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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 20, ISSUE 02 JULY 6–12, 2011

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TAK EE E ON E! FEATURE 11

MARGARET’S MARKET The last days of a Boise icon 1ST THURSDAY 19

MAP AND GUIDE INSIDE Create your plan of attack

SCREEN 28

HOMEMADE HORROR Rock star’s daughter stars in local flick

FOOD 30

FISH TO FRY IDFG cooks up a way to reel in anglers

“These are the realities in which we live.”

CITIZEN 8


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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Sheree Whiteley Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Guy Hand, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall, Sheree Whiteley, Jeremiah Robert Wierenga Interns: Lizzy Duffy, David McNeill, Brady Moore, Shelby Soule, Trevor Villagrana ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Photography Interns: Will Eichelberger, Will Jones, John Winn, Matthew Wordell CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE AND NOW, FOR MORE IRREVERENT FOREPLAY We’re exhausted. As an organization, we’re not very good at saying “no.” Or maybe we’re just too good at saying “yes.” Besides churning out daily content for boiseweekly.com, assembling the weekly print edition and selling ads like crazy to pay for it all, we spend a good deal of our personal time manning event booths throughout the summer and working extra-long hours testing the coldest beer all over Ada County. Last week’s Coldest Beer edition is a twomonth process, and this year, we did it while also finalizing the 2011 edition of Annual Manual, which is now at the press, and will hit stands on July 27. But don’t pity us too much—though we may pull a few late nights before big deadlines, we recently managed to squeeze in a midday drinking session in our conference room with the folks from Deschutes Brewery and team up with Northstar Cycle Couriers to throw the annual badass Bars and Stripes Alley Cat race. Which, coincidentally, also involved copious amounts of beer. So this week, now that Annual Manual is finished and the year’s coldest beer winner declared, we’re going to breathe a bit. Maybe sleep a little later. Maybe leave the office an hour earlier. Maybe actually leave our desks for lunch. And we’re not going to feel bad about it because, though it may be the calm after a major storm, it’s also the calm before the next major tempest—Best of Boise. For the third year, we’ll split Best of Boise into two editions: Staff Picks, which publishes Sept. 21, and Readers’ Picks, which publishes Sept. 28. The purpose of the former is not to contradict the readers’ winners. It’s merely the irreverent foreplay to get you excited about the main event. Voting starts Wednesday, July 20, at boiseweekly.com. Check this same space that week for a QR code to take you directly to the voting landing page online. And for the first time in a few years, we’ll host a Best of Boise party—because, frankly, after BOB has worked us over, we need a drink. We’re hammering out the details of the party, and as soon as we do, we’ll let you know. As for the week’s edition, News Editor George Prentice started reporting on the main feature before the subject of his story, Margaret Lawrence, passed away. Her death, like her life, touched many in Boise. Prentice’s story looks at her life and final days. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Matt Bodett TITLE: Elevate MEDIUM: Image transfer and gesso on wood ARTIST STATEMENT: This series explores the relationship between the artist and the viewer. The experiences that make this connection possible are foregrounded in these drawings, paintings and prints. More of this series is on view at the Basement Gallery in July. mattbodett.com

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 3


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BARS AND STRIPES FOREVER More than 125 bikers scoured Boise on July 2, sweating their way between bars as part of the annual Bars and Stripes Alley Cat Race. Miss all the insanity? Check out images from the event at Cobweb.

SCALES OF JUSTICE Idaho’s legal system recently handed down two notable decisions. One involved the DUI charges against state Sen. John McGee after his infamous unauthorized joyride, and the other involved allegations of misuse of funds by former Idaho State Tax Commissioner Royce Chigbrow. Check out the full stories at Citydesk.

BACK ON TRACK Boise State reached a settlement with the former track coach who set off an NCAA investigation into the university’s athletic department. Read the details at Citydesk.

MURAL PROJECT, PART II A group of artists plans to do for a downtown Boise alley what it did for a parking structure last year. Read all about the Freak Alley Gallery Art Jam at Cobweb.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Whatever Happened to Margaret?

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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FIRST THURSDAY Skateboards become art at the Art Deck-O Show 19 FIRST THURSDAY LISTINGS Plan your attack

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SUDOKU

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Thirty Proof Coil

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SCREEN TV Reality of reality TV

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FOOD Frying up a future for fishing in the Gem State 30 FOOD REVIEW Bacon

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WINE SIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 5


OPINION/BILL COPE

WHAT MAKES YOU THINK Red questions Cope’s edgercation credentials “What you been doing with yourself, Red? I haven’t seen you in a blue moon.” “A what?” “A month of Sundays.” “A what!?” “A coon’s age.” “A what!?” “A long time, Red. I’m just saying that I haven’t seen you in a long time.” “Well, why don’t you spit it out, Cope, and forget about all them blue coons and such? Besides, it ain’t my fault you ain’t seen me. I been coming to your house least once a week for months, trying to get you to answer the gull durn doorbell.” “Oh, that was you? I heard the dingdong, but I figured it was Jehovah’s Witnesses. So I’d duck down behind the philodendron and pretend I wasn’t home.” “You ain’t fooling me. I know what you were doin’. You was hunkered down on that Macinapple of yours, hatching up new ways to disrespect ol’ Tom Luna. Fact, you been on this anti-edgercation kick all year long. Don’tcha think people’re getting tired of it?” “Me anti-education? You’re nuts! Red, you’ll never meet a more pro-education person than me. You want anti-education, go check with your chum Luna. Go check with Hopalong Otter and that bunch of screw jobs who keep infesting the Legislature year after year. There isn’t a one of those corrosive creeps I’d trust to mow my lawn, let alone decide what constitutes a decent education.” “What makes you think you’re qualifiable to decide what a decent edgercation is, Cope? You ain’t no teacher. Hows do you know what yous acalling proedgercation ain’t really anti -edgercation? Especially since what yous been preaching goes against durn near everthin’ ol’ Tom Luna says needs t’ be done. And last time I looked, he was our superintenement of edgercation, not you. Or did you get that job since I seen ya’ last?” “Listen, pal. If I did have that job—not that I’d want it, but if I had it—I’d be a damn sight better at it than him. And you want to know why? Because unlike Luna, I know the difference between ‘education’ and ‘training,’ that’s why.” “What’s wrong with training, Cope? If it twern’t for someone training me, I’d have no idea hows to honeydip those septic tanks what puts food on my family’s table.” “That’s just the point, Red. Training is all well and good. We need it, sure. But let’s not confuse it with education. Training is what you do with jumpy dogs and flabby bodies and people who need a marketable skill. Training’s for getting your hair to part a certain way or getting your little kid to use the toilet instead of his pants. You

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train your horse to barrel race and your bonsai to lean one way over another. But training and education are two different things, Red. And I’m afraid we don’t have many leaders in this state who know the difference. Least of all Tom Luna. He’s a ‘trained’ man, not an educated one. Just remember, there’s a lot more to a wellrounded education than what kind of job you get.” “Now hold on a gull durn minute, Cope. What’s the point of an edgercation if’n it ain’t to train a feller for gettin’ a gull durn job? And when you say ‘well-rounded edgercation,’ you mean like ... what? Like learning to be both a dental assistant and a diesel mechanic?” “Uh … not exactly. I mean learning more than you need to know just to earn a paycheck. I mean learning so much about so many things that your brain needs to grow to fit it all in and your understanding needs to stretch out like a girdle to make some sense and shape out of it. To cram so much history and geography and arts and literature and languages and science and math and philosophy and even miscellaneous trivia into your skull that, eventually, you transcend yourself. “That you realize you are part of something that is so much grander than a job market or a payroll or even an entire economy. To fill your senses with so much knowledge that there’s no room left for ignorance and prejudice and savagery. To send kids forth from school with a desire for ever more schooling, with a craving to continue learning and a thirst for wisdom. That’s what I mean by a ‘well-rounded education,’ Red. Think of it this way … training plugs you in. Education sets you free.” “And what’s the point? What the U.S. of A. needs is more engineers, not more o’ your gull durn wisdom. We’ll be slipping off the top spot of the country pile if we don’t get our employee pool up to snuff.“ “Aw, so what? There are a lot of perfectly fine countries full of perfectly fine foreigners who don’t think they have to be the perpetual kings of the hill. And Red, have you seen any evidence that being No. 1 has made Americans any happier? Or any smarter? Or more responsible citizens?” “We don’t need to be smart an’ happy, Cope. N’r more responsible, neither. Wes’re already what they call ‘exceptionable,’ ain’t you heard? And wes need to stay exceptionable!” “We’ll save that ‘American exceptionalism’ discussion for another day, OK Red? I have a philodendron that needs watering, and by the way, sounds to me like your enunciation training is wearing off.” “What?”

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TED RALL/OPINION

BRAVE NEW BOOK Political scientist argues this is a police state The United States is a police state. Not in danger of becoming one. Is. And it’s too late to restore democracy. That’s the stark message of Andrew Kolin’s brave, lucid and important book State Power and Democracy: Before and During the Presidency of George W. Bush. Kolin comes out swinging: Illusions about America as a democracy, much less a benevolent one, don’t stand a chance. The United States, Kolin says, shares all the major attributes of a Third World police state: a constant state of emergency; sidestepping of laws by the government; excessive secrecy; the use of preventative detention and holding enemies of the state without filing formal charges; the manufacturing of reasons to go to war. “The expansion of state power over the course of U.S. history came at the expense of democracy,” Kolin begins. “As state power grew, there developed a disconnect between the theory and practice of democracy in the United States. Ever-greater state power meant it became more and more absolute. This resulted in a government that directed its energies and resources toward silencing those who dared question the state’s authority.” Some find Kolin’s deadpan delivery disconcerting or depressing. I think it refreshingly honest. Notice the past tense? The United States is over. It’s always been over. Creeping authoritarianism, Kolin says, began “not long after the end of the Revolutionary War.” A hundred pages in, you’ll either be stuffing rags into Molotov cocktails or slitting your wrists. I was surprised to learn that Kolin is a professor at Hilbert College in upstate New York. His methodical walk through U.S. his-

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tory feels like a tight legal brief. The fix was in from the start. “The framers [of the U.S. Constitution] needed to establish a government that could promote and protect property, regulate the economy, create an elaborate infrastructure, and acquire native Indian lands, adhering to the policy of North American expansion, while allowing the democratic surge from below to be both expressed and contained,” Kolin writes. Where the book becomes indispensable is its last third, focusing on the Clinton, Bush and early Obama administrations. This, the author argues, is when American citizens lost our basic freedoms and civil liberties. For Kolin, the USA Patriot Act, passed in haste by a cowardly Congress that hadn’t had time to read it after 9/11, marks the final end of formal democracy in the United States. I can imagine one logical objection to Kolin’s thesis. The government may have the right to oppress, but it is not impelled to do so. So long as officials are well-intentioned, stout of heart and full of integrity, they will refrain from abusing the rights they claim against us. However, our government is not run by such individuals. And even if it were, who would want to live in a nation where the difference between democracy and dictatorship relies on the whims of a coterie of elites? Though “a glimmer of hope seemed to appear after President Obama took office,” Kolin shows how the Democratic president “merely modified police state practices.”If you’ve somehow managed to ignore Obama’s record over the last few years, and you’re still thinking of voting for him next November, this book will change your mind.

BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 7


CITIZENS

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

DAN HOLLAR AND NANCY LANDON ‘These are not scare tactics. These are the realities.’ GEORGE PRENTICE Dan Hollar and Nancy Landon have had a lot of homework lately. Hollar, public affairs administrator, and Landon, budget and finance administrator, both with the Boise School District, have been studying the numbers that make up the budget for the second-largest public school district in Idaho (Meridian is the largest). While Hollar and Landon don’t worry too much about the 2011-2012 school year, they have deep concerns about 20122013 and whether residents will make what they call “intelligent” votes in a supplemental levy election set for Tuesday, Aug. 30. How long have you been crunching numbers? Landon: About 20 years. I worked at the State Department of Education before coming to the Boise School District. I’ve been here 14 years. When is your department busiest? Landon: We begin the budget process in November for the following year, but I would have to say that we’re busiest from the end of the legislative session until the end of August. Has the Boise School Board of Trustees officially approved the budget for 2011-2012? Landon: Yes. Now we’re rolling it out to all of our budget officers.

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Are budget officers the equivalent of department heads? Landon: That’s right. There are about 30. Additionally, each principal is a budget officer because every school has its own budget. Is the budget set in stone for the next year? Landon: Yes, but budget officers have the ability of moving money around within their department. Hollar: Those department budgets have really been drastically cut over the last several years, so when you say, “set in stone,” well, that stone has been rolling downhill. How many schools are in the district now? Hollar: Approximately 50: five high schools, eight junior highs, 32 elementary schools. Plus we have the ASCENT [Alternative Students Courageously Exploring New Territory] program, a tech center, and the Madison pre-school. Didn’t you close another school this past year? Hollar: The Boise Language Academy operated at Jackson Elementary. It’s for students who don’t have English as their primary language. We’ll continue to operate that program at two locations: Hillside Junior and Borah High. What happens to Jackson Elementary? Hollar: We’re basically mothballing it. The

old Franklin and Cole elementary schools are still for sale, but as everyone knows, property values have gone down. We have not had anyone come forward to offer us a fair value for them yet. When those properties are eventually sold, the funds will go toward our facilities budget. Are you aware of any extra general funds that might come to the district from the state’s fiscal year-end surplus? Landon: We should know that figure any day now. But we don’t want to use those funds for the 2011-2012 school year. We have already balanced our budget for that year. Can you bank the funds? Landon: Absolutely. Those funds will definitely come into play when we talk about the levy that we’re going to put before voters. When does the board of trustees make a final decision on a levy? Hollar: They will need to set an amount at their Monday, July 11 meeting. So those extra funds from the state will be a major factor in determining the amount of the supplemental levy. Do you already know for a fact that there will be a levy election on Tuesday, Aug. 30? Hollar: Yes. The board made that 10 decision in April.

