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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 51 JUNE 15–21, 2011

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TAK EE E ON E! INSIDE

WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE BW’s annual ode to getting away not far away NEWS 8

BUMPING THE CEILING Idahoans on what the national debt comes down to FEATURE 13

STAND BY ME Gay Rights movement needs straight supporters ARTS 26

POSTER CHILD Bike-themed Poster Party benefits BBP

“I would love to live in a country in which lying to the public was cause for resignation.”

RALL 6

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Sheree Whiteley Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Stephen Foster, Matt Furber, Zach Hagadone, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall Interns: Elizabeth Duffy, David McNeill, Brady Moore, Shelby Soule, Trevor Villagrana ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Glenn Landberg, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow, Ben Wilson Photography Interns: Will Eichelberger, Will Jones, John Winn, Matthew Wordell CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE ANOTHER YEAR, ANOTHER PRIDE ISSUE, SAME OLD GRIPE Pride. I look forward to this issue every year for two reasons. First, although we cover LGBT issues regularly, this is the one week each year we’re guaranteed to have coverage dedicated to a part of our community that continues to be largely ignored by the mainstream media. Second, our annual Pride issue marks my anniversary as editor of Boise Weekly. This edition is the fourth Pride issue that’s been published under my watch, and each year, I hope that by the next Pride issue, I’ll have something nice to say. Instead, I tend to get a bit mouthy in this space, lamenting that Idaho lawmakers continue denying basic protections and rights to Idaho citizens and taxpayers. But this year, I won’t get on my soapbox to once again wag my finger at lawmakers for continuing to sit on the Idaho Human Rights Act amendment. Nor will I revisit last week’s lecture about remembering the lessons of our past and having the courage to repeat them. Instead, I’ll simply point you to “Equality Now” from Zach Hagadone (Page 13), a piece that draws on history to reinforce the lesson that if difficult change is going to be achieved, bystanders—aka, heterosexual supporters—need to put some skin in the game, so to speak. This weekend’s Pride festivities are an easy way to start. The annual parade from the Capitol is Saturday, June 18, at 10:30 a.m. And if you support the LGBT community here in Idaho, put on your walkin’ shoes. Another good way to show support: Come time for the Legislature to head back under the rotunda, ring up/write/email/Facebook your legislator and ask him or her to support an amendment to the Idaho Human Rights Act to include protections for gender identity and sexual orientation rather than shoving the bill aside yet again. On a personal note, thanks to the staff of St. Luke’s Regional Medical Center, particularly the ladies of 9 East. I’m heartened to know that so many of you are Boise Weekly readers. Keep up the good work. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: James Lloyd TITLE: Water Logged MEDIUM: Digital color and collage made from graphite drawings on 20-pound bright white paper. ARTIST STATEMENT: This piece is about a moment of reflection after a big mistake. A quiet time in a place that looks like our own. It is also about a giant pink monster.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. AMANDAHAMILTONART.COM

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Each week Art Director Leila Ramella-Rader posts a smattering of the last week’s cover art entries. Have a look at what’s walkin’ in the door each week at Cobweb.

TECH U. In the midst of a whole lot of controversy, Tom Luna’s educational technology task force met for the first time on June 13. Check out their mission at Citydesk.

OH SAY CAN YOU SING? Ever had a fantasy about singing the national anthem at a baseball game? Watch the locals who showed their skills at the anthem-singing auditions for the Boise Hawks.

FREEDOM OF RELIGION? Guess what a “Constitution” group in North Idaho is all up in arms about. Here’s a hint: It has four arms and an elephant’s head.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Scratching at the U.S. debt ceiling

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CITYDESK

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Equality Now

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS Poster Party offers an ode to the bicycle

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SCREEN Super 8

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SCREEN TV Honoring the television survivors

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FOOD Community garden creates lessons in farming

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BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

FLUTTER.9-PAGE TWO 100 percent Koch-free Since 2007!

First, I apologize for the inconvenience of a two-page newsletter, especially since there’s a week’s interval ’twixt pages. But the subject with which we’re dealing today is too expansive to fit in a regular Flutter, and BW only lets me have one piece of paper a week to write on. So what else was Rajah Bill to do? Now, on page one you heard how I was hot on the twisty trail of the nefarious Society For Making People Worse, a malevolent yin counterpart to the yang of our beloved Society For Making People Better. We’re convinced its roots run deep in history—deeper than I could go even if BW allowed me a thousand pieces of paper to write on—but I determined that a convenient place to start our inquiries was the rise of the John Birch Society in ’58. The Birchers claimed to be anti-communist crusaders, but as we see in retrospect, they were out to smash any fellow American to the slightest degree left of themselves. But our interest today, 50-some years after the JBS emerged, is in one of their founding members, Fred Koch, who also founded an industrial empire that today ranks as one of the most powerful in the United States. Fred is dead but both his radical-right politics and his vast fortune live on in his children, David and Charles. The brothers’ wealth is estimated at $44 billion, and with every passing day, we learn more and more of the financial support they provide one right-wing organization after another. We may speculate whether there would even be a Tea Party, to name but one of their foster fronts, if not for the money the Koch brothers have dumped into it. We’ve also started to wonder if people aren’t forming such groups just to get a piece of that Koch brothers’ largesse—a welfare system for fanatics, if you will. Which brings us back to our new slogan: “100 Percent Koch-Free Since 2007!” It is meant to assure both our active and prospective members that the Society For Making People Better has taken not so much as a single buck from the Koch boys. Not one dollar, not one dime! In fact, when and if we ever have a roster of financial backers, we would be delighted to let any inquiring minds see who supports us. You see, we here at the SFMPB believe that the more secretly someone is manipulating the public, the more crucial it is the public be alerted that they’re being manipulated. On the other hand, in Boise resides an influence-peddling outfit that resolutely refuses to disclose who is feeding its kitty. The Idaho Freedom Foundation was patched together a little over two years ago by one Wayne Hoffman, who continues on as executive director. Prior to opening the Freedom Foundation, Hoffman was the mouthpiece for the clownish Congressman Bill Sali, and before that, he was a local reporter. (Rajah Bill dedicated another column to Hoffman some five years ago, as li’l Wayne wrote a whiny editorial WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

complaining about Idaho having open primaries. He offered a previous column of mine as proof that Democrats were pouring over the levee that defines ideological purity, voting for those compromising RINOs and denying him the right to associate exclusively with the craziest birds in the Right’s flock.) So we are curious. How did this guy go from speaking for a Republican that even the most Republican of states couldn’t tolerate for more than one term, to heading a wellheeled lobbying house that, after a measly two years, has accumulated the clout to seduce the poobahiest of the GOP poobahs? Last month, with 400 fellow travelers attending, Hoffman’s foundation awarded Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter and Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna some phony honor for their shared complicity in the education reform debacle. Then they all sat back and enjoyed the presence of that scuzziest of scuzzballs, Andrew Breitbart, whose fame (at that point in time) came from knowingly spreading the lie that almost destroyed a dedicated government servant’s honorable career (the Shirley Sherrod affair). I’m sure Breitbart was a hit with such a crowd. But then, Hoffman has a history of falling head over heels for people whose only accomplishment is spreading lies. In an interview published in Boise Weekly in the March 2, 2011, edition, Hoffman tells how his world was rocked once he was exposed to the sour wit and doubtful wisdom of the late Ralph Smeed, Canyon County’s loonitarian guru, at whose feet some of Idaho’s most useless and vacuous leaders have fawned. (Smeed, as a matter of minor interest, had a regular column in the Weekly for a time in the late ’90s, until it became clear he was such a Walphy onenote that everything he wrote sounded exactly like everything else he wrote.) But back to this funding matter: Rajah Bill is not the only one who suspects Hoffman has his lips wrapped tightly around the Koch brothers’ secret donations teat. It’s been a rumor among real reporters—a category to which neither Hoffman nor I belong, incidentally—that through the snuggle-ups Wayne made as a Sali side man, he plugged into that Club for Growth/Tea Bag/Bircher dough flow and set himself up a cozy situation. So here and now, I’m offering him the opportunity to either confirm or deny he’s on the Koch payroll. And further, does he or does he not think the citizens of Idaho deserve to know where these ideas of his—“nullification,” for one—are really coming from? Seriously, since Hoffman has become bulked-up enough to jerk Idaho’s strings, shouldn’t we know who’s jerking his? Note to SFMPB members: Don’t forget to renew your subscription to The Flutter. When your Rajah ultimately pins a face on the Society For Making People Worse, you’ll read about it here first.

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OPINION/TED RALL

WEINERGATE HYPOCRISY Hold warmongering murderers to same standard

LAS VEGAS—Should Anthony Weiner resign? Aside from the obvious pleasure that we derive from wallowing in salacious revelations about the rich and powerful, this week’s Weiner sexting controversy provides a window into American morals. Namely: What is wrong, what is right, and what if anything should be done about it? Let’s look at the sin first. Weiner sent smutty photos, some with smutty captions, to some of his followers on Twitter. As far as we know, he never met any of these women in person, much less had sex with them. After the congressman realized that he had mistakenly sent one of his crotch shots to the wrong addressee, he got too clever by half. Trying to get ahead of the story before it broke organically, he called a press conference and claimed that evil right wingers had hacked his Twitter account. This lame story quickly fell apart, and here we are, with The New York Times officially decrying Weiner’s “profoundly squalid and offensive pattern of conduct,” language one would have liked to have seen used to describe, for example, torture. Or the bailouts for millionaire bank executives. No victim, no sin. Who’s Weiner’s victim? Not, apparently, the women to whom he tweeted. As far as we know, they were willing participants. Weiner’s wife Huma Abedin is the sole candidate for victim. No doubt, Weiner lied to we, the people. It’s hard to imagine now, but that used to be an impeachable offense. Dig up Richard Nixon and ask him. And to Weiner’s credit, he didn’t lie long:

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one week. When he fessed up, he did it like a man: took questions from the press, accepted responsibility, volunteered dirty deeds we didn’t know about. It’s certainly not “we did find the WMDs,” a la Bush-Cheney. Who, remember, did not resign. I would love to live in a country in which lying to the public was cause for resignation. It sure would make for a lot of vacancies in government. But we don’t—and it seems weird to hold a sexter to a higher standard than a warmongering mass murderer. Ultimately, the public’s case against Weiner comes down to the one Edward G. Robinson snaps at the dastardly insurance salesman played by Fred MacMurray in Double Indemnity: “I picked you for the job, not because I think you’re so darn smart, but because I thought maybe you were a shade less dumb than the rest of the outfit. I guess I was all wet. You’re not smarter, Walter. You’re just a little taller.” Weiner doesn’t even get to be tall. The Times questioned Weiner’s “judgment and character, considering that he was once considered one of the savvier members of the House. Had it not occurred to him, in an era of unending sexual scandal, that repeatedly sending these kinds of photographs to strangers would eventually catch up with him? And that, if it did, his attempt to exploit his political celebrity for online sexual gratification would be considered reprehensible?” Should Weiner resign? Only if not being sufficiently cold, cynical and calculating is just cause.

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CITYDESK/NEWS NEWS

DEBT ON ARRIVAL Aug. 2 deadline looms for U.S. debt ceiling LIZZY DUFFY, DAVID MCNEILL AND GEORGE PRENTICE

BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT LOSES MONEY FROM FUNDRAISER IN WEEKEND BREAK IN “Heartbreaking” is how shop manager Amanda Anderson described the June 12 burglary of Boise Bicycle Project. The shop’s back door was a mess of wood splinters sticking out from a busted lock. “It’s almost like getting your home broken into,” she said. Anderson was still stunned, a full day later. For any other organization, the event might be just a bump in the road, but for BBP, it’s a gaping pothole. Most of the approximately $1,000 in cash stolen was from BBP’s June 10 Helladrome fundraiser, which kicked off the nonprofit’s campaign to buy its building at 1027 Lusk St., near Ann Morrison Park. “All the money we make goes to buying kids’ bikes and helmets, and going to buying the building,” Anderson said. Still, the capital campaign, Pedal 4 the People, will continue as planned. The next big event will be a Poster Party on Thursday, June 16 (see Arts, Page 26). To date, BBP has raised $16,000 of the $115,000 needed to buy the building by an October deadline. “I work days off, Jimmy puts in 60-hour weeks. We put our hearts into it,” Anderson said. —David McNeill

CORRECTION BW incorrectly stated the final text of SB 1105—which dealt with the issue of bullying—in the story “Bully Pulpit” (BW, Features, June 8, 2011). The final bill was amended on the Senate floor on March 8 to include a mandate requiring state school districts to create training and informational programs to address the bullying issue. The bill eventually died after delays prevented it from being put to vote before the session closed. BW regrets the errors.

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the last moment.” Sen. Mike Crapo agrees that, while the dilemma will probably go right down to the wire, the political game of chicken has to end at some point. “Congress will not allow—and I’m certain the Obama administration will not allow—the United States to default on its debt-issued bonds.” Crapo was referring to Treasury Bonds, or T-bonds. America raises money by selling debt in the form of Treasury bonds, the government’s version of an IOU, sitting in safe deposit boxes across America. A fair amount of IOUs are also in the hands of the Chinese and Japanese central banks. “You hear a lot about China, because we’re afraid of them these days,” said economist Dr. Don Holley. “But Japan holds almost as much.” According to the Treasury, China holds $1.1 trillion and Japan holds $900 billion in U.S. debt. Holley, who has taught economics at Boise State since 1973, doesn’t travel far without pad and pencil. He likes to draw supply-and-demand charts as he talks (he started drawing less than five minutes into our conversation). “You want to track the economy? Track the spending,” said Holley, while making a list of indicators that drive America’s economic engine: consumer spending, investment spending (in plants and machinery), foreign investment (in our exports) roughly 18 percent of our gross domestic and government spending. product.” “If we start spending less as a government, Third, Labrador advocates a balanced it will weaken our economy,” said Holley. “It budget amendment to the U.S. Constitution, would, quite simply, make the recession worse. similar to Idaho’s constitutional requirement. “Let’s say the Republicans get their way to “We are truly in uncharted waters,” Sen. Jim Risch told BW. “It’s staggering. I ask every cut government. It will have a significant multiplier effect,” he said while drawing another economist, ‘How do you see this playing out?’ chart. “If 50,000 government employees are There are some that are bombastic and they laid off, that could easily translate to think they know everything, but there 150,000 layoffs nationwide.” isn’t anyone who thinks this is going to Holley admits that when politicians end well.” start talking about billions or trillions Risch, a 40-year veteran of politics, of dollars, citizens’ eyes glaze over. thinks he knows political one-upmanBut a comparison to Idaho might ship when he sees it. offer some more perspective. “This is saber rattling,” said The United States borrows apRisch. “In the end, it will be the Video: Citizens talk proximately $4 billion daily. In comthe debt ceiling. people in the middle, not those of us parison, the state of Idaho’s entire on the right or those on the far left annual budget for government serthat will resolve this.” Risch likes to refer to what he calls “a basic vices, including public schools, is about $2.25 billion per year. Simply put, every 12 hours, the truth” in the nation’s capital. “None of these things ever get resolved until federal government borrows the equivalent of Idaho’s entire annual running costs. they have to,” he said. “And that’s usually at B EN W ILS ON

The break in occurred between the late evening of June 11 and the morning of June 12.

