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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 16 OCTOBER 12–18, 2011

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

BOISE’S CULTURE CLUB JUMPstarting the city’s cultural district FEATURE 11

CENSORED The top 10 stories mainstream media didn’t cover SCREEN 27

TRESPASS IS A CRIME Cage and Kidman should surrender their Oscars after this one FOOD 28

STRANGE FRUIT One local farmer ain’t afraid of the pawpaw

“People smoke here. That’s why it’s a smoke shop.”

CITYDESK 8

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Reporters: Andrew Crisp Andrew@boiseweekly.com Stephen Foster Stephen@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Mistress of Data: Sheree Whiteley Sheree@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreader: Jay Vail Contributing Writers: Amy Atkins, Bill Cope, Guy Hand, David Kirkpatrick, Brian Palmer, Chris Parker, Ted Rall Interns: Talyn Brumley, Garrett Horstmeyer, Kat Thornton ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Guy Hand, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE IF ONLY SOMEONE WOULD CENSOR BIEBER COVERAGE We tackle a couple of annual happenings in this edition of Boise Weekly. Project Censored, the big enchilada as far as stories go this week, is a report we’ve run annually since I’ve been steering this boat. In the past, other BW editors have, for various reasons, opted out of the piece, which is offered to alternative papers throughout the country. I like to run it for one simple reason: It’s a starting point for readers who want to delve more deeply into alternative stories they may have yet to come across. Though some of the stories Project Censored has highlighted in recent years—chemtrails, anyone?—are earning it a few disapproving glances, by and large, the stuff coming out of the roundup is still quality journalism that unfortunately missed its 15 minutes of fame so that, for example, the MSM could dedicate more time and energy on Palin, Weiner, Knox, Christie, Bieber … A few pages beyond Project Censored, right smack in the center of the paper this week so that you can easily pull it out, fold it up and cram it into your back pocket, is an advertorial about BOSCO. I don’t typically draw attention to ads in my editor’s note, but if there is an exception, this is a good one. This weekend, about 30 artists will open their studios to the public as part of BOSCO’s Open Studios Weekend. For those of you into supporting local artists— and based on the attendance numbers at our annual Cover Auction, hundreds of you are—this weekend is kind of a big deal. Find all the info you need in the center four pages of this edition or see the blurb on Page 16. And art enthusiasts, don’t forget: The BW Cover Auction cometh Wednesday, Nov. 2, at the Linen Building. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Marianne Konvalinka TITLE: bring forth the light MEDIUM: mixed media on canvas ARTIST STATEMENT: My goal is to stay curious and engaged; to keep playing, learning, growing and sharing. It takes my art in strange directions sometimes, but it sure is fun!

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. M AR C O FLAVIO M AR INU C C I

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS JUMP plans to jump-start Boise’s cultural district Local bar hangs noose outside

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CITIZEN

THE POLITICS OF FOOD Economist and food activist Raj Patel spoke to an audience at Boise State about the global politics of food. Read some of what the outspoken critic of the World Bank and the World Trade Organization (both of which he has worked for) had to say.

UNDERWORLD TAKES OVER LINEN As BW hits stands this week, Homegrown Theater is in the middle of a three-day run of Eurydice. Check out a video preview of rehearsals and an interview with the director.

SPLC SKEWERS LGBT HATER The Southern Poverty Law Center’s Intelligence Project released a report on former Idahoan and eternal LGBT hater Bryan Fischer, written by two Idaho journalists.

CANCER IN THEM THAR HILLS? Deposits of a naturally-occurring, cancer-causing mineral are the subject of concern throughout the West, including in southwest Idaho. Read more about it at Citydesk.

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FEATURE Project Censored

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Shellac-ked

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS The rise of the story story

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SCREEN Trespass

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FOOD The mighty pawpaw

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WINESIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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OPINION/BILL COPE

IN SPITE OF The crusade against smokers There’s this place. I won’t tell you what or where it is. Just take my word for it ... there’s this place. If I am to be found enjoying a beer from somewhere other than my own refrigerator, it’s likely to be in that place. Not so long ago, people would go there not only to drink but to smoke. The place is loosely connected to a restaurant and the owners had done everything they could to seal it off from the restaurant short of filling the connecting passage with cement. One could still get from the bar to the restaurant, but only after passing through two heavy doors that had heavy rubber strips around all sides, closing off any avenue that smoke might have into the restaurant. What’s more, the bar was well ventilated so smoke didn’t hover in the air. There were no complaints from the restaurant, and were any nonsmoking drinkers upset that they couldn’t enjoy their drinks with smokers around, they could always take their drinks out to the non-smoking sections of the establishment. Or they could have gone to any one of the joints that are so pleased with themselves over having converted to nonsmoking bars. What I’m saying is: There were plenty of options. Then the place got a visit from the state police—the division whose duty it is to see that businesses comply with non-smoking laws. Even though the transfer of smoke from the bar to the restaurant was next to impossible, the officer told the owners that, henceforth, smoking would not be allowed in the bar. Period. The bar started losing patrons. It’s not the sort of place that people go to order brightly colored martinis and be seen by people like themselves. It’s the sort people go to drink PBR on tap, play the jukebox and smoke when they feel like it. And there are still plenty of other places they could go to do that. (At least, for the time being, contingent on what is decreed from the Boise City Council.) The owners decided they had to do something decisive—“pro-active” as people in the martini joints downtown might say. So they converted a little storage room just off the far end of the bar from the restaurant into a smoking room. It, too, had a heavy door with heavy rubber strips for a complete seal around the jamb. Plus, there was a fan on the roof above this room that had enough suck to strip graffiti off the walls. It was so powerful, you had to hold onto your schooner with both hands if you’d been foolish enough to enter that room with a light beer. It was so powerful that, not only did no smoke escape the room even when the door opened, sometimes weak or decrepit people had to be held down by someone hefty enough to resist the pull. I’m exaggerating. But not when I say the

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only way anyone outside that room would come in contact with smoke is if they went into that room. It was a solution to the owners’ problem, the smoking patrons’ problem, the non-smoking patrons’ problem, and it worked. It worked, that is, up until the time someone turned them in for having an illicit smoking room. The officer was not swayed in the least, I am told, by the fact that every party involved was content with the arrangement. (The owners are quite sure they were ratted out by a pair of oozing crud who had acquired a reputation for starting trouble in a myriad of ways and who, coincidentally, never came back to that bar after the anonymous call to the ISPD. I make a point of calling them “oozing crud” on the off-chance they are reading this and recognize themselves.) U Yes, I smoke. I’m not proud of the fact, but neither am I ashamed of it. I try to be a considerate smoker. I never blow smoke in the face of anyone, even another smoker. I never dump my car ashtray any place other than a proper trash receptacle. I never toss a butt, hot or cold, out of the car window. It makes perfect sense to me that children shouldn’t be around cigarette smoke any more than they should be allowed to play in the exhaust of an ACHD dump truck. And I understand why non-smokers don’t want to breathe my fumes, even if I must sometimes suffer through a soupy bank of their perfume or aftershave or barbecue effluvium. When eating establishments abandoned the practice of providing smokers with a section of their own, I was irritated, but I learned to live with it, even though it was obvious that there are methods available to clear smoke from the air so fast others would hardly be aware it was there to begin with. But when airports began to deny fliers trapped behind the iron curtain of security procedures a place to go for a quick smoke during a flight change, I began to suspect somebody was screwing with us. A conservative friend bitched to me about the smoking bans being further evidence that liberals were turning America into a “nanny state.” But as a liberal smoker here in the HolierThan-Thou Valley, I sense other influences at work, and they have more to do with piousness and spite than liberal or conservative. Let’s call it the “we’ll show you for not being one of us!” doctrine. Again, there are ways to make a smoking environment smoke-free. And if a bar owner would choose to go to the expense and trouble of making such a place, he or she should be allowed that option. But that won’t happen, not in Boise or any other smugly pretentious town. Not when it’s simpler, more acceptable and more satisfying to kick smokers around than to give them, for once, a goddamn break. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

TED RALL/OPINION

YOUNG AND IN HATE Young radicals attack a system that ignores them Enraged young people,” The New York Times worries aloud, are kicking off the dust of phony democracy, in which “the job of a citizen was limited to occasional trips to the polling places to vote” while decision-making remains in the claws of a rarefied elite of corporate executives and corrupt pet politicians. “From South Asia to the heartland of Europe and now even to Wall Street,” the paper continues, “these protesters share something else: wariness, even contempt, toward traditional politicians and the democratic political process they preside over. They are taking to the streets, in part, because they have little faith in the ballot box.” The rage of the young is real. Who can blame them for rejecting the system? The political issue people care most about—jobs and the economy—prompts no real action from the political elite. Even their lip service is half-assed. Here in the United States, no one should be surprised that young adults are among the nation’s angriest and most alienated citizens. No other group has been as systematically ignored by the mainstream political class as the young. What’s shocking is that it took so long for them to take to the streets. Every other age group gets government benefits. The elderly get a prescription drug plan. Kids get taken care of, too. They get free public education. Obamacare’s first step was to facilitate coverage for children younger than 18. Young adults get debt. The troubles of young adults get no play in Washington, D.C. Pundits don’t bother to debate issues that concern people in their 20s and 30s. Recent college graduates, staggering

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under soaring student loan debt, are getting crushed by 80 percent unemployment. Un- and underemployment, the insanity of a job market that requires kids to take out mortgage-sized loans to attend college just to be considered for an entry-level gig, the financial and emotional toll of disintegrating families, and our fear that the natural world was being destroyed left many of my peers feeling resentful and left out. The debts of today’s Gen Y-ers are bigger ($26,000 in average student loans, up from $10,000 in 1985). Their incomes are smaller. Their sense of betrayal is deeper. Young adults turned out big for Barack Obama in 2008, but he didn’t deliver. They noticed: His approval rating has plunged from 75 percent among voters ages 18-29 in January 2009 to 45 percent in September. Politicians like Obama ignore young adults, especially those with college degrees, at their—and the system’s—peril. Now, however, more is at stake than Obama and the Democrats’ 2012 election prospects. The entire economic, social and political order faces collapse; young people may choose revolution rather than accept a life of poverty in a state dedicated only to feeding the bank accounts of the superrich. As Crane Brinton pointed out in his seminal book The Anatomy of Revolution, an important predictor of revolution is downward mobility among strivers—young adults whose education and ambition would traditionally have led to a brighter future. The young are getting screwed the hardest. And with 80 percent unemployment, the young have a lot of free time to rise up.

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CITYDESK/NEWS BOISE SMOKE SHOPS FIRED UP

NEWS

Two well-known projects—Eighth and Main and JUMP (Jack’s Urban Meeting Place, named for the late J.R. Simplot)— have grand designs to change the face of downtown Boise. But a lesser-known initiative is concurrently seeking to better define the heart, and perhaps soul, of the city. “The signs around here say we’re in Boise’s Cultural District,” said Paul Kaine, Paul Kaine, executive director of Ballet Idaho, wants to see executive director of Ballet Idaho, referring Boise better develop and market its cultural district. to signs that the city has installed outside of his Eighth Street office. “But what makes “I invited all the arts organizations, the groups as we possibly can.” this a cultural district? Minimally, it could city’s Arts and History Department, the From his Ballet Idaho office window, be kept much the way it is now, but there’s CCDC and the Downtown Boise AssociaKaine has a bird’s-eye view of where JUMP really nothing defined or strategic. By the is expected to spring up: between Front and tion. The response was very good. I was time JUMP gets built, we could have somepretty surprised. In other communities, I Myrtle and Ninth and 11th streets. thing more formal in place.” Kaine said that shortly after he took over don’t think the response would have been Compared to this time last year, there so good.” as Ballet Idaho’s executive director in Januis good reason to assume that JUMP will Kaine said his previous arts leadership ary, he met with representatives from the indeed be built sooner than later. In Octopositions in other cities, particularly Austin, JUMP project. ber 2010, the project was threatened by a Texas, and Seattle, confirmed that Boise is “When I left that meeting, I had a lot nasty tangle with the city’s Design Review poised to better define its cultural district. of things going on in my head, because it’s Committee. But on Oct. 3, Boise’s Plan“Take Seattle, for example,” he said. pretty extraordinary. As time went on, I ning and Zoning Commission quickly and “That city’s cultural district was built in an became more aware of all the things going unanimously approved phase one—plans undeveloped area. Ever since, it has had a on, including the city’s cultural district.” for underground parking—of JUMP and significant impact on the city. Seattle has An April 2005 City of Boise resolution is expected to green-light phase two—an defined the city’s cultural district as “gener- become one of the premiere cities outside eight-story building and six-acre park—beof New York for art and culture. It’s a great ally along and between Capitol Boulevard fore the end of the year. example of how meaningful an arts foot“I think the process smoothed out as city and 15th Street and the Boise River.” In 2007, the Capital City Development Corpo- print can be to a city.” officials and JUMP team members became Kaine said the new dialogue among ration defined what it called more proficient in commuBoise’s arts organizations has been energizthe “Eighth Street Cultural nicating with each other,” District” as an L-shaped area ing, and the timing couldn’t be better. said JUMP spokesman David “You can just sense it. The economy with Main Street (The EgypCuoio. “A project of this Construction on JUMP’s underground garage is is turning; it’s going to happen. But we as tian Theatre) to the north, scope has a lot of nuances, expected to begin in spring, an arts community need to be ready,” he the Boise River (The Cabin) and we just needed time to with above-ground building said. “If we simply wait around to create an to the south and Julia Davis sort it all out.” to follow. JUMP officials are appropriate place for the arts, it will Park (Boise Art Museum) to The Simplot Family Founhopeful for a spring 2014 completion. get paved over when new development the east. dation’s grand plan for the sweeps through.” “But to me, it is not very $70 million JUMP includes Kaine told BW that the consensus of the well-defined or marketed,” ample space to play host to group was to move forward, tentatively said Kaine. “There’s a sign the arts, with as many as five scheduling another session for Thursday, or two. But there really might be some opseparate dedicated spaces for performing Nov. 3, with the same attendees and some portunity to create not only synergy but an arts and/or nonprofit organizations. new guests: representatives from Boise’s energy to truly identify the city’s cultural “At any one time, we could have as downtown business community. district. Not just JUMP. Not just the Esther many as five groups at JUMP,” said Cuoio. “I’ve had a number of conversations Simplot Academy. Not just BODO. But a “At any one time” is a key phrase bewith businesses who are interested in being fully developed district.” cause initial plans are to regularly circulate more involved,” said Kaine. “If we have Kaine said he began having informal organizations through select JUMP spaces. more activity in a cultural district, it will conversations with other arts organizations “No one will be setting up permanent be to everybody’s benefit. This could be an about the district, and eventually decided shop there,” said Cuoio. “There will be a extraordinary statement of the importance to make those conversations more encomcontinual in-and-out flow. We’ll involve of culture to our community.” passing. as many of the local nonprofits and arts