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The Sound of Sun Valley 2011 Sun Valley Concerts & Events

Photo: Todd Roeth

July 10

A Midsummer’s Night Serenade For tickets please visit www.sunvalleyopera.com

July 13

The Avett Brothers Presented by the Sun Valley Center for the Arts For tickets please visit www.sunvalleycenter.org

The Great British Invasion

July 16

Featuring UK Bands Thunder & The Union With Special Guest Marina V

Sun Valley Artist Series Concert Artist Susan Spelius-Dunning For Tickets Visit svwas.org or call 208.725.5807

Sun Valley Summer Symphony Free Concert Series Free admission – svsummersymphony.org

Huey Lewis and The News

July 17

July 24 – August 15 August 17

35th Annual Danny Thompson Memorial Benefit Concert

Sun Valley Writers’ Conference

August 19 – 22

For Tickets please visit www.svwc.com

Trey McIntyre Project

August 26

Boise Modern Dance Company

Governor’s Cup Concert

September 9

Featuring Lee Ann Womack

The Sun Valley Pavilion features artists and groups across various genres under one unique acoustic canopy. For tickets and show information, call 208.622.2135 or visit seats.sunvalley.com. For summer hotel & concert packages call 800.786.8259.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 9


CITIZENS CON’T Do you know the amount of the levy yet? Hollar: We know the range. It will be between $15 million and $17 million. I don’t want to second-guess the board, because they will make the final decision. When we look to the 2012-2013 school year, it’s very dire. 8

How do you know that already? Hollar: We’re looking at a deficit of $17.5 million. Plus, we’re looking at projected funding, the values of the district’s properties and the impact of the new Luna proposals. What are some examples of that? Landon: This year, they reduced all schools’ salary appropriations by 1.67 percent. Next year, it kicks up to a 4.05 percent reduction, and the reduction continues to grow in the next five years. But aren’t there things you can do right now to safeguard against those reductions? Landon: In the new 2011-2012 budget, we’re using about $4 million in one-time dollars from the feds, and we already know that those funds aren’t going to be there in 2012-2013. The other thing is, we’re spending down much of our savings account. That’s about $8.5 million. Will you drain that account? Landon: We’re going to retain a 5.5 percent reserve. That’s very low for a district of our size. It’s not even the equivalent of one month of operating costs. How do you prepare for a levy vote? Hollar: It’s about getting the facts out. The numbers are overwhelming and quite complex, but it’s also about how well the district is performing. But isn’t it fair to say that this is not your typical levy vote this year? Do you think some politics came into play during a recent levy vote in the Meridian School District? Hollar: We want a vote to be an intelligent vote. We wouldn’t be asking for this without a complete understanding of what’s at stake. We’re talking about maintaining class sizes and retaining teachers so that we can hopefully avoid staff cuts. These are not scare tactics. These are the realities in which we live. Landon: You really need to look at how dependent school districts have become on supplemental levies. Since 2006, there has been something like 60 percent more supplemental levies across the state. What you’re seeing is a shift of support from the state Legislature to the voters. And the voters in most cases are saying yes. Almost 83 percent of supplemental levies do pass. How long has it been since you bought new textbooks? Hollar: It’s been two years. Landon: We put $50,000 in the next budget for new library books. That’s less than $2 per kid. We wiped out the library budget last

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year, and they desperately need replacement books. Do you have a sense of how many lottery dollars are coming into the district? Landon: Let me tell you what’s going on with the lottery. Prior to the economic downturn, the district used to get about $1.6 million from the lottery each year. We would use that money for a much-needed boiler or new roof. Two years ago, the state decided to earmark the money as part of the general fund. We are now going into year three of not receiving those lottery funds. Other than salaries, what are your bigticket expenses? Landon: Health coverage is a major expense. Who is your carrier? Landon: Regence Blue Shield. Hollar: We require all of our employees to participate in a wellness program. If they don’t, they have to pay a higher deductible and higher co-pays. How do you project student enrollment? Hollar: Our enrollment has continued to increase over the last several years. Lately, we have seen a bump in our early grades, so that bump should continue through our system over the years. We have seen increases not only in our traditional students, but also a big increase in our ELL [English Language Learner] students. They provide such a rich opportunity for our district, but they also provide challenges to our district’s teaching staff. Is the cost per student any higher for ELL students? Landon: We look at the full population when we do our cost per student. We don’t break out the ELL kids, because they could easily be in a math class, for example, with all of the other kids. What is your overall cost per student in the district? Landon: For the last school year, it was $8,186, and I’m pretty sure it will be down to about $7,800 in the next year. A lot of people say Boise spends a lot more compared to the rest of the state, but Boise is about 45th in the state among all school districts. That puts us right in the middle. You must spend a lot of your time in front of spreadsheets with a calculator nearby, but how do these huge budgets translate to students? Landon: To be honest, I work a lot with the numbers. But are you a mom? Landon: I am. For me, what’s most important is the investment in quality education, and that means quality teachers, a quality curriculum and adequate class sizes. It’s really about everybody having an equal opportunity to be successful. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


The final days of Margaret Limbert Lawrence, owner of the Hollywood Market GEORGE PRENTICE

argaret Lawrence’s passing was not going to go unnoticed. During the last moments of her life at St. Luke’s Boise Medical Center on June 22, a sudden cold front pushed through a stifling curtain of heat that had draped across the Treasure Valley. Within a few hours, a wave of thunder shook the Boise Foothills and lightning ripped the sky. Many of Lawrence’s friends who had not received official word of her passing said they knew—or at least sensed—that Margaret was gone when the storm erupted. In fact, some acquaintances said they were unaware of the severity of Lawrence’s hospitalization, but suspected that she had few days remaining after the Hollywood Market on Eighth Street was unexpectedly closed just six weeks prior. What happened between May 9, when the iconic Boise North End market was shuttered, and June 22 remains unknown to many. Dozens of North Enders told BW that they were told Lawrence had become ill. Some guessed that she hurt herself in an accident, and most said that her age, 95, had finally taken its toll. But individuals who said they knew Lawrence best said up until May 9, she was still operating the market, seven days a week, much like she had for decades. Eccentric? Yes. Colorful? Absolutely. But incompetent?

M

Pictured: Margaret Lawrence, circa 1930.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 11


COURTESY JASON HAROIAN

Margaret Lawrence and her son Danny visited Red Fish Lodge in 2010. The lodge was built by Margaret’s father, Robert “Two Gun” Limbert (see Page 14) in 1932.

Hollywood Market on May 9, followed by Lawrence’s admission to an assisted living facility and two trips to a psychiatric hospital before being transferred to St. Luke’s, where she died.

“She was sharp as a tack,” said John Reed Hansen is the owner and president Weber, who knew Lawrence for more than of Impact Directories, publishers of white50 years. and yellow-page phone books throughout “She hadn’t lost her mind,” said Alan the Treasure Valley, as well as communities Derr, veteran Boise attorney who counted in Washington. Hansen is also a member Lawrence as a former client and close friend. and faith-leader in the Warm Springs AvEach person BW spoke with enue Chapel of the Church of Jesus conceded that Lawrence Christ of Latter-day Saints. struggled with mobili“I was a bishop of a ty and had difficulty ward that Danny was making change in,” Hansen said, deat the store; scribing the relationhowever, Derr, ship with Margaret Weber and Lawrence’s son, many more Daniel. “I go close friends back farther with of Margaret Danny than with said her menMargaret.” tal capacity Danny, 62, has was no less cerebral palsy. than it had “He has mobilbeen years ity problems,” — PETITION FOR APPOINTMENT before. said Hansen. “But OF GUARDIAN But in court I think he’s capable documents of handling his own afobtained by BW, fairs to some degree.” petitioner Reed Hansen Danny walks with short, claimed that Lawrence shuffling half-steps and almost “suffered from mental confualways has a smile. He spends his time sion,” “an inability to appreciate her visiting with friends at the LDS chapel or mental circumstances” and could not “efat the Hollywood Market. In fact, Danny fectively communicate to others her mental made sure to attend a candlelight vigil or physical needs.” In the two-and-a-half outside the store on June 25, where he page petition, Lawrence was labeled “inswapped remembrances with many of his capacitated” no fewer than 12 times. “An mother’s former customers and friends. emergency exists,” read the petition. “No “Margaret took very good care of other person appears to have authority and Danny over the years,” said Hansen. “But willingness to act in the circumstances.” maybe she was too careful in protecting The petition was accepted on April 25 him. She was pretty controlling. She kind by Idaho Magistrate Christopher Bieter of managed his life to the point where he (brother of Boise Mayor Dave Bieter) and didn’t get too much of a chance to really a temporary guardian was appointed to blossom.” oversee Lawrence’s personal and profesHansen said that eight years ago, Marsional affairs. The order was to remain garet asked him to serve as an adviser to temporary until a public hearing on July Danny after she passed away. 19, but after Lawrence’s death, the hearing “I sat in on all of their financial meetwas canceled. ings,” said Hansen. “She accumulated a The court order set in motion a series fair amount of resources so that Danny of events that led to the closure of the would have money when she was gone.”

AN EMERGENCY EXISTS. NO OTHER PERSON APPEARS TO HAVE AUTHORITY AND WILLINGNESS TO ACT IN THE CIRCUMSTANCES.”

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ADAM R OS ENLU ND

The Hollywood Market has been closed since May 9. A sign on the door reads: “Store closed due to illness.”

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While Margaret and Danny lived simply, her estate is considerable. Everyone BW spoke to said Margaret owned a minimum of nine and as many as 11 properties in addition to the Hollywood Market. Most of the properties were rental homes, including at least one duplex and one triplex in Boise. Additionally, Margaret was well-known for her thrift. “She probably saved 80 cents of every dollar she made,” said Jason Haroian, who said Margaret was probably his best friend. “I can tell you that back in the 1990s, Margaret negotiated a $1.3 million deal,” said Weber. “She sold 360 acres of prime farmland out in Kuna to an investor. She wanted cash and she got it.” Derr, who also knew Margaret for more than 50 years, and occasionally served as her lawyer, remembered his friend and client as a tough negotiator. “The last time I represented her, we had a big disagreement over some work I had done for her,” said Derr. “And of course, she questioned how much she was willing to pay for it.” Derr confirmed that Margaret’s sole focus in life was to make certain that Danny was taken care of, but said he was uncertain of how Hansen became a petitioner for Margaret’s affairs. “I’m not even going to speculate on that,” said Derr. “Danny became a member of the LDS church, but Margaret was not a member of that church.” “In her will, Margaret had some things that said that if she became incapacitated, the bank would take control over her property,” said Hansen. “I was involved in some of those meetings. Wells Fargo [executor of Margaret’s will] wanted to have somebody there to protect her and help her physically and mentally.” Hansen’s court petition for guardianship included a March 17 letter from Boise neurosurgeon Roy Frizzell, who said he knew Margaret for six years, declaring her to be “mentally incapacitated, unable to effectively manage or apply her estate to necessary ends.” The letter and the attached petition, approved by Bieter, changed everything for Margaret and Danny.

“Margaret told me many years ago that if they ever made her leave the store, she WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

braunbrothersreunion.com

would die a short time later,” said Derr. “That prediction certainly came true.” Whether Margaret had all of her faculties at the time of the court order was the subject of some debate. “They said Margaret was having trouble making change,” said Haroian. “Well, for goodness sake, she always had trouble making change. You know what it was? She was so trusting. She would allow customers to have tabs and she told them they could pay her later.” “For years, people always had questions about the store,” said Derr. “I would get phone calls to check on her, but she hadn’t lost her mind. In fact, she was always reading every day, and she was very well-informed. If she wasn’t attending to a customer, she was reading.” Title 15, Chapter 5, Part 4 of Idaho Code addresses “protection of property of persons under disability and minors.” The law states that “a protective order may be made in relation to the estate and affairs of a person if the court determines that 1) the person is unable to manage (his) property and affairs effectively for reasons such as mental illness ... and 2) the person has property which will be wasted or dissipated unless proper management is provided.” Following the court’s approval of the petition in late April, a newly appointed guardian, Debbie Hansen (no relation to Reed) of Castle Rock Services, assigned a professional aide to oversee Margaret’s affairs while working in the store. The aide began distributing a letter to customers who walked into the North End market, classifying a guardian as “a parent” and Margaret as “a minor child.” The letter also threatened anyone interfering with the guardian’s duties could “be construed as elder abuse and turned into law enforcement.” BW tried to contact Debbie Hansen on multiple occasions but our calls went unreturned. “A short time later, I walked into the store to see what was going on,” said Weber.

BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 13


BOISE STATE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY, ROBERT LIMBERT COLLECTION

INTERFERING WITH THE GUARDIAN OR TRUSTEE’S DUTIES IN PROTECTING MARGARET LAWRENCE MAY BE CONSTRUED AS ELDER ABUSE AND TURNED IN TO LAW ENFORCEMENT.” — LETTER HANDED TO HOLLYWOOD MARKET CUSTOMERS

Margaret Lawrence could shoot from the hip, literally and figuratively. While many Idahoans know of Lawrence’s verbal shootouts with politicians, she took great pride in learning a “fast draw” from her father, Robert “Two Gun Bob” Limbert in the 1920s and ’30s. Two Gun made his living as a gunslinger—flipping a silver dollar, shooting it in mid-air or splitting a bullet by shooting at a sharp axe blade. He even claimed to have once challenged Al Capone to a shootout (Limbert said Capone backed out). Through his 48 years, he was an outfitter, an ardent sportsman and took countless photographs and movies of the Owyhee Canyons. He helped prepare the Panama-Pacific Exposition on Idaho in 1915 and was a writer of short stories and poems. In 1919, he toured across Idaho on his Excelsior motorcycle. Limbert worked diligently for the protection of the Craters of the Moon National Monument. He famously trekked across the unmapped lava flows in 17 days, documenting the 54,400 acres before it became a national monument in 1924. In 1926, he formed the Sawtooth Tours Company with cheese magnate J.L. Kraft as a key investor. Limbert traveled throughout the Sawtooth Mountains searching for the perfect place to build a lodge, finally settling in 1927 on the shores of Redfish Lake. His daughter Margaret recalled hauling rocks with her brothers to help build the fireplace for the lodge. In 2010, Margaret’s friend Jason Haroian escorted her on a return trip to the lodge, along with her son Danny. “She was treated like royalty when we walked in,” said Haroian. “Everyone thought she was wonderful. It was a glorious time for Margaret and Danny.” Limbert finished building the lodge in 1932, a year before he died. One account said he suffered a brain hemorrhage, another said he died of a heart attack. Both said he was on his way to visit his dying mother.

“And they handed me the letter. I asked, ‘What is this?’ And they said, ‘This is Margaret’s choice.’ But that simply was not true.” Reed Hansen conceded that Margaret didn’t like having someone “shadowing her.” “She didn’t want anybody looking over her shoulder or telling her what she had to do,” said Hansen. “No, she didn’t like it at all.” Approximately one week later, in early May, Debbie Hansen asked Weber to help escort Margaret on a visit to the Willow Park assisted living facility on Milwaukee Street. “Yeah, they thought that if I went with them, Margaret would be more amenable about going into a nursing home, but she was having none of it,” said Weber. “They even tried to get her to sign some papers there, voluntarily admitting herself, but she refused. She was not happy.” Margaret knew something was up. She called a friend, Kathy Vawter, to drive her home from work a little early the evening of May 9. “When we walked into the door of her home, Margaret turned to Danny and said, ‘I don’t really know what is going to happen tomorrow,’” said Vawter. “She was worried.” Friends said the next day two men from the LDS church came to Margaret’s home and asked to spend the day with Danny. Shortly thereafter, friends said someone escorted Margaret not to the assisted living facility, but to Boise Behavior, an acute mental health hospital for “psychiatric intervention and stabilization.” A sign was put up on the door of the Hollywood Market: “Closed Due to Illness.” “I had stopped by the store to visit with her,” remembered Derr. “And John Weber came running across the street and said he had some bad news. Margaret had been taken away.” “They just shut her off from the whole world,” said Weber. “She just disappeared,” said Haroian. “Nobody knew where she went. We immediately started making calls.” Haroian, Weber and all of Margaret’s friends were told that Boise Behavior did not allow visitors except for a “restricted list.” In spite of their requests, friends were not able to see Margaret until approximately a week and a half later, when she was transferred to the Willow Park assisted living facility. By then, Debbie Hansen had Margaret’s personal items and some furniture moved over to the nursing home, as well as Danny. “Yes, Danny and Margaret were living together again, but this time at the home,” said Haroian. “But at last, we could see her, and talk to her again.” Visits to Margaret at Willow Park were closely monitored. While she could receive visitors, an aide would never be further than a few feet away. “The first thing I noticed was that they weren’t letting her read the newspaper,” said Haroian. “Well, anyone who knows Margaret knows that the news was a lifeline for her. But get a load of this: They told me that because of some injections that they were administering, her eyesight was failing and she couldn’t read that well anymore. That was cruel.”