Government inhales money like most of us inhale air. Listen to the “Minute Waltz” and the United States government has borrowed $4 million. Boil an egg and in the same amount of time, feds have borrowed $20 million. How did you sleep last night? While you were slumbering, the United States borrowed approximately $1.6 billion. According to the American Association of Retired Persons, the United States increases its debt by about $20,000 every three-tenths of a second. In the approximate time it will take you to read this story, the United States will accumulate about $12 million in additional debt. Through much of the past week, BW listened to an array of Idahoans on the issue, including business owners, retirees and students. Those we interviewed called the nation’s debt ceiling everything from “nasty” to “ugly” to “armageddon,” and the running theme of comments channeled anger or frustration. “It’s out of control,” said Boise engineer Bruce Daybell. “It’s discouraging,” said Tracy Bideganeta, a Mountain Home pharmacist. “We’re passing that onto our children.” “The government has spent money that we don’t have,” said retiree Linda Loucks. “Congress will play this for as many votes as they can,” said Harry Tumanjan, a financial consultant. “Completely irresponsible.” While most citizens BW spoke to didn’t know the exact amount of the current debt ceiling, the majority understood the concept. At the end of 2010, the government owed a grand total of $13.9 trillion. The debt has since increased to a grander total of $14.3 trillion. The national debt is the sum of all current loans taken out by the government, and the debt ceiling is akin to a limit on a national credit card. Since 1960, Congress has raised, extended or revised the debt ceiling 78 times—49 times under Republican presidents and 29 times under Democratic presidents. This year, a GOP-controlled House of Representatives, fed up with what it calls runaway spending, wants to begin and end most negotiations over the debt ceiling with proposed cuts—big ones. “This is a spending crisis, first and foremost,” Rep. Raul Labrador told BW. “First, we should cut our annual deficit in half by reducing spending by about $400 billion. Second, we should cap federal spending to

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NEWS/GLOBAL

Health officials traced E. coli to sprouts from an organic farm in the German village of Bienenbuettel.

SUPER TOXIC STRAINS As new food safety threat emerges, U.S. regulators still steps behind MARIAN WANG, PROPUBLICA law status as their more famous cousin. The The E. coli outbreak in Germany—identimeat industry has resisted the idea, arguing fied by scientists as a new deadly strain of that it takes other steps to keep E. coli out of the bacteria—has by now killed at least 29 the beef supply, and that no outbreak involvpeople and spread to 10 countries. And while it hasn’t yet hit the United States, the outbreak ing the rarer strains has been definitively tied to beef. has highlighted longstanding gaps in the U.S. The problem isn’t just that food producsystem for identifying such threats. ers aren’t required to test for what public A former U.S. Department of Agriculture health experts call the “big six” E. coli strains. official told the Washington Post that the Doctors also rarely check for the strains and spread of this strain would be a “major disasonly 5 percent of medical laboratories are ter” for the U.S. food industry and for public health. “The regulatory framework is a couple equipped to test for them, meaning that some sicknesses caused by these six strains likely go of steps behind,” the ex-official said. undiagnosed. Though there are hundreds of strains of E. And now of course there’s a seventh strain coli that appear to be harmless, U.S. regulaspreading in Europe—one that scientists have tors have known for years about several strains that do cause potentially fatal illnesses. said is “super-toxic.” In recent years, Congress and the fedBut their focus—as well as that of the food industry—has largely been on just one strain, a eral agencies have made efforts to update the U.S. food safety system. version known as E. coli 0157. The Food Safety ModernizaThe New York Times says tion Act signed into law this regulators “largely ignored” Idaho’s last reported year requires the Food and six other strains that have also incidents of E. coli include Robie Creek Beach at Lucky Drug Administration to write caused outbreaks and deaths. Peak Reservoir in July 2010 rules that could help prevent Here’s what the Times reported and Ted Trueblood Wildlife produce contamination. USDA last year: Management Area southeast has also been doing research on Although the federal of Boise in December 2010. the other six E. coli strains to government and the beef and develop tests for them in beef, produce industries have known about the risk posed by these other dangerous but it’s unclear whether those tests will be required, as food safety advocates hope. bacteria for years, regulators have taken few Also unclear is whether the federal agencies concrete steps to directly address it or even in charge of changing the food safety system measure the scope of the problem. For three years, the United States Depart- will be adequately funded. As the Associated Press and others have noted, Republican proment of Agriculture has been considering whether to make it illegal to sell ground beef posals to cut the FDA’s budget and the USDA’s inspection budget could cut into efforts to tainted with the six lesser-known E. coli strains, which would give them the same out- update the system.

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CITIZEN

NICOLE SIRAK A family’s advocate GEORGE PRENTICE

Is it fair to say that most people probably know Family Advocates through the guardian ad litem program? Yes. Technically, it’s known as the Court Appointed Special Advocate program. CASA is primarily managed through volunteers, assigned to 600-700 foster children in Ada, Boise, Elmore and Valley counties. Our other program is Families First. We go into homes to work with families struggling with pre-kindergarten children. How do those families come onto your radar? A lot of referrals. In some cases, police may have visited a family where there may not have been a good reason to take the children into custody but there is certainly great reason for concern. We serve about 100 families and 200 children a year in Families First. But Families First is at risk because of lack of funding. We had a 10-year federal grant that came direct to us: the Parent Information and Resource Center Grant. It shuts down in September.

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How come? Massive federal funding cuts; $400,000 came to Idaho with $200,000 of it funding Families First. Now it all goes away. What are your options? We’ll probably scale back the budget for the program to about $100,000, but we still need to raise that money. We get about $25,000 from the United Way, so we’re going to need to raise the rest. Do you know how difficult it is to raise $75,000 nowadays? Even if you raise those funds, will you still need to scale back the program? We’re pretty sure that the volunteer method is the way to maintain the services, so we’re going to need to borrow what we’ve learned from our volunteer CASA program. But will you still have to make cuts? I haven’t notified staff yet. [*Note: Sirak was scheduled to meet with her colleagues this week.] What’s at stake for the families you service? I look into the eyes of these families and I know that we are the only thing between them and disaster. Can you speak to Idaho lawmakers’ lack of commitment to this program? You know what it is? Let families be families. Don’t do home visiting. Don’t tell people how to be a better parent. It’s a private matter. Are legislators not sympathetic to the cause? It’s pretty interesting to note that a few legislators are raising their grandchildren. There are 20,000 grandparents as parents in Idaho. But that doesn’t mean that they’re voting to support the program.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Nicole Sirak loves her job, although that’s not to say she isn’t heartbroken at times. As executive director of Family Advocates, Sirak oversees a handful of staff and hundreds of volunteers making a difference in the lives of thousands of Idaho children. Family Advocates has two primary pillars: A guardian ad litem program (court-appointed guardians for foster children) and Families First, the only early education home visiting program in the Treasure Valley. But Sirak is facing a pending crisis: the elimination of federal funding for Families First.

I would be remiss if I didn’t ask you about the Robert Manwill case. What are your thoughts as you read the testimony coming from that courtroom? [Long pause] The system failed a little boy. No matter the verdict, won’t there be volumes of unanswered questions? From reading the testimony, a lot of people who lived nearby sensed that there was some trouble there. Why are we so afraid to intervene? There are so many ways to prevent child abuse. People know when their neighbor is struggling with a child. Not too long ago, our homes had front porches. Now, we have back decks. Why are people so hesitant to offer to babysit? Or tell a neighbor that it’s OK to call if they’re about ready to snap? We simply don’t live in a society where it’s OK to say, “I don’t know how to be a better parent.” With so much pain and abuse in these cases, where do you find the joy in your work? It’s in 250 people volunteering 15,000 hours. Extraordinary. Our team is so dedicated. But mostly I love that we’re both intervention and prevention. CASA is wonderful, but it’s a big Band-Aid. Families First is prevention. I’m heartbroken that we might lose that prevention. I love CASA and it’s wonderful, but we need to see if we can keep these kids from coming into the system.

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How Idaho can move forward on LGBT rights by Zach Hagadone

hen Bill Kale was on Oprah Winfrey’s show in early May, she had to stop taping because of the tears. Kale, now 74, had been one of the courageous young people to board buses in the 1960s and travel from comfortable Northern affluence to the stifling heat of the Jim Crow South. Oprah honored their achievement on the 50th anniversary of their journey, which came to be known as the Freedom Rides, by telling them that she wouldn’t be where she is today without them. A native of Grangeville, Kale was a 24-year-old Yale Divinity School student when he joined the Freedom Riders, groups of blacks and whites who traveled through the South via bus to fight segregation.

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His decision—as a young, white Ivy Leaguer—to risk life and limb on behalf of people he’d never met came easily. “When we went down to the Freedom Rides, it was an automatic thing to do: ‘I’m not going to put up with that,’” said Kale, who now lives in Wisconsin. “You have to stand up for what is right.” Now 50 years—almost to the day—after his June 7 arrest and incarceration in the Mississippi State Penitentiary, Kale can look back on the Freedom Rides and Civil Rights Movement of the ’60s and see correlations between his generation’s great struggle for social justice and what will in all likelihood be the great struggle of the current generation: equality for gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people.

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COURTESY BILL KALE

Bill Kale was one of many arrested in 1961 for taking part in the Freedom Rides. The riders—both blacks and whites—took a stand against the injustice of racism.

“At church camp, I encountered my first black, and I think there’s a parallel directly here,” he said. “I thought he was a really nice kid and got to know him like any other person. Then, of course, as I went off to college and began to meet with and be engaged in diversity—which is key—I basically concluded that people are people.” As American Civil Liberties Union of Idaho Executive Director Monica Hopkins put it: “Like Martin Luther King said: ‘The rising tide raises all boats.’ This is not an issue that only people who are LGBT should care about.” You’ll hear that sentiment echoed by many Idahoans, but the fight for LGBT equality in the state has a dismal history. Despite brave opposition—often from Republicans bucking leadership—the anti-gay marriage amendment was passed in 2006. Inclusion of LGBT as a protected group in the Idaho Human Rights Act has been stymied five years in a row now, and lawmakers let two bills die this past session that would have provided key support and protections for both youths and adults in the LGBT community: the anti-bullying bill and legislation that would have afforded fair access to employment, housing and education. At the same time, a Boise State public policy survey concluded that upward of 63 percent of Idahoans think it should be wrong—contrary to the current statutes— that someone can be denied employment, fired, barred from education or refused housing based on their sexual orientation or gender identity. Testimony on the anti-bullying bill drew powerful and widespread support from groups and individuals across the spectrum, but it was strangled in committee nonetheless. The bill didn’t even specifically mention LGBT students; it would have simply required counter-bully training for teachers, counselors and administrators. “I think those are the things that the public supports and feels are necessary and which lawmakers really shouldn’t have a problem with, you would think,” said Boise Democrat Sen. Nicole LeFavour, Idaho’s only

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openly gay legislator. For LeFavour, the problem is painfully simple. “I think the biggest obstacle is that this is legislation we’re trying to pass through what is ostensibly a legislature that isn’t made up of gay people. That understanding and that need for understanding is monumental,” she said. “The public has moved miles on this issue and the legislature is so far behind,” she added. “It’s down to the regular folks in the state to really speak out and say, ‘You know, this is enough waiting. This is a basic fundamental issue of humanity and it’s time to address it.’” Another stumbling block, according to Amy Herzfeld, who helms the Idaho Human Rights Education Center and is also a member of the LGBT community, is plain old fear. “It is always, always important for lawmakers who are undecided on this issue to hear from allies, to hear from straight family members, to hear from business members, people who are in more rural or isolated communities,” she said. “As we’re talking about pride and the importance, politically, of people coming out and telling their stories and having the courage to talk about their lives and their families, that personalizes the stories and makes it visible. That’s incredibly important, but there are also tremendous risks.” Ask LGBT leaders and those heading allied organizations whence the fear of speaking out comes and you’ll run up against a consistent culprit: religion. “Religion is always a difficult obstacle to deal with. Some religions have come to be comfortable with gay people sooner than others, and some churches have come to understand that they have gay people in their congregations,” said LeFavour. “I’m really saddened sometimes that the LDS church has been really reticent to make that progress more clear, because there have been statements that were very clear that they don’t oppose employment protections and yet very, very strong statements against marriage. I think many people blur the issues.” Pam Baldwin, executive director of the WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

GLENN LANDB ER G

Elizabeth Morgan helms the Idaho Safe Schools Coalition, which provides support for school clubs for gay and straight teens struggling with identity and acceptance issues.

worship have a responsibility to have these Interfaith Alliance of Idaho, has lobbied on conversations and forge public policy. They behalf of myriad human-rights and socialcan’t be political insofar as they endorse canjustice issues, including LGBT equality. “Folks that join the Interfaith Alliance are didates, but they can talk about immigration, of a progressive worldview in that we believe racism, classism, heterosexism,” she said. “Most world religions are based on love, first and foremost that religion, spirituality, faith should be used as a way to bring people caring for each other, the common good. They’re not based on greed or ‘me first.’ together—not a way to divide people,” People have to get back to their basic values Baldwin said. “We also feel strongly about and figure out what they want for their comundoing oppression and working to have munity, for their children.” social, economic and environmental justice Kale, a former pastor and camin the state of Idaho.” pus minister for the UniversiBaldwin said the fear ty of Minnesota, echoes that surrounds public much of Baldwin’s advocacy on behalf sentiments. of LGBT equality THERE ARE “We’re reruns deep. All ally talking the way to the MEMBERS OF THE about life, pulpit. CLERGY WHO ARE AFRAID here, and “I think our desire it’s religioTO TALK ABOUT THESE ISSUES that politieveryone cal,” she BECAUSE THEIR CONGREGATIONS has life said. LISTEN TO GLENN BECK AND THEY and ev“It is eryone religious SAY, ‘THEY’LL KICK ME OUT.’ WHAT? has the leaders GLENN BECK’S MORE IMPORTANT abilorganizity to ing out THAN JESUS CHRIST?” develop of fear of their others that spirit, you are making — Pam Baldwin, executive can say, or this so prevadirector of the Interfaith Alliance their self or lent. … There of Idaho their mind to are members of the total extent the clergy who are possible,” he said. afraid to talk about “But you get so much these issues because their crap from churches and othcongregations listen to Glenn ers who are bigoted. My thesis work Beck, and they say, ‘They’ll kick me out.’ was on Paul, and Romans in particular, What? Glenn Beck’s more important than and there’s this one phrase that I’ve always Jesus Christ?” contemplated: ‘There is neither male nor Rather than look at religion as an obfemale. All are one.’” stacle, Baldwin said her organization strives Indeed the feeling of being part of the to inspire churches of all faiths and denomiwhole is central in the LGBT rights movenations to use sacred spaces for their deeper purpose: as places where people contemplate ment and lends a level of nuance that differand discuss what is not only most important entiates it from other social-justice struggles. “I think there’s a complexity to being gay in their own lives but in the lives of others. Discussion is the most important, she said. that you can pass people in the street and they won’t necessarily know that you’re gay in “They don’t understand that houses of WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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the same way that they would know you’re not Caucasian or a woman,” LeFavour said. “That ability to blend in does make the movement different, but when you come to gender identity, you do find very real similarities.” Herzfeld agrees that there are very real dissimilarities between the fight for LGBT equality and past equality movements, not least of which are the ways in which the discrimination manifests itself. “I don’t think it’s appropriate to make a wholesale comparison between the LGBT movement and the Civil Rights Movement because it’s impolite to co-opt the hard fought battles of a unique struggle, and I also think homophobia and racism are systems of oppression that operate in different ways,” she said.