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LAU R IE PEAR M AN

Where there’s smoke, there’s some fiery opposition to Boise’s proposed ordinances to restrict smoking in public places. At an Oct. 5 information meeting at City Hall, one question raised an issue that had yet to be publicly addressed: What happens to businesses that deal exclusively with indoor smoking? Hannifin’s Cigar Shop has been in business at the corner of 11th and Main streets since 1905. Owner Stan Minder told Citydesk he is frustrated, saying he can’t understand why the city would impose a smoking ban when motorcyclists don’t have to wear helmets. “It pisses me off because they’re taking more and more rights away,” said Minder, a non-smoker. “I’m not saying it’s a great habit. I don’t approve of a parent smoking with a car full of kids. But people smoke here. That’s why it’s a smoke shop.” Ryan Sturman of Sturman’s Smoke Shop attended the Oct. 5 meeting and voiced a similar complaint. Citydesk stopped into Sturman’s store at 218 N. 10th St., where he and his father personally sample the cigars they sell. “Just our one shop alone pays the State of Idaho $100,000 in tobacco tax,” Sturman said. “With cigars, there’s no additives, no chemicals. It’s just a rolled-up leaf, inside of a tube.” Sturman said the city’s goal of creating a smoke-free workplace shouldn’t apply to his store. He said he wouldn’t hire someone who couldn’t smoke, just as a mechanic shop wouldn’t hire somebody who didn’t know about cars. He said that in order for him to make recommendations to customers, he has to be able to smoke in his shop, not down the street. The International Premium Cigar and Pipe Retailers Association agreed, issuing a press release calling the proposed ordinance a “tyranny of the majority,” and sought to debunk scientific findings that link secondhand smoke with health. Murtadha “Ali” Alsudani owns and operates the Ali Baba Hookah Bar at 2174 Broadway Ave. Alsudani worried that if the ordinance passes as written, he’ll be forced to close down his business. “The hookah bars will close down,” said Alsudani, of which Boise has three. “When the hookah bars close down, the employees lose their jobs. It’ll just make the economy worse.” As BW went to press, the City Council was expected to take up the issue of a tobacconist exception in its Oct. 11 work session. The discussion was expected to “consider whether to add an exception for tobacconist establishments that sell only tobacco and tobacco-related products.” Visit Citydesk at boiseweekly.com for an update. The City Council will host an official public hearing during its regular meeting scheduled for Tuesday, Oct. 18, at 6 p.m. at City Hall. —Andrew Crisp

THE NEW CULTURE CLUB Boise’s arts community wants to better define its cultural district GEORGE PRENTICE

NEWS

BROADWAY BAR NOOSE SPARKS DEBATE Rope was show of support for football TALYN BRUMLEY A hangman’s noose that hung from the Broadway Bar through September is no longer twisting in the wind. Boise State students, the NAACP and at least one lawmaker complained about the symbol, in spite of the insistence that it was the Broadway Bar’s unique way of supporting the Bronco football team. “It [the noose] created quite a bit of conversation,” said Don Wilcox, bar operations manager. “It was just a rah-rah Boise State thing for us.” That’s not how Boise State junior Tasha Lundquist saw it. “I am all about supporting my team,” said Lundquist, who is majoring in social work. “But hanging something like that could initiate a hate crime.” Lundquist said when she first called the bar after seeing the noose, an unnamed employee apologized and promised to take it down. Two weeks later, the noose was still hanging high. Agitated, Lundquist began contacting her friends and classmates. “I started a phone campaign and sent out hundreds of emails,” Lundquist said. “I talked to the owner, and I said it symbolized violence.” Boise State social work professor Raymond Mullenax told Lundquist that a boycott would be effective. “Folks can certainly express themselves any way they want to, but if they’re putting that kind of symbolism out there, we can choose not to spend our money there,” said Mullenax. “If you are a person of color, especially an African-American, the noose is a symbol that could be offensive.” Until the mid-1930s, lynchings were not uncommon in the United States. Even in the 21st century, white supremacist groups use nooses at rallies and in propogandistic literature. “I don’t think [the bar’s] intentions are racist,” said Lundquist, even though she had little-to-no luck convincing the bar’s management to lose the noose. “People called asking for the owner and he’s just resorted to hanging up on them,” she said. Wilcox and some of the bar’s patrons

told BW that the noose did not have racist implications. “They were making way too much hay out of it,” says Wilcox. Regular patron Dick Hall agreed. “We didn’t put up a white sheet or burn a cross,” he said. “We didn’t put up the oak tree to hang the noose from.” Wilcox and Hall, both Boise State alumni, asserted that the noose was meant as support for the Boise State football team. When the noose originally went up, a University of Georgia stuffed bulldog hung from it, but Wilcox said that after a public-relations employee from Boise State contacted him, he removed the bulldog. The empty noose stayed up. “I don’t understand where the violence and racism come from,” said Wilcox. “I’m not a violent person. I’m not a racist. What am I missing? The funny thing about it is, there’s a black beauty shop next door. A woman from there comes in here on her breaks. She never said anything.” BW spoke with Shari Ashley from the Cut-N-Up beauty salon, next door to the Broadway Bar. “Yes, I go in there to have a smoke and have a glass of cranberry juice on my break,” said Ashley. “But nobody asked me my opinion. If they had, I would have told them, ‘Yes, I have a problem with a noose.’ A number of our customers definitely had a problem with the noose.” Wilcox said after a visit from District 19 Rep. Cherie Buckner-Webb regarding the matter, he had enough and took the noose down, saying he was “doing what was best for the bar.” Wilcox insisted that the noose was only related to football. “We’re supporting our team,” he said. “They’re accusing me of missing the point. They missed the point.” In the aftermath, Lundquist was grateful that the noose was gone.” “I’m really impressed because of the community and all the people who called,” she said. “I think it’s about raising consciousness. When you see injustice, you can change it.”

T H E Y ’ R E A C C USI NG ME OF MISSING T H E P O I N T. T H E Y M I S S E D T HE P O I N T. ”

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | 9

CITIZEN

ROBERT STEVAHN The Costume Shop’s man of a thousand faces GEORGE PRENTICE I noticed you had a number of new items with the Jersey Shore label on them. It’s licensed Jersey Shore, but we have knock-offs, too—Guido and Guidette kits.

How much of a shadow has the recession cast on your business? It’s been horrible. We bought the business in April 2008, right at the beginning of the recession.

Does Boise have quite a bit of costume culture? Absolutely. There are the ravers, with the whole electronic dance music scene. The Burning Man community throws several parties a year. The goths, the chrononauts and, of course, anime cosplay.

But you hire quite a few people. In October, we could have as many as 2025 employees. This is an old-fashioned store. We pride ourselves with customer service. Each year, we continue to see more big-box Halloween stores pop up. They are the bane of my existence. They kill me. People think they have better prices. Well, they don’t. Is your store equally divided between retail and rental? The space is pretty even—probably more even than it should be, because our rental business is only 30 percent. How much inventory do you have? Over 5,000 full costumes.

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Does popular culture change much of your inventory? Things will strike people’s imaginations, but in our particular store, Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman and Pirates continue to sell year after year. So, what’s new? Steampunk. It’s like the Wild, Wild West. It’s Victorian meets mechanical gears and weapons.

And how about the more conservative crowd? Absolutely. We’ve helped Opera Idaho throw parties at the Arid Club. Everybody in town has walked through our doors. Does it just get insane here the closer it gets to Halloween? A lot of people wait until the last minute. I probably do half of my monthly business in the last three or four days before Halloween. You can’t walk through here, but people have such a good time. And they’re so patient, but we have all of our cash registers cranking.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

What does an 18-year Hewlett-Packard veteran, husband, father, stepfather and grandfather-to-be do for fun? Dress up in Steampunk boots and a gold thong, of course. As owner of the Costume Shop in Boise, Robert Stevahn can be anybody he wants—but more often than not, he’s simply the boss. Following 25 years of writing and managing software products, Stevahn took an early retirement in 2007. He said he was “just burned out—fried.” A few months later, when his wife told him he needed to do something to “get out of the house,” he took a part-time job at the Costume Shop for Halloween. A few months later, he was the new owner.

Do a lot of people reserve costumes in advance? We start getting reservations in August. We’ll probably have 300 reserved. Other than Halloween, what are your big events? We sell and rent a lot of Santa suits for Christmas, and a lot of bunny suits for Easter. There’s Mardi Gras and New Year’s Eve. Year-round, we probably sell more wigs than anyone in the valley. We also have a good yearround hosiery and makeup business. Are costumes getting sexier with every passing year? It certainly was a trend the last five years. But it tamed down a bit recently. We do a lot of sexy costumes, but there is a bit more coverage lately. When was the last time you dressed up? Last weekend. I was a DJ at the Idaho Decompression event [a post-Burning Man party]. I wore a black jacket with white and gold trim, some really big bronze Steampunk boots and a gold thong. That was my radical self-expression for the night. That makes for a very unique grandpa. I don’t really think of myself as a grandfather. But I saw some little Halloween costumes for infants today. I have to admit, I peeked at them. I guess I’m softening up a bit.

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A DAM ROSEN LUN D

n an age of blogs, tweets, hacks and piles of beans spilled by Wikileaks, the notion of media censorship may seem dated. But the rundown of stories Project Censored calls attention to this year serves as a reminder that mainstream media outlets favoring the superficial over the substantive don’t give us all the information we need. Since 1976, Project Censored has endeavored to spotlight important news articles that didn’t find their way into mainstream headlines. Originating with a classroom assignment in a communications course taught by Carl Jensen at Sonoma State University, the perennial project has evolved into a book, a radio show and the Project Censored and Media Freedom International websites, which aggregate underreported independent news stories from around the globe. Students and professors engaged in unearthing oft-ignored stories, part of a nationwide network of affiliates working under the direction of history professor Mickey Huff, bring a harsh critique to standard mainstream media fare. “Corporate media (singular) is the information control wing of the global power structure,” former Project Censored Director Peter Phillips wrote in the introduction to Censored 2012: Sourcebook for the Media Revolution. “The corporate media systematically censors the news stories that challenge the propaganda of empire.” In Huff’s words, “We try to highlight the things that are highly relevant, that seem to be conspicuously absent.” Huff said the selection process for the top censored stories begins with nominations of independent articles that readers feel warrant greater attention than they’ve received. From there, students comb through Lexis Nexis or other databases to see whether they’ve been adequately covered. If not, they fact-check the stories with professors or other experts in the field. Once they’ve been “validated” in this way, they’re posted to Project Censored’s sister site, Media Freedom International. The famed Top 25 Censored Stories list, which has long served as the tagline of the organization, is the result of a ranked-choice voting process in which judges and affiliates select from the entire pool of validated news articles posted from April to April. The end product—an annual book featuring a compilation of the censored stories, as well as sociological essays on media censorship and scathing critiques of “junk food news” churned out by the likes of Fox News—can be considered a kind of historical almanac, Huff said. “Journalism is the rough draft of history,” he noted. “And if you have these mainstream corporate news outlets getting so much of it wrong or missing it, how does that impact historical construction?” For the most part, Project Censored’s story list offers a sampling of smart, investigative journalism produced by the independent press. It includes deep investigative pieces such as “Diet Hard With A Vengeance,” by David Moberg of In These Times, and a heart-rending portrayal by Chris Hedges of a Marine stationed in a mortuary unit in Iraq.

This play is appropriate for ages 7+

TERTAINMENT AN EN : The Amazing Adventures of Louis de Rougemont (As Told By Himself)

Oct. 5 29, 2011

tickets: start at $10 phone: 331-9224 x205 online: BCTheater.org 854 Fulton St. Downtown Boise, ID

More U.S. soldiers died from suicide than in combat in 2010.

Yet there are instances when Project Censored seems to wander too far afield. Its claims of “censorship” seem dubious at times, as with the charge that the mainstream media has ignored the real unemployment rate because it hasn’t turned an eye toward the analysis of economist John Williams, who maintains a website called Shadow Government Statistics. Huff and Phillips regularly discuss questions surrounding the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center on their KPFA radio show, and their emphasis on this particular issue, along with a recent tendency to give weight to fringe theories concerning things like suspicious contrails issuing from airplanes, have caused allies of the organization to defect in the past. The organization’s definition of censorship has evolved, too, to the point where the authors cast it as a form of propaganda that is “intentional by nature ... In essence, this is a conspiracy.” Nevertheless, the Project Censored team delivers yet another rundown of surprising, alarming, and thought-provoking stories that are worth noting—more so, perhaps, because they received so little attention to begin with. Without further ado, here are the Top 10.

MORE U.S. SOLDIERS

1 COMMITTED SUICIDE THAN DIED IN COMBAT IN 2010

Six more, to be exact. That’s the figure reported by Good Magazine and spotlighted by Project Censored in an article highlighting the fact that 462 American soldiers were killed in combat in 2010 while 468 soldiers, counting enlisted men and women as well as veterans, took their own lives. This was the second consecutive year that more soldiers died by their own hands than in combat. In 2009, the 381 suicides of activeduty soldiers recorded by the military also exceeded the number of deaths in battle. The Good report, which references Congressional Quarterly as a source, was published in January 2011, just weeks after military authorities announced that a psychological screening program seemed to be stemming the suicide rate among active-duty soldiers. “This new data, that American soldiers are now more dangerous to themselves than the insurgents, flies right in the face of any suggestion that things are ‘working,’” Good Senior Editor Cord Jefferson wrote. Project Censored also spotlighted Hedges’ sobering portrayal of Jess Goodell, a Marine who was stationed in the Mortuary Affairs

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unit in Iraq. Goodell published a memoir titled, Death and After in Iraq, also the name of Hedges’ column.

U.S. MILITARY’S “FRIEND”

2 FAKE-OUT

Anyone suspicious of “sock puppets,” those online commenters pretending to be someone they’re not, would be unnerved by the U.S. military’s “online persona management service,” a little-known program described in The Guardian UK, Raw Story and Computerworld stories unearthed and highlighted by Project Censored. The U.S. Central Command secured a contract with a Los Angeles-based tech company to develop the program, which enables U.S. service workers to use fake online personas on social media sites to influence online chatter. Using up to 10 false identities, they can counter charged political dialogue with pro-military propaganda. “These ‘personas’ were to have detailed, fictionalized backgrounds, to make them believable to outside observers, and a sophisticated identity protection service was to back them up, preventing suspicious readers from uncovering the real person behind the account,” according to a Raw Story account. A Centcom spokesperson told the Guardian UK that the program would only intervene in online conversations in Arabic, Farsi, Urdu or Pashto, and that it wouldn’t initially target Twitter or Facebook. However, critics likened this U.S. endeavor to manipulate social media to China’s attempts to control and restrict free speech on the Internet.

3

OBAMA’S HIT LIST

The Central Intelligence Agency and the U.S. military have the authority to kill U.S. citizens abroad, outside war zones, if strong evidence exists that they’re involved in terrorist activity, The Washington Post reported in a front-page story in January 2010. Despite this prominent press treatment of targeted assassinations under the Obama administration, Project Censored deems this an underreported news story because “a moral, ethical and legal analysis of the assassinations seems to be significantly lacking inside the corporate media.” The authors instead point us to coverage in Salon, the Inter Press Service, Common Dreams and several other sources that sharply question the president’s authority to license extrajudicial executions of individuals. In December 2010, Human Rights Watch asked WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

Private prison companies have made major contributions for antiimmigrant legislation.

for clarification of the legal rationale behind this practice after a judge dismissed a lawsuit challenging the notion. Columnist Glenn Greenwald blasts the practice in Salon: “[George W.] Bush merely imprisoned [Jose Padilla] for years without a trial. If that’s a vicious, tyrannical assault on the Constitution—and it was—what should they be saying about the Nobel Peace Prize winner’s assassination of American citizens without any due process?”

4

MANMADE FOOD CRISIS

Project Censored highlights an article by David Moberg for In These Times, offering an in-depth breakdown of the global food crisis, touching on the environmental context of worsening droughts and flooding, as well as the economic ramifications of a system in which free-market speculators stand to profit from volatile food prices. Beyond crop reductions resulting from irregular weather patterns, Moberg places the blame for rising food prices and increasing malnutrition on flawed economic policies. “Hunger is currently a result of poverty and inequality, not lack of food,” he concluded. The food price index rose to its highest level since 1990 in February, according to a report by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. “Since 2010 began, roughly another 44 million people have quietly crossed the threshold into malnutrition, joining 925 million already suffering from lack of food,” Moberg writes. “If prices continue to rise, this food crisis will push the ranks of the hungry toward a billion people.”

PRISON COMPANIES

5 FUND ANTI-IMMIGRANT LEGISLATION

When Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer ran for re-election in 2010, her greatest out-of-state campaign contributions came from high-ranking executives of Corrections Corporation of America, one of the nation’s largest prison companies. Brewer gained notoriety among immigrant-rights advocates after championing SB 1070, strict anti-illegal immigration legislation that drew criticism for legitimizing racial profiling. SB 1070 established new crimes and corresponding prison sentences relating to illegal immigration; CCA profits directly from building and operating prisons and detention centers. Bringing it closer to home, CCA previously employed two of Brewer’s legislative aides as lobbyists. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

In a Counterpunch article entitled “Wall Street and the Criminalization of Immigrants” that is spotlighted by Project Censored, Peter Cervantes-Gautschi points out Brewer’s links to CCA and goes deeper still, offering an historic account of how investors in CCA and prison giant Geo Group have for years actively pushed for legislation that would result in the widespread incarceration of undocumented immigrants.

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GOOGLE SPIES?

A flurry of stories aired in the spring of 2010, when it became apparent that Google Street View vehicles, in the process of collecting data for its mapping service, also picked up consumer “payload” data on Wi-Fi networks, including email messages, website data, user names and passwords. The tech giant publicly apologized for what it characterized as a mistake, saying it had “failed badly.” The Federal Trade Commission admonished Google in a letter but declined to pursue it further. From there, Project Censored authors make the leap that the FTC abandoned its inquiry because a week earlier President Barack Obama attended a Democratic Party fundraiser at the Palo Alto, Calif., home of Google executive Marissa Mayer, citing a San Francisco Chronicle article about the $30,000-per person affair. Project Censored authors also point to an article by Eric Sommer titled “Google’s Deep CIA Connections,” appearing on pravda.ru (a website whose most mostread article was “Bermuda Triangle: New Anomalous Phenomenon Discovered”). Sommer claims that “Google is, in fact, a key participant in U.S. military and CIA intelligence operations,” basing his argument on a perplexing set of links between investors in Google and CIA technologies.

STAY POSITIVE—

7 AT ALL COSTS

A military training program that Project Censored has deemed “U.S. Army and psychology’s largest experiment—ever” was profiled in a detailed American Psychologist series in early 2011. Comprehensive Solider Fitness is described as a “holistic approach to warrior training,” emphasizing positive psychology as a means to counter mental-health problems arising from horrific combat situations. While the American Psychologist series reads like a puff piece finessed by the professionals who developed CSF, Project Censored

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Nuclear power in the United States may not be as safe and clean as some sources have led the public to believe.

spotlighted articles in Truthout and The Psychology of Well-being that raised questions about the wisdom of launching a required, untested psychology program for more than 1 million soldiers, one that encourages soldiers to think positive even in the face of traumatizing events. In an article appearing on opednews.com, authors Roy Eidelson, Marc Pilisuk and Stephen Soldz write that the CSF “training” program would better be described as a research project. They point out that a hypothesis of the program’s success lies at the very core of CSF, “yet it is merely a hypothesis—a tentative explanation or prediction that can only be confirmed through further research.”

THE MYTH OF CLEAN

8 NUCLEAR POWER

The terrifying meltdowns of Japan’s Fukushima nuclear reactors reignited a worldwide debate about the wisdom of relying on nuclear energy as an electricity source. While Germany opted to phase out its nuclear facilities by 2022 in the wake of the tragedy, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission came under scrutiny after a Union of Concerned Scientists report analyzed 14 “near misses” at nuclear power plants in 2010, revealing the shortcomings in NRC inspections. Project Censored’s critique of mainstream media’s treatment of nuclear power is that it’s too willing to endorse the idea that nuclear power is safe so long as proper safety measures are in place, and that major news publications readily go along with the nuclear industry’s branding of the power source as “clean” and “carbon free” when it’s really not. Claiming that “the refrain of the corporate media” is that nuclear power is “perfectly harmless,” the authors spotlight a number of articles and literature from anti-nuclear nonprofit organizations explaining the health hazards of radiation, plus Jeff Goodell’s “America’s Nuclear Nightmare,” an in-depth Rolling Stone article investigating ties between the NRC and the nuclear industry.

THE GOVERNMENT

9 IS MANIPULATING THE WEATHER

This one stretches credulity, and it’s probably the best example of why Project Censored has gained detractors even on the left in recent years. The authors point us to a Centre for Research on Globalization article entitled, “Atmospheric Geoengineering: Weather Manipulation, Contrails and

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Chemtrails,” by Rady Ananda, who begins by informing readers: “The military-industrial complex stands poised to capitalize on controlling the world’s weather.” It describes an “international symposium” held in Belgium in May 2010, during which “scientists asserted that manipulation of climate through modification of Cirrus clouds is neither a hoax nor a conspiracy theory,” and is “fully operational.” That sounds rather serious, but a web video of that symposium easily located online offers a closer look. One speaker begins by showing slides of old paintings to demonstrate “what the sky is supposed to look like,” then offers evidence of a chemtrail cover-up by quoting an unnamed pilot who tells someone in an online comment that he could reveal the truth about chemtrails but is bound by contract to shoot anyone he tells. Scientific American and other publications have reported that geoengineering—spreading tiny atmospheric particles to reflect sunlight as a method to counter climate change—has actually come under serious consideration in recent years. Yet Project Censored seems to conflate this with a fringe obsession with supposedly suspicious airplane contrails.

THE “REAL”

10 UNEMPLOYMENT RATE

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics calculates the “official unemployment rate” by counting everyone who did not have job, was available for work and had actively sought work in the last four weeks, according to the BLS website. But alternative BLS statistics incorporate so-called “discouraged workers,” unemployed individuals who’ve given up on the job hunt. In the first four months of 2011, the national unemployment rate officially stood at around 9 percent, while a BLS statistic incorporating discouraged workers and the marginally employed bumped that figure up to 15.9 percent. However, Project Censored highlights an article by Greg Hunter published on Information Clearinghouse, claiming that the “real” unemployment rate is actually 22.1 percent, or one out of five U.S. residents. Hunter’s claim is based on his interview with San Francisco-based economist John Williams, who maintains a website called Shadow Government Statistics. By ignoring the claims of this economist, Project Censored argues, the mainstream media is engaging in censorship. As with several claims in this year’s list, that may be stretching things a bit. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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JIM B OLEN

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Just your average horror music comedy rife with gore and bad jokes.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY OCT. 14-15 scary funny EVIL DEAD THE MUSICAL

Pint-sized shredders at Boise Rock School are movin’ on up—to the downtown side.

THURSDAY OCT. 13 rockers in training BOISE ROCK SCHOOL GRAND OPENING At some point, almost every kid dreams of becoming a rock star and living a glamorous life of fame, fortune and power. And music really is powerful. Research has shown that playing a musical instrument helps kids do better in school and relieves stress. Plus, creating music is just plain fun. The folks at Boise Rock School know this, and they’ve been teaching music to young ’uns since 2008. Boise Rock School offers all kinds of programs that teach kids how to rock—everything from after-school programs to summer camps to private lessons. Kids who participate in these programs form their own bands and give performances at venues like the Linen Building and the Knitting Factory. But learning to rock doesn’t only mean a kid can become a real-life guitar hero—he or she will also learn social skills, like cooperation and teamwork. Boise Rock School’s musical mission has proven popular with an increasing number of students and its founders decided it’s time to expand and get thrashing in a swank, brand new studio on Idaho Street. To break in the new location, Boise Rock School is hosting a grand opening, featuring a live concert by students. The music is the main attraction, but there will also be a raffle, food and beer available with ID. Get down to the new studio and listen to some amazing kids as they show off their super-sweet shredding skills. 6:30-8:30 p.m., FREE. Boise Rock School, 1404 W. Idaho St., 208-559-0065, boiserockschool.com.

FRIDAY OCT. 14 words GHOSTS AND PROJECTORS POETRY READING When daily life gets too prosaic, sometimes all you

need is a little poetry. Fortunately, Hyde Park Books is a hotbed of local literary talent, hosting both the Mouth and Thistle Reading Series and the Ghosts and Projectors Reading Series. In the latter, an eclectic mix of poets share the spotlight and their writing. The series blends every kind of poetry, from experimental and slam

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to more lyrical or traditional. Ghosts and Projectors is curated by Boise poet Megan Williams. The latest event in the series features original poetry by local writers Zach Vesper and Ken Rodgers. Vesper is originally from Omaha, Neb., and is the editor of Strange Machine Books, a Nebraska-based online poetry journal. He

Director Sam Raimi’s 1981 film, The Evil Dead, isn’t exactly a good movie in the traditional meaning of the phrase. Nor are its two sequels, Evil Dead 2 and Army of Darkness. The latter, the most successful of the three, grossed only $11.5 million at the box office (according to Box Office Mojo), which is still much better than the pitiful $2.4 million the first film made. But Raimi’s innovative slapstick approach to special effects and schlocky plotlines made him a marquis director, and the films are now among the most influential in contemporary filmmaking and pop culture. Still, considering The Evil Dead’s NC-17 rating and splatter themes, it wouldn’t seem a likely candidate for a musical stage adaptation. But it happened, and even more unlikely, it killed: more than 100,000 tickets to the show sold in Toronto, it won a Korean Tony award and The New York Times called it the “next Rocky Horror.” The play, which combines plot elements from all three films, focuses on five college students who head to an abandoned cabin in the woods for a weekend of debauchery. They accidently unleash supernatural evil forces that transform some of their group into murderous demons. Both the heroes and the demons must then sing and dance their way through chainsaw battles and occult rituals. Rife with terrible jokes, dismemberment and buckets of blood, Evil Dead the musical is billed as the only stage play to feature a “splash zone.” If there’s a better play to get you in the Halloween mood, we don’t know of it. Luckily for Boise, the crew at Daisy’s Madhouse will be staging a production of Evil Dead the Musical this month. Directed by Jennifer Dunn, the play will show Fridays and Saturdays at the Idaho Outdoor Association Building, through Saturday, Oct. 29. It should go without saying that the show features sex, violence and naughty language. So you probably shouldn’t bring your kids or wear your favorite white pants unless you want either of them to be forever stained by the experience. Friday, Oct. 14-Saturday, Oct. 15, 8 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Building, 3401 Brazil St., 208-995-0088, daisysmadhouse.org.

is also an MFA candidate at Boise State. Vesper’s appearance at Ghosts and Projectors will also mark a celebration of the release of his new chapbook titled Only One Beast. Rodgers is also a man of many talents: He teaches creative writing classes online and is producing a documentary film about the Siege of Khe Sanh during the Vietnam War. Rodgers has published

in Idaho Arts Quarterly and he released a collection of poems, Passenger Pigeons, in 2009. He is also a founding member of the Idaho Writers Guild. The reading is free and refreshments will be available for a $3 donation. 7 p.m., FREE. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St. For more information, email ghostsandprojectors@gmail. com.