—George Prentice

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GEOR GE PR ENTIC E

North Enders have turned the doorstep of the Hollywood Market into a makeshift memorial for Margaret Lawrence.

Weber said Margaret’s stay at Willow Park did not go well. “I would get calls in the middle of the night,” he said. “Once it was 2 in the morning, and Danny said, ‘Come and get my mom. She wants out.’ He even ended up calling the police, but of course, they couldn’t do anything.” Reed Hansen eventually began cutting back Margaret’s visits. “Here’s what the issue was,” Hansen said. “Anytime Margaret would talk to anybody, it was a different story. There were people who were trying to push her one way or another and some people were trying to take advantage of her financially.” When asked if any of the visitors had a legal claim to Margaret’s estate, Hansen said no. “I can guarantee that they’re not in the will,” he said. On June 10 while visiting Margaret at Willow Park, Vawter said she was encouraged by the home’s administrator and Debbie Hansen to escort Margaret over to the home’s dementia ward. “I said, ‘Why would I do that?’ That was clearly not Margaret’s wish,” said Vawter. “In fact, Margaret would hold me close in a hug and whisper in my ear, ‘Please get me a lawyer. Get me some help.’” Vawter said she learned later that day, that Margaret had been transferred back to the Boise Behavior psychiatric facility for “observation,” where once again visits would be restricted.

admitted to St. Luke’s. “She really should have been back home,” said Derr. “Her own prediction was coming true.” Derr said it was equally disappointing that friends could not see her.“Which was a cruel thing, I think,” he said. When BW asked Derr to comment on how the law allowed the situation to progress the way it did, he said, “I could only surmise, and I hesitate to do that.” Margaret’s obituary listed natural causes as the official reason of her passing, but friends said they think that she was vulner— JOHN WEBER able to illness and viruses in her multiple transfers, to Boise Behavior to Willow Park back to Boise Behavior, and finally to St. Luke’s. Hansen said he would not comment, on the record, regarding Margaret’s cause of death, saying only there was “a multi-system failure.” Since his mother’s death on June 22, Danny has decided that he would like to remain living at Willow Park. On June 25, he attended the candlelight vigil outside the store, and on June 29, he walked alongside his mother’s casket at a funeral service at the Warm Springs LDS chapel before her burial at Morris Hill Cemetery. Sitting near the back of the chapel were Haroian, Vawter and Weber. They listened to the music and a couple of brief remembrances during the service. They had few words but plenty of tears. They said they knew what most people in the chapel didn’t know: Margaret’s final days weren’t in keeping with her wishes.

IT WAS 2 IN THE MORNING AND DANNY SAID, ‘COME AND GET MY MOM. SHE WANTS OUT.’”

Haroian said he repeatedly tried to call Debbie Hansen to ask about Margaret’s status. “I asked her, ‘What is your goal here?’” said Haroian. “And she said, ‘To have Margaret and Danny live happily ever after.’” Margaret’s physical condition was deteriorating. Less than a week later, she was WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 15


BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events M IK A B ELLE

Sample a flood of suds with your buds at the Idaho Brewers Festival.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY JULY 8-10 Get crunk at Trunk It Up, a benefit for Anneliessa Balk.

beer IDAHO BREWERS FESTIVAL

FRIDAY JULY 8 benefit TRUNK IT UP BENEFIT Since 2005, the Visual Arts Collective has helped make art accessible in Boise, hosting live music, art exhibitions and performance art. VAC co-founders Anneliessa Balk and Sam Stimpert have given a lot to the community, and now the community is returning the favor. Balk has been in and out of the hospital and the bills are piling up, so VAC is hosting Trunk It Up, a veritable festival of talent to raise money for Balk. Bands like Owlright, Talk Math to Me, Junior Rocket Scientist, Atomic Mama, Sleepy Seeds, Field Guide, Dark Swallows, Brett Netson, Discoma, Le Fleur, Finn Riggins, Tim Andreae and more have signed on to play the benefit show on Friday, July 8. Alongside the music, there will also be an elephant art silent auction and Robert Smith look-a-like contest. According to its website, “VAC is dedicated to providing Boise and the Treasure Valley opportunities to explore various disciplines, to engage in interactive art, to participate in special events and to encourage artists and the community to continue in the discovery of artistic expression.” It has done that and more—it’s helped nurture and grow the local artistic community. Tickets to the show are only $5 for a full afternoon and evening of music, so come show your love for art, VAC and Balk. Additional donations will be accepted and appreciated. 4 p.m., $5. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

FRIDAY JULY 8 runway TANZANITE FASHION SHOW The Eighth Street strip between Idaho and Bannock streets is a place to

see and be seen. Between shops, restaurants and bars, this small section of downtown is an unofficial catwalk, which is why Tanzanite Salon and Spa chose it as the venue for its first local fashion show. Local businesses have teamed up to shut down Eighth Street for the sake of fashion, and proceeds

16 | JULY 6–12, 2011 | BOISEweekly

will benefit the Women’s and Children’s Alliance. Twenty-five models will strut down the street, including Boise’s Chelsey Hersley, a runner-up on America’s Next Top Model, Cycle 15. Each model will showcase clothing, accessories, shoes and styling from Boise retailers to promote the city’s fashion scene.

To sample all of the specialty and custom-crafted brews from the potato state, you’d have to do some serious pub-crawling. Fortunately, you can save time and gas—and a potential DUI—at the Crescent Brewery’s inaugural Idaho Brewers Festival at Lakeview Park in Nampa. Brewers from all over Idaho will conveniently congregate to showcase their products, and beer lovers and their families are invited to take in some sun, fun, music and, of course, beer. This three-day beer-tastic event will feature suds from 16 Idaho brewing companies, including Grand Teton Brewing Co., Laughing Dog Brewing, Sun Valley Brewing and Snake River Brewery. The venue boasts a grassy outdoor amphitheater where live music acts like Decade Blues Band, The Quartertons and Voice of Reason are scheduled to perform throughout the weekend. Plus, local food vendors will be dishing out barbeque and corn on the cob to ensure that no one goes hungry. Brick 29 Bistro, co-sponsor of the event, will park the B29 Streatery food truck to serve up its hearty fare—like pulled pork grilled cheese, BLTs and hand-cut fries. A day pass can be purchased for $20, which includes a tasting cup and 16 beer samples. Regular admission is $5 at the gate, and kids younger than 12 get in free. A portion of the proceeds will go to benefit Camp River Run. Friday, July 8, 5-9 p.m.; Saturday, July 9, 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Sunday, July 10, 11 a.m.-5 p.m.; $5 gate admission, $20 single-day tasting package, FREE younger than 12. Lakeview Park, corner of Garrity Boulevard and 16th Avenue North, Nampa, idahobrewfest.com.

Music by Boise Rock School students will start at 6 p.m., with a cocktail hour at the restaurants lining Eighth Street’s sidewalk. DJ Nathan Hudson will follow, spinning the beats for the catwalk. From 6 to 7 p.m., you can also try your luck at a raffle by dropping tickets for various prizes at the featured local businesses. The event is free and open to the public, but VIP tickets with major perks are available at Tanzanite Salon. For $50, you get prime seating by the runway and a swag bag from Sojourn Hair

Products. 6-9 p.m., FREE, $50 VIP tickets. Eighth Street between Idaho and Bannock streets, 208-344-1700, tanzanitesalon.com.

FRIDAYSATURDAY JULY 8-9 music PINTO BENNETT AND THE FAMOUS MOTEL

COWBOYS REUNION Post-Fourth blues got you down? Let country musician Pinto Bennett perk you up at his annual reunion with The Famous Motel Cowboys. Bennett has lived a long, interesting life, and after having four heart attacks and a stroke, this ex-Navy honky-tonk brawler decided to settle down in the Owyhee Desert. Lately, he’s been inspired by a spirit of a different kind—moving from boozy ballads like “I Hold the Bottle, You Hold the Wheel,” to straight-up gospel tunes WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FIND LUCKY PEACH

Get your butt out of bed, it’s time for a Potter-thon.

MONDAY-THURSDAY JULY 11-14 Bill Clinton tried lavender once, but didn’t inhale.

film HARRY POTTER MOVIE MARATHON

SATURDAY-SUNDAY JULY 9-10 lavender LAKESIDE LAVENDER FESTIVAL According to scientist Tiffany Field of the University of Miami School of Medicine, lavender aroma has been shown in humans to “slow down heart rate, slow blood pressure and put you in a parasympathetic state, which is a relaxed state.” Basically, lavender makes you feel stoned. If you’ve ever made the trek out to Nampa for the Lakeside Lavender Farm U-Cut Festival, you know what we mean. One minute you’re skipping Red Riding Hood-style through a purple-speckled field, and the next you have lavender ice cream smeared across your face and you’re giggling about how hilarious the words “body butter” are. The seventh-annual festival will take place this year on Saturday, July 9, and Sunday, July 10, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Lakeside Lavender Farm, 1002 W. Locust Lane, Nampa. In addition to a spacey lavender buzz, here’s what you can expect at the festival: you-cut lavender bundles for $6 a pop, lavender products like essential oils, eye pillows, soaps and body butters (tee hee); a gourmet lavender-inspired lunch from Brick 29 Bistro; classes on propagating, harvesting and cooking with lavender; and horse-drawn wagon rides from Dreamerz Carriage Co. Saturday, July 9, and Sunday, July 10, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., FREE. Lakeside Lavender Farm, 1003 W. Locust Lane, Nampa, 208466-0523, lakesidelavender.com.

on his latest album, Echoes from Paradise. You can catch Pinto and Co. at Humpin’ Hannah’s and light up the floor with your explosive dance moves. On Friday, July 8, Pinto Bennett and The Famous Motel Cowboys will be accompanied by the Lemmon Family, Kole Moulton and Lonely Road, Kip Attaway

S U B M I T

Band, Blind Driver and Rocci Johnson. On Saturday, July 9, Bennett and The Cowboys play alongside Reilly Coyote, Joshua Tree, Claudia Williams and John Hansen. Friday, July 8, 5 p.m.; Saturday, July 9, 6 p.m.; $10. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., 208-345-7557.

Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, the first Harry Potter book, was published in 1997. The seventh and final book, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, was released in 2007. Release parties were held at bookstores nationwide and people lined up for hours ahead of time to get each book and rush home. Deathly Hallows sold 15 million copies overnight, shattering the previous sales record of 9 million, which had been set by the sixth Potter book, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince. Apparently, the books were so popular that emergency rooms tracked a decrease in admissions following their release, because kids were reading on the couch instead of galloping around recklessly. And then there are the films—seven of them since 2001, with one more to come. All together, Harr y Potter fans have invested 14 years of their lives in a stor y that spans 4,175 pages, has more than 200 characters, and includes a series of movies that runs 19 hours and 38 minutes. The stor y is so complex and detailed that editors employed an internal fact-checker to ensure that details like the bend of the toilet pipe that the ghost Moaning Myrtle lived in didn’t change from an “L” to an “S” from book to book. Scholars have written no shortage of academic papers analyzing Harr y Potter’s social messages, religious analogues and even its effect on youth literacy. The chances that there will be another story of this magnitude in this generation are slim to none. And the final piece of it will fall into place on Friday, July 15, with the release of the eighth film, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2. That means Harry Potter fans better do all they can to maximize the experience, ’cause there won’t be another moment like this. Luckily, the good folks at the Edwards 9 Cinema see it the same way, and are screening all seven of the previous films in the days leading up to the release of the new film. Harry Potter fans can view the films as one complete set, seeing the characters and story grow right before their eyes. The films will show in order from Monday, July 11, through Thursday, July 14. Tickets are $5 per movie or $30 for a full festival pass and are available at the Edwards 9 box office. Monday, July 11-Thursday, July 14, various times, $5 each, $30 for series. Boise Downtown Stadium 9, 760 Broad St., 208-338-7465, regmovies.com.

Lucky Peach—the new mag from McSweeney’s, former New York Times food writer Peter Meehan and Momofuku restaurateur David Chang—brings lit nerds, food dorks and design freaks together at the metaphorical table. According to the magazine’s website, the quarterly journal of food writing will “explore a single topic through a melange of travelogue, essays, art, photography, interviews, rants and, of course, recipes. The journal will be full color and perfect bound, with an eye toward exploring new recipe designs.” The first issue dives into everyone’s favorite You can subscribe to Lucky Peach online at store.mcsweeneys.net. cheap wrinkled noodle: ramen. But not just the 10 for $1 Maruchan variety. Writer Harold McGee, who penned the epic tome On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, explains how to make alkaline ramen noodles and explores the term “molecular gastronomy,” while TV celeb Anthony Bourdain discusses David Chang’s career trajectory by examining classic films like Ramen Girl and Tampopo. And if that’s not enough foodie clout to get you salivating, the first issue also includes recipes like ramen-encrusted skate or Parisian gnocchi with instant ramen pate a choux from big wigs like Chang and Wylie Dufresne, purveyor of New York’s wd-50. —Tara Morgan

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 17


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JULY 6 Festivals & Events ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Unwind mid-week with friends, live music and a cold beverage during this family friendly concert series. 5 p.m. FREE, The Grove, Boise, downtownboise.org. PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP, SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—A performance poetry workshop followed by an all-ages poetry slam. 7 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208331-5632, boisepoetry.com.

On Stage CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION—Four New Englanders enroll in a six-week drama course and create some drama of their own. Winner of the 2010 Obie Award for Best New American Play. 7 p.m. $10-$30. Company of Fools, 409 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-788-6520, companyoffools.org.

Citizen ART, FASHION AND CAMP RAINBOW GOLD—This fundraiser includes cocktails, sushi, dessert and a fashion show featuring Diane Von Furstenberg’s pre fall collection. Call 208-4220843 for tickets. 5:30-7:30 p.m. $45. Gilman Contemporary, 661 Sun Valley Road, Ketchum, 208726-7585, gilmancontemporary. com.

THE WIZARD OF OZ—The beloved story in an outdoor setting. 8 p.m. $10-$24, Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP—Practice rolling/slurring your R’s during this Spanish conversation group hosted by CR Languages. 6 p.m. FREE. Sapphire Bar & Grill, 622 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-7277.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS BASEBALL—vs. Everett AquaSox. 7:15 p.m. $7$12. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208322-5000, boisehawks.com.

Farmers Markets MERIDIAN URBAN MARKET—5-9 p.m. FREE, downtown Meridian on Idaho Avenue between Main and Second streets, 208-331-3400, facebook.com/ meridianurbanmarket.