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“Racism is a system of oppression that can be experienced in a generational way. Generational discrimination isn’t as common in the LGBT community because families can have straight or LGBT members,” she added. “I think it takes social-justice organizations to reach out across issue and constituencies to recognize that the work needs to come from a rights-based place and not an identity-based place.” In other words, the struggle for LGBT rights involves a commitment on the part of groups and individuals—often in their own homes—to combat discrimination. As Kale agreed, this social-justice movement will be won with personal “Freedom Rides,” not a bus trip en masse to a specific location. “In the end, what changes minds is people

knowing a gay person or transgender person and realizing that these issues affect people that they care about,” LeFavour said. “I wouldn’t say you have to drop the label thing; you have to know you know a gay person and know that they’re a person and that they matter and they have dignity.” Elizabeth Morgan works with a population that feels the slings and arrows of LGBT inequality as much—if not more—than any other: students. As co-chair of the Idaho Safe Schools Coalition, Morgan helps provide support for diversity clubs and gay-straight alliances comprised of youths, both LGBT and straight, who all struggle with issues of identity and social acceptance. “That’s probably one of the bigger chal-

lenges, and I think that’s true particularly because students may face negative social responses to them being involved in these organizations. It’s hard for students who are not going through these issues themselves to willingly submit themselves to that social scrutiny,” she said. “Usually, if we do have heterosexually identified students participating, it’s because they have a good friend who’s gay or a parent who’s gay or some connection to the community.” Morgan, a developmental psychologist who also directs the Family Studies program in Boise State’s Department of Psychology, said the central goal of the coalition is to provide a voice for youth in both secondary and post-secondary school, as well as advocate on their behalf. “Often schools and school boards are not particularly friendly toward these groups,” she said. “I think that that’s really our main goal: to empower the youth. But at the same time, we do that by taking kind of a topdown approach with teachers and administrators at school and speaking for them or speaking up for them.” The Idaho Safe Schools Coalition has been helping bring LGBT and heterosexual students together since its foundation in 2005 by members of the Idaho Education Association and Civil and Human Rights Committee. The effort is creating results. According to Morgan, the younger generation is markedly more accepting of diverse sexual orientations and gender identities. “Having kids who are out in high school, and we know that happens a lot more than it did 10 years or 20 years ago, makes a big difference,” she said. “Then there’s just the ability to have these clubs in schools to support them.” Leaders like LeFavour and Herzfeld laud the efforts of groups like the Idaho Safe Schools Coalition and Interfaith Alliance, crediting them and many others with some of the most important work yet done for the cause of LGBT equality in Idaho. They, like allied groups, underscore that the real fight remains in the statehouse. “For five consecutive years, we haven’t been given a public hearing at the state legislature [on LGBT inclusion in the Idaho Human Rights Act],” Herzfeld said. “It’s a longer-term battle and it’s one that requires a lot of education, a lot of grass-roots movement work. “The public support is there,” she added, but lawmakers—in particular Senate State Affairs Committee Chairman Rep. Curt McKenzie, from Boise—refuse to move on it. “He doesn’t see that there are votes on the committee to get it out. I have a hard time accepting that,” Herzfeld said. “The difficulty of a task does not relieve us of the obligation to try.” Hopkins chalks up the Legislature’s abysmal and repeated failure on LGBT rights to simple political cowardice. “I think what it will take to pass something like [fair employment legislation] and to pass the Idaho Human Rights Act amendment is first and foremost some political will and some backbone on the issue, and second to realize that it’s an equality issue. It is about fundamental liberty,” she said. “If we’re going to say, as former Gov. Dirk Kempthorne did, that ‘Idaho is a human rights state,’ then we should be demanding these things.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

GLENN LANDB ER G

Steve Martin of Pride Foundation said we’ll know we’ve made progress when the discussion is about the community as a whole, not the just the LGBT community.

about an economic downturn and how do Hopkins, like Herzfeld, can’t understand we get out of that, why are we not conwhy something like the Human Rights Act cerned about making Idaho a place where amendment won’t even receive a hearing. companies would want to come and build “There’s no democratic kind of process a diverse workforce?” that this is going through right now. One of When talking about the importance of getthe reasons being, at least that we’re told, is ting involved with the Freedom Riders, Kale that there isn’t enough support on the comreturns to the feeling of frustration he felt at mittee. One of the ways that changes, and the lack of action on the part of his peers. has changed, is through public testimony,” “I was really pretty annoyed with all she said. of my friends who were talking, “It’s going to take not only talking, talking, talking and political will, but it will take not doing anything. I said politicians getting out of to myself: ‘All right, the way and allowIT’S GOING TO you just talk. I’m ing the people to going to do it,’” speak,” she conTAKE NOT ONLY he said. “It’s all tinued. “We’re part and parcel in a different POLITICAL WILL, BUT IT of the same world and I WILL TAKE POLITICIANS thing: People think it’s going want their to take legislaGETTING OUT OF THE WAY freedom. They tors trying to AND ALLOWING THE PEOPLE don’t want understand the man—any that and move TO SPEAK.” man—telling out of their old them what to models. We’re do.” in this for the — Monica Hopkins, Getting to long haul. We executive director that perspective, will keep comACLU of Idaho however, requires the ing back year, after community to think of year, after year. And itself as a whole. we give kudos to the ways Steve Martin, Idaho comthat community organizations munity development organizer for the and community members are banding Pride Foundation, said much the same thing, together on this.” putting a finer point on the issue. One of the bright spots pointed to by “I think it goes back to that ‘us-and-them’ LGBT and allied groups alike is that even if mentality. Some people just have a difficult the state won’t codify employment protectime accepting people who are different than tions for LGBT workers, many private busithey are, and are also scared about change nesses and local governments have. and how that might impact them personally. The City of Boise approved an all-incluOvercoming that as a society will happen sive policy that protects employees regardover time but starts with all of us embracing less of sexual orientation or gender identity. the strength in diversity,” he said. Pocatello has done the same and Caldwell in “Someday, when the conversation in 2010 put in place a guarantee that protects this context becomes, for example, a workers against discrimination based on discussion about issues related to the comsexual orientation but not gender identity. munity as a whole and not just the LGBTQ “This isn’t just a social issue. This is community or the straight community, an economic issue,” Hopkins said. “This then we’ll really know we’ve made some is an issue related to the education of our progressive strides.” population. In a time when we’re talking WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events IDAHO S HAK ES PEAR E FES TIVAL

Decked out ladies bid farewell to marines entering WWII.

They’re men, men in tight tights.

WEDNESDAY-TUESDAY JUNE 15-21

gimlets and aspics COCKTAILS AND COUTURE

theater IDAHO SHAKESPEARE FESTIVAL Pack your cooler with some picnic noshes, a bottle of wine (or two) and pray for good weather, because the Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s 35th season is up and rolling. There is nothing better than enjoying ol’ Bill’s timeless work from the comfort of your own lawn chair, and this week offers two performances that you won’t want to miss. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged), a festival favorite, returns to the stage to make you ROGL (roll on the grass laughing). Clad in more outrageous apparel and props than you probably care to imagine, three actors attempt the impossible: to cram all of Shakespeare’s plays and two sonnets into a two-hour show. The result is an unexpected and highly entertaining mash-up of the Bard’s work that will have you wishing the performance lasted the entire night. Also running this week is The Two Gentlemen of Verona, a play replete with all the romantic language, disguises, love triangles, Italian gentleman and happy endings that make a Shakespearean comedy great. A definite highlight of the show is canine actor Scooter Moose deChumber, a French bulldog, who will play the role of Launce’s dog, Crab. Scooter’s actor bio on the ISF website describes his excitement to appear in a role that “embodies [his] vision of excellent canine thespianism.” We certainly share his excitement. The Two Gentlemen of Verona: Wednesday, June 15-Friday, June 17, and Tuesday, June 21, 8 p.m. The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged): Saturday, June 18, 8 p.m.; Sunday, June 19, 7 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., 208336-9221. For a full calendar, visit idahoshakespeare.org.

THURSDAYSATURDAY JUNE 16-18 milk mustache MERIDIAN DAIRY DAYS For more than 80 years,

Meridian Dairy Days has celebrated cows and curds on the third weekend in June. It all starts with the appearance of large plywood cows, decorated by residents and groups. The colorful bovines start turning up around town the weekend before the main celebration. This year’s theme is Cowtoon Characters, so think

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THURSDAY JUNE 16

Mighty Moo’er and Super Guernsey. This year’s Dairy Princess will be on hand to keep the milk mustaches at full attention at the Real Dairy Parade, which kicks off Friday at 7 p.m. Other events include a carnival, a 5K fun run, a bike race and the odd-sounding milk mocktail competition.

For years preceding World War II, silk stockings were the hosiery of choice. But when synthetic silk—or nylon—premiered at the New York World’s Fair in 1939, there was a stampede of well-coifed lasses eager to snatch up the latest in leg-coverings. Unfortunately, when the United States entered the war a few years later, those oh-so-popular nylons began to disappear off shelves. The synthetic fabric became integral to the defense effort and all supplies were used to manufacture things like parachutes and tents. Instead of going barelegged, ladies got creative. They began penciling stocking seams on the back of their legs to give the illusion of wearing nylons until the supply was replenished. Whether you strap on a pair of real vintage nylons or pencil in some fakes, make sure to get your stockings down to the Idaho State Historical Museum on Thursday, June 16, for Cocktails and Couture. The museum will host a fashion show featuring clothing from the 1930s1950s, along with a no-host vintage cocktail bar and apps to snack on. The caterer promises to use “Jell-O in ways long forgotten.” The Vinyl Preservation Society will also be on hand spinning throwback tunes from the era. 7 p.m., $15 adv., $20 door. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, 208334-2120, history.idaho.gov.

New to the 2011 celebration is the Dairy Days Hatter Tea Party, which features Alice and Wonderland-esque crafts and snacks on Friday, June 17, and Saturday, June 18, in Storey Park. Saturday morning at 8 a.m. is the Milk Run, so you might want to wait to gorge yourself on gouda until afterward. With the carnival running until Saturday at midnight, you’ll be able to party until the cows come home. Thursday, June 16-Saturday, June 18, various times, FREE. Storey Park, Main and

Franklin streets, Meridian. For more info and a schedule of events, call 208-8882817 or visit meridianchamber.org.

SATURDAY JUNE 18 film MOVIES UNDER THE STARS Grab the kids and a few blankets, it’s time to make Julia Davis Park your own

giant, outdoor living room. Movies Under the Stars, presented by the Boise Public Schools Education Foundation, returns this summer with Megamind, a family friendly animated feature about what happens when a super villain takes over the world. This film pits Megamind (Will Ferrell) against Metro Man (Brad Pitt) in a battle of strength, wits and ultimate dreaminess. Also featured in this PG movie are the voices of Tina Fey, David Cross and Jonah Hill. The movie begins at dusk WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FIND SCENTSA AT SEPHORA

These guys make a prolific music career look like a piece of Cake.

FRIDAY JUNE 17 music Reconstruct models do a little turn on the catwalk.

CAKE Sacramento, Calif.-based band Cake has produced its unique style of music consistently on six full-length albums during the past 20 years. Depending on who’s talking, the group is described as alternative rock, funk, ska, jazz, country hip-hop or pop. But while it’s difficult to pinpoint the genre, you always know when you’re listening to Cake. Occasionally ironic and typically sarcastic, John McCrea has made half-spoken, half-sung vocals with accompanying trumpet and piano the band’s signature sounds. The group rose to popularity when it released Fashion Nugget in 1996 and is most famous for its singles “The Distance,” “I Will Survive,” “Never There” and “Short Skirt, Long Jacket.” After a seven-year hiatus, Cake’s latest album, Showroom of Compassion, exceeds expectations for both loyal and casual fans by delivering polished tracks and some experimental instrumentation without dropping the band’s style. The album debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard charts in January and includes the singles “Sick of You” and “Long Time.” To promote Showroom’s release, band members donated their old T-shirts and clothing to produce lyric books for the song “Bound Away.” Cake takes center stage on Friday, June 17, as a part of the Outlaw Field Concert Series, before continuing its tour in Europe. As Marie Antoinette would say, “Let them see Cake.” 6:30 p.m. gates, 7:45 p.m. show, $35. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Old Penitentiary Road, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

but free live music, games and inflatable jump houses will be available before the movie for the whole family to enjoy. Attendees are encouraged to bring snacks from home, although there will be some available for purchase. Blankets are also strongly recommended, along with

S U B M I T

flashlights and camping chairs. As for the rest of the summer, Diary of a Wimpy Kid will play on Saturday, July 16, and Chronicles of Narnia: Voyage of the Dawn Treader will play on Saturday, Aug. 20. This is a family oriented

SATURDAY JUNE 18 fashion show

For nearly two decades, I wore Fendi perfume. It was made by the same company that makes the high-priced handbags and silky, spendy scarves—and it smelled exquisitely expensive. Heady notes of amber, musk and spice sat well on my skin, and I often received “you smell nice” compliments. So it was a dark day when I discovered that Fendi, the scent, had been discontinued. Sadly, I couldn’t find a replacement. Staring down the wall of fragrances in department stores was overwhelming. Every time a pop star puts out a new single, she also puts out a fragrance. I’m sure they’re nice ladies, but I don’t want to smell like Britney Spears, Beyonce, Shakira or any Kardashian. SEPHORA Boise Towne Square Mall Then I found the 350 N. Milwaukee St. Scentsa machine at 208-375-3538 Sephora. boisetownesquare.com Scentsa is a fragrance finder. A touch screen takes you through a list of options to search for a scent based on notes, ingredients (vanilla, myrrh, floral, etc.), lifestyle or, for someone like me, another scent. Stefanie O’Neill, a manager of the Boise Towne Square Mall Sephora store, said in the year-and-a-half the store has had the machine, hundreds of people have discovered the perfect smell—whether it’s a $135 bottle of Prada parfum or a $15 bottle by Philosophy. I found something called Boyfriend by Kate Walsh. It’s less spicy on the nose than Fendi and not a perfect replacement, but it’s close enough. When it runs out, I’ll go back in to see if I can find something that smells even more like me.

