoke doesn’t go down [to the street], so it’s not going to affect anyone walking along Eighth Street.” The Balcony isn’t known as a smokers’ “hot spot.” Smith guessed that about 25 to 30 percent of his patrons light up. “I think people who come downtown come here for a reason,” said Smith. “They’re not going to switch up bars.” But Smith was pretty sure that there will be some push-back come Jan. 2. “I think smokers in general are going to be pissed off about it,” he said. “But it’s good, though, it gets people to quit.” Josh Flatman steps out to The Balcony’s balcony when he wants a puff. “The ban is no big deal. It’s not that hard to go outside,” said Flatman, who has been smoking for 15 years.

MULLIGANS Mulligans is for smokers. No bones about it. Management told BW that approximately 90 percent of its patrons are smokers. Additionally, most of the staff smokes. A significant culture shift is definitely in store. “We’re all consenting adults,” said Boise State student Remmington Brooks. “If you don’t like it, why come here?” Brooks likes to hang out in the back of

10 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Mulligans with his buddies Darrin Slack and Jeremy Lowman. Slack, a nonsmoker, sympathized with his smoking friends. “Why do smokers need to walk 20-feet down the street and feel ostracized like second-class citizens because they smoke?” asked Slack, who works at St. Luke’s Hospital. “It should be up to the bar owners.” Lowman, an occasional smoker, didn’t see the harm in having a cigarette in a cocktail-slinging establishment. “It’s not like we’re sitting at a playground blowing smoke in children’s faces,” said Lowman. Brooks agreed, taking issue with what he called the prejudice he perceived against smokers. “It’s a personal choice, and I don’t think people should be so judgmental about it,” said Brooks. Behind the bar, Kelly Frederick, one of the only bartenders who doesn’t smoke, said he was definitely worried about losing business. “People are already saying they’re going to go to bars in Garden City and Meridian,” said Frederick. “Everybody better have the same New Year’s resolution, that’s for sure.” Bartender Kaci Furniss, who prefers Marlboro Lights, said Mulligans is planning to rip up the carpets and give the place a good scrubbing come the New Year. “It’s going to suck, because it costs a lot of money,” said Furniss, who rated her customers’ frustration a “nine or 10” on a scale of one-to-10. “I think it has to be up to the bar owner to decide,” she said. “You already have the option to go to a non-smoking bar.” Meanwhile customer Jimmy Atkins was doing fine when BW spoke to him on a cold December night, and he expects to be doing fine when he nurses a drink on a cold January night. “I don’t come to a bar to smoke. I come to drink,” said Atkins.

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 11


CITIZEN

JACK MILLER Firsthand knowledge about secondhand smoke GEORGE PRENTICE

So your father smoked? He still does. He’s in his early 60s. How is his health? He recently had a heart attack. The first thing that he did when he got out of the hospital was smoke. Is smoke an out-of-bounds topic between the two of you? Nope. But haven’t those conversations gone in circles by now? Pretty much. I think that the big thing it teaches me for my job is that I can’t make anyone quit. That’s why our marketing message right now is “You decide when. We’ll show you how.” When we’re out in the community, we’ll have couples come up to us and a wife might say, “We’re here because he needs to quit.” We’ll turn to the man and ask, “Are you ready to quit?” Then he’ll say, “No.”

12 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Do you envision your dad as you go about your work? I really haven’t thought about that. Probably. Sometimes when I come in to work, it’s like, “Should I really be doing this job?” because I can’t even help my own dad quit. At some point, you need to stop beating yourself up over it. I’m fortunate to have great staff because they remind me of our program’s message. They reiterate to me that I can help him when he’s ready to be helped, but he’s not there yet. Did you follow the debate that led up to Boise’s no-smoking ordinances? Yes. I attended a couple of the meetings to listen to public testimony. I didn’t testify. With some of our funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we have to be very careful about lobbying. If a city council member were to ask me about secondhand smoke, I could educate them. But if they asked me whether they should vote yes or no on a policy, I could only refer to the facts. Did you hear anything in those hearings that you hadn’t heard before? No. The arguments are the same as those I heard more than a decade ago. So for all of the conversation about smoking before individual rights, I’m guessing you see this as a public-health issue. That’s right. It costs the state $319 million in medical costs each year to treat the effects of tobacco-related disease; 450,000 people die in this country every year from tobacco-related illnesses; four Idahoans die every day from tobacco-related disease. There’s no need for that. Worse yet, approx-

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Jack Miller has smoked just one cigarette in his life. He was only 5 years old when he and his older sister stole one of his father’s cigarettes. “We lit up and got real sick real fast,” said Miller. “We told our parents and got in big trouble.” Many years later, Miller spends his days talking to people about the catastrophic effects of smoking. Following his undergraduate years at Ricks College (now BYU Idaho) and graduate years at Idaho State, Miller focused on public-health education, eventually becoming a program manager for Idaho’s Department of Health and Welfare. Miller oversees Project Filter, the state’s tobacco prevention and control program. His work has become a professional—and to some degree—personal mission.

imately 50,000 people nationwide die each year from disease tied to secondhand smoke. They have never picked up a cigarette in their lives. My mom has lung issues but she never smoked. There were some conversations earlier this year among state lawmakers about the possibility of raising the state’s tobacco tax, as a possible effort to fund Medicaid shortfalls. In Idaho, our cigarette tax is only 57 cents a pack, one of the lowest in the nation. But that issue didn’t go anywhere last session. It didn’t pass, but we felt we still made inroads. We still got the message out there. Do you have a sense that it will be revisited year? Yes. Rep. [Dennis] Lake has been quoted as saying he would sponsor a bill again if a coalition wants to push it forward. They’re definitely talking about it. How much of an issue is smokeless tobacco? It’s growing across the board. I knew people growing up who said, “You’re not a real man if you spit your smokeless. You swallow it.” I had people my own age die of throat and stomach cancer. I have a hard time with a product that markets itself as something you don’t have to spit out.

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VACCINATION LIBERATION MOVEMENT TAKES A SHOT AT PUBLIC HEALTH GEORGE PRENTICE

S

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with a common fear of the needle. But the fear of vaccinations in the north is matched only by the fear of the lack of vaccinations in the south—in particular, at the Boise office of the Department of Health and Welfare. That’s where the state’s top health officials have been pouring over the latest statistics on Idaho’s vaccination exemptions, and they don’t like what they see. In fact, the contrasting fears may be best represented by two very different women. One, in the north, is a heart-on-her-sleeve rabblerouser who takes on everyone “from the governor on down” in her fight against vaccines. The other, in the south, may be Idaho’s most authoritative voice on disease, yet she has no desire to engage in a heated debate over vaccinations.

A D AM ROSEN LUN D

ome contend that there are two Idahos. Divided by rivers, mountains and even a time zone, North Idaho has a new and possibly more potent distinction from its southern half—fear. An increasing number of Idahoans living north of the 45th Parallel are afraid of vaccinations. For whatever reason—and there are quite a few—more Panhandle parents are opting not to vaccinate their children against diphtheria, hepatitis, measles, mumps, pertussis, polio, rubella and/or tetanus. Analysts are hard pressed to stereotype exemption seekers. They include the college educated and high-school dropouts, six-figure-salaried professionals and families requiring government assistance, uber-conservatives and left-wing progressives—all

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 13


Ingri Cassel has turned a personal crusade against vaccinations into Vaccination Liberation.

INGRI CASSEL When Ingri Cassel walked into the Common Knowledge Tea House, a cozy usedbook store doubling as a tea room tucked into a Sandpoint neighborhood, both arms were filled with anti-vaccination literature. She is usually poised to convince anyone who will listen that vaccinations are an ultimate evil. But between her promotions of alternative medicine and diatribes against the government, it quickly becomes clear that Cassel’s motivations are quite personal. Within seconds of beginning our conversation, Cassel said she needed to “make one thing clear.” “First of all,” Cassel said, her finger punctuating the air with each word. “I need to correct you. You need to stop using the word immunization. We don’t say immunization. Vaccines don’t immunize anything.” The tone had been set. “I started doing this work because I’m not vaccine free,” said Cassel. “There was a car accident when I was 3 or 4, and I ended up in an emergency room. They gave me a tetanus shot. That was the first assault.” Cassel is a second-generation crusader. Her mother, Walene James, is the author of several books, including 1988’s Immunization: The Reality Behind the Myth, based, Cassel said, on her sister’s court battle in Virginia, where she was accused of child neglect for not having her son vaccinated. Cassel is the president of a group called Vaccination Liberation, which trumpets on its website such topics as: “Why Doctors are Idiots,” “Vaccines Exposed: A Hidden Crime Against Children,” and “Doctors Are the Third Leading Cause of Death.” Cassel insisted that her group was not registered as a business or nonprofit in spite of the fact that it collects membership dues ($30) and sells products (books, DVDs and CDs). “We don’t register and we won’t,” said Cassel. “But I have over 500 members that have paid dues over the years.” Without divulging membership, Cassel said she has a few political allies, too, includ-

14 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

ing State Sen. Shawn Keough. “That’s not exactly accurate,” Keough told BW. “I support vaccines.” But the eight-term District 1 senator said she agreed with Cassel in objecting to the exemption form used by parents to opt their children out of vaccinations. “I would never sign that form the way it’s written now,” said Keough, who expects to bring up the controversial issue in the 2012 legislative session. “We have quite a bit of political support up here,” Cassel said. “But we don’t have support from down south. They just wallow in ignorance.” “Down south” would include the Governor’s Office. In an email to BW, Cassel referred to Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter as “Butcher.” “When I called the Governor’s Office regarding the vaccination exemption form, they basically told me that I’m going to get in trouble if I keep telling people how to fill it out,” she said. Cassel’s organization publishes a how-to guide to alter the document. By crossing out or inserting key words, the form is dramatically altered. For example, the document includes the following: “I know that failure to follow the recommendations about vaccination may endanger the health or life of my child and others ...” Cassel recommends parents alter the document to: “I know that failure to following the recommendations about vaccination may endanger the health or life of my child and others ...”

CHRISTINE HAHN Christine Hahn knows that—due in large part to Cassel’s coaching—some of Idaho’s vaccination exemption forms have been altered by parents, but she’s not too worried about it. “If a parent tweaks this form, they’re going to exempt anyway,” said Hahn. “They see the language on the form. They have already decided that they disagree with it. I just don’t WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


VA C C I NAT I O N LI BER AT I O N DI STR I BU T E S IT S O W N A N T I VA C C I NAT I O N L I TER ATU R E , W HI C H HA S TA K E N THE LOO K O F A S OPHI STI C AT E D M A R K ET I N G C A M PA I G N .

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Silver & Gold Ice Show December 21, 2011 6pm

Sun Valley celebrates its 75th Anniversary with the Silver & Gold Ice Show. Starring Evan Lysacek, Sasha Cohen and special guest announcer Scott Hamilton. The Show will be followed by a Signing and Book Launching Party in the Limelight Room. Joining in at the Signing Party will be author Van Gordon Sauter autographing his new commemorative book, “The Sun Valley Story.” For tickets: 208.622.2135 or seats.sunvalley.com

Christmas Traditions December 23–25

- 23 4th Annual Christmas Concert at the Sun Valley Opera House. For Tickets: 208.622.2135 or seats.sunvalley.com. - 24 Free Christmas Eve Performance, Nutcracker on Ice followed by Torchlight Parade and Fireworks. - 25 Christmas Brunch 9am–1:30pm

New Years Festivities December 31, 2011

- New Year’s Bubbly Bash 9pm–1am. For tickets: 208.622.2135 or sunvalleycenter.org /buytickets - Dinner at Roundhouse, Limited seating for 75 people. (River Run Lodge Party ticket included.) Reservations required: 208.622.2800 - Family Fun for the whole family- Giant twister, microreality stock car racing and more in the Limelight Room. Reservations: 208.622.2135

For Reservations Call:

1.800.786.8259 or visit sunvalley.com

WELCOME TO 16 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

b TRADITION.

Rates of pertussis, or whooping cough, in Idaho have far outpaced national infection rates.

think that’s a fight we’re going to get into. Push hasn’t come to shove on any of this.” Hahn said she’s less concerned about words that may have been crossed out or altered on the front of the exemption form and more concerned about what parents are writing on the back. “For the first time, beginning this fall, we asked parents to explain their personal, religious or medical reasons why they’re not having their child immunized. We’re going to ask the school districts to deidentify the forms—in other words, take away any names from the form—and then forward them to us. We have no desire to track anyone down, but we really need to better understand their reasoning.” Hahn spread a number of graphs and charts across a huge conference table at Health and Welfare’s State Street headquarters. The one chart that stood out from the rest contained what Health and Welfare would consider some good news (Eastern Idaho’s 2.4 percent immunization exemption rate, for example), some so-so news (District 4, including Ada County’s rate, which is 3.3 percent), and some rather troubling news. “There’s definitely a disturbing trend up in the Panhandle,” said Hahn. “We’re talking about this quite a bit lately here at Health and Welfare.” Hahn’s finger traced a steadily rising line representing the school exemption rate by Public Health District 1, representing Benewah, Bonner, Boundary, Kootenai and Shoshone counties. Since the beginning of the 2006-2007 school year, the northernmost district’s exemption rate has grown nearly one-third, registering 7.4 percent at the end of the last school year, nearly double the state rate of 3.8 percent. “We’re worried most about that particular trend,” said Hahn. “I think we have an issue, in particular, with young parents who are too young to personally remember some diseases—for example, measles.” Hahn said she was recently at an Advi-

sory Committee on Immunization Practices meeting in Atlanta, where there was quite a bit of talk about measles outbreaks in Canada, Mexico and Europe. “You’ve heard of snakes on a plane,” she asked. “Well, what scares us is measles on a plane.”

MEASLES AND MYTHS A closer look at school immunization records in North Idaho reveals the vaccination that parents choose to keep their children away from more than any other is MMR (measles, mumps and rubella). “Even after the misinformation spread by Andrew Wakefield has been put to rest, those doubts still linger,” said Hahn. Andrew Wakefield, a former surgeon from Britain, is largely credited for creating a global pushback against the MMR vaccine in 1998, even though he was barred from further practicing medicine and ruled to be “dishonest and irresponsible” by a statutory tribunal of the British General Medical Council. Wakefield’s 1998 document presented what turned out to be false evidence that autism spectrum disorders could be caused by the MMR vaccine. Investigations by the Sunday Times of London revealed that Wakefield had manipulated evidence. But by then, Wakefield’s article had swept across the world, causing MMR vaccination rates to drop precipitously. Wakefield is not alone with his MMR infamy. Former Playboy Playmate-turnedactress Jenny McCarthy found notoriety with her book Healing and Preventing Autism: A Complete Guide, documenting her son’s autism while blaming vaccinations for many instances of the affliction. McCarthy plugged her story on Oprah, the Today Show and the Tonight Show as a self-professed vaccine expert. In April, Time Magazine reported that as many as 24 percent of parents surveyed by the University of Michigan said they placed “some WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


Canada, Mexico and Europe have all reported recent outbreaks of measles, which has U.S. health officials worried.

trust” in information provided by celebrities about the safety of vaccines. Yet another well-known figure, Bill Gates, pushed back against claims such as McCarthy’s in a February interview with CNN. “It’s an absolute lie that has killed thousands of kids,” said Gates, who recently pledged $10 billion to distribute vaccines worldwide. “The mothers who heard that lie, many of them didn’t have their kids take either pertussis or measles vaccines, and their children are dead today.”

GROUND ZERO If Idaho’s Panhandle is a key target for state health officials to improve vaccination rates, the Lake Pend Oreille School District No. 84 is ground zero. “We probably have a higher immunization exemption rate than the whole United States,” said Dana Williams, head nurse for the district. “A lot of it has to do with misinformation regarding the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella. Some keep saying that MMR is supposedly connected to autism, which is bunk.” Williams is a busy woman lately. She’s the lone full-time nurse for the entire district. The recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is one nurse per 750 students. “But we have 3,700 kids in the district,” said Williams. “So far this semester, I’ve done 360 action plans, and that’s not even including our high schools. We have some sick kids here. It’s everything from mild asthma to diabetes. I’ve been traveling quite a few miles between schools this year.” Williams said she’s anxious to have conversations with parents who may choose to exempt their children from vaccinations. “There’s a lot of people up here that are, let’s say, off the grid,” said Williams. “But we sit down and talk with them. And we tell them that if there’s an outbreak and their child doesn’t have a vaccine, he or WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

she can be kept out of school for up to six weeks. And one more thing—our school board policy doesn’t force us to give the child their homework once they have been sent home. Our policy pretty much tells the parent, ‘You’re on your own,’ even though a lot of our teachers feel guilty and send work home anyway.” Williams said her fear is even greater than her frustration. “This is stupid. There’s absolutely no reason for these exemption rates,” she said. “We’re going to end up with something bad happening here. People don’t realize that a child can die from a bad case of chicken pox or the mumps.” Cynthia Taggart, public information officer of the Panhandle Health District, which includes Williams’ school district, said the vaccination exemption rates aren’t anything new to her part of the state. “It’s a mind set,” said Taggart. “We have had vaccination opponents here for many, many years. It goes way back.” Taggart said the region’s “streak of independence” runs through each of the many reasons for exemptions. “Idahoans want freedom of choice in everything,” said Taggart. “And, well, this is their choice. We don’t argue with them, but we do tell them that their choice has consequences. That’s really all we can do.” Taggart said she was quite familiar with Cassel and her Vaccination Liberation movement. In fact, everyone that BW spoke with in North and Southern Idaho knew of Cassel and her initiative. Cassel is gearing up for a new debate, this time over Gardasil, the human papilloma virus vaccine designed to prevent cervical cancer, genital warts and some other cancers. “It’s not required in Idaho right now but they’re pushing for it,” said Cassel. “They’re chomping at the bit to force that vaccine on little girls and boys. But if I have anything to do with it, that will never happen in Idaho. Over my dead body.”

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 17


M IC K EYAVALON.C OM

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Check Christmas debauchery off your list at Mickey Avalon.

Catch mood swings and swinging tunes at Menopause the Musical.

glitter

THURSDAY-FRIDAY DEC. 15-16

A MICKEY AVALON CHRISTMAS

hot flashes MENOPAUSE THE MUSICAL Humans fear change. Women especially fear it in the form of “the change,” which is our mothers’ and grandmothers’ euphemism for the biological warfare known as menopause. When it can’t avoid talking about the “silent passage,” pop culture makes jabs at menopausal women. Menopause The Musical In Concert jabs right back with retooled popular music and cracks about what women go through at midlife. Menopause The Musical In Concert presents all the jokes and songs from the original production in touring concert format rather than a play. The numbers parody popular music from the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s and become odes to womanhood (and the sufferings associated with it). The women in Menopause endure the common symptoms of changing hormones, mood swings, insomnia and food cravings. They tackle hot flashes in “I’m Flashin’” (“I’m Sorry”), weight gain in “My Thighs (“My Guy”), and relationships with their aging mothers in “I’m No Babe, Ma” (“I Got You Babe”). They even take on more-adult subjects in “Good Vibrations,” but the show strives to be entertaining without being raunchy. The play chooses archetypes rather than real characters. Menopause focuses on a Midwestern housewife, a professional woman, a hippie “Earth mother” and a fading soap opera star. None of them have names, which lends itself well to the concert format. You don’t have to know the show to enjoy the music and laugh. You don’t even have to be a woman of a certain age, although admittedly the jokes are funnier to the over-50 set (and mostly funny to the under-50s as a flash forward—pun intended). 7:30 p.m., $30. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

SATURDAY DEC. 17 music HOT DOG HOLIDAY As Christmas nears, the number of charity events dedicated to the cold and hungry rapidly multiply. But

let’s be honest. For the most part, while those events are doing good things for people in need, they’re also the worst kind of boring—stuffy people wrap themselves up in ugly sweaters year after year to pat one another on the back while “enjoying” terrible music and mediocre hors d’oeuvres. The only worthwhile moment

18 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

FRIDAY DEC. 16

comes when some drunk socialite engages in her annual tradition of downing too much champagne and telling people what she really thinks. This year, if you’d like your holiday charity event— and its snack food—of choice to be a little more “of the people,” then consider the sixth annual Hot

One, two, three, four, get your booty on the dance floor—China Blue’s dance floor, that is, ’cause Hollywood rapper Mickey Avalon is hosting a glitter-filled Christmas extravaganza. That’s right, you can do the Jane Fonda and feel oh so rich and pretty at the dance club’s eighth annual Christmas party. This definitely won’t be your office’s holiday party. Instead of enduring two hours of irritating small talk before you’ve made enough of an appearance to head for the door, you can swig back cocktails and dance to your heart’s content. Christmas outfits are encouraged, so rock the hideoso sweater your grandmother made you with the smiling pine tree on the front or go a little more club-ish. Imagine the North Pole transformed into a Las Vegas or Hollywood nightclub with sexy elves, reindeer with killer dance moves and a smattering of red-velvet trimmed with faux fur. The evening’s host will perform a few songs, then mingle and take photos with the crowd— which is sort of like having your picture taken with a glammed-out, much slimmer Santa. Three lovely and oh-so-talented instructors from Ophidia Studio will perform acrobatic, Vegas-style pole routines as solos, pairs and triples. Prepare yourself to be amazed at their athleticism and bring some stunner shades, because they’ll be covered in shiny gold body paint. There will be plenty of giveaways and prizes, so you can take home some goodies whether you’ve been nice or naughty. Break out of the season’s norm and have some hedonistic holiday fun. 9 p.m., $10. China Blue, 100 S. Sixth St., 208-338-6604, chinabluenightclub.com.

Dog Holiday, going down at The Shredder on Saturday, Dec. 17. Not only will there be live Christmas music from local—primarily punk rock—bands like Hot Dog Sandwich, The Meatballs, The Retrobates and more, the event will also feature free hot dog sandwiches and grape jelly meatballs—apparently so you can experience what it’s like to eat as a poor person and learn empathy. There will also be spoken-word performances from Ben The Drunken Poet

and stand-up comic Jessie McCoy. 9 p.m., $3, or $1 with canned food donation for the Corpus Christi House. The Shredder, 430 S. 10th St.

SATURDAY DEC. 17 art BOISE ART MUSEUM’S 75TH ANNIVERSARY Since 1937, Boise

Art Museum has worked diligently to supply the community with quality visual art experiences and exhibitions. And in the context of Boise’s history, that’s a long time. To celebrate 75 years of showcasing painting, sculpture, pottery and other media in the Treasure Valley, the museum is highlighting 100 of the most important pieces from its 3,200-piece permanent collection. The 100 pieces in Open to Interpretation are drawn from the best of this collection, including Roy Lichtenstein’s “Sleeping Muse.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FIND METAL COCKTAIL STRAWS

Get a Handel on the holiday spirit with Boise Philharmonic.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY DEC. 17-18

Curtis Stigers’ Xtreme Holiday Xtravaganza xemplifies the Xmas xperience.

philharmonic HANDEL’S MESSIAH Most holiday traditions are the sweet and fuzzy kind— Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer on TV, twinkling lights on houses, hot cocoa and snowmen. But how about a holiday tradition that overwhelms you with a symphonic right hook? The instrumental and vocal supergroup of Boise Philharmonic and Boise Philharmonic Master Chorale will bust out its annual performance of Handel’s Messiah on Saturday, Dec. 17, and Sunday, Dec. 18, at the Morrison Center. Messiah is one of the most performed oratorios in the world—especially around the holidays thanks to its obvious religious theme. While George Frideric Handel was not an overtly religious man, some have said he was full of the spirit when he wrote the entire work in just 24 days in 1741. Upon completing the best-known section of Messiah—the “Hallelujah Chorus”— Handel is famously said to have told his servant, “I did think I did see all of heaven before me and the great God himself.” So what does this little oratorio have going for it? Well, a mastery of the musical form, songs that are both inspirational and powerful and a devoted following. If the idea of anything operatic makes you nervous, fear not—despite being born in Germany and trained in Italy, Handel wrote his most-famous work in English. Sure eggnog and Charlie Brown’s woebegone tree have their place, but a performance of Messiah will add some octane to your holiday season. And don’t forget: If you bring a nonperishable food item for the Idaho Foodbank, you’ll receive 20 percent off your next Boise Philharmonic 2011-2012 ticket. Saturday, Dec. 17, 7:30 p.m., children $11.50, adults $31.50-$41.50; Sunday, Dec. 18, 2 p.m., $26.50-$36.50, Sunday. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-3447849, boisephilharmonic.org.

The exhibition opens on Saturday, Dec. 17, with a reception on Jan. 20. Open to Interpretation is designed to spur the viewer to search out similarities between corresponding objects or series’ of objects. “This exhibition will be

S U B M I T

particularly fun for people because it’s designed to encourage them to interact with the artwork in a game of discovery,” said Melanie Fales, executive director of Boise Art Museum. “It really will be a different way for us to display the works and for

SUNDAY-TUESDAY DEC. 18-20 music XTREME HOLIDAY XTRAVAGANZA Boise’s reigning jazz king, Curtis Stigers, is a busy guy. For two days in December, the jet-setting saxophonist and singer will take a break from his hectic schedule to host the annual Xtreme Holiday Xtravaganza, a fundraiser for Interfaith Sanctuary homeless shelter. The salt-and-pepper stud, along with Fool Squad co-hosts Joe Golden and Tom Willmorth, will present a packed lineup of acts. This year’s event promises dance, comedy, tumbling, origami and music from locals like Rebecca Scott and Hillfolk Noir, among others. When Stigers isn’t starring on British television, he’s busy packing Pengilly’s Saloon with eager jazz-lovers or playing at Boise Contemporary Theater. All we know is we’re lucky to have a guy who’s so fiercely loyal to his hometown. For the sixth year, the Egyptian Theatre will host this evening of Idaho music, replete with a beautifully lit, holidaythemed stage, local arts luminaries and a cadre of Boise musicians to soothe you into much-needed bliss. The popularity of the event pushed Stigers to stretch the jam-packed set-list out over two days starting last year, and this year it’s so popular a third day was added. The Sunday, Dec. 18, show is already sold out, and as of press time, the Monday, Dec. 19, performance was nearly sold out as well, so get your tickets—if you can. Sunday, Dec. 18-Tuesday, Dec. 20, 6:30 p.m., $25. The Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

the community to engage with the works.” If you can’t make the opening weekend, or even the first month of the exhibition, no worries—it will run through April 15, 2012.

The basic design of the straw hasn’t changed much over time, novelties aside. It’s a tube with two open ends. There are plastic bendy straws, which are so frat par ty all that’s missing is a red Solo cup. Or there are crazy straws—which, while cool looking, epically slow down the time it takes for booze to hit your tongue. And cocktail straws are fine, but that plastic is just going to wind up languishing in a landfill. What’s the smar test way to slurp down a stiff drink after a long day? Metal cocktail straws are where it’s at, especially on the Boise bar scene. If you’ve been to Red Feather Lounge, you may recognize these iconic stainless steel straws, which accompany stiff artisan cocktails like the Averee or the Rye Knot. Recently, the staff at Red Feather has been routing straw-curious customers over to Bricolage, where they can pick up a set of 10 metal cocktail straws for $24. Called Good Straws, they are made locally by Noel Weber at Classic Design Studio. Understandably, they’re one of Bricolage’s top-selling items. The set of 10 5-inch straws comes mounted in a piece of wood that ser ves as both decoration and storage. The reuseable straws will keep your home bar well-equipped, and best of all, they’re tougher than nails. bricoshoppe.com

—Talyn Brumley

Exhibition opens Saturday, Dec. 17, admission varies. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum. org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 19


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY DEC. 14 On Stage A PERMANENT IMAGE—The newest work from Samuel D. Hunter was commissioned by BCT. Win tickets at promo.boiseweekly. com. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Workshops & Classes WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT BUSINESS WORKSHOP—Meet, learn from and be inspired by Jamison Olson, owner of Jamison Rae Jewelry Collection; Yvonne Anderson-Thomas, owner of Brown Shuga Soul Food; and Carlyn Blake, owner of Sustainable Futures, as they discuss the challenges and opportunities that have led to their success as women business owners. Lunch will feature cuisine from Brown Shuga Soul Food. For information or to register, email ron@metaidaho.org, call 208336-5533, ext. 230, or go to metaidaho.org. 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. $20. U.S. Bank Building, 101 S. Capitol Blvd., Ste. 202, Boise, unicoprop.com.

THURSDAY DEC. 15 On Stage A PERMANENT IMAGE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org. THE ACHERI—Empty Boat Theatre Company presents this horror play about happenings at a fictional abandoned day care facility in Victor. Tickets available at brownpapertickets.com. See Review, Page 24. 8 p.m. $10 advance, $15 door. 510 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3822. BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER—This will be the best Christmas pageant ever when the Herdman kids learn the true meaning of Christmas. 7 p.m. $15 for students, seniors, militar y; $18 general admission. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org. MENOPAUSE THE MUSICAL IN CONCERT—The popular change-of-life musical comedy presented in concert format. See Picks, Page 18. 7:30 p.m. $30. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

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Citizen TRICA FUNDRAISER—HotMess has joined forces with the Treasure Valley Institute for Children’s Arts for a charity burlesque performance. All proceeds will be donated to TRICA. 7:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com. BENEFIT FOR PORTER—Proceeds benefit Porter Jensen, a 2-year-old boy with an extremely rare but curable form of cancer. Music by Dan Costello, Hillfolk Noir, Bill Coffey, Sean Hatton and Dave Manion. Fine art silent auction featuring work by many local

artists. 6:30 p.m. By donation. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St. Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com

Animals & Pets HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS PET ADOPTION EVENT—Canyon County Animal Shelter will be offering reduced fees and serving hot drinks and Christmas cookies. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Canyon County Animal Shelter, 5801 Graye Lane, Caldwell, 208-455-5920, canyoncountyshelter.org.

NOISE/CD REVIEW DEER TICK, DIVINE PROVIDENCE On Deer Tick’s website is a short intro to its latest record, Divine Providence. Detailing how the production of the new record departs radically from the band’s previous efforts, Cecil Thyme writes: “This record may rattle your thoughts and it may make you think differently about Deer Tick, but at least they didn’t make the same album four times in a row, right?” Thyme hit the mark—as well he should, since frontman John McCauley admitted in a Boston Globe interview that he writes his own releases under that pseudonym. Everywhere on the record, the band sounds fuller, yet rawer; the production is lusher, yet less refined. The spacey synth of “Make Believe” would have been completely foreign on past Deer Tick efforts, but it is at home here. So are the blues-influenced numbers interspersed among the more melodic song structures fans are familiar with. “Let’s All Go to the Bar” is, appropriately, a rollicking barroom romp framed by studio noise and comments (“Let’s go get drunk,” someone says as the guitars die down). “Walkin’ Out the Door” is a driving, bluesy break-up song with a half-shouted chorus. The acoustic guitar, storytelling style and well-paced melody of “Clownin’ Around” recall the band’s earlier efforts, even as electric piano and additional percussion mark it off as a staple of the group’s newer style. This duality is most evident here, but it is present throughout the album. Though the similarities are obscured by the fuller sound, the songwriting on Divine Providence is closer to that of the band’s 2007 debut, War Elephant, than either of the band’s middle two records (2009’s Born on Flag Day and 2010’s The Black Dirt Sessions). The pop-folk strum of “Miss K” closes the record simply, yet elegantly. Deer Tick released this song early to promote the album and it’s an understandable choice—here, again, the band seems to step back from the rawer, thicker sound found in the bulk of the record. But perhaps this song didn’t fully prepare fans for the difference in the band’s sound, and maybe the group wanted it this way. Divine Providence is a surprise but a welcome one. —Stephen Lovely WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 21


8 DAYS OUT FRIDAY DEC. 16 On Stage A CANDLE IN THE WINDOW—A small group of weary travelers learns about the magic of the holiday season while trapped in a train station on Christmas Eve. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 seniors and students. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, boiselittletheater.org. A CHRISTMAS CAROL—This Charles Dickens classic gets the full Broadway treatment in this musical rendition. 7:30 p.m. $16 adults, $15 students/seniors, $14 youth. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208468-5555, nampaciviccenter. com. A PERMANENT IMAGE—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org. THE ACHERI—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10 advance, $15 door. 510 W. Main St., Boise, 208342-3822. BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $39 dinner/show or $20 show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org. FOCUS DANCE ENSEMBLE WINTER PERFORMANCE— Eight dancers will perform choreography by Trey McIntyre Project’s Channel DaSilva, Idaho Dance Theatre’s Sayoko Knode, and IDT alum Jenn Freeman. 7:30 p.m. $10 adults, $5 students and youth. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208426-3980, theatre.boisestate. edu.

FOCUS DANCE ENSEMBLE WINTER PERFORMANCE—See Friday. 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. $10 adults, $5 students and youth. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4263980, theatre.boisestate.edu.

donations will benefit Corpus Cristi House. See Picks, Page 18. 9 p.m. $3, $1 with canned food donation. The Shredder, 430 S. 10th St., Boise, myspace.com/ toomuchdistortion.

Animals & Pets

Concerts

HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS PET ADOPTION EVENT—See Thursday. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Canyon County Animal Shelter, 5801 Graye Lane, Caldwell, 208-4555920, canyoncountyshelter.org.

THE MESSIAH— Handel’s seasonal favorite is conducted by Robert Franz and features Boise Philharmonic and Boise Master Chorale. See Picks, Page 19. 7:30 p.m. $11.50-$41.40. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc. boisestate.edu.

SATURDAY DEC. 17 On Stage

EARLY DEADLINES All 8 Days Out events through Jan. 4, 2012, due to BW by Wednesday, Dec. 14. Email calendar@boiseweekly.com.

Art

OPEN TO INTERPRETATION— This exhibition celebrates Boise Art Museum’s 75th anniversary and highlights more than 100 works from the museum’s permanent collection. See Picks, Page 18. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

A CANDLE IN THE WINDOW— See Friday. 8 p.m. $12.50, $9 seniors and students. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. A CHRISTMAS CAROL—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $16 adults, $15 students/seniors, $14 youth. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. A PERMANENT IMAGE—See Wednesday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $15 and up. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Animals & Pets HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS PET ADOPTION EVENT—See Thursday. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Canyon County Animal Shelter, 5801 Graye Lane, Caldwell, 208-4555920, canyoncountyshelter.org.

THE ACHERI—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10 advance, $15 door. 510 W. Main St., 208-342-3822. BEST CHRISTMAS PAGEANT EVER—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $39 dinner/show or $20 show. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Concerts MINDY GLEDHILL BENEFIT CONCERT—Mindy Gledhill performs selections from her just-released Christmas album, and 100 percent of ticket sales will go to the International Rett Foundation. Purchase tickets in advance online at mindygledhill.com or at the door. 7 p.m. Donation to charity. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483, parklaneco. com/roseroom.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

A MICKEY AVALON CHRISTMAS—The Hollywood rapper will perform, mingle and take photos with fans. The evening includes acrobatic pole routines from instructors at Ophidia Studio, prizes and give-aways. Christmas costumes encouraged. See Picks, Page 18. 9 p.m. $10. China Blue Nightclub, 100 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-3459515, chinabluenightclub.com.

Festivals & Events HOT DOG HOLIDAY— Featuring Christmas music by Hot Dog Sandwich and others, words by Ben the Drunken Poet and comedy by Jessie McCoy. Food

22 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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8 DAYS OUT SUNDAY DEC. 18 Festivals & Events HOLIDAY MARKET—Modeled after the Linen Building Sunday Market, this special event will showcase two dozen artists’ work. Performances by Dan Costello and Greg Bridges. A portion of the proceeds will benefit the Idaho Youth Ranch, and children may tell Santa their Christmas wish in exchange for a nonperishable food donation for the Boise Rescue Mission. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

THE MESSIAH—See Saturday. 2 p.m. $11.50-$41.40. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Literature

CURTIS STIGERS’ XTREME HOLIDAY XTRAVAGANZA—See Sunday. 6:30 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net.

VELMA V. MORRISON FAMILY READING SERIES: A CHRISTMAS CAROL—Bring the entire family and listen to Charles Dickens’ Christmas classic. Tickets available by calling 208426-1110, at all Select-a-Seat outlets, the Morrison Center box office or online at idahotickets. com. 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. $7. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1609.

Art

MONDAY DEC. 19

TUESDAY DEC. 20

On Stage

On Stage

THE EIGHT: REINDEER MONOLOGUES—Daisy’s Madhouse presents Jeff Goode’s dark Christmas comedy. Call 208854-9636 or visit daisysmadhouse.org for tickets. 8 p.m. $8 advance, $10 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

THE EIGHT: REINDEER MONOLOGUES—See Monday. 8 p.m. $8 advance, $10 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Concerts CURTIS STIGERS’ XTREME HOLIDAY XTRAVAGANZA—A musical variety show jam packed with local artists and hosted by Curtis Stigers and The Fool Squad. All proceeds go to Interfaith Sanctuary homeless shelter. Tickets available now at curtisstigers.com. See Picks, Page 19. 6:30 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Concerts

THE MEPHAM GROUP

BOISE STATE PRINTMAKING CLUB SILENT AUCTION—Red Circle Press printmaking club will hold a silent auction of prints, paintings and drawings. For more info, contact redcirclepress@ gmail.com. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing Company, 111 W. 33rd St., Garden City, 208-3440011, payettebrewing.com.

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE—This live radio play includes the favorites from It’s a Wonderful Life, plus staged commercials, sound effects and music. 7 p.m. $10$20. Sun Valley Opera House, Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley, 208-622-2244, sunvalley.com.

| SUDOKU Concerts CURTIS STIGERS’ XTREME HOLIDAY XTRAVAGANZA—See Sunday. 6:30 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre. net.

WEDNESDAY DEC. 21 On Stage THE EIGHT: REINDEER MONOLOGUES—See Monday. 8 p.m. $8 advance, $10 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com. IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE—See Tuesday. 7 p.m. $10-$20. Sun Valley Opera House, Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley, 208-6222244, sunvalley.com.

Workshops & Classes | EASY

| MEDIUM |

HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

REIKI FOR SCHOOL TEACHERS—This special Reiki I class, taking place Wednesday, Dec. 21, and Thursday, Dec. 22, will help develop techniques for the classroom to keep your vital life force in balance. Noon-6 p.m. $99 for both days. Reiki Energy Healing Center, 3939 Targee St., Boise, 208-353-0604, reikienergyhealingcenter.com.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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8 DAYS OUT ONGOING

a permanent image by Samuel D. Hunter directed by kip fagan

tickets: start at $15 $10 if you are under 30 phone: 331-9224 x205 online: BCTheater.org 854 Fulton St. Downtown Boise, ID

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Idaho Botanical Garden is once again transformed into a majestic holiday wonderland with more than 250,000 lights. Through Sunday, Jan. 8, 2012. Win tickets at promo.boiseweekly.com. FREE children younger than 3, $4 members and children ages 4-12, $8 general. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. HOLIDAY LIGHTS TOUR—Enjoy an old-fashioned trolley tour of Boise homes decked out for the holidays. Tickets can be purchased through Select-A-Seat outlets or by calling 208-4261494. Through Monday, Dec. 30, 6 and 8 p.m. $14 adults, $12 children younger than 12. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City. TROLLEY HOLIDAY LIGHTS TOURS—One-hour tour aboard the vintage decorated “Molly” Trolley leaves from the Evergreen Business mall. Tickets may be purchased online at boisetrolleytours.com or at booth inside the mall. Reservations are recommended. Nightly through Monday, Dec. 30, except Christmas Day. $16 Adults, $8 children ages 3-12, $4 children younger than 3. Evergreen Business MallLibrary Plaza, corner of Cole and Ustick roads, Boise. HELICOPTER CHRISTMAS LIGHT TOURS—Take to the skies for a 15-minute helicopter tour of Boise’s Christmas festivities. Going on from Friday, Dec. 16-Wednesday, Jan. 1, 2012. Call 208-453-8577 for reservations. $125 for two people, $150 for three people. Western Aircraft at Boise Airport, 4300 S. Kennedy St., Boise, 208-3449558, westair.com. CENTENNIAL BASEBALL CHRISTMAS TREE SALE—Beautiful trees at a great price. The CHS baseball team will also be collecting nonperishable food items for The Idaho Foodbank. Donate two cans of food for $2 off any tree. Through Saturday, Dec. 17. For more info, go to centennialbaseballgroup@live. com. Mondays-Fridays, 5-8 p.m.; Saturdays, noon-6 p.m. Centennial High School, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-9391404, chs.meridianschools.org. CITY SANTA—Children may tell Santa their Christmas wishes and have their photos taken. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. For more information visit downtownboise. org. Through Saturday, Dec. 17. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. By donation. D.L. Evans Bank, 213 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-331-1399.

24 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

W ENDY FOX

nov. 22 thru dec. 17, 2011

World Premiere

Closing We e k !

REVIEW/SHOW

Actor Nick Garcia makes his Acheri face.

THE ACHERI While there is no substitute for a professional theater with good lighting and a well-designed stage, the greatest strength of live theater is its ability to put the audience in the middle of the action, edging them closer to participant than spectator. The Acheri, the debut production from The Empty Boat Theater Company, exploits that principle to its fullest. From the moment you enter the “theater”—an empty retail space near Fifth and Main streets—it’s clear you are in for a very different kind of play. The set, a post-apocalyptic day care center, is strewn with toys and garbage and the windows are covered in duct tape. Lumber is stacked in the corner and machine noises rumble softly, Through Saturday, Dec. 17. creating an atmosphere of THE ACHERI unease. Once you enter this 510 W. Main St. nightmare world, the doorman theemptyboattheatre locks you in. It’s an effective company.org gag, because it makes you a piece of the play’s world. When The Acheri starts, the lights flicker on and off, giving short, fractured glimpses of a society’s descent into chaos in the wake of a potentially supernatural onslaught. Three people have holed up in an abandoned day care center to wait it out. They have food, guns and each other—all the things needed to survive, which others come looking for. Despite its horror themes, the play is more impressionistic than it is a thriller. The brief, clipped scenes jump back and forth in time, giving the atmosphere center stage. It’s not that there isn’t a story, but it isn’t one full of carefully plotted, nailbiting twists and turns. Some of the plot doesn’t even make sense, but when you’re trying to tell a tale about how quickly things fall apart, little does. What plot there is the cast sells magnificently. Empty Boat co-founder Nick Garcia is so effective in his depiction of a mentally ill character it’s unclear whether his stor y is the revelation of the plot or simply the ramblings of lunacy. And even if you answer that question, the per formance leaves you wondering which came first: the madness in his mind or the chaos he inhabits. If you’ve ever been to a haunted house at Halloween and wished for a plot to be added, The Acheri is for you. Conversely, if you don’t like having the bejeezus scared out of you, stay away. While many of the scare moments are the sort of sudden shocks that become predictable, they hit far harder in a live setting than on screen. When you add them to the general feeling of dread one experiences being in that room, it’s either the best or worst theater experience you’re likely to have in Boise for some time. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 25


NEWS/NOISE NOISE JU LIA GR EEN

FAST TRACK An on-set shot of Youth Lagoon’s “July.”

SXSW, TREEFORT UPDATES The upcoming showcase of Boise bands at SXSW is developing and now includes Built to Spill, Finn Riggins and Hillfolk Noir. Youth Lagoon, Le Fleur and The Bret Netson Band are also on the list but are still unconfirmed by SXSW. But they won’t be the only Boise bands there. RevoltRevolt announced plans on its website to hit SXSW to play some unofficial showcases with local band Jumping Sharks. Speaking of Youth Lagoon, work on its new video for the song “July,” has just finished. The video will be a sci-fi take on the July 4th, set in the ’80s and features special effects by a crew member of the feature film Sin City. Look for it in early 2012. “July” was directed by local auteur Tyler T. Williams, who received a nod from Pitchfork for creating one of the best 12 videos of 2011—Youth Lagoon’s “Montana.” Williams is also rumored to be starting a new music blog that will feature bands performing in found spaces similar to the French site blogoteque.com. When Atlanta metalistas Mastodon played in Boise, band members told BW about a recent TV appearance they’d done in the United Kingdom with the decidedly not-metal indie artist Feist. Apparently it worked out well because singer Troy Davis told MTV Canada that the two groups are planning a split 7-inch on which they will cover each other’s material. The songs haven’t yet been picked for the record, but the release date has: Record Store Day, Saturday, April 21, 2012. Also in recording news, local teens Working on Fire have somehow managed to find time in between high school classes in high school to record not just one album but their third, Metaphoria. The disc is a 12song rockfest that will receive a pre-release at The Knitting Factory on Friday, Dec. 16, when the band opens for Hell’s Belles, the world’s greatest ACDC cover band. Remember building forts? The best part was deciding who you’d let into your secret refuge. On Dec. 12, the first five artists to be allowed in to the inaugural Treefort Music Fest were announced: Of Montreal (Athens, Ga.), folk-pop group Why? (Bay Area/Cincinnati), Sallie Ford and the Sound Outside (Portland, Ore.), Monster Rally and Rumtum (Cleveland, Ohio) and Boise’s sweethearts Built to Spill. More artists on the lineup will be announced Monday, Dec. 19. Check back at boiseweekly.com. The inaugural festival is slated to take place March 22-25, 2012. A date for ticket sales has yet to be announced.

New technology creates opportunities for cross-continental collaboration JOSH GROSS Last week, Boise musicians Jake Hite and Jeremy Jensen took the stage in Glasgow, Scotland. Though the duo had traveled more than 4,000 miles to perform at the Glasgow Popfest, they had never actually met the other members of their band Baffin Island. Jensen and Hite, who also play in The Very Most, met, wrote songs and recorded a threesong EP with the other members of Baffin Island—who live in Scotland and play as The Hermit Crabs—entirely on the Internet. “We tried to talk on the phone,” said Jensen, referring to lead singer Melanie Whittle. “She has a Scottish accent, and the phone connection didn’t turn out so well. We had a hard time communicating.” Instead, they stuck to email and other online file-sharing programs. Baffin Island isn’t alone. More and more, musicians are turning to the Internet to collaborate over long distances in ways that weren’t possible only a few years ago. Jensen said the biggest thing that made Baffin Island possible was new FTP services like YouSendIt and Soundcloud, which allow people to send large, high-quality audio files. Before such services, bands would have to physically mail recordings back and forth, a slow process that ran the risk of damaging the recordings, especially in the days of magnetic tape. But now pieces of songs can be zipped across the globe in minutes, making the field of potential collaborators nearly unlimited. “The way that our process works so far is that I send Mel a really, really rough batch of chords on top of a drum machine, and then she thinks of words and melodies and she records them at her friend’s studio and sends them back to me,” explained Jensen. But he’s also quick to admit that not being able to goof around or jam out makes it tougher to collaborate in an unstructured manner. “It works well because we have these predefined roles in the songs,” said Hite. “If it got more complicated than that, it could get interesting.” Baffin Island—the halfway point between Boise and Glasgow—was started as a side-project for a compilation put out by the label Eardrums Pop, which paired members of existing bands into new groups. Jensen emailed The Hermit Crabs and the band grew from there. But other long-distance bands have devel-

oped more out of necessity than happenstance. Garage-rock quartet Teens spent late 2009 and 2010 building buzz as one of Boise’s best live acts. But then things got complicated. First, the band split with drummer Dustin MacFadden-Elliott—amicably—right before it was supposed to leave on tour. Then the band’s guitar player, David Wood, was accepted to a doctoral program at Idaho State in Pocatello. To solve the first problem, the band flew in an old friend from Canada to fill in. For the second, it decided to “pull a lateBeatles and just put out records.” Teens’ process is similar to that of Baffin Island’s—zipping audio recordings between Pocatello, Boise and Medicine Hat, Alberta. Wood said it’s less organic than the band’s previous jamming-out method of songwriting. But that doesn’t mean he’s against it. “I think the songs are stronger on this album because this method takes more consideration,” said Wood. But even though the process is more laborious, Wood said it’s worth doing things this way instead of forming a new band because of the group’s chemistry. “I’d rather play with these guys than anyone in the world,” said Wood. “It’s hard to find people you gel with when trying to make music.” But chemistry or not, Wood said it wouldn’t work without the Internet. “If we had to do it through snail-mail, we would have all quit by now,” said Wood. “I honestly don’t have the patience to wait weeks for a track.” And it does take patience, even with the Internet. Though Boise band Muffalo formed in 2002, the band didn’t play its first gig until early 2010 because it had members spread across three states. Like Teens and Baffin Island, Muffalo emailed demos back-and-forth to one another, then met up periodically to rehearse and finalize recordings. With an appearance at SXSW in 2010 and a European tour, it might seem like things worked out for Muffalo. But that isn’t how the band’s frontman, Eagle resident Derek Myers, sees things. “I realized on stage in Europe that we hadn’t built chemistry,” Myers said. “We

hadn’t really decided that we were a band. We were friends, and we had these songs.” Myers emphasized that the long-distance process is too removed and too sterile. “It’s like going to a dentist’s office to watch a movie,” he said. “Even though you’re collaborating together, you’re not becoming a unit; you’re not growing together.” After the tour, Myers made the difficult decision to replace his longtime friend and drummer in California with someone local. “From now on, I’m only going to play with people I live near,” Myers said. “There’s ways to make [long-distance collaboration] better but not to make it good.” Some of those ways include using Skype for rehearsal sessions and decentralized live recordings, and using new virtual instruments. Garageband for iPhone and iPad allows project files to be shared wirelessly via multiple devices, and it’s only a matter of time until they manage simultaneous tracking. Someone who has embraced these new tools fully is Ontario, Ore., rapper Steve Stein, who goes by Oso Negro. Stein used to front the band New Madrid Click when he lived in Mississippi, but it was too difficult to get the musicians to practice consistently. At the time, he was active on hip-hop message boards, participating in text versions of rap battles. It was there that he met different DJs and beat-makers and began setting his lyrics to their music. It wasn’t long before Stein was a full-fledged player in a complex and growing online market for hip-hop beats and collaborations, something he relishes because it breaks him out of his own style. “It allows me to produce music vocally that I wouldn’t do over my own stuff,” he said. “It’s more complex.” Still, Oso Negro misses his band. He even worked a sample from one of its old recordings into his new album, Hungry Bear. “I hate being up there by myself,” he said. But Stein’s past experiences tell him it would just be aggravating to form another band. And that’s why he’s OK with collaborating online. “This is the future,” he said. “I can’t help that I live in Ontario. But now I can collaborate with anybody, anywhere.”

—Josh Gross and Sheree Whiteley

26 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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Berryhill’s Restaurant · Bar Reservations at 387.3553 www.johnberryhillrestaurants.com

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 27


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY DEC. 14 DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE FLING—With Yukon Blonde. See Listen Here, This Page. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW—6 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadDowntown TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill WILSON ROBERTS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid GODCROTCH—With Black Bolt and Skittish Itz. 9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s HANNAH’S GONE WILD—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. $5. Humpin’ Hannah’s

YUKON BLONDE, DEC. 14, NEUROLUX Vancouver, B.C., forest rockers Yukon Blonde have been hard at work over the past year. In 2010 the band released its self-titled album, then toured the United States. In September the band released the EP Fire//Water, and it is slated to release a brand new, as-yet unnamed LP in February 2012. Yukon Blonde is lauded for its skillful live per formances. The band tours heavily and is in the midst of a 60-plus-date U.S. trek. In 2010, popular Canadian music publication Chart named Yukon Blonde Best Band of the 2010 Canadian Music Week Festival, and the Canadian Broadcast Corporation labeled it one of the “10 Canadian bands destined to break in 2010.” —Stephen Foster With The Fling. 8 p.m., $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

28 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

THURSDAY DEC. 15 AFTER ABBEY—7:30 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Curb

IN THE FADE—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JOHNNY SHOES—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri La PAUL TILLOTSON—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel RICO WEISMAN AND KEN HARRIS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill NOAH PETERSON—5:30 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hot Springs PAUL TILLOTSON—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel REILLY COYOTE—7 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— 7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MEGAN NELSON—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s

THE WORKING DJS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

FRIDAY DEC. 16 BIG WOW—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle BLAZE AND KELLY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub CAMDEN HUGHES—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DANGERBEARD—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid FREUDIAN SLIP—8 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews HELL’S BELLES—8:30 p.m. $13. Knitting Factory JIMMY BIVENS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

STARDUST LOUNGE—11 p.m. FREE. Red Room TIM AND THE BANJO PROPHECIES—10 p.m. FREE. Goldy’s Corner THE WORKING DJS—9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

SATURDAY DEC. 17 CHRIS GUYIRREZ—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers EMILY BRADEN—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE ISGC ANNUAL CHRISTMAS SHOW—5:30 p.m. $5. Neurolux JONATHAN WARREN—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s JUPITER HOLIDAY—With the Quick and Easy Boys. 9 p.m. $5. Liquid NEW TRANSIT—With Bill Coffey, Pinto Bennett and Reilly Coyote. 7 p.m. $5. See Listen Here, Page 29. VAC

SUNDAY DEC. 18

THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— 7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BEN BURDICK—Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

TUESDAY DEC. 20

LARRY CONKLIN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s LIKE A ROCKET—7:30 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s

SPOKEN UNPLUGGED—With False. 4 p.m. FREE. Red Letter Books and Cafe

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SINGLE CAR GARAGE BAND— 8 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews STEADY RUSH—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE WORKING DJS—9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

PHANTASMAGORIA—With 5 Gears In Reverse. 9 p.m. $5. Mardi Gras

DYLAN SUNDSTROM TRIO—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

EARLY DEADLINES All music events through Jan. 4, 2012, due to BW by Wednesday, Dec. 14. Email calendar@boiseweekly.com.

SUNDERGROUND—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

JIMMY BIVENS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

NATHAN MOODY—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge OLD-TIME JAM SESSION—6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY DEC. 19 BLUES JAM WITH RICHARD SOLIZ—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

WEDNESDAY DEC. 21

HANNAH’S GONE WILD—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:30 p.m. $5. Humpin’ Hannah’s JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Curb LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La NEW TRANSIT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel PAUL DRAGONE—5 p.m. FREE. Shangri La STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadMeridian WILSON ROBERTS— 5:30 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadBown

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

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There’s a bluegrass supergroup in town, and it’s called New Transit. The band features Sean Hatton and A. Nigel Gates on guitar, bass and vocals, Louis McFarland on drums and Dave Manion on guitar and pedal steel. Separately, the boys have played with the Jeremiah James Gang, Exit 51 and more. New Transit’s debut album, One, combines the members’ individual talents in a stew of stick-to-your-ribs melodies. Songs like “She Moves Me a Little” shine with seduction, with Hatton crooning: “She steps out of my shirt / closes the door / and pulls all the sheets off my bed.” The band’s sound has even pulled Treasure Valley legend Pinto Bennett—doffed in his trademark cowboy hat and bolo tie—out of his 2010 sheep wagon retirement for a special show at Visual Arts Collective on Saturday, Dec. 17. —Andrew Crisp

RILEY FRIEDMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

NEW TRANSIT, DEC. 17, VAC

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

With Bill Coffey, Pinto Bennett and Reilly Coyote. 7 p.m., $5. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, visualartscollective.com.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 29


SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

TINTIN IS BOX-OFFICE GOLD Cheers to the first of (hopefully) many adventures GEORGE PRENTICE A full hour into The Adventures of Tintin, Steven Spielberg’s ripping-good holiday adventure, I paused to consider if my boyish enthusiasm for the 3D escapade was a singular experience. I needed only to look a few rows away to see a brother and sister, maybe 8 or 9 years old, literally bouncing in Tintin and Captain Haddock spot swashbuckling adventure on the horizon. their seats during one of the thrill-a-moment chase sequences that make the film such a joy. All was right with the world, as it was by John Williams (who penned the iconic animated scenes sweeping audiences from with The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret Indiana Jones soundtrack) is always on-point the streets of Belgium, across the high seas of the Unicorn. to galvanize the action. I was convinced that Tintin, source material unfamiliar to many and on to a Moroccan oasis. The Secret Harrison Ford might step into the story at of the Unicorn is a mash-up of several of Americans, enjoys cult status in much of Herge’s twice-told tales. Here, Tintin (Jamie any moment. Europe, where the film has been playing to Tintin is a brilliantly animated feature, Bell) challenges the boffo box office busidastardly Ivan Sakha- a fact I had to remind myself of repeatedly ness since September. because the performance-capture technology rine (Daniel Craig) Immortalized by is so precise and textured. The film looks to solve a mystery of Belgian illustrator THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN (PG) and, more importantly, feels like a true-to-life three hidden manuGeorges Remi (nom Directed by Steven Spielberg cinematic experience. scripts, ultimately de plume Herge), Starring Jamie Bell, Daniel Craig The reigning king of PCT-acting is Andy leading them to Tintin has been a Opens Wednesday, Dec. 21 Serkis (The Lord of the Rings, King Kong). (what else) ancient European best-seller treasure. No less than In Tintin he plays Capt. Haddock, the seasince the 1930s. But faring merchant marine with a rum-soaked the French Foreign U.S. audiences should gift of gab. Legion and swashfind a kindred spirit “Billions of bilious blue blistering barwith Tintin, the intrepid boy reporter. Think buckling pirates enter the fray. nacles,” he blubbers to everyone’s glee. In one particular scene—which had my a young Clark Kent but with a lot more Tintin is a kid-friendly thriller that builds fellow audience members seat-bouncing— moxie. One of the true wonders of the film mystery and suspense while keeping the Tintin and Sakharine race through a Maris that Spielberg invokes the feel of a classic page-turner, not unlike the best from Robert rakech marketplace, employing a motorcycle, action tightly paced. There isn’t a dancing Louis Stevenson, Jack London or even Rud- tank and, oh yes, a bazooka. The breath-tak- penguin or singing chipmunk anywhere to be found, but Tintin is undoubtedly the ing pursuit pays homage to classic cinematic yard Kipling. sugar-plum treat of the season … with just a chases, including Spielberg’s best from the But make no mistake—Tintin is truly a 21st century classic, complete with gorgeous Indiana Jones series. Coincidentally the score splash of rum.

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings FOR THE BIRDS—Premiere of Prestige Skateboard’s new film by Mack Scharff and Blake Bolton, with musical performances from Dark Seas and Spell Talk. Thursday, Dec. 15, 7 p.m. FREE. The Shredder, 430 S. 10th St., Boise, myspace.com/ toomuchdistortion. THE GREELY EXPEDITION—Produced as part of the PBS series American Experience in 2011, the hour-long documentary tells a tale of shipwreck, starvation, mutiny and cannibalism. Preceded by a tour of the gallery exhibition Thin Ice:

30 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Journeys in Polar Regions. Thursday, Dec. 15, 6:15 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org.

Rapace, Jared Harris, Eddie Marsan, Stephen Fry and Rachel McAdams star. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22, Edwards 14 YOUNG ADULT—Dark hilarity ensues when a recently divorced writer

returns home to reunite with her high-school boyfriend. Written by Diablo Cody (Juno) and director Jason Reitman (Up in the Air). (R) Flicks, Edwards 9, Edwards 22, Edwards 14

Opening SHERLOCK HOLMES: A GAME OF SHADOWS—When the prince of Austria is found dead, the evidence points to suicide. But famed detective Sherlock Holmes deduces that the prince has been the victim of murder—and is part of a larger scheme designed by Professor Moriarty. Robert Downey Jr., Jude Law, Noomi

For movie times, visit boiseweekly.com or scan this QR code. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FOOD/NEWS DU LC E C U PC AK ES

FOOD GU Y HAND

ROASTING ON AN OPEN FIRE

Dulce Cupcakes keeps it fancy with the Mr. Tuxedo cupcake.

The once-blighted American chestnut makes a comeback

WARM TOES AND SUGARY TREATS

GUY HAND “I think we got a rainstorm coming in,” Peggy Paul said, pointing to the ominous band of clouds rolling our way on a blustery, mid-November day. She led me into the shelter of her nearby orchard as icy rain began to tick against the dry leaves and bristled burrs that clung to some 500 chestnut trees. As my eyes adjusted to the light under that nearly closed canopy, I whispered the word “beautiful.” Those trees both protected us from the rain and reminded me—with hundreds of trunks giving way to a tangle of interlocking branches—of an enchanted forest far more than a commercial orchard. Enchanted or not, a chestnut forest is a rare sight. That’s because, as a recent New York Times article put it, the American chestnut (Castanea dentata) “had a worse 20th century than the British Empire, the ice-delivery trade or rhyming poetry.” Once a stately member of the Eastern hardwood forest ecosystem, up to 4 billion American chestnut trees fell victim to a blight during the 1930s and 1940s, virtually scouring the species from its native habitat. That’s why the majority of Americans today experience the chestnut via imported and frequently inferior Chinese chestnuts, or vicariously through that 1946 nostalgia-laden chestnut of a ballad, “The Christmas Song,” in which Nat King Cole crooned about chestnuts roasting over an open fire. “These are Colossal chestnuts,” Paul said of the stately trees that surrounded us. “This is a strain of chestnut that has been crossed with a domestic nut and a Chinese chestnut. They’re blight-free chestnuts.” With the relatively recent development of disease-resistant stock, new strains of chestnuts are being introduced into the tree’s historic habitat, as well as into entirely new territory, like Peggy and Jim Paul’s commercial orchard near Nampa. “I, along with a lot of growers within the Northwest and the Midwest, am trying to bring chestnut trees back to the United States,” said Paul. Paul knows of one other commercial chestnut grower near Horseshoe Bend, about 20 growers in Oregon, 15 in Washington and another 50 in Missouri and Illinois. As Paul and I wandered through her orchard, we crunched our way through a lumpy carpet of what looked like brown, WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Thanks to Peggy and Jim Paul, you can score Idaho chestnuts at a handful of restaurants and grocery stores.

porcupine-quilled Christmas ornaments. She carefully picked one up—a chestnut burr— and through a slit in its side, showed me three shiny chestnuts nestled tightly within. Thankfully, she added, most burrs don’t cling so tenaciously to their contents. “When the nut ripens, the burrs open and the nuts fall to the ground,” Paul said. “Just kind of Mother Nature’s way of helping harvest.” Though the Pauls had wrapped up their 2011 harvest a few days before, Peggy Paul remembered just how the season began. “This year’s first 5 pounds were picked by my 3- and 5-year-old grandsons,” she said. “They came out here, and it’s like an Easter egg hunt: ‘Come on grandma, let’s look for a nut.’” A trickle of nuts start falling from the sky at the beginning of autumn, which soon turns into a deluge as more and more burrs burst open, sending thousands of pounds of chestnuts raining down as the harvest progresses. For that, Paul hires a crew. According to a 2009 study conducted by the University of Missouri, commercial chestnut production in America is “still in its infancy” as growers like the Pauls plant and tend young, blight-resistant orchards that haven’t yet reached full maturity. The Capital Press, an agricultural weekly, reported last year that “many chestnut growers in the U.S. have no problem selling their entire crops year after year, either fresh or processed.” When the Pauls planted their orchard in 1993, they thought of it more as a hobby than a way to capitalize on a resurgent interest in a nearly extinct crop. Several years passed before they even began to collect chestnuts. “In 1998, I had enough to do my first big Albertsons order,” Paul said with a smile. “At that time, it was 50 boxes. I was so excited I could hardly contain myself. Now, we have a Portland, [Ore.,] distribution center

and Salt Lake [City] distribution center. We supply Albertsons/SuperValu in close to 20 states.” In Idaho, the Pauls sell their fresh chestnuts under the name “Idaho Chestnut Growers” in several Paul’s Markets, Super One Food Stores in North Idaho, Atkinsons’ Market in the Wood River Valley, and at Boise Co-op. According to Paul, several area restaurants like Gino’s Italian Ristorante in Meridian, Copper Canyon in Nampa, and Murphy’s Seafood and Steakhouse in Boise have included their chestnuts on menus. A few days later, Nick Duncan, head chef at La Belle Vie in Nampa, showed me a chestnut risotto he was making as a dinner special from chestnuts he’d picked up from the Pauls earlier that morning. Rather than carefully scoring the hard outer membrane of the chestnut first, a laborious task that turns off many a chestnut novice, Duncan simply chopped the nut in half with a sharp chef’s knife before parboiling it. He then scooped out the chestnut meat while still hot, explaining that the meat clings to the pellicle (the thin, inner skin) if left to cool. Once cooked, he said, you can make soups, stuffings, desserts or any of number of other preparations. For his chestnut risotto, Duncan sauteed parboiled chestnuts in brown butter, then added a little brandy and marsala, let it simmer until the chestnuts were soft and, finally, pureed the mixture. He then used that sweet, earthy base to enrich his risotto. Duncan also plans to make a chestnut and sherry soup as one of seven courses he’ll offer at La Belle Vie’s New Year’s Eve dinner party. “What I wanted to feature is a French delicacy,” Boise Co-op cooking instructor Sylvie Ryan told me as she set up a chestnut demonstration in early December. “It’s called marrons glaces, which are candied chestnuts.” 32 Ryan grew up eating chestnuts in

When 13th Street Pub and Grill took over the former Bungalow space in Hyde Park, the new owners sunk a pretty penny into the patio space, adding removable glass windows and a central fire pit surrounded by seats. Now 13th Street has ratcheted things up another notch, putting all other patios in town to shivering shame. “We put in geothermal heating underneath, so the floor radiates the heat from underneath and goes up,” said wine purchaser Tony Baker. The toe-warming remodel, which took approximately two weeks to complete, “was not inexpensive,” said Baker, chuckling. Speaking of feeling all toasty, why not head down to Payette Brewing Company for a gut-warming mug of its limited-release holiday brew, Busted Wagon. In addition to adding a rosy flush to your cheeks, Busted Wagon will also warm your heart—100 percent of proceeds from the amber-colored ale will be donated to the Women’s and Children’s Alliance. You can also score a pint at Bardenay, Gernika, Bittercreek, Brewforia, Fork and Falcon Tavern among others. For more information, visit payettebrewing.com. In other giving-back news, Bardenay will host a Charity Night on Monday, Dec. 19, from 5-9 p.m., in which 20 percent of sales benefit Wish Granters. The local nonprofit grants wishes to Treasure Valley adults with terminal illnesses. For more information, visit bardenay.com. If you’d rather give the gift of diabetes— er, sugary holiday confections, consider a couple of cupcakeries. Dulce Cupcakes, which currently has a booth at the Capital City Public Market, offers “super duper fancy schmancy” flavors like cookie vs. cupcake, which features a chocolate chip cookie baked inside a double chocolate cupcake, salted caramel mocha and banana butterscotch a-roo. To schedule a delivery, call 208-880-2637 or email dulcecupcakes@hotmail.com. Sugar Rush Cupcakery is also whipping up gourmet cupcakes for the holidays. Sugar Rush has a new storefront location at 10804 W. Fairview Ave. near Five Mile Road, where it offers 28 cupcake varieties along with Family Ties fudges and brittles. Options include chardonnay- and bourbonflavored brittles, pumpkin butterscotch or eggnog fudge and special-order pies and cheesecakes. Sugar Rush is open 9 a.m.-6 p.m. on weekdays and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on Saturday. For info, call 208-376-1918. —Tara Morgan

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 31


FOOD/CON’T France (the chestnut blight didn’t strike Europe), and the labor-intensive marrons glaces remind her of home. “They take about a week to prepare, and you just slowly add sugar to the syrup [made of water, sugar and fresh vanilla bean] every day,” said Ryan. “You let the chestnuts soak the sugar in, and then you glaze them in the oven.” That final glazing gives marrons glaces its name and creates a sweet crunch to a chestnut confection that may have been created not long after the Crusades brought sugar to France. Once Paul and I stepped out of the rain and into her small warehouse, she told me how to make classic, roasted chestnuts. You can buy a special chestnut roaster, she said, that has a wire mesh clam-shell at one end and a long handle that allows you to hold the roaster over an open fire, a la Nat King Cole. Paul, however, prefers throwing the nuts into a perforated aluminum pan on a barbecue grill heated to about 350 degrees, closing the lid and letting the nuts roast for about 25 minutes. Paul offered me some still-warm roasted chestnuts she’d grilled earlier. After prying one out of its shell and popping it into my mouth, I could understand what a tragedy it must have been for earlier American chestnut lovers to lose their beloved trees to blight and never again be able to savor the sweet, earthy flavor of a freshly roasted chestnut. However, thanks to a new crop of American growers, like the Pauls, that taste no longer has to be just a memory. Before leaving, Paul gave me one last, essential bit of chestnut advice: “You always score a chestnut before cooking it,” she said. “Once in a while I’ve been roasting chestnuts in downtown Boise and forget to score one and it will blow up in a customer’s face, which is very embarrassing.” 31

32 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

FOOD/WINE SIPPER

BEAUJOLAIS, NOT NOUVEAU In Beaujolais, a part of France’s larger Burgundy region, the gamay noir grape, not pinot noir, is king. Almost two-thirds of the world’s gamay is planted there and much of that goes into light and fruity nouveau wines. But there’s more to this region. Village wines using semi-carbonic maceration, where whole grape clusters ferment without being crushed, retain all the charm of nouveau but with more depth of flavor. Wines from the 10 designated crus are another step up. In an outstanding vintage like 2009, Beaujolais offers an appealing richness and exceptional value. Here are the panel’s top picks: 2009 CH. DE LA CHAIZE BROUILLY, $18.99 A cru Beaujolais from the commune of Brouilly, this chateau has a history dating back to the 17th century. Its 2009 vintage offers enticingly complex aromas dominated by deep, dark berry and plum, along with nice hints of anise, chocolate and spice. Round, ripe and delicious, this wine’s red fruit flavors show excellent persistence. Light tannins and balancing acidity come through on the finish. 2009 DOMAINE MANOIR DU CARRA BEAUJOLAIS-VILLAGES, $13.99 Made with grapes from vines between 70 and 100 years old, the aromas on this wine are classic gamay, with bright red fruits highlighted by ripe cranberry and cherry and backed by touches of dried flowers. A few months spent in large, neutral oak barrels add structure to the lively fruit flavors, while a bit of spice comes through on the creamy finish. 2009 JOSEPH DROUHIN BEAUJOLAIS-VILLAGES, $11.99 Drouhin is one of the most-respected Burgundy houses. It brings all of its many talents and expertise to Beaujolais, producing a wine that, while reser ved on the nose, is filled with luscious fruit flavors. Lots of smooth raspberr y and creamy cherr y fruit stand out in this beautifully balanced red, which is colored by hints of dried herb and cedar. This wine is a definite bargain. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


R E A L ES TAT E BW RENTALS 1 BD, view, incld. internet/satellite. $690/mo. New downtown high rise in BODO. 343-5476. EXECUTIVE CONDO 2BD, 1BA. Hardwood flrs., granite, all stainless, cherry cabinets. W/D incl, A/C & electric heat. Walk-up street access. Gated secure parking. HOA inc. Built 2008. $1050/mo. Call Don 8802746. GETAWAYS & GROUP EVENTS! Getaway to Cascade at Birch Glen Lodge & Motel. 27 newly remodeled clean, comfortable rooms with common area lodge, large grassy BBQ area, wireless internet, sauna, billiard table, big screen TV, foosball, air hockey & large parking area for trailers, snowmobiles, and trucks. Route 55 cafe next door provides catering service making Birch Glen the perfect location for group events including wedding receptions, family reunions, church retreats, and more. HOUSE FOR RENT Charming 1BD, 1BR in Nampa near NNU off Powerline. Clean and bright. Includes W/D. No lease, no application fee, no credit check. $495/mo. Call 3330066. NORTH END APARTMENT 1BD in the heart of the North End. Perfect location -2 blocks from Camels Back, 4 from Hyde Park, at the corner of 11th and Ridenbaugh. Cute, clean, quiet, and compact. Hardwood floors, off street parking, garden area. Completely remodeled 4 yrs. ago. W/S/T and hot water paid. Sorry, no smoking or pets. $500/ mo. Deposit $400. Call 841-6808. WALK TO BSU! 3BD, 1.5BA duplex, walk or bike to BSU. 1800 sq. ft., W/D, DW, large living area. All util. paid, only $1100/mo. Available December 1st. Please contact us if interested! 208-761-5890.

BW FOR SALE FOR SALE 5209 Targee #21, 2BD, 1BA. MFH convenient to bus, park, airport, bank freeway, shopping, grocery. Call Deborah 208-484-0752. Only $6500. See virtual tour at www.tourfactory.com/790006

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NORTH END HOME 4 SALE! Bungalow with real historic charm. The house has a wonderful wrap around porch outside and many mature trees. Prime location just blocks from downtown, Hyde Park & foothills. Sold AS-IS. $165,000. ASCENT Boise Real Estate/Katie Rosenberg 208-8416281. NORTH END STYLE This is the house you never thought you could afford. 2112 sq. ft., 3BD, 2BA, 2 car grg., 1932 historic home. Updated, maintained, completely movein ready! This is on the Bench. Check out the website for info and photos. www.2011arcadia. com

BW COMMERCIAL RETAIL SPACE FOR SALE Retail Store front property for sale at 6521 Ustick Rd. Boise, Id. Great buy! Easy Parking, all Glass Store Front, Next to established businesses. Call Dave Bohecker at 208-947-1081. Click on link below for more info! http:// www.loopnet.com/lid/16372493

CA REERS BW HELP WANTED FIRE SPRINKLER FITTERS Looking for an experienced fire sprinkler fitter. Must have experience in sprinkler & pipe fitting for fire sprinkler installations & inspections. Contact 208-232-3640 for more information. STATION FOR LEASE! Plush Hair Lounge has 2 stations available to lease! Rent is only $95/wk & your first 2 weeks are free to move in! Stations are private so you may decorate as you please, have a chair and mirror, and we also provide backbar, towels, and a personal supply cabinet! We are small, super trendy, and have a great, relaxing environment that our clients rave about! Call Crystal if interested 283-7186...and don’t forget to google us to check out our many websites and pictures! FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

SERVICES - HOME

BOISE W E E KLY COMMUNITY BW VOLUNTEERS ROLLER DERBY TRAINER The Treasure Valley Rollergirls are looking for an additional coach/ trainer for the 2012 season. The prospective coach will run practices and drills designed to increase the overall athleticism of TVR. This coach must have experience in playing and or coaching in competitive sports. A derby background is not required. TVR has practices 3 nights/wk. This is a volunteer position. Please submit resume and letter why you should be TVR’s next coach to: tvrgirls@gmail.com Subject Line: Coach/Trainer Application.

BW ANNOUNCEMENTS STOLEN CAR A 1994 VOLVO 840 Wagon. White with a Borah HS Parking sticker on the windshield/drivers side, ID license plate number 1A2T425. If you see this vehicle, please call the Boise Police Department at 208377-6790. Last seen on Michigan St./Ave in Boise. ASAP! All of her school work (yes, everything from her senior year) is also in the car.

BW CLASSES & WORKSHOPS VOLUNTEERS Boise Schools Community Education is seeking volunteer instructors for our WINTER 2012 Session! Our instructors teach a variety of courses at area schools. You can share your passion, hobby, cause or skills with us and give back to the community! If you’d like to learn more, please contact us at 854-4047!

BW LOST LOST CHILDS HAT Joann’s Fabric Store on Milwaukee. Black hat with strip of red with black polka dots, black & white bow on front hat. Made by Bonnie Baby. Very important contact outaboutphotography@ gmail.com LOST KITTY! REWARD! Small black and white long-haired female, 2 yrs, old. Black nose, black splotch on chin, white lightning bolt shape on forehead, white whiskers. Was last seen 12/3/11 in NE Boise, Fort Boise area. If found, please call 830-6607.

BW FOUND FOUND MEMORY CARD At Chili’s on Franklin Road. Tell me what pictures are on it and it’s all yours. 539-0048.

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*SPEND A DAY IN NAMPA*

SERVICES BW CHILD PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois).

Holiday Hair Special at Nina’s A & C Salon. Senior haircuts $10, Sets $12. Inside Village Square, downtown Nampa, 1305 2nd St. South. Call Nina for an appt. 5708526.

OFFICE HOURS Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Out to Lunch 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

BW PROFESSIONAL CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com DIRECT AUTO REPAIR LLC Mobile Service | 1/2 Shop Rate | ASE Master Certified | Visit: DirectAutoRepair.com | Call:477-1059. PERMANENT MAKEUP $50 How would you like to wake up with makeup? Dreaming of fuller looking lips in peach or pale pink and the color never washes off? Want a permanent eyeliner in a color to enhance your natural eye color that doesn’t run into your eyes? Would you like eyebrows that don’t look uneven, bare or wash off in the pool or during exercise? Eyeliner or brows $50, Lipliner $75, Full lips $100. Call Tina 208-890-0003 at Visual Effects Salon & Spa.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

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DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

* Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

BW BEAUTY

RATES

HAIRLINES 409 S. 8th St. Boise. Stop in and talk with Lui The Hair Whisperer. Get a new style for the Holidays! 383-9009.

COMMUNITY

We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER

EDUCATION

Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 33


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B O I S E W E E K LY CUTTIN LOOSE HAIR SALON $5 off any chemical services, $2 off haircuts! Mention this ad. Located at 16472 Franklin Rd, Nampa. 463-4422. Come on in and check us out!

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BW AROMATHERAPY FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy!

BW HEALTH, FITNESS

VAP FOR THE HOLIDAY

510 eCigarette kit is $36.95. It makes a perfect gift for Christmas at Vapoligy, 4935 N. Bradley St., Behind Boise Army Navy Store on Chinden. Call 906-2611 for info or www.vapoligy.com

Check Out: eckankar-idaho.org COME HOME FOR CHRISTMAS Come home to Saint Joseph Reformed Catholic Community. We are an open and affirming community. Our sacraments are valid as described in Cardinal Ratzinger’s (pre-pope) document Dominus Iesus which can be found on the Vatican’s website. Mass is held every Saturday evening at 5pm at Boise First UCC, 2201 Woodlawn Boise. Come home for Christmas and partake in the comfort, peace and welcome of the Reformed Catholic Community of St. Joseph. Contact number is 208-914-5934.

BW MASSAGE A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas. A full body, hot oil massage. In home studio/shower. $45 flat hr. 841-1320. Terrance.

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE Christmas Gift Certificates 3 for $75. Hours 1-10pm, 7 days/wk. by appt. 90 min. for $40. 322 Lake Lowell, Nampa. 283-7830. Betty. ULM 340-8377. Hrs. 8:30AM8PM.

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

THERAPEUTIC MASSAGE

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio.

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MU S IC BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION/OTHER

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231.

FOR SALE BW STUFF 8” DOBSONIAN TELESCOPE 3 Plossl eye pieces, several lens filter set’s, Astronomy Search Software. Owner manual & specs catalog. Asking $325. Paul 465-0498. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $425! 888-1464. GRASS FED LOWLINE ANGUS! Only 1/2 a beef left. www.boguscreeklowlines.com is offering 1/2 steer. All-natural, grass-finished beef. Angus taste, smaller cuts, Omega 3’s. $4/lbs. & wrapped by a reputable local butcher. You give the butcher your specific cut and wrap instructions as far as cuts, package sizes and thickness. No hormones, antibiotics, chemicals used. This is the healthiest beef choice you could make for your family. Available in 2 wks. Please contact 208-8698016 or 208-869-8006.

KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. RETRO DINING TABLE Hey I have a table I need to part with, not using it & can use the money for school. Call or txt 4129677. $350 obo. TREADMILL FOR HOME Reebok 8000C, Model W60130506, can be folded up, 3yrs. old, like new. $300. 939-5642. UNIQUE CHRISTMAS GIFT We are a local beekeeping family & have honey for sale. Our honey is all natural, pure, produced organically, & unfiltered. It tastes amazing compared to the storebought honey! $10/pint, $15/ quart. Call Alex at 208-921-1503, or Katie at 208-409-9473. ATOMIC TREASURES Atomic Treasures 409 S. 8th St. Boise. Celebrate The Holidays and Reuse with an eclectic mix of vintage, retro, art and found objects. Decorative and unique treasures for home, jewelry, books, collectibles. Unusual and Unforgettable Gifts! 208-344-0811. MIJA’S BOUTIQUE FREE shipping for the Holidays! Starting Nov.15. These products make perfect stocking stuffers. mijaboutique09@yahoo.com QUE PASA Thousands of handcrafts from Mexico’s Master Craftsmen. Steel sculptures for the wall at home or office. Sterling silver jewelry, Black pottery, Blown glass, Dragons, Fairies, Mermaids, Furniture and more. 409 S. 8th St. Between Broad & Myrtle Boise.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

BW ART, ANTIQUES & COLLECTABLES

SARA’S FURNITURE

Will pay CASH for furniture. 607 N. Orchard St. Call 322-1622.

4-WHEELS BW AUTO SERVICES CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www. cash4car.com

34 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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NOTICES BW NOTICES ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS Exchange Students from Around the World come to the Treasure Valley in January. Ann Roe, in-

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B OISE W E E KLY

ternational exchange coordinator, is accepting applications for host families for January 2012 through the school year. Learn more about high school exchange at effoundation.org or contact Ann Roe at annwitheffoundation@gmail.com FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy!

BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Julie Layne Long CASE NO. CV NC 1119469 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (adult)

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A Petition to change the name of Julie Layne Long, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Julie Layne Collins. The reason for the change in name is : I am divorced. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Dec. 8, 2011 at the Ada Coun-

ty Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Oct. 24, 2011. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. Nov. 23, 30 Dec. 7, 14 2011. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

PETS BW PETS INDY WE WILL MISS YOU Dear Indigo, You have been a loving neighbor & friend to our family. We will miss looking after you, giving you your pills on peanut butter & wrestling to get you outside when your family is away. Most of all we will simply miss your lovely, gentle face.

ADOPT-A-PET

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

SPUDS: 6-year-old male Lab/rottweiler mix. Good natured and funny. Loves people and other dogs. Knows basic commands. (Kennel 415- #14543053)

JUDE: 8-year-old male Lab. Mild-mannered and friendly. Good with other dogs. Very attentive once he bonds. (Kennel 401- #14575569)

GERTIE: 3-year-old female domestic shorthair. Indoor cat. Litterbox-trained, good with dogs and cats. Talkative. (Kennel 3#5491781)

MACY: 7-year-old female domestic longhair. Litterbox-trained and has lived with other cats. Good with older children. Independent. (Kennel- #14578602)

DAISY: 3-year-old female pit bull mix. Good with dogs and appears housetrained. Mature and gentle. Sits and lies down for a treat. (Kennel 406- #8396830)

STORM: 1-year-old male domestic medium hair cat. Enjoys living with dogs and other cats. Litterbox-trained indoor cat. (Kennel 62#11579228)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

HERCAMER: Quiet and reserved, this gentle cat seeks love.

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SERENA: The perfect blend of sweet and spicy.

S’MORES: I am a staff pick for December. $20 to adopt me.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | 35


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B O I S E W E E K LY BW CHAT LINES

C O N N E C T IO N S E C T IO N BW ENTERTAINMENT

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REPLY TO MAZZAH PARKCENTER I saw your ad. I worked 10/31 and remember saying hi to a person in a red coat. I have red hair, am I the right person? Reply back so we can talk. SPARKS FLEW AT WINCO Saw you at downtown Winco on Monday, Nov. 14 about 10:30am. I feel like I am sleepless in Boise here. You were the tall dark handsome dude in Northface & running gear. Super friendly at the checkout line, so wish I would have found the opportunity & guts to give you my number. Hoping this finds you & you are single. Let’s meet again!

PAPA EAGLE AND BABY BIRD I am very thankful for my 2 Besties. Love you two gooses oh so so much!! Love Mama Bird.

BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. I am a 30+ SWF who is looking for a SM that would like to develop a relationship through writing, talking and visiting. I love boating, skiing, camping, sports and anyone with a great sense of humor! Kerry Beckman #93806 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204.

BW KISSES BW CHAT LINES MAZZAH-PARKCENTER Saw you 10/31. I had the red coat. We said hi. Post another ad so I know you saw this, then we’ll talk.

MY BUTTER BUNS I know we’ve had our ups and downs but you truly are THE ONE and I wouldn’t change a thing. Your the BEST. Love your SWEET CHEEKS.

NYT CROSSWORD | SWAPPING PARTNERS BY KELSEY BLAKLEY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Secretaries, e.g. 6 Modern record holder?

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10 Bucks 15 Take ___ (doze)

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8

24

27

28 31

40

34

54 59

47

55

77

83

84

70

78

80

91

92

102

105

106 114

118 122

115

97

103

107

82

93

96

101

81

86

95

113

75

85

94

50

71

79

90

49

64

74

89

48

61

69

88

18

56

60

73

76

17

36

63

72

100

35

46

53

68

16

26

45

67

15

42

58

99

14

30

41

62

87

13

22

33

52

66

12

29

44

57

11

25

39

51

98

10

21 “The Ten Commandments” role 22 ___ contendere (court plea) 23 Anaïs Nin, e.g.? 25 Seizure at Sing Sing? 27 Title girl in a 1979 Fleetwood Mac hit 28 Reverse 29 Cause for a kid’s grounding 30 Heavenly: Prefix 31 Tech marvel of the 1940s

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19 Dow Jones industrial with the N.Y.S.E. symbol “AA” 20 Cataract site

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33 “Adam-12” call, briefly 34 Pioneering 37 Rice may be served in it 39 Heavenly voice of conscience? 43 Figure in Raphael’s “School of Athens” 45 Going to hell 46 Verbally attack, with “at” 51 Old switch attachment? 52 Wrong 54 Due 56 House of ___ (European dynasty) 57 Sailors’ spars 59 Specialty of a couples therapist? 62 “___ see it my way” (Beatles lyric) 63 Razzed 64 Adams and Falco 65 Israel’s Dayan 68 Dear 71 Capital and largest city of Ghana 72 Gathering of spies 73 Fjord, e.g. 74 Very good, in slang 76 Courtroom jacket? 79 Work in a chamber, say 83 Scrutinizer 84 Prone to acne, say 85 Food item prized in French cuisine 86 De Matteo of “Desperate Housewives” 87 Put right 89 “Yeah, r-i-i-ight!” 92 Hypnotist Franz 94 Circus performer in makeup? 97 Fashion inits. 98 Starts, as a big meal 102 Business partner, often 103 Reciprocal function in trig 105 Very sore 106 Island hopper? 108 No voter 110 Herr’s her 113 Storyteller for Satan? 116 Improvement of a Standardbred’s gait? 118 “The ___ lama, he’s a priest”: Nash

119 Biology lab stain 120 Dense 121 Rend 122 Moolah 123 Prefix with history 124 Gorilla skilled in sign language 125 Kicks back

DOWN 1 Many Little League coaches 2 “Popular Fallacies” writer 3 One starting a stampede, maybe? 4 Much-read collection of verses 5 Suppose 6 Rub with ointment, as in a religious ceremony 7 Skewbald 8 Bread spread 9 Burrow, for some 10 Qualified 11 “___ and the Real Girl” (2007 movie) 12 Up 13 Criminal patterns, briefly 14 Hostess ___ Balls 15 Up in arms 16 “WarGames” grp. 17 “The George & ___ Show” (old talk series) 18 Submarine 24 Dilemma 26 Sets to zero 29 Name sung over and over in a Monty Python skit 32 The last Pope Julius 33 Década divisions 35 Decorative tip on a lace 36 ___-thon (literary event) 37 English channel, familiarly, with “the” 38 Mark’s replacement 40 Counterpart of advertising 41 Antarctica’s ___ Ice Shelf 42 Votary 44 Became discouraged 47 NyQuil targets 48 “Hamlet” courtier 49 Downright 50 Nickname for Theresa

53 “Leather,” in baseball 55 Generous leeway 58 Onetime Procter & Gamble shampoo 59 Churl 60 Be contiguous to 61 Pages (through) 63 Kind of force 65 Corner joint 66 How some sandwiches are made 67 Wallowing sites 69 Cause of a breakdown 70 ___ of Venice 75 Movie genre 77 Element used for shielding nuclear reactors 78 Rank below capt. 79 Möbius strip, e.g. 80 Troops’ harvest? 81 Athletic supporters? 82 Title below marquis 85 Big name in faucets 88 Balcony window 90 “What’s it gonna be?” 91 Whip 93 Some “Men in Black” characters, for short 95 Card game akin to Authors

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96 Time for the balcony scene in “Romeo and Juliet” 98 Managed 99 “The Faerie Queene” character 100 It may punctuate a court order 101 Fence straddler 104 Annual advertising award 107 It may come in buckets 108 First name at Woodstock 109 Barnes & Noble electronic reader 111 Stuck in ___ 112 Tag callers? 114 “Get it?” 115 Bunch 116 Reproachful cluck 117 Mess up Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

O S H I V A B N E H O T N A M E M E R B R I T A I L T H H A N I T M O R S G C O N S T H A T E A T R H Y T T A L E M O E S A R O N S A F S O N F O B N E H E R Y L S O A S T A L N T H E N O S S H A C A U H E M I N I U R E A S T

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SWF, 23 yrs. Old who is currently incarcerated seeking M/F companionship. Dark hair, brown eyes, 5’2”, 130 lbs. Loves to laugh, fast cars and tattoos. Danyaelle Valdez #94149 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. SWF, 40, ISO pen pals. 5’5”, 160 lbs., hazel eyes, light brown hair. Loves to laugh, read, cook and garden. M. Umbaugh #57008 PWCC 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. SWF, blonde hair, 29 yrs. Old ISO correspondence while in prison. Please be funny and energetically entertaining! Naomi Wilson #92216 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. SWF, 35 yrs. Old, 5’4”, 125 lbs., currently incarcerated until 2015. Looking for SM pen pals who enjoy nature, wildlife, spontaneous adventures, philosophy, moral companionship, sincerity with all aspects of life, fun, pranks, laughter and working out. Sandee Cargile #75449 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204.

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SWF, 30 yrs. Old, 5’3”, 170 lbs., looking for SM pen pal. Must be mature, honest, spiritual, intelligent and must have a sense of humor. Also, a open mind and a belief in the inherent goodness of mankind. Anginette Hollis #95095 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. SWF, 32, brown hair and eyes. Seeking friendship, possibly more, to keep me company while I finish my time and when I return to Boise. Any race, age, religion is welcome. Gerilyn Flerchinger #57622 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. My name is Tyler Weaver. I am currently doing a 2-10 year in the ISP for a drug charge. I am a WM, 22, 145 lbs. I enjoy the outdoors. I am a very fun, passionate, genuine person. I would like to fin someone to share letters with and get to know. I have a parole date of 3-9-12 and will be out in less than six months. I don’t know very many people in this area. If interested I can send pics and buy phone time. Tyler Weaver #94312 ICC P3-138A PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707.

45, SWM, 6’1”, 200 lbs., blue eyes, salt and pepper hair, a bit of a poet and romantic. Have made my mistakes and have a different attitude towards life. Would like someone to share with. If you would like to meet an interesting man, please write to Bill Travis #95125 ICC West U21A PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. My name is Raymond Robb. I’m 40 yrs. Old and looking to write a SF for friends or more. I am currently at ISCI. I’m 6’2”, with dishwater blond hair and weigh 210. I like to do a lot of different things indoor and outdoor. I also like to cook. Raymond Robb #81740 ISCI 16-A-51-B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. JUGGALO’S!! If anybody went to the ICP concert and took pic’s and would like to share them, please send them to a locked up Ninja. WHOOP WHOOP! Shaun Butticci #51380 ISCI 13C-66B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I am 37, 5’11”, 170 lbs., blond hair and blue eyes. I am looking for a F for a pen pal. I am a divorced father of two boys. I am in for DUI. Timothy Woodard #37502 SICI N.D. PO Box 8509 Boise, ID 83707.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Jim Moran (1908-1999) called himself a publicist, but I regard him as a pioneer performance artist. At various times in his colorful career, he led a bull through a china shop in New York City, changed horses midstream in Nevada’s Truckee River, and looked for a needle in a haystack until he found it. You might want to draw inspiration from his work in the coming weeks, Aries. You will not only have a knack for mutating cliches and scrambling conventional wisdom, in doing so you could also pull off feats that might seem improbable.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Barney Oldfield (1878-1946) was a pioneer car racer who was the first ever to run a 100-mph lap at the Indianapolis 500. He was a much better driver while setting speed records and beating other cars on racetracks than he was at moseying through regular street traffic. Why? He said he couldn’t think clearly if he was traveling at less than 100 mph. I suspect you may temporarily have a similar quirk, Leo—not in the way you drive, but rather in the way you live, work and play. To achieve maximum lucidity you may have to be moving pretty fast.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): One possible way to tap into the current cosmic opportunities would be to seek out storegasms—the ecstatic feelings released while exercising one’s buyological urges in consumer temples crammed with an obscene abundance of colorful material goods. But I advise you against doing that. It wouldn’t be a very creative solution to the epic yearnings that are welling up in your downbelow-and-deep-inside parts. Instead, I offer a potentially far more satisfying recommendation: Routinely maneuver yourself into positions where your primal self will be filled up with sublime wonder, mysterious beauty and smart love.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Back in August 2010, there was an 11-day traffic snarl on a Chinese highway. At one point, the stuck vehicles stretched for 60 miles and inched along at the rate of one mile per day. In that light, your current jam isn’t so bad. It may be true that your progress has been glacial lately, but at least you’ve had a bed to sleep in and a bathroom to use, which is more than can be said for the stranded Chinese motorists and truck drivers. Plus, I’m predicting that your own personal jam is going to disperse sometime in the next few days. Be prepped and ready to rumble on.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’m not an either-or type of person. I don’t think that there are just two sides to every story and that you have to align yourself with one or the other. That’s one reason why, as an American voter, I reject the idea that I must either sympathize with the goals of the Democratic or Republican party. It’s also why I’m bored by the trumped-up squabble between the atheists and the fundamentalist Christians, and the predictable arguments between dogmatic cynics and fanatical optimists. I urge you to try my approach in the coming weeks, Gemini. Find a third way between any two sides that tend to divide the world into us against them. CANCER (June 21-July 22): No one actually looks like the retouched images of the seemingly perfect people in sexy ads. It’s impossible to be that flawless, with no wrinkles, blemishes and scars. Acknowledging this fact, the iconic supermodel Cindy Crawford once said, “I wish I looked like Cindy Crawford.” Our unconscious inclination to compare ourselves to such unrealistic ideals is the source of a lot of mischief in our lives. Your assignment in the coming week, Cancerian, is to divest yourself, as much as possible, of all standards of perfection that alienate you from yourself or cause you to feel shame about who you really are.

38 | DECEMBER 14–20, 2011 | BOISEweekly

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here’s a joke from Woody Allen’s movie Annie Hall: “Two elderly women are in a Catskills Mountain resort and one of them says: ‘Boy, the food at this place is really terrible.’ The other one says, ‘Yeah, I know—and such small portions.’” Is it possible you’re acting like the second woman, Libra? Are you being influenced to find fault with something you actually kind of like? Are you ignoring your own preferences because you think it might help you to be close to those whose preferences are different? I urge you not to do that in the coming week. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, it’s very important that you know how you feel and stay true to your feelings. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The Los Angeles School District downgraded the role homework plays in the life of its students. Beginning this fall, assignments kids do after school account for only 10 percent of their grade. As far as you’re concerned, Scorpio, that’s not a good trend to follow. I think you should go in the opposite direction. During the enhanced learning phase you’re now entering, your homework will be more important than ever. In order to take full advantage of the educational opportunities that will be flowing your way, you should do lots of research, think hard about what it means, and be very well-prepared. The period between late 2011 and early 2012 is homework time for you.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The Amazon is the second-longest river in the world and has such a voluminous flow that it comprises 20 percent of all river water in the world. And yet there is not a single bridge that crosses it. I love that fact. It comforts and inspires me to know that humans have not conquered this natural wonder. Which leads me to my advice for you this week, Sagittarius. Please consider keeping the wild part of you wild. It’s certainly not at all crucial for you to civilize it. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Emotion is the resource we treasure when we’re young, says poet Naomi Shihab Nye, but eventually what we thrive on even more is energy. “Energy is everything,” she says, “not emotion.” And where does energy come from? Often, from juxtaposition, says Nye. “Rubbing happy and sad together creates energy; rubbing one image against another.” That’s what she loves about being a poet. Her specialty is to conjure magic through juxtaposition. “Our brains are desperate for that kind of energy,” she concludes. I mention this, Capricorn, because the coming weeks will be prime time for you to drum up the vigor and vitality that come from mixing, melding and merging, particularly in unexpected or uncommon ways. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Studies show that if you’re sharing a meal with one other person, you’re likely to eat up to 35 percent more food than if you’re dining alone. If you sit down at the table with four companions, you’ll probably devour 75 percent extra, and if you’re with a party of eight, your consumption may double. As I contemplate your horoscope, these facts give me pause. While I do suspect you will benefit from socializing more intensely and prolifically, I also think it’ll be important to raise your commitment to your own physical health. Can you figure out a way to do both, please? PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “Were it not for the leaping and twinkling of the soul,” said psychologist Carl Jung, “human beings would rot away in their greatest passion, idleness.” To that edgy observation I would add this corollary: One of the greatest and most-secret forms of idleness comes from being endlessly busy at unimportant tasks. If you are way too wrapped up in doing 1,000 little things that have nothing to do with your life’s primary mission, you are, in my opinion, profoundly idle. All the above is prelude for the climactic advice of this week’s horoscope, which goes as follows: Give everything you have to stimulate the leaping and twinkling of your soul.

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