Odds & Ends BIKES, BRUTALISM AND BEER—Tour downtown’s midcentury buildings on your bike and get info about joining Idaho Modern. Chat with like-minded folks and enjoy a drink after the ride. Visit preservationidaho.org to register and for more info. 6:30 p.m. $8 members, $10 nonmembers, preservationidaho.org. MEET THE DOCTORS—Meet the doctors, tour the clinic and learn about the art and science of naturopathic medicine. 5:30-6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Natural Health, 4219 Emerald St., Boise, 208338-0405, boisenaturalhealth. com.

FRIDAY JULY 8 Festivals & Events KETCHUM ARTS FESTIVAL— 12th annual celebration of arts and crafts featuring custom jewelry, artwork, home decor and more. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Festival Meadows, Sun Valley Road, Ketchum, 208-3091960, ketchumartsfestival.com. TANZANITE FASHION SHOW—Fashion show and benefit for the Women’s and Children’s Alliance. Call 208-344-1700 for VIP tickets. See Picks, Page 16. 6-10 p.m. FREE, $50 VIP tickets, Downtown at Eighth Street, tanzanitesalon.com.

On Stage CABARET—Smash hit about love, war and a changing society. 8 p.m. $18-$65. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org. CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$30. Company of Fools, 409 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-788-6520, 23 companyoffools.org.

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—5-8 p.m. FREE. Located on the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library.

Odds & Ends SCRABBLE GAME NIGHT—6 p.m. FREE. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 1315 N. Milwaukee St., Boise, 208-375-4454, barnesandnoble.com.

THURSDAY JULY 7 On Stage CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $10-$30. Company of Fools, 409 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-788-6520, companyoffools. org. 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE—Six unusual adolescents compete in a spelling bee. 7 p.m. $15-$20. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org.

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Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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1ST THURSDAY

Artist Cale Cathey’s creatures are about to deck one another.

DECK THE WALLS Mulligan’s rolls out the boards for First Thursday art show and benefit SHEREE WHITELEY Club as its marketing director. Everything fell The skateboard. That simple plank and four into place after Knopp assembled a “dream wheels has become an icon of rebellion (think team” of local artists for the event. Bart Simpson), punky adolescent love stories “I picked people that I look up to, and (think Avril Lavigne)—and art. people with a good reputation,” Knopp said. On Thursday, July 7, from 5-10 p.m., the “I wasn’t sure if anyone would want to conskateboard will be the medium of the latter tribute, but there’s been a great response. The at the Art Deck-O Skate Deck Art Show and artists have made it easy on me; I haven’t had Auction. More than 25 local artists—both to knock on doors or beg. It’s been great to well-established and up-and-coming—will see artists in Boise helping the community, and have their creativity on display at Mulligan’s there’s a great caliber of artists in the show—I Bar when the home of late-night foosball games and killer people watching is turned into hope people realize that.” Many of the artists, like Knopp, have some an art gallery for a night. Contributing artist Sarah Creamer said she’s connection to the cause or skate culture. Contributing artist Ben Wilson has skated off and excited about the unlikely location. on since the ’80s and volunteered at various “It’s a cool venue,” Creamer said. “It’ll be Boys and Girls Club locations, and Creamer interesting to see who just stumbles in the bar worked at an art camp for children in Maine and wonders what’s going on.” Each artist involved was given a deck (that’s and she painted longboards (long skateboards) for Boise-based Sibbz Custom Rides. the board part for the skate terminologyThursday certainly won’t be the first time challenged) and not much else—no theme, no skateboards have been seen in an artistic light. rules. The assignment for Art Deck-O marked Jane Brumfield, co-owner and curator of the first time Julia Green had ever worked with Basement Art Gallery in downtown Boise, a skate deck, although she’d wanted to for a remembers having a painted skateboard in the long time. first show she oversaw at Basement in 2010. “The only real challenge was trying to She understands the intrigue of unusual objects decide exactly what I wanted to make on the used in artwork. board, and the dimensions of the board,” “I think everything is fair game for art, and Green said. “The board is a lot thinner and there’s lots of issues with using an unconvenlonger than you realize, so composition really tional medium,” Brumfield said. “There are comes into play when laying out the artwork all sorts of unexpected things, and having that for the deck.” third dimension can The artists’ crereally add to a piece.” ations will not only be Brumfield also available for viewing, Art Deck-O Skate Deck Art Show and Auction, noted how attitudes but for taking home as First Thursday, July 7, 5-10 p.m., FREE toward pop culturewell. Each piece will MULLIGAN’S infused art have be sold during a silent 1009 W. Main St. changed. auction, with half of 208-336-6998 “Art is much more the proceeds going accepting of pop culback to the artists and ture now,” Brumfield the other half benefitsaid. “Illustration and graffiti are becoming ing the Boys and Girls Clubs of Ada County. more accepted, and that was almost comContributing artist and unofficial show organizer Kelly Knopp grew up rolling around pletely unheard of 10-15 years ago. There have always been galleries willing to take risks, but on skateboards and editing skate videos. He the world is much more open now, and that’s also has special insight into the Boys and Girls WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

helped broaden people’s awareness of what may have been considered subcultures.” Lori Wright, co-founder of Newt and Harold’s, has been around board culture for 15 years. She said she isn’t sure why the link between skateboarding and art exists, but she’s glad it does. “[I’m] happy to see that some of the skaters have grown up and started giving back to the community. There’s a somewhat new attitude toward skating—it’s viable, it’s what kids do,” Wright said. Knopp said that the Art Deck-O show should contain “a lot of crazy stuff.” While he wants the details of his own piece to remain a mystery, he did reveal that it has “something to do with a musical instrument.” Creamer’s piece also promises to be something completely original. “It has to do with sports equipment, toys and robots—just because I like robots,” Creamer said with a half-smile. These works of art may be on skateboard decks, but they aren’t necessarily meant to be skated on. For Green, seeing her work rolling down the sidewalk might be a bit tough. “I really truly hope no one skates on the board,” Green said. “I would hate to see it scratched and wrecked. It belongs on a wall.” That won’t be problem for local skater Mike Shier, who has been skating for more than a decade. “I wouldn’t want to skate on something that’s considered art,” Shier said. “I’d want to hang something like that on a wall, like what they do at some tattoo shops. It’s kind of a cool idea—a lot can be done with skate decks and art is so universal.” That universal connection is part of what Knopp hopes to achieve by using the decks as a medium and giving the contributing artists creative freedom. “As time goes, people are more receptive to different things,” Knopp said. “There’s a skateboard culture anyway, and having a new canvas changes it up. It’s not pretentious and there aren’t rules. Anything goes.”

BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 19


1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS East Side BASQUE MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER—Check out the gallery 1 exhibit Hidden in Plain Sight: The Basques or take a guided tour of the Jacobs-Uberuaga house. 6:30 p.m. FREE. 611 Grove St., Boise, 208-3432671, basquemuseum.com.

2

BOISE ART GLASS—Enjoy live demonstrations and snacks, or sign up to make your own cup. FREE. 530 W. Myrtle, Boise, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com.

THE DISTRICT—A new series 3 of paintings by Tomas Montano called Eamesisms will be on display.

THE FLICKS—Idaho premiere and 5 sneak peek of the documentary Buck. Meet buckaroos in traditional

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE— 6 Check out musician, artist and filmmaker Ned Evett’s artwork.

FREE. 110 S. Fifth St., 208-3431089, districtcoffeehouse.com.

garb as well as Andrea Scott, the author of the upcoming book about the buckaroo lifestyle. Proceeds to benefit the Idaho Buckaroo Project. 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

Also, pick up a “book map” to follow through downtown. In doing so, you will collect pages from one of the stories in the soon-to-be-published collection, Secrets and Lies, authored by BW’s own Josh Gross. FREE. 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com.

DRAGONFLY—All dresses are 20 percent off. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 414 W. Main St., Boise, 208-338-9234, gama-go.com. FLATBREAD COMMUNITY OVEN4 DOWNTOWN—Check out Amber Grubb’s photographs and enjoy $6 happy hour deals. 615 W. Main St., 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com.

FLOATING FEATHER DAY SPA—Stop in for live music and complimentary makeup services. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 602 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-424-5153, floating-feather.com.

INDIE MADE—Local crafters and artists will set up shop in pop-up tents in the Pioneer Building. Enjoy wine tasting and live music while you browse. FREE. 108 N. Sixth St., Boise. LE CAFE DE PARIS—Special tapas and live music. 204 N. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-336-0889, lecafedeparis.com. MELTING POT—Enjoy happy hour all evening on the patio and in the lounge with $5 martini specials. Vote for your favorite martini for a chance to win a free cheese fondue. 200 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-383-0900, meltingpot.com. WILLI B’S SANDWICH SALOON—Stop in for Treasure Hunt Karaoke, $2.50 well drinks and draft beer, $3 Salmon Creek wine and $1.50 PBR cans. 225 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-331-5666, willibs.com.

South Side ATOMIC TREASURES—The featured artist is 7 Chris Brown, whose exhibit is comprised of recent photographs with an emphasis on fine art work. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3440811, atomictreasures.com. BOISE ART MUSEUM—View Mike Rathbun’s 8 large-scale installation piece in the Sculpture Court. Woodworker Monte Eldfrick will discuss the techniques Rathbun used in creating his art at 5:30 p.m. FREE. 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY—Live music with Leta Neustaedter. 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org. BONEFISH GRILL—Check out Bejeweled 9 Creations by Adele and enjoy buy-one-get-one beer and wine with the purchase of an appetizer in the bar. 5-7 p.m. 855 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-433-1234, bonefishgrill.com. BROWN’S GALLERY—Check out 10 paintings and sculptures by artists Terri Thickson, John Horejs, David Mensing and Robert Akers. Music by Dr. Todd Palmer and free chair massage from Yvette Zoe. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 408 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-6661. CASA DEL SOL—Enjoy $2 tacos, $2 Tecate and live music. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208287-3660. EIGHTH STREET MARKETPLACE AT BODO—Part of the Artist in Residence 11 program. Kathleen Keys will display a collection of everyday altars and discuss travel and art. Matt Bodett will share part of his new series of paintings and poems called Sixty-Four. Marcus Pierce and Cody Rutty will feature a collaborative painting, as well as their individual work. 404 S. Eighth St., Mercantile Building, Boise, 208-3385212, 8thstreetmarketplace.com. HAIRLINES—Stop in and make an appointment for a new ‘do. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3839009. IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM— 12 Joel Hunter from Heirloom Dance Studio will offer swing dance instruction from 5:30-8 p.m. Admission is by donation. 5-9 p.m. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history. idaho.gov. QUE PASA—Check out the best selection of Mexican artwork in town, including wall fountains, silver, pottery and blown glass. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9018. RENEWAL UNDERGROUND—Part of the 13 Artist in Residence program. Featuring work by Ed Anderson, Saratops McDonald, Bruce Maurey, Wren Van Bockel and live painting with Patrick Hunter. There will be a public aluminum pour in the alley behind the gallery. 517 S. 8th St., Boise, 208-338-5444. R. GREY GALLERY—Check out the wide 14 variety of art in various price ranges, perfect for gift-giving. New items arrive daily. Re-design or repair of your jewelry can be done on site. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, rgreygallery.com. SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Stop in for red, white and blue Jell-O shots made with Snake River wines. 786 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-345-9463.

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LISTINGS/1ST THURSDAY M ATTHEW W OR DELL

SOLID—Enjoy liquor tast15 ing, David Day’s artwork, music from Robert James, appetizers and a $5 happy hour menu. FREE. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-6620.

Central Downtown ALLIES LINKED FOR THE PREVENTION OF HIV AND AIDS— Be one of the first to shop the new Exposure A.L.P.H.A. Interchange store during its soft opening. 213 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-424-7799, alphaidaho.org. AMERICAN CLOTHING GALLERY—All Christopher Blue jeans and capris, and Blue Willie’s sweaters and T-shirts are 30 percent off. Check out specials on other items as well. 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 121A, Boise, 208-433-0872, americanclothinggallery.com. People get fired up about demonstrations at Boise Art Glass.

ART WALK Locations featuring artists

ART GLASS ETC.— Featuring Zion Warne’s 16 latest pieces in the gallery and in the courtyard. 5-9 p.m. 280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 138A, Boise, 208-794-3265. ART OF WARD HOOPER 17 GALLERY—Featuring artwork that celebrates summer and new gift items. 745 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-866-4627. BASEMENT GALLERY— 18 Showcasing Matt Bodett’s work depicting highly personalized statements about mental health. FREE. 928 W. Main St., Boise, 208-333-0309. BRICOLAGE—Check 19 out a dimly lit evening of shredded paper taped together by artist Scutch Calhoun. 5-8 p.m. 280 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-3718, bricoshoppe. com. CHOCOLAT BAR—Sawtooth Winery will pair its wine with specialty chocolates for your enjoyment, while a magician wows the crowd. 805 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-338-7771, thechocolatbar.com. DAWSON TAYLOR—Stop 20 in to view Jared Meuser’s artwork. 219 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-5633, dawsontaylor.com. GALLERY ALEXA ROSE—Check out work 21 by illustrator and installation artist Julia Green. 6-9 p.m. 280 N. Eighth St., Boise. IDAHO ADVANTAGE CREDIT UNION—Stop by the open house for info on car loans and more. 6-8 p.m. 249 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-342-5660. LISK GALLERY—Featur22 ing Carl Rowe’s paintings of trees done over several years,

1 Basque Museum

Marketplace

2 Boise Ar t Glass

12 Idaho State Historical Museum

3 The District Coffeehouse

21 Galler y Alexa Rose 22 Lisk Galler y

13 Renewal Underground

23 Rediscovered Bookshop

14 R. Grey Galler y

24 Thomas Hammer

5 The Flicks

15 Solid

25 The Alaska Center

6 Flying M

16 Ar t Glass Etc.

26 Ar t Source Galler y

7 Atomic Treasures

17 Ar t of Ward Hooper Galler y

27 Galler y 601

4 Flatbread-Downtown

8 Boise Ar t Museum 9 Bonefish Grill 10 Brown’s Galler y 11 Eighth Street

18 Basement Galler y

28 The Galler y at the Linen Building

19 Bricolage

29 Mulligans

as well as work by Jerri and Mark Lisk. August Johnson’s funky and modern chairs will be on display. FREE. 850 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3773, liskgallery.com. MAI THAI—Enjoy two-for-one drinks at the bar from 5-6:30 p.m. and then again from 9 p.m.-close. FREE. 750 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8424, maithaigroup.com. MCU SPORTS—Stop in for a mini bike repair clinic at 6 p.m. 822 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-342-7734, mcusports.com.

20 Dawson Taylor

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BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 21


1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS 1ST THURSDAY/NEWS JENNIE JOR GENS EN

OLD CHICAGO-DOWNTOWN— Kids eat free. Karaoke from 10 p.m.-close in the bar. 730 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-0037, oldchicago.com. PIPER PUB AND GRILL—Happy hour from 3-6 p.m. features two-for-one drinks and a special menu. 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-2444, thepiperpub. com. REDISCOVERED BOOK23 SHOP—Meet Sandy Schackel, author of Working the Land: Stories of Ranch and Farm Women in the Modern American West. 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org. THOMAS HAMMER— 24 Enjoy a cup of joe while viewing Brian Rayner’s artwork. FREE. 298 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-433-8004, hammercoffee. com. TWIG’S CELLAR—Taste before you buy. Great deals on bottles—as low as $8 each. 816 W. Bannock St., lower level, Boise, 208-344-8944, twigscellar.com.

West Side THE ALASKA CENTER— 25 View the Earth Visions Art Show featuring Tony Caprai, Bobby Gaytan, Chieshenam Westin, Christine Barrietua and Alejandro Anastasio. 1020 Main St., Boise. ART SOURCE GAL26 LERY—Winners of the Annual Juried Art Exhibit will be announced during the gallery’s opening reception. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery. com. GALLERY 601—Featur27 ing the annual Rodeo Round-up with watercolor paintings by Chris Owen and Western images by Robert Coronato and G. Harvey. FREE. 211 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-336-5899, gallery601.com. THE GALLERY AT THE 28 LINEN BUILDING—View Bill Blahd’s exhibit In Our Name. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. MULLIGANS GOLF PUB 29 AND EATERY—Art show and benefit auction featuring more than 25 local artists’ work on blank skateboard decks. Proceeds benefit the Boys and Girls Club of Ada County. See First Thursday Feature, Page 19. 1009 W. Main St., Boise, 208336-6998. OWYHEE PLAZA HOTEL—Allages pool side party with live music from Ben Burdick and Amy Weber, beer flights, food and drink specials. 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com. THE RECORD EXCHANGE—The Record Exchange offers $2 off any used CD or DVD $5.99 or more all day. You are sure to find a rarity in its extensive collection. In the coffee shop, all 12-oz. espresso drinks are $2, and get $2 off any sale gift item over $5.99. FREE. 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com.

22 | JULY 6–12, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Watch out for cat burglars on the Secrets and Lies scavenger hunt.

TAKING SHELTER IN SECRETS AND LIES This First Thursday, bid adieu to the stuffy confinement of gallery walls for a hot sec, and let your inner art lover frolic amid the outdoors. The Boise City Department of Arts and History is offering free tours of its eight new bus transit shelters, which line Main Street and promise to enhance “the experience of pedestrians and downtown bus riders … by providing colorful, unusual artwork to mark the transit shelters, and to provide shade for anyone using them.” Tour-goers will meet on the front steps of City Hall at 4 p.m. on Thursday, July 7, for the first tour, and again at 5 p.m. for the second. Stops include Will Spearman and Melissa “Sasi” Chambers at Eighth and Idaho streets and Capitol Boulevard and Main streets; Shantara Sandberg at Ninth and Main streets; Ben Gin at Eighth and Main streets; Chad Erpelding at Idaho Street and Capitol Boulevard; April VanDeGrift at For more info on Secrets and Ninth and Main streets and Lies, visit indiegogo.com/ Eighth and Idaho streets; and secretsandlies Jennifer Manning-Gilbreath at Eighth and Main streets. The tour will also visit the new city-funded mural, “Strata” by Byron Folwell on Main and Eighth streets. For more info, visit boiseartsandhistory.org. Another way to get your outside on this First Thursday is to follow BW Media Czar Josh Gross’ paper trail. Gross is publicizing his new collection of short stories, Secrets and Lies, with a scavenger hunt, featuring the story “The Curse of the Failed Novel.” “We’re posting [pages] in several places around town, so you can pick up a map and follow it to go read the story,” said Gross. “So it’s like one page here, one page there … At the end you’ve read the whole story.” “The Curse of the Failed Novel” has previously been published in Caveat-Lector and Pathos Lit Magazine and tells the tale of a man who loses friends and lovers each time he gifts them his book. You can pick up Gross’ scavenger hunt map at the Flying M Coffeehouse. —Tara Morgan

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8 DAYS OUT HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL—The cast and crew of starlight Mountain Theatre perform Disney’s much-loved musical. 8 p.m. $10$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

Sports & Fitness

HISTORY FROM THE ASHES— Ben Kemper will recount the history of the fire of 1910 in this performance. Noon-3 p.m. $3$5. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-368-6080, history. idaho.gov/oldpen.html.

Citizen

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25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

BOISE HAWKS BASEBALL— See Thursday. 7:15 p.m. $7$12. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks. com.

WALK A MILE IN HER SHOES— Show support for victims of sexual assault. Men, as well as women, are encouraged to wear high heels. The walk will begin at FACES and end at Boise Art Museum. There will be a limited number of large heels for men to borrow. Email jeff@engagingvoices.org to register. 11:30 a.m. FREE. FACES, 417 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-577-4400, adaweb. net/adacountyfaces.aspx.

Food & Drink IDAHO BREWER’S FESTIVAL—Breweries from all over the state celebrate locally brewed suds. Enjoy food from local restaurants, live music and more during the three-day festival. See Picks, Page 16. 5-9 p.m. $20 single day package, $5 gate admission only, FREE kids 12 and younger. Lakeview Park, 1227 East Orson F. Persons Court, Nampa, crescentbeer. com.

SATURDAY JULY 9 Festivals & Events CELEBRACION: MASQUERADE AND SERENADE—Go incognito to this masquerade ball. Drink specials and DJs will help make sure you get your groove on. 10 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-5142531, drinkfattys.com.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

KETCHUM ARTS FESTIVAL— See Friday. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Festival Meadows, Sun Valley Road, Ketchum, 208309-1960, ketchumartsfestival. com. LAVENDER FESTIVAL— U-pick lavender, food, beverages, music, homemade lavender products and make-your-own-lavender crafts. There will also be culinary and educational classes, plants to purchase and horse-drawn wagon rides. See Picks, Page 17. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE, Lakeside Lavender Farm, 1003 W. Locust Lane, Nampa, 208-466-0523, lakesidelavender.com. NINTH ANNUAL NORTHWEST MOTORFEST—Roll back time during this classic car show. Visit rpmprod.com for more info. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. $7. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com.

On Stage CABARET—See Friday. 8 p.m. $18-$65. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. CHUCKLES COMEDY CABARET—Featuring hot young newbies and established stand-up comedians. 8 p.m. $12. China Blue, 100 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-9515. CIRCLE MIRROR TRANSFORMATION—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$30. Company of Fools, 409 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-788-6520, companyoffools. org. SUN VALLEY ICE SHOW—Featuring Alissa Czisny. 9:45 p.m. $54-$102. Sun Valley Resort, 1 Sun Valley Road, Sun Valley, 208-622-4111, sunvalley.com. 25TH ANNUAL PUTNAM COUNTY SPELLING BEE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $15-$20. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

Food & Drink IDAHO BREWER’S FESTIVAL—See Friday. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. and Sun., July 10, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $20 single-day package, $5 gate admission only, FREE kids 12 and younger. Lakeview Park, 1227 East Orson F. Persons Court, crescentbeer.com.

Workshops & Classes

| EASY |

MEDIUM | HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

SECOND SATURDAY SERIES: BEE KEEPING—Learn about keeping bees, taste local honey and participate in related craft projects and activities. Visit boiseenvironmentaleducation. org for more info. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-514-3755, cityofboise.org/ parks/foothills. TURNING WATER INTO GOLD— Learn about the brewing process, followed by a discussion and beer tasting. 7 p.m. $20 Idaho Botanical Garden members, $25 nonmember. Sockeye Grill and Brewery, 3019 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-658-1533, sockeyebrew.com.

BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 23


8 DAYS OUT Sports & Fitness

On Stage

BOISE HAWKS BASEBALL— See Thursday. 7:15 p.m. $7$12. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks. com.

CABARET—See Friday. 8 p.m. $18-$65. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Farmers Markets CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, 208-345-9287, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. KUNA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-noon. Bernard Fisher Memorial Park, Swan Falls Road and Avalon St., Kuna. MERIDIAN FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Located in the Crossroads shopping center at Eagle and Fairview roads, meridianfarmersmarket.com. MIDDLETON FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Located in Roadside Park at the corner of Highway 44 and S. Middleton Road, middletonfarmersmarket. webs.com. NAMPA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Located on Front Street and 14th Avenue South in Lloyd’s Square, nampafarmersmarket.com.

Odds & Ends RECORD SKINNY-DIP AND OPEN HOUSE—Help beat the skinny-dip record and enjoy water volleyball, hot dogs and more during this open house at the local nudist club. Pre-register at bareidaho.com. 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. FREE.

SUNDAY JULY 10 Festivals & Events

MONDAY JULY 11 On Stage PLAYS FROM THE ALLEY—Summer reading series. Purchase tickets at brownpapertickets.com. 8 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Food & Drink IDAHO BREWER’S FESTIVAL—See Friday. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $20 single-day package, $5 gate admission only, FREE kids 12 and younger. Lakeview Park, 1227 East Orson F. Persons Court, Nampa, crescentbeer. com.

Workshops & Classes HOME CANNING DONE SAFELY—Learn canning techniques, equipment, product preparation, acidity and altitude adjustment. 7 p.m. $10 members, $15 nonmembers. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS BASEBALL— See Thursday. 7:15 p.m. $7$12. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks. com.

Sports & Fitness BOISE HAWKS BASEBALL— See Thursday. 7:15 p.m. $7$12. Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks. com.

Farmers Markets EAST END MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Bown Crossing, Bown Street, end of Parkcenter Boulevard, Boise.

Kids & Teens

Animals & Pets

ORIGAMI—Kids are invited to learn the Japanese tradition of paper folding. 10:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, adalib.org.

IDAHO MILITARY FAMILY DAY—Military families can enjoy the zoo and hamburgers, hot dogs, chips and drinks. 5:308:30 p.m. FREE. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208384-4125, zooboise.org.

Odds & Ends

INDEPENDENCE DAY BLACK DOG WALK—Bring your own dog and walk to raise awareness of the plight of black dogs and cats in shelters. Visit snipidaho.org for more info. Noon. FREE. The Ram, 709 E. Park Blvd., Boise, 208-345-2929, theram.com.

BOISE UKULELE GROUP—All levels welcome with no age limit and no membership fees. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Meadow Lakes Village Senior Center, 650 Arbor Circle, Meridian.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

KETCHUM ARTS FESTIVAL— See Friday. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Festival Meadows, Sun Valley Road, Ketchum, 208309-1960, ketchumartsfestival. com. LAVENDER FESTIVAL— See Saturday. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Lakeside Lavender Farm, 1003 W. Locust Lane, Nampa, 208-466-0523, lakesidelavender.com. NINTH ANNUAL NORTHWEST MOTORFEST—See Saturday. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $7. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, expoidaho.com.

Concerts A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S SERENADE—The Sun Valley Opera will perform famous arias and popular songs accompanied by a 25-piece orchestra. 8 p.m. $25-$75 general, $125 Diva Tickets. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley, sunvalley.com. Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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8 DAYS OUT TUESDAY JULY 12 On Stage THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA—Valentine and Proteus’ friendship is put to the test in this comedy by the Bard. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. THE WIZARD OF OZ—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $10$24, 208-462-5523, Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

Workshops & Classes

Citizen

Kids & Teens

SUNSET SERIES: BITS AND PIECES—Create artwork using pieces of cut tumbled glass with local artist Reham Aarti. 7-8:30 p.m. $15. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-514-3755, cityofboise.org/parks/foothills.

BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT VOLUNTEER NIGHT— Volunteers may donate their time to help build and repair bicycles for those in need. 6-8 p.m. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

KID’S MAKE AND TAKE—A science and art program for children ages 6 and older held in The Secret Garden. 4 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2941, gardencity.lili.org.

Literature

Farmers Markets

BOISE NOVEL ORCHARD—Writers meet to edit and encourage each other’s work. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—5-8 p.m. Located on the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library.

MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP—Young designers, inventors and engineers can bring their creations to life with Legos. Bring a shoebox full of your own if you’ve got them. Some will be provided for you if you don’t. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

Literature PARTNERS IN CRIME BOOK GROUP—Join the group for discussion regarding writing and reading mystery, suspense and true crime literature. 7 p.m. FREE. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 1315 N. Milwaukee St., Boise, 208-375-4454, barnesandnoble.com.

Talks & Lectures CHOCOLATE: FOOD FOR THE GODS—Call to register for this Summer Lecture Series discussion about the natural and cultural history of chocolate, followed by sampling different varieties of the sweet stuff. 7 p.m. FREE members, $5 nonmembers. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Odds & Ends BEER PONG TOURNEY—Eight tables set up for play, $4 pitchers and a $300 cash prize. What more could you ask for? 10 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-514-2531, drinkfattys.com. BOOZE CLUES—Trivia and prizes with the one and only E.J. Pettinger. 9 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344. STAND-UP COMEDY NIGHT—Test out your routine on patrons during open mic night, hosted by Danny Amspacher. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430. PABST BINGO NIGHT—Play bingo for PBR, swag and other random stuff found at second-hand stores. $1 PBR, Oly, or Rainier cans, or get a “ghetto bucket” (two of each) for $4. 7 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008.

WEDNESDAY

JULY 13 Festivals & Events ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Unwind mid-week with friends, live music and a cold beverage during this family friendly concert series. 5 p.m. FREE, The Grove, downtown, Boise, downtownboise.org.

On Stage GENERATION ME COMEDY SHOW—Featuring 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th, Boise, 208-3430886, neurolux.com. HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL—See Friday. 8 p.m. $10$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middlefork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com. THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA—See Tuesday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

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LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY JULY 6

THE THROWDOWN: WEEK 1—Featuring The Well Suited, The Gunfighters and Unto The Legions. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid

ALIVE AFTER FIVE: HONEY ISLAND SWAMP BAND—With Thomas Paul. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove

WILSON ROBERTS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

BLACK TOOTH GRIN, JULY 8, KFCH Local band Black Tooth Grin has something to smile about and a reason to celebrate: its new album Psycle. Psycle is the culmination of BTG’s nearly nine years of existence. It’s only the band’s third full-length and sounds like something that has been nurtured until its creators felt it was good and ready. BTG’s classic swampy Southern rock/ metal sound reverberates through every track, but Psycle is a concept album dealing with ”birth, life, struggles and death— things all humans go through,” according to BTG frontman Justin Arthur. All four band members contributed to the songwriting, giving the tracks a connective tissue. From heartbeat-thumping bass lines, drum beats like heavy footsteps, Arthur’s punishing but peaceful vocals and guitarist Jeremy Schmidt’s mastery of knowing when to slay a riff and when to pull back, Psycle is a good reason for BTG to throw a party. —Amy Atkins With Elite, Workin’ On Fire and Xex, 8 p.m., $6. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212

26 | JULY 6–12, 2011 | BOISEweekly

GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

THURSDAY THUNDER: YO MAMA’S BIG FAT BOOTY BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Edwards Stadium 22 Plaza

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

FRIDAY JULY 8

BILL COFFEY AND BERNIE REILLY—7 p.m. FREE. The Modern

BLACK TOOTH GRIN—With Elite, Workin’ on Fire and Xex. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory

DOWNTOWN NAMPA NIGHTS: THE CHANCELLORS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square

JESSICA FULGHUM—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE: BIG WOW—6:30 p.m. $7 members, $10 general. IBG

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

HENRY TURNER JR.—9 p.m. FREE. Reef

KARMEN WOLFE ENSEMBLE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KEVIN KIRK—With Steve Eaton and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

NEKO CASE—8 p.m. $25-$55. Knitting Factory

KISSING PARTY—With Atomic Mama and Talk Math to Me. 8 p.m. $5. VAC

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

THE RIZING TIDE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

THURSDAY JULY 7

JAM NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

RIZING TIDE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

THE SCOTT PEMBERTON TRIO—9:45 p.m. FREE. Liquid

LAST BAND STANDING—9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s REBECCA SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

BLAZE AND KELLY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

A TASTY JAMM—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire TRUNK UP BENEFIT CONCERT—Featuring Owlright, Talk Math to Me, Junior Rocket Scientist, Atomic Mama, Sleepy Seeds, Field Guide, Dark Swallows, Finn Riggins and more. See Picks, Page 16. 4 p.m. $5. VAC

SATURDAY JULY 9 AN EVENING WITH STEVE EATON—5-9 p.m. $15, $10 with canned food donation. IBG

KAYLEIGH JACK—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

BLUE DOOR FOUR—7:30 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

CAMDEN HUGHES—With the Cheryl Morrell Trio. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

PHILLY’S PHUNKESTRA—10 p.m. $5. Reef PINTO BENNETT AND THE FAMOUS MOTEL COWBOYS REUNION— Featuring the Lemmon Family, Kole Moulton and Lonely Road, Kip Attaway Band, Blind Driver, Pinto Bennett and Famous Motel Cowboys and Rocci Johnson and Pinto Bennet. See Picks, Page 16. 6 p.m. $10. Hannah’s

CRAVING DAWN—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FLEET STREET KLEZMER—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid HINDERSHOT—With The Well Suited and Shipshape. 8 p.m. $5. VAC

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE JIMMY BIVENS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s MIKE PINTO—With Echo Movement. 10 p.m. $5. Reef

NIT GRIT—10 p.m. $7. Reef THE VAN PAEPEGHEM TRIO—5 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

MONDAY

CAMDEN HUGHES—With Cheryl Morrell and Clark Sommers. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CAMDEN HUGHES—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JEFF MOLL AND GUESTS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

RUSS PFEIFER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

THE NEW TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

JULY 11

SONS OF THUNDER MOUNTAIN—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

JESSICA FULGHUM—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

PINTO BENNETT AND THE FAMOUS MOTEL COWBOYS REUNION— Featuring Reilly Coyote, Joshua Tree, Claudia Williams, John Hansen and Pinto Bennett and Famous Motel Cowboys. See Picks, Page 16. 6 p.m. $10. Hannah’s

BROCK BARTEL—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

TERRI EBERLEIN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

LARRY BUTTEL—7 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

UBER TUESDAY—Featuring We Are the Willows. 8 p.m. FREE. VAC

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

REBECCA SCOTT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WARNER DRIVE—See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory

NOW OR NEVER TOUR—Featuring Mr. P Chill, Luis, Mike Colossal and DJ EOL. 8 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid REX MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

SUNDAY

THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JULY 10 BELLA RUSE—With Like a Rocket. 9:45 p.m. FREE. Liquid GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MUSIC FROM STANLEY: BEARFOOT—4 p.m. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge

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TUESDAY JULY 12

KARMEN WOLFE ENSEMBLE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Blue Door KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

WEDNESDAY JULY 13 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: JOHN NEMETH—With Hokum Hi-Flyers. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire THE AVETT BROTHERS—With Jessica Lea Mayfield. 7 p.m. $25-$40. Sun Valley Pavilion

MAYHEM FESTIVAL—Featuring Disturbed, Godsmack, Megadeath, Machine Head, In Flames, Trivium and more. 12:30 p.m. $45-$49.50. Idaho Center REBECCA SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper SOUL SERENE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub THE THROWDOWN: WEEK 2—Featuring Celebration, The Associates and Tyler Jakes and The Bootleggers. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

WARNER DRIVE, JULY 9, KFCH Los Angelesbased band Warner Drive looks like a punk band, but isn’t. NOFX is vocalist and WD founder Jonathan “Jonny Law” Lawrence Jonah’s “favorite band of all time.” And WD’s new release, K-GO!, got its name from a NOFX song. “But we aren’t punk ... we’re a rock band with a punk edge,” Jonah said. K-GO! is a tonguein-cheek concept album about a pirate radio station in which the DJs play whatever the hell they want. Jonah said his band is DIY, refusing to relinquish control to a label, regardless of how lucrative the offer. And WD grew a Boise fanbase by being regulars at 1332’s Punk Mondays at Liquid (something, Jonah said, that angered punk purists). “We write for the masses ... We want as many people as possible listening to our music,” Jonah said. And plenty are. WD packed Hollywood’s Roxy Theater recently and WD fans are wildly loyal: a large number of them sport tattoos of the band’s logo and members’ autographs. —Amy Atkins

B3 SIDE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye BLACK FRANCIS—8 p.m. $18 adv., $20 door. Neurolux

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

With The Meatballs, 3rd To Last, Roofied Resistance, 8 p.m., $6. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212.

BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 27


LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

HEAD-GAME HORROR CABLE ONE MOVIE NIGHT—Take lawn chairs, snacks, blankets and the entire family to watch a flick on an inflatable screen in the park every Friday night at dusk. The movie this week is Nanny McPhee Returns, rated PG. Friday, July 8, FREE, Settler’s Park, corner of Meridian and Ustick roads, Meridian, meridiancity.org/movienight. HARRY POTTER MOVIE MARATHON— Catch all of the Harry Potter movies on the big screen this week, leading up to the premiere of Harry Potter and Deathly Hallows Part 2 on Friday, July 15. There are two movies per night beginning Monday, July 11, through Wednesday, July 13. The first part of Deathly Hallows will play on Thursday, July 14. See Picks, Page 17. 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. $5 each, $30 for series. Edwards Stadium 9, 760 Broad St., Boise, 208-338-3821, regmovies.com.

THE IDAHO BUCKAROO PROJECT—Idaho premiere and sneak peek of the documentary Buck, preceded by a no-host reception where you can meet buckaroos in traditional garb and Andrea Scott, the author of the upcoming book about the buckaroo lifestyle. Proceeds to benefit the Idaho Buckaroo Project. Thursday, July 7, 6-8:45 p.m. $12. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3424222, theflicksboise.com. THIRTY PROOF COIL—Boise premiere of the locally made horror film starring Calico Cooper, who will sign autographs after the film. See Screen, this page. Saturday, July 9, 7 p.m. $10. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. TOSCA—Verdi’s tragic opera is the third filmedlive performance in the Cinema Meets Culture Series. Sunday, July 10, 2:30-5 p.m. $9. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

JEREMIAH ROBERT WIERENGA No one would argue that the Idaho filmmaking duo of producer Andrew Ellis and writer/ director Will Schmeckpeper isn’t prolific. With six full-length features in seven years (including Pizza Man vs. The Dude and The Highly Contested Election for Payette County Sheriff), the two have consistently hit the mark in creating humorous, exuberant flicks that embrace the DIY spirit of independent Calico Cooper may have cut the apron strings, but it looks like she traded them in for chains. film. And they’re getting faster at it. Their latest production, the horror thriller Thirty on screen for nearly every second of the film’s psychic chimeras and one very large, very Proof Coil, was shot in only six days. 120-minute running time, and there’s not a toothy Shaggy Man. It’s a battle of wits, grit Filmed in and around Boise and New wasted moment. She delivers a sucker-punch of and grim grotesqueness that plays out—effecPlymouth in 2010, it’s a sly cinematic treat a performance, with bristling physicality and a tively—within a 30-foot radius. anchored with a solid lead performance, desperate charm as she cheekily considers how “I liked the idea of tongue-in-cheek pop taking a smart woman Bruce Campbell or Alice Cooper might conculture references and Thirty Proof Coil screens on Saturday, July 9, who just so happens to front their captor. McCullough, a longtime Ela blood-pumping story at 7 p.m. The filmmakers and the actors will lis and Schmeckpeper collaborator, provides a find herself in a lousy that embraces the ball be available after the film. Tickets are $10 measured, appropriately emotionless showing situation and then has and chain of a low and available at the Egyptian box office or that gives ballast to Cooper’s frenetic energy. to think her way out budget. through thirtyproofcoil.com. Like their 2010 adventure Vagabond Lane, of it,” said SchmeckRock ’n’ roll progeEGYPTIAN THEATRE Thirty Proof Coil demonstrates the indomipeper. “That’s why it ny Calico Cooper—her 700 W. Main St. 208-345-0454 table independence of Idaho cinema: less slick was such a roll of the father is Alice—plays egyptiantheatre.net dice to cast Calico sight studio production values, more earnest enthuThe Woman, a gutsy siasm for clever camera work and great stories. unseen. She had to naturalist taken from “I would hope that Idahoans would recogcarry this movie, and her tent during a solo nize that there are good movies grown here by camping trip and chained to a post in a remote any lesser of an actress wouldn’t have brought local people,” says Schmeckpeper. “People that barn by The Man (Tate S. McCullough). What enough game to do so.” they can actually interact with, even become Cooper, who came to the project after follows is five days of intense captivity, where part of the process with.” Schmeckpeper sent her an unsolicited email, is The Woman must battle The Man, her own

SCREEN/THE TUBE there is A&E’s Hoarders and Intervention, History Channel’s Ice Road Truckers, Fox’s Hell’s Kitchen and Someday, an in-depth analysis of the AmeriLifetime’s Project Runway. Each of can psyche will reveal the reasons, but until those has an exploitative angle, but then, millions of us will continue to wonder why they seem to be trying to help or we tune in to new reality TV shows and after inform—at least on Project Runway doing so, why we don’t poke our own eyes out and Hell’s Kitchen, the contestants or throw a baseball bat through the screen (or have to do something and prove they turn the damn TV off). have a talent. So it’s not all bleak. We tune into Bridezillas, The Real HouseOr maybe it is. wives of Wherever and America’s Karaoke In June, E! premiered its newest Challenge. Not only do we tune in, we stay contribution to the realtuned in. We allow the words ity TV stew: Ice Loves “On the second season of Jersey Coco. It shows rapper/ For a list of this sumShore ...” to reach our ears. But actor Ice-T and his overmer’s reality TV, visit this summer, when a slew of realityblurred.com. ly endowed model wife sludgy reality shows hit the air, it Coco in their day-to-day won’t be all bad. lives. She cleans the house, talks For every VH1 Tough Love— about pleasing her man and makes lunch. He Steve Ward tells “single, attractive women goes around dropping pearls of wisdom like, “If composed of classic female archetypes” what you take the ‘n’ off nice, you get Ice, baby.” they’re doing wrong when it comes to dating—

REALITY TV AND A BASEBALL BAT: ALL-AMERICAN PASTIME

Opening

HORRIBLE BOSSES—Three frustrated employees (Jason Bateman, Charlie Day and Jason Sudeikis) hatch a plot to kill off their over-the-top bosses (Jennifer Aniston, Kevin Spacey and Colin Farrell). (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 29

28 | JULY 6–12, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Local film, Thirty Proof Coil, illustrates the colors of Calico

Ice may love Coco, but I hate myself for watching it.

They obviously love each other, which is sweet, but it’s like a train wreck you can’t stop staring at. I’m going to go get my bat. —Amy Atkins WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


LISTINGS/SCREEN NEW DVD RELEASE/SCREEN

ZOOKEEPER—Kevin James stars as a zookeeper who is on the hunt for a mate. When he decides that he must quit his job at the zoo in order to find someone, the zoo animals decide to lend a paw. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 28

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code.

HOBO WITH A SHOTGUN

BOY MEETS WORLD: SEASON SIX

The title says it all. Rutger Hauer is known only as “the hobo” in Hope Town—a corrupt city controlled by the criminals. Instead of getting back on his feet by begging for money and minding his own business, the hobo purchases a shotgun and becomes a vigilante bent on bringing justice to the city. The movie was originally a fake film trailer: It was produced for an international contest to promote the release of Quentin Tarantino and Robert Rodriguez’s double feature Grindhouse. After winning first prize, Hobo with a Shotgun, directed by Jason Eisener, was expanded into a feature film that was released in Canada and the United States.

ABC created a classic in the ’90s when it introduced adolescents Cory Matthews (Ben Savage), Shawn Hunter (Rider Strong), Topanga Lawrence (Danielle Fishel) and teacher/principal/professor Mr. Feeny (William David Daniels). The seven-season show was a guidebook to surviving middle school, high school and beyond. The sixth season is the introduction to college life. Cory and Topanga are engaged, Shawn has ups and downs in his own love life, and Mr. Feeny is there to lend advice when needed. You can watch late-night reruns of the show, but this collection allows immediate access to freshman-year melodrama. —Elizabeth Duffy

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

WEB/SCREEN MISFITS FITS RIGHT IN Misfits, which is now available on Hulu, is the tale of a group of five 20-something petty criminals sent to do community ser vice. The miscreants are hit by lightning during a freak electrical storm, and slowly begin to realize that the blast of electricity gave them powers. Think the show Heroes, but better. Each delinquent has a power that he or she doesn’t necessarily want, but is a grand exaggeration of his or her personality or most heartfelt desire: the ability to turn back time, hear peoples’ thoughts or become invisible. their way stateside. The show originally It sounds like the plot of a comic book, aired on E4, a UK channel known for its dr y and the show has its silly mohumor and American imports of ments, but Misfits is incredibly shows like Friends, Glee and The Visit hulu.com to smart. Classic British humor laySopranos. watch Misfits. ered on quick-witted dialogue and A new episode from the first dark stor ylines make for a show season is available on hulu.com that’s difficult to stop watching. ever y Monday. Misfits crossed the pond to America after —Brady Moore thousands of illegal pirated versions found WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 29


NEWS/FOOD FOOD/YEAR OF IDAHO FOOD

FLYING M SOLD TO NEW OWNER During the Flying M’s typical morning rush, a sleepy line snakes around coffee beans and knickknacks and out the downtown coffee shop’s door. But on July 1, one thing was different—former owner Lisa Myers was one of the patient masses waiting in line for a latte. “It’s funny; Teresa was hesitating even ringing me up,” said Myers, from the customer side of the counter. Myers, who opened the Flying M Coffeehouse with husband Kevin in 1992, officially sold the Boise coffee hotspot to longtime employee Kent Collins on June 30. The Myers felt it was time to focus their energy on the Flying M location in Nampa. “The kids are starting to go off to college; our second one leaves this fall,” said Myers. “It just felt like the timing was right, we could pull back a little bit, concentrate on Nampa.” But longtime Flying M devotees can rest easy: The transition should go largely unnoticed. “We’ll keep the consistency; nothing should change really because [Collins is] still buying Flying M beans, which we roast in Nampa, and then we’ll be doing our advertising together and our logo stuff together,” said Myers. According to Collins, owning the M has been a longtime dream. “In October I will have been here 12 years,” said Collins. “At about year 10, [Myers] made a little joke about selling the place one day, and I called ‘dibs.’” But Collins plans to maintain the Flying M’s long-running traditions—rotating monthly art shows will still be organized by Jerms Laningham and John Warfel, and the M will continue to host Valentines for AIDS. “I think this place is amazing, and I want to keep it that way. Maybe a couple of new chairs and tables would be nice, but other than that, everything else will stay just the same,” said Collins. “I would never buy this place and then change it.” Surveying his new domain, Collins flashed a smile filled with nervous excitement and almost palpable pride before returning to man the espresso machine. “I’m not sure if it’s really sunk in yet,” Collins said. “I signed all the bank papers and everything, but so far, it just seems like a regular shift.” —Tara Morgan

30 | JULY 6–12, 2011 | BOISEweekly

GU Y HAND

The Myers’ are gone, butt not forgotten.

GROWING A NEW CRAPPIE OF LOCAVORES IDFG is angling to get folks fishing GUY HAND A mouth-watering aroma drifted out of an industrial warehouse behind the Jerome Fish and Game office. “Make sure you’ve got your cholesterol meds on board,” grinned Ed Papenberg, a The Idaho Department of Fish and Game aims to hook new fishing fans at its annual fish fry. senior wildlife technician for the Idaho Department of Fish and Game’s Magic Valley nowned for the sport—and this might come no licenses are required, and participates Region, as he entered a doorway into what in a national program called Trout in the as a surprise to some—fishing is falling out looked like a coven of Macbethian witches Classroom where children are taught to of favor. The most recent survey conducted toiling in dim light over a half-dozen bubraise trout in classroom aquariums. The bling caldrons. But the scent was less eye of by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service found that between 1996 and 2006 the number of department also runs casting clinics for newt than deep-fried, down-home fish fry. Idahoans who fished fell by a precipitous 28 groups like scout troops, and it operates a “This is the second year we’ve done fishing trailer that employees pull to fishing percent. this,” Papenberg said of a free public feed areas to loan equipment to budding anglers. “It is surprising,” Papenberg said in a christened the Annual Magic Valley SportsPapenberg estimates that, through these slightly crestfallen voice. “In fact, when we men’s Fish Fry, Chips and Tips. “And it’s programs, the Magic Valley Fish and Game go into the classrooms in the Magic Valley basically an event where we invite folks in office offered fishing assistance to nearly and ask middle-school students to tell us if the community to come and enjoy fish that 3,000 people in 2010. they’ve ever done any fishing, it’s a surpriswere raised or caught locally.” In IDFG’s main building, the fish fry ing number of students who don’t raise Fishing isn’t often considered in terms was in full swing. Dozens of people sat at their hands.” of the local food movement—and the word Idahoans turning away from their storied long tables, dousing mounds of fried catfish locavore wasn’t uttered at the fish fry. That and crappie with ketchup as others wiped trout streams, lakes and reservoirs reflects doesn’t mean the two don’t coincide. a national trend. America lost a total of 5.2 dessert from their lips and wandered over “Hunting and angling really fits with to the instructional booths that lined the million anglers between 1996 and 2006, a this whole notion of finding sustenance room. One booth offered tips on steelhead national drop of 15 percent. close to home and finding sustenance that rigging, another on fly tying, another on fish “Luckily some of these surveys do adyou have a hand in procuring,” Papenberg filleting. said. “Although we don’t state it in this fish dress the various demographic and ecoSteve Money manned a display showing nomic factors that influence this trend,” fry—‘welcome locavores’—that’s actually people how to catch crappie. Papenberg said. implicit in a lot of what we’re doing.” “This is a good event, especially for Surveys show that access is a factor that Along with chunks of spiced and breaded young fishermen and families that haven’t contributes to lower numbers of people Idaho crappie, catfish and carp—or “Asian who fish. As more Americans flock to cities, fished in Idaho,” he said. “We have walleye, sweetfish” as the Fish and Game employees they move farther away from easy-to-get-to we have crappie, we have perch, we have manning the deep fryers jokingly called bass. It’s a fantastic state to fish in and hunting and fishing spots. It’s not easy to it—the crew carefully lowered french fries people just don’t realize it,” he said. cast a few flies after work when you live and golf ball-sized hush puppies into the According to a Fish and Game manual, three-hours from the nearest fishing hole. shimmering oil. Those same 15 caldronDemographics also play a role, especially there are close to 25 fishable species across tending employees helped catch much of the state. However, the manual also menthe 75 pounds of crappie they were cooking in rural states like Idaho. tions a few words of caution about eating “Our hunters and our anglers in this plus another 50 pounds of fish donated and fish. Idaho fish contain mercury. The older country, by and large, are the baby boomer bought from local fish farms. and larger the fish, the higher its mercury generation,” Papenberg said. “As that “We also use the fish fry as a way to generation is aging, we’re not content. Therefore, the recommendation is introduce people to angling,” to limit eating large fish like walleye to once replacing them with people said Papenberg, a dark-beardwho have interests in outdoor a month, medium fish like bass to every two ed, avid fisherman. For more information, visit weeks and small fish, like the fish fry’s crappursuits.” More often than That’s where the “Tips” fishandgame.idaho.gov. pie, to two times a week. not, he suggested, we’re part of title came in. Fish and At the fly fishing booth, a 5-year-old girl a country fishing for our Game not only provided free iPhones and remote controls. named Kelly was explaining what she’d just food, but also invited several learned to her two younger brothers. That’s why IDFG runs several outreach fishing experts to set up booths around the “Fishies aren’t very smart,” she programs designed to inspire a new gendining hall and offer angling tips to guests. said with a studious nod. “They bite It was all part of the agency’s push to entice eration of fishing enthusiasts. The agency 31 down right on the sparkly things on offers a free fishing day every June, where Idahoans back to fishing. In a state reWWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


CON’T/FOOD DISH/FOOD Restaurants get one chance to hit BW with their best shot. LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

John Berryhill’s lasagna brings home the Bacon.

BACON Berryhill & Co.’s new cafe-style venture is all about the B’s. Bacon is the name of the eatery and its tagline is “breakfast, bistro and bloody marys.” Because I visited at noon on a weekday, opinions on both breakfast and bloody marys will have to wait, but Bacon definitely has the bistro part down. Floor-to-ceiling windows bounce sunbeams off the ochrecolored walls and earth-tone stained concrete floor. The droolinducing glass case features giant muffins that glitter with sugared tops, pastries du jour like strawberry “Pop Tarts” and specialty cakes. And bacon. Plates brimming with locally sourced bacon beckon; Berryhill’s signature strips are flavored with both chile and sugar. Other varieties include the Kurobuta with thyme, sage, rosemary and lavender; apple-smoked turkey; spicy hot; tempeh; pancetta, candied and chocolate-covered. Owner John Berryhill said that he has been working on the different flavors for years and plans to add even more varieties as time goes on. Berryhill added that the concept of Bacon came about because the pork product was always an extremely popular menu item. BACON “I know there’s a trend in 915 W. Idaho St. 208-387-3553 bacon right now, but Bacon has johnberryhillrestaurants.com nothing to do with that,” Berryhill said. “I’ve been cooking bacon since 1995.” Menu items—sandwiches, egg dishes and salads—are served a la carte and bacon is sold by the strip. The bacon lasagna ($7.95) was served solo and didn’t need a salad assist. Tender, not-too-thick pasta was an unobtrusive foundation for fresh, well-seasoned ingredients. Lasagna can easily be overpowered by too much ricotta, but it’s a requisite for the dish. A conservative amount of the curd cheese kept Bacon’s dish classic and added both traditional taste and texture. Salty chunks of ham and bacon and a generous helping of earthy mushrooms dotted every forkful and a piquant oily marinara atop jack, cheddar and parmesan added a toothsome acidity while a chevre bechamel sauce gave it creaminess. Add in we-treat-everyone-like-family service, and if the word charming started with a B, it would belong in Bacon’s tagline. Boxing half of the dish was a necessity to avoid a desktop nap. However, the leftovers didn’t sit long enough to even get cold. The siren call of bacon and bechamel proved too great, and soon the little waxed brown box was empty except for a smear of bright red sauce. Berryhill may be all about the B’s, but the bistro’s bacon lasagna gets an A. —Amy Atkins WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

the hooks and it hooks under their lip and then they get caught and that’s how you catch a fish.” “Clever,” said her brother Andrew as he leaned in on tiptoes to get a closer look at the bright orange fly a volunteer was tying. Papenberg thinks children like those three are the future of fishing. At that age, he said, the impulse to fish is nearly innate. “You’ll see it in a little kid who’s never done it before,” Papenberg said. “They toss out a bobber and the trout bites and the bobber goes under the water and the excitement is just there. You don’t have to teach it.” After Papenberg and I sat down to fried catfish and hushpuppies, I asked him why—apart from the revenues IDFG gets from selling fishing licenses—he thought it so important to devote so much agency energy to keep people dangling hooks into water. Giving his beard a thoughtful stroke, it didn’t take Papenberg long to cast his reply well beyond the recreational reasons IDFG might cite. Like Herman Melville, Henry David Thoreau, Ernest Hemingway, Norman Maclean, David James Duncan and so many articulate fishermen before, Papenberg reeled in his answer from a much deeper metaphysical fishing hole. “You know, I don’t want to take it further than some people might be comfortable,” he said, “but it’s almost spiritual. We’re filling our lives with virtual experiences, but these [fishing experiences] are real experiences, they’re tangible, they’re right in front of you. They focus you intensely in the here and now, and for that reason alone I love it.” He paused as he looked around the room and then added, “I think a lot of people can get something out of that.” 30

BOISEweekly | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 31


FOOD/NEWS FOOD/WINE SIPPER

Find out what the beekeeping buzz is all about.

FOOD-RELATED WORKSHOPS Following in the footsteps of medieval alchemists, Sockeye master brewer Josh King will show folks how to Turn Water into Gold on Saturday, July 9. After learning about styles of beer, participants will sample Sockeye’s brews. The class starts at 1 p.m., which should give you plenty of time to sleep off Friday night’s experiment turning beer into a hangover. The class meets at Sockeye, 3019 N. Cole Road, and costs $20 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and $25 for non-members. For more info or to register, call 208-658-1533. While bacteria can help create good things, like beer, under the wrong conditions, it can also lead to bad things, like botulism. That’s why Idaho Botanical Garden is hosting Home Canning Done Safely, on Monday, July 11, at 7 p.m. Food safety advisers from the University of Idaho will help attendees understand proper canning techniques. The course costs $10 for IBG members and $15 for non-members, and students will meet in the Idaho Botanical Garden Cottage. For more information, call 208-343-8649. If you’re tired of supporting big agri-bees-ness and you want to learn how to Winnie the Pooh some honey from your own hive of bees, the Foothills Learning Center has you covered. On Saturday, July 9, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., it’s offering a course on the benefits of Backyard Beekeeping. Attendees will get to sample local honey and work on craft projects. Admission is free and no preregistration is required. For more information, call 208-514-3755 or visit bee. cityofboise.org/foothills. —Tara Morgan

32 | JULY 6–12, 2011 | BOISEweekly

SUMMER REDS Summer is barbecue season, and beer is the fortified beverage of choice. But what’s a person to do if he or she prefers a glass of wine? It’s something of a dilemma—beyond fish, the food that comes off the grill typically goes best with a glass of red. Unfortunately, the summer heat makes most red wines unappealing—but there are exceptions. Look for lighter, fruit-driven wines, ones that can be served slightly chilled. The three that topped the latest tasting are classic examples of good summer reds. 2009 DUPEUBLE BEAUJOLAIS, $14.99 In Beaujolais, located in the south of France’s Burgundy region, the gamay noir grape rules, producing a fruit-driven wine that’s both light and lovely. This wine opens with bright red fruit aromas backed by subtle rose petal, smoke and earth. Ripe cherry fruit flavors are matched by soft, food-friendly acidity, making this wine a great choice for your backyard barbecue. 2007 STARRY NIGHT ZINFANDEL, SONOMA, $17.99 What could be a better match for the all-American barbecue than this all-American grape? Unfortunately, the modern trend for zin has been toward big, jammy, high-alcohol wines better suited for sipping in front of a winter fireplace. Happily, this wine has all the smooth blueberry and dark cherry fruit that makes zin so appealing, but with the light touch and balance that is too often missing. Open a bottle of this and light up the grill. 2009 VALDELANA TEMPRANILLO, $8.99 This tempranillo from the Rioja region of Spain is blended with 5 percent viura, a white wine grape. Classified as a joven or young wine, it’s a style that emphasizes fresh fruit flavors. The Valdelana offers lots of sweet and spicy fruit on the nose with a touch of vanilla. Soft and round in the mouth, the palate is all supple cherry fruit. This is a definite bargain. —David Kirkpatrick

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BW RENTAL NORTHEND CHARMER Available Aug. 15. 4BD, 1.5BA. charming two story North End home near 26th & Hill Rd. 15 acres. This immaculate 1815 sq. ft. home borders the foothill trails. Non-smokers only, dogs negotiable, credit report and references required, sorry no cats. $1100/ mo., $600 dep. & first month’s rent due at lease signing. Lease length negotiable. 208-608-1032.

BW FOR SALE BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED HOME Wonderful 2BD, 2BA. 1995 Fleetwood mobile home located in the desirable Ponderosa Mobile Home Park, 2725 N. Five Mile Rd. Space 15. Really nice landscaped home features covered porch and patio. Includes washer, dryer, stove, refrigerator and outdoor storage shed. Convenient to public transportation, retail, grocery, banking and more! Home has gone thru the Idaho Power Energy House Call Program. Call Deborah with Idaho Properties at 208-484-0752 for a showing. See virtual tour at www.tourfactory.com/754891. Priced to sell at $23,500.

BW SERVICES REAL ESTATE LOANS Idaho based private lending company will provide short-term ,1-2 yrs.,financing on investment real estate. We do not provide loans on primary residences. Call Diane Barker at 208-720-3438.

CAREERS BW HELP WANTED ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. EARN $75-$200 HOUR (Now 25% Off) Media Makeup Artist Training. For Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. 1 wk class. Learn & build Portfolio. Details at: http://www.AwardMakeUpSchool.com/ 310-364-0665. $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com NOW HIRING The ID Dept. of Finance is seeking a full-time IT Programmer Analyst, Sr. to join their team. $18.73 -$26.17/hr. DOE. Apply online at dhr.idaho.gov or call 334-2263. Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. homemailerprogram.net FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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OPEN & AFFIRMING CHURCH St. Joseph Reformed Catholic Community is a church which is open & affirming. All are welcomed to celebrate the Mass, participate in the sacraments & in the whole life of the church. Mass is celebrated every Sunday. We are thankful to the community of Boise First United Church of Christ for welcoming us & sharing their space with us. The address is 2201 Woodlawn Avenue in Boise. Just a few blocks south of State Street. Please join us as we celebrate Christ. Parish phone: 9145934 or www.reformedcatholicchurch.org

BW PSYCHIC NEXT STEP AWARENESS Physic reading for $30. For seeing your life for work, love and health. Call Ajna counseling at 863-6864. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

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GROUP WEIGHT LOSS COURSES Group weight loss courses starting soon in Meridian, Eagle, & North Boise. Groups meet one evening/ wk., right after Labor Day, continuing for 12 wks. Cost for individuals $295, or couples $445. $20 discount if registered by July 1st or $10 discount if by Aug. 1st. Class size is strictly limited to 20 participants & spaces fill up fast, so reserve your spot now! One on one coaching is also available any time & starts at just $91.50/mo. Call for more details: 283-2844.