RECONSTRUCT PRESENTS THE ILLUSIONIST Utilizing materials salvaged from greasy garage benches, refuse bins and grandma’s closet, designers at the fifth annual Reconstruct benefit fashion show are vamping up their duds for a new theme: The Illusionist. These reused, recycled and reconstructed masterpieces will storm the Flying M Coffeegarage catwalk on Saturday, June 18, beginning at 7 p.m. A silent auction featuring donations from The Record Exchange, Simple Sushi, Cameo Salon and wines from Bueno Cheapo Vino will be open for the entire week preceding the show. The fashion show and silent auction both raise funds for the local chapter of Dress for Success, a nonprofit organization that provides women with the resources to help them return to, or enter, the workforce. Last year’s show, Masquerade Ball, raised more than $2,000, and organizers are looking to do even better this time around. Tickets are $10 in advance at either Flying M location or $15 at the door. This event has sold out in the past, so get your tickets early. 7 p.m., $10 adv., $15 door. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com.

event, so there is no alcohol or tobacco allowed. Parking is free in the Julia Davis lot, along with some auxiliary spots at the Main Library. Pets are not allowed and

—Amy Atkins

parents are asked not to leave children unattended. 7 p.m., FREE. Gene Harris Bandshell in Julia Davis Park, boiseschoolsfoundation.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 15-21, 2011 | 19

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WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 Festivals & Events ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Unwind mid-week with friends, live music and a cold beverage during this family friendly concert series. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove, downtownboise.org. MERIDIAN DAIRY DAYS—Five-day celebration of dairy farming includes a carnival, pancake feed, McDonald’s Farms at Dairy Barn, Meridian Symphony Orchestra at Storey Park, a parade and cattle and goat show. See Picks, Page 18. Prices vary by event. Visit dairydays.org for more info and a complete schedule of events. PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP, SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Followed by an all-ages poetry slam. There is a $25 prize for the haiku champ. 6 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632, boisepoetry. com. TOGA PARTY—Exactly what you think it is. Part of Boise Pride Week. 10 p.m. $3. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com.

On Stage THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA—Valentine and Proteus’ friendship is put to the test in this comedy by the Bard. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Workshops & Classes FALL GARDEN CROPS—Master Gardener Elisa Clark will teach the basics of growing fall crops as well as sharing info on composting and topdressing. Call 208-343-8649 to pre-register. 7 p.m. $10. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Talks & Lectures

QUEER IDOL—Sign up to sing your heart out or watch others sweat it out in front of the judges. 8 p.m. $5 general, $20 VIP, $10 entry fee. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557.

LINDA HOYT—The writer will speak on Raising the Bar with Nonfiction Writing: Exploring Content, Form and Craft. Visit bswproject.com for more info. 2-5 p.m. FREE for members, $5 nonmembers. Boise State, 208426-1000, boisestate.edu.

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—5-8 p.m. FREE. Located at the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library.

Art COCKTAILS AND COUTURE—Grand opening for the Our Lives, Our Stories exhibit featuring fashion from the 1930s-1950s. “Vintage” cocktails and appetizers will be served. Those in vintage attire will be eligible for a prize. See Picks, Page 18. 7 p.m. $10 members, $15 adv., $20 door. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 Julia Davis Drive, 208334-2120, history.idaho.gov.

Odds & Ends PEACE OUT—Camp for teens and young adults with a focus on nonviolent conflict resolution. Email peace2you@rocketmail. com for more info. 1-9 p.m. $40. Hyde Park Mennonite Fellowship, 1520 N. 12th St., Boise.

THURSDAY JUNE 16

POSTER PARTY—More than 30 local artists have created posters that will be displayed and sold (prints for $30 each), with proceeds benefit Boise Bicycle Project. See Arts, Page 26. 6-10 p.m. FREE. Oliver Russell Building, 217 S. 11th St., boisebikebrigade.com.

Festivals & Events MERIDIAN DAIRY DAYS—See Wednesday. Prices vary by event. Visit dairydays.org for more info and a complete schedule.

Farmers Markets On Stage

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—4:30-8:30 p.m. Downtown Boise, Eighth Street from Bannock Street to Main Street, capitalcitypublicmarket.com.

FLEMMING—Comedic thriller in which Henry Flemming sells off his lucrative business to become a detective and finds his calling. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 Emerald St., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

MERIDIAN URBAN MARKET—5-9 p.m. FREE, downtown Meridian on Idaho Avenue between Main and Second streets, 208-331-3400.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Art ESPECIALLY FOR SENIORS— Senior guests (age 62 and older) receive a guided talk on the current exhibit. 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Literature LONNIE WILLIS: BOOK SIGNING—The author of The True Adventures of a Texas Sharecropper Kid will read from and sign copies of his memoir. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks. org.

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Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail leila@boiseweekly.com

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WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE 2011

PRESENTED BY BOISE WEEKLY

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WELCOME TO THE 2011 WOOD RIVER VALLEY GUIDE Getting away from it all doesn’t mean you have to A) take out a loan, B) take an extended leave of absence, or C) dig out your passport. In fact, for those of us who live in Southern Idaho, a grand escape is mere hours away. A short drive can take you to a magical land where your hands don’t burn on your steering wheel on a summer day, crisp air greets you in the morning and star-filled skies glitter overhead at night. OK, so maybe it’s not actually magical, but the Wood River Valley offers an all-toorare escape from the city, and one that is completely doable over a single weekend. This is Boise Weekly’s third annual Wood River Valley Summer Guide, your

go-to guide for plotting your mountain minivacation this year. Whether you’re interested in the arts, big-name concerts, festivals, hours spent antiquing or racking up miles on some stunning trails, you’ll find it in this guide. Check out the extensive calendar to help you plan your fun-filled vacation. Of course, if you’re more interested in dedicating yourself to some quality time spent sipping a drink under the clear, blue skies while munching some gourmet goodies, we’ve got you covered, too, with some of our picks for the best al fresco dining around. Mark off a weekend on your calendar before the entire summer fills up. —Deanna Darr

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OUTDOORS BY THE NUMBERS

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EVENTS CALENDAR

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BIG NAMES, BIG CONCERTS

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SUN VALLEY DINING OUT(SIDE) IS IN

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FARM FRESH

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SUN VALLEY’S FINE ART

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Away from the hubbub is yurt biking at Sun Valley Trekking’s Coyote Yurt, the only backcountry yurt in the Sun Valley area open summer and fall to hikers and bikers. Offerings may be expanded with the Forest Service recently announcing Sun Valley Trekking and Galena Lodge will receive new permits for guided mountain biking this summer on National Forest trails. Be sure to check in at the Ketchum Ranger District office on Sun Valley Road for more information. Check with Sun Valley Trekking (svtrek.com) for yurt and guided hiking prices.

OUTDOORS BY THE NUMBERS

10 things to keep you busy

YURTS

— M AT T F U R B E R — ILLUSTR ATIONS BY ADAM ROSENLUND

If Leonardo Da Vinci is out there in a time machine somewhere in the cosmos, he is sure to hit Sun Valley at some point to test out the progress of humanity’s most elegant invention: the bicycle. Of course, bikes still have greasy chains and it takes a few rough tumbles to learn how to ride in the mountains, but for artists, anglers, horse people, David Hockney and blown glass fans and at least one bicycle, Sun Valley has many affordable outdoor options for active travelers, even if they really came for the arts. Top billing for 2011 is the first Ride Sun Valley Bike Festival (ridesunvalley.com) presented by Sun Valley bicycle manufacturer Scott. From Monday, July 11-Sunday, July 17, visitors can learn about the Sun Valley riding scene from the experts while watching the USA Cycling Mountain Bike Cross-Country National Championships (usacycling.org/ mtb). Greg Randolph, a former cycling champion and spokesman for the event, said the highlight will be the Local Stoker Rides—a free tour of Sun Valley’s single track. And this is a full-service tour, including a ride, shuttle and a guide. Randolph said the Sun Valley course designs make for an excellent set of spectator races, from Bald Mountain downhill to Ketchum Town Square Fat Tire Criterium. “It is the most spectator-friendly mountain biking course I have ever seen,” he said. Better yet, it’s free.

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Something similar but definitely more youth oriented is the Galena Summer Camp (galenalodge.com), which is a mix of local and visiting children who come to “get dirty and play” in the outdoors, said chef Don Schepler, who with his wife, Erin Zell, manages Galena Lodge. Famous as a former mining town, the heritage of Galena comes to life in summer. There is a wagon ride and barbecue every Thursday—the same wagon that has transported many a bride to be wed in the regal backdrop of Senate Meadows. Mystic Saddle Ranch offers daily horse rides. Camp costs $250 to $395 per week.

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Horseback riding and llama treks in the Sun Valley area are a huge opportunity to transform a cowpoke into a swashbuckler able to clang spurs with the best wranglers. There are eight outfitters listed on the visit Sun Valley website (visitsunvalley.com) that cater to travelers interested in animalguided adventures, which can include pack mule aid during hunting season. Those willing to muck out a stall or two might even find a free riding lesson. Mystic Saddle Ranch (mysticsaddleranch. com) charges adults $75 for a half-day ride.

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Another free way to play in the dirt is at the pump parks, where kids and adults test dirt bike skills in Ketchum and Hailey. The already popular Ketchum park—located across from Hemingway Elementary School—was expanded last fall. The Hailey park—adjacent to the Blaine County Aquatic Center—boasts a beginners’ area. Both parks were built by the volunteer Wood River Bike Coalition, which is largely responsible for the stewardship of Sun Valley’s 400 continuous miles of world-class single track.

Sun Valley biking is not all about dirt, however. Local outfitters (read “bikeshops”) offer weekly free group rides, including Wednesday night road rides. Meet at The Elephant’s Perch (elephantsperch.com) for a prompt 5 p.m. start.

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The Wood River YMCA (woodriverymca.org) in Ketchum has a 30-foothigh climbing gym with about a dozen belay stations that can help prepare the vertically inclined athlete with a climbing waiver and ambition to tackle the Mountaineers Route on the Elephants Perch in the Sawtooth Mountains or any one of the hundreds of climbs, many pioneered by Wood River Valley climbers, at the City of Rocks down south. The gym charges $3 each for harness and shoe rentals or $5 for both. Staff belays are $5 for two climbs and $10 for five climbs. Check with Sawtooth Mountain Guides (sawtoothguides. com) for climbing guide prices.

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Although the word “fore!” sounds something like the wartime adage “fire in the hole!” when used appropriately, it is reserved as a mild declaration of warning for the most gentlemanly of Sun Valley sports: golf. The valley boasts half a dozen courses and tee times rarely include a wait. Knickers, cleats and other golf attire are welcome—the more vintage the better, especially at the Sawtooths Putting Course at the Sun Valley Club (sunvalley.com/golf/ sawtooth), the resort’s latest lodge addition. Putting is $3 for children and $5 for adults.

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More than a dozen outfitters listed on the visit Sun Valley website (visitsunvalley.com) will point anglers and rafters toward water sports on the rivers of the Sun Valley area. Hiring a guide and buying licenses will cost, but like most activities in the Sun Valley area, the greatest expense is really transportation, food and shelter. Famed spots such as Silver Creek, the Big Wood River, the Big Lost River, Copper Basin and the Little Wood River all lure those with a penchant for fish and game.

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The same attire plus kneepads and a helmet can also be used for the Ketchum and Hailey skateboarding pools, ramp lips and pipes. Just ask for a tour. The Hailey park is located by the Snow Bunny Restaurant and the new rodeo grounds and visitors’ center now under construction. The Ketchum park is located on Warm Springs Road west of the Wood River YMCA and it’s free for users.

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Sun Valley Summer Symphony

Weekly charity concerts to benefit the Envrionmental Resource Center on Wednesday evenings through the summer beginning Wednesday, June 29, at the Wicked Spud in Hailey. 208-788-0009, ercsv.org.

JULY

Hailey’s Main Street Antique Show

The bluegrass legend brings her Paper Airplane Summer Tour featuring Jerry Douglass to the Sun Valley Pavilion on Saturday, July 2. Tickets $29-$110, seats.sunvalley.com.

One night, two shows. Featuring Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers, Bela Fleck and the Original Flecktones and an

Sun Valley Shakedown

Take in free classical music performances in the Sun Valley Pavilion and on the lawn outside. The season runs Sunday, July 24-Tuesday, Aug. 16. Open seating begins at 5:30 p.m. Concerts begin at 6:30 p.m. svsummersymphony.org.

Cross-country and marathon race Saturday, July 23, sponsored by Knobby Tires Series, includes double track, single track, creek crossings, flats and climbs, all with scenic mountain views. knobbytireseries.com.

Back Alley Concert Series

Alison Krauss & Union Station

Galena Grinder

Company of Fools presents Annie Baker’s Obie Award-winning play at the Liberty Theatre, Tuesday, June 28-Saturday, July 9. companyoffools.org.

Sun Valley Center Wine Auction

The popular fair in a beautiful setting sells only handcrafted items with food available. Saturday, July 16-Sunday, July 17, in Stanley.

35th Annual Sawtooth Mountain Mama’s Arts And Crafts Fair

Free events throughout the month of July include art walks, concerts, farmers and artist markets and theater productions. Includes the Night of Music on Monday, July 11. haileycityhall.org.

A Month of Art in Hailey

Enjoy gimlets and music from the Joe Fos Trio to benefit the Sawtooth Botanical Garden’s educational programs on Saturday, July 16. Tickets are $100, sbgarden.org.

Gimlets in the Garden Fundraiser

Stroll through private gardens to learn about native and cultivated plants, as well as to see unique garden designs on Saturday, July 16. Tickets are $35 for Sawtooth Botanical Garden members and $45 for nonmembers. sbgarden.org.

16th Annual Garden Tour

The 30th annual event runs Thursday, July 21-Saturday, July 23, and includes the auction gala, vintner dinners in private homes, a hosted wine picnic on a golf course, and a tasting of wines from 120 wineries. sunvalleycenter.org.

Circle Mirror Transformation

The Tuesday evening free concerts are held in Ketchum’s Forest Service Park and run June 14-Aug. 30. A local band opens at 7 p.m., followed by a headliner act at 7:30 p.m. allsunvalley.com.

Ketch’em Alive 2010 Summer Concert Series

The free concerts run Sunday, June 26-Sunday, July 31, in Rotary Park on Warm Springs Road in Ketchum. The concerts begin at 6 p.m.

Sunday Evening Jazz In T he Park

The 10-piece Latin-funk orchestra plays Hop Porter Park on Thursday, June 16. Tickets $5-$20, sunvalleycenter.org.

Grupo Fantasma

JUNE

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Colin Hay

Bellevue’s Labor Day festivities kick off with a street dance on Saturday, Sept. 3, followed by a parade on Sunday, Sept. 4, with music, food, crafts and antiques in the Bellevue Park. On Monday, Sept. 5, the celebration includes music, art, vendors and children’s activities.

Bellevue Labor Day Celebration

This celebration of Idaho’s mining history runs Friday, Sept. 2-Monday, Sept. 5. wagondays.com.

2011 Wagon Days Celebration

SEPTEMBER

The two-day festival Saturday Aug. 20-Sunday, Aug. 21, at Pioneer Park in Stanley includes educational tours and booths, along with food, vendors and entertainment. stanleycc.org.