SATURDAYSUNDAY OCT. 15-16 artists BOSCO In the 1960s Andy Warhol started producing art in his studio, which he dubbed The Factory. Despite all the licentiousness that films WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

DANIEL R OS ENTHAL

FIND

Dying Famous will take it from the big screen to the stage.

BEAR COASTERS

SATURDAY OCT. 15 rockers done training DYING FAMOUS What do bands such as The Doors, Led Zeppelin and Motley Crue have in common with Boise-based band Dying Famous? Other than playing rock ’n’ roll, each band has per formed at the Whiskey a Go Go, the legendar y Hollywood venue where dreams are either realized or crushed under the feet of moshers. Local filmmaker Michael D. Gough will premiere his latest documentary, titled Dying Famous, on Saturday, Oct. 15, which follows the band’s turbulent road to performing at the hallowed rock ’n’ roll stomping ground. Gough, who grew up in Kuna, met the band’s lead vocalist and rhythm guitarist Zane McGinley seven years ago, during the premiere of Gough’s debut film. It wasn’t until 2010, when Gough had a dream about managing Dying Famous, that he decided to take a break from filmmaking and moved to Idaho from Utah. While handling the management duties of the band, he realized that there was a documentary plot at the core of his endeavors. Gough faced a number of challenges as the group’s manager—including handling an enraged drummer who threatened to shoot everyone associated with the band. Dying Famous has courted fans with an original mix of rock, alternative rock and punk. McGinley’s magnetic on-stage presence is characterized by him belting out lyrics while clad in his trademark black kilt. Dying Famous is the fifth movie effort from Gough, who has shot three other documentaries and one feature-length film. The world premiere of Dying Famous, the movie, will be screened at the Egyptian Theatre. Save your ticket for free admission to the after-party at Humpin’ Hannah’s, where Dying Famous the band will perform live with the Rocci Johnson Band. Visit boiseweekly.com for more on Dying Famous, including interviews with Gough and McGinley. 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $10. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., dyingfamousmovie.com.

like Factory Girl would have you believe was the sole enterprise of the place, art was happening in that studio. Artists were inspired by their comrades to create and Warhol allowed some members of the public to view his process. This weekend, you’ll have the chance to watch some Boise artists in their own studios. Members of the Boise Open Studios Collective will open their doors so the public can see and expe-

S U B M I T

rience artists creating in a multitude of media, including assemblage, pottery, oil and acrylic painting, photography, glass and sculpture. More than 25 artists will open their studios during the event. For more info on the artists or for a guide and map to the studios visit boiseopenstudios.com. Saturday, Oct. 15-Sunday, Oct. 16, noon-6 p.m., individual schedules vary, FREE. For more information, see the insert in this week’s BW.

Getting grounded has never been this much fun.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY OCT. 15-16 dancin’ dancin’ dancin’ TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT’S GROUNDED If you haven’t heard of the Trey McIntyre Project yet, you haven’t been paying attention. The local dance company prances all over Boise, partnering with local arts organizations, winning awards and swilling specialty cocktails named after the company’s dancers. But Boise isn’t the only town TMP has taken over. Since it was founded, the troupe has made waves across the globe. The Washington Post praised TMP for its “fresh and forward-thinking choreography.” And in the spring of 2012, TMP will storm Asia, swinging through China, South Korea, the Philippines and Vietnam as cultural ambassadors for the Dance Motion USA tour. Before storming the world, TMP will kick off its fourth season in Boise with Grounded. TMP Executive Director John Michael Schert said the theme for Boise this season is “welcome home.” “The idea of welcome home is our continued investment in the Boise community, really choosing this as our homebase and wanting to be here as much as possible and reconnecting,” said Schert. On Saturday, Oct. 15, and Sunday, Oct. 16, TMP will per form three new ballets at the Morrison Center as part of Grounded: “Gravity Heroes,” “Oh, Inverted World” and “In Dreams.” “What this show at the Morrison Center really represents is the feeling of being grounded. So not only growing upwards and reaching new heights, but also growing internally and growing in depth and growing a root system, which is connecting us with our home community of Boise,” said Schert. Saturday, Oct. 15, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Oct. 16, 2 p.m.; $10$63. The Morrison Center, 2201 W. Caesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1110, treymcintyre.com/tickets.

Bearskin rugs are often found next to roaring fires or under mustachioed ’70s porn stars. Their soft fur gives bare toes a cozy reprieve from the otherwise chilly concrete in a drafty castle. And while it’s not uncommon to see soap opera lovers toasting ruby-hued zinfandels on a bearskin rug, you never see them furiously spritzing Resolve to get out the resulting red wine stains. kikkerland.com Well now, you can harness all the awesomely sleazy kitsch of the bearskin rug while actually protecting your furniture from nasty stains. Design superstars Kikkerland make a set of four fauxbearskin rug coasters to set your leaky beverages on. The pancaked bears were designed by Billy Law and come in milky white or light chocolate brown. And the best part— they’re are made from the much easier to clean, far less furry silicone. A slight cup-sized indentation in the center of the bear keeps beer bottles or baby bottles in place without leaving un-bear-able condensation rings on your beloved wooden coffee table. And if you need something to open your beverage before setting it on a bearskin coaster, Kikkerland also offers a cast iron bear beer bottle opener that can be mounted to a wall. —Tara Morgan

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY OCT. 12 On Stage SARAH RUHL’S EURYDICE—A woman must choose between being a loyal daughter to her father or being a proper wife to her husband. See Page 4 for more. 7:30 p.m. $8 general, $6 students and seniors. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. SHIPWRECKED! AN ENTERTAINMENT: THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF LOUIS DE ROUGEMONT—This play includes exotic islanders, a man-eating octopus and an examination of the fine line that separates the truth and tall tales. 8 p.m. $13-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Citizen LOOK! SAVE A LIFE MEBERSHIP PARTY—Look! Safe a Life is an advocacy group that should be embraced by everyone who rides bicycles. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill and Brewery, 3019 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-6581533, sockeyebrew.com.

THURSDAY OCT. 13 Festivals & Events BOISE ROCK SCHOOL GRAND OPENING—Celebrate the school’s new location and enjoy the music of some talented young uns’. See Picks, Page 16. 6:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Rock School, 1404 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-5590065, boiserockschool.com TRUNK OR TREAT—University of Phoenix will host its second-annual Trunk or Treat fall community celebration. The family oriented event is open to the public and trunk-or-treaters can enjoy traditional treats like kettlecorn, hot cider and hot chocolate. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE. University of Phoenix-Idaho campus, 3080 E. Gentry Way, Ste. 150, Meridian, 208-888-1505, phoenix.edu.

On Stage OKLAHOMA!—Two cowboys compete for the women they love in Rodgers and Hammerstein’s musical comedy set at the turn of the 20th century. Dinner is optional on Friday and Saturday nights, and tickets must be purchased 24 hours in advance. Dinner is served at 7 p.m., followed by the show at 8 p.m. $18-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org. SARAH RUHL’S EURYDICE— See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $8 general, $6 students and seniors. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3850111, thelinenbuilding.com.

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SHIPWRECKED: AN ENTERTAINMENT: THE AMAZINGADVENTURES OF LOUIS DE ROUGEMONT—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $13-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

$30. Ophidia Dance and Art Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

Workshops & Classes

READY FOR NANOWRIMO—November is National Novel Writing Month, and if you can churn out 50,000 not-so-artfully crafted words by Nov. 30, learn about the challenge at this session. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-3844200, nanowrimo.org.

CLASSIC BURLESQUE WORKSHOP—Absinthia will put you in the shoes of a classic burlesque dancer. Optional strip tease ideas and the feather boa and gloves are yours to take home. 8-9 p.m.

Literature

NOISE/CD REVIEW BROOKE ANNIBALE: SILENCE WORTH BREAKING Pittsburgh, Penn.,-based singer-songwriter Brooke Annibale’s third album, Silence Worth Breaking, is a revelation. A little bit of ever ything, the record easily slides into the realms of pop, rock, folk, Americana and soul, and all the while, the progression between songs is organic rather than schizophrenic. This album is thought-provoking without being pompous, and it’s one of those rare albums whose content lives up to its title. Lyrically, Annibale dodges the stereotypical singer-songwriter landmine of focusing solely on romantic relationships, instead broadening her landscape to include songs that communicate hard truths, like accepting the past and learning to stand up for yourself. She paints one hell of a beautiful picture of a relationship with the natural metaphors she employs in her first single, “Yours and Mine,” and the gritty and groovy “Bullseye” makes you pause when she sings lines like, “We’re throwing darts in the dark / Tr ying to hit the bullseye / But nobody knows / What it looks like.” At 23 years old, Annibale’s lyrics display an uncommon wisdom, and her obser vations about life—be it hers or someone else’s—are spot-on. Annibale not only wins points for insightful lyricism, but also for her subtle, yet attention-grabbing vocals. When she isn’t channeling Natalie Merchant on the mid-tempo rocker, “The Way it Was,” or walking into Brandi Carlile territor y on the Americana-tinged, “I Believe,” Annibale shines because of the smoky quality of her pipes. Songs like “Under Streetlights” are undeniably catchy, as much for their acousticambient sound (this sucker will burrow into your mind and you won’t want it to leave) as they are for Annibale’s ability to stay within her range and still hit highs and lows when necessar y. “Tr yin’” is possibly the best song on the record, despite Annibale barely speaking above a whisper throughout the track. Her broken whispers juxtapose nicely with the power ful lyrical content. The songs on Silence Worth Breaking are anything but empty, singer-songwriter musings. It’s an album worth speaking up about. —Brian Palmer WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | BOSCO 2011 | 3

4 | BOSCO 2011 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT JANET HOLMES AND ALVIN GREENBERG READING—The writers will read from their poetry, essays and short stories. Sponsored by the Artist in Residence program and hosted by Mike Medberry. 7-9 p.m. FREE. The Cole Marr Gallery, 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, Boise, 208336-7630.

FRIDAY OCT. 14 Festivals & Events FALL QUARTER FUN FAIR— Broadview University is teaming up with the Education Foundation to help raise money for teachers in Boise, Meridian, Eagle and Star at the Fall Quarter Fun Fair. Activities range from food to face painting. All proceeds will be donated to help fulfill items on the teachers’ wish lists. 3-7 p.m. 25 cents per activity. Broadview University, 750 E. Gala Court, Meridian, 1-866-253-7744, broadviewuniversity.edu. SUN VALLEY JAZZ JAMBOREE—Over 275 shows and 200 musicians. Enjoy swing, big band, zydeco, blues and, of course, multiple jazz disciplines, as well as a multitude of activities like the ‘Marching Band Salute’ and jazz worship services. Info at sunvalleyjazz.com.

On Stage BALLET INNOVATIONS—Experience the creativity of the Ballet Idaho dancers as they express themselves as choreographers. Tickets are available at the door or call 208-343-0556. 8 p.m. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL—Based on Sam Raimi’s cult classic Evil Dead series, this “bloody” hilarious musical unearths the tale of five college students who travel to an abandoned cabin in the woods, accidentally unleashing an evil force that turns them into demons. For mature audiences. Tickets at brownpapertickets.com or by calling 208-995-0088. See Picks, Page 16. 8 p.m. $10 online, $15 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise. LIPSINC! HELL ON HEELS— Idaho’s first professional female impersonation troupe is setting soles on fire one high heel at a time. For more info, visit lipsinc. net. 8:30 p.m. $15. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com. OKLAHOMA!— See Wednesday. 6:15 p.m. $18-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

OPEN REHEARSAL—Ring in the 23rd season of Idaho Dance Theatre with a preview of the company’s fall performance. RSVP at 208-331-9592. Noon-1 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center Room 111, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise. SHIPWRECKED! AN ENTERTAINMENT: THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF LOUIS DE ROUGEMONT—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $13-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater. org.

Literature GHOSTS AND PROJECTORS POETRY READING—Zach Vesper and Ken Rodgers will read from their latest works of poetry. See Picks, Page 16. 7 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise. 208-429-8220, hydeparkbookstore.com.

SATURDAY OCT. 15 Festivals & Events BOSCO—BOSCO artists will open their studios for the public to see how and where they make their artwork. Artists info and work samples available at boiseopenstudios.com. See Picks, Page 17. Noon - 6 p.m. FREE. Various locations. boiseopenstudios. com. JFK DINNER AND SILENT AUCTION—The Fool Squad hosts the annual benefit for the Idaho Democrats. This year’s theme is Fool Moon Over the Capitol, featuring BW’s Bill Cope as keynote speaker. 6-11 p.m. $60 or $35 with pledge of $5 monthly donation for one year. Doubletree Hotel Boise-Riverside, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden city, doubletree1.hilton.com. PICCADILLY CIRCUS—Featuring the Elephant Extravaganza, Motorcycle Madness daredevils, Mongolian Angels contortionists, and crazy comedy with clowns, and more. Special buy-oneget-one-free adult tickets are available online at thefuncircus. com. See site for details and ticket pricing. 1:30 p.m., 4:30 p.m., 7:30 p.m. O’Connor Field House/Caldwell Events Center, 2207 Blaine St., Caldwell, 208455-3004.

| EASY

| MEDIUM |

HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

THE 2011 FAMILY CAREGIVERS CONFERENCE—Friends in Action hosts this event to help you manage your caregiving challenges while taking care of yourself. The conference features a presentation by national speaker and caregiving author Gary Barg, a panel of caregiving experts who will answer your questions, and an expo to connect you with valuable resources. 8:30 a.m.1:30 p.m. $10. Doubletree Hotel Boise-Riverside, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, doubletree1. hilton.com.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | 19

8 DAYS OUT THE VAULT NIGHTCLUB—The valley’s newest all-teen dance club launches with a huge party. The club is for high-school students only and opening night features DJs, a hair tinsel artist, air spray tattoos and a concession stand. For more info, visit ishpromotions.com or call 208-899-4476. 8 p.m.-midnight. $5 adv., $7 door; $8 all-access adv., $10 all-access door. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425. WITCHES MARKET AND PSYCHIC FAIR—Annual Witches Market and Fall Bazaar, featuring tarot/palm readers, henna artists, vendors of magical and eclectic items, along with face painting and pumpkin carving for the kids. 9 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. The Community Center, 305 E. 37th St., Garden City, 208-3363870, tccidaho.org.

On Stage BALLET IDAHO’S INNOVATIONS— See Friday. Tickets are available at the door or call 208-343-0556. 8 p.m. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116. EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL— See Friday. 8 p.m. $10 online, $15 door. Idaho Outdoor Association Grange Hall, 3401 Brazil St., Boise. LIPSINC! HELL ON HEELS— See Friday. 8:30 p.m. $15. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com. OKLAHOMA— See Thursday. $18-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

class materials and instruction. No previous felting experience required. 9 a.m.-noon. $40, puffymondaes.com. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-407-3359.

208-420-5946, or Dodge at 208324-8306. 1-3 p.m. FREE. Twin Falls County Historical Museum, 21337A U.S. Highway 30, Filer, 208-736-4675, twinfallsmuseum.org.

NINA HARTLEY—The adult film star will conduct a couples’ class, sign autographs at 5 p.m., and Adam and Eve will host a raffle for someone to have dinner with her that night. 1-3 p.m., $10/couple. Adam and Eve, 6919 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208376-0068, adamevestores.com.

SHOW N GO—Join the Farmboys Car Club for a cruise up Highway 21 to Idaho City in your classic car or bike. The club will leave Ben’s Crow Inn at 2:30 p.m. If you don’t have an old car or bike, but still want to check them out, head to Idaho City anyway. Noon. FREE. Ben’s Crow Inn, 6781 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-342-9669.

Kids & Teens BILINGUAL MARIONETTE SHOW—Spanish-language puppet show for the preschool set. Noon-1 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, gardencity.lili.org. GREENING YOUR HALLOWEEN—Create a costume from recyclable materials, get your face painted and participate in a costume parade and go on a tour of the haunted wastewater plant. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, cityofboise.org/bee/watershed.

Odds & Ends A GHOSTLY AFFAIR—Earie Cuff, executive director of the International Paranormal Reporting Group, along with her team members, will discuss paranormal activity in Idaho. Have a good ghost story? Other Bunch Press will be available to listen, and possibly put your story in the upcoming book Hauntings From The Snake River Plain. For more information, call Marcantonio at

SUNDAY OCT. 16 Festivals & Events BOSCO—See Saturday. Noon - 6 p.m. FREE. Various locations. boiseopenstudios.com. CROP WALK—Boise/Ada County CROP Walk celebrates its 31st year walking for hunger and poverty relief. 1 p.m. Donations accepted. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, cropwalkonline.org. HARVEST FEST—Celebrate the harvest season with live music, grape-stomping contests, local artists and crafters, wine and winery tours, and local food trucks. Noon-5 p.m. Indian Creek Winery, 1000 N. McDermott Road, Kuna, 208-922-4791, indiancreekwinery.com.

ROAD TO DIDDLYSQUAT—Actor Tim Behrens and writer Reed McColm each perform multiple characters in this hilarious new comedy. 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. $17. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. SHIPWRECKED! AN ENTERTAINMENT: THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF LOUIS DE ROUGEMONT— See Wednesday. $13-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT: GROUNDED— The celebrated dance company presents Grounded, consisting of “Oh, Inverted World,” “In Dreams” and “Gravity Heroes.” See Picks, Page 17. 8 p.m. $20-$63. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Workshops & Classes DOULA SPEED DATING—Are you pregnant? This is your opportunity to find out what doulas are all about and meet some of the local doulas in the Treasure Valley. 10-11:30 a.m. FREE. Broadway Dance Center, 893 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-7946843. NUNO FELTING—Create a wool-on-silk scarf with local felt artist Pattie Fowler. This is a one-session class. Fee covers all

20 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT On Stage

Odds & Ends

BALLET IDAHO’S INNOVATIONS—See Friday. 8 p.m. $15. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, Ballet Idaho Annex, 501 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-0556, balletidaho.org.

STORY STORY STUDIO—If you have a story to tell, but are a bit nervous about doing so, this three-part workshop can help get you ready for the popular Story Story Night held at the Rose Room once a month. 7-9 p.m. FREE, donations encouraged. The Cole Marr Gallery/Coffee House, 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, Boise, 208-336-7630.

TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT: GROUNDED— See Saturday. 2 p.m. $20-$63. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu.

TUESDAY OCT. 18

Odds & Ends

Talks & Lectures

BOISE MEMOIR GROUP—Share your stories about living in Boise. 2-3:30 p.m. FREE, donations accepted. Boise Train Depot, 2603 Eastover Terrace, Boise.

IDAHO ENVIRONMENTAL FORUM—U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson will provide insight into what’s happening with environmental issues in Washington, D.C. Call 208-761-2989 for more info. 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. $13 for lunch and program, $5 for program only. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com.

BRUNCH TRAIN—Enjoy a gourmet brunch and scenic surroundings during this three-hour train ride along the Payette River. Visit thundermountainline.com for more info. Noon. $37-$60. Thunder Mountain Line Scenic Train Rides, 120 Mill Road, Horseshoe Bend, 877-IDA-RAIL or 208-793-4425, thundermountainline.com.

LOVING KINDNESS—Beginner’s Mind Boise hosts a public talk by Dharmacharya Chan Huy (True Radiance), Loving Kindness: Cultivating a Boundless Heart. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Yoga Center, 3113 Rose Hill Road, Boise, 208-343-9789, boiseyogacenter. com.

MONDAY OCT. 17

WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY, AFRICA AND CONSERVATION—Photographer, author and activist Boyd Norton will give a multimedia presentation about the current conservation challenges in the Serengeti National Park of Tanzania and the state of conservation. All ages; full bar with ID. 6:30 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

Workshops & Classes PALEO COOKING CLASSES— This series of four classes is based on the Paleo diet — a simple way to reduce inflammation, stabilize blood sugars and achieve a healthy weight. To sign up or for more information, call 208-867-6612 or email anne@ abundantbowl.com. 6-8 p.m. $50. University Christian Church, 1801 University Drive, Boise, 208-343-5461, uccboise.org.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

WEDNESDAY OCT. 19 Festivals & Events CLOTHESLINE PROJECT—Counselors will be available to help victims and allies of genderbased violence create a symbolic T-shirt in the Women’s Center lounge. Co-sponsored by the Women’s and Children’s Alliance of Boise and Men Today, Men Tomorrow. Call 208-426-4259 for more info. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Boise State campus, Boise.

On Stage SHIPWRECKED! AN ENTERTAINMENT: THE AMAZING ADVENTURES OF LOUIS DE ROUGEMONT— See Wednesday, Oct. 12. 8 p.m. $13-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

Ongoing HAUNTED WORLD—Scare yourself silly with a 30-acre haunted cornfield, a haunted hostel asylum and a giant corn maze. Concessions and a bonfire will settle your nerves afterward. The fun starts at dusk. MondaysThursdays, 7-10 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays, 7 p.m.-midnight. Continues through Monday, Oct. 31. $18, $10.80 with BW card, FREE children 5 and younger. Sugar Factory Road and U.S. 2026, Nampa, hauntedworld.org. THE MAIZE—Celebrate the harvest with pumpkin picking, hay rides, live music and farm-based activities for young and old alike on the farm. While you’re there, take a walk through the Maize— an 18-acre corn labyrinth. Fridays, 4-11 p.m.; MondaysThursdays, 4-9 p.m.; and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-11 p.m. Continues through Monday, Oct. 31. FREE to visit the farm, $7.95-$15.95 for Maize admission. The Farmstead, 8685 S. Meridian Road, Meridian, 208-922-5678, farmsteadfestival.com. SCARECROW STROLL—Celebrate fall by taking a tour of the garden to check out the scarecrows created by local businesses, organizations, clubs and individuals using a PVC frame and their own creativity. Visitors can enjoy the beauty of the changing seasons under the watchful eyes of these garden guardians. Saturdays, Sundays, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; and MondaysFridays, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE members, $5 nonmembers. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | 21

NEWS/NOISE NOISE

WANDERING YOUTH AND FOUND NIRVANA In music news this week, it’s all about things lost and found. Like the original slow movement of Beethoven’s String Quartet in G, Opus 18 Number 2. The Hove constantly revised his music, regularly discarding what most people would consider masterpieces. That movement was performed once in 1799 and then revised to the version known today, meaning it hasn’t been heard for more than 200 years. Though the original movement was lost, Professor Barr y Cooper of the University of Manchester has reassembled it from sketches in ol’ Ludwig Van’s personal papers. “This movement is of particular importance, as it stands out as the last substantial work that Beethoven composed in full and apparently had per formed in 1799 before it was discarded and lost,” Cooper said. Also lost and found is an unfinished track from another genius with bad hair: one Kurt Donald Cobain. In a recent interview by Jon Stewart with Krist Novoselic and Dave Grohl, the surviving members of Nirvana, and Butch Vig of Garbage (who produced the band’s smash album Nevermind) it was revealed that K-Cob and the boys recorded a track called “Song in D” that wasn’t included on the album because it never received lyrics. Spin Magazine reported that Grohl then quipped that the lost song means it’s time for a new box set. And though he wasn’t technically “lost,” Boise’s own Trevor Powers, aka Youth Lagoon, has returned home from wandering about the country on a national tour to support his critically-lauded debut album The Year of Hibernation. The Record Exchange hosted an in-store appearance with Powers for all the local Lagoon-a-tics with specials on vinyl copies of his album and other special releases from Fat Possum, the label that snatched him up after only four live shows here in Boise. But Powers isn’t the only rambling Boisean musically associated with corpulence to find his way back to town. Bill LaBounty, formerly of Boise band Fat Chance, cofounded by Boisean Steve Eaton, will be in town for a special performance at The Blue Door Cafe on Saturday, Oct. 15. Since his days in Fat Chance, LaBounty has written more than 100 songs for megastars like Brooks and Dunn, Sawyer Brown, Tim McGraw and more. Twenty-five of them even received BMI awards. That per formance is being presented by the Idaho Songwriter’s Association. Tickets are on sale at idahosongwriters. com for $25. —Josh Gross

22 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | BOISEweekly

FR EEK OR PS AT EN.W IK IPEDIA

There’s youths in this here lagoon.

KEEPING THE DIY FAITH Steve Albini relishes Shellac’s unvarnished power CHRIS PARKER If punk rock still stood for a certain way of doing things and approaching life, then you might characterize Steve Albini as a punk-rock godfather. Steadfastly anti-corporate, DIY and a purveyor of music as no-frills as his famous production style, Albini is an underground icon who still preaches the gospel of self-sufficiency at the core of DIY. “It’s true in almost any enterprise. If you do things for a reason other than that you really want to do that thing, then that thing you end up doing becomes a tool, and most tools get dull after a while,” Albini said from his studio, he concentrates heavily on mic placement and tends to shy away from knob-twiddling unless Electrical Audio. “That’s the way I’ve always instructed to by the band. approached creative endeavors—to try to “I tend to not get involved in creative decimake them satisfying in their own right. Then sions in the studio because I’m an ignorant it doesn’t matter what the result is.” outsider. I haven’t done those eight-hour drives As a musician, Albini founded the influenwhere the whole life story and philosophy of tial act Big Black in Chicago during the early the band has been worked out in conversation. ’80s. Its blend of bleak, crushing guitars and I haven’t lived through the helping-your-drunkdrum-machine beats would serve as an early inspiration for mainstream bands like Ministry en-friend-up-the-stairs-moments that build the bonds of fraternity that are the basis of bands, and Nine Inch Nails. Meanwhile, the aggresso I really have no right to and no perspective sive guitar brutality rallied legions of late ’80s to tell them that this song should actually be Midwestern bands—Tar, Helmet, The Jesus a little bit faster or that maybe the guitar solo Lizard, the Cows, Killdozer—under the noiseshouldn’t be so long,” Albini said. rock banner. “I didn’t start out from that perspective, Albini carried over that scabrous, hardobviously. When you’re first put in the position hewn minimalist sound when he started of making recordings for other people, after Shellac with bassist Bob Weston (Volcano a couple of sessions you realize you actually Suns) and drummer Todd Trainer (Breaking Circus) in 1992. Since then, they have released have a lot of power and that you could actufour albums along with a handful of EPs and 7 ally influence the outcome. And initially, at least, it’s seductive. The inches. Most of Albini’s first couple sessions I time is spent burnishdid for other people, ing his reputation as With Helen Money. Monday, Oct. 17, 9 p.m., I probably did go a one of the busiest, most $10 adv., $15 show. little too far in trying affordable big-name VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE to make things suit producers in the busi3638 Osage St., Garden City myself,” Albini said. ness. As a result, he’s 208-424-8297 visualartscollective.com “It was through that recorded plenty of big experience of seeing names like Nirvana, what effect that had on Pixies, Bush, Cheap other people that I realized that was not the Trick, Nine Inch Nails, and far lesser-known way to approach it, and it kind of resonated ones like Neurosis, Wrangler Brutes, Om and with my perspective on the rest of everything Scout Niblett. else involved in the music scene, which is that His production style reflects his musical bands mattered and they should be treated aesthetic, preferring the raw and unadorned with respect,” he said. sound of a live band to the artificiality of meA similar idea continues to drive Shellac. ticulous multi-tracking. He’s often credited on Though releases have been rather sporadic— albums as an engineer rather than a producer, with seven years separating 2007’s Excellent an expression of his desire to capture the band’s true sound as opposed to tweaking and Italian Greyhound and its predecessor, 1,000 polishing it into something it’s not. As a result, Hurts—each came out of a simple desire to

Shellac(k)ing takes concentration. And shellac.

make music. Recordings and tours happen when they feel like it or they don’t happen. If Shellac is standing in front of you, it’s because the band wants to be there. Band members book their own relatively short tours and only leave when they’re in the mood, helping to ensure an inspired rather than perfunctory performance. “A lot of bands end up in a position where they have to do something for their band so it ends up becoming an obligation in the same way that because you have to go to your job every day you end up resenting it,” Albini said. “So I’ve never allowed my band to create obligations for me. If we make a commitment of time to do something that’s always by consensus, and we don’t give ourselves deadlines for [making records] we just do it and when they’re done, they’re done.” That said, Albini admits that Shellac has done a good bit of recording already and— while not wanting to fence them in—he expects to have a new album out by this time next year. Meanwhile, he couldn’t be happier about the developments of the last decade, which he sees as having freed musicians from the seductive spectre of major labels bargaining for their souls. “The music business is no longer the record business. It’s actually about music. It’s about people playing music in front of other people for a living,” he said. “Now when people are playing stuff on their iPod, they’re much more likely to be playing something they stumbled upon themselves and that genuinely suits them. A fair bit of it is going to be stuff that never got an airing in the commercial music marketplace because there was no label support for it, or the band wasn’t sexy on television or whatever. So there are an awful lot of bands whose music is becoming popular based on its merits, and I think that’s fantastic.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | 23

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE DANNY C LINC H

GUIDE WEDNESDAY OCT. 12 BACK ALLEY CONCERTS—6 p.m. FREE. The Wicked Spud

RATTLEHEAD, KAUSTIK, KRYSTOS—8 p.m. $5. The Shredder SWINGIN’ WITH ELLIE SHAW— 5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown TRAVIS MCDANIEL—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s Fine Pizza

BILLY ZERA—7 p.m. FREE. Sully’s THE BOURBON DOGS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian CLUB ZUMBA—9:30 p.m. $5 before 9 p.m. Humpin’ Hannah’s DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE, OCT. 18, TACO BELL ARENA The last time Seattle-born Death Cab for Cutie performed in Boise, it was a lovely if somewhat sedate affair at the Morrison Center. When DCFC’s Ben Gibbard, Nick Harmer, Jason McGerr and Chris Walla come back to town on Tuesday, Oct. 18, there’s a chance that the sitter-downers from the Morrison Center show will become get-up-and-dancers: DCFC will perform in the much larger Taco Bell Arena and have rockers The Hold Steady warming things up. DCFC will be celebrating the release of Codes and Keys (May 2011, Atlantic), and not only is this an opportunity for DCFC fans to celebrate the new album, it’s also a celebration for Boise State—this show is the official Boise State homecoming concert, and students get $10 off on tickets purchased at the arena box office. —Amy Atkins With The Hold Steady. 7 p.m., $27-$40. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-1900, tacobellarena.com.

24 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | BOISEweekly

DAVID MARR—6 p.m. FREE. Cole Marr GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s JAM NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JIM LEWIS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La OMINOUS BLACK, DUTCHGUTS, THE MALADROIDS, THE BLEACH EFFECT—6 p.m. $5. The Venue

THURSDAY OCT. 13 CYMBALS EAT GUITARS—With Hooray for Earth. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux FRIM FRAM 4—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HIGH DESERT BAND—6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater JAM NIGHT WITH KEVIN SHRUMM—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

FRIDAY OCT. 14 33RD HANNAHVERSARY—Featuring Marcus Eaton and The Rocci Johnson Band. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s AMY WEBER— 8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper GAYLE CHAPMAN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid GRIEVES AND BUDO—With Prof and MC Type. 10 p.m. $5. Reef JIMMY BIVENS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel MANIMAL HOUSE—9 p.m. $3. Tom Grainey’s

REILLY COYOTE—7 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s Saloon

MIRANDA LAMBERT—With Justin Moore and The Randy Rogers Band. 7:30 p.m. $26.74$46.75. Idaho Center

ROBERT JAMES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

RANDOM COUNTY GROWLERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. FREE for ladies. Humpin’ Hannah’s

SUN BLOOD STORIES—10 p.m. FREE. Bouquet WAYNE COYLE—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge THE WORKING DJS—-9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

STEADY RUSH—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub & Grill THE WORKING DJS—-9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

SATURDAY OCT. 15 6 DOWN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid AGUA-PALOOZA BENEFIT CONCERT—Featuring Actual Depiction, Jupiter Holiday, Neo Tundra Cowboy, Danger Beard, and Pat McDonald and the Tropical Cowboys. 6 p.m. $5-$8. Knitting Factory AMY WEBER—8:30 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper B3 SIDE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s BILL LABOUNTY SONGWRITER SHOWCASE—With Steve Eaton. 6 p.m. $25. Blue Door BRONCO—9 p.m. FREE. Woody’s CHAMBERLIN—With Olin and the Moon. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux DJ RYAN BRACKNEY—11 p.m. $3. Neurolux DYING FAMOUS—With the Rocci Johnson Band. 9:45 p.m. FREE with Dying Famous movie ticket. Humpin’ Hannah’s

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE MATT WOODS—With Jimmy Sinn and Matt Smith. 10 p.m. $10. Red Room MIGUEL GONZALES—Noon. FREE. Casa del Sol

MONDAY OCT. 17

DISCO DOOM—With Brett Netson Band. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux JEFF MOLL AND GUESTS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

BLUES JAM WITH RICHARD SOLIZ—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

LARRY CONKLIN—11 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

BROCK BARTEL—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

OLD TIME JAM SESSION—6 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

DAVID COOK AND GAVIN DEGRAW—With Carolina Liar. 7:30 p.m. $35-$70. Knitting Factory

RUSS PFEIFER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

SHON SANDERS—With Amy Weber. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub & Grill

LARRY BUTTEL—7 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

ROOTDOWN—10 p.m. $10. Reef RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Solid

THE WORKING DJS—9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

SUNDAY OCT. 16 6 DOWN—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— Featuring Camden Hughes and Sam Strother. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SHELLAC—With Helen Money. See Noise, Page 22. 9 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. VAC

A DOUG BROWN COLLECTIVE—1 p.m. FREE. Solid BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers HAMBONES ON THE BEACH—4 p.m. FREE. Sun Ray Cafe LARRY CONKLIN—11 a.m., FREE. Moon’s SUNDERGROUND—9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

TUESDAY OCT. 18

SMOOTH MONEY GESTURE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

GIANT PANDA GUERILLA DUB SQUAD—With Chris Boomer. 8:30 p.m. $12. Reef GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s GOLD RUSH—With Hillfolk Noir. 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s IMPENDING DOOM—With Revocation. 6:30 p.m. $10. The Venue JIM LEWIS—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Boise LARRY CONKLIN—11:30 a.m. FREE. Shangri La

WEDNESDAY OCT. 19 BACK ALLEY CONCERTS—6 p.m. FREE. The Wicked Spud BILLY ZERA—7 p.m. FREE. Sully’s CLUB ZUMBA—9:30 p.m. $5 before 9 p.m. Humpin’ Hannah’s

RICO WEISMAN AND KEN HARRIS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown ROCKY VOTOLATO— With Matt Pond PA. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. See Listen Here, this Page. Neurolux SMOOTH MONEY GESTURE—9 p.m. $3. Liquid

DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

THE VANPAEPEGHEM TRIO— 5:30 p.m. FREE. FlatbreadMeridian

DAVID MARR—6 p.m. FREE. Cole Marr

WILSON ROBERTS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

CROWN POINT—9:30 p.m. $2. Reef DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE—With The Hold Steady. 7 p.m. $27-$40. See Listen Here, Page 24. Taco Bell Arena

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

MATT POND PA, OCT. 19, NEUROLUX Singer-songwriter Matt Pond began his music career playing French horn and teaching himself guitar. In 1998, he founded Matt Pond PA and has released eight albums since. Though Matt Pond PA has rotated through members, its orchestral pop sound has only gotten more solid. Pond’s often melancholy lyrics blend with jangling tambourines and snappy percussion—a mix that lends even up-tempo songs more meaning than your average pop tune. Pond and keyboardist Chris Hansen composed the score for the 2010 indie film Lebanon, PA. The band has also stormed the small screen, with appearances on TV shows The O.C. and Chuck. But Pond also knows how to duck out of the spotlight; he holed himself up in a cabin to craft new recordings for the band’s latest album, The Dark Leaves. —Talyn Brumley With Rocky Votolato. 8 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | 25

ARTS/VISUAL LAU R IE PEAR M AN

THE RISE OF THE STORY Why live storytelling events are proliferating in the digital age ANDREW CRISP Jessica Holmes has the perfect storytelling voice—it’s sweet and husky and makes an audience hang on her words. In 2009, Holmes, Hollis Welsh, Clay Morgan and Paul Shaffer, founded Boise’s Story Story Night, a monthly showcase of true stories, told live on stage without notes. Story Story Night takes place the last Monday of every month and manages to sell out almost every time. The event recently Jessica Holmes has helped turned Story Story Night into an event so nice they named it twice. moved from the Linen Building to the largercapacity Rose Room to accommodate its “like,” “poke,” “retweet,” but we’re not “Stories originally, and still to a certain ever-growing popularity. connecting. extent, were how people learned to live,” “There’s something that happens in that “Those are really cold media. They’re not first little raw moment between the storyteller McCarl said. “You can go back to the Iliad interpersonal media,” said McCarl, chuckand the audience,” Holmes said. “You’re not and the Odyssey and Beowulf. A lot of the ling. “Maybe that’s what the proliferation of classic works of humanity are captured even going to find it in a play or something. these story groups is all about.” ... There’s something raw and communicating ethics.” The information overload theory suggests But now the stone tablet has been replaced and deep.” that as the amount of available information by the iPad. And while stories continue to That storyteller/audience connection that aid people in learning the ins-and-outs of life, increases, the emphasis becomes less on qualHolmes refers to is something inside every those stories are largely shared electronically, ity content and more on brevity and anecgood story. Story Story Night explores that dote. Ann Blair wrote a piece for the Boston relationship when audience members become not face-to-face. It has been suggested that Globe about information overload, which social media has stepped in to supplement storytellers. Story Story is a two-part event, was once, she said, the result of Gutenberg’s personal relationships but has yet to encomwith the first half highlighting featured printing press. In our world, it’s the tweet, pass the whole range of human interaction. storytellers, followed by stories from brave “If you assume that everyone needs stories the headline and the sound bite. members of the crowd, chosen by names “We’ve gotten so enamored with docuto survive, then what happens with the drawn out of a hat. mentation of the printed word that we’ve Internet and all the other ways that we get Those stories are impromptu and unkind of lost a bit of the power of the oral information electronically changes how we edited, in contrast to a program like This tradition,” said McCarl. “I think StoryCorps access stories,” said McCarl. American Life, a weekly radio show that and some of those other organizations are The change in medium has hobbled the polishes the rough bits of a story. The two do people realizing the importance of these way we tell tales. A status update can’t elicit share an element, however: the anecdote. things.” an emotional reaction the way a facial ex“The anecdote is a story in its purest The stories told at each Story Story Night pression can, and people are programmed to form,” said Public Radio International’s Ira follow a theme, and the theme of the Sepneed that interaction. Personal storytelling is Glass, host of This American Life, in a 2009 tember forum that Clark attended was Earth: emotional and informative for the audience, video interview series. “No matter how borTales of Reaping What You Sow. It was the but it’s a two-way street, a dialogue. ing the material is, if it’s in a story form with first in the Rose Room, and the space had the “I definitely felt an anecdote happenair of an intimate party. The crowd mura human connecing ... you can feel mured quietly, all the while ruthlessly jockeytion with some of inherently that you’re The next Story Story Night is Monday, Oct. ing for good seats. Statistically, the strikingly the storytellers,” said on a train, and that it 24, at the Rose Room. Doors open at 6 p.m. average crowd should have been home that Heather Clark after has a destination.” Show starts at 7 p.m. Tickets are $5. For more information on Story Story Night visit Monday evening watching cable. attending the Sept. Locally, new story storystorynight.org. “You can get entertainment in a variety of 26 Story Story event. showcases continue forms,” Holmes said. “But something that’s “A couple made me to pop up. Boise tear up a bit and some not produced, it’s just made by somebody usState Public Radio, ing words ... it’s made me realize that, to me, made me laugh out loud.” an underwriter of Story Story Night, created all these forms of entertainment aren’t really Storytelling can be cathartic and uplifting its own storytelling event, Risky Business, that great.” for those on stage as well. stories from people who took business risks In Holmes’ opinion, people are searching “This is one of the insights of therapy, acthat paid off. tually,” Glass said. “Most people aren’t great for a more in-depth, information-rich experiThough it may seem odd that there’s now ence, in contrast to information overload. storytellers in general, but if you stumble a growing thirst for stories, Dr. Robert Mc“They’re definitely searching for someCarl has some insight. The Boise State profes- on the thing that really means something to thing,” said Holmes. “I’ve had some people them, you’ll get a great story out of them.” sor has a Ph.D. in oral histories, with work say—and it disturbed me a little bit—‘Story The Internet isn’t allowing the storyteller encompassing fables, legends and stories Story Night is like my church.’” in each of us enough of a voice. We can from cultures ancient and modern.

26 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

SCREEN/LISTINGS THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

TRESPASS HOLDS AUDIENCES FOR RANSOM

SOLITAIRE—This recreation film takes audiences the length of South America via horseback, paragliders, skis and snowboards. Sponsored by Winter Wildlands Alliance, a national organization for human-powered snow sport enthusiasts and winter wildland conservationists. Check out winterwildlands.org for more information. Visit promo.boiseweekly.com for a chance to win tickets. Friday, Oct. 14, 7:30 p.m. $15. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Can the Academy recall Cage and Kidman’s Oscars? Please?

ANNA BOLENA—The Met: Live in HD presents Donizetti’s Anna Bolena, starring Anna Netrebk. Saturday, Oct. 15, 12:55 p.m. Edwards Boise Stadium 22 and IMAX, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-9603, regmovies.com.

GEORGE PRENTICE How can a movie with such a beautiful actress (Nicole Kidman) be so agonizing to watch?

Put your hands in the air and step away from I have two new candidates: Nicolas Cage the Oscar. I have often fantasized about a SWAT-like and Nicole Kidman, who team up in the so-boring-it’s-laughable Trespass, which unit, working exclusively for the Motion premiered at the Toronto International Film Picture Academy. On a semi-regular basis, it Festival. would storm a celebrity compound insisting Even the poster and trailer for the psythat actors, let’s say Mira Sorvino or Cuba Gooding Jr., for example, surrender their Os- chological thriller boast Cage and Kidman as Academy Award winners. But the film cars for acting unbecoming of the Academy. isn’t worth the price of admission or, for that I think it would be a nice addition to matter, a DVD rental. Heck, it’s simply not each year’s Academy Awards ceremony for a worth 90 minutes of your time. Believe me, I celebrity to be voted off of “Oscar Island.” know, I kept checking my watch. Imagine if right about the two-hour mark, Cage and Kidman unbelievably portray when the ceremony is getting really, really a married couple who face off with violent long, an actor is summoned to the stage and extortionists. That’s it, forced to surrenno nuance and no real der his or her statsubplot. It’s quite simply a uette. I’m thinking TRESPASS (R) below-par hostage drama. of countless Directed by Joel Schumacher The plot has played out instances when acStars Nicolas Cage, Nicole Kidman, in dozens of films—some tors show up in an Ben Mendelsohn and Cam Gigandet good, some bad—but none absolute piece of Opens Friday, Oct. 14 worse than Trespass. When junk, right on the the lights came up from the heels of pulling screening I attended, a coldown filmdom’s highest honor. My list is pretty long: Roberto lective groan swept through the theater. It turns out that Cage rarely watches his Benigni, Kim Basinger, Whoopi Goldberg, own films. Helen Hunt ... need I go on?

“I don’t want my movies playing in my house,” Cage told the media, including BW, at TIFF. We could only be so lucky. As for Kidman, she was nowhere near Toronto, opting not to attend the premiere. My guess is she had a pretty good idea how the movie would be received. I’m also presuming that she was busy counting the dough she pulled in for this lame effort. And that’s really my beef. I don’t fault an actor for negotiating a top dollar, but inflated budgets for ridiculously bad movies are becoming more common. And basic economics will prevail: When more bloated flops are produced, fewer movies will be funded, making it increasingly difficult to green-light good, character-driven, story-rich films. The reported budget for Trespass was $35 million—more than twice the budget for films like The Hurt Locker, Slumdog Millionaire and The King’s Speech. All in, Cage, Kidman and director Joel Schumacher have long since cashed their Trespass checks. But their work will clutter the nation’s screens for the next few weeks.

THE TUBE/SCREEN CBS’ HAT TRICK: A GIFTED MAN, PERSON OF INTEREST AND UNFORGETTABLE There are, by my count, 32 new television shows on the dial this fall. The odds of success are almost insurmountable. Think of the uphill battle—you have to make it on a network schedule; compete against three other major networks (not to mention cable) that, in many cases, are already airing audience-tested, popular shows; and ultimately, you have to convince viewers to commit to 30, or heaven forbid, 60 minutes of their lives. So it was with some surprise that I immediately found three new dramas to love. A bigger surprise is that they were all on one networkCBS. And the biggest surprise is that none have the letters CSI or NCIS attached. Person of Interest (Thursdays, 8 p.m.) is rather conventional, at WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Special Screenings

least on paper. But creator J.J. Abrams (Lost) works his small-screen magic and makes this drama highly watchable. Extra credit for snappy editing. Unforgettable (Tuesdays, 9 p.m.) stars the gorgeous Poppy Montgomery, who plays a former detective with a rare ability to remember everything. And I mean everything. Patrick Wilson is better known on Broadway (Barefoot in the Park, Oklahoma) than television, but his new series, A Gifted Man (Friday, 7 p.m.), is about to change all that. He plays an arrogant surgeon whose life is turned inside out when his dead ex-wife (Jennifer Ehle, another Broadway veteran) continues to haunt him. It’s a bit of a mash-up of House and Ghost Whisperer. The time slot is a killer. Fridays at 7 p.m. Kudos, CBS. You’ve given me three more reasons to surrender three more hours of my life. —George Prentice

DYING FAMOUS MOVIE PREMIERE—The members of Boise band Dying Famous are following their rock star dreams (see Picks Page 17). This rockumentary film follows the band from its inception to its goal of playing the Whiskey a Go Go in Hollywood, Calif. After-party to follow at Humpin’ Hannah’s. Visit dyingfamous.net for more info on the premiere and the band. Saturday, Oct. 15, 8 p.m. $10, free admission to Humpin’ Hannah’s after-party. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Opening THE BIG YEAR—Owen Wilson, Steve Martin and Jack Black struggle with, in order, a mid-life crisis, a late-life crisis and a no-life crisis. So they do what any fictional characters in a big budget comedy would do: They go on a cross-country journey of wild, crazy and all-around nutty adventures, with a little heart-tugging soul searching. The trio of friendly rivals dedicates a full year of their lives to follow their dreams. From David Frankel, the director of The Devil Wears Prada and Marley and Me. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 HIGHER GROUND—A fundamentalist’s lifelong struggle with tenets of her church comes to a head in the wake of a tragedy involving her best friend. Starring Vera Farmiga in her directorial debut. Based on Carolyn Briggs’ memoir, The Dark World. (R) Flicks

FOOTLOOSE—As a transplant from Boston, teenager Ren MacCormack gets a big dose of culture shock when he moves to a small Southern town called Bomont. Never one to toe the line, MacCormack challenges a town ordinance banning loud music and dancing, simultaneously revitalizing Bomont and falling in love with the clergyman’s troubled daughter. Exactly why Hollywood thinks it’s a great idea to remake the Kevin Bacon film, we’re still not sure. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code. BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | 27

NEWS/FOOD GET THEE TO THE GREEK

28 | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | BOISEweekly

FOOD/YEAR OF IDAHO FOOD GU Y HAND

Good news for Greek geeks: There’s a new spot to get your spanakopita and feta fix—Sofia’s Greek Bistro. The eclectic turquoise-walled cafe is set to have its soft opening on Thursday, Oct. 20, from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. Located at 6748 N. Glenwood St., Sofia’s is the brainchild of BW extended family member Litsa Manolis and will offer familiar Greek fare like dolmades and the Big Fat Greek Salad, which features tomatoes, cucumbers, onions, feta and olives. The menu also includes lesser-known Greek delicacies like Avgo-Lemono soup, a creamy lemon soup with rice, and Pastichio, a Greek lasagna with ground meat and macaroni topped with bechamel sauce. For more info on Sofia’s Greek Bistro, visit sofiasgreekbistro.com. In a move to rule both the early morning eggs-and-coffee scene and the super latenight, wine-and-snacks circuit, Goldy’s has extended the hours of Goldy’s Corner, the Goldy’s Breakfast Bistro sister joint, until 3 a.m. Now you can extend your bender into the wee hours before taming your hangover with a sloppy plate of buttery benny. For more info on Goldy’s Corner, visit goldysbreakfastbistro.com. Not to be out-cooled, the Obama White House has officially trod into micro-brewing territory. President Obama recently shared a pint of White House Honey Ale, made, of course, from honey harvested from the White House beehive, with Medal of Honor recipient Dakota Meyer. Though both George Washington and Thomas Jefferson were big brews bros and dabbled in fermenting, this is the first time beer has been brewed at the White House. If you need a little nudge to dig into your foodie reading pile, the Victory branch of the Ada Community Library wants to lend a hand. This fall, the library has instituted “We Are What We Eat,” part of the Let’s Talk About It adult program series. Every three weeks from 6-7:30 p.m., the book discussion group will meet to mull over the latest food-related novel. On Tuesday, Oct. 25, the group will discuss The Language of Baklava with speaker Jennifer Black. On Tuesday, Nov. 15, Black will also facilitate a discussion on The Tummy Trilogy and the series wraps up on Tuesday, Dec. 6, with We Are What We Eat: 24, Memories of Food with speaker Heike Henderson. For more information, call 208-362-0181 or visit adalib.org. —Tara Morgan

A Southern favorite, the pawpaw is a relative stranger in the West, but some adventurous souls are introducing the fruit to Idaho eaters.

IN AWE OF THE PAWPAW Meridian man sings the praises of an unusual fruit GUY HAND Jan Huskey, a big man with a kind smile and sand names like cherimoya, ylang-ylang and soursop. soft voice, greeted me in his Meridian yard, Yet pawpaws are also fragile, don’t keep garden hose in hand. Behind him stood an long and have seeds that make them a little unruly forest of fruit trees. tricky to eat. Thus, they’ve been shunned by “I’m just a common home gardener that commercial agriculture. Even in Ohio, where happened to run into a friend that knew the pawpaw is the state’s official fruit, it’s about pawpaws,” Huskey said by way of hard to come by. introduction. “Mostly, it takes lottery-style luck to I hadn’t heard of that mysterious fruit chance upon them,” concluded a recent until I spotted Huskey’s produce on display article from the Canton, Ohio, Repository at Boise Co-op one fall. This friend of Husnewspaper. Pawpaw trees survive there only key’s had grown pawpaws back in Alabama, on abandoned farmsteads and in wild groves. and knowing that Huskey loved growing But once found, the article also cautioned odd fruit, thought he should try the stubbythat pawpaws should only be eaten when banana-shaped pawpaw in Idaho. In response to his friend’s suggestion, Hus- ripe: “Unripe pawpaws will turn your stomach into a compost barrel and generate key asked what nearly everyone west of the enough gas to heat your house.” Mississippi asks: “What’s a pawpaw?” Jan Huskey wasn’t discouraged by bad Considering the fact that the pawpaw is press when he ordered and planted his first the largest edible fruit native to America, pawpaw tree in his Meridian yard more than its lack of fame is a little surprising. An a decade ago. He likes the novelty and chalunderstory tree common to the eastern lenge of unusual or heritage fruit trees. United States, the pawpaw was cultivated by “This is the pawpaw tree ahead of us,” he native tribes, loved by George Washington, said of a small upright plant with big, floppy frequently depended on by Lewis and Clark, leaves shading clusters of pudgy, greenish and the subject of a children’s nursery rhyme fruit. “It’s probably about 13 (way down yonder in the pawyears old, and it’s taken off paw patch). and grown quite well.” It has a sweet, creamy Available at Boise Co-op 888 W. Fort St., Boise, Although native to the interior with a flavor reminis208-472-4500, humid East, Huskey said his cent of mango and banana—a boisecoop.com dozen or so pawpaw trees sunny, equatorial taste that and Pollard’s Fruit Stand have adapted just fine to is less astonishing when one 3411 Garrity Blvd., Nampa southern Idaho’s arid climate. learns that the rest of the “They call them a tropical pawpaw’s close relatives in tree,” he said. “But oddly enough, they are the Annonaceae family are found only in hearty down to 25 below.” the tropics—fruit with palm-tree-and-white-

Pawpaws do need a bit of coddling in their first years, but, said Huskey, “with a little instruction and reading on it, I think anybody could grow these pawpaws.” Southern Idaho is clearly capable of growing more varieties of fruit than it does. Two years ago, when I interviewed Dr. Esmaeil Fallahi, an Idaho fruit researcher at the University of Idaho Parma Research Center, he walked me into an orchard full of figs, pistachios, almonds—even persimmons and pomegranates. Fallahi told me gardeners are often limited more by tradition than climate. After seeing those Idaho persimmons and pomegranates, pawpaws seemed easy. As Huskey led me deeper into his orchard, his pawpaws looked to be flourishing, filling their natural ecological niche in the understory and spreading their broad leaves in the shade of apple, plum and peach trees. One pawpaw tree was packed with particularly large fruit. “I’ve had up to about a half pound on some of these,” Huskey said. When the fruit is ripe, usually late September or early October, Huskey sells his pawpaws through Boise Co-op and Pollard’s Fruit Stand on Garrity Boulevard in Nampa. The fruit stand’s owner, Hazel Pollard, said she frequently sells out of pawpaws thanks in part to an explanatory sign Huskey made. “Probably seven out of 10 people will buy one just because they’ve never tried it before,” said Pollard. “And then the ones who do try it and like it, they’ll come in and buy them by the bag-full,” she said. 29 Huskey isn’t really into pawpaws WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

CON’T/FOOD WINE SIPPER/FOOD

PINOT NOIR The surge in popularity that pinot noir enjoyed after the movie Sideways has calmed, but the sales of wine made from that grape are still strong. Supply and demand, along with the difficulty involved in growing good pinot, have kept prices high, but two wines in our tasting proved you don’t have to take out a bank loan to score a fine example of the variety. And despite entries from around the globe, pinot noir from Oregon scored a hat trick, taking all three of the top spots. Here are the panel’s favorites: 2010 GROUCHAU CELLAR GC COMMUTER CUVEE PINOT NOIR, $15.99 The wine opens with light but lovely dark berry and cherry aromas colored by nuances of earth and leather. This is a well-integrated, elegantly structured wine filled with ripe cherry and plum fruit flavors that are nicely balanced by bright, foodfriendly acidity. This is a charming bargain you can feel good about buying—part of the proceeds go to a charity promoting bicycle safety. 2006 J.K. CARRIERE PINOT NOIR, $42 Five years after the vintage, time in the bottle has resulted in a multi-faceted complexity. The aromas are a mix of spicy dark fruit layered with touches of herb (tarragon), fresh dill, earth, coffee, rose petal and smoke. Soft and smooth on the palate, mature tannins underscore the creamy cherry flavors, mingling with cigar box, leather, chalk and rose hip: classic Oregon pinot noir. 2009 WITNESS TREE CHAIN SAW PINOT NOIR, $16.99 A bit reserved at first, this wine opens up nicely with a little time in the glass. Patience reveals bright cherry fruit aromas backed by enticing hints of sage and soft oak. It’s an impeccably balanced wine with bold, ripe berry fruit playing against tart cherry. The finish turns creamy and is marked by smooth tannins. Another definite bargain.

for their commercial value, though. You only have to hang out with him under his trees for a few minutes to realize he just likes weird fruit. Along with his pawpaws, he proudly showed me two types of Asian jujube fruit, unusual pears, old-time apples and stuff that just popped out of the ground. He’s really an amateur botanist who likes to watch things grow. And as I was leaving, he just had to tell me one more tidbit about pawpaw botany. “The blossoms on it are kind of interesting,” Huskey said. “Before the leaves come out, the blossoms come out and they’re kind of an upside down tulip about the size of a marble and they’re green.” Before I could get a bead on where he was going with this story, he added, “they’re fertilized by flies and mosquitoes, not honey bees, which is interesting.” The pawpaw, it turns out, appreciates a little irony. It’s one of those plants that produces sweet fruit with the help of what some might consider unsavory pollinators— which also include blow flies and carrion beetles. To lure those bad boys in, the pawpaw wraps its flowers in the faint scent of rotting flesh—not uncommon in the natural world—and not particularly noticeable, according to Huskey. To ensure proper pawpaw pollination, some growers resort to hanging chicken parts or other overripe meat in their pawpaw trees. Huskey said his specimens mostly manage on their own, but when needed, he prefers hand pollination to rotting flesh. “I got a little artist’s brush,” he said, pantomiming a delicate task he clearly enjoys. “And I got some pollen off one and took it over to the other blossom and pollinated it and I had a little fun doing that.” “But no chicken wings in the trees?” I asked. “I think I hung a gopher one time,” he said. 28

—Dave Kirkpatrick WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 12–18, 2011 | 29

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A Petition to change the name of Elena Isabel Tison, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, had been filed in the District Court in ADA County, Idaho. The name will change to Elena Isabel Tyson. The reason for the change in name is: because My husband has legally changed his surname to Tyson from Tison. I wish to have the same surname spelling as him. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on (date) November 10, 2011 at the ADA County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. September 20, 2011

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33 Only nonsentient zodiac symbol 36 In style 37 Voting to pass 38 Empathetic words 40 Password preceder, generally 41 Example, for instance: Abbr. 42 007 strategy 44 High card up one’s sleeve 46 Baltimore daily, with “the” 47 ___ voce 48 French river or department 49 Smartphone supplements 53 Property claims 55 Some sexy nightwear 60 Clingy wrap 61 Ties up 63 Memo abbr. 65 “To Live and Die ___” 66 Narrow overhang 68 Government resister standing ready 70 It might be in a belt 71 More than attentive 72 Immature egg 73 East Coast rte. 74 Was sincere 76 Strong point 78 It often involves a Snellen chart 80 ___ about 82 All, in old-time stage directions 84 Modern address 85 Shock a fairy-tale monster 89 Nocturnal birds liable to keep people awake 91 Take most of 94 Burglar discouragers 95 Billiards shot 97 Fannie ___ 98 “Pastorals” poet 99 Former Portuguese colony in China 100 Certain game-ending cry 101 Industrial hub of Germany 103 1983 domestic comedy 104 Like invalid ballots

CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 5, 12, 19 & 26, 2011.

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Ceasar Dennis Donald Tison Case No. CV NC 1117691 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Ceasar Dennis Donald Tison, a minor, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County Idaho. The name will change to Ceasar Dennis Donald Tyson. The reason for the change in name is: because: His father’s surname has been legally changed to Tyson from Tison. I am in the process of legally changing my surname to Tyson from Tison. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. (date) November 10, 2011 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name

Ten famous people are attending a costume party in this crossword. After the grid is filled, change the two shaded letters in each theme answer to “unmask” a celebrity. 107 Fries, e.g. 109 Soup spoon designed for shellfish 111 Last costume at a costume party 113 Requiem hymn word 114 Visibly stunned 115 Michael and Sonny’s brother in “The Godfather” 116 Cleaner target 117 Five-spots 118 Transport, as across a river 119 1999 Broadway revue 120 Seasonal worker, say

DOWN 1 U.N. member since ’49 2 Like some newly laundered shirts 3 Ointment base 4 Bitterly cold 5 Californie, e.g. 6 Collection of specialized words 7 Green-headed water birds 8 What wavy lines may indicate in a comic strip 9 Lean-___ 10 Celestial being, in France 11 Actor José 12 Trilogy that includes “Agamemnon” 13 Eye layers 14 Carnival follower 15 When the events in flashbacks took place 16 Field with unknowns 17 RR stop 18 “___ knight doth sit too melancholy”: “Pericles” 24 Part of “the many,” in Greek 26 Canola, for one 28 Clears out of, as a hotel room 29 Hosts, briefly 31 Cheerful and spirited, as a voice 34 Singer Ocasek 35 Fruit drink 37 It might have serifs 39 Before long 40 Straight 42 ___ Vista (Disney video distributor)

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change. Date: September 20, 2011 CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT DEIDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 5, 12, 19 & 26, 2011. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estate of: ROBERT DENNIS SANFORD, Deceased. Case No. CV IE 1117840 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (I.C. 15-3-801) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal Representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 27th day of September, 2011. Ruth Hintz c/o C.K. Quade Law, PLLC 1501 Tyrell Lane Boise, ID 83706 (208) 367-0723. Pub, Oct. 5, 12 & 19, 2011. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE 4TH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Katie Anne Curry Case No. CV NC 1117850 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Katie Anne Curry, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Wilder Heartwood. The reason for the change in name is : because I have no contact to blood relatives

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and no connection to the name they gave me. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on November 10, 2011 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: September 20, 1022 CLERK OF THE COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 5, 12, 19 & 26, 2011.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): If it’s at all possible, Aries, don’t hang around boring people this week. Seek out the company of adventurers who keep you guessing and mystery lovers who are always on the lookout for new learning experiences. For that matter, treat yourself to especially interesting food, perceptions and sensations. Take new and different routes to familiar hotspots. Even better, find fresh hotspots. Cultivating novelty is your mandate right now. Outgrowing your habits would be wise, fun and cool. Changing your mind is a luxury you need and deserve. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “My grandfather always said that living is like licking honey off a thorn,” wrote the SlovenianAmerican author Louis Adamic. That’s true enough. Here’s the thing, though: If you manage to get a smooth thorn without any prickles (like on certain hawthorn trees), the only risk is when you’re licking the honey close to the sharp end. Otherwise, as your tongue makes its way up the sleek surface of the rest of the thorn, you’re fine—no cuts, no pain. According to my analysis, Taurus, you have just finished your close encounter with the sharp point of a smooth thorn. Now the going will be easier. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): On the front of every British passport is an image that includes a chained unicorn standing up on its two hind legs. It’s a central feature of the coat of arms of the United Kingdom. I would love to see you do something as wacky as that in the coming week, Gemini—you know, bring elements of fantasy and myth and imagination into some official setting. It would, I believe, put you in sweet alignment with current cosmic rhythms. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’ve come across two definitions of the slang term “cameling up.” One source says it means filling yourself with thirst-quenching liquid before heading out to a hot place on a hot day. A second source says it means stuffing yourself with a giant meal before going out on a binge of drinking alcohol because it allows you to get drunk more slowly. For your purposes, Cancerian, I’m proposing a third, more metaphorical nuance to “cameling up.” Before embarking on a big project to upgrade your self-expression— quite possibly heroic and courageous—I suggest you camel up by soaking in an abundance of love and support from people whose nurturing you savor. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I love Adele’s voice. The mega-famous British pop singer has a moving, virtuoso instrument—technically

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perfect, intriguingly soulful, capable of expressing a range of deep emotion, strong in both her high and low registers. And yet there’s not a single song she does that I find interesting. Does what I’m describing remind you of anything in your own life, Leo? A situation you half-love and are half-bored by? An experience that is so good in some ways and so blah in other ways? If so, what can you do about it? You may be able to improve things if you act soon. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): There’s a good chance that you will soon find something you lost awhile back. It may even be the case that you will recover an asset you squandered or you’ll revive a dream that was left for dead. To what do you owe the pleasure of this blessing? Here’s what I think: The universe is rewarding you for the good work you’ve done lately on taking better care of what’s important to you. You’re going to be shown how much grace is available when you live your life in rapt alignment with your deepest, truest values. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Chris Richards wrote a story in The Washington Post in which he complained about the surplus of unimaginative band names. At this year’s SXSW music festival in Austin, Texas, he counted six different bands that used “Bear” and two with “Panda.” Seven bands had “Gold,” including Golden Bear. Marshmallow Ghosts was one of seven bands with “Ghost” in their names. You’re in a phase of your life when it’s especially important not to be a slave of the trends, Libra—a time when it’s crucial to your well-being to come up with original language, unique descriptions and fresh approaches. So what would your band’s name be? SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): You’ve got to cry one more tear before the pungent comedy will deliver its ultimate lesson and leave you in peace. You’ve got to make one further promise to yourself before you will be released from the twilight area where pain and pleasure became so tangled. You’ve got to navigate your way through one more small surrender before you will be cleared to hunt down your rebirth in earnest. But meanwhile, the catharses and epiphanies just keep on erupting. You’re growing more soulful and less subject to people’s delusions by the minute. Your rather unconventional attempts at healing are working—maybe not as rapidly as you’d like, but still, they are working. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Most people who profess a deep love of the Bible have never

actually read the book,” says religious writer Rami Shapiro. If they did, they’d know that Satan is not implicated as the tempter of Adam and Eve. There’s no mention of three wise men coming to see baby Jesus, nor of a whale swallowing Jonah. Homilies like “This too shall pass” and “God helps those who help themselves” never appear in the scriptures. And contrary to the Ayn Rand-style self-reliance that evangelicals think is a central theme of their holy book, the Bible’s predominant message is that goodness is measured by what one does for others. I bring this up as a teaching about how not to proceed in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. You really do need to know a lot about the texts and ideas and people and situations upon which you base your life. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “The artist’s job is not to succumb to despair, but to find an antidote to the emptiness of existence.” So says the Gertrude Stein character in Woody Allen’s film Midnight in Paris. As an aspiring master of crafty optimism myself, I don’t buy the notion that existence is inherently empty. I do, however, wish that more artists would be motivated by the desire to create cures for the collective malaise that has haunted every historical era, including ours. In alignment with your current astrological omens, I invite you to take up this noble task yourself in the coming weeks, whether or not you’re an artist. You now have much more than your usual power to inspire and animate others. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The world-famous whiskey known as Jack Daniel’s is produced in Moore County, Tenn., which prohibits the sale of alcohol in stores and restaurants. So you can’t get a drink of the stuff in the place where it’s made. I suspect there’s a comparable situation going on in your life, Aquarius. Maybe something you’re good at isn’t appreciated by those around you. Maybe a message you’re broadcasting or a gift you’re offering gets more attention at a distance than it does up close. Is there anything you can do about that? The coming weeks would be a good time to try. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Once you drive your car into Norway’s Laerdal Tunnel, you’re in for a long haul through the murk. The light at the end doesn’t start appearing until you’ve traveled almost 14 miles. Using this as a metaphor for your life in the here and now, I estimate that you’re at about the 12-mile mark. Keep the faith, Pisces. It’s a straight shot from here. Can you think of any cheerful tunes you could sing at the top of your lungs?

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