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FO R S ALE BW STUFF 1978 VW BUS Selling the Family Truckster. Haul you & 6 of your friends all over town. Very clean & runs very strong. Nicely tuned & brand new stereo. $5500. Thanks 8415216. ABSTRACT PAINTING Large 6 ft x 3 ft abstract triptych 3-panel painting $60 OBO. Cash only. 208-562-0477. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 8881464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. WARHOL FRAMED PRINT Framed Andy Warhol print ‘Flowers’. Great print modern frame-3 ft x 3 ft. $60 OBO. Cash only. Please call Jan at 208-562-0477.

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9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. 5 PIECE BEDROOM SET $60. Cream colored, gold trim. Queen size head board, dresser, 2 night stand two-drawer dressers & mirror. Phone or text 208-761-6266. LIVING ROOM END TABLE Beveled glass Jade colored green base, approximately 21 inches high. $20. 208-761-6266. RECALL LUNA T-SHIRTS Recall Luna T-shirts in Andrus blue. S - XL. 10 Bucks; XXL XXXL 12 Bucks. Cash only. Call Pete 853-0932. Thanks. TV 27” TV with universal remote. Excellent condition. 208-761-6266. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

MUSIC BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION/OTHER GUITAR LESSONS Beginning to advanced. All music styles. 20+ yrs. experience. Making it affordable to all who want to learn to play. Just $20/hr. Call Mitch 297-7642.

BA RT E R BW HAVE HOUSE TRADE ON OREGON COAST Do you want to experience the winter solitude of a small town on the stormy Oregon coast? We’d love to ski for a few weeks in January or February. House trade may be the answer. Contact: Gary, PO Box 1087, Manzanita, OR 97130 SWAPCAFE.COM Come join us! Trade your stuff, your skills, your inventory. Submit via SwapCafe.Net for personal swaps or SwapCafe.Com for B2B. Good luck trading! Questions Info@SwapCafe.Net

COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS

T RA N S P O RTAT IO N BW 4-WHEELS Junk cars, trucks, vans. Paying up to $200. 208-963-0492.

1981 BOISE HIGH REUNION 1981 Boise High School ‘30th Class Reunion August 5, 6 & 7. Early registration ends July 15th. All details are on the Official 1981 Boise High 30th Class Reunion website: boisehighreunion81. yolasite.com/ AAAA** Donation. Donate Your Car, Boat or Real Estate. IRS Tax Deductible. Free Pick-Up/Tow. Any Model/Condition. Help Under Privileged Children Outreach Center 1-800-419-7474.

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BW LOST LOST TURQUOISE RING Sterling silver, 3 round points on each side of square turquoise stone. Lost in Reserve parking lot trailhead 6/16 noonish. Please email layna03@msn.com if found.

BW GARAGE SALE MOVING/ESTATE SALE 422 W. Thatcher July 8-10, 8-3pm. MANY unique quality items. Follow @danGrad on twitter for a taste of things to come. YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

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ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

IBANEZ: Quiet, indeBOWIE: Senior with one CHAUCER: Dashing pendent lady looking for green eye and one blue, long-haired fellow seeks peaceful home. looking for you. lifelong companion.

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B O I S E W E E K LY BW FUNDRAISERS FIT FOR LIFE CLOTHING DRIVE This year Fit for Life will partner with The Arc to collect clothing items prior to the half marathon on July 9th. Runners will be encouraged to use this as an opportunity to weed out the closet for those items that “no longer fit for life” (due to size, style, bad memories, or whatever!). If you know someone participating in this event, please tell them to bring clothing to donate at the race!

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CUSTOM MAGNETIC SIGNS Great for mobile advertising 24/7. It’s easy to order custom magnetic from same day sign. You can check out the online store, or just print & fill out the fax order form with your idea. Perfect for construction, deliveries, and more. www.samedaysign.net/ Public/Magnetic-Signs.htm OLD HOME MOVIES OR VIDEOS? Give the gift that will bring back all those old memories. Convert old VHS, MINI-DV or 8MM video to DVD. Only $25/2 hrs. Bulk DVD or CD duplication available. Toll free 888-907-1559 or 353-8342. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Anthony Gilberto Carvajal Case No. CV NC 1111476 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Anthony G Carvajal, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, had been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Anthony Cale. The reason for the change in name is: I would like my stepfathers name since he is the one who raised me. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on August 11, 2011 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change.

Housekeeping chemical free. Home & office organizing. Simplicity 830-2911.

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13 Bosses 20 Cry from a balcony 21 ___ pork 22 Many a Nevada resident

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69

80

45

56

68

71

44

60

63

67

19

50

59

62

66

43

55

58

61

18

30

49

53

17

39

41

57

16

35

48 52

29

38

40

15

25

32

36

14

27 Prefix with caching 28 Baja’s opposite 30 Author 31 “Hang on ___!” 32 Locale for a cattail 33 “None of the leading sales people came in today”? 36 Grandparents, typically 38 With a wink, say 39 Berkeley campus nickname

22

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31

100

12

24

26

88

11

21

23

51

23 Dance seen in a Lincoln Center performance of “Don Giovanni”? 25 Penn State campus site 26 Also-___ (losers)

40 Celebration after a 1964 heavyweight championship? 42 “You don’t need to remind me” 48 Not so big 49 Tampa paper, briefly, with “the” 50 Blackmore heroine 51 Washed (down) 54 Female co-star in “Love Crazy,” 1941 55 Stirrup? 57 Tolkien creatures 58 41-Down was named after one: Abbr. 59 Scarlett O’Hara’s real first name 60 Voiced 61 Summer sign 62 Little dipper? 63 Claimed 64 Chop 65 The Mavericks, on scoreboards 66 Up for grabs, as convention delegates 68 Shriners’ headwear: Var. 69 Gob 70 Ending with soft or spy 71 Decide to sleep in the nude? 73 Drink with one’s pinkie up, say 74 Some cats blow on them 75 Sodium ___ 76 “Around the Horn” cable channel 77 Summer treats 79 1983 #1 hit with the lyric “Put on your red shoes” 81 What whitewashers apply? 84 ___ Friday’s 85 Interlocks 86 ___ acid 88 Response to the query “Does Ms. Garbo fistbump?”? 94 Summer mo. 95 “Rock ’n’ Roll Is King” band, 1983 96 Make it

97 Actress Polo 98 See 33-Down 99 Polynesian potable 100 They’re often said to be fair 102 Love before war? 106 Looms 107 Shocking, in a way 108 Leonard of literature 109 Sting, e.g. 110 Team that once played at Enron Field 111 Bob Evans rival

DOWN 1 Former German chancellor Adenauer 2 Imagine 3 One hit by a tuba 4 Singer Grant and others 5 Prefix with -lithic 6 Stuffs oneself with 7 Shot, e.g. 8 Question that may be answered “And how!” 9 Garfield’s owner 10 For the most part 11 Country star ___ Lynne 12 “Così fan ___” 13 Agcy. with a list of prohibited items 14 Tree whose two-word name, when switched around, identifies its product 15 A Fonda 16 Plane over Yemen, maybe 17 College town just off Interstate 95 18 Thief, in Yiddish 19 Wolf (down) 24 When doubled, a number puzzle 29 Credit 32 “Totem and Taboo” writer 33 With 98-Across, showy play 34 Story teller 35 Judo-like exercises 37 French beings 38 Offspring 41 Town on the Hudson R. 42 Filmmaker Allen

43 Pipe shape 44 Apollo target 45 Bygone hand weapon 46 Catch 47 Crib items 49 Lugs 51 Like a corkscrew 52 What Cher Bono, e.g., goes by 53 Ceases 55 Soap units 56 River to the North Sea 58 Artist Francisco 59 Director of the major film debuts of James Dean and Warren Beatty 62 Not live 63 Home to Sun Devil Stadium 64 Tickled 67 Old Fords 68 Like Mussolini 69 Ranks 70 Didn’t miss 72 Game whose name is derived from Swahili 73 Sean Connery and others 74 Turn brown, maybe 77 Jazz singer Anderson 78 Busy L A S T W A S P S

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80 Doesn’t miss 81 Most murky 82 It’s worst when it’s high 83 High and softly resonant 85 Alex of “Webster” 87 Sweet-talks 88 Southwest Africa’s ___ Desert 89 Commercial name suffix 90 Handles 91 Lifts 92 “___ could have told you that!” 93 Seven: Prefix 94 Speck 98 Assns. 99 Alphabet string 101 Retired flier 103 It landed in the Pacific Ocean on 3/23/01 104 Yucatán year 105 Drink with a head Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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G O A E R R N C O R E C O S E W S T A O U N T D A A N T S E W E A M E R C E E H A N G E S I S A C A N G A U T A G S R Y S I T I S H E M

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JULY 6–12, 2011 | 37


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s my observation that women find it easier than men to tune into their natural rhythms. The menstrual cycle helps cultivate that ability. We men experience less dramatic physical shifts, and that seems to give us license to override messages from our bodies for the sake of ambition, laziness or convenience. Having acknowledged that, I must say that I know men who are highly sensitive and responsive to somatic cues and women who aren’t. Whatever gender you are, I believe that in the coming weeks, it’s crucial for you to be acutely aware of what’s going on inside your beloved flesh-and-blood vehicle. This is one time when you need to be intimately aligned with its needs.

38 | JULY 6–12, 2011 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Are you feeling the sting of disappointment, railing at life for reneging on one of its promises to you? Are you in the throes of unleashing a great accusation, suffering the twisty ache that comes from having your pet theories disproved? Maybe you should consider the possibility that you are simply getting an opportunity to correct a misunderstanding— that life isn’t being mean to you and you’re not being punished. I’d like to propose that you are, in fact, in the first phase of your healing. Listen to Bengali writer Rabindranath Tagore: “We read the world wrong and say that it deceives us.”

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): One of the greatest kings of the ancient Persian Sassanid Empire was Shapur II (309-379). Shortly after his father died, he was made king while still in his mother’s womb. Since he could not yet wear his crown, officials set it upon his mother’s pregnant belly. He ruled from then until the day he died, 70 years later. I’m naming him your patron saint for the second half of 2011, Taurus. My sense is that the seed of some great accomplishment is already germinating within you. It may take a while to be fully born, but I suggest we consecrate its bright future now.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “The more one dwells on oneself,” says psychoanalyst Adam Phillips in his book Going Sane: Maps of Happiness, “the more one is likely to suffer.” He thinks people need encouragement to avoid excessive introspection. “My project as a psychoanalyst,” he writes, “is to free them to not have to think about their lives so much.” While I feel he overstates the case, I do suspect his message would be good for you to heed in the coming weeks. For maximum success and robust mental health, take a generous portion of your attention off yourself and focus it on living your life with compassion, curiosity and concern for others.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’ve got no problem with the real world. I spend a lot of time there, enjoy its chewy riddles and take it quite seriously. But I also consider myself a militant lobbyist for all the Other Worlds—the domain of everything that’s invisible to the naked eye and irrelevant to the schemes of the rational ego. These alternate realities consist of the unconscious, the spiritual sphere, the intelligence of nature and the realm of the ancestors. In my astrological opinion, you’re due for a major upgrade in your relationship with these dimensions in the next 12 months. Now would be a good time to get started.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “One must choose in life between boredom and suffering,” proclaimed author Madame de Stael (1766-1817). I beg to differ with her, however. As evidence, I present the course of your life during the next few weeks. After analyzing the astrological omens, I expect you will steer a middle course between boredom and suffering, being able to enjoy some interesting departures from the routine that don’t hurt a bit. There may even be pain-free excursions into high adventure, along with a fascinating riddle that taxes your imagination in rather pleasurable ways.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): While listening to the sound-collage radio program Over the Edge, I learned that a new primary color has been detected. Different from red, yellow or blue, it has its own distinct hue that’s impossible to describe. You really have to see it to appreciate its essence. The discoverer of this marvel is Dr. Wohan Squant, who has named the color “squant.” (bit.ly/ squant.) I wish I could predict that you’re about to create something equally revolutionary, Cancerian, but I can’t. Nevertheless, you’ve entered a phase when you have the power to tinker with and even transform fundamental laws of your universe.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I accompanied a friend and his family to a small fairground where a local school was having a fundraiser. There were rides and games for younger kids. Right away we came to a challenging activity that involved climbing a ladder made out of rubber and coated with some slippery substance. One girl, about 7 years old, was having a moment of rowdy bliss as she tried to ascend. “It’s impossible—but fun!” she cried out to her mom. Your assignment in the coming week is to find an adventure like that: one that’s impossible but fun.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “It is not always needful for truth to take a definite shape,” wrote Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. “It is enough if it hovers about us like a spirit and produces harmony; if it is wafted through the air like the sound of a bell, grave and kindly.” With this quote, I’m alerting you to the fact that a new truth is now floating into your world, Sagittarius. It’ll be misty and sparkly, yet somehow also decisive and lucid. It will comfort you and yours, but also be a bit shocking. It will be sharply tonic, like strong medicine that has a pungent yet oddly delicious flavor you’ve never tasted before. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If there were a useful website with the domain name amiagoodpersonornot.com, I would advise you to go check it out. The same is true if there were websites like amiauthenticornot.com, amiyummyornot.com, amienlightenedornot.com, or amiagorgeousgeniusornot.com. What I’m trying to tell you, Capricorn, is that this would be an excellent time for you to find out more about yourself from objective sources—or any other kind of sources, for that matter. Solicit feedback, my beautiful darling. Ask for updates on how you’re doing. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Ninety-six percent of all adults say they would change something about their appearance if they could. That statistic is one factor that leads philosopher Jonathan Zap to make this observation: “Suffering associated with body image has reached such epidemic proportions in our culture that it must be counted as one of the greatest spiritual plagues ever to be visited upon mankind.” That’s the bad news, Aquarius. The good news is that the coming months will be an excellent time for learning to be more at peace with how you look. I invite you to formulate a three-point plan that will help you come to a perspective in which you will love your body exactly the way it is. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): On her website reuniting.info, Marnia Robinson reported on a discovery that may be useful to you. Wandering around a county fair, she went to a reptile exhibit, where she encountered an animal trainer who had an alligator resting serenely on his lap. She asked him why the creature was so well-behaved. “I pet it daily,” he said. “If I didn’t, it would quickly be wild again, and wouldn’t allow this.” Apply that lesson in your own life, Pisces. Bestow regular tenderness and loving touch to the feral, untamed, primitive influences in your life—including any that may reside within you.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 20 Issue 02