Sawtooth Salmon Festival

Conference held Friday, Aug. 19-Monday, Aug. 22, features talks, readings and group discussions led by distinguished writers, including Poet Laureate of the United States W.S. Merwin, former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor and New York Times op-ed columnist David Brooks. 800-841-4906. svwc.com.

Sun Valley Writers’ Conference

Bring the whole family to groove to their unique sound at River Run Lodge on Monday, Aug. 15. Tickets $35-$80, sunvalleycenter.org.

Michael Franti and Spearhead

Labor Day weekend in Ketchum means the return of the granddaddy of all area festivals: the 54th annual Wagon Days. The three-day event is a celebration of the area’s mining past, and visitors can spend the weekend checking out gallery walks, a classic car auction, an Old Western shootout, antique fairs and star-studded ice shows. But the highlight is the Big Hitch parade, featuring museum-quality buggies and wagons. Anchoring the parade is the Big Hitch—six 15-foot-tall Lewis Ore Wagons

Wagon Days Friday, Sept. 2-Monday, Sept. 5

For the last 34 years, Hailey has been a destination for folk music fans. This year’s lineup includes Quailfish, Rose’s Pawn Shop, James McMurtry, Sloans, Justin Wells, Carly Gibson, Intersection, Slow Children Playing, Up A Creek, Bill Coffey and The Gourds. Music lovers can plop themselves on a blanket in Hop Porter Park along the Big Wood River all weekend for $32. In addition to the music, downtown Hailey will host a two-day craft festival on Saturday, Aug. 6-Sunday, Aug. 7. For more information, visit nrff.net.

Northern Rockies Folk Festival Friday, Aug. 5-Saturday, Aug. 6

The holiday weekend is filled with events from one end of the valley to the other. Hailey is hosting a three-day antique show, while Alison Krauss and Union Station will be rockin’ in Ketchum. But the real Americana will be happening at the Hailey Days of the Old West celebration. The annual event is as much a celebration of Western small town culture as Independence Day and includes three nights of rodeo. The oldfashioned celebration continues Monday, July 4, with a children’s carnival and a parade down Main Street followed by a criterion bike race. The day finishes with a concert by the Army Band in Fox Acres Park and the ever-important fireworks display beginning at dusk. For more information, visit haileyidaho.com or call 208-788-3484.

Fourth of July Saturday, July 2-Monday, July 4

Need an excuse for a weekend getaway? The Wood River Valley hosts a rich series of festivals throughout the summer and fall that can provide the perfect reason to head to the mountains.

FESTIVALS WORTH THE TRIP

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Ride Sun Valley Bike Festival

Crosstoberfest, Saturday, Oct. 29-Sunday, Oct. 30, features the 2010 Idaho State Championship Cycle Cross, as well as a traditional Bavarian Oktoberfest-style festival with food, a beer garden and music. sunvalley.com.

2010 Crosstoberfest

The event held Thursday, Oct. 20-Saturday, Oct. 22, celebrates Hemingway’s history in the Wood River Valley. The event includes lectures, speaker presentations and a Hemingway Haunts tour of Papa’s favorite spots in the area. thecommunitylibrary.org.

Ernest Hemingway Symposium

Get in the mood at the 21st annual Jazz Jamboree Wednesday, Oct. 12-Sunday, Oct. 16. Times and locations vary. sunvalleyjazz.com.

Sun Valley Jazz Jamboree

The 15th annual event in Ketchum runs Friday, Oct. 7-Sunday, Oct. 9, and honors the history and culture of sheep ranching in the West. trailingofthesheep.org.

Trailing Of the Sheep Festival

OCTOBER

The 33rd annual Baldy Hill Climb Saturday, Sept. 24, will include both hiking and mountain bike events. Also featured is the “Baldy Double,” consisting of a mountain bike race followed by a hiking race. svsef.org.

Baldy Hill Climb

Formerly the Sun Valley Food and Wine Festival, the event, held Friday, Sept.23-Sunday, Sept. 25, will feature cooking demonstrations by visiting regional chefs, wine and beer tastings, a culinary trade show, a restaurant walk, chefs’ dinners and a beer garden, all focused on regional sustainable products. sunvalleyharvestfestival.com.

July 13 July 21-23 August 2 August 12-14 August 15

MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD

SUN VALLEY CENTER ARTS & CRAFTS FESTIVAL

RICKIE LEE JONES

SUN VALLEY CENTER WINE AUCTION

Sun Valley Center for the Arts sunvalleycenter.org | 208.726.9491

—Deanna Darr

The festival season in Sun Valley comes to a conclusion with a celebration of all things jazz. For five days, more than 40 groups perform every incarnation of jazz across the town, playing more than 300 shows in all. No matter the time of day, jazz can be heard, drawing crowds from across the country. The earlier you buy your passes for this one, the cheaper they are, but they top out at $144 for a five-day pass. For info, check out sunvalleyjazz.com.

Sun Valley Jazz Jamboree Wednesday, Oct. 12-Sunday, Oct. 16

Sheep once ruled the Wood River Valley, and for a brief period each fall, they do again. The three-day festival is all about living history. The 15th annual event will include music, wool spinning and sheep dog demonstrations, story telling, sheeporiented crafts and some lessons on cooking with lamb (don’t tell the sheep). The event’s highlight is on Sunday, when masses of sheep making their way from summer to winter pastures are the centerpiece of a parade. For more information, check out trailingofthesheep.org.

Trailing of the Sheep Friday, Oct. 7-Sunday, Oct. 9

What was once the Sun Valley Food and Wine Festival is now all about the fall harvest. The event focuses on regional foods with cooking demos, beer and wine tastings, a restaurant walk, chefs’ dinners, a martini and caviar party and a River Guide Culinary Competition, showing off Dutch oven skills. The weekend’s finale will be the Grand Tasting, with proceeds going to the Make A Wish Foundation. Check sunvalleyharvestfestival.com for a full schedule.

See a collection of traditional and contemporary quilt designs on Friday, Sept. 16-Sunday, Sept. 18, in the heart of Stanley. stanleycc.org.

Sun Valley Harvest Festival

Sun Valley Harvest Festival Friday, Sept. 23-Sunday, Sept. 25

pulled by a 20-mule jerkline. Crowds line up to see the team make the 90-degree turn at Main Street and Sun Valley Road, a maneuver that requires the muleskinner to move half the mules to one side of the hitch. Of course, watching 24,000 pounds of antique wagons heading back down Saddle Butte is exciting in its own right. For more information, visit wagondays.com.

Sawtooth Mountain Mamas Annual Quilt Festival

Classics mixed with new music from the former front man for Men at Work at the Sun Valley Opera House on Sunday, Sept. 18. Tickets $20-$25, sunvalleycenter.org.

THE AVETT BROTHERS

The 2011 Sun Valley Center Arts and Crafts Festival will run Friday, Aug. 12-Sunday, Aug. 14, and will include more than 130 artists with fine arts and crafts, including painting, photography, fiber, ceramic, metal, jewelry and woodwork. Atkinson Park, sunvalleycenter.org.

Save the dates & head to the mountains for these great events!

The Sun Valley Opera is celebrating its 10th anniversary with an evening of favorite songs performed by a five-voice ensemble on Sunday, July 10. sunvalleyopera.com.

Sun Valley Opera: Midsummer Night’s Serenade

43rd Annual Sun Valley Center Arts and Crafts Festival

Three-day concert festival featuring members of the musical family, their bands and friends playing to a packed crowd at the Challis Community Stage. Thursday, Aug. 11-Saturday, Aug. 13, $45 one-day pass, $74.95 two-day pass, $99.95 three-day pass. braunbrothersreunion.com.

Celebrate some of the country’s best race courses and more than 400 miles of continuous singletrack, bike parks and paved bike paths during this week-long event from Monday, July 11-Sunday, July 17. Includes the Fat Tire Criterium for amateurs and pros and USA National Mountain Biking Championships. ridesunvalley.com.

Braun Brothers Reunion

Music festival at Hop Porter Park in Hailey Friday, Aug. 5-Saturday, Aug. 6, featuring headliners Lisa Haley and the Zydekats and Kelly Willis. nrff.net.

33rd Annual Northern Rockies Folk Festival

On Tuesday, Aug. 2, the Grammy-winning singer-songwriter will perform at River Run Lodge. Tickets $35-$80, sunvalleycenter.org.

Rickie Lee Jones

AUGUST

The annual summer event brings out the outdoor enthusiasts to ride the 20-mile Wood River Trail, a paved bike path that runs along the river and through the streams from Ketchum to Sun Valley on Saturday, July 30. bcrd.org.

Ride the Rails

Three days of music in the mountains, Friday, July 29-Sunday, July 31. $50-$55 weekend pass, or $20-$40 single-day ticket, ages 12 and younger get in free. $10-$22 camping pass, Pioneer Park, Stanley, sawtoothmusicfestival.com.

Sawtooth Music Festival

after party at Whiskey Jacques. All ages are welcome, and camping is available. Thursday, July 28. Tickets $48-$125, kids 10 and younger are FREE. Sun Valley Festival Meadows, sunvalleyshakedown.com.

The white-hot Americana group takes the stage at the Sun Valley Pavilion on Wednesday, July 13. Tickets $25-$40, sunvalleycenter.org.

Avett Brothers

Booths will be set up at Sun Valley Festival Meadows from Friday, July 8-Sunday, July 10, featuring work from more than 100 Wood River Valley artists, as well as live music, dancers, poets, chefs, brewmeisters and a new children’s festival tent. ketchumartsfestival.com.

Ketchum Arts Festival

A celebration of the Old West, including a Fourth of July parade, Days of the Old West rodeo and community fireworks. Saturday, July 2-Monday, July 4. haileyidaho.com.

Hailey Days of the Old West

Ketchum Antiques Show comes to town during the Fourth of July weekend, Friday, July 1-Monday, July 4, at the Nexstage Theatre on Main Street. 208-720-5547.

Ketchum Antiques Show

Everyone loves a parade, especially one that marches through downtown Hailey, followed by a bike race hosted by the Blaine County Recreation District. The Fourth of July Bike Criterium features a carnival with bounce houses, face painting and children’s activities. haileyidaho.com.

Fourth of July

The annual music festival runs Friday, July 1-Saturday, July 2, at Bellevue Memorial Park. Music starts at 5 p.m. on Friday and noon on Saturday. Tickets $10 advance; $12 door. 208788-1526.

Bigwood Folk Festival

Watch as world-class ice skaters perform on the ice rink every Saturday from July 2-Sept. 3, at the Sun Valley Lodge. Tickets $54-$107, sunvalley.com.

Sun Valley Summer Ice Shows

More than 50 antique dealers will set up shop on Main St. Friday, July 1-Sunday, July 3.

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Sun Valley works its magic to attract leading acts — MATT F URBER —

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ntimate music venues are what make Sun Valley, said Kristine Bretall of the Sun Valley Center for the Arts, who has booked everyone from Bob Dylan to Michael Franti. “Even our big concerts max out at about 4,000 people, which means you can see your favorite performers in really small settings,” Bretall said. “One of the great things about Sun Valley Center concerts at River Run is that you can bring in a full picnic, sit wherever you want, see friends, mix and mingle, and have Baldy behind you with top-notch performers in front of you.” Booking shows in Sun Valley—including Groupo Fantasma, Avett Brothers, Rickie Lee Jones and Michael Franti and Spearhead, all scheduled for this summer—is like trying to win the lottery, Bretall said. “As everyone who spends time here knows—and secretly loves—it’s not easy to get here and we’re not close to any big cities. When trying to book big-name concerts, we have to try to find them as they are touring, and catch them when they’re nearby.” Peak Productions has booked Bela Fleck and the Original Flecktones and Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers, who will perform separately and together for a finale at the first Sun Valley Shakedown (sunvalleyshakedown. com) at the Sun Valley Festival Meadows on Thursday, July 28. “As a producer and a promoter here, you have to go beyond the people who live here. You just have to appeal to the region,” said Jay Fry, principal promoter of the Shakedown. John Mauldin, Sun Valley’s director of entertainment, who booked Bill Cosby, Alison

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Krauss and Union Station and the Robert Moses’ Kin Dance Company, said it helps when artists want to spend time in the area. “The public demands good entertainment,” Mauldin said. “If you don’t come through with good entertainment, I hear about it.” Fry said he and his supporters want The Shakedown to be a destination festival and he hopes to add a day to the event in 2012. Who performs in Sun Valley is also dictated by local interest, he added. “We’re almost too straight-laced for Widespread Panic. Would we do a Vans Warped Tour here? Probably not, but Boise would kill it ... It is a challenge to get the bigger artists here. You might think that Springsteen should love to come here because he stays here on vacation, but when you’re on tour, you’re working—vacation when it’s time for vacation.” Of course, some musicians are swayed by the beauty of Sun Valley and sometimes fit it in. “With the Avett Brothers, I’d been talking to their agent about them for about the last year and called him one day this winter to remind him of my interest. He’d just booked them in Colorado at Red Rocks and he was looking to fill in travel locations. Lottery win,” Bretall said with utter enthusiasm for the show. “All the stars lined up on this one, including having a venue available. They often don’t. But it’s wonderful to try to find the needle in the haystack, and this summer, I feel that I came up with four winning lottery tickets with our four concert series.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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occe at The Powerhouse Pub & Bike Fit Studio in Hailey and ping pong at Rickshaw in Ketchum are not the first things that come to mind for most gourmands contemplating dining options. However, patrons who love to mix mountain breezes with fresh homemade food will thrive on the bounty of the state Highway 75 culinary corridor. Veteran Ketchum chef Chris Kastner, owner of CK’s Real Food (320 S. Main St., Hailey) has perfected the outdoor dining experience. After 17 years with Ketchum’s former outdoor hotspot Evergreen, Kastner brought his outdoorsy style to Hailey, where the perennial gardens of his slow food establishment on Main Street, managed by master gardener Mary Ann Wuebker, are responsible for transforming at least a few Hailey visitors into regulars. It is common to see Kastner returning from Croy Canyon on his mountain bike before a shift. Even a small metal table and chair precariously perched on a curb allows diners to soak up the valley’s ambiance, but many substantial patios, decks and porches cater to dining en plein air. The outdoor games, including the chessboard in the Wicked Spud beer garden (305 N. Main St., Hailey), and especially the Sawtooths Putting Course at the Sun Valley Clubhouse (200 Trail Creek Road, Sun Valley), go well with cold beer or a bottle of sake. It is a fitting cool down from a day of outdoor adventure or after dipping into the artistic pursuits that breathe life into Sun Valley. Between the Timmerman Hill, U.S. Highway 20 and

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Highway 75 junction and Stanley in the Sawtooth Valley, nearly every restaurateur and coffee shop or pub owner offers some homage to the sun and fresh air, like the tiny but adequate portico at Wize Guy Pizza Pie (460 Sun Valley Road, Ketchum). The Hailey store shares a more spacious raised dining patio with large tables and umbrellas with Ketchum Burritos (126 S. Main St., Hailey) for those with the need to spread out. It also has more shade than some outdoor haunts for those feeling a little sun-weary. KBs offers a summer food cart in Ketchum on the curb by Sturtevants Mountain Outfitters (340 N. Main St.) for a ready meal enjoyed anywhere in the mountains. Even those sticking to the main drag will find many gastronomic enterprises with outdoor seating. A quick peek at the visitsunvalley.com dining guide opens even the repeat visitor to new tantalizing dining experiences. Take Oak Street Foods (109 Oak St., Bellevue), which has perhaps the quintessential garden patio for a leisurely lunch. The roomy deck at El Pastor (321 S. Main St., Bellevue) is a sunny treat for Mexican food aficionados. Don’t be surprised if their taco truck also shows up at any number of outdoor events. Hailey is a tough nut to crack for the passerby because there are so many choices. The Cowboy Cocina (111 N. First Ave., Ste. 1C, Hailey), secluded in the Meriwether Building, offers some comforting shade with bottomless swamp water for a hot day. The building is also home to one of the two Java coffee houses in the valley (191 Fourth St. W., Ketchum; 111 N. First Ave., Hailey), each with sunny outdoor spots for a morning espresso shot. Back to bocce, another thing that makes the Powerhouse

(411 N. Main St., Hailey) a delight, beyond the homemade ketchup and a beer list so lengthy it is in fine print, are the custom outdoor tables made by artist Nate Galpin—who is also contributing artistic bike racks with a group of other artists for the multi-million-dollar Woodside Boulevard reconstruction. Galpin’s contemporary, outdoor table designs and the Powerhouse ambiance smacks of Bavarian beer gardens. It feels proper to plunk a respectable pint on the sturdy wooden planks in sheer appreciation of Mother Nature’s finest. Shorty’s Diner (126 S. Main St., Hailey) has dependable umbrella seating that is sunny side up. On an unhurried morning when the orb is a little higher in the sky, another prime outdoor breakfast spot in the county seat is Zaney’s River Street Coffee House (208 N. River St., Hailey). It’s simply a good place to sip a hot brew, catch up on local happenings and contemplate life. Ketchum delivers the al fresco goods from the extended sidewalk in front of the sun-focused Coffee Grinder (321 E. Fourth St., Ketchum) to the rooftops of The Roosevelt Grill (280 Main St., Ketchum) and The Sawtooth Club (231 N. Main St., Ketchum), and the newer Sego Restaurant (131 N. Washington Ave., Ketchum)—all are outdoor venues with impeccable views. Back to ping pong, Rickshaw (460 N. Washington Ave., Ketchum) also stokes a fire for cooler evenings. An unrivaled old-world experience is certainly choosing an excellent wine to accompany the cuisine and ambiance of a meal outside at Michel’s Christiania Restaurant & Olympic Bar (303 N. Walnut Ave., Ketchum), not to be confused with Cristina’s Restaurant & Bakery (520 Second St. E., Ketchum), where a sumptuous outdoor lunch is nationally acclaimed. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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lthough Wood — MATT River Valley farmers markets take place on Tuesdays in Ketchum (East Avenue and Fourth Street) and Thursdays in Hailey (Main Street between Carbonate and Galena streets) from 2:30 p.m. to 6 p.m., fresh Idaho produce is available every day somewhere in the Sun Valley area. Because the growing season in the mountains is constrained by climate, in recent years, promoters of locavore living have developed strong ties to farmers in Southern Idaho communities from Picabo to Buhl. “We kind of fill in the gaps,” said Melinda Springs, who, with her husband Richard, runs the Wood River Sustainability Center. Springs has offered the center to Idaho’s Bounty, a non-profit food distribution cooperative that works with some 60 farmers, for its online orders for Wednesday pickup. Idaho’s Bounty and the Sustainability Center’s year-round indoor farmers market (308 S. River St., Hailey) work with many of the same farmers who create the profusion of fresh local veggies, herbs, trout and assorted goods, including fresh-baked breads, jewelry, photography, stained glass and clothing for the farmers markets. Fans and farmers post updates daily on Twitter and Facebook. “Buying local products is not like buyWWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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ing processed packaged products,” said Manon Gaudreau, a new U.S. resident from Quebec. She said she lets salad greens soak in water for an hour to restore crispness. “I have a goal to eat 80 percent local. That means buying local and processing myself. It can be time consuming, but it is like a hobby—to preserve your food for a week, you have to plan a little.” Gaudreau said one interesting fact about the increasing popularity of the farmers markets is that Southern Idaho farmers can rely a little less on exports and consumers less on imports. Some claim Idaho farmers could feed the entire state, which means that by feasting locally, Idahoans are helping to reduce the part of their carbon footprint that goes to trucking food. The less farmers spend on fuel, the more they earn and the more ecologically sustainable their enterprise becomes, said Richard Springs. That seems like reason enough to fill a market basket. Another is to soak in the festive atmosphere of the community wide food shopping spree. “I think the farmers market is an amazing event that happens in our community,” said Stephanie McCord, special events coordinator for the city of Ketchum. “It brings music, food, local artists and farmers from around the area together every week.”

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website. “It’s a subject that fascinates—and obsesses— D AN a huge number of people in T S I our community,” said Britt UdeART T HE ATIN Y S E sen, the center’s director of education A HUST T R U O C . ON, BOOK, 2008 and humanities. “I love it when we can find a subject that is pushing contemporary artists to make work that forces us to ask better questions and look more closely at what we already know. Plus, we’re showdventures in the ing really good movies and hosting good parties.” wilds of Idaho’s Wood River Valley are uniquely steeped “People who come here do all this amazing outdoor recrein a cosmopolitan brew of fine arts, from poignant theater and ation and you have the supporting backdrop of the arts,” said rousing classical concerts in the Sun Valley Pavilion to titillating Greg Randolph, the Wood River Valley’s marketing linchpin. paintings and sculptures by national and international artists “It’s so unique. It’s world-class recreation on this remote outduring a Friday evening gallery walk. post of civilization and it has New York City- and Los AngelesEven a passing visitor in July can get involved with one of level arts. We have a really unique proposition that highlights the Creative Jump-Ins! from Company of Fools (companyofthe center for the arts, Boulder Mountain Clayworks and the fools.org) and Sun Valley Center for the Arts. The one-time, [Sun Valley] Writers’ Conference. It’s world-class stuff.” two-hour, $25 classes are for people age 17 and older to learn Another summer tradition in Sun Valley is the August Sun a song and a dance, work on forming a British stage accent or Valley Center Arts & Crafts Festival at Atkinsons Park by develop abstract water color skills. the Hemingway Elementary School in Ketchum, which allows “Education is really an integral part of who we are here,” children to create art with a teaching artist for free. Projects are said Denise Simone, who served six terms with Idaho Arts different every day and mesh with what artists are working on. Commission and is a Company of Fools founding member. Past projects have included hat making, felting, painting, paSimone is leading July’s Act II course Stages of Memory, permaking, bookbinding and printmaking. Udesen said while which incorporates personal experience for adult thespians age there are no formal classes for adults, there are artist demon55 and older. “We have an amazing group of extended learners. strations from 1-4 p.m. each day of the festival. Arts education is such an important part of what we do.” Fine arts are prominent and successful in the Wood River Visitors can feel the benefit of dynamic community support, Valley because many people come from very urban areas and including a special Sun Valley Center for the Arts (191 Fifth want to have the same experience they might have in a city, St., Ketchum, sunvalleycenter.org) summer installation titled said Claudia McCain, president of the Wood River Arts AlliGeared: The Culture of Bicycles. Images of bicycle portraits ance and chair of the Ketchum Arts Commission, two organiare on display at the Hailey Center (314 Second Ave. S., Haizations that work to promote Sun Valley arts. ley)—on a very bicycle–friendly street—a hot spot for “a sumAs the draw to the Sun Valley arts scene expands, the mer’s worth of bike-related events, including classes, films and economy does as well, McCain said. an interactive outdoor installation,” according to the center’s “We’re going into our 27th season, and I think that the NE AN

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Sun Valley Summer Symphony is successful because of our widespread community support,” said Jennifer Teisinger, executive director for the symphony. That support is more than financial—although that part is substantial considering it’s the nation’s largest privately funded, free-admission symphony. “The community attendance keeps growing. We grew 25 percent from 2009 to 2010 in part because of our major marquis artist (Itzhak Perlman). We had 42,000 who attended concerts last year,” Teisinger said. Music education is also an important part of the symphony (svsummersymphony.org) with three main programs: the School of Music, a comprehensive year-round music program for local students; the Summer Music Workshops, a week-long music workshop for elementary through high school students held the first week of the symphony season each August; and the Adult Education Lecture Series, which is held during the symphony season and includes “Upbeat” with Music Director Alasdair Neale and pre-concert talks. “The audience is so appreciative. The orchestra musicians feel it. The guest artists feel it. They want to come back year after year,” Teisinger said. “It is an inspiring and supportive community that is enthusiastic about having the highest quality musicians here. The energy goes both ways and is transformative.” Reserve seating in the Sun Valley Pavilion goes to major donors, but there is usually space for those who choose to relinquish the picnic blanket and sit inside the state-of-the-art canopy. The thousands who choose to enjoy the views of Bald Mountain from the lawn, which also has a large-screen LED that shows the stage, are encouraged to picnic. “Our tag line for the Sun Valley Summer Symphony is ‘elevate your senses,’ which is a double entendre with the altitude and increasing your musical experience,” Teisinger said. “All five senses are engaged. We’ve got people eating and Baldy in the background. It can be any experience you want it to be. It doesn’t matter how much money you have and you don’t have to plan ahead.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends PEACE OUT—See Wednesday. 1-9 p.m. $40. Hyde Park Mennonite Fellowship, 1520 N. 12th St., Boise. SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP—Spanish conversation group. 6 p.m. FREE. Sapphire Bar & Grill, 622 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-7277.

FRIDAY JUNE 17

THE WIZARD OF OZ—Production of the beloved story in an outdoor setting. 8 p.m. $10-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middle Fork Road, Crouch, 208-462-5523, starlightmountaintheatre.com.

Art

MERIDIAN DAIRY DAYS—See Wednesday. Prices vary by event. Visit dairydays.org for more info and a complete schedule.

AN EVENING WITH EDGAR CAHN—Listen to the founder of TimeBanks USA speak about building stronger communities. 6 p.m. $25. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-3434611, owyheeplaza.com.

On Stage

Sports & Fitness

FLEMMING—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 Emerald St., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

CLASH OF THE TITANS—XFS No. 57 includes three superheavyweight fights. Andrew Nelson takes on undefeated champ Lowell “The Juggernaut” Urwin. 7 p.m. $7-$27. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-4242200 or box office 208-3318497, qwestarenaidaho.com.

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

PRIDE LEATHER NIGHT—Celebrate diversity within diversity. 9 p.m. $3. Lucky Dog, 2223 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-3330074, luckydogtavern.com.

Animals & Pets

ART SHOW: DEE MILLER—View Dee Miller’s new work and enjoy a glass of beer or wine. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Green Chutes, 4716 W. State St., Boise, 208-342-7111.

Talks & Lectures

Festivals & Events

Odds & Ends

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MOOO-VE OVER FOR BLACK DOGS—Dogs of all colors are invited to march in the Meridian Dairy Days parade to raise awareness of black dog syndrome. 7 p.m. FREE. Downtown Meridian.

SATURDAY JUNE 18 Festivals & Events BOISE PRIDE FESTIVAL—Enjoy a day of food, beer, wine, entertainment, live music and vendors—including A.L.P.H.A.— and celebrate Boise’s LGBT community. 11 a.m.-9 p.m. $3. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Boulevard, Boise. A HOMEBREWED SOULSTICE— Celebrate the solstice and join Radio Boise for an organic homebrew contest, live music, Radio Boise DJs and more. 6-11 p.m. FREE. MERIDIAN DAIRY DAYS—See Wednesday. Prices vary by event. Visit dairydays.org for more info and a complete schedule. ONE BY ONE 2011 COUNTRY FAIR—Bring the family for games, prizes, food and fun to raise funds for the Treasure Valley Children and Animal Support Program. Former Boise State football players Ian Johnson and Drisan James will be there and Chad Gold and will perform. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE, 1390 E. Mallory Lane, Meridian. PRIDE BLOCK PARTY—Wrap up Pride week with this end-of-Pride blowout party. Wild 101 will broadcast live from the roped-off parking lot. 9 p.m. $5, $3 with your festival ticket. Lucky Dog, 2223 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-333-0074, luckydogtavern. com. YE OLDE RENAISSANCE FAIRE—Children’s arts, puppet theater, storytelling, sword fighting, tournament games, archery, performers, food and vendors. Proceeds from the day will go to help orphans here in the Treasure Valley. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE ($5 vehicle parking fee), Eagle Island State Park, Eagle

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Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

On Stage THE COMPLETE WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)— Three actors armed with an outrageous assembly of outerwear and props cram all of Shakespeare’s plays and two sonnets into this two-hour show. See Picks, Page 18. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

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8 DAYS OUT FLEMMING—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 Emerald St., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. THE TWILIGHT ZONE—The Red Light Variety Show brings the Twilight Zone to life via ballet, burlesque, hula-hooping, belly dance and more. Purchase tickets at brownpapertickets.com. 9 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com. THE WIZARD OF OZ—See Friday. 8 p.m. $10-$24. Starlight Mountain Theatre, 850 S. Middle Fork Road, Crouch, 208-4625523, starlightmountaintheatre. com.

Food & Drink DECK PARTY AND BREWERS BASH—Sample the house beer, as well as beer from other area breweries, including Sockeye, the Ram and Tablerock. Proceeds from the evening will be donated to the Land Trust of the Treasure Valley to help save Harrison Hollow. See Food News, Page 30. 4-9 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow Brewhouse, 2455 Harrison Hollow Lane, 208-3436820, highlandshollow.com.

Sports & Fitness ALS CORN HOLE CHALLENGE—Help raise money to fund research for a cure for ALS by competing in this bag toss tournament. Visit yfals.com for more info. Noon. $50 per twoperson team. Hawks Memorial Stadium, 5600 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-5000, boisehawks.com.

WORLD REFUGEE DAY—Celebrate refugees’ heritages and contributions to the community. There will be music, food, crafts and more, as well as a naturalization ceremony for those who’ve taken the first steps toward becoming American citizens. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. The Grove, Boise.

Farmers Markets CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Capital City Public Market, Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, 208-345-9287, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. KUNA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-noon. FREE. Bernard Fisher Memorial Park, Swan Falls Road and Avalon Street, Kuna. MERIDIAN FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Crossroads shopping center at Eagle and Fairview roads. meridianfarmersmarket.com. MIDDLETON FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE, Roadside Park, middletonfarmersmarket.webs.com. NAMPA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Lloyd’s Square, nampafarmersmarket. com.

Odds & Ends RAINBOW PARTY—Wrap up Pride week with a dance party. 9 p.m. $5. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, Boise, 208336-1313, thebalconyclub.com.

SUNDAY JUNE 19 Festivals & Events SUMMER SOLSTICE OPEN RITUAL—Food, friends, fairies and fun. Bring a dish to share and dress up in your favorite pirate or fairy costume. Contact Woventear at 208-570-4247 for more info. 1 p.m. FREE, Eagle Island State Park, 2691 Mace Road, Eagle.

On Stage THE COMPLETE WORKS OF SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED)— See Saturday. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org. FLEMMING—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 4802 Emerald St., Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Food & Drink FATHER’S DAY MAN BRUNCH— Enjoy a beefed-up menu, draft beer, live music and more during this brunch to benefit the Women’s and Children’s Alliance. Call 208-343-3688, Ext. 11, to purchase tickets. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $35 adults, $15 kids younger than 12. Chandlers Steakhouse, 981 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-383-4300, chandlersboise.com.

FIESTA DE VIOLENCIA—The Treasure Valley Rollergirls go head-to-head with Cherry City. Visit treasurevalleyrollergirls.net for more info. 7 p.m. $10 general, $4 kids. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, qwestarenaidaho.com.

Citizen PRIDE RALLY AND PARADE—Meet at the Idaho Capitol to show your support for the LGBT community in Boise. This is also the starting point for the Pride Parade that goes through downtown to the Pride Festival at Ann Morrison Park. 10:30-11:30 a.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705. RECONSTRUCT BENEFIT FASHION SHOW—The theme for this year’s fashion show to benefit Dress For Success is The Illusionist. Reused, recycled and reconstructed styles will hit the runway and will be on display in for the week leading up to the big night. See Picks, Page 19. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com. Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT HAPPY PAPPY’S DAY—Bring dad out for a day of live music with the Hokum Hi-Flyers, Mama Mia’s lunch, local vendors, massages, golf contests and wine tastings. Noon-5 p.m. $10. Indian Creek Winery, 1000 N. McDermott Road, Kuna, 208-9224791, indiancreekwinery.com.

Farmers Markets EAST END MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Bown Crossing, Bown Street, end of Parkcenter Boulevard, Boise. SUNDAY MARKET—Local artisans showcase their arts and crafts, jewelry, clothing, food and more during this indoor market. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3850111, thelinenbuilding.com.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 22 Festivals & Events ALIVE AFTER FIVE—See Wednesday, June 15. 5 p.m., The Grove, downtownboise.org.

On Stage

Farmers Markets

THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA—See Wednesday, June 15. 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, idahoshakespeare.org.

CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—5-8 p.m. FREE. Located on the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library.

Odds & Ends Literature BOISE NOVEL ORCHARD—Writers meet to edit and critique each other’s work. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO—Buy, sell, trade and listen to vinyl records with other analog musical enthusiasts. 7-10 p.m. FREE, vpsidaho.org. Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244.

MONDAY JUNE 20 On Stage INSERT FOOT THEATRE—Local improv comedy. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, heirloomdancestudio.com.

Workshops & Classes WRITERS WORKSHOP—Best-selling author Robert Dugoni will lead a workshop for aspiring writers. Call 208-376-4229 to register. 11:30 a.m. Smoky Mountain Pizza and Pasta, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-429-0011, smokymountainpizza.com.

Literature AUTHOR TALK: ROBERT DUGONI—The New York Times best-selling author will discuss his work, including his most recent legal thriller, Murder One, during this fundraiser to benefit the Idaho Human Rights Education Center. 7 p.m. Donations appreciated. Congregation Ahavath Beth Israel, 11 N. Latah St., Boise, 208-343-6601, ahavathbethisrael.org.

Food & Drink BSA TROOP 91 SPAGHETTI FEED—Support Boy Scout Troop 91 and enjoy a spaghetti dinner. 6-7 p.m. $7.50. Maple Grove Grange, 11692 W President Drive, Boise.

Odds & Ends TRIVIA NIGHT—Usually the previous week’s losing team gets to pick the theme, but this week is Pride, and that means gay-themed trivia with Matt Bragg. 8 p.m. FREE. Pitchers and Pints, 1108 W. Front St., Boise, 208-906-1355.

TUESDAY JUNE 21 On Stage THE TWO GENTLEMEN OF VERONA—See Wednesday, 8 p.m. $12-$40. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-3369221, idahoshakespeare.org.

Literature SCREENWRITERS GROUP—Practice pitching your screenplay during this meeting of the Idaho Screenwriters Group. Idaho Pizza Company, 405 E. Fairview Ave., 208-375-4100, idahopizzacompany.com.

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LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY JUNE 15 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: GRUPO FANTASMA— With Oso Negro. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove A.L.P.H.A. BENEFIT CONCERT—Featuring Hillfolk Noir, The Numbats and more. 7 p.m. $5 donation. Neurolux

OKKERVIL RIVER, JUNE 17, EGYPTIAN THEATRE The members of Okkervil River are feeling a bit worse for the wear. Blown tires, busted fenders, marooned tour buses and engine trouble have kept the band down. “Some wild shit’s happened, but hopefully all of our bad luck is out of the way so that now we can just make it from show to show and perform,” said bassist Patrick Pestorius. As long as they avoid further issues, the indie-rock statesmen are scheduled to perform in Boise this week. The group plans to mix in a number of OR staples, as well as some old deep cuts. A large portion of the material will be from their new record, I Am Very Far (Jagjaguwar, 2011)—an ambitious and grandiose rock album that exhibits the band’s growth with dense arrangements, lush soundscapes, polished production and as always, outstanding lyrical content. Hard-rocking New Jersey quintet Titus Andronicus will open the show. —Stephen Foster 8 p.m., $18 adv., $21 day of show. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net.

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AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid DR. JOE AND OLIVER—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown FACE TO FACE—With Strung Out and Blitzkid. 7 p.m. $18-$35. Knitting Factory GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s INSIDIOUS DECREPANCY— With Abolishment of Flesh, The Deep and End of All Flesh. 9 p.m. $5. Red Room JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SUPER SOULFIGHTER—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

RYAN WISSINGER—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

THE THROWDOWN—Featuring After Abbey, The Higher Council and Holistic Meditation. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SOUL SERENE—With Airstream Safari. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

CHIODOS—With The Color Morale, The Air I Breathe, Here Til We’re Dead, We Are The Broken, Unto The Legions and For The Sake Of. 7 p.m. $5. The Venue

SOULCRATE AND PROF—9 p.m. $5. Reef

ESTHETIC EVOLUTION—7:30 a.m. $45-$70. Twin Springs

STEVE FULTON AND TIM WILLIS—6 p.m. FREE. The Modern

JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TRAVIS MCDANIEL BAND—9 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

THURSDAY JUNE 16 ALLEN WENTZ AND FRIENDS—8 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

TIM MCGRAW—7 p.m. $49.75$65.75. Idaho Center

FRIDAY JUNE 17

DOWNTOWN NAMPA NIGHTS: HIGH STREET—5:30 p.m. FREE. Lloyd Square

ANDY FRASCO—10 p.m. $5. Reef

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

AUDIOPHILIA—9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE—Featuring the Ben Burdick Trio with Amy Weber. 6:30 p.m. $10. IBG

BLACK LIPS—With Cerebral Ballzy and Teens. See Listen Here, Page 25. 8 p.m. $15-$35. Knitting Factory

KEVIN KIRK—With Steve Eaton and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LAST BAND STANDING—9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE LONELY FOREST—With Youth Lagoon. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

REBECCA SCOTT—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

RIZING TIDE—8 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Eagle

ANTIOQUIA—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

BLAZE AND KELLY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub BOISE ROCK SCHOOL END OF SESSION GIG—4 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Linen Building CAKE—See Picks, Page 18. 6:30 p.m. $35. IBG

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire LIKE A ROCKET—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid NEXT IN LINE—9 p.m. FREE. Bouquet OKKERVIL RIVER—With Titus Andronicus. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $18 adv., $21 door. Egyptian Theatre PILOT ERROR—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

SATURDAY JUNE 18 ANTIOQUIA—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid AUDIOPHILIA—9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE DAX RIGGS—With Reprobates and Jane’s Plaine Wreck. 9 p.m. $10. Red Room

DR. JOHN AND THE LOWER 911—8 p.m. $28.50-$75. Knitting Factory

EDDIE VALIANT—10 p.m. FREE. Reef

ESTHETIC EVOLUTION—9 a.m. $45-$70. Twin Springs

ESTHETIC EVOLUTION—8 a.m. $45-$70. Twin Springs

ESTHETIC EVOLUTION AFTERPARTY—Featuring DJ Odissi. 10 p.m. $5. Reef

GET THE LEAD OUT—Featuring 57 Heavy, Calderra and Defenders. 8 p.m. $5 donation. Bouquet GIZZARD STONE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JON HYNEMAN—With Sally Tibbs and Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MORTAL ENEMY—With A Constant North and Scorch the Fallen. 8 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid TALK MATH TO ME—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire X-KID AND DANK P.—With Krude Love, ValerMusicHD, DPro, JBoi, Yung Skillz and Double O Ryderz. 9 p.m. $5. Neurolux

GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers NEO TUNDRA COWBOY—9 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

MONDAY JUNE 20 BROCK BARTEL—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid LARRY BUTTEL—7 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny PAULY ZARB AND ROB MEHL—8 p.m. FREE. Reef PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SUNDAY JUNE 19 BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

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THURSDAY—With Colour Revolt and Unitahs. 7:30 p.m. $12$25. Knitting Factory

TUESDAY JUNE 21 DAKOTA MAD BAND—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye KEVIN KIRK—With Cheryl Morrell Trio. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LEO RONDEAU—With Vandaveer. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Bouquet RAY LAMONTAGNE AND THE PARIAH DOGS—With Brandi Carlile and the Secret Sisters. 6 p.m. $35. IBG

AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s HIP-HOP NIGHT—Featuring Burnell Washburn, GeorgeLife, Pigpen and Pat Maine, Charles Engels and the Family Matters, DJ Rukus, the Boise B Boys, P-Dirt and Oso Negro. 9 p.m. FREE. Red Room

RUSS PFEIFER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SAD SONG TOUR 2011— Featuring Jeremiah Clark and Erin Dawes. 7 p.m. $10. Community Center

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SERYN—With Priory. 9 p.m. $3. Reef

PRIORY—With A Seasonal Disguise. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage RICHMOND FONTAINE—8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

WEDNESDAY JUNE 22 ALIVE AFTER FIVE: BROTHERS COMATOSE—With Sarah Sample. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove

SOUL SERENE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub THE THROWDOWN—Featuring The Defenders, Scorch the Fallen and White Bread. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid TIM STILES—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

BLACK LIPS, JUNE 17, KNITTING FACTORY If a band has the word “black” in its name, the music may have an edge: Black Flag, Black Sabbath, The Black Keys, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, maybe even Blackalicious and Black Mountain. Black Eyed Peas are definitely the exception to the rule—but Black Lips aren’t. The Atlanta-based band’s surfy punk may not be new—that ’60s sound has seen a resurgence of late—but there is something fun and fierce in Black Lips’ jangly guitar riffs and middle-finger-in-your-face lyrics, like from “Bad Kids”: “Bad kids / all my friends are bad kids / Product of no dad kids ... / Toilet paper on the yard / Six F’s on my report card / Smoke cigs in the bathroom stall / Spray paint penis on the wall.” The Black Lips’ sound is more refined on the newly released Arabia Mountain (Vice, June 7), but it’s still a barrage of badassery, and coupled with raucous shows, Black Lips lives up to the darkness in its name. —Amy Atkins With Cerebral Ballzy and Teens. 8 p.m., $15-$35. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

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NEWS/ARTS ARTS/VISUAL

Beverly Macaulay, 1st place winner in the 32nd annual Idaho Watercolor Society Exhibition.

ANNUAL ART, ANNUAL AWARDS Take a respite from the rainy weather and dive into the 32nd Annual Idaho Watercolor Society Juried Membership Exhibition at Boise State. Juried by internationally renowned contemporary watercolorist Sterling Edwards, this year’s selections are as diverse as its participants are talented. Among the fulgent winter- and mountain-scapes you might expect to find in an exhibit of watercolors, the walls are lined with portraits of people, llamas, fowl, machinery and more. In a letter to the entrants, Edwards described his criteria as based heavily on bold composition and originality: It’s difficult to find something that has not been painted numerous times by various artists. Taking a little artistic license, however, can make a world of difference in creating a unique piece of art that commands attention. Marcia Warne, publicity chairwoman for IWS, said Edwards encountered some obstacles while judging the entries. “He said that this show was very difficult to judge, as it was one of the best shows he has ever seen,” Warne said. Those paintings found to exemplify the watercolor medium received awards from the juror, IWS and other sponsors. In addition, the top 20 paintings will comprise a traveling exhibit that will show in four locations throughout Idaho between August and November. The exhibit is open for viewing from 7 a.m.-10 p.m. daily through Thursday, June 23, at Boise State’s Student Union Building Galler y. In news of other winners, the recipients of the 2011 Mayor’s Awards for Excellence in Art and History were announced on June 6. Here are this year’s honorees: Excellence in Arts-Individual: Surel Mitchell; Excellence in History-Individual: Mark Baltes; Excellence in Arts-Organization: The Cabin; Excellence in History-Organization: Basque Museum and Cultural Center; Business-Support for the Arts: Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center; Business-Support for History: Planmakers (John Bertram); Excellence in Art Education-Organization: Idaho Shakespeare Festival; Excellence in Art Education-Individual: Leah Stephens Clark; Excellence in History-Education: Doug StanWiens, Boise School District; Lifetime Achievement: Jane Oppenheimer (posthumously); Lifetime Achievement: Tim Woodward, retired, Idaho Statesman. For more information on tickets to the awards ceremony, which takes place on Thursday, Sept. 22, visit boiseartsandhistory.org. —Amy Atkins and Shelby Soule

26 | JUNE 15–21, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Poster Party artists from left to right: Mark Curtis, Ryan Lascano and James Lloyd.

PARTY EVERY DAY Getting down with the inaugural Poster Party TARA MORGAN BBP is currently knee-deep in a fund-raising Bikes are more than functional, kinetic campaign to buy its building, located at 1027 machines; they’re also aesthetic contraptions, Lusk St. The open house campaign kick-off works of art even. Their greasy gears and nubevent raised $31,000 in pledges in a single by tires hold memories—your first, tear-filled night. Sadly, BBP was robbed on June 11 and wobbly ride or tearing through back alleys as more than $1,000 in cash and merchandise a teen, watching dust clouds froth forth. was stolen. [For more information on that “As a kid, I grew up riding a bike. story, turn to Citydesk on Page 8.] It’s kind of your first real brush with “Right now we’re raising funds with a freedom,” said Boise State graphic design capital campaign called Biking to Buy the student James Lloyd. Building, and our goal is to raise about Lloyd is one of 31 artists participating in $115,000 by Oct. 1, that will help us purchase the inaugural Poster Party on Thursday, June the building and really establish ourselves as 16, a benefit event that aims to unite the bike a permanent fixture in Boise,” explained BBP and design communities. His submission, co-founder Jimmy Hallyburton. “Raising Cane,” depicts a roving gang of Though BBP hasn’t had a direct hand in orbiking boys—Band-Aids, V-necks, headphones ganizing the Poster Party, the group is psyched and backward caps all gleaming under the night sky. A kid with a ski mask reaches out to to be involved. “Events like this one are great because high-five a dude carrying a Samurai sword as we’re always working hard down here to get ghosts of howling wolves float from the trees. more people on bikes, teaching people how to “I thought about hanging out with my fix things, so that often doesn’t leave us a lot friends and making trouble … The scene is of time to go out there and plan these really just a bunch of kids going out and freeing cool events ... It’s just a their animal spirits,” huge load off of us and said Lloyd. something that we alPoster Party orgaways want to be a part nizers Sarah Lunstrum Thursday, June 16, 6-10 p.m. FREE. of,” said Hallyburton. and Russ Stoddard OLIVER RUSSELL BUILDING When Lunstrum had a simple thought 217 S. 11th St. and Stoddard first process when organiz208-440-8134 started soliciting artboisebikebrigade.com ing the event: They like ists for the event—lobikes. They like art. cal household names And they like nonproflike Grant Olsen, Erin its. So why not squish Cunningham, Kelly Knopp, Julia Green, Erin them all together? Ruiz and Ben Wilson, along with a slew of “We had 31 artists design a bike-themed up-and-comers—they were surprised at how poster and printed 30 of each of those prints, intertwined the bike and art worlds can be so 930 total posters. Those will be sold for in Boise. $30 each,” said Lunstrum. “Half of the “It so happens all of the artists love bicyproceeds go to the artists, so they’re going to cling too, so that was really convenient,” said get paid depending on how much they sell … Lunstrum, laughing. “We just said, ‘It’s openand then also proceeds are going to go toward ended, whatever you want to do.’” the Boise Bicycle Project and their capital That open-ended thematic approach, while campaign.”

liberating, was also a challenge for some designers, who are used to more rigid guidelines. “Usually in design, it’s easier to have constraints. It kind of makes the creative process flow a little bit better,” said graphic designer Ryan Lascano. “So just figuring out ... what bikes and bicycling, what that meant to me, what I was interested in. It was a little bit challenging.” Lascano’s poster depicts a charming French cafe scene—complete with cobblestone streets and the requisite Eiffel Tower—with a vintage orange cruiser chained up to a street post. “In my design work, I look to history to inform my creative process a lot,” said Lascano. “So I did some research on the history of bicycles, and the first proper bicycle was built in France in the 1860s … I travel a lot, so I think of European patio culture and bike culture.” But according to Lunstrum, Lascano’s straightforward, scenic approach wasn’t the norm. At least half of the submissions—like illustrator Julia Green’s poster featuring headdress-clad Native Americans on bicycles shooting arrows at buffalo—feature animals prominently. “There’s a lot of animals incorporated with bicycles, which we were kind of surprised about,” said Lunstrum. “I guess it just goes to show you how much people in this area really love animals—animals and bicycles.” The Poster Party, a BW Cover Auction Grant recipient, was originally slated to be at Studio J but has been moved to the Oliver Russell “I Love You” Building at 217 S. 11th St. In addition to limited-edition bike-themed poster art, there will also be a live graffiti performance by Sector 17, music by DJ Pedro/ Audiomedics and beer from Payette Brewing. “I knew they’d be good, but I’m just surprised they’re as good as they are,” said Lunstrum, describing the poster submissions. “But I shouldn’t be, because they’re all our favorite artists.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

CABLE ONE MOVIE NIGHT—Bring your lawn chairs, snacks (or purchase some there), blankets and the entire family to watch a flick on an inflatable screen in the park every Friday night at dusk this summer. The movie this week is State Fair, rated G. FREE, Settler’s Park, corner of Meridian and Ustick roads, Meridian, meridiancity.org/ movienight. HALO EFFECT—Catch pro kayaker Steve Fisher and his brother in this whitewater action movie. Saturday, June 18, 7:30 p.m. $13 adv., $15 door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. LORD OF THE RINGS: THE TWO TOWERS EXTENDED EDITION—Special screening of the second installment of the Lord of the Rings trilogy. Tuesday, June 21, 7 p.m. $12.50. Edwards Boise Stadium 22 and IMAX, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-9603, regmovies.com.

MOVIES UNDER THE STARS—Bring the family to the park for an evening of games, crafts and family friendly entertainment. There will be live music, games, crafts and more before the movie begins at dusk. Bring snacks from home if you wish (some will be available for purchase), a blanket, flashlight and camp chairs—but leave pets at home. The movie this month is Megamind, rated PG. See Picks, Page 18. 7 p.m. FREE. Gene Harris Bandshell, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., in Julia Davis Park, Boise, cityofboise.org/parks. PRIDE MOVIE NIGHT—Social hour on the patio is at 6 p.m., followed by the Idaho premiere of Bill Cunningham New York, a film about the infamous street fashion photographer. 6 p.m. $9. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

Opening

Super 8 is a super film GEORGE PRENTICE One down, nine to go. I’m locking in my first of 10 nominations for Best Picture of 2011. I know, I know, it’s only June. But in less than a week, I’ve already thrilled to Super 8 twice—it was even more exciting the second go-round. Super 8 is that rare blend of blockbuster fun sustained by a memorable story and heartIn 1979, a kid had to wait days to see what kind of mysterious thing he may have captured on film. tugging performances. Director J.J. Abrams (Lost, Star Trek) and played by Elle Fanning. producer Steven Spielberg (what planet do you saving the day brings up memories of Lost, The grownups are great, too, in particular but Super 8 is, if nothing else, original. It’s not live on if you need a list of his credits?) have Kyle Chandler as a deputy sheriff and Joe’s once again made it utterly entertaining to go to a sequel and the ending is airtight, and those widowed dad. Always great in TV’s Friday factors alone set it apart from everything else a summer movie. A tried-but-true formula of Night Lights, Chandler has been waiting for a this summer. pitting ordinary people against extraordinary A big hand for Joel Courtney, the little man breakout role like this. Super 8 should do for challenges is a hit-or-miss proposition. But him what Jaws did for Roy Scheider. from Moscow, Idaho. when the characters Baby boomers will have a blast with this The 14-year-old stars are complex and funny, film, as the setting is mid-America in 1979. as Joe, the film’s young and are required to SUPER 8 (PG-13) hero. His wonderment When Abrams drops in references to The muster the better part Directed by J.J. Abrams Match Game, Walter Cronkite, The Knack is a testament to a of themselves to face Starring Elle Fanning, Joel Courtney, (“My Sharona”) and the Walkman, it’s like highly skilled director the unknown, it’s a Kyle Chandler swimming in your memory’s backyard pool. (and it’s likely that cinematic treat. Now playing at Edwards 9 and Edwards 22 Ultimately, Super 8 does what great movZen master Spielberg While Abrams ies do best: It entertains your socks off. The helped wrangle the and Spielberg evoke a special effects are excellent, the humor is milkkids’ performances, style not unlike some out-of-your-nose funny and the characters’ too). Courtney, in his film debut, performs as of their previous films, they never seem to be relationships guarantee a lump in the throat. If well as anyone three times his age. He’s surripping off their own genres. Sure, scenes of rounded by a goofy crew of friends and a love you only see one movie this summer, make it young boys riding their bikes at twilight are Super 8. If you see two, see Super 8 twice. reminiscent of E.T., and anti-heroes reluctantly interest—or at least crush—Alice Dainard,

SCREEN/THE TUBE C.K. doing standup, but more than even his comedy, the show feels like a voyeuristic peek into C.K.’s With all of the TV shows that are canceled every year—sometimes real world as he goes about his daily life—grothey’re even garroted mid-season—a sigh of relief and a cheer follow cery shopping, dating, working out, news of a particularly brilliant show’s survival. taking his daughters to school, New seasons of both Louie (on FX) and Futurama (on Season two of Louie masturbating—while dealing Comedy Central) will air on Thursday, June 23. Huzzah! premieres at 11:30 with the paralyzing effects p.m. on FX. Futurama Futurama is an animated series about a group of misfits airs at 11 p.m. on of loneliness and fear. that run an interplanetary delivery service in the 31st cenComedy Central. It is both a drama and a tury. It was on the air from 1999-2003 and then returned in comedy, often painfully at 2008, something that seldom happens in television outside the same time. of remakes. Futurama and Louie are safe for Its success is due in part to creator Matt Groening’s character develthe immediate future—Futurama opment. His humans, aliens and mutants—though two-dimensional— is renewed for two years, Louie are deeper, funnier and more engaging than many a sitcom star. And for one. It’s good that both Futurama’s time (the future) and setting (the universe) allow for endless have found an audience plotlines and a host of characters from an acerbic robot to a cyclopean and it just goes to show ship’s captain. that sometimes Then there’s Louie, which is created, produced, edited and directed smart people do by stand-up comedian Louis C.K. It is attractive for the opposite reaturn on the televison—it’s visceral, which makes it as discomfiting as it is funny. sion. C.K. is a working comic in his 40s, recently divorced, raising two —Amy Atkins kids—so is the title character of the show. The show includes cut-ins of

INTO THE FUTURAMA WITH LOUIE

BILL CUNNINGHAM NEW YORK—Documentary profiling the octogenarian Bill Cunningham, whose photography of both street and high society trends for The New York Times earned him legendary status. (NR) Flicks GREEN LANTERN—Tasked with maintaining peace within the universe, the Green Lanterns recruit Hal, a cocky test pilot, to help them defeat a villain threatening the universal order. (PG 13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

ABRAMS’ INSTANT SUMMER CLASSIC

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LISTINGS/SCREEN NEW DVD RELEASE/SCREEN

MR. POPPER’S PENGUINS—Jim Carrey stars in this movie based on a childhood tale about a businessman whose professional life begins to unravel when he acquires penguins. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 28

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code.

VANISHING OF THE BEES When most people think of bees, they think of sweet honey or painful stings. But the insect is a key factor in our agriculture, responsible for pollinating two-thirds of all foods that we eat. Narrated by actor Ellen Page, Vanishing of the Bees takes a hard look at the complex problem that is causing a rapid decline in the honeybee population. Covering the history behind man’s relationship with bees, the film investigates economic, political and ecological implications connected to our lives. An official selection for the International Wildlife Film Festival, the Colorado Environmental Film Festival and the San Francisco Documentary Film Festival, Vanishing of the Bees raises more questions as to what we can do now and what we will face in the future.

HALL PASS Hall Pass, the latest in slapstick humor from the Farrelly Brothers (Dumb and Dumber, The Heartbreak Kid), delivers laughs with simple jokes and one-liners. Rick (Owen Wilson) and Fred (Jason Sudeikis) are given what amounts to a hall pass in their marriages: one week to do whatever they want, no questions asked. With encouragement from their envious friends, the pair spends the seven days trying to get some action with outdated pickup lines. Their wives (Jenna Fischer, Christina Applegate) have their doubts and participate in the free-for-all as well to make for an interesting ending. Though the overall message may appeal to women, the movie’s crude jokes make this one for the guys, too. —Elizabeth Duffy

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

NEWS/SCREEN Winners of the 2011 i48 film competition were announced on June 12 at the Egyptian Theatre and are as follows. In the novice category—Best Film and Best Sound: The Driver, No Business Even Trying This; Second Best Film: Boiz Noize, Lampost Prod.; Best Use of Dialogue: Techno Lies, LCMS Dream Team; Best Use of Prop: Thunder Rack, The Fighting Cocks; Best Use Use of Dialogue: Trinkets, Whitefire; Best Use of Character: To Sunday, All Fools Prod.; Best of Prop: Sum Ting Wong, Mirandize This; Best Sound: The Driver, No Business Even Use of Character: Solitaire, the RelucTrying This; Best Cinematography: Tag tant Do-Gooders; Best Actress: Lina Along, Cinema Verita; Best Actress: Chambers from Beard’s Company, MovHaley Ganatos from Joy Ride, Dapper ing Parts, and Rachel Lamar from DeGents Prod.; Best Actor: Darrin Bush parture, Bumblebird Films; Best Actor: from Boiz Noize, Lampost Prod. Dusty Aunan from Beard’s Company, In the open category—Best Moving Parts. And the Boise Film, Best Cinematography, Best Weekly Audience Award went to Visit boiseweekly.com Sound: Beard’s Company, Moving Departure, Bumblebird Films. and click on “Video” to Parts; Second Best Film: Wheels —Amy Atkins see all of the i48 entries. of Healing, Rank Amateurs. Best WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

ZA CH GA NSCHO W

2011 I48 WINNERS

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NEWS/FOOD FOOD/YEAR OF IDAHO FOOD ALI WAR D

Jamie Oliver demonstrates the revolutionary art of cooking with fresh ingredients.

THE FOOD REVOLUTION WILL BE TELEVISED Following in the footsteps of Manhattan Grill, Texas Boogie and Boogie Woogies, The BrickYard will soon become Boise’s newest dueling piano bar/restaurant. “It is a steakhouse … We’ll be more casual by lunch, no tablecloths, no linens,” said owner Chad Johnson. “By evening, we’ll be tablecloths and candlelight ... All of our entrees come with a salad service that’s prepared table-side.” Johnson, who also owns Reef, The Front Door and Legends Pub and Grill, will open The BrickYard in the old Idaho Statesman Building on Sixth and Main streets, former home to Red Room. The kitchen, run by Chef Jeremy Haskell, will focus on USDA prime and USDA choice beef cuts sourced from Midwest corn-fed cattle. Menu prices run from $18 to $40. “Whatever a guest is willing to pay, that’s the guest that we target … It caters to a clientele that doesn’t think about menu prices or doesn’t think about wine bottle prices,” said Johnson. In an interesting twist, The BrickYard will also aim for the late-night crowd, with dueling pianos from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Johnson hopes to be open by late June. For the full story, visit Cobweb at boiseweekly.com. If you cringe every time Rachael Ray says, “E-V-O-O” or Gordon Ramsay throws a kitchen tantrum, Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution is a show for you. Oliver strives to raise awareness about the foods we put in our bodies, where they come from and why they’re making us sick. Angela Levesque recently started a Boise chapter of the Food Revolution on Facebook, which aims to “get people back into their kitchens, cooking whole, nutritious food with their families.” For more info, visit facebook.com/boiseidfoodrevolution. In brews news, Saturday, June 18, is gearing up to be a badass beer day. Highlands Hollow Brewhouse, Sockeye Grill and Brewery, The Ram and TableRock Brewpub are all teaming up for the Highlands Hollow Deck Party and Brewer’s Bash from 4-9 p.m. The event will feature samples of microbrews and half of the proceeds will go to the Land Trust of the Treasure Valley to help purchase and protect the 58-acre Harrison Hollow property. Also on Saturday is the Fourth Annual All Idaho Hausbrau Battle and Organic Homebrew Challenge. The $5 public judging portion will go down from 4-6 p.m. at Fatty’s, with an awards ceremony at 7 p.m. during Boise Community Radio’s Solstice Block Party. For more info, email matt@ idahobeerunited.org. —Tara Morgan

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Getting back to the root of where our food comes from is both beneficial and educational.

OLD MCDOWNTOWN HAD A FARM Boise High Teaching Farm is all about science and community AMY ATKINS in science: soil, water, horticulture. And the Near the oldest high school and one of the budget for field trips had been eliminated. most majestic churches in Boise sat a half“We have a number of kids at different block parcel of fallow, weedