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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 18 OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011

TAK EE E ON E! INSIDE

SNOW Getting ready for the white stuff from mountains to deals to gear NEWS 9

ELECTIONS BEYOND BOISE The race for mayor is on in Eagle and Meridian NEWS 11

ON DEATH ROW Prison prepares for the state’s first execution in almost two decades ARTS 32

AHOY, MATEY Ballet Idaho goes swashbuckling

“It results in an arresting mix of menace and mellifluousness.”

NOISE 28


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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Copy Datatante: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Reporters: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Stephen Foster Stephen@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreader: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Guy Hand, David Kirkpatrick, Andrew Mentzer, Chris Parker, Ted Rall, Greg Simons Interns: Talyn Brumley, Garrett Horstmeyer, Kat Thornton ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Julia Green, Guy Hand, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE THE RETURN OF SNOW For those of us pining for the white stuff, this issue is a combination of buzz and torture at the same time. We’re on the cusp of getting our ski on, and yet the season is still so far away. This issue reinforces the latter. In this year’s edition of Snow, we focus on the ski resorts—from the new lift at Bogus Basin to the improvement projects other area resorts have taken on. The annual Northwest Mountain Guide will help you find the mountain that suits you best, whether it’s the vert, the terrain park or the price that draws you. Speaking of prices ... check out Rec News on Page 36, where you’ll read about some of the seriously sweet deals to be had this season. In non-snow news, we start getting serious about election coverage in this week’s issue. Up this week: the hotly contested Meridian mayoral race and the contentious Eagle mayoral race. Notice we didn’t touch Boise’s mayoral race in this edition. Had we, the headline might have read something like: “What If We Held an Election and Nobody Ran?” Kidding ... more election coverage in next week’s issue. And finally, this is your last reminder from me about this year’s Cover Auction. On Wednesday, Nov. 2, at the Linen Building, we’ll sell the artwork that’s appeared on the covers of Boise Weekly since September 2010. If you’ve been under a rock here’s the deal: Local artists submit their work to BW for the weekly cover. Every November, we auction off a year’s worth of original artwork from those covers, and then turn around and grant the proceeds of the auction back to local artists. This year’s auction starts promptly at 6 p.m. Reserved seating is available in advance for $5. Doors open to ticket holders at 5 p.m. At 5:30 p.m., the doors open to everyone else with a $3 donation. Bring your credit card and stretch out your paddle arm because the competition gets fierce. See the inside four pages of this edition for a preview of the artwork up for auction this year, and let the plotting begin. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Bruce Maurey TITLE: los tres mariachis (youtube.com/ watch?v=VmZ4HlrkboQ) MEDIUM: Acrylic and mixed media on canvas ARTIST STATEMENT: It is time to celebrate the ones we have lost.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

IS THIS JUST FANTASY? What’s the funniest thing on the Internet? William Shatner as God singing Queen. Yeah, WTF, right? Check out the video by scanning the QR code.

DEDICATED TO A GOOD DEAL BW catches up with Dedicated Servers in the newest installment of Scenes from a Scene. Watch the episode and read about the band’s free new album at Cobweb.

NO SOUP FOR YOU! After the AP reported that state legislators close to home were cashing in on a per-diem benefit meant for far-flung lawmakers, one legislator said he intends to curb benefits in the upcoming legislative session.

WHOLE FOODS DIGGIN’ IN After much ado over several years, Whole Foods finally broke ground in Boise. Expect to be able to spend your whole paycheck sometime late next year. Read the full story at Citydesk.

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EDITOR’S NOTE 3 MAIL 6 BILL COPE 7 TED RALL 8 NEWS Meridian’s scrappy mayoral race 9 E-cigs subject to smoking ban 10 Inside the execution chamber 11 CITIZEN 12 FEATURE Alms for the Lift 13 BW PICKS 18 FIND 19 8 DAYS OUT 20 SUDOKU 22 NORTHWEST MOUNTAIN GUIDE 26 NOISE Getting to know Mr. Gnome 28 MUSIC GUIDE 30 ARTS Pirates en pointe 32 SCREEN Margin Call 34 REC Winter biking 36 FOOD In search of heritage apples 40 BEER GUZZLER 42 FOOD REVIEW Shaka Shack 44 CLASSIFIEDS 45 NYT CROSSWORD 48 FREEWILL ASTROLOGY 50

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This play is appropriate for ages 7+

TERTAINMENT AN EN : The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (As Told By Himself)

Oct. 5 29, 2011

tickets: start at $10 phone: 331-9224 x205

MAIL

online: BCTheater.org 854 Fulton St. Downtown Boise, ID

AS A VAMPIRE, I HAVE BEEN GREATLY OFFENDED.”

—Vampy88 (BW, News,“Broadway Bar Noose Sparks Debate,” News, BW, October 19, 2011)

IDAHO ONE OF THREE Registered voters: If you want to add a felony penalty for third convictions of animal abuse and torture—as it is in every state except Idaho, North Dakota and South Dakota—there are petitions to be signed at ArtSmith on Vista Avenue, the Doghouse on Franklin Boulevard, Simply Cats, Eastgate Vet, idaho1of3. org and more places. Please take the time to sign a petition if you are a registered voter. —Cheryl Magni, Boise

SENIOR SQUEEZE I am paying almost $250 per month for Medicare Advantage, just for me. I know a retired federal employee who is paying $250 per month for family coverage—husband and wife. Congress wants to raise the premium for current Medicare recipients. I paid into Medicare when I was working. In addition to this, I paid high federal taxes. I can’t afford an increase in my premium. The federal government wastes tax dollars right and left, then wants to cut Social Security and Medicare on older Americans who will have a hard time finding work to supplement their income. Here are just two examples of waste and there are a lot more: 1) The

United States dollar gives millions of dollars every year to foreign countries to combat child labor. This should be done by charitable organizations, not U.S. tax dollars. 2) The Social Security Administration sent out millions of dollars in Social Security checks to dead people. How does this happen? —Judy Ford, Boise

JEALOUSY: OPIUM OF THE MASSES Karl Marx said that religion is the opiate of the masses. He was wrong, of course, the real opiate of the masses is jealousy, which those in power use to vilify the very wealthy, and thus get support from the “have-nots.” Those in power (the Obama administration), including sycophants, such as Michael Moore and Al Gore, are very wealthy themselves. Do you think they want their wealth redistributed? I think not. —Bill Place, Meridian

BIZ MAN ROMNEY Remember the “house flippers”? They provided some equity, took out a big mortgage and bought a house. They fixed it up a little. Then they sold the house, paid back the mortgage and kept all the increase in equity value. This

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

worked really well when credit was easy and home prices went up, up and up. Do you know about the “company flippers”? They provided some equity, took out a big loan and bought a corporation. They fixed it up a little. Then they sold the company, paid back the loan, and kept all the increase in equity. This worked really well when credit was easy and stock prices went up, up and up. It’s called a leveraged buyout. It’s how Mitt Romney made his fortune. Romney is as much a businessman as a house flipper is a carpenter. —Chuck Castlewood, Boise

ON CRIME AND PUNISHMENT On Boise Weekly’s Facebook page, readers recently posted opinions on the death penalty as Idaho readies for its first execution in 17 years. The following comments are selections from that discussion. “Smoke ’em if you got ’em.” —Aaron Sheehan “We murder them for murdering someone else, doesn’t make sense to me.” —Stacie Aspiazu “Just in time! One less turkey leg for the prison to buy!” —Chris Olsen

CORRECTION In last week’s News section, Laurie Pearman should have been credited as the photographer on Page 9. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


BILL COPE/OPINION

CONSTITUTION REBOOT 5 Bob, Red and the Sacrosanct Second

The freedom of expression, but if you know that what you intend to express is a f***ing lie, you’d better say that from the get-go, Buster; The freedom of worship, as long as you don’t get up in other peoples’ faces with your goofy religious s***; The freedom from want, and that means not starving to death or living in a cardboard box while the Wall Street types are eating truffle-flavored caviar and living in Taj Mahal knock-offs from the bonuses they make by swindling you out of your money; The freedom from fear, and the worst fear of all is leaving your family to live in a cardboard box after you sell off every asset you ever accumulated for a tiny fraction of what it will cost to fight your cancer, but you have no choice, since your insurance was pulled as soon as your motherf***ing insurer found out you were sick; The freedom not to be shot dead by halfwits, demented creeps and/or crazed ideologues, none of whom seem to have any trouble getting hold of a gun these days, thanks to the half-wits, demented creeps and crazed ideologues in Congress and the NRA killers who own them. —Excerpted from “Badger” Bob Berzerquierre’s “37 Freedoms,” a reworking of Franklin Roosevelt’s famous “Four Freedoms” speech. U I was loading up the last of it when I heard Cope whining to that hillbilly friend of his: “Red, don’t go down there. Really, that’s a bad idea. Aw Jeez, this isn’t good.” Then the two of them come stomping down the stairs, one after the other. Cope looked like someone who wasn’t sure he’d get to the toilet in time, and the hillbilly looked like he was chewing on something that wouldn’t hold still. “Mister Badger Bob, I got a hair to spit with you!” “And a good morning to you, too, Mister Red. Been a while. What you been up to? Read any good books lately? Seen any good movies? Or are you still putting all your efforts into being the best damn ignoramus you can be?” “Tells ya’ what, Mister … one thing I ain’t been doing is blasphemizing up the holy Constitution with all sorts of pinko flapadoodle!” “Gee whiz, Red, that isn’t fair. Bob’s no pinko, are you, Bob? And not everything he put into his Constitution is flapadoo …” “Cope, I can speak for myself. So tell me, Red, what is it specifically you object to? Not that I give a s***.” “Wull gull durnit, I ain’t got nothing specifical in mind. Fact is, I ain’t actually read none of your re-writin’. But I know how our gun rights is always bein’ attacked WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

by elitismists. And since I knows you to be a dang elitismist by your own admission, I figured sooner or later, you’d be messing with what my favorite blog spot calls ‘The Sacrosanct Second.’” Cope asked him, “What blog is that, Red?” “That’d be the Gun Nuts United website, what they call the ‘GNUS News.’ So Badger, have you started messing with my Second?” “I’m done with it, Red. I started on your damn amendment the day after one of the many massacres we’ve seen this year ... or did you notice? Pull up a stool and let me read you the first sentence.” “Bob, uh, that’s probably not a great idea. I mean, Red has things to do, I’m sure. Don’t you, Red? And you and I have to get this stuff over to your ...” “Relax, Billy boy. Just one sentence, then I’ll get back to moving.” “‘At’s right, Cope. ’Sides, I ain’t got nothing more important to do than protecting my right to tote a gun whenever and wherever I gull durn feel like it!” “OK, you ready? Are you listening? Here goes: ‘A well-regulated militia, along with a clear and unscrew-upable definition of what a damn militia is, shall not be infringed, being necessary to secure a free state and livable society from the a**hole gun deviants and the evil, greedy, lying scum at the National Rifle Association who insist that some cretin’s right to keep and bear arms on college campuses, bar stools, federal parks and even on his flabby butt when he goes to Starbucks for coffee takes privilege over any innocent bystander’s right not to be blown away during a macho pissing match, a domestic disturbance or a workplace dispute with a souped-up, semi-automatic peopleslaughtering device that no sane society would allow to be manufactured, sold or owned, particularly by the sort of twisted moron who would want to own one.’ There it is, Red, What do you think?” “That’s just one sentence?” “From there, I go on to define how that gun you keep around to defend yourself and your family with is in reality the biggest threat either you and your family are apt to come across in this lifetime. Say, Red, did you hear about the 3-year-old that shot his little brother last week? Yeah, happened over in Rupert. Then there’s that U of I student cut down by a perv with a permit, and a 10-year-old dead from ...” “You ain’t fightin’ fair, Mister. Them stories about chil’run getting all shot dead ain’t got nothing to do with my liberties.” “You keep telling yourself that, pal. But you might want to throw in a prayer now and then that you never have to bury one of your own.” To be continued ... will this never end!

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OPINION/TED RALL

OWS MUST GROW

We can change everything with more participation As I saw at Stop The Machine/OccupyDC, there is an split between revolutionaries and reformists. Typical of the reformists: This week, OWSers urged sympathizers to close their accounts with big banks like Citibank and Bank of America and move their savings to credit unions and local savings and loans. If revolutionaries get their way, there will be no banks. Or one, owned by the people. There is no immediate rush, nor should there be, to issue demands. The horizontal democracy format of the Occupy movement’s general assemblies is less about getting things done than giving voices to the voiceless. At some point down the road, however, the movement will come to a big ideological fork: Do they try to fix the system or tear it down? The OWSers don’t have to choose between reform and revolution right away— but they can’t wait too long. You can’t make coherent demands until you can frame them into a consistent narrative. What you ultimately want determines what you ask for in the time being—and how you ask for it. If the Occupiers choose the bold path of revolution, they’ll alienate moderates and liberals. The state will become more repressive. On the other hand, reformism is naive. The system is plainly broken beyond repair. Trying to push for legislation and working with establishment progressives will inevitably lead to co-option, absorption by big-money Democrats and their liberal allies and irrelevance. Revolution means violence in the streets. Reform means failure and the continued, slow-grinding violence by the corporate state: poverty, repression, injustice.

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At this point, job one for the movement is to grow. I don’t mean more Facebook pages or adding more cities. The day-to-day occupations on the ground need to get bigger, fast. The bigger the occupations, the harder they will be for the police to dislodge. More than 42 percent of Americans do not work. Not even part-time. Tens of millions of people, with free time and nothing better to do, are watching the news about the Occupy movement. The Occupiers must convince many of these people to join them. Why aren’t more unemployed, underemployed, uninsured and generally screwedover Americans joining the Occupy movement? Protesters should make it clear that they are fighting for everyone in “the 99 percent” who aren’t represented by the two major parties and their compliant media. OWSers must broaden their appeal. Many of the Occupiers are in their 20s. The media often quotes them complaining about their student loans. They’re right to be angry. But it’s not about them. It’s about us. The Occupy movement will expand when it appeals to tens of millions of ordinary people sitting in homes for which they can’t pay the rent or the mortgage. People with no jobs. Occupy needs those men and women to look at the Occupiers on TV and think to themselves: “They’re fighting for me. Unless I join them, they might fail.” For the first time in 40 years, we have the chance to change everything. To end gangster capitalism. To jail the corporate and political criminals who have ruined our lives. To save what’s left of our planet. The movement must grow. Nothing matters more.

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NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS

A RACE TO THE TOP IN MERIDIAN Five candidates vie to run Idaho’s third-largest city GEORGE PRENTICE

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jobs or create businesses. It is there to clear obstacles, so that businesses can survive.” De Weerd countered by pointing to what she called her impressive jobs record. “In eight years, we added 12,000 jobs,” said the mayor. “Are we perfect? No. But we continue to build solid relationships between the city and businesses.” The forum was cordial and well behaved, at least among the candidates. Republican Sen. Shirley McKague, representing Meridian’s Legislative District 20, had to be shushed repeatedly through the

event because of a louder-than-a-whisper commentary to her table mates. Strategically, McKague only talked as de Weerd was speaking. When Sweet spoke, she listened attentively and led the applause. McKague proudly sported a “Sweet for Mayor” button. “I wish I could have been [at the forum], I honestly do,” said Lisa Paternoster, a fourth mayoral candidate. “I told the organizers that I would definitely do my best to be there but I had an important family event.” Paternoster, 43, a marriage and family counselor with the Genesis Counseling and Psychological Center, told BW that she was still anxious to get her message out to Meridian voters in the final two weeks of the campaign. “Hope is a precious commodity, and I know that may sound cheesy, but I want to give people hope,” said Paternoster. “They need to hope that things are going to get better. Meridian needs more trust in its government right now, and I honestly haven’t heard that as a focus from any other candidate.” Paternoster said she took pride in not being flashy or political. “You know those people who show up in class but didn’t study for the test, but they get by because they wing it? I’ve never been that girl. I’m analytical. I like to have all the information,” she said. “I’m not a winger.” Randy Pew, a fifth contender, said his motivation to run for mayor was simple. “I didn’t want Tammy de Weerd to run unopposed.” Pew, 56, owner of Mountainaire Research and a seasonal soccer referee, told BW he’s not an aggressive campaigner. “I have a zero budget. You won’t find any signs with my name on them,” said Pew. “I’m not buying votes, basically.” Conceding that his chances of winning are slim, at best, Pew said he’s not entirely opposed to endorsing another candidate. “That’s a distinct possibility,” said Pew. “I spoke to Mr. Sweet, but, believe me, my campaign is not coming anywhere near in interrupting his campaign. He’s spending an extensive amount of money. “What’s the chance of me endorsing someone else? Fair to medium. I’m thinking about it,” said Pew. B EN W ILSON

Meridian is at a crossroads but it depends which side of the road you stand on. Take the intersection of Eagle and Overland roads as an example. To the north, cattle slowly graze in an open field not more than a cow patty’s throw from Interstate 84. To the south, an endless string of strip malls promises everything from a quick loan to even faster food. It was more than appropriate for a hotel on the southwest corner of Eagle and Overland roads to be the site for an Oct. 18 gathering of the men and women who want to lord over the people (and possibly the cows) of Idaho’s fastest-growing urban/rural community. The 2010 Census showed Meridian’s population at 75,092, representing an 81.5 percent increase since 2000. Meridian recently surpassed Pocatello and Idaho Falls to become Idaho’s third-largest city. Meridian residents who filled the Courtyard by Marriott’s ballroom represented a microcosm of the community as trucker caps and Levi’s shared lunchtime tables with pinstripes and Florsheims. The 200-plus attendees were all too anxious to hear from the five candidates who want to be Meridian’s mayor but only three were present: incumbent Tammy de Weerd, 52, the two-term mayor and former member of the Meridian City Council and the city’s planning and zoning and parks commissions; Gerry Sweet, 54, former Republican state senator and former staffer for Republican Rep. Bill Sali; and Jason Monks, 43, owner of The Blind Gallery and Valley Medical and proud non-politician. Sweet immediately wanted attendees to know of his political influences (though party affiliations traditionally have no place in a mayoral election). “I’m a conservative Republican,” he said. Just in case anyone missed it, he would repeat the line twice in the next 45 minutes. “I believe in less government, lower taxes and promoting family values.” De Weerd and Monks kept their “family values” comments limited to introductions of their relatives. “I like Mayor de Weerd. I like this guy,” said Monks, pointing to Sweet. “But if you think I’m going to support either of them, you’re wrong. I believe that government is not there to create

EAGLE’S EYE ON ITS NEXT MAYOR Jim Weatherby, Idaho’s elder statesman of all-things political, said if you’re an election wonk like him, you need not look any further than Eagle. “Thank goodness for Eagle, Idaho,” said Weatherby, kicking off an Oct. 11 candidates forum sponsored by the Eagle Chamber of Commerce. “What more could you ask for? Three races and 10 candidates.” While two open seats on Eagle’s City Council have attracted no fewer than eight contenders, most of the attention in the evergrowing city (population: 19,908) has focused on the race for mayor. Eagle’s last elected mayor, Phil Bandy, abruptly resigned in March 2010, citing communication frustrations and insufficient compensation. City Hall reeled for the better part of seven months until the City Council appointed Jim Reynolds, 72, a retired U.S. Air Force pilot, to take over as mayor. One of the council members who voted for Reynolds was, ironically, Norm Semanko, who now wants to show Reynolds the door. “We had a mayor under siege at that time, and we needed an acting mayor,” said Semanko. “Yes, I voted for Jim Reynolds. He’s been a good interim mayor. But this is about the next four years.” Semanko, 44, knows quite a bit about running a campaign, for himself or for anyone else, for that matter. He has been the chairman of the Idaho Republican Party since 2008, right about the same time he was elected to the Eagle City Council. While Semanko takes a back seat to no one with his campaign prowess, Reynolds had zero political experience before taking over as Eagle’s mayor. “My friends said, ‘You have to be crazy,’” Reynolds remembered. “But where others saw animosity, I saw a city in search of itself.” Reynolds said since he settled into Eagle’s nest, the city staff now has a “probusiness approach, looking for new collaborative solutions.” Semanko begged to disagree. “City Hall isn’t business-friendly,” said Semanko. “As a matter of fact, the City Council recently raised business fees over my objections. We have to repeal those fees as soon as possible. If we don’t keep the businesses we have now, we’ll have nothing.” Reynolds said the city’s working relationships with businesses begins at the threshold of his City Hall office. “And that door is always open,” said Reynolds. “If it’s ever closed, it’s because someone else closed it.” The interim mayor said he’s particularly encouraged by Eagle’s post-recession growth. “And our growth is going west; that’s ver y positive. Businesses need to be on the edge of our city, rather than in the middle of it,” said Reynolds. “We need the balance of a small-town atmosphere with significant growth.” Semanko said there’s one place where Eagle needed no growth whatsoever: at City Hall. “I’m for limited government,” said Semanko. “We seem to end up spending a lot of time talking. There are too many meetings. I’m sick and tired of talking. We need to pick three or four things and get those things done.” —George Prentice

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 9


NEWS ANDR EW C R IS P

This e-cigarette, sold by Vapoligy in Garden City, is a miniature vaporizer.

NO-SMOKING RULES SEND E-CIGARETTES UP IN SMOKE Proposed ordinances won’t allow ‘vaping’ ANDREW CRISP category as nicotine inhalers and gum—cesJim Longden held a black tube, about the sation devices. However, an appeals court size and width of a large Sharpie marker, decided otherwise, lumping them in with with a gold ring connecting the two halves. tobacco products. Periodically placing the end to his lips and The product’s first retailers marketed depressing a small plastic button with his e-cigarettes largely online, with flavored thumb, he breathed deeply, then exhaled a cartridges. The FDA found diethylene—not dissipating cloud. propylene—glycol in the cartridges, as well The “smoke” smelled sweet. According as carcinogens. Longden’s vaporizers don’t to Longden, the owner of Vapoligy at 4935 use cartridges. N. Bradley St. in Garden City, that’s the The American Association of Public Health propylene glycol, the sugary-clear liquid he combines with liquid nicotine, called “niquid.” Physicians has officially stated that e-cigarettes could help smokers reduce their health In essence, the cigarette-like object Longden risks by 98 percent. But Health Canada issued “smokes” from is a miniature vaporizer and an advisory against them, and King County, the smoking is called vaping. Niquid is inserted into the end of the device Wash., outlawed their use in public areas. King County’s ordinances are considered the and a heating element turns the liquid into toughest regulations in the nation. steam, which the user inhales. If the Boise City Council passes pro“It’s no different than the hot water heater posed smoke-free ordinances as written, in your bathroom,” he said. e-cigarettes would also be banned from For Longden, the e-cigarette keeps him bars, any indoor place with employees and from smoking the real thing. Before he parks, with the exception of limited found e-cigarettes, he smoked four smoking areas. packs a day. But he developed a Boise City Council Member T.J. racking cough and doctors told him Thomson told BW that a proposed he had to quit. Traditional tobacco exemption for e-cigarettes was cessation devices didn’t help him. removed to make enforcement easier. “None of them really attack the The worry, said Thomson, was that problem. The problem that almost Scan this QR e-cigarettes would look too similar any smoker will tell you is they code to watch a to real ones. need something to do with their video report on Longden said most people don’t hands,” said Longden. e-cigarettes. confuse his devices with cigarettes. He The appeal of the e-cigarette is said even ex-smokers with sensitive in its form. Smokers can purchase an electronic version that looks just like the noses don’t mistake the steam from his cigarette for the real deal. paper variety. They can blend in with their “I sell absolutely nothing that’s tobacco social group, still get the nicotine and have based,” said Longden, puffing at a cigar-flasomething to do with their hands. “Otherwise, they start grabbing M&Ms or vored niquid. “I’ve vaped going through secugummy bears or whatever is nearby,” he said. rity at the airport, on the airplane, in schools, in restaurants—you name it. I’ve vaped The Food and Drug Administration in almost everywhere known to man.” 2010 classified e-cigarettes in the same

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NEWS

PREPARING FOR DEATH IDOC has tight schedule leading up to execution GEORGE PRENTICE

COURTESY DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTION

with our partners from a security standpoint, Idahoans got their first glimpse of F Block in the Idaho Maximum Security Institution when there will certainly be expenses. We’re already doing some tabletop exercises with the Idaho boiseweekly.com published its photograph on State Police, the Idaho Guard, Boise Police and Oct. 20. On Friday, Nov. 18, convicted rapist and murderer Paul Rhoades is slated to get his Kuna Fire. They’re all involved. first, and last, look at the execution chamber. Will a team of physicians be a part of the Brent Reinke, the man in charge of execution process? Rhoades’ execution, in addition to managing There will be an escort team, a medical 6,700 other inmates in more than a dozen team and an injection team. The identities of facilities, has been preparing for the fateful those teams will all remain concealed. procedure for more than a year. This will be Reinke’s first Can you speak professional to maintaining an involvement in an appropriate, strucexecution. He has tured environment been director of for your staff and the Idaho Departinmates over the ment of Correcnext few weeks? tion since 2007. If We’re conRhoades is indeed cerned about our put to death on inmate populaNov. 18, his will tion, but above all, be the first Idaho we’re concerned execution since about our staff 1994 and only the because of the second since 1957. professionalism BW sat down that they have with Reinke and will need to to talk about maintain. We’re Rhoades and the Idaho’s state-of-the-art execution chamber in F Block. drafting a message detailed schedule for our inmate leading up to population on the anticipated what kind of disruptions they can expect, execution. especially when we are within the 24-hour This extraordinary event is certainly outside window to the event. We want to keep as minimal an interruption to our inmate popuof your day-to-day operations. lation as we can. And we understand that I first met with Gov. [C.L. “Butch”] Otthey’re no different than those on the outside ter a year ago, and we were looking at the of the fence in wanting to know what’s going possibility of being here today. We wanted to on. The thing we’re letting our staff know is make sure as we moved forward that we had an execution chamber that encompassed three that this is not about us. We’ve got to focus on the victims. We’ve got to focus on making areas—professionalism, respect and dignity. sure that what the juries found, and what the court has ordered, be carried out to the best of What does that mean? our ability with professionalism, respect and a It’s a state-of-the-art execution chamber. dignified fashion. We spent some time with a number of our staff involved in the 1994 execution. We’re What do you know about Rhoades? concerned about lessons learned from them, A fair amount. Our warden has been and we’ve been watching the United States Supreme Court, particularly regarding cases in working with him very intently. He’s in the F Block holding cell now. We’re going to treat Arizona and Washington where they recently him with as much dignity as we can, knowing conducted executions. As we move forward, the future. everything will be covered—as we move from 14 days to seven days, down to 24 hours, 12 How would you characterize his behavior hours and the event itself. since he has been behind bars? The feedback I have received from staff Is there an expense to this event? is that, at times, he has good days and he Of course there is. has bad days, as do many of our individuals on Death Row. But at this point, I’m not Do you have a sense of what that expense equipped to speak to his character or how he’s will be? addressing the past. We’ll know when we’re done. As we work WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 11


CITIZEN

KURT ZWOLFER A day for the dead with an abundance of life GEORGE PRENTICE

How many people visited the Dias de los Muertos exhibit last year? We had about 2,000 people in five days, which is great for an event that we, honestly, planned at the last minute. About a month prior to the event, the Mexican Consulate asked us to put an altar in the lobby. We ended up doing a few more. We thought we would get some response, but the night of Dias de los Muertos [Nov. 2], people kept coming and coming. We knew that night that this would be something that would become an annual event. How much bigger will this year’s event be? We have expanded it to two weeks instead of one, and the altars will be much more elaborate and larger. When you give an artist several months, they can come up with a pretty significant project. And these altars traditionally honor someone or something. Dia de los Muertos is kind of a combination of pre-Christian belief—maybe going back to the Aztecs—and a time when Christianity came in with the Spaniards. Like many religions, it borrows from multiple eras. There is one day, the day after All Saints Day, when the spirits return to be with the ones they love. All over Mexico and Central

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America, altars are set up, usually to a family member but also to friends. People put pictures on the altars, along with favorite food, alcohol and flowers. In a lot of houses, they have a trail of marigold petals leading from the front door to the altar, because the spirits are attuned to marigolds. Will any of the altars at the museum have perishable items? A lot of the main items that go on an altar are things you’re never supposed to have in a museum—flowers, flames and food. But this is a festival of life. Anglo cultures usually attach solemnity to the dead, so this is very new for many. Essentially you’re having a celebration around somebody who died. To us death is always considered an occasion where you mourn for a day or weeks or months, but then you try to get it out of your mind and forget about it. In my opinion, Dias de los Muertos is a much healthier attitude. And I think a historical museum is all about memory. So this is a way to celebrate your ancestors and friends. The colors in many of these displays are so vibrant. Almost gaudy in their brightness. We think of a funeral and we think of wearing black. Here it’s the complete opposite. The colors are almost electric. We have one particular altar from a folk artist in Nyssa, [Ore.]. It will be particularly meaningful. Her granddaughter just passed away a few weeks ago. Her name is Sachi, which means flower in Aztec. This altar is in her memory. It is a pillar with flowers that have been dipped in wax, but then we have about 500 to 600 spectacularly colored paper flowers that have been made by school kids

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Growing up near Chicago, Kurt Zwolfer had never heard of Dia de los Muertos. Now he’s the curator of a Day of the Dead exhibit at the Idaho State Historical Museum, where he works as an education specialist. Up to 13,000 Idaho school children walk through the doors of the museum each year, many to participate in the programs that Zwolfer oversees, but he says this year’s Dias de los Muertos exhibit is, strangely enough, life affirming.

at Whitney Elementary and Sage Elementary. All of their flowers will become a long river of color flowing from the pillar. Additionally, we have work from school kids at Foothills Elementary. They crafted some beautiful hanging banners—papel picado, which means cut paper. People might think twice about bringing children to a festival marking death. It’s the complete opposite. Even though Dia de los Muertos is the return of the dead, it’s truly a festival of life. The kids love it. There’s a lot of energy. There’s a good chance that this might be the first time many people visit the museum. I hate to say this, but the museum, for many years, has been a very static place. Some of the exhibits have been here since the 1960s and for good reason. They’re beloved. We’ll never change our role of being Idaho’s collective memory, but our hope is to build a sense of community through shared experience. I know this is your job, but have you had moments of reflections of friends or families that you miss most? Certainly. Everyone knows the big bar in our museum. We’re turning the bar into a large altar, where people can bring pictures of family members or friends. I brought some pictures of my own. I’m remembering a friend from college who passed and my grandparents.

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AlmsLift FOR THE

BOGUS BASIN’S NON-PROFIT SKI MODEL STANDS ALONE by Greg Simons

s the autumn morning sun was still warming the Boise Foothills, a low, droning sound echoed across the hills. Slowly a massive helicopter rose into view, supporting an even more massive metal tower beneath its hovering bulk. Gradually, with pinpoint precision, the tower was maneuvered up the mountain and lowered inch by inch to a crew waiting to permanently anchor the tower in its new home. While a group of local media huddled on a ridge overlooking the scene, the newest, and much anticipated addition to Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, began to take shape. The Superior lift was being reborn as a $5 million high-speed quad, with the capacity to carry twice the number of skiers and boarders to the top of the hill in half the time of its predecessor.

A

AD AM RO SENLUND

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L A U R IE P E A R M A

and we’re borrowing $4 million through Though the addition of a new lift is a big a Home Federal Bank loan,” said Mike deal for any resort, the way this lift became Shirley, Bogus Basin general manager. a reality busts the traditional ski-area model. To date, approximately $850,000 of the Where most resorts would have set aside $1 million goal has been raised, and the funds each year and eventually taken out a remaining gap is closing daily. The lead loan for such a massive capital-improvement donation was $500,000 from the J.A. and project, Bogus Basin turned to the public. Kathryn Albertson Foundation, From a front-page feature on the with George and Bev Haresort’s website to donation rad contributing an adboxes at the base of the ditional $100,000. hill to a text message Bogus’ status donation system, as a nonprofit Bogus is taking traces its every advanorigin back tage of a to 1942, status that when a is rare in group of the indusdie-hard try—Boskiers gus is a decided nonto create profit. a resort. DeThey esspite Botablished gus being the Bogus a major Basin highlight of Recreational winter life in Association, the Treasure and this ownerValley, its status ship structure has as a nonprofit isn’t weathered the last widely known by 70 years. the public. But it’s that The association is status that has allowed the comprised of 50 members resort to approach business and elects a 12-person in ways usually not board of directors. found in an industry That board apthat is dependent points the genon both the eral manager, weather and a position the willingresponsible ness of for hirskiers and ing the snowstaff to boarders run the to fork resort, out cash which for lift generally tickets. numWhen is bers 100 the last to 120 time you during the were able winter. to text a Nonprofit $10 donation resorts can be to help you get found in other to fresh powder areas, but in most faster? (Text the mescases they are run as a sage BOGUS to 20222 if branch of a municipality. you’re interested.) In the case of Bogus Basin, From the convenienceA helicopter was used Boise and the other neighstore-counter-style donation to move the massive boring cities do not have boxes mountain bikers and towers of Bogus Basin’s Superior lift into place input into its operations, hikers found at the base of the earlier this fall. making it one-of-a-kind hill throughout the summer to even among the subpopulaan official campaign dubbed tion of nonprofit ski areas. “Make 2011 a Superior SumThe thought of converting mer,” Bogus Basin officials had to a for-profit business has never really a clear picture of not only how much they been pursued by Bogus’ leadership, even needed, but how they would get it. though some resorts in the industry have The expense of a new lift is significant for any resort but especially for one the size been sold to real estate investment trusts and then leased back to the groups responof Bogus Basin. With an annual budget of sible for running the resorts. around $10 million, taking on the $5 mil“Nonprofit is the best way for Bogus lion lift project has been a major undertakBasin to be operating. I will always ask my ing. friends to contribute to Bogus Basin, but “We’re targeting $1 million in equity never to invest,” Shirley said. toward the $5 million [cost of the lift], N

L A U R IE P E A R M A N

Boise’s Only e r o t S y t l ia ec p S i k S Since 1957 SALES

RENTALS

LEASING

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www.GreenwoodsSkiHaus.com #2400 Bogus Basin Rd. #342.6808 Expires Oct. 31., 2010 14 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 15


COURTESY BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN

In search of fresh tracks at Brundage Mountain.

BUILDING A MOUNTAIN It may seem like all operators of ski areas have to do is be able to pull off a really good snow dance and watch the skies, but it takes a whole lot of the cold stuff—cash, that is—to keep a resor t running and drawing in the skiers. Bogus Basin’s new high-speed quad lift has captured all the attention this year, but here are the big improvements area resor ts have invested in recently. SUN VALLEY RESORT This year, the resor t is dropping some cash building new runs, including six new kids adventure trails and adding 30 acres of glade skiing on Baldy. It’s also moving the half pipe from Warm Springs to Dollar Mountain and adding 20 more rails to the terrain park. It’s a serious investment considering that moving to Dollar means using city water to make snow for the half pipe. Two years ago, the resor t put in the new gondola linking River Run and Roundhouse at a cost of more than $10 million. BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN RESORT Brundage in McCall is in the middle of remodeling the second floor of its main lodge, adding 100 square feet for guests to stretch out in. It also dropped roughly $600,000 on two new groomers to keep runs in tip-top shape. The resor t installed two sixth-grip triple chairs—the Bear Chair and the Lakeview Lift—for the 2007-2008 season. The roughly $3 million price tag opened an additional 160 acres of skiable terrain. SOLDIER MOUNTAIN Sun Valley’s kid sister was forced to make some major capital improvements after a fire destroyed the main lodge in March 2009. The area has built a new lodge for roughly $800,000, which opened in Januar y 2010. This summer, work was completed on a 10,000-gallon water tank for the lodge, coming in at a price of roughly $250,000. POMERELLE This family-owned ski area is always up to something, even if it isn’t obvious to visitors. Most recently, area owners invested in new snowmaking equipment, spreading the purchases out over several years. TAMARACK RESORT Considering Tamarack’s sordid history, the fact that it opened to skiing last year is a decided check mark in the improvement category. —Deanna Darr

16 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

The resistance to becoming for-profit is centered primarily on the fact that the resort is a capital investment that is only used for about three months each year. There are biking and hiking trails and a disc golf course that are used during the off months, but the vast majority of revenue enters the coffers during the winter, while Bogus treads water—at best—the rest of the year. The fact that the resort depends on natural snowfall, which can vary greatly between years, has minimal snow-making capabilities, and the uncertainty of when a season will begin and end all combine to limit Bogus Basin’s revenue-generating ability, which makes a long-term financial commitment all but untenable for potential investors. Additionally, there would be statutory problems with selling the resort to a for-profit enterprise. The legal process would be cumbersome and complicated, and Shirley and the board of directors have no desire to go that route. Of course, there are some financial benefits to being a nonprofit as well. “We don’t pay any income taxes,” said Shirley, adding that any income typically would be written off as depreciation of the equipment. “We don’t pay any property taxes, and we can raise tax-deductible contributions for capital improvements.” That last point has been the impetus for Bogus Basin’s fund-raising campaign, because the resort changed from a 501(c) (4) to a 501(c)(3) organization in 2005, which paved the way for Bogus to accept contributions that donors could write off on their taxes. According to National Ski Areas Association President Michael Berry, Bogus is a standout in the industry. “Bogus’ situation is somewhat unique in that their setup allows for tax-deductible charitable contributions. It was a unique asset in a unique situation with a unique amount of support. It allows for a high degree of community involvement. There are no parallel examples, though others have looked at it,” Berry said. The process of making resort improvements is vastly different at Idaho’s most well-known resort, Sun Valley, where all major projects are self-funded. Basically if the money is there and the upgrade makes sense—as was the case two years ago when a new gondola was installed—they will invest in the change, according to Jack Sibbach, Sun Valley marketing manager. It’s much the same story in nearby Jackson Hole, Wyo., where the area’s largest ski hill, the Jackson Hole Mountain Resort, is owned in whole by the Kemmerer family. JHMR Marketing Coordinator Anna Cole said the resort typically takes out traditional bank loans to pay for significant upgrades, including the recent replacement of the resort’s famed aerial tram, which can carry 100 passengers. It was constructed three years ago at a cost of $32 million. This summer’s improvements totaled $4.5 million. Bogus’ modification of its nonprofit status has emboldened officials to market the resort in a different way, strongly emphasizing the connection between the resort and the community and the direct WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


should be next for completion. Shirley pointed out that the new Supe“Chair 3 was an equal priority for rior lift is just one component of a folks, along with redeveloplong-term master develment of the Simplot base opment plan Bogus area and redevelopBasin put together ment of the begin15 years ago to ner area. We’re modernize the listening to the facility and public about keep pace what they with what would like other to see done resorts next,” offer. Shirley With said. the Amid compleall the extion of citement the new of a new highlift, there is speed a downside. quad lift, For the first a total of time in a very $30 million long time, the will have been cost of a season spent since the pass is going up, plan was adopted. starting next spring. Now that these While the exact price has upgrades are near comyet to be set, the current cost pletion, the focus is shifting Bogus Basin Spokesof $199 will go up to either to what is next for Bogus. woman Gretchen $229 or $239. “We have to redevelop Anderson gives the rundown on how the new The increase is a change both base areas … and covert Superior lift will change in the direction the resort set several other lifts,” Shirley the mountain. in 1998, when it drastically said of some key components slashed pass prices from $550 of future development. to $199, which Anderson said These improvements are started a ripple effect through the business. based on a market study Bogus conducted a The effect was immediate and dramatic— few years ago, asking visitors what projects L A U R IE P E A R M A N

impact the community can have on Bogus’ success and growth. “The 2010-2011 winter was the best financial season Bogus has ever had. The total of 354,000 skier visits was a very close second to the record set in 2009-2010,” said Gretchen Anderson, Bogus Basin spokeswoman, about the benefits of this new approach and the growth it has created. As a nonprofit, making money is not Bogus’ No. 1 goal—although it is vital to operations, of course. The primary goal, from its inception to today, has been to keep people skiing. Shirley emphasized that Bogus Basin has “always spent everything it makes on capital improvements, reinvesting in the resort.” Anderson agreed. “This new high-speed detachable quad is one of three now on the mountain, and it makes a difference. It really brings Bogus Basin into the 21st century in terms of having a high-speed quad on all sides of the mountain.” Still, any new features have to be paid for somehow, and both Anderson and Shirley said that the numerous contributions from season pass holders and others have been greatly appreciated, and more people are giving all the time. As a way to incentivize and publicly recognize those who give, a donor pass program has been established. Any season pass holder who gives a $100 donation will receive a green-colored pass; those contributing $250 will get a blue pass; and those donating $500 or more will be given a black diamond pass. So far approximately 300 individuals have contributed in this manner.

season pass sales skyrocketed from 3,500 the previous year to 19,000. Those new pass holders needed new equipment, so the season pass price reduction was a boon for Bogus’ equipment rental business, too. Resort management asked local equipment retailers to offer a low-cost rental option, but after meeting with staunch resistance, they created the program themselves, offering season-long packages starting at $99. Bogus management held to the $199 price tag as long as it could, but the reality of rising costs of power, labor and insurance forced the decision. A piece of good news for families with young skiers is that season passes for those ages 7-11 will remain $59. Even as the first hints of autumn are arriving in the valley, the final touches are being put on the new Superior lift—concrete has been poured, and equipment has been shipped in from Canada and Austria. Load testing will be conducted in November, and everything is on schedule to be ready for the first significant snowfall of the winter. It won’t be long until the temperatures drop, the snow starts accumulating and the slopes at Bogus Basin are packed with multitudes of skiers and snowboarders shredding their way through the powder and down to the base, ready to be whisked to the top of the mountain again on a new high-speed quad lift. Maybe they should keep some cash in their pocket to drop in the donation box while they’re waiting in line.

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Put your money where your mouth is at Stage Coach’s production of The Rocky Horror Show.

If you don’t have Jack to do this Halloween, let BW be your ghoulish guide.

THURSDAY-MONDAY OCT. 27-31 camp

WEDNESDAY-MONDAY OCT. 26-31 trick or treat HALLOWEEN GOINGS-ON These days, zombies abound in pop culture. A Google search on “zombies” brings up a bevy articles that claim the zombie apocalypse is a real possibility, like cracked.com’s, “5 Scientific Reasons a Zombie Apocalypse Could Actually Happen,” which cites brain parasites, neurotoxins and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. You can party like a zombie on Saturday, Oct. 29, at the Red Room’s Rise Up, a zombie apocalypse Halloween bash, with DJ Kreeper and a whole mess of local DJs. Come in your best livingdead costume. 9 p.m. $8, The Red Room, 1519 W. Main St., 208-331-0956, redroomboise.com. If you’re not up for a whole night of zombie partying, check out the Thrill the World Boise in front of Boise City Hall on Saturday, Oct. 29, as part of the third-annual worldwide simultaneous dance of Michael Jackson’s “Thriller.” 8 p.m., FREE, Boise City Hall, 150 N. Capitol Blvd. And if more refined zombie action is your taste, check out Evil Dead: The Musical, which is based on Sam Raimi’s cult classic Evil Dead films, with performances on Friday, Oct. 28, and Saturday, Oct. 29. 8 p.m. $10-$15, Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, 3401 Brazil St., 208-995-0088, brownpapertickets.com. Of course if blood and guts aren’t your thing, there are a whole host of more classic Halloween haunts to hang out at this weekend. Old Death Whisper, whose music “is a cocktail of dirty Western roots music and country-tinged parlor tunes,” will headline the Linen Building’s Halloween Costume Party on Friday, Oct. 28. It’s an all-ages event with a full bar for the grownups and food from Pie Hole. 8 p.m., $5. Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. Creepier than the twang of a steel guitar, Boise Trolley Tours will tour the haunted history of downtown on Friday, Oct. 28, and Saturday, Oct. 29. It’s a two-hour tour, with one hour spent on the trolley and one spent exploring the Old Idaho Penitentiary. Also, on Monday, Oct. 31, is an adults-only party tour; vampire wine and food will be served on board. 8 p.m., $18 adults-only tour, $22 Old Pen/trolley. Boise Trolley Tours, 1911 W. State St., 208-433-0849, boisetrolleytours.com. And if you’re looking for a good time west of the county line, on Wednesday, Oct. 26, check out the Halloween Party Video Premiere of Turn Off Your Mind with music from The Shades. 7 p.m., FREE, Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com. For the kids and the kid in you who still loves to don a costume and rifle trough the linen closet for a sturdy old pillowcase, you can fix your sweet tooth at Boise’s beloved Boo at the Zoo on Saturday, Oct. 29. There will be costumed characters passing out candy, costume contests for all ages, a bat toss, pumpkin patch photos, face painting and lots of fun animals. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., $4-$7, FREE for kids 3 and younger and pass holders. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, 208-3844260, zooboise.org. If classic cars tickle your fancy, you can take the little ones to Trunk or Treat on Saturday, Oct. 29, with lots of candy, games, costume contests and ’50s tunes from band Ghosts of the Malt Shop. Noon-3 p.m., FREE. Burger Time, 1273 S. Orchard St., 208-424-5073.

18 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW Stage Coach Theatre would like, if it may, to take you on a strange journey. Seasoned sweet transvestites and those doing the Time Warp for the first time can check out Stage Coach Theatre’s performance of The Rocky Horror Show this Halloween. Rocky Horror—a campy mash-up of musical theater, drag shows, science fiction and horror films—is the tale of Brad and Janet, an innocent, recently engaged couple on a drive through the country. When their car gets a flat tire in the middle of nowhere, Brad and Janet find themselves looking for help in the bizarre mansion of Dr. Frank N. Furter as he unveils his master creation. Of course, it wouldn’t be so funny and fascinating if everything were that simple. There are dead delivery boys and extraterrestrial encounters thrown in the mix, plus it seems that no one in the house can be faithful to anyone else. Everything has a musical number attached, and there are more corsets and pairs of ankle-twisting high heels than you can count. And that’s just what’s happening onstage—audience members do far more than just clap at the end of The Rocky Horror Show. Don’t be surprised if you spot folks walking into the theater with newspapers, rice, toilet paper and any number of other show-related props. With memorable numbers like “Time Warp,” “Sweet Transvestite” and “I Can Make You a Man,” show veterans will be singing along and contributing dialogue to this cult classic. Newcomers won’t be alienated. Stage Coach Theatre has “virgin kits” available for $5, allowing virgins— those uninitiated in the ways of Rocky Horror—to participate as well. Thursday, Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m.; Friday, Oct. 28, 8:15 p.m.; Saturday, Oct. 29, 8:15 p.m. and midnight; Monday, Oct. 31, 7:30 p.m.; $20. Stage Coach Theatre, 710 N. Orchard St., 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

THURSDAY OCT. 27 powerpoint IGNITE BOISE 7 PowerPoint presentations aren’t usually exciting. Many of us have sat through a droning presentation about sales figures or the proper use of gerunds or any number of snoozewor thy topics. Not even whizzing animations can spice up these other wise mind-numbing slideshows. If you’ve come to fear and loathe PowerPoint, Ignite Boi-

se will cure you and perhaps foster a new fascination. This volunteer-run, for-fun event gives local presenters five minutes, 20 PowerPoint slides and no limit to the topics they may talk about. Ignite Boise 7 will include 16 speakers, four of whom were chosen by an audience vote. Some are even highprofile local personalities, like KTRV Channel 12 News anchor Stacey Skrysak. The topics at Ignite Boise 7 var y from the histor y of facial fur in Beards: A Time of Need, to the countless ways auto-correct can cripple budding writers and speed-texters in Did You

Mean Ignore Noise? How Auto-Correct and Typos Are Running Are World. More serious presentations include topics like improving bicycle safety in Boise, the art of living simply in a 97-squarefoot house and even the emergence of new digital currencies like Bitcoin. With these enlightening, funny and dramatic presentations, you might even learn more in three hours than you learned in four years watching college professors’ PowerPoint lectures. 7 p.m., FREE. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., igniteboise.com. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FIND TRUE VINTAGE DESIGNS HALLOWEEN T-SHIRT

Need some rad art for your walls? We’ve got you covered.

Get some industry tips from prolific Idaho author Robin Lee Hatcher.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY OCT. 28-29

WEDNESDAY NOV. 2 awesome BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART AUCTION

books IDAHO BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA Most of us know someone who is writing a book, wrote a book, or wants to write one and isn’t sure how to get there. Maybe you fit into one of those categories yourself. Idaho literary enthusiasts and folks looking to make connections in the writing and publishing world need look no further than the Idaho Book Extravaganza. Now in its second year, the Idaho Book Extravaganza features a trade show, the Top 50 Idaho Writers Awards and a student essay contest. If you’re looking to talk to a published author from Idaho or around the countr y, IBE’s author mixer allows attendees to meet with authors face-to-face, get books signed and form connections. Along with the mixer, more than 25 organized workshops allow attendees to learn from speakers, including writers, publishers and exper ts in online marketing. Among these speakers are Don Jacobson, current owner of author management company D.C. Jacobson & Associates, and Idaho writer Robin Lee Hatcher, who has published more than 60 novels and won numerous awards for lifetime achievement. Also included are children’s book author Nancy Mills and writer Estevan Vega, who has been a published author since he was 15 years old. The Idaho Book Extravaganza is an chance to get your feet wet in the publishing world. Friday, Oct. 28, 11 a.m.-8:30 p.m.; Saturday, Oct. 29, 10:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; $55 all-access pass, $30 student all-access pass, $15 author-mixer ticket. FREE for trade show only. Boise Centre, 208-319-3517, idahobookextravaganza.com.

SUNDAY OCT. 30 vinyl BOISE RECORD SHOW AND SWAP CDs and MP3s have brought convenience to music lovers, but vinyl records—with their warm,

S U B M I T

full sound combined with imperfections like popping and hissing—still have a special place in the hearts of collectors. The Vinyl Preservation Society of Idaho will host a gathering of local and out-ofstate record dealers at The Linen Building for the Boise Record Show and Swap on Sunday, Oct. 30. Are you looking for a copy

Whenever an art auction is portrayed on TV, pearled grayhairs quietly fan themselves with golden paddles at Christie’s or Sotheby’s, extending their diamond-burdened wrists only long enough to bid a cool mil on Napoleon’s underwear. BW doesn’t roll like that. The Boise Weekly Cover Auction is a loud, raucous, boozebathed affair with epic bidding wars that end in champagne jubilation or tequila heartbreak. So drink lots of water and give your liver a pep talk before this year’s Cover Auction, which will go down on Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 6 p.m. sharp. Two important things have changed this go-round. First: the location. The Cover Auction has moved to the Linen Building. Second: Trey McIntyre Project has officially partnered with the Cover Auction and will receive 20 percent net proceeds from the event for its community arts outreach efforts. If you’re all like, “Cover Auction, whaaa?” Here’s a quick rundown: Boise Weekly commissions local artists to design our covers every week for the entire year. Then you get the chance to take the original artwork home to benefit the local arts community. Last year, we handed out $15,646 in Cover Auction grants, which went to organizations like WGP Productions (Hollis Welsh and Nick Garcia), Idaho Dance Theater, BOSCO, TMP, Boise Parks and Rec, Boise Contemporary Theater, Boise Bicycle Project and Searching for Quarztburg (Rachel Reichert, Eric Bower, Seth Ogilvie). We also distributed funds to individual artists, including Tomas Montano, Scott Michael and Ben Love. So slide on your fake pearls and plastic bling and head down to the Boise Weekly Cover Auction and help us show those duds at Christie’s how it’s really done. 5 p.m. doors reserved seating, $5 presale; 5:30 p.m. general admission, $3 donation; 6 p.m. auction. The Linen Building, 1402 Grove St., 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com.

of the stereo version of Bob Dylan’s 1963 album The Freewheelin’ Bob Dylan or Elvis Presley’s 1954 That’s All Right 45? While these are two expensive and highly sought-after records, you will be able to fill in the gaps in your collection without breaking the bank. Whether you’re a collec-

Trick-or-treating has gone downhill. Honestly, what happened to the good old days when you could walk up to the homes of strangers, per form some adorable feat and receive a delicious confection, without worr ying if there’s a razor blade or cyanide inside? The tradition of costume-clad candy begging has been belittled and confined to parking lots and malls. Candy has to be investigated before kids can indulge in a $19.99 sugar high, and there’s THE RECORD EXCHANGE a ton of skepticism sur1105 W. Idaho St. rounding anything that 208-344-8010 therecordexchange.com isn’t mass-produced and pre-wrapped. If you miss the days of fun, possibly dangerous trick-or-treating, you can display your sense of nostalgia with True Vintage Designs’ throwback Halloween T-shir t. The uber-comfy American Apparel cotton will put you at ease, as the circa-1960 trick-or-treat bag design reflects your desire for the Halloweens of yester year. It’s also an awesome alternative to running around downtown nearly naked and freezing off that ass you’ve been toning in preparation for a great whoreloween outing. Or maybe you’ve racked your brain for a witty, original and exceptionally hilarious costume idea, and then realized that there are a lot more impor tant things to spend your workday thinking about—like work. If you want to go more vintage-hipster-chic than trashy or shtick, this T may be the right alternative for you. —Sheree Whiteley

tor with a full-blown compulsion to complete your library or a music lover whose vinyl collection is gathering dust in the garage, bring it down and trade it in for cash. 10 a.m.-5 p.m., $3 general, $10 VIP. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 19


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY OCT. 26

Literature OPEN MIC POETRY—8 p.m. Bouquet, 1010 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6605.

Festivals & Events ONE DAY ONLY WWII TRAVELING EXHIBIT—This exhibit gives unique insight into the battlefields of World War I, including a simulation of what war in the trenches meant. See this temporary display along with the museum’s A Grateful Nation: A Look Back at WWII. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE, donations welcome. Museum of Idaho, 200 N. Eastern Ave., Idaho Falls, 208-5221400, museumofidaho.org. TURN OFF YOUR MIND HALLOWEEN PARTY VIDEO PREMIERE— Enjoy a special performance by Shades, a raffle and the premiere of the video Turn Off Your Mind. See Picks, Page 18. 7 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com.

Talks & Lectures BOISE URBAN AGRICULTURE FORUM—Featuring panelists representing various aspects of urban agriculture, including farming, marketing and city regulations. Sponsored by the Idaho Chapter of the Sierra Club. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Wright Congregational Church, 4821 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-333-0312.

Kids & Teens DISCOVERY CENTER YOUNG DISCOVERERS—Bring in your preschoolers for an hour-long session on a variety of topics. 10:30 a.m. General admission. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, scIdaho.org.

KIDS EXPERIENCE—A science and art program for children ages 6 and older. 4 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, gardencity.lili.org. MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Young designers, inventors and engineers can bring creations to life with Legos. Bring your own or some will be provided if you don’t. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

Odds & Ends LAST CALL TRIVIA—8 p.m. FREE. The Lift Bar and Grill, 4091 W. State St., Boise, 208-3423250, theliftboise.com; 7 p.m. FREE. Eastside Tavern, 610 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-345-3878; 8 p.m. FREE. Jumpin’ Janets, 572 Vista Ave., Boise, 208-3427620, jumpinjanets.com; 8 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Wild Wings, 3223 E. Louise Drive, Meridian, 208288-5485, buffalowildwings.com; 9 p.m. FREE. Applebee’s-Emerald, 7845 W. Emerald St., Boise, 208378-1890.

On Stage COMEDY ON THE ROCKS—Featuring three local comics along with MC Danny Amspacher. 9 p.m. $5. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-5142531, drinkfattys.com. ROMEO AND JULIET—Starcrossed lovers suffer the consequences of a family feud in this classic Shakespearian tragedy. 7 p.m. $5. Mountain View High School, 2000 Millenium Way, Meridian, 208-855-4050. SHIPWRECKED! AN ENTERTAINMENT: THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF LOUIS DE ROUGEMONT—Features exotic islanders, a man-eating octopus and an examination of the fine line that separates the truth and tall tales. 8 p.m. $13-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Food & Drink BREATHE EASY BREAKFAST— Stacy Allison, the first American woman to summit Mt. Everest, will speak. Proceeds support clean air and lung health advocacy, programs and education. Register now at bebboise.org. 7:30-9 a.m. $25 per guest or $400 for VIP Table of eight. Stueckle Sky Center, Boise State football stadium, Boise.

Art ERIC OBENDORF—Local photographer Eric Obendorf’s work is on display at the artists’ co-op. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Green Chutes, 4716 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-7111, greenchutesboise.com. NAMPA ART GUILD FALL JURIED SHOW OPENING RECEPTION—Nampa Art Guild’s 26th Fall Juried Art Show Art Out Loud opening reception. Features works in oil, acrylic, watercolor and mixed media. Show runs through Wednesday, Nov. 2. 6:30 p.m. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com.

20 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

REVIEW/BOOK Q, EVAN MANDERY Q, the third novel from Evan Mandery, begins with a simple premise: An unnamed narrator who is engaged to the love of his life is visited by his future self, who says the marriage is a mistake that will ruin them both. That conflict alone is enough for an engaging and dramatic story but Mandery doesn’t stop there. Like a farcical version of A Christmas Carol, the narrator is successively visited by more versions of himself, each with a tragedy for him to dodge. One future self gives him the Graduate-esque advice to “study beavers.” While being led to and fro by his future selves—who are also constantly sticking him with the check at fancy restaurants—the narrator embarks on a long exploration of his emotional self that humorously dissects philosophy, politics and pop culture. Mandery’s references to episodes of The Twilight Zone are so overt that some of the narrator’s future selves point out that they are bordering on plagiarism. Some of Q’s finest moments come from the world that Mandery creates. The lovers go on a date to a Communist miniature golf course, where they can’t tell their balls apart because they are both red. Organic gardeners march on New York City Hall dressed like vegetables. Time travel is used to historically manipulate the market for coffee makers. Q’s New York is the sort of place one wants to live in simply to marvel at. But what ties it all together is the relationship between the narrator and Q, which is fraught with the tension of a tragedy that hasn’t actually happened and sparkles with the giddy trappings of true love. A paragraph can start on a guffaw and finish on a gut-punch. Reading Q in public is inadvisable for criers. Q is easily Mandery’s best effort yet, and it’s the sort of book one dreads finishing because it may be years before an equal will be encountered. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT SHIPWRECKED! AN ENTERTAINMENT: THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF LOUIS DE ROUGEMONT—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $13-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

THURSDAY OCT. 27 On Stage GASLIGHT—Bishop Kelly Theatre Arts presents the classic Victorian thriller Gaslight, by Patrick Hamilton. 7 p.m. $6 general, $5 preschoolers/seniors. Bishop Kelly High School, 7009 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-375-6010, bk.org. OKLAHOMA!—Two cowboys compete for the women they love in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical comedy set at the turn of the 20th century. 7 p.m. $18$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—Take a wild trip to Transylvania just in time for Halloween, presented by Stagecoach Theater. See Picks, Page 18. 710 N. Orchard St., Boise, 7:30 p.m. $20. 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. ROMEO AND JULIET—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $5. Mountain View High School, 2000 Millenium Way, Meridian, 208-8554050.

Food & Drink BOISE GREEN DRINKS—Eat, drink and be eco-friendly during a social gathering for anyone interested in environmental issues. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Bittercreek Ale House, 246 N. Eighth St., 208345-1813, bcrfl.com/bittercreek. FOOD AND FILM—A monthly fundraiser featuring a threecourse meal followed by a movie and discussion. Proceeds from the night go toward the growth and preservation of local foods. Visit treasurevalleyfoodcoalition. org for info and tickets. 7 p.m. $25, includes a three-course meal. Red Feather Lounge, 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-4296340, bcrfl.com/redfeather.

Workshops & Classes ART AND CRAFT CLASSES— Learn a new skill and make something unique for the holidays. Visit letbeautyemerge. blogspot.com for more info. 7:30-8:30 p.m. $15. Meridian Entrepreneur Think-Tank Co-Operative, 33 E. Idaho Ave., Meridian, 208-602-5129, meridianetc.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

PRACTICE AQUI—Spice up your bilingual aptitude during this weekly gathering. Designed for ages 13 and older. Attendees should have an understanding of English and Spanish. 6 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2941, gardencity.lili.org. PROSE POEM AND SHORTSHORT STORY WORKSHOP— Authors and teachers Malia Collins and Kerri Webster will aid aspiring writers in crafting short works. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $120 for all four sessions. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

Literature VINYLISM: KALI’S TONGUE— Join “vinylists” Justin Kishbaugh and Carl Della Badia as they blend poetry with the Rolling Stone’s 1971 album Sticky Fingers, played on a Califone 1410. 7 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-429-8220, hydeparkbookstore.com.

9:30AM - 1:30PM 8th Street from Bannock to Main Street & on the Grove Plaza

BOISE LIBRARY’S FALL BOOK SALE—Annual sale conducted by the Friends of the Boise Public Library. 9 a.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Talks & Lectures FRANK CHURCH CONFERENCE: CHRISTOPHER HILL—The 28th annual Frank Church Conference will explore the Arab Spring, this year’s series of popular uprisings against authoritarian regimes across the Middle East and North Africa. Christopher Hill, former assistant secretary of state and ambassador to Iraq, will deliver the conference’s keynote address. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union (Simplot Grand Ballroom), 1910 University Drive, Boise. SALONS IN THE ALLEY—Learn about the upcoming play Head, which opens Wednesday, Nov. 9. Watch a rehearsal and discuss its impact. See Arts News, Page 32. 7 p.m. FREE. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com. BLACKS CREEK OPEN HOUSE—Boise’s Golden Eagle Audubon Society and nine other partners recently received a $26,300 grant to help the BLM and local landowners improve the area around Blacks Creek Reservoir as a bird habitat and wildlife viewing area. Drop by the open house to learn how to get involved. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE. Land Trust of the Treasure Valley, 708 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208385-7927.

JOIN US FOR A HARVEST FESTIVAL AT THE MARKET!

Guest Chef Abbigail Carlson cooking with fresh, seasonal produce from the Market.

This Saturday Q 10am to Noon

A IS FOR APPLE, C IS FOR CIDER! Apple & Cider tasting QFace Painting First 100 kids get a goody bag Prizes for Best Costume

A Free Service of the Market! HerBs *LocaL ProDuce, Q Q

&

PUMPKINS*

Apples, Dried Apples & Applesauce Pears & Pear Tarts Potatoes, Beets & Winter Squash Carrots, Onions & Fall Greens Q Artisan Farmstead Cheeses Q Farm Fresh Eggs & Milk

*IDaHo SPecIaLTY FooDs*

Fresh Pasta & Pasta Sauces Q Take ‘n Bake Lasagna & Shells Q Locally Made Root Beer Local Jams, Jellies and Honey Q Bar - B- Q Sauces, Salsas & Salad Dressings Q Pizza by the Slice Q Crepes Tacos, Burritos & Sambusas Q Fresh Baked Breads, Pastries & Pies Q Gluten Free Baked Goods

*AWaRD WINNING IDaHO WINeRIeS* Woodriver Cellars Q Davis Creek Cellars Q Holesinsky Organic Winery

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Odds & Ends LAST CALL TRIVIA—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com; 9 p.m. FREE. Applebee’s-Meridian, 1460 N. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-8550343.

*UnIQue HanD-CraFTeD LocaL ArT* Pottery Q Jewelry Q Mosaics Q Handcrafted Metal Works Q Hand Painted Silk Q Fiber Art Hand Carved Wooden Items Q Photography Q Paintings Q Natural Bath & Body Products Hand Blown & Fused Glass Items Now Accepting Debit, Credit & EBT Cards

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 21


8 DAYS OUT FRIDAY OCT. 28 Festivals & Events BE TWICE INSPIRED WEDDING SALE—Be Twice Inspired Wedding Sale is an easy way to consign, sell and buy new and gently used wedding items. For more info, email sara@betwiceinspired.com. 4-9 p.m. $5. Canyon Ridge Church, 11505 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-5851217, canyonridgeboise.com. HALLOWEEN COSTUME PARTY CONCERT—Dress to impress (or terrify) and enjoy the sounds of Old Death Whisper, Hillfolk Noir and Up a Creek at this all-ages Halloween celebration. Full bar with ID. Tickets are available at brownpapertickets.com or at the Record Exchange. 8 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

THE WIZARD OF OZ—Take a trip down memory lane and the Yellow Brick Road with this rendition of the 1939 classic film. 7:30 p.m. $14-$20. Music Theatre of Idaho, 203 Ninth Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-2385, mtionline.org.

Concerts BENEFIT CONCERT—A benefit Concert for the Timberline High School Orchestra will feature the music of the American Tradition. 7 p.m. $5 adults, $3 students, FREE 5 and younger. Timberline High School, 701 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-854-6230. FACULTY ARTIST SERIES—Featuring Brian Hodges, cello, and Betsi Hodges, piano. Call 208426-1596 for more info. 7:30 p.m. $5 general, $3 seniors, free to students and Boise State faculty and staff. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1609.

THRILLER SALSA COSTUME PARTY—Costume contest for those age 18 and older; full bar with ID. Doors open at 8 p.m., with beginner lessons in merengue, bachata and salsa at 9 p.m. and dancing with DJ Giovanni from 10 p.m.-2 a.m. Free tickets available at salsaidaho.com or Salsa Idaho on Facebook. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. $6. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

MERIDIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA—Featuring selections from Harry Potter and the Wizard of Oz along with the music of Mussorgsky, Berlioz, Grieg and Saint-Saens. Halloween costumes encouraged. Costume contest for kids. 7 p.m. $10 adults, FREE for children. Jewett Auditorium, 2112 E. Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-459-3405, aldwellfinearts.org.

On Stage

DINNER AND LIVE MUSIC FRIDAY—Enjoy a glass of wine, paired with a tasty dinner selection and music from Kaycee Kennedy. 6-9 p.m. Woodriver Cellars, 3705 N. Hwy. 16, 208-2869463, woodrivercellars.com.

BALLET IDAHO’S MIX IT UP—Includes “Clair de Lune,” “City Symphony” and “Aarrrg! Pirates!” For more information, call 208-343-0556. See Arts, Page 32. 8 p.m. $36-$49.50. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu.

Food & Drink

Workshops & Classes INTERCAMBIO: SPANISH-ENGLISH—English speakers have the opportunity to practice their Spanish with native Spanishspeakers. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Puentes Language Programs, 4720 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-344-4270, puentes.biz.

Literature BOISE LIBRARY’S FALL BOOK SALE—See Thursday. 9 a.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org. IDAHO BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA 2011—Network and learn about the book industry and how it’s changing. See Picks, Page 19. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. $55 all-access pass/tradeshow open to public, idahobookextravaganza.com. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900.

Citizen NEW REPUBLICAN CLUB (TREASURE VALLEY PACHYDERMS)—Guest speakers and an open forum over dinner for local Republicans. For more information, email treasurevalleypachyderms@yahoo.com. 6 p.m. $5 for members and $6.99 for nonmembers. ArtsWest School, 3415 Flint Drive, Eagle, 208938-5410, artswestschool.org.

GASLIGHT—See Thursday. Bishop Kelly High School, 7009 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208375-6010, bk.org. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL—Based on Sam Raimi’s cult classic Evil Dead series. Tickets at brownpapertickets.com or by calling 208-995-0088. See Picks, Page 18. Doors 7:30 p.m., show 8 p.m. $10 online, $15 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise. OKLAHOMA!—See Wednesday. 6:15 p.m. $18-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $20. 710 N. Orchard St., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com. ROMEO AND JULIET—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $5. Mountain View High School, 2000 Millenium Way, Meridian, 208-8554050. SHIPWRECKED! AN ENTERTAINMENT: THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF LOUIS DE ROUGEMONT—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $13-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater. org.

22 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT Kids & Teens

younger or Scouts in uniform. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com.

DISCOVERY CENTER YOUNG DISCOVERERS—See Wednesday. General admission. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895, SCIdaho.org.

BOO AT THE ZOO—This family friendly event includes an all-ages costume contest, a bat toss, photos in a pumpkin patch, face painting and candy from costumed staff. For more info, call 208-384-4260. See Picks, Page 18. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE for children and passholders, $4-$7. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3844125, zooboise.org.

SATURDAY OCT. 29 Festivals & Events

CREEPY CRITTER ENCOUNTERS—Learn about creatures that live in the refuge on a spooky hike. Arrive in costume for a special treat. 4-6:30 p.m. FREE. Deer Flats Visitors Center, 13751 Upper Embankment Road, Nampa, 208-467-9278, fws.gov/deerflat.

BE TWICE INSPIRED WEDDING SALE—See Friday. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $5 Friday, $3 Saturday. Canyon Ridge Church, 11505 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-5851217, canyonridgeboise.com. BOISE BASIN BOOSTERS HALLOWEEN BASH—Go dressed in your favorite Halloween costume and spend the evening taking a haunted hayride, and enjoy the warmth of a bonfire while you feast on chili, hot dogs, apple cider and/or coffee. Please bring a dessert to share. Email: lssirani@yahoo.com. 5 p.m. FREE. Placerville Plaza, Placerville.

GOBLINS’ GHOSTLY GALA— Costume contest, games, creepy drink concoctions and music from the Rocci Johnson Band. 7 p.m. $5. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557. HALLOWEEN FETE—Nightology, Fusion Magazine and Wild 101 present this adult evening of costumes, art, DJ culture and after-hours revelry. Featuring the Rock-it Scientist and a surprise guest-host with live art, dancing and costume contests. For 21 and older. 9 p.m. $15. The Bouquet, 1010 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6605.

BOISE HALLOWEEN BASH— This 18-and-older Halloween party features a live DJ, dancing and a multiple category costume contest, with the best-dressed couple netting a $200 prize. Tickets available at the Record Exchange, tixxfixx.com or by calling 325-650-5846. 9 p.m. $10$25. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

MERIDIAN FARMERS MARKET HOLIDAY BAZAAR—Benefits the Idaho Foodbank, Invisible Children, Rocky Mountain and Mountain View high schools. Santa, musicians, “man” and “mom” caves and a food court will be available. Call 208-3762610 for more info. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Rocky Mountain High School, 5450 N. Linder Road, Meridian, 208-350-4340, rmhs. meridianschools.org.

BOISE KNIFE SHOW—Thousands of knives from all the top makers. Chuck Buck, president and CEO of Buck Knives, will autograph your new or used Buck knife. There will be numerous competitions and clinics, along with drawings and door prizes. Info at rockymountainknifeshow. com. 9 a.m. $8 one-day, $14 three-day pass, FREE 10 and

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

THRILL THE WORLD: BOISE—The third-annual worldwide simultaneous dance of the King of Pop’s “Thriller.” There is no good reason why—all we know is that it is awesome. 8 p.m. FREE. Boise City Hall, 150 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise. THRILL THE WORLD: MERIDIAN—Thrill the World is a worldwide simultaneous dance to “Thriller.” The event will raise money for The Ronald McDonald House in Boise. Get details and instructions at Facebook.com/ ThrillBoise. 7:30 p.m., donations welcome. Linder Farm, 7165 S. Linder Road, Meridian. TRUNK OR TREAT FREE EVENT—Classic cars, candy, games, a costume contest and fun for everyone, including all your ’50s favorites from Ghost of the Malt Shop. See Picks, Page 18. Noon-6 p.m. FREE. Burger Time, 1273 S. Orchard St., Boise, 208-424-5073, pattysburgertime.wordpress. com. VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO—VPS will hold its fourth anniversary event, complete with a costume contest and multiple DJs spinning vinyl. A portion of the proceeds will benefit KRBX Radio Boise. For more info, contact Chad Dryden, 208-284-0355. 8 p.m. FREE for members, $3 nonmembers. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

On Stage BALLET IDAHO’S MIX IT UP— See Friday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $36-$49.50. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. GASLIGHT—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $6 general, $5 preschoolers/seniors. Bishop Kelly High School, 7009 W. Franklin Road., Boise, 208-375-6010, bk.org. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL—See Thursday. Doors 7:30 p.m., show 8 p.m. $10 online, $15 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise. OKLAHOMA!—See Wednesday. 6:15 p.m. $18-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org. SHIPWRECKED! AN ENTERTAINMENT: THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF LOUIS DE ROUGEMONT—See Wednesday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $13-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3319224, bctheater.org. THE WIZARD OF OZ—See Friday. 1:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. $14-$20. Music Theatre of Idaho, 203 Ninth Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-2385, mtionline.org. THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—See Wednesday. 8:15 p.m. and midnight. $20. Stage Coach Theatre, 5012 Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. ROMEO AND JULIET—See Wednesday. $5. Mountain View High School, 2000 Millenium Way, Meridian, 208-855-4050.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 23


8 DAYS OUT Concerts MERIDIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $10 adult, $8 senior/ student, $25 family. Centennial High School, 12400 W. McMillan Road, Boise, 208-939-1404, chs.meridianschools.org. SENIOR FLUTE RECITAL LINDA STAUM—Call 208-426-1596 for more info. 3:30 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1609.

a wall-sized screen and drifting to sleep. Ages 5-12. 7 p.m. $35 first child, $30 each additional. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-3763641, wingscenter.com. WIZARD OF OZ MEET THE CHARACTERS BREAKFAST— Enjoy your morning meal with the cast of Music Theatre Of Idaho’s Wizard of Oz. 8-10 a.m. $7. Music Theatre of Idaho, 203 Ninth Ave. S., Nampa, 208-468-2385, mtionline.org.

Food & Drink

PUMPKIN PARTY—This family friendly pumpkin-themed event boasts decorating and delicious treats. Festoon your family’s pumpkin in style. 3-5 p.m. $10$15. Locavore, 3110 S. Bown Way, Boise, 208-338-8887.

Workshops & Classes MASK-MAKING WORKSHOP— Drop in during our open hours to create a custom work-of-art mask. Tickets may be purchased in advance at the shop or online at puffymondaes.com. All ages are welcome. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. $15 adv., $20 door. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-407-3359, puffymondaes. com.

Art COFFEE, TALK, ART—Join Cate Brigden, Lisa Pisano and Andrea Merrell for homemade biscuits and jam while Jacqueline Crist, their longtime friend and colleague, presents insights into their work. See Arts News, Page 32. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Enso Art Space, 120 E. 38th St., Ste. 105, Garden City, 208-6956864, ensoartspace.com.

Literature BOISE LIBRARY’S FALL BOOK SALE—See Thursday. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Kids & Teens HALLOWEEN SLEEPOVER— Kids can enjoy crazy costumes, a treat hunt, pizza, witches brew and non-stop fitness-based activities before watching a movie on

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Festivals & Events BOISE KNIFE SHOW—See Saturday. 9 a.m. $8. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., 208-2875650, expoidaho.com. HALLOWEEN PARTY—Costume party with candy for everyone. 12:30-3:30 p.m. $5, including skate rentals. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, 208331-0044, idahoiceworld.com. KIDS HALLOWEEN PARTY— Costume party geared toward the little ones—scary stories, tasty treats and costume prizes. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., 208-4298220, hydeparkbookstore.com.

HALLOWEEN COSTUME PARTY—Wicked wines and brews, appetizers, dancing, costume contest for prizes, wine bar ghosts and photographic dungeon. Must be 21 or older with ID. 8 p.m.-12 a.m. $10. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Highway 44, Star, 208286-7960, helinamaries.com. OWYHEE ELEMENTARY’S HALLOWEEN BREAKFAST—Special Halloween breakfast of all-youcan-eat pancakes, hosted by Owyhee’s PTO and Applebee’s. Children (and adults, too) are encouraged to wear their Halloween costumes. 8-10 a.m. $7 for 12 and older, $5 for 11 and younger. Applebee’s, 2810 W. Elder St., Boise, 208-344-5630, applebees.com.

SUNDAY OCT. 30

REVIEW/BOOK THE KITE RUNNER GRAPHIC NOVEL The 2003 novel The Kite Runner by Khaled Hosseini was an instant smash. It hit No. 1 on The New York Times bestseller list, selling 7 million copies domestically. It was even adapted into a film in 2007. The Kite Runner—the story of a young Afghan’s exodus from his homeland to escape the Russian incursion in the late ’70s, his coming of age in America, and his dramatic return home to face his past by confronting the Taliban— has now also been adapted into graphic novel form by Riverhead Books. The illustrations, by Fabio Celoni and Mirka Andolfo, move the story along at a brisk pace. The whole of the book can easily be finished in an evening, making an intense story like The Kite Runner approachable for readers unwilling to commit to a novel. But the book as a whole reads somewhat like a storyboard for the film adaptation, offering little in the way of unique panel technique or artistic interpretation. Some of the morenuanced elements of the images are lost and don’t hit as hard, which is a great loss for a story as moving as The Kite Runner. This problem is especially noticeable during a graphic depiction of sexual assault that is a major turning point for the plot. In the film and the novel, it is a painful experience one goes through with the characters. But in the graphic novel adaptation, it can be breezed through with little difficulty. Another scene, in which the protagonist’s father confronts a Russian soldier at the risk of his own life, is also less tense. Some of the funnier moments from the story are dulled as well. In the book/film, they come from the subtle hint of a smile or the liberating emotions a character wishes to express but must repress so as not to offend those who adhere closely to ethnic traditions. But that’s not to say it isn’t a good read. The story still sings from the page, and it gives credibility to a storytelling medium that has struggled to be accepted as literature. The Kite Runner may not go down as one of the great graphic novels of all time, but the adaptation is a way to introduce it to those who might prefer a comic medium. —Josh Gross WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT On Stage

Food & Drink

Art

BALLET IDAHO’S MIX IT UP— See Friday. 2 p.m. $36-$49.50. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu.

HALLOWEEN BEER 4 BIKES PARTY—A Halloween Party (with beer) to benefit the Boise Bicycle Project, with a group bike ride. Half of Payette Brewing Company’s profits for the day will go to BBP. 3 p.m. FREE. Payette Brewing, 111 W. 33rd St., Garden City, 208-334-0011, payettebrewing.com.

BW COVER ART AUCTION—What was your favorite Boise Weekly cover last year? This is your chance to own it. Cover art from previous issues will be auctioned off to raise money that will be granted to local artists and organizations that promote local visual arts. To buy a ticket for limited seating, pony up $5 at brownpapertickets.com. Doors open at 5 p.m. for reserved seating. Those without reserved seating will be admitted at 5:30 p.m. with a $3 donation. 5-9 p.m. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding. com.

Concerts ORCHESTRA CONCERT—The Halloween-themed program includes Wagner’s Flying Dutchman overture, Chadwick’s Hobgoblin and Mussorgsky’s Night on Bald Mountain. For more information, call 208-426-1596. 7:30 p.m. $5 general, $3 senior and students, free to Boise State faculty, staff and students with ID. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Literature BOISE LIBRARY’S FALL BOOK SALE—See Thursday. 9 a.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Kids & Teens FREE HALLOWEEN PORTRAITS—Drop by in your costume along with two cans of food for a free 4x6 portrait. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE with two cans of food. Timeless Photo, 1742 W. State St., Boise, 208-343-4501 and 3210 E. Chinden Blvd., Eagle, 208-375-7604, timelessphotoboise.com.

Odds & Ends BOISE RECORD SHOW AND SWAP—The Vinyl Preservation Society of Idaho presents this opportunity to swap and gawk at records from a multitude of local and out-of-state dealers. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $3 general, $10 VIP admission pass. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

MONDAY OCT. 31 Festivals & Events DISCOVERY CENTER HALLOWEEN NIGHT—Bring a science twist to this great holiday while providing a safe indoor location for trick-or-treaters. Featuring snacks, candy, games and experiments. 6-8 p.m. $4. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-3439895, scidaho.org.

On Stage THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $20. Stage Coach Theatre, 5012 Emerald Ave., Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

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TUESDAY NOV. 1 On Stage CELTIC THUNDER—The popular public television stars pay homage to the musical culture of Ireland in this show based on the PBS special Heritage. 7:30 p.m. $52.50-$67.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Odds & Ends KILROY COFFEE KLATCH—Join other WWII-generation people for a morning of conversation and friendship. All veterans are welcome and there are often guest speakers. 10-11:30 a.m. FREE. Warhawk Air Museum, Nampa Airport, 201 Municipal Drive, Nampa, 208-465-6446, warhawkairmuseum.org.

WEDNESDAY NOV. 2 Festivals & Events DIA DE LOS MUERTOS: A CELEBRATION OF LIFE—This is a free, all-ages event, and everyone is encouraged to paint their faces, dress in costume and bring any sort of art in the style and tradition of the Day of the Dead. Art and altars will be on display from 5-9 p.m. Traditional dance and musical performance from 5:30-7 p.m. Costume community walking parade downtown from 6:30-8 p.m. Ending in a 21-and-older party at Fatty’s Bar on Eighth Street, with live music by Lo-Fi from 9-11 p.m. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Freak Alley, Bannock Street between Eighth and Ninth streets, Boise. LIQUID FORUM—Join United Vision for Idaho, the Idaho Hispanic Caucus and Salsa Idaho in celebration of Hispanic Heritage Month. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP, SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Performance poetry workshop followed by an all-ages poetry slam. There is a $25 prize for the haiku champ. 6 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, boisepoetry. com. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., 208-331-5632.

Sports & Fitness STEELHEADS HOCKEY—vs. Las Vegas Wranglers. 7 p.m. $16$50. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3318497, centurylinkarenaboise. com.

ONGOING HAUNTED WOODS—Presented by the Eagle Volunteer Firefighters Association. Dusk to 11:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays. Through Saturday, Oct. 29. $10 adults, $6 kids 5-12. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive, Eagle. HAUNTED WORLD—Scare yourself silly with a 30-acre haunted cornfield, a haunted hostel asylum and a giant corn maze. The fun starts at dusk. BW Card members get a 40 percent discount on tickets purchased at BWHQ. Mondays-Thursdays, 7-10 p.m. and Fridays, Saturdays, 7 p.m.-midnight. Through Monday, Oct. 31. $18, $10.80 with BW card, FREE children 5 and younger. Sugar Factory Road and US Highway 20-26, Nampa, hauntedworld.org. THE MAIZE—Farmbased activities for young and old alike on the farm. Fridays, 4-11 p.m., Saturdays, 10 a.m.-11 p.m. and Mondays-Thursdays, 4-9 p.m. Through Monday, Oct. 31. FREE to visit the farm, $7.95-$15.95 for Maize admission, 208-9225678, farmsteadfestival.com. The Farmstead, 8685 S. Meridian Road, Meridian. SCARECROW STROLL—Take a tour of the garden to check out the scarecrows created by local businesses, organizations, clubs and individuals. Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Mondays-Fridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Through Monday, Oct. 31. FREE members, $5 nonmembers. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden. org.

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VERTICAL DROP: 3,190 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: (2010-2011 PRICES) $90 ADULTS, $60 JUNIORS (7-12) AND SENIORS (65+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 435-649-5400, THECANYONS.COM. SNOW REPORT: 435-615-3456.

The Canyons one of the largest ski resorts in the country. Heli-ski trips, plus world-class dining and lodging, round out a possible high-end, not to mention high-elevation experience.

17 THE CANYONS, PARK CITY, UTAH—Nine mountain peaks, 4,000 skiable acres, six natural halfpipes and a massive terrain park with more than 50 features make

VERTICAL DROP: 1,745 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $62 ADULTS (AGES 13-69), $29 YOUTH (AGES 8-12), $35 SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 7 AND YOUNGER. 800-873-5512, BRIGHTONRESORT.COM.

Renowned for its ski and snowboard school, Brighton also has 200 lighted acres and 22 runs for night skiing, not to mention some of the best of Utah’s powder.

16 BRIGHTON, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—Speed is king at Brighton, where all terrain is accessible by high-speed quad lifts, and boarders are welcome alongside skiers.

VERTICAL DROP: 2,020 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $72 ADULTS, $38 CHILDREN (AGES 12 AND YOUNGER). 801-359-1078, ALTA.COM. SNOW REPORT: 801-572-3939.

with an abundance of expert skiing. Alta’s average seasonal snowfall is more than 560 inches, more than enough to keep the family occupied all winter long.

15 ALTA, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—Although Alta is for skiers only, it’s proof positive that focusing on one thing can mean excellence—in this case, more than 116 runs

VERTICAL DROP: 1,000 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $37 ADULTS (AGES 12-64), $29 CHILDREN (AGES 5-11) AND SENIORS (AGES 65+). FREE FOR CHILDREN YOUNGER THAN 4. 208-538-6251, SKIKELLY.COM.

mediate, but Kelly Canyon also has several short expert runs and longer runs for beginners.

14 KELLY CANYON, IDAHO FALLS—Offering the only night skiing in the area, Kelly Canyon also boasts a terrain park and yearly X Games. Of the 26 runs, most are inter-

VERTICAL DROP: 2,270 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $69 ADULTS (AGES 13-64), $29 YOUTH (AGES 6-12), $44 SENIORS (AGES 65+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 5 AND YOUNGER WITH PAID ADULT. 307-3532300, GRANDTARGHEE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 800-827-4433.

powder at this nationally recognized Teton resort. This season, Grand Targhee welcomes back its terrain park.

13 GRAND TARGHEE, ALTA, WYO.—Two mountains and an average of 500 inches of snow every year means skiers, boarders and snow cat riders find some serious

VERTICAL DROP: 3,365 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $53-$73 ADULTS (AGES 19-64), $43-$63 TEENS (AGES 13-18) AND SENIORS (AGES 65-69), $32-$46 YOUTH (AGES 6-12) AND SENIORS 70+. FREE FOR CHILDREN 5 AND YOUNGER. 800-829-2442, MTBACHELOR.COM. SNOW REPORT: 541-382-7888.

Mt. Bachelor famous. Advanced skiers will find the back side of the mountain to be fierce competition.

12 MT. BACHELOR, BEND, ORE.—Long seasons and a huge amount of liftaccessible terrain, plus the highest skiable elevation in Oregon and Washington, have made

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VERTICAL DROP: 2050 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $58 ADULTS (13-64), $37 JUNIORS (7-12) AND SENIORS (65-72), $5 CHILDREN (6 AND UNDER) AND SUPER SENIORS (7+). 509-672-3101, SKIWHITEPASS.COM. SNOW REPORT: 509-672-3100.

WHITE PASS SKI AREA, YAKIMA, WASH.—White Pass has doubled in size with the addition of Paradise Basin, a 767-acre area that features rolling alpine meadows and tree lines all made accessible by way of the Couloir Express and Basin lift, both quad chairlifts.

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VERTICAL DROP: 1,800 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $36 ADULTS (13-59), $26 JUNIORS (6-12), $28 GOLDEN AGERS (60-69), $13 SENIORS (70+), FREE CHILDREN (5 AND YOUNGER). 406-821-3211, LOSTTRAIL.COM. VERTICAL DROP: 3,400 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $89 ADULTS, $52 YOUTH AND $60 SENIORS (65+). 208-622-4111, SUNVALLEY.COM. SNOW REPORT: 800-635-4150.

six hours away

Divide on the Idaho-Montana border and experiences more than 300 inches of snowfall a year.

28 LOST TRAIL POWDER MOUNTAIN, CONNER, MONT.—Open only Thursdays through Sundays, Lost Trail Powder Mountain is perched atop the Continental

VERTICAL DROP: 2,020 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $32 ADULTS, $20 JUNIORS AND SENIORS (70+). 406-834-3454, SKIMAVERICK.COM.

MAVERICK MOUNTAIN, POLARIS, MONT.—Deep in the Pioneer Mountains lies a mom-and-pop ski resort that boasts an unpretentious environment, long runs and minimal lift lines.

more than six hours away

39 CRYSTAL MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, ENUMCLAW, WASH.—Washington’s largest ski area is now more accessible with the addition of the Mt. Rainier gondola, VERTICAL DROP: 3,620 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $58 ADULTS (18-64), $48 TEENS (15-17), $38 JUNIORS (7-14) AND SENIORS (65-70), FREE JUNIORS (6 AND UNDER) AND SENIORS (71+). 503-272-3158, TIMBERLINELODGE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 503-222-2211.

LIFT TICKETS RANGE FROM $10-$86. SKILAKETAHOE.COM.

party days. There are a total of seven mountains: Sierra at Tahoe, Mt. Rose, Northstar, Heavenly, Kirkwood, Squaw Valley and Alpine Meadows. Each mountain is world-class in its own right, but together, they form the greatest winter destination of all time.

46 LAKE TAHOE, LAKE TAHOE, CALIF.—Lake Tahoe, Calif., otherwise known as the Promised Land to skiers and snowboarders, offers massive powder days and sunny

VERTICAL DROP: 2,400 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $49 ADULTS (19-64), $42 JUNIORS (13-18), $32 COLLEGE/MILITARY (WITH VALID ID), $41 SENIORS (65-69), $19 CHILDREN (6-12), $15 SUPER SENIOR (70+), FREE CHILDREN (6 AND YOUNGER). 800-444-8977, REDLODGEMOUNTAIN.COM. SNOW REPORT: 406-255-6973.

RED LODGE, BILLINGS, MONT.—Whether you’re a novice bunny or advanced ripper, you’ll find your thrills on long, cruiser runs or in steep chutes. With two terrain parks, one for beginners and another for more advanced riders, you’ll find jumps and rails fit for your style.

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,400 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $67 ADULTS (18-64), $50 JUNIORS (7-17), $57 COLLEGE STUDENT (WITH VALID ID) AND SENIORS (65+), FREE CHILD (6 AND UNDER). 208-263-9555, SCHWEITZER.COM. SNOW REPORT: 208-263-9562.

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT, SANDPOINT—From the top of Schweitzer, you’ll be able to see Canada, three states and three mountain ranges. Look down and you’ll see tons of snow spread across 2,900 accessible acres and 92 runs. If all that plus night skiing, terrain parks, tubing and Nordic skiing isn’t enough, venture into the Schweitzer’s backcountry by way of a snowcat or snowmobile with the Selkirk Powder Company.

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VERTICAL DROP: 1,563 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $49 ADULTS (11-64), $30 YOUTHS (6-10), $30 MASTERS (65+). 541-345-SNOW, WILLAMETTEPASS.COM.

WILLAMETTE PASS SKI AREA, EUGENE, ORE.—This little mountain offers big-time fun with more than 400 inches of annual snowfall, challenging runs and excellent beginner slopes. Two terrain parks, night skiing and 20 km of Nordic skiing will leave you searching for a hot tub to unwind in.

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,353 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $66 ADULTS (19-64), $54 SENIORS (65-69), $58 TEENS (13-18), $35 JUNIORS (7-12), FREE CHILD (6 AND UNDER) AND SUPER SENIOR (70+). 800-858-3930, SKIWHITEFISH.COM. SNOWREPORT: 406-862-SNOW.

terrain. Whether you’re a beginning freestyler or an expert shredder, you’ll find your thrills in one of five different, ever-changing terrain parks.

42 WHITEFISH MOUNTAIN RESORT, WHITEFISH, MONT.—One 7.5-minute chair ride gives you access to the majority of Whitefish Mountain’s 3,000 acres of

VERTICAL DROP: 2,280 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $59 ADULTS (13-61), $40 YOUTHS (7-12) AND SENIORS (62-69), $12 CHILDREN (6 AND UNDER) AND SENIORS (70+). 425-434-7669, SUMMITATSNOQUALMIE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 206-236-1600.

THE SUMMIT AT SNOQUALMIE, SNOQUALMIE, WASH.—The Summit is a Northwest Goliath spread out across four separate peaks—Alpental, Summit West, Summit Central and Summit East. Featuring two renowned terrain parks and more than 2,000 acres of terrain, this resort is a great white beast.

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VERTICAL DROP: 1,800 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $62 ADULTS (16-61), $52 STUDENTS (13-15), $42 YOUTH (7-12) AND SENIOR (62-69), $8 CHILDREN (6 AND UNDER), $15 SENIORS (70 AND OVER). 206-812-4510, STEVENSPASS.COM. SNOW REPORT: 206-634-1645.

disappoints with its massive bowls and steep faces. Be sure to hang out for apres ski, when the mountain lights up and the base village starts swinging.

40 STEVENS PASS, SKYKOMISH, WASH.—With a whopping average of 450 inches of snowfall a year, 37 runs and 1,125 acres of accessible terrain, Stevens Pass never

VERTICAL DROP: 3,100 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $65 ADULTS (18-69), $60 YOUTH (11-17), $40 SENIORS (70+), FREE CHILDREN (10 AND YOUNGER). 360-663-2265, SKICRYSTAL.COM. SNOW REPORT: 888-754-6199.

which takes less than 10 minutes to travel up 2,500 feet. The new gondola can be enjoyed by riders as well as those who just want to bask in the glory of Mt. Rainier.

VERTICAL DROP: 4,350 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $81 ADULTS (18-69), $64 JUNIORS (11-17) AND COLLEGE STUDENTS (WITH ID), $74 SENIORS (70+), FREE KIDS (10 AND YOUNGER). 800-5484486, BIGSKYRESORT.COM. SNOW REPORT: 406-995-5900.

some of the shortest lift lines and longest runs, Big Sky is ski and snowboard heaven.

38 BIG SKY, BOZEMAN, MONT.—You’ll need a couple weeks and lots of energy to cover Big Sky’s 150 runs spanning 3,832 acres on three separate mountains. With

VERTICAL DROP: 1,150 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $37 ADULTS (18-61), $26 JUNIORS (7-17) AND SENIORS (62+), $35 STUDENT/MILITARY (WITH ID), FREE CHILDREN (6 AND YOUNGER). 208-744-1301, SKILOOKOUT.COM.

unheralded gems. Kids will have no shortage of fun in Lookout’s two terrain parks and the Famous Free Ski School.

37 LOOKOUT PASS SKI AREA, WALLACE—With three different sides, 540 acres of runs and an average annual snowfall of 400 inches, Lookout Pass is one of Idaho’s

VERTICAL DROP: 2,200 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $51 ADULTS (18-61), $36 YOUTHS (7-17), $46 COLLEGE STUDENTS/MILITARY, $41 SENIORS (62+), FREE CHILDREN (6 AND YOUNGER). 866-344-2675, SILVERMT.COM.

SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT, KELLOGG—Silver Mountain is your allinclusive resort for a variety of winter activities, including ice skating, Nordic skiing, snow tubing, not to mention world-class skiing on two mountains. Spend the day exploring more than 1,600 acres of slopes or kick back at the terrain park. This is an ideal destination for a family vacation so the kiddies will never be bored.

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,700 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $48 ADULTS, $21 SENIORS (70-79), $16 YOUTH (712), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER AND SENIORS (80+). 406-587-2111, BRIDGERBOWL.COM. SNOW REPORT: 406-586-2389.

BRIDGER BOWL, BOZEMAN, MONT.—One of Montana’s most-revered ski resorts, Bridger Bowl features more than 2,000 acres of terrain, eight lifts, three lodges and a terrain park for freestylers of all abilities. Whether you’re a first-timer or an expert, you’ll find your thrills at Bridger Bowl.

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,600 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $42 ADULTS, $39 STUDENTS/SENIORS, $19 CHILDREN (6-12), FREE CHILDREN (5 AND YOUNGER). 406-549-9777, MONTANASNOWBOWL.COM.

sures in at a whopping three miles. Explore the 950 acres of runs but beware the Grizzly, a beastly run that has a 2,000-foot vertical drop.

34 MONTANA SNOWBOWL, MISSOULA, MONT.—Powder lovers rejoice when they visit Montana Snowbowl to find knee-deep terrain and a cruising run that mea-

VERTICAL DROP: 2,000 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $45 ADULTS (18-69), $38 COLLEGE AND MILITARY (WITH ID), $35 YOUTHS (7-17), $26 SENIORS (70+), FREE CHILDREN (6 AND YOUNGER). 509-238-2220, MTSPOKANE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 509-443-1397.

terrain park with different-sized jumps, rails and jibs.

33 MT. SPOKANE, COLBERT, WASH.—Mt. Spokane features 1,425 acres of terrain, 45 runs and 16 runs of night skiing, as well as a tubing hill and a super-sized

VERTICAL DROP: 1,125 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $42 ADULTS, $38 STUDENTS, $33 CHILDREN (GRADES 1-8) AND SENIORS (65+), FREE PRESCHOOLERS (KINDERGARDEN AND YOUNGER). 509-382-4725, BLUEWOOD.COM. SNOW REPORT: 509-522-4110.

also a variety of instructional classes including a free group lesson to all first timers who purchase a platterpull ticket.

32 BLUEWOOD, DAYTON, WASH.—A hidden gem in the Cascade Range, Bluewood offers 24 runs of deep, dry powder and a quiet, relaxing atmosphere. There are

VERTICAL DROP: 1,851 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $54 ADULTS (18-69), $45 YOUTH (7-17), $48 COLLEGE STUDENT/MILITARY/SENIORS (70+), $10 CHILD (6 AND YOUNGER). 509-935-6649, SKI49N.COM.

49 DEGREES NORTH, CHEWELAH, WASH.—With a massive annual snowfall of more than 300 inches, 75 trails and a leg-burning 2.75 mile-long run, 49 Degrees North will have enthusiasts pushing the fun button all day long. Check the website for a variety of ski-and-stay packages that won’t break the bank.

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VERTICAL DROP: 2,388 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $38 ADULTS, $19 CHILDREN (12 AND UNDER) AND SENIORS (65+). 406-563-2184, SKIDISCOVERY.COM.

freestyle park and three separate sides. There’s also the 1.5-mile-long Winning Ridge run for those who want to test their legs.

30 DISCOVERY BASIN, PHILIPSBURG, MONT.—Discovery Basin offers a multitude of terrain for skiers and boarders of all abilities, including Nordic trails, a

and the longest vertical terrain with 3,690 feet. The Palmer snowfield offers thrilling terrain above the tree line for experienced skiers and boarders. Terrain parks and half pipes will leave the more adventurous drooling on their outerwear.

26 TIMBERLINE SKI AREA, GOVERNMENT CAMP, ORE.—Timberline is your best bet to experience the endless winter, with the longest season in the North America

VERTICAL DROP: 1,500 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $44 ADULTS (13-64), $24 JUNIORS (7-12) AND SENIORS (65-71), FREE CHILDREN (6 AND YOUNGER) AND SENIORS ($72). 503-272-3206, SKIBOWL.COM. SNOW REPORT: 503-222-BOWL.

extensive night skiing and freestyle terrain parks. There are plenty of other winter activities, including snowmobiling, snowtubing, snowshoeing and cross-country skiing.

25 MT. HOOD SKI BOWL, GOVERNMENT CAMP, ORE.—The closest ski resort to Portland, Mt. Hood Ski Bowl features the most black diamond runs in Oregon,

VERTICAL DROP: 7,300 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $74 ADULTS, $44 JUNIORS (7-14) AND SENIORS (70+), $64 SENIORS (65-69), $10 CHILDREN (6 AND YOUNGER). WEEKDAY SALES OFFICE: 503-659-1256, WEEKENDS: 503-337-2222, SKIHOOD.COM.

experiences in the Northwest. There are plenty of options for all skill levels, including gentle bunny slopes, steep and deep backcountry and freestyle terrain parks. The new Stadium Express high-speed chair will improve access to both day and night skiing.

24 MT. HOOD MEADOWS, HOOD RIVER, ORE.—Nestled on the slopes of an extinct volcano, Mt. Hood Meadows offers one of the most explosive ski and snowboard

VERTICAL DROP: 4,139 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $85-$95 ADULTS (AGES 15-64), $51-$57 YOUTH (AGES 14 AND YOUNGER), $64-$71 SENIORS (AGES 65+). 307-733-2292, JACKSONHOLE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 888-DEEP-SNO.

powder on two mountains and more than 100 runs, plus two terrain parks. A new lift connecting the South Pass Traverse to Gondola Summit will improve traffic this season.

23 JACKSON HOLE MOUNTAIN RESORT, JACKSON HOLE, WYO.—The area is not just a refuge for elk but skiers and riders as well. Jackson Hole promises primo

VERTICAL DROP: 1,035 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $45 ADULTS (AGES 13-64), $31 YOUTH (AGES 6-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 65+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 5 AND YOUNGER. 541-822-3799, HOODOO.COM. SNOW REPORT: 541-822-3337.

the largest tubing areas in the Northwest. Hoodoo also allows snowbiking on all its runs, so suit up and take a seat for a wild ride down the slopes of the Central Cascades.

22 HOODOO SKI AREA, SANTIAM PASS, ORE.—At the summit of Santiam Pass is a tubing and skiing haven with 32 runs and more than 800 acres, including one of

VERTICAL DROP: 2,047 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $68 ADULTS (AGES 14-69), $42 YOUTH (AGES 7-13), $45 SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 801-534-1400, SKISOLITUDE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 801-536-5777.

boarders the opportunity to enjoy 65 runs and three bowls. Though it’s largely geared to intermediate skiers, beginners and vets will enjoy Solitude just as much.

21 SOLITUDE, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—The name is all you need to know. Unlike many large Utah resorts, Solitude boasts shorter lift lines, offering skiers and

VERTICAL DROP: 3,240 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $78 ADULTS (AGES 13-64), $42 KIDS (AGES 7-12), $65 SENIORS (AGES 65+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 801-933-2222, SNOWBIRD.COM. SNOW REPORT: 801-933-2100.

with a variety of difficulties, including a zigzagging 2.5 miles that form Chip’s Run, the resort’s longest track.

20 SNOWBIRD, SALT LAKE CITY, UTAH—Down the canyon from Alta, Snowbird is no less exciting. Its high elevation tops out at 11,000 feet and it offers 85 runs

VERTICAL DROP: 3,100 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: PRICES VARY DAILY. 800-222-PARK, PARKCITYMOUNTAIN.COM. SNOW REPORT: 435-647-5449.

the lighted Three Kings. There’s also ample backcountry skiing and hiking access. If you’re looking for a different kind of downhill ride, check out the Alpine Coaster.

19 PARK CITY, PARK CITY, UTAH—Consistently named in the top 10 for family resorts, Park City has it all: 114 trails, eight bowls and four terrain parks, including

VERTICAL DROP: 3,000 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $96 ADULTS (AGES 13-64), $60 CHILDREN (AGES 4-12), $69 SENIORS (AGES 65+), $21 TODDLERS (AGES 3 AND YOUNGER). 800-424-DEER, DEERVALLEY.COM. SNOW REPORT: 435-649-2000.

when you consider this skiers-only paradise has six mountains with 100 runs, including runs from the 2002 Olympic Winter Games.

18 DEER VALLEY RESORT, PARK CITY, UTAH—For four years in a row, Deer Valley Resort has been named No. 1 in North America by Ski Magazine. It’s easy to see why

Mountain and Dollar Mountain, 6,000 feet of Nordic and snowshoe trails and three 600-foot tubing lanes make Sun Valley an international winter sports destination, not to mention perfect for snow-loving locals.

11 SUN VALLEY SKI RESORT, SUN VALLEY—The Mecca of Idaho skiing has been in operation for more than 75 years. World-renowned skiing and boarding on Bald

VERTICAL DROP: 400 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $17 ADULTS AND CHILDREN, $15 SENIORS, FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 208-983-3866, GRANGEVILLE.US/SNOWHAVEN.

SNOWHAVEN RESORT, GRANGEVILLE—This city-owned getaway features two 850-foot-long tubing runs on top of seven ski runs served by a T-bar lift and rope tow. It’s an inexpensive adventure for the whole family and is open only on weekends and holidays.

10

VERTICAL DROP: 1,000 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $35 ADULTS (AGES 13-69), $25 YOUTH (AGES 7-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 70+), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 208-673-5599, POMERELLE-MTN.COM. SNOW REPORT: 208-673-5555.

Carpet lift helps beginners get their start, while more confident folks can enjoy 24 groomed slopes and two terrain parks.

09 POMERELLE, ALBION—High annual snowfall of around 500 inches means Pomerelle has some of the earliest and best powder in southern Idaho. A 450-foot Magic

VERTICAL DROP: 2,200 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $40 ADULTS (AGES 12-65), $26 CHILDREN (AGES 6-12) AND SENIORS (AGES 66+), $3 CHILDREN 5 AND YOUNGER. 208-775-4452, PEBBLECREEKSKIAREA.COM.

challenge to advanced skiers without shutting out newbies. As a bonus, chilled skiers can warm up at nearby Lava Hot Springs.

08 PEBBLE CREEK SKI AREA, INKOM—Three triple-chair lifts and 54 runs make for a wide range of skiing without long lift lines. Mount Bonneville provides an honest

VERTICAL DROP: 845 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $15 FULL DAY, $10 HALF DAY OR NIGHT. 208-962-3624, COTTONWOODBUTTE.ORG.

resorts. Two lifts, including one 3,000-foot T-bar, serve four major runs and several smaller powdery trails.

07 COTTONWOOD BUTTE, FERDINAND—Low ticket and rental prices and a welcoming family atmosphere make Cottonwood Butte an excellent escape from bigger ski

VERTICAL DROP: 900 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $35 ADULTS (19-69), $29 STUDENTS (13-18), $21 CHILDREN (7-12), $5 CHILDREN (6 AND YOUNGER), $25 SENIORS (70+). 541-856-3277, ANTHONYLAKES.COM.

driest powder in the region and few lift lines.

06 ANTHONY LAKES, NORTH POWDER, ORE.—Just over the state line, Anthony Lakes has a lot to offer, with the highest base elevation in Oregon, some of the

three hours away

VERTICAL DROP: 1,425 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $36 ADULTS (AGES 18+), $25 YOUTH (AGES 7-17) AND SENIORS (62-69), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER AND SENIORS 70+. 208-764-2526, SOLDIERMOUNTAIN.COM.

glade skiing as well as trikke skiing lessons. The price is modest but the offerings are not, with more than 36 runs for all difficulty levels.

05 SOLDIER MOUNTAIN, FAIRFIELD—Surrounded by the Sawtooth National Forest, Soldier Mountain is an affordable family destination that includes tree and open

VERTICAL DROP: 700 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $31 ADULTS (AGES 18+), $22 YOUTH (AGES 7-17), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 208-736-SNOW, MAGICMOUNTAINRESORT.COM.

The natural terrain of the southern Sawtooth Mountains provides plenty of jumps and more challenging runs.

04 MAGIC MOUNTAIN, TWIN FALLS—For skiers and snowboarders seeking an excellent range of trails, from beginners to experts-only, Magic Mountain is the place.

VERTICAL DROP: 405 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $13 ADULTS (AGES 17 AND OLDER), $11 CHILDREN (AGES 5-17), FREE FOR CHILDREN 4 AND YOUNGER. 208-634-5691, LITTLESKIHILL.ORG.

sion and a great place for kids to learn how to ski for more than 60 years. The Little Ski Hill’s Little Bear Basin features more than 30 km of cross country ski trails for adventurous Nordic types.

03 LITTLE SKI HILL, MCCALL—Originally founded to entertain Forest Service employees looking for winter recreation, the Little Ski Hill has been a perfect winter diver-

VERTICAL DROP: 1,800 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $55 ADULTS (AGES 18-69), $37 YOUTHS AND SENIORS (AGES 12-17, 70+), $23 CHILDREN (AGES 7-11), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER. 208-634-4151, BRUNDAGE.COM. SNOW REPORT: 208-634-SNOW.

BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, MCCALL—Though it’s known for its expansive runs and thrilling terrain parks, Brundage hosts guided backcountry skiing and snow cat skiing for those who want to explore the untracked winter wonderland of Payette National Forest.

two hours away

VERTICAL DROP: 1,800 FEET. LIFT TICKETS: $48 ADULTS (AGES 12-69), $20 CHILDREN (AGES 7-11), FREE FOR CHILDREN 6 AND YOUNGER AND SENIORS (70+), $20 NIGHT-ONLY. 208-332-5100, BOGUSBASIN.ORG. SNOW REPORT: 208-342-2100.

Bogus added a third high-speed quad lift to the Superior side of the mountain to let skiers and boarders zip uphill as well as down.

01 BOGUS BASIN MOUNTAIN RECREATION AREA, BOISE—Hit the powder practically in your own back yard in this local favorite’s 68th season. This year,

Within One Hour

mountainguide two thousand eleven


NEWS/NOISE NOISE

A LITTLE BIT CRAZY Google “douchebag” and you’ll find this dude.

MAKE YOUR MOVE This week in Noise News is all about moving and moving on up. Take, for example, Boise Rock School, which relocated from its warehouse space off River Street to some choice new downtown digs at 1404 W. Idaho St. The school’s new space features multiple classrooms, custom murals, a garage door for summer Scan this QR code concerts and a color scheme to watch a video report on the that is supposed to either new Boise Rock accelerate learning or ADHD, School space. Rock School founder Ryan Peck isn’t sure which. Also on the move is former Limp Bizkit singer Fred Durst. MTV is reporting that he’ll be moving from music to TV when he produces and stars in a new sitcom for CBS about a rock star dad. The one thing that won’t be changing is his role: The show’s working title is Douchebag. The next musical move is actually a march, from the literary to the musical. The University of Idaho’s annual Tubaween will feature a Lord of the Rings theme this year. Dudes in drag playing tubas will perform a skit called “The Lord of the Tuba” in full homemade Middle Earth duds. The studentproduced shenanigan is going down at 7:30 p.m on Monday, Oct. 31, at the Lionel Hampton School of Music Haddock Hall at the University of Idaho in Moscow. Moving on up is Sacramento, Calif.-based schlock-rock band Get Shot, which accepted $50,000 in sponsorship from a “wealthy call-girl” known as Svetta. The band agreed to hire prostitutes as stage dancers for its show, which features singer J.P. Hunter singing into a microphone attached to his wang. “There was no way anyone else would have given us a loan or invest in us,” Hunter said in a press release. “We just want to rock out and hang out with hot girls. I’m glad someone has faith in us.” The band is currently holding a national “talent” search and is planning a 56-city tour with its fancy new money and fancy ladies. The final move is a skip. Uber Tuesdays, the killer free concert series Visual Arts Collective hosted most of the summer will be taking off the rest of the year because of theater productions booked into the space before the concert series began. Don’t worry, uber-goobers. VAC officials told BW that the Uber will be back in your Tuesdays in 2012— just in time for the Mayan apocalypse to end Tuesdays once and for all. —Josh Gross

Mr. Gnome grows comfortable with its Madness in Miniature CHRIS PARKER

The thing with outsiders is—absent the tomato cages of peer pressure—they tend to grow in glorious and unexpected ways. Such is the case with Cleveland husband-and-wife duo Mr. Gnome. The band’s music doesn’t squeeze into any easy mold, balancing thundering onslaughts of guitar with gauzy drifting passages of great delicacy and beauty. Singer and guitarist Nicole Barille lies in the storm’s eye—her breathy vocals vacillating between wispy croon and sultry banshee wail. It results in an arresting mix of menace and mellifluousness. “We’ve never really cared about fitting into one simple format. As a result, the Those in the Gnome won’t miss this Cleveland duo at Neurolux. albums tend to be all over the place ... We don’t want to have them be heavy or soft “madness in miniature.” EP arrived in 2006, followed shortly thereall the way through,” Barille said, motoring “I just thought that was awesome,” after by their first national tour. Two more out of Cleveland toward the band’s first tour Barille said. “It’s all very fitting because we albums—Deliver This Creature (2008) and stop. “I always liked albums that kind of always feel a bit crazy.” take you on an adventure, and that’s what we Heave Yer Skeleton (2009)—followed, acThat attitude is mirrored in the band’s companied by near non-stop touring. For a were going for.” live shows. Unable to replicate the richness while, the couple’s only home was a CleveBarille and drummer/hubby Sam Meister of its albums, the live shows have assumed land storage facility or friends’ couches. grew up in the shadow of grunge, which a life of their own. Over the last couple The hard work has paid off with Barille said may have inspired some of their years, Barille has begun to collect looping dramatic growth. While Mr. Gnome has approach. Mr. Gnome utilizes a loud/soft and other effects pedals to help recreate the dichotomy with slow-builds of intensity that always made intriguing, theatrical music, widescreen breadth of the band’s sound. it has begun to master pacing and spacing. culminate in colorful sonic firestorms. But “As far as the live show, it’s been a it’s not that simple, if only because the songs Not only is there greater concision to the arrangements on Mr. Gnome’s latest album, growing process of adding so many pedals are never that straightforward. There’s a that I’m probably going to fall over many Madness in Miniature, but they’re full of prog-inflected windiness to the sound that’s times. It’s a bit crazy on stage and it’s always a lot closer to a three-act opera than a three- sound without being overcrowded. Indeed teetering on falling apart. It’s kind of fun minute pop song. Barille gives credit to Mas- everything’s crisper on this new album, that way,” she said. “We’ve added a ton of sive Attack for opening her eyes to different which heightens its impact. Like Heave looping. Sam’s actually looping a few things, Yer Skeleton, Madness in Miniature was possibilities for a song, and Queens of the too. We just want to have the option … recorded at QOTSA’s Josh Homme’s Pink Stone Age for cluing her into the intoxicatDuck Studios with studio manager/engineer to build guitar parts on top of each other ing mix of power and prettiness. like all these different kind of instrumental Justin Smith. But this time, the band felt “It was really cool to hear stoner rock more comfortable and harmonies. And then we’re always working with these really focused in the studio. with octave pedals for the low-end because pretty choir boy voWith Finn Riggins. we don’t have a bass player. Yeah, it’s total “I think with this cals. I really dug that Thursday, Oct. 27, 8 p.m., $5. madness on stage for sure.” album, we knew juxtaposition,” she NEUROLUX But whether it’s total madness or just exactly what we said of QOTSA. “I 111 N. 11th St. madness in miniature, Mr. Gnome remains were going for when also think it’s about 208-343-0886 dedicated—like any long-standing freaks— we went out to L.A. the music that Sam neurolux.com to doing just what it’s always done. So maybe the huge and I were digging “We really like to experiment with all amount of layering when we met and different sounds. I think that confuses some kind of introduced each other to. I was defi- on Heave was just like another step of us nitely into heavier stuff and he was into the figuring out how exactly we like our sound,” people because they really like to put on a lighter, spacier stuff, and that’s just a fusion said Barille. “I think this one, we scaled back record and want it to all be the exact same thing. And we’re all over the place,” Barille a little bit. I don’t know. There are still a lot of the beast Mr. Gnome has become.” said. “But I just think that’s because we are The couple met in high school but didn’t of tracks.” really open-minded music listeners. I love The album’s title is taken from a line get together until they had finished college. Barille read in a Time magazine article from distortion pedals, and I love an acoustic They married in 2005 and instead of going tone and a soft voice. It’s just whatever the ’60s about Timothy Leary. It spoke of on a honeymoon, spent the time in downmoves you.” psychiatrists taking small dosages of LSD town Cleveland working on their first EP, Let the moving begin. in their practice, which they described as Echoes of the Ground. A second self-titled 28 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 29


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE RYAN LEW IS

GUIDE WEDNESDAY OCT. 26 BEN BURDICK—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown BLUE SCHOLARS—Featuring Bambu/Grynch. Doors 8:30 p.m., show 9:30 p.m. $7 adv., $10 door. See Listen Here, this page. Reef BOOM CHICK—9 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

BLUE SCHOLARS, OCT. 26, REEF

THE BOURBON DOGS—5:30 p.m., FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

Seattle’s rap duo Blue Scholars is about more than just rhymes. The two are self-proclaimed filmmakers, bloggers and travelers, and consider their music just another exercise in storytelling. Their myriad influences are “a mix of audio artifacts and imagination”—whether it be Arizona’s SB1070 immigration law on “Joe Arpaio” or the roster of the former Seattle Supersonics basketball team. Iranian DJ/producer Sabzi makes his underground, throwback hip-hop beats for other musicians to build on. Blue Scholars exists primarily as an Internet collaboration. Filipino rapper MC Geologic lays lyrics on top of Sabzi’s tracks. Song “The Ave” highlights the starburst fusion of culture: lyrics about Seattle’s 98118 zip code and vegan sandwiches are laid over conga-esque Cuban horns, with a hook of “Fuck class / get your education on the Ave.” —Andrew Crisp

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandler’s

8:30 p.m. doors, $7 adv., $10 show. Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., 208-287-9200, reefboise.com.

DAVID MARR—6 p.m. FREE. Cole Marr GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GAROZNIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill.

THURSDAY OCT. 27 BLAZE AND KELLY—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel Frim Fram 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s High Desert Band—6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater Pizza Island Reggae Thursdays—10 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SUICYCLES—9:30 p.m. $5. Grainey’s Basement SUN BLOOD STORIES—10 p.m. FREE. Bouquet WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge WILLISON, ROOS, CHARLIE BURRY—7:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m., FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club STEADY RUSH—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub & Grill SUICYCLES—9:30 p.m. $5. The Red Room

FRIDAY OCT. 28

THE WAR ON DRUGS—With Purling Hiss and Carter. 8 p.m. $6 adv., $8 door. Flying M Coffeegarage

ANTIOQUIA—9 p.m. $5. Liquid

THE WORKING DJS—9:30 p.m. $TBD. Grainey’s Basement

BOSS HAWG AND THE SHORT BUS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye BRANDON PRITCHETT—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

SATURDAY OCT. 29

Jam Night with Kevin Shrumm—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

CHERRY ROYALE—10 p.m. $5. Reef

James Lewis—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears

GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

6 DOWN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

JAM NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

MR. GNOME—With Finn Riggins. 8 p.m. $5. See Noise, Page 28. Neurolux

BLIND DRIVER—6 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars

JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KOFFIN KATS—With Poke. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

REILLY COYOTE—7 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s Saloon

NAOMI PSALM—With Blue Cinema. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La Tea Room

ROBERT JAMES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

BLUES AT BREAKFAST—Featuring Rex Miller, Sandra Cavanaugh, Richard Soliz, The B3 Trio and others. 10 a.m. FREE. The Blue Door Cafe

NEW TRANSIT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE, Lock, Stock & Barrel

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club

REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JACK’S MANNEQUIN—With The Academy Is and Lady Danville. 7:15 p.m. $23.50-$50. Knitting Factory

ANTIOQUIA—9 p.m. $5. Liquid

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DC3—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO—

30 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE DJ ERIC RHODES—9 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

SUNDAY OCT. 30

HALLOWEEN PARTY WITH MISS KIMBERLY—9 p.m. $3. Neurolux

6 DOWN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

LARRY BUTTEL—7 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

A DOUG BROWN COLLECTIVE—1 p.m. FREE. Solid

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid

MIGUEL GONZALES—Noon. FREE. Casa del Sol

BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon-3 p.m. FREE. Grape Escape

REX MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

OLD DEATH WHISPER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

GAME—7:30 p.m. $25-$45. Knitting Factory

SHAUN BRAZELL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

PETER WOLF CRIER—With Birds and Batteries. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

PILOT ERROR—10 p.m. $7. Reef

HAMBONES ON THE BEACH—4 p.m. FREE. Sun Ray Cafe

RADIATION CITY—With Junior Rocket Scientist. 9 p.m. $5. See Listen Here, this page. VAC

LARRY CONKLIN—11 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

KATE VOEGELE AND PARACHUTE—With Nate Fowler. 8 p.m. $17-$30. Knitting Factory

SUNDERGROUND—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper RYAN PECK—6 p.m. FREE. Salt Tears RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club THE WORKING DJS—9:30 p.m. $TBD. Grainey’s Basement

MONDAY OCT. 31 ALTERNATIVE PRESS TOUR 2011—Featuring Four Year Strong, Gallows, Title Flight, The Swellers and Sharks. 7 p.m. $16.50-$30. Knitting Factory

TUESDAY NOV. 1 BROCK BARTEL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

TERRI EBERLEIN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill TRIO43—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

WEDNESDAY NOV. 2 CURTIS STIGERS—8 p.m. $50. Boise Contemporary Theater GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s STEVE EATON AND PHIL GAROZNIK—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DAN COSTELLO—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW—6 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadDowntown

FOREVER GROWING—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

JEFF MOLL AND GUESTS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

THE TIME TWINS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

LARRY CONKLIN—11 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

THE VANPAEPEGHEM TRIO— 5:30 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadMeridian

REP THE AXE TOUR—Featuring Axe Murder Boys. 7 p.m. $18. Mardi Gras

BLUES JAM WITH RICHARD SOLIZ—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge BROCK BARTEL—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

RUSS PFEIFER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

V E N U E S

MORE LIVE MUSIC LISTINGS AT BOISEWEEKLY.COM.

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

RADIATION CITY, OCT. 29, VAC Typically musical interpretations of radiation are aggressive— driving rock about the horror of fallout or the wacky ways it has been interpreted in pop culture. Portland, Ore., band Radiation City takes a different approach. Its sound is more like actual radiation: subtle, intoxicating and deadly. The group’s hybrid of smooth, dreamy electronica and soul-tinged indie-rock is a soft blur of notes, without so much as a tinge of rock aggression. Instead Radiation City’s music is a mutant anti-pop version of pop. Recently signed to Portland’s Tender Loving Empire, Radiation City has been generating no shortage of buzz while floating around the country on tour. The band played Boise in early August and will be back on Saturday, Oct. 29, for a headlining slot at Visual Arts Collective. —Josh Gross 8 p.m. doors, 9 p.m. show. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 31


NEWS/ARTS K RYS TA FIC C A

ARTS/VISUAL COURTESY BALLET IDAHO

SWORDS AND TUTUS Daniel Orozco lands a Whiting Writers’ Award.

TWO IDAHO AUTHORS TAKE HOME PRESTIGIOUS AWARDS Big news for two local authors. Daniel Orozco and Kerri Webster both received a 2011 Whiting Writers’ Award at a banquet in New York City on Oct. 25. Each year, the prestigious $50,000 Whiting award is given to 10 up-and-coming writers from across the United States. According to Cort Conley at the Idaho Commission on the Arts, this is an unprecedented honor for the state. “For Idaho to get two, and in the same year, is astounding,” Conley wrote. Whiting Awards have been bestowed upon such household names as Jeffrey Eugenides, Michael Cunningham and Kim Edwards before they were famous. Denis Johnson, a currently Idaho-based author, received a Whiting Writers’ Award in 1986, before he moved to Hope. In visual arts news, Enso Artspace is featuring an exhibit called the Nature of Things, which is comprised of artwork that explores trees and other flora. The show includes paintings, sculptures, drawings and mosaics from Enso members Andrea Merrell, Cate Brigden and Lisa Pisano. The exhibition runs through Friday, Nov. 11, at Enso Artspace, 120 E. 38th St., No. 105 in Garden City. If you’re looking to learn more about the Nature of Things and connect with the artists directly, visit Enso on Saturday, Oct. 29, from 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. for Coffee-Talk-Art. Jacqueline Crist, former owner of Boise’s J Crist Gallery, is giving a presentation about the artwork, and there will be a light brunch served. For more information, visit ensoartspace.com. Theater enthusiasts haven’t been left out. Alley Repertory Theater’s Salons in the Alley allows theater-goers to participate in the plays they watch through conversations about the play’s cultural context and meaning. Participants can watch a rehearsal, meet the playwright and tour backstage before they take their seats in the audience. The first Salon will focus on HEAD, a play about crime and punishment in modern Iraq, written by Oliver Russell Stoddard. The performance examines a beheading and its consequences with more gallows humor than most of us are used to seeing on TV news. If you’re interested in the story and people behind HEAD, head down to Visual Arts Collective for free Salons on Thursday, Oct. 27, Thursday, Nov. 3, and Thursday, Nov. 10, at 7 p.m. Email Artistic Director Buffie Main at buffie@alleyrep.org for more information. Early bird tickets for HEAD, which runs Wednesday, Nov. 9-Friday, Nov. 18, at Visual Arts Collective, are $10 through Tuesday, Nov. 1. For more information about HEAD or Salons in the Alley, visit alleyrep.org. —Tara Morgan and Talyn Brumley

Let Ballet Idaho’s “Aarrrg! Pirates!” hold you captive SHEREE WHITELEY It’s not often that a Ballet Idaho rehearsal begins with Artistic Director Peter Anastos crying: “Slash harder. You’re not going to break the swords,” and “He doesn’t need both his eyes anyway.” But Anastos recently delivered these instructions with the same frequency as more common ballet directions like “attitude front.” The dancers laughed, and it was immediately clear that this wasn’t the rigid ballet atmosphere that blockbuster dance movies Prepare for some Corsair flare at Ballet Idaho’s “Aarrrg! Pirates!” so often depict. “We like being a company,” Anastos said. tos said. “The whole idea of pirates is a “I think our dancers genuinely like each other let if you can get them to laugh,” he said. great fantasy, and I thought it would make “If people can laugh, and come in and be and that helps. But I think that’s partly Boise, a super ballet. This music is sort of riotous really entertained in the theater, they will too. I think Boise does that to people.” and funny, so I thought I could make a come back. I love ballet, and I want people The environment in the studio was strikto love ballet. The chief thing we need to do farcical ballet about pirates.” ingly casual, and the content of the ballet Anastos credits the music for bringing is entertain. We want to be entertaining. We being rehearsed was equally surprising. It the ballet together, although he had a few want to have fun.” was evident from the get-go that “Aarrrg! ideas about what he wanted for a pirateBalletmaster Alex Ossadnik doesn’t want Pirates!” isn’t your typical fluffy-tutu, themed ballet. attendees to arrive at “Pirates” with any marvel-at-the-unbelievable–beauty, lullaby“I always let the music tell me what preconceptions. on-stage kind of performance. Dancers to do,” said Anastos, who was a pianist “I’d like them to get in there like they’re performed the leaps, pirouettes and changebefore he became a choreographer. “It going to a fun movie and just have a good ments expected from a professional ballet time,” Ossadnik said. “There’s nothing to un- always does. If you have good music and a troupe, but their ethereal facial expressions derstand. There’s this perception about ballet fairly good idea, you’ll make a good ballet, were replaced with grins and snarls. The because the music always tells you what that you have to know what you’re seeing. clinking of metal swords coincided with comes next.” If you have to know what you’re seeing, it’s Anastos’ counts, and dancers brandished Johnny Depp may have had a little to lousy ballet. their weapons in Zorro-worthy fashion. do with it, too. Anastos said he enjoyed the “Ballet is enterBallet Idaho will famed Pirates of the Caribbean movies, but tainment,” he added. premiere “Aarrrg! they didn’t provide much in the way of in“If it is good, it will Pirates!” on Friday, Mix It Up runs Friday, Oct. 28, 8 p.m.; Saturtouch you some way.” spiration for movement. They did, however, day, Oct. 29, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Sunday, Oct. Oct. 28, at the Boise 30, 2 p.m.; $35-$55. provide some ideas about characters. The music for the State Special Events “I like how [Depp’s] character was sort of “Arrrg! Pirates!” is ESTHER SIMPLOT CENTER FOR THE Center. “Pirates” goofy, maybe sort of drunk,” Anastos said. a mash-up of opera PERFORMING ARTS is the final piece in 516 S. Ninth St. Although intentionally farcical and hucomposer Giuseppe Ballet Idaho’s Mix It 208-426-1494 morous, “Aarrrg! Pirates!” isn’t an amateur Verdi’s “Jerusalem,” Up, a performance balletidaho.org production. The steps are technical, and “Il Trovatore” and consisting of three may even be considered virtuoso pieces. “Les Vepres Sione-act ballets, which “I wanted it to be a technical challenge ciliennes.” Although includes Anastos’ triple pas de deux, “Clair for the dancers,” Anastos said. “There’s Verdi composed ballet music out of obligade Lune” and Principal Dancer Ryan Nye’s tion (operas of the time had to have a ballet lots of solos. There’s a big pas de deux, and modern ballet “City Symphony.” there’s solos in the pas de deux, too. That’s sequence), his music is nonetheless inspirAccording to Anastos, “Pirates” will not in every ballet. I wanted to show how ing, especially for Anastos. involve a ship, a female-pirate island and good our company really is.” For “Aarrrg! Pirates!” Anastos employed several other surprises meant to make audiThe evening promises to be a mixed bag of his humor and creativity to invent an entire ences laugh. modern, classic and just-plain-entertaining. background for the production, which “What’s nice about Peter is his creativ“Everything is completely different—it’s involves a performance by a pirate ballet ity and sense of humor. That’s not typilike a really great buffet,” Anastos said of troupe in the middle of a fantasized Verdi cally associated with ballet,” said Ballet Mix It Up. “Also, it helps to develop taste. opera called La Regina Trovatiara (The Idaho Board Chairman Chris Privon, as he It forces an audience to say, ‘I like that. Queen Found Her Hat). watched the artistic director morph into a I don’t like that,’ and that’s a good thing “This music is all kind of crazy and ship captain and instruct his pirates on the because then you become discriminating in nutty, and there’s a fast finish to everything. right way to slash. a really good way. You can’t like everything Watching the rehearsal, it was impossible It’s one finale after another one. There’s a in life, and you can’t hate everything—alsort of zaniness to being a pirate—they lead not to crack a smile, which is Anastos’ goal. though some people try.” “I find it’s easier to get people to like bal- these adventurous, dangerous lives,” Anas-

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LISTINGS/SCREEN Special screenings

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

MARGIN OF ERROR Margin Call occupies Wall Street INTO ETERNITY—This documentary explores the treatment of radioactive waste. Sponsored by the Snake River Alliance. Thursday, Oct. 27, 7 p.m. $10 general, $8 students. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com. FATHOM THRILLER THURSDAYS—Catch the firstever showing of Butterfinger the 13th, a special horror featurette, followed by the docu-drama Jack the Ripper: The Definitive Story. Thursday, Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m. $12.50. Edwards Boise Stadium 22 and IMAX, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-9603, regmovies.com. THE MET: LIVE IN HD, DON GIOVANNI—Fabio Luisi conducts a new production of Mozart’s classic opera of lust, heartbreak and revenge. Saturday, Oct. 29, 10:55 a.m. $18-$24. Edwards Boise Stadium 22 and IMAX, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-9603, regmovies.com.

TWILIGHT SAGA TUESDAYS—Re-watch your favorite vampire movies and get prepped for the debut of The Twilight Saga: Breaking Dawn-Part 1 on Friday, Nov. 18. Cast interviews and special features to precede movie screenings. Tuesday, Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m. Edwards Boise Stadium 22 and IMAX, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3779603, and Edwards Nampa Spectrum Stadium 14, 2001 N. Cassia St., Nampa, 208-467-3312, regmovies.com.

Opening

GEORGE PRENTICE On March 16, 1979, Paramount Pictures quietly released a pedestrian but capable drama, The China Syndrome, a fictional tale of safety cover-ups at a nuclear power plant. Twelve days later, the Three Mile Island nuclear accident turned the movie into box office gold. The film was instantly deemed “important,” earning four Oscar nominations, including one for Best Picture. More than three decades later, Margin Call may be the next China Syndrome. It certainly Kevin Spacey plays outside the margins in Margin Call. didn’t forecast Occupy Wall Street—principal photography wrapped in the summer “I have learned one truism in all my years,” associate plugs in some additional numbers to of 2010—but it comes awfully close. And if an embedded spreadsheet and concludes that says Irons’ character. “To succeed, you must the current global financial crisis is remotely the company’s assets are on a highway to shiteither be first, smart or cheat.” interesting to you, I can’t recommend Margin town. The associate, in a fine performance by Audiences clearly have the upper hand as Call enough. Zachary Quinto, holds a doctorate from MIT Margin Call begins. We know how it’s going Before I go much further, a caveat—in in aerospace engineering. So, yes, that would to end—global economies will be ruined, the 1990s, I worked for a large New York make him a rocket scientist. millions will be unemployed and visceral bank (Marine Midland) in the midst of a The only option, the firm’s top executives demonstrations will spill to the streets of the takeover by a larger Far East bank (Hong conclude, is to limit their own carnage at the Kong Shanghai Banking Corp). I also worked world’s capitals. First-time writer-director J.C. Chandor tells expense of everyone else. A running, but notfor one of the nation’s largest insurance and so-funny joke is that the higher the corporate his story as historical financial institutions ladder goes, the less-abled the executives are fiction, not putting a (Transamerica). I have to interpret the graphs and charts that forecast name to the centurysat in a dozen boardMARGIN CALL (R) old investment firm on their fate. It’s the most accurate portrayal of a rooms, where acquisiDirected by J.C. Chandor the brink of collapse in corporate boardroom I have ever seen on film. tions and layoffs were Starring Jeremy Irons, Stanley Tucci, Unfortunately Chandor can’t seem to help 2008. (Lehman Broththe order of the day Kevin Spacey himself by injecting too many David Mameters? Hello?) so that the man in the Opens Friday at The Flicks like speeches, complete with “Fuck me” Margin Call’s 100 corner office could and “Fuck you.” Such scenes sheathe the minutes chronicles the have more toys. characters as smug jerks rather than the naive 36-hour life and death I felt a familiar chill charlatans they truly are. of an investment bank, beginning with the as I watched Jeremy Irons’ killer performance In a slim piece of irony, Margin Call was all-too-familiar sacking of dozens of six-figured in Margin Call. His performance as mastersuits. One of the casualties, played perfectly by produced on a limited budget of $3.4 milof-the-universe John Tuld is his best since his lion. Its box office return should be much Stanley Tucci, passes a flash drive to an under1990 Oscar-winning turn as the equally evil more significant. ling, warning him to “be careful.” The junior Claus von Bulow in Reversal of Fortune.

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN Jan. 6: The Iron Lady—She’s mastered every other accent and mannerism in history. Meryl Streep was bound to get around to portraying Nov. 11: J. Edgar—Leonardo DiCaprio, directed by Clint Eastwood, Margaret Thatcher. in a profile of possibly the most powerful Jan. 13: The Descendants—George man of the 20th century. Clooney’s best starring role to date. Nov. 23: My Week With Marilyn—MiSure to win him a trip to the Academy’s chelle Williams is getting glowing filmbig night. festival notices of her portrayal of Miss Jan. 13: Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy— Monroe. John le Carre’s spy classic starring Colin Dec. 21: The Girl With the Dragon Firth and Gary Oldman. Tattoo—The first of three Americanized Jan. 20: A Dangerous Method—Direcversions of Stieg Larsson’s trilogy. tor David Cronenberg takes on Sigmund Dec. 23: The Artist—If you haven’t Freud, Carl Jung and a lot of sex with the heard about this one, you will soon. It’s a help of Viggo Mortensen, Michael Fassgorgeous (yet black and white) tribute to bender and Keira Knightley. 1930s Hollywood. Dec. 25: War Horse—Steven Spiel—George Prentice berg’s adaptation of the hit stage drama. I spy Gary Oldman in Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.

COMING ATTRACTIONS OF OSCAR-BUZZ MOVIES

IN TIME—The only way to stay alive in the future is to steal, inherit or earn more time. Justin Timberlake and Amanda Seyfried star in this thriller. (PG-13) Edwards 22, Edwards 14, Edwards 9 MARGIN CALL —This drama from writer-director J.C. Chandor covers the meltdown of a financial institution. Zachary Quinto, Jeremy Irons, Paul Bettany, Kevin Spacey, Simon Baker, Stanley Tucci, Mary McDonnell and Demi Moore star. See Screen, this page. (R) Flicks PUSS IN BOOTS—The beloved Shrek character goes on an adventure of his own. Antonio Banderas provides the voice for the furry protagonist. (PG) Edwards 22, Edwards 14, Edwards 9

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LISTINGS/SCREEN THE TUBE/SCREEN

THE RUM DIARY— Johnny Depp stars in this film based on the debut novel by Hunter S. Thompson. Aaron Eckhart, Amber Heard, Michael Rispoli, Richard Jenkins, Giovanni Ribisi and Marshall Bell star. (R) Edwards 22, Edwards 9 34

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code. ONCE UPON A TUBE Fairy tales don’t show up on television too often, unless you count those mindless 30-minute DVDs that parents use to preoccupy the little one while mommy makes lunch or daddy folds the laundry. In fact, you have to visit a far off land called the 1980s to find television’s last successful visit with Mother Goose. Shelley Duvall’s Faerie Tale Theatre had a nice fiveyear run on Showtime, bringing classic tales to life with a pretty amazing cast, including Jeff Bridges, Billy Crystal, Mick Jagger and Robin Williams. Even more impressive were some of the episodes’ directors, such as Tim Burton and Francis Ford Coppola. But twice-told tales have returned to the small screen after a long slumber. ABC is sprinkling some fairy dust on its Sunday night lineup with Once Upon a Time. NBC is dimming the lights on Fridays

with a much darker Grimm. Once Upon a Time, a highly original conceit, mashes up everyone from Snow White to Jiminy Cricket and then traps them in, horror of horrors, modern-day Maine. An impressive cast is led by Ginnifer Goodwin as Snow. You may know her better from five seasons on HBO’s acclaimed drama Big Love. Ironically, one of her Big Love co-stars, Amanda Seyfried, starred earlier this year in a big screen re-telling of Red Riding Hood. NBC’s Grimm unleashes some of the same characters on modern-day Portland, Ore. In this fantasy/crime series, a homicide detective sleuths out Grimm-esque creatures wreaking havoc on the city. Fairy tales spill over to the big screen in 2012 with dueling productions of Snow White, one starring Julia Roberts and the other starring Kristen Stewart and Charlize Theron. —George Prentice

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

DVD/SCREEN CAN’T FIND THE HOT REDBOX RENTAL? TRY PLANS B OR C Treasure Valley Redbox customers mirrored the nation in craving some solid action films for the week ending Oct. 16. According to the dollar-a-night, flicks-in-a-box company, the most-popular DVDs rented in the Boise metro area were Zookeeper, X-Men: First Class, Transformers: Dark of the Moon and Hanna. While Zookeeper, the X-Men reboot and the Transformers sequel were box office blockbusters, Hanna was an unlikely No. 4. The film did poorly on the big screen but is clearly resonating with home audiences. The film tells the story of 16-year-old Hanna Heller (Saoirse Ronan), trained as an immaculate assassin by her ex-CIA father Erik Heller (Eric Bana) in secluded Finland. He dispatches Hanna to Europe for a ruthless mission, and a determined CIA operative, Marissa Wiegler (Cate Blanchett), stays on Hanna’s heels as she traverses the continent. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

If Hanna is unavailable, you may want to check out its star Saoirse Ronan in The Way Back, the true story of Siberian gulag escapees who trekked 4,000 miles to India and freedom. It also stars Ed Harris and Colin Farrell. Or if you want to see a young girl hold her own (against Jeff Bridges and Matt Damon, no less), check out Hailee Steinfeld in her Oscarnominated film debut in True Grit. All titles are available from Redbox. —Kat Thornton

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NEWS/REC COURTESY BRUNDAGE MOUNTAIN

REC

BRAVING THE COLD How to bicycle without becoming an icicle RACHAEL DAIGLE AND ADAM ROSENLUND It is possible to get your snow fix on the cheap.

SLOPESIDE BARGAINS Brundage Mountain in McCall is ramping up not only for another season of powder but for its golden anniversary. This year marks the resort’s 50th season, and managers are sharing the love with patrons. Besides a newly expanded and remodeled second story of the main lodge, there are a couple of deals so good, they’re worth marking on your calendar. No. 1: Beginning on Friday, Nov. 4, Brundage will sell a limited number of season passes that include not only a season’s worth of lift rides but a full day of snow cat skiing, a two-hour lesson and a full-day performance rental for—drum roll, please—$489. For those keeping score, that’s the price of a regular season pass but a value of $876. When they say “limited number,” they’re serious. Only 50 of the uber passes will be sold and when they’re gone, they’re gone. No. 2: Between Monday, Dec. 12, and Thursday, Dec. 15, Brundage will hold Golden Ticket days, allowing two adults to get two full-day passes for $50. No. 3: Families can also get in on the season-pass mania on Nov. 4, when they can purchase season passes (still for $489) that include three full-day visits to the Brundage Bears children’s program. No. 4: On Wednesday, Dec. 28, the resort will host Light Up The Night II, a torchlight parade and fireworks show preceded by live music and followed by an optional sit-down dinner. “We really want people to be able to celebrate our 50th anniversary with us,” said April Russell, Brundage spokeswoman. Check out brundage.com for more info and to take advantage of the deals. Sun Valley Resort has been riding the anniversary bandwagon for the last year, but the resort’s official 75th anniversary is on Wednesday, Dec. 21, an occasion that will be marked with numerous celebrations. The resort is also offering some attention-grabbing early season deals, made possible, in part, by the area’s impressive snow-making capacity. With its eyes firmly on a Thanksgiving weekend opening, Sun Valley has a Thanksgiving Package, which includes four nights of lodging beginning on Wednesday, Nov. 23, a three-of-four-day lift ticket, and a Thanksgiving dinner buffet for $297-$305 per person. Also starting on Nov. 23 and running through Tuesday, Dec. 20, the Pre-Holiday Package offers one night’s lodging and a lift ticket for $79 per person double occupancy or $123 single occupancy. Visit sunvalley.com for more info.

Be honest, how many of you die-hard summer cyclists have found yourself more often in the warm confines of your car lately and less often pedaling through the crisp autumn air? For we fair-weather cyclists—well, technically, we’re warm-weather cyclists, right?—here’s a little advice on how to avoid wussing out as Jack Frost starts making regular appearances in the valley.

ROADS According to Karen Dreher, sales associate at George’s Cycles and a year-round cyclist, the two things you should remember are black ice and general safety. “Know your roads and your route and back off a bit because of ice,” she said. Even if the road is free of shady spots, be careful because that doesn’t mean it’s ice free. Also, said Dreher, be cautious of cars. Drivers and cyclists share responsibility for safety, and in icky weather conditions, even the best drivers and cyclists may not have the best control.

FACE & HEAD Don’t try to decide between a helmet and a thick wool hat. Go with the helmet and consider either a helmet liner if your noggin gets cold or—if you’re committed to function over aesthetic—a balaclava to cover your head and face. And don’t forget glasses to keep the stinging cold wind out of your eyes.

TOP What to don on the top of your body depends on what kind of rider you are. If you’re slower, you may not sweat, and moisture-wicking material may not be necessary. If you don’t mind being a little chilly, perhaps a vest to keep your core warm is a better option than a long-sleeved jacket. Dreher recommends a base layer that wicks moisture followed with a light-weight jersey then if you need added protection, wear a jacket.

HANDS & TOES “The main thing you need to think about are your hands and toes,” Dreher said. To keep your piggies warm, try booties that cover your whole foot and shoe or toe warmers for a partial-foot wind shield. And for the hands, go with lobster gloves, three-fingered gloves that keep fingers together while allowing for shifting and breaking movement.

BOTTOM “The key to riding in winter, fall and spring is layering,” said Dreher, who recommends windand water-resistant pants to keep your knees warm because they’re doing all the work.

READER’S ADVICE We asked readers for tips on winter cycling and here’s what they said:

BIKE Dreher said the fall and winter months are a good time to have your bike serviced because bike shops are slow and can take the time to pay some serious attention to your ride. Most importantly, keep your chain clean and lubed. As for your tires, be sure to keep them at the recommended pressure. In Boise, where snow sometimes melts before you can dig out your sled, it’s possible to get through the winter on regular tires.

—Deanna Darr

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If you’re dedicated enough to pull out your metal steed in the snow on a regular basis, studded tires and bike tire chains will give you more grip in the slick stuff. Same with fenders—unless you’re completely committed to two wheels, it’s mighty tempting to crank up the car on slushy and rainy days. Fenders come in permanent and temporary, depending on what you need, but if you plan to ditch the car altogether, they’re your best bet for staying clean on those mucky days.

“AME heated grips! Stop the wind manage the moisture! There is no bad weather, only bad gear. —The Boise Bike Wench “Layers and waterproof shells, fenders and safe routes.” —Aviva Cryophoenix Crichton “New Levi’s 511 commuter pant is one of my favorite tools.” —Glenn Landberg Read more at facebook.com/boiseweekly. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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REC/LISTINGS Events BOISE STATE FOOTBALL—vs. Texas Christian University. Saturday, Nov. 12, 1:30 p.m.: vs. Wyoming. Saturday, Nov. 26, noon: vs. New Mexico, Saturday, Dec. 3, 4 p.m. Bronco Stadium, Boise State football, Boise, 208426-1000, boisestate.edu. STATE CYCLOCROSS CHAMPIONSHIPS—Top cyclocross racers from around Idaho compete for the title of state champion. The event benefits the Boise Bicycle Project, which will have a heated tent with beer, music and an amateur hour race. Saturday, Nov. 19, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Sandy Point State Park, adjacent to Highway 21 below Lucky Peak Dam, Boise. STEELHEADS HOCKEY—Vs. the Las Vegas Wranglers. Wednesday, Nov. 2, 7 p.m., $16-$50. CenturyLink Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, centurylinkarenaboise.com.

IDAHO SENIOR GAMES—A social and recreational opportunity for adults age 50 and older. Register to compete in 16 different sports, more than 50 events to select from and 11 age groups. Medals are awarded for all events. Visit idahoseniorgames. org to register and for more info. Games are Nov. 5-6. INSTRUCTIONAL FITNESS PROGRAMS—Boise State Recreation offers a variety of threeand eight-week programs aimed to get you fit. Check out their list of classes and register online at rec.boisestate.edu/fitness.instruction or call 208-426-5644. Wednesdays. Boise State Rec Center, 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5641, 208-4261131, rec.boisestate.edu.

MOUNTAIN WEST OUTDOOR CLUB—Member-led recreational activities throughout the year, including hiking, camping, canoeing and kayaking. Upcoming trips include: weekly Wednesday hikes in the Foothills and mid-week paddles. Check the members-only group website to keep current on all recently posted and spontaneous activities occurring. Memberships cost $15 per year. For information, call Mike Fritz at 208-3231383 or email mountainwest@ yahoogroups.com groups.yahoo. com/group/mountainwest.

REC/PLAY RACHAEL DAIGLE

Register BOISE PARKS AND RECREATION 5-ON-5 BASKETBALL LEAGUE—League play begins Monday, Nov. 28. All fees are due upon registration. A team roster with a minimum of seven players must be submitted at registration with players’ names, addresses, email addresses, phone numbers and residency verification. For information, call 208-6087650. Oct. 31-Nov. 4, 8:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. $511 plus a $25 USSSA fee and $27.70 for each non-resident player. Boise City Recreation office, 110 Scout Lane, Boise, 208-384-4256, cityofboise.org/parks. FARM MAN CHALLENGE—Have some healthy Halloween fun with a Zombie 5K, Farm Man Crossfit Challenge, Hellish 6.66-miler and a Pumpkin Head Dash for the kiddies. Saturday, Oct. 29, 10 a.m. $45, $10 children. Linder Farms, 7165 S. Linder Road, Meridian, 208-371-0222, linderfarms.com. FARMSTEAD 5K—Race through corn, crawl through straw and cross the jumping pillow—all in costume. Race to be held at 1020 S. Rackham Way, Meridian. Saturday, Oct. 29, 9:30 a.m. $30, $10 for kids course. Register Shu’s Idaho Running Company, 1758 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-6604, idahorunningcompany.com. FREE KIDS HOCKEY CLINIC— Open to girls and boys, ages 5-13. This free clinic allows youth to get a sample of the game and learn some basic skills such as skating, puck handling and shooting with quality coaching instruction. Most importantly, they will have fun in a positive and safe environment. Skates, sticks, gloves and helmets will be provided. This is a FREE clinic, but you are required to pre-register for the event. Space is limited, so register early at idahoiceworld.com. Saturday, Nov. 5, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-3310044, idahoiceworld.com.

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FALL CAMPING ON THE MAIN SALMON Before the cold hand of winter officially bitch slaps the Gem State for the next five to seven months, there is still time to get out and play like its July. Recently, I headed north with a few friends for a weekend of hot springing, boating and hiking on the Main Salmon, just east of Riggins on the National Forest road to Vinegar Creek. Many Idahoans stash their summer recreation gear in the garage at the first sign of cooler temperatures despite the fact that we enjoy one of the best Indian summers anywhere in the Northwest. The key is finding a low-elevation spot with manageable temperatures and year-round opportunities for play. At an elevation of 1,821 feet and just three hours from Boise, Riggins is a great spot because it maintains some of the mildest temperatures in the state. The Hells Canyon-Oxbow corridor to the southwest is also a nice area to explore when higher elevations start taking on snow. For our trip, we set up shop on a large white sand beach adjacent to a treed flat—with a public toilet and a nice shady area to situate a kitchen and fire pan. The steelhead were running, so there were quite a few folks on the river decked out with boats and fall fishing gear. The seasonal foliage provided us with a vibrant backdrop, and the crisp, wet mornings created an ideal setting for taking in some fresh, clean Central Idaho air. A few short hikes to epic canyon viewpoints, a quick float trip and a run out to a lesser-known remote hot springs made for a very complete and rewarding weekend. With one extra day, we probably would have ventured south into the French Creek area (weather permitting), where historic Burgdorf hot springs (elevation 6,152 feet) sits not far from McCall. The road to Vinegar Creek was recently paved to past the 10-mile mark, so accessing this scenic playground is now easier then ever. If you didn’t get enough out of your summer in 2011, there is still plenty of time to enjoy the milder side of Idaho recreation—provided that you are willing to travel a bit to get there. —Andrew Mentzer WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


LISTINGS/REC RUSH CREEK STAMPEDE, HALF MARATHON, 5K AND 1-MILE FUN RUN/WALK—Register through race day for this half marathon, 5K or one-mile fun run to be held Saturday, Nov. 12, in Cambridge. Register at bluecirclesports.com. Through Nov. 12. $15-$45. Cambridge Elementary School, 455 Hopper Ave., Cambridge. TURKEY DAY 5K—Build up an appetite with this flat 5K course, open to runners, joggers and walkers. The route takes turkey trotters through downtown Boise, and it is hosted by Life Time Fitness. Bring at least one non-perishable food item to benefit local food banks. For more info, go to turkeyday-5k. com. Thursday, Nov. 24, 6:30 a.m. $20-$30. Main Street at Capitol Boulevard. URBAN ADVENTURE—Take an easy three-mile hike along the Boise River on the Bethine Church River Trail. Suitable for the entire family and pets. Call 208-3441459 or email karen.benton@ sierraclub.org to register. Sunday, Nov. 6, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. ZEITGEIST HALF MARATHON— Register online at signmeup.com through the day of the event for this half marathon that starts and finishes at the Optimist Football field located on Hill Road Parkway. Proceeds benefit the Polycystic Kidney Disease Foundation and the Idaho Donor Network. Visit zhalfmarathon.com for more info. Saturday, Nov. 5. $45-$85.

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Recurring BOISE FOOSBALL—Draw-yourpartner foosball tournament. Signups begin at 7:30 p.m., matches beginning about 8 p.m. The first Saturday of every month is Super Saturday with all-day tournaments. Singles start at 2 p.m., followed by bring-your-partner and drawyour-partner at 3:30 p.m. For more information, call 208-860-4990, boisefoosball.com. Dutch Goose, 3515 W. State St., Boise. BOISE RUN WALK—A fun training program for runners and walkers of all ages, shapes and sizes, slow or fast. Six-, 10- and 12-week training programs for 5K, 10K, half and full marathons. Includes educational seminars and clinics, group coaching, group support, routes on the Greenbelt and Foothills, access to massage and physical therapists. 8-11 a.m. 208-639-1434, boiserunwalk.com. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise. CARDIO CLASSES—Burn more than 800 calories per class under the guidance of professional instructors who are on hand to motivate students and keep them sweating with classes Monday through Friday. The introductory offer is $2 for two weeks. Mondays-Fridays. 208-371-9037. A Warrior’s Way Martial Arts Academy, 10338 Fairview Ave., Boise, ww4you.com.

DROP-IN ADULT BASKETBALL— The gymnasium is open for drop-in use from 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Mondays-Fridays. $4 per visit. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise, 208-3844486, cityofboise.org/parks. EARLY BIRD MEDITATION—Rise and shine during two meditation periods, a morning chant and Dharma tidbits, with walking in between. Tuesdays, 7 a.m. FREE. Yoga for Wellness Studio, 1175 Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-4841053, yogaforwellnesspro.com. FAMILY NIGHT—Quality entertainment and a meal at an affordable price. Check out special family pricing every Wednesday night 6:30-8:30 p.m. Admission is $5 per person, including skate rentals. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-331-0044, cityofboise.org/parks/iceworld. FEMME MOVEMENT STUDIO CLASSES—Register for all types of classes including pole dance, burlesque, belly dance, yoga and hip-hop all in a studio with skilled instructors. Open on Fridays from noon-10 p.m. and on Saturdays noon-midnight. The studio is available during and after hours for private functions and classes. E-mail femmeboise@gmail.com or call 208-906-1470 to register for classes. Fridays. $5-$20. FREE INTRO TO YOGA—Yoga Fusion in the Linen District offers yoga classes six days a week, and on Saturdays, the studio offers introductory classes to bring yoga into your fitness routine. Discover

yoga and learn how great you can feel after just one class. Mat and props will be provided. Saturdays, 11 a.m. FREE. Barefoot Yoga Studio, 1578 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-383-9616, boisebarefoot.com. IREST—Yoga nidra meditation classes. Tuesdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. and Wednesdays, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $14-$16. Yoga for Wellness Studio, 1175 Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-484-1053, yogaforwellnesspro.com. JUMP ROPE CLASSES—Beginners and novices are encouraged to join. Ages 6 to adult can learn moves on single rope, double Dutch and the Chinese wheel, in small class sizes, from professional national and world champion teachers, the Summerwind Skippers. Class held at Irish Dance Studio (Fairview Avenue and Wildwood Street) Contact Kathy Moe at kmoe@cableone.net. $35 per month Sept-May. Inquiries are answered year round. Mondays, 6:15-7:15 p.m. $35 per month, 208-631-5294. Irish Dance Idaho, 1909 Wildwood St., Boise, irishdanceidaho.com. LUNCHTIME YOGA CLASS—Take a break from the grind and get in a yoga class on your lunch hour. You can order food from Bittercreek Ale House and it will be ready to go for you when class is over for a few extra bucks. Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, noon. 10 classes for $70. Sage Yoga and Wellness, 242 N. Eighth St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-338-5430, sageyogaboise.com.

STROLLER STRIDES—A stroller fitness class with a power walk and body sculpting exercises. Meets Monday, Wednesday and Friday at 9 a.m. at the playground in Julia Davis Park; Monday-Friday 9-10 a.m. at the Boise Towne Square Mall and Tuesdays and Thursdays at 9:30 a.m. at Reid W. Merrill Park in Eagle. First class FREE; single class $15; packages available, 1-800-676-0865, strollerstrides.com. TEEN CLIMBING CLASSES—Ages 6-13 years old learn the basic ideas of indoor and outdoor climbing as well as increasing strength, endurance and confidence. New classes begin the first Tuesday of the month and run for four consecutive Tuesdays. Beginners attend from 5-6 p.m. Tuesdays. full-facility member $36; program member $72, 208-344-5502, ext. 222. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, ymcaboise.org. TREASURE VALLEY BMX—Hang out with BMXers or just watch. Long-sleeves, pants, helmet and a bike are all you need. One-time memberships $1. For more information, visit treasurevalleybmx. net. Saturdays, 10-11 a.m. TREASURE VALLEY FITNESS WALKERS—Meet for a group walk at the Parkcenter Pond. Saturdays, 8 a.m. FREE. 208-343-3346.

TREASURE VALLEY SCRABBLE CLUB—Scrabble Heads of the world, unite! All skill levels welcome. First and Third Sunday of every month, 6-9 p.m. For information, call Ben at 208-8886938 (evenings). Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 1315 N. Milwaukee St., Boise, barnesandnoble.com. VOLLEYBALL FOR SENIORS— Seniors of all skill levels are welcome to drop in and play volleyball on Monday and Wednesday mornings. For more info visit cityofboise.org/parks or call 208608-7680. Mondays, Wednesdays, 9-11 a.m. $3. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise, 208-384-4486, cityofboise.org/parks. WOMEN FLY FISHERS OF IDAHO—Women of all ages and all levels of fly fishing get together, compare catches and plan trips and activities. The group meets in the Trophy Room at Idaho Fish and Game all year except during the months of July, August and December. Call for more information. Third Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m. FREE, 208-338-1660, . Idaho Fish and Game Headquarters, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, wffid.com.

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NEWS/FOOD FOOD/YEAR OF IDAHO FOOD GU Y HAND

HOW ’BOUT THEM APPLES? Bier:Thirty falls somewhere between quarter-tosober and drunk o’clock.

DONNIE MAC’S CLOSES, BREWFORIA-BOWN BECOMES BIER:THIRTY Donnie Mac’s is packing up its pink flamingos and heading to the great rusty trailer park in the sky. The Linen District’s white-trash-themed restaurant is officially closing on Wednesday, Oct. 26, at midnight. “We’re disappointed,” said manager John Rapp. “But this business is a struggle. With the economy right now, it’s a struggle in the restaurant industry … We were happy to provide the service that we have for the last six years … It was a great place to work, and we’re sad to see it go.” The Linen District’s David Hale said that another restaurant will soon move into the space, but there are no plans to reopen Donnie Mac’s in another location, confirmed Donnie Mac’s owner Jim Finch. Donnie Mac’s will host a big blowout, good-bye bash Wednesday night. “I’d invite ever yone to come down on Wednesday. We’re going to blow out any inventor y we have left. We’ll have some killer deals,” said Rapp. “It’ll be like 25, 50, 75 percent off beer and food. We’ll just blow through our inventor y and par ty it out trailer-style.” And in splitsville news, the original Brewforia in Meridian and Brewforia-Bown have officially severed ties. On Oct. 18 Brewforia-Bown became Bier:Thirty Bottle and Bistro. According to Bier:Thirty co-owner Chris Oates, the spot will continue to focus on premium suds but will also expand its menu considerably and offer wine by the glass. “We want to go more local food, more Nor thwest cuisine, get away from just having sandwiches and chips and stuff we have had.” According to Brewforia owner Rick Boyd, the change arose because of differing visions. “Essentially, Chris wanted to go a different direction and it wasn’t a direction that would’ve kept it as a Brewforia … From what I understand from him, it’s going to be a little more food-focused,” said Boyd. But food wasn’t the only reason the stores par ted ways, according to Oates. “The menu wasn’t a huge par t of it … There’s a lot of other reasons that we can’t necessarily get into,” 44 said Oates. Brewforia-Bown wasn’t technically

The Idaho Heritage Tree Project helps preserve genetic diversity GUY HAND As we roared downstream through the River of No Return Wilderness via jet boat, skipping off rapids and dodging just-submerged boulders, I decided my imaginary movie version of this adventure should be titled Indiana Appleseed in the Canyon of Lost Treasure. Naturally it would be packed with whitewater action, pioneer spirit, hungry ers down there probably brought apples in by black bears and most importantly, a whole horseback and planted their trees as saplings.” lot of strange apples. Apple orchards, and their relationship to First, the backstory. Sadie Barrett—who took me on this Salmon pioneer progress, was a subject Henry David River jet boat expedition—and project partner Thoreau addressed in an 1862 essay called Candace Burns decided they needed to save the “Wild Apples.” “It is remarkable how closely the history neglected, sometimes century-old apple trees of the apple tree is connected with that of they saw slowly dying all over Idaho’s Lemhi man,” he wrote. “For when man migrates, he County. As a kid growing up in Salmon, the carries with him not only birds, quadrupeds, 35-year-old Barrett used to munch on apples insects, vegetables and his very sward, but his from trees planted by Idaho’s early pioneers. orchard also.” But upon returning to her hometown after a After racing 12 miles down river, our 10-year absence, she was stunned by the numjet boat driver suddenly pulled back on his ber of trees that had disappeared. throttles, the bow settled into the water and “They’d either been built over or just had we quietly slid to shore at Lantz Bar, a pioneer perished because they hadn’t been irrigated,” homestead with a large orchard planted by the Barrett said. late Frank Lantz, which is now managed by Barrett and Burns decided this threatened the Forest Service and deemed eligible for the edible heritage shouldn’t be left to quietly sink National Register of Historic Places. into oblivion, so the two women made plans Barrett and friend Scott Grasser unloaded to catalog, take cuttings and graft as many buckets, notebooks and cameras from the worthy fruit trees as they could find. boat, then we walked a short, dusty trail up As we skittered down the Main Fork of from the river and soon saw dozens of untendthe Salmon River on a gleaming October day, ed apple trees—and evidence of why Barrett Barrett showed me one abandoned orchard carries a sense of urgency to her project. Many after another. Each orchard was perched on a terrace along the shore, wedged between rapids of the trunks in the Lantz orchard had long, parallel gashes sunk deep into their bark and and steep-walled canyon, ripe apples dotting large limbs were snapped completely off. nearly every tree in pointillist patterns from “Broken down by a bear,” Grasser said pale yellow to bright green to burnt russet to as he ran his hand over a Christmas-light red. long series of claw marks. “I think there were 800 to For more information visit Around us were large piles 1,000 people living in the area salmonvalley.org or contact Sadie Barrett at of fresh, apple-rich bear scat. when it was a mining commu208-469-0533. (In my movie version, of course, nity,” Barrett shouted over the I’ll focus less on scat than on rumble of the jet-boat’s twin enbattling the bears.) gines. The importance of apple According to the book River of No Return, orchards to that burgeoning community of a travelog and history of the Salmon River homesteaders was obvious, living as they did Canyon, Frank Lantz planted 80 fruit trees on a long, arduous ride from anything they could this site in about 1925. Although the property even euphemistically call a grocery store. was occupied as early as 1900, and some “They were subsistence farming,” said of these trees could have been planted then, Mary Williams, forest historian for the Bitterroot National Forest, which manages the area. there’s little supporting documentation prior to Lantz’s arrival. Lantz, on the other hand, “I’m sure the earlier prospectors and miners was very well known. who made up the bulk of those homestead-

40 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

A heritage apple a day keeps the monoculture away.

“As a person,” the book’s authors, Johnny Carrey and Cort Conley, wrote, “he loved lemon meringue pies, corn whiskey, baseball, horses and dogs.” He also obviously loved apples. Barrett and Grasser quickly found dozens of varieties, many they had never seen before. Barrett pulled a dusky green apple off one tree, sniffed it studiously, took a lingering bite, then offered the fruit to Grasser. “Taste this one. Tell me what you think it tastes like.” “Mmmm,” Grasser said, eyes rolling. “Wow! That’s really good.” “Does it taste like honey?” Barrett asked. “It totally does,” Grasser agreed. “And the texture,” Barrett said, trying to find the words as she slowly chewed. “It’s just like ... I don’t think I’ve ever had an apple that has such a texture.” These unusual, yet delectable apples—dangling from the most-threatened trees—were the exact specimens Barrett hoped to catalog. “Because we don’t know what’s here, we’re wandering through, sampling, taking note of the flavors, the colors, whether it’s a winter storage apple or an early eating apple or something good for pies, applesauce or cider,” she said. After finding an apple she liked, Barrett would sit cross-legged under its tree, take notes, photograph the apple and fill out a metal tag that Grasser would attach to the tree. “Then,” Barrett explained, “we will come back in the spring with our grafting tools and we’ll take scion wood from the trees we’ve tagged and bring them back to our little spot that we do the grafting and hopefully share some of these trees with the community.” In a surprisingly short time, the three of us had tasted more varieties of apples than we’d probably sampled in all our lives. “We go to the grocery store,” Barrett said as she wiped apple juice off her chin, “and there’s maybe, in a big grocery store, 10 varieties. But there’s thousands 42 of varieties out there.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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FOOD/YOIF CON’T In about 45 minutes, Barrett figured we had tasted 15 to 20 different kinds of apples. Shortly thereafter, Grasser handed Barrett an apple that could clearly play the movie role of lost treasure: a ghostly white, pearlesque apple with an ethereal aroma I could only describe as rose petals and wild strawberries. Its soft, floral taste left me speechless. But this variety of apples wasn’t the only thing that impressed Barrett. “I consider these trees to be genetically superior,” she said. “They’re withstanding so much neglect, harsh conditions, little or no irrigation. And they’re in these isolated little pockets that have never been touched by monoculture or spray or genetically modified plants. They’re really pure and clean and strong.” Barrett and Burns are in the early stages of what they’ve christened the Idaho Heritage Tree Project and are still looking for funding. But historian Williams was enthused enough about the project’s historical and horticultural potential to foot the bill for the jet boat that got us to the Lantz orchard. “It was a good opportunity for us to learn more about the orchard and hopefully get some information in helping us in maintaining it,” said Williams. Other organizations and individuals have expressed interest, too, including the Bureau of Land Management and University of Idaho fruit expert Dr. Esmaeil Fallahi. As Barrett headed back down to the river, she was already thinking about expanding the project. “I think this is a fun spot to come and do research,” she said. “But there are so many trees in people’s back yards and in neighborhoods all over Idaho that are just as important as the trees down here. Hopefully, we can ... get them going on new rootstock so we can have them in back yards and preserve them for the future.” I’ll save that chapter for the movie’s sequel. 40

42 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

FOOD/WINE SIPPER

CHIANTI Chianti has come a long way from those squat-bottomed bottles covered with wicker that were best suited for holding candles. Sangiovese is the primary grape in this Italian region, but regulations allow for other varieties in the chianti blend, up to a total of 25 percent. However, all three of the top wines in this tasting are 100 percent sangiovese, including a surprising ringer from our home state. Here are the panel’s favorites: 2007 POGGIO AMORELLI CHIANTI CLASSICO, $18.99 There’s a lightly herbal quality to the nose in this wine that complements the rich cherry and licorice aromas. Round and ripe in the mouth, it’s filled with a mix of cherry liqueur, anise, chocolate and spice. Well-integrated tannins come through on the finish in a wine that’s drinking beautifully now. A good buy on a chianti classico. 2007 SELVAPIANI CHIANTI RUFINA RESERVA, VIGNETO BOCERCHIALE, $30 This wine opens with heady aromas of dusty cherry, berry, anise and a nice hit of white pepper. This is a big, bold wine that reins in the ripeness level just enough so as not to become overwhelming. It’s loaded with bright cherry fruit that’s laced with a touch of strawberry and backed by lively acidity that keeps things in balance. Ripe tannins and black pepper color the persistent finish. 2009 SNAKE RIVER WINERY SANGIOVESE, $19.49 This oh-so-worthy ringer from Idaho earned the top-place vote from every panelist—a first in more than 10 years of tastings. A definite elegance marks this wine, with its soft cherry fruit aromas backed by pepper and spice. Exceptionally well balanced on the palate, it’s filled with creamy cherry and berry fruit, soft oak and smooth tannins. This is an impressive effort, but you’ll have to wait a few days to taste it. The winery has scheduled a Thursday, Nov. 3, release date. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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FOOD/NEWS CON’T

—Tara Morgan

FOOD/DISH Restaurants get one chance to hit BW with their best shot. LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

a franchise, Boyd explained, but rather 40 a “licensed facility.” “So they had the rights to use the name and the concept that we had granted them ... It wasn’t owned by Brewforia. It was owned by Chris and Kammie, and they’ve decided to just do things a little differently,” Boyd said. But Brewforia isn’t singing the brews blues just yet. “We’re OK with it,” Boyd said. “We’ll just continue to keep chugging along. We’re already looking to open a few more stores here in the valley in the near future.” Though Boyd hasn’t settled on any locations, he mentioned the downtown Boise-Boise State area as a likely possibility. “Our goal is to grow Brewforia and open more stores and to develop a ver y cohesive, consistent brand,” said Boyd. “So it’s impor tant to us that our stores reflect a similar look an feel and our menus be consistent throughout.” In downtown news, Subway is choosing to ignore the fate of the recently shuttered Caruso’s Sandwich Company. The national fast-food chain is gearing up to open a new location in the space that formerly housed Caruso’s, at 130 N. Eighth St. Apparently, the corner of Eighth and Main must have sandwiches. And in TV food news, everyone’s favorite foulmouthed, booze-swilling former chef, Anthony Bourdain, has a new 10-part series premiering on the Travel Channel, which he described on the TC blog as “faster, more democratic and more caffeinated than No Rez. But just as obnoxious.” The Layover will follow Bourdain as he spends 24 to 48 hours cavorting around cities like New York, San Francisco and Rome, exposing all the must-see attractions. Billed as “no nonsense and budget-friendly,” The Layover promises to showcase Bourdain’s signature snark and predilection for back-alley holes-in-the-wall. The show will premiere on Monday, Nov. 21, on the Travel Channel.

Ono kine gridz: kalua pork, mac salad and rice.

SHAKA SHAK In the last decade, Hawaiian restaurants have become as numerous in the valley as Speedo-clad Japanese tourists at Waikiki Beach. I’ve been firmly planted on the Hawaiian food beat at BW since day one—I’ve eaten at and opined about ever y one of the valley’s island-themed restaurants within these pages over the years. And I’ve come to a final conclusion: They each get the job done about the same, though some scratch the itch of nostalgia better than others. On the nostalgia front, I’ve come to know Shaka Shak as the most reliable place in town to get a can of Hawaiian Sun. You’ll pay a whopping $2.25, but none of the other joints around town seem to able to keep the stuff in stock consistently. Plus, none of the others are as convenient for a drink drive-by as Shaka Shak, which is literally a shack set up in the Broadway Plaza shopping SHAKA SHAK center lot. Curiously, it’s situ2100 S. Broadway Ave. ated almost directly in front of 208-331-0404 the grand master of Hawaiian food in the valley, Ono Hawaiian Cafe. On the food front, Shaka Shak’s menu is a mix of local favorites—kalua pork, lomi lomi salmon, lau lau, teri beef, saimin—and house specialties like curr y, soba and stir fr y. Recently, I ordered a mixed plate called the Big Wave Board, a massive two-container meal of mayo-heavy mac salad, two scoops of white rice and a mound of teriyaki beef, kalua pork and grilled chicken. As plate lunches go, the meal was fine. The rice was per fectly sticky, the mac salad appropriately calorie laden and each protein moist and distinctively flavored—the pork was a touch smoky, the beef a touch sweet, and the grill came through just a hint on the chicken under the teri-based sauce. In the end, however, if plate lunch is what you’re after, Shaka Shak does it just like all the others do. Maybe you like L&L Drive In better than Zippy’s for some reason, or maybe you like them both the same and just go with whichever is closer. For me, the per fect Idaho Hawaiian meal would be a roundup of specific dishes from each of the valley’s island restaurants. But when I’m not shooting for per fect, I hit the drive-thru at Shaka Shak. —Rachael Daigle

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R E A L ES TAT E BW ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com RESPONSIBLE M/F ROOMMATE Responsible roommate wanted in Kuna. Available immediately! New home & subdivision. Rent is $350/mo., util. incld. Must have steady income. No pets. No illegal drugs. Kitchen & laundry privileges. Big closet. Private bathroom. Some storage and driveway parking available. Quiet neighborhood. Walking distance to downtown Kuna. 8 miles from Meridian. Contact Nicole 5985531. Leave a message I will get back to you!

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BW FOR SALE BEAUTIFUL HORSE PROPERTY Lovely country home nestled on 3.74 acres. 4BD, 2.5BA, 4 car grg., shop, barn, 3 stalls w/free flowing water Artesian well, tack room, corral, stunning landscaping, auto sprinklers, irrigation, huge covered porch to sit and enjoy those cool country evenings. Approx. 30 min. to Boise, 3 miles to I-84. New Middleton High school. Just S. of Hwy 44 on country lane. Don’t miss this gem! $330,000. Call Carol Cunningham Real Estate 208-2787222.

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BW ANNOUNCEMENTS LOOKING FOR ART TO SELL Starting a small coop art gallery in Nampa. Need 15 painters(any medium), 5 ceramists, 2-3 sculptors & 2 jewelry artists. No work shifts. Membership $30/ mo. Hoping to open on 28th of Oct. Please e-mail covertmetalsmith@yahoo.com or call 4673606.

BW ESTATE SALES ESTATE SALE BENEFITING HUMANE SOCIETY Collecting gently used, estate quality items for our fundraising sale. Drop off items at The Shabby House, 4906 W. State St. until Oct. 31. Visit the Winter Wonderland Sale that benefits the Idaho Humane Society, Nov. 10th from 4-8pm. More info at www.theshabbyhouse.com

BW HEALTH & FITNESS

BW NEED

TRADE

Accepting Knick Knacks for in store trade at Thrift Store with a Twist. Jewelry, DVD’s, Clothes. 4610 W. State St. 570-7962.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW BEAUTY LEASE STATION $100/WK! I am looking for 2 great stylist to fill my last two stations! First 3 weeks free. Please call 283-7186 if interested! Thanks! FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.”

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE LOSE WEIGHT STAY HEALTHY This 90 Day Challenge has already helped people lose millions of pounds! Close to 50,000 new people are joining the Challenge every month... that is over 1,000 a day! The company is led by three dynamic Founders who have inspired countless people to begin the journey to better health and wealth. ViSalus is also a part of Blyth, Inc., a publicly traded, billion-dollar partner that gives the company the agility and opportunity of a small start up with the security and stability of an established company. www.IdahoViSalus.com

BW CLASSES FEELINGS 101! Basic skills & support for reconnecting with feelings. Starts Wed., Oct. 26, 6:30-8pm, 6 wks., $90. Boise. 541-709-1463.

BW SPIRITUAL Check Out: eckankar-idaho.org

BARTER

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Out to Lunch 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

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RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 45


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B O I S E W E E K LY BW HEALING ARTS EFFECTIVE REIKI TRAINING Powerful Reiki training from the comfort of your own home! Study Reiki for self-healing & self-realization. Be a Master faster than you believed possible, starting today! npdowling@yahoo.com

BW MASSAGE A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

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1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, 24/7. I travel. 880-5772. New website massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Private Boise studio. RELAXATION MASSAGE Call Ami at 208-697-6231. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. MYSTIC MOON MASSAGE 90 min. for $40. 322 Lake Lowell, Nampa. 283-7830. Betty.

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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Embrace the moment with a sensual massage at ULM. 340-8377.

VIP MASSAGE

Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

FOR SALE BW STUFF Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $425! 888-1464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

16’ ABOVE GROUND POOL!! 16’ x 48” above ground pool. Comes with ladder, vacuum, chlorine floater and pump. Set up, full of water right now so come check it out! 208-703-1727. CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/Truck. Running or Not! Top Dollar Paid. We Come To You! Call For Instant Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy!

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a good reason against the name change. September 20, 2011

NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Elena Isabel Tison Case No. CV NC 1117690 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Elena Isabel Tison, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, had been filed in the District Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Elena Isabel Tyson. The reason for the change in name is: because My husband has legally changed his surname to Tyson from Tison. I wish to have the same surname spelling as him. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) November 10, 2011 at the ADA County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court

CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 5, 12, 19 & 26, 2011. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Ceasar Dennis Donald Tison Case No. CV NC 1117691 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Ceasar Dennis Donald Tison, a minor, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County Idaho. The name will change to Ceasar Dennis Donald Tyson. The reason for the change in name is: because: His father’s surname has been legally changed to Tyson from Tison. I am in the process of legally changing my surname to Tyson from Tison.

SHOP HERE

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

46 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. (date) November 10, 2011 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: September 20, 2011 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 5, 12, 19 & 26, 2011. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Katie Anne Curry Case No. CV NC 1117850 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Katie Anne Curry, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Wilder Heartwood. The reason for the change in name is : because I have no contact to blood relatives and no connection to the name they gave me. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on November 10, 2011 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: September 20, 1022 CLERK OF THE COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 5, 12, 19 & 26, 2011. I [Joseph Callan] am Executor to the JOSEPH CALLAN Estate as Witnessed by my Sole Ability to Personally Obtain a CERTIFICATE OF BIRTH and Do Hereby Give Legal, Lawful, Public and

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Actual Notice of The Same Hereby and Herein. By: executor Joseph Callan , of my own right. nation Idaho. general post-office. county Ada. Callan Province. United States Minor, Outlying Islands. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO AND IN FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Brayen Allen Finch Case No: CV NC 1117563 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE A Petition to change the name of Brayen Allen Finch, now residing in the County of Ada, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Breanna Lynn Destiny. The reason for the change in name is Petitioner is in the process of changing gender from male to female. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on Dec 1, 2011 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Sep 20 2011 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 26, Nov.2, 9 & 16, 2011. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

RIZZO: 5-monthold male Australian cattle dog mix. Happy, energetic puppy who likes other dogs. Older children recommended. (#14263531)

BONNIE: 2-year-old female domestic shorthair. Found as a stray near Kootnai and Roosevelt. Friendly, loving and litterbox-trained. (#14251930)

YELLOW: 6-month-old male Lab/border collie mix. Happy, lively and friendly puppy. Likes everyone he meets and enjoys playing with other dogs. (#14273240)

MISO: 6-month-old male Chihuahua/terrier mix. Confident, happy, gentle dog. Good with other dogs but may annoy the older ones. (#14209892)

BENJI: 1-year-old male domestic medium hair. Friendly, handsome cat. Found as a stray near State Street and Gary Lane. Litterbox-trained. (#14267669)

DOLLY: 6-year-old female bloodhound. House- and cratetrained, good with dogs and cats. Goofy and loving. Knows some commands. (#13491012)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

JUNO: Outgoing dilute calico adores snuggling and movie nights.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

CLARA: DSH female loves dogs and lap time.

SIR SOOT: I am ready to be your knight in shining armor.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 47


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B O I S E W E E K LY EAT HERE

PETS

MU S IC

BW PETS

BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION

YORKIE STUD Sir Galahad is a healthy, beautiful 2 yr. old male Yorkie. His current weight is 4.8 pounds. He is available for stud service. If interested, please call Shelly at 208412-7230. Terms are negotiable, but the cost of stud service is usually equal to the sell-price of one puppy. YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

& a removable rosewood resonator for playing open backed. This is a great banjo for any level of playing! I am asking $270 OBO. Call or text Patrick at 208-3408350. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

CO N N E CT I O N SE CT I O N BW ENTERTAINMENT ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+. HOT GAY & BI LOCALS Browse & Respond FREE! 208472-2200. Use FREE Code 5914, 18+. MEET SEXY SINGLES Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7760. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. WHERE SINGLES MEET Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7759, 18+.

BW OTHER

BW INSTRUMENTS CLASSIC ARIA BANJO Late 70’s Vintage. Made in Japan, this banjo has a one piece aluminum tone ring with stainless flange, mahogany neck with faux mother or pearl inlay at odd frets

NYT CROSSWORD | GETTING IN SHAPE BY JOEL FAGLIANO / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Small amount 6 Nab, as a base runner

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24 See shaded letters intersected by this answer 26 Game hunters 28 Business card abbr. 29 Friend of Fifi 30 Fleur-de-___ 31 Frozen beverage brand 32 One in debt 34 Author ___ Hubbard 35 Guess on a tarmac: Abbr. 36 Geological feature on a Utah license plate

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38 Polite 40 Some batteries 41 Speak horsely? 43 ___ hall 44 Tennis’s Berdych 45 Type 46 Golfer nicknamed “The King” 47 Year Michelangelo began work on “David” 48 As ___ (usually) 49 Charades participant, e.g. 52 Newsroom workers, for short 53 “Unfortunately, that’s the case” 55 “Hurry!” 57 Obedient 58 Umpire’s ruling 60 “I ___ the day …” 61 Priestly garment 64 Folkie Guthrie 65 Repeated musical phrases 67 Mazda model 69 Facility often closed in the winter 71 Home state for 86-Across: Abbr. 72 Soviet space station 73 Zig or zag 74 Home to the Venus de Milo 76 “Easy as pie” 80 Majority figure? 82 Texans’ org. 85 Palindromic vehicle 86 Cheney’s successor 87 82-Across stats 88 Launch 90 Jack or jenny 91 Beginning of un año 92 Eggs in a sushi restaurant 93 Freshen, as a stamp pad 94 Isn’t wrong? 96 Popular pie flavor 97 Ends 98 PC key 99 1977 thriller set at sea 100 Comedy Central’s “___.0” 101 Prefix with -gon 103 Pointed tool 104 “… ___ saw Elba” 105 Co. that owns Moviefone

106 Commonly called 109 See shaded letters intersected by this answer 114 Child’s pet 115 Phenomenon associated with the Southern Oscillation 116 Message seen after 13-Across dies 117 Setting for van Gogh’s “Cafe Terrace at Night” 118 Phillies div. 119 Drama has it 120 Shooting sport

DOWN 1 So 2 Character in “The Hobbit” 3 See shaded letters intersected by this answer 4 Critical situation 5 Cosmetician Lauder 6 They have mtgs. in schools 7 Not std. 8 Share 9 Harvey of “Reservoir Dogs” 10 Two-for-one, e.g. 11 Flunk 12 Media watchdog org. 13 “Going Rogue” author 14 Rheumatism symptom 15 1969 film with an exclamation point in its title 16 When the table is set 17 Missing parts 18 Realizes 21 Jewel holder 25 Book after Joel 27 Cousin of an oboe 32 See shaded letters intersected by this answer 33 Sassy 34 Site of a key battle in the War of 1812 35 Flotsam or Jetsam in “The Little Mermaid” 36 Fleet 37 He played the candidate in “The Candidate,” 1972 39 “___ in the Morning” 40 ’10 or ’11 person, now 41 Buster 42 Shop posting: Abbr. 44 Follow

45 Aviation pioneer Sikorsky 46 Designer of the pyramid at the 74-Across 50 See shaded letters intersected by this answer 51 It’s for the birds 54 Garlicky mayonnaise 55 “___ for Cookie” (“Sesame Street” song) 56 Totaled 59 Ashanti wood carvings, e.g. 62 See shaded letters intersected by this answer 63 Reason to doodle 66 Apple debut of 1998 67 “I’m less than impressed” 68 Mouse in a classic Daniel Keyes book 70 Contact ___ 73 RCA products 75 “I didn’t mean to do that!” 77 Quite a schlep 78 “Do the Right Thing” pizzeria owner 79 Thomas who lampooned Boss Tweed 81 “You have no ___” 82 “Tell Me More” network 83 Age-old philosophical topic L A S T T Y R A

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84 Fictional reporter 86 Buzzers 89 ___ Park, home for the Pittsburgh Pirates 94 Cézanne’s “Boy in ___ Vest” 95 Bonus to something that’s already good 96 Spanish chickens 97 Active 99 Doubting words 100 Representative 102 Musical symbols that resemble cross hairs 103 Gulf of ___ 104 A very long time 105 Top 106 “Show Boat” composer 107 Writer James 108 The “S” of TBS: Abbr. 110 Unaccounted for, briefly 111 Take sides? 112 Prefix with culture 113 Boss of bosses Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

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BW PEN PALS

BW CHAT LINES ALL MALE HOT GAY HOOKUPS! Call FREE! 208-489-2162 or 800777-8000. www.interactivemale. com 18+. MEN SEEKING MEN 1-877-4098884 Gay hot phone chat, 24/7! Talk to or meet sexy guys in your area anytime you need it. Fulfill your wildest fantasy. Private & confidential. Guys always available. 1-877-409-8884 Free to try. 18+. REAL DISCREET, LOCAL CONNECTIONS Call FREE! 208-287-0343 or 800210-1010. www.livelinks.com 18+.

BW KISSES FLYING M For rescuing my wallet… And keeping it safe from harm….

Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. I am 5’11”, weigh 179 lbs., brown hair and brown eyes. I am looking for a F pen pal ages from 40-50. I am 46 yrs. Old. I like to watch TV, walk around, play card games, a photo is appreciated but not necessary. Michael Earl Montoya #23378 ISCI 16A-23B PO box 14 Boise, ID 83707. 32 yr. old SWM looking for a F pen pal to correspond with. Maybe more. I am 6’, 200 lbs., brown hair and eyes. I am an Idaho native that loves everything outdoors. I also enjoy romantic nights at home with a good movie. I am very positive person who lives life to the fullest. I am a nonjudgmental person. ISO a F who is the same. If interested write me and I’ll tell you more. Chad Lawrence #70566 ICC D1-109-B PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707.

Ever feel the need to unleash your crazy side? Tell me all your fantasies ... 29, SWF, brown hair with blue eyes. Fun and crazy. Locked up and looking to meet new people. Amber Stewart #84721 15 N. 2nd E. Rexburg, ID 83440. My name is Carlos Burweti. 6’ 4”, African American SM ISO pen pals in the Boise area. I’m honest, open minded and intelligent. Seeking the same in a pen pal. Carlos Burweti #84141 ICC K105B PO box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. SWF, 30 yrs. Old, 140 lbs., blue eyed bad girl locked up. Wanting to hear your sexy fantasies. Help me pass the time and I’ll help your dreams come true. Gabrielle Saksa #86310 15 N. 2nd E. Rexburg, ID 83440. I am a 38 yr. old S fun loving F ISO a pen pal. Brynn Eckenrode #46506 PWCC Unit 2 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. 29 yr. old S fun loving M ISO a F pen pal and maybe more later. I have blonde hair, blue eyes and a toned body. I weigh 162 lbs. Jeremy Noef #88756 ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | 49


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “Life is not just a diurnal property of large interesting vertebrates,” poet Gary Snyder reminds us in his book The Practice of the Wild. “It is also nocturnal, anaerobic, microscopic, digestive, fermentative: cooking away in the warm dark.” I call this to your attention, Aries, because according to my astrological reckoning, you’d be wise to honor all the life that is cooking away in the warm dark. It’s the sun-at-midnight time of your long-term cycle; the phase when your luminescent soul throbs with more vitality than your shiny ego. Celebrate the unseen powers that sustain the world. Pay reverence to what’s underneath, elusive and uncanny. Halloween costume tips: Draw inspiration from the shadow, the dream, the moon and the depths.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Microbiologist Raul Cano managed to obtain a 45-millionyear-old strain of yeast from an ancient chunk of amber. Collaborating with a master brewer, he used it to make a brand of beer. One critic praised Fossil Fuel pale ale for its sweetness and clove aroma, while another said it has a “complex and welldeveloped taste profile.” I regard their successful project as a good metaphor for the task you have ahead of you in the coming weeks, Leo: extracting the vital essence from an old source and putting it to work in the creation of a valuable addition to your life. Halloween costume suggestions: a friendly ghost, a polite and helpful mummy, a cloned version of Buddha, the person you were as a child.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Speaking on behalf of the cosmic powers-that-be, I hereby give you permission to make your love bigger and braver. Raise it to the next level, Taurus. Help it find a higher expression. Wherever your love has felt pinched or claustrophobic, treat it to a liberation. If it has been hemmed in by a lack of imagination, saturate it with breezy fantasies and flamboyant dreams. Cut it free from petty emotions that have wounded it and from sour memories that have weighed it down. What else could you do to give love the poetic license it needs to thrive? Halloween costume suggestion: the consummate lover.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “When I read a book on Einstein’s physics of which I understood nothing, it doesn’t matter,” testified Pablo Picasso, “because it will make me understand something else.” You might want to adopt that approach for your own use in the coming weeks, Virgo. It’s almost irrelevant what subjects you study, investigate and rack your brains trying to understand. The exercise will help you stretch your ability to master ideas that have been beyond your reach—and maybe even stimulate the eruption of insights that have been sealed away in your subconscious mind. Halloween costume suggestion: an eager student, a white-coated lab researcher, Curious George.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You’ve heard the old platitude, “If life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” The owner of a pizzeria in Mildura, Australia, updated that sentiment in 2010, when the area was invaded by swarms of locusts. “They’re crunchy and tasty,” he said of the bugs, which is why he used them as a topping for his main dish. It so happens that his inventive approach would make good sense for you right now, Gemini. So if life gives you a mini-plague of locusts, make pizza garnished with the delectable creatures. Halloween costume suggestion: pizza delivery person carrying this novel delicacy. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Some doors are almost always locked. On those infrequent occasions when they are ajar, they remain so for only a brief period before being closed and bolted again. In the coming weeks, Cancerian, I urge you to be alert for the rare opening of such a door. Through luck or skill or a blend of both, you may finally be able to gain entrance through—or perhaps exit from—a door or portal that has been shut tight for as long as you remember. Halloween costume suggestion: the seeker who has found the magic key.

50 | OCTOBER 26 – NOVEMBER 1, 2011 | BOISEweekly

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Sit, walk or run, but don’t wobble,” says the Zen proverb. Now I’m passing it on to you. Maintaining clarity of purpose will be crucial in the coming weeks. Achieving crispness of delivery will be thoroughly enjoyable. Cultivating unity among all your different inner voices will be a high art you should master. Whatever you do, Libra, do it with relaxed singlemindedness. Make a sign that says “No wobbling,” and tape it to your mirror. Halloween costume suggestion: the superhero known as No Wobbling. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You could preside over your very own Joy Luck Club in the coming days. According to my reading of the astrological omens, the levels of gratification possible could exceed your normal quota by a substantial margin. You may want to Google the Chinese character that means “double happiness” and use it as your ruling symbol. And it might be time to explore and experiment with the concepts of “super bliss,” “sublime delight” and “brilliant ecstasy.” Halloween costume suggestions: a saintly hedonist from paradise; a superhero whose superpower is

the ability to experience extreme amounts of pleasure; the luckiest person who ever lived. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): For more than 100 years, an English woman named Lena Thouless celebrated her birthday on Nov. 23. When she was 106, her daughter found her birth certificate and realized that mom had been born on Nov. 22. I’m guessing a comparable correction is due in your own life. Something you’ve believed about yourself for a long time is about to be revealed as slightly off. Halloween costume suggestion: a version of yourself from a parallel reality or another dimension. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Everyone is a genius at least once a year,” said scientist Georg Lichtenberg. According to the astrological omens, Capricorn, the coming weeks will be your time to confirm the truth of that aphorism. Your idiosyncratic brilliance is rising to a fever pitch and may start spilling over into crackling virtuosity any minute. Be discriminating about where you use it; don’t waste it on trivia or triumphs that are beneath you. Halloween costume suggestions: Einstein, Marie Curie, Leonardo da Vinci, Emily Dickinson. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You’re ready to shed juvenile theories, amateurish approaches, or paltry ambitions. I’m not implying you’re full of those things; I’m just saying that if you have any of them, you now have the power to outgrow them. Your definition of success needs updating, and I think you’re up to the task. Why am I so sure? Well, because the big time is calling you—or at least a bigger time. Try this: Have brainstorming sessions with allies who know your true potential and can assist you in formulating aggressive plans to activate it. Halloween costume suggestions: a head honcho, big wheel, fat cat, top dog. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I know a woman who claims on her Facebook page to speak four languages: English, Elvish, Mermish and Parseltongue. (For those who don’t read Tolkien or Harry Potter, Elvish is the language of the elves, Mermish of the merpeople, and Parseltongue of snakes.) My Facebook friend probably also knows pig Latin, baby talk and glossolalia, although she doesn’t mention them. I’d love for you to expand your mastery of foreign tongues, Pisces, even if it’s just one of the above—and the coming weeks and months will be an excellent time to begin. You will have a greater capacity for learning new ways to talk than you have since childhood. Halloween costume suggestion: a bilingual bisexual ambidextrous expert in reciting tongue twisters.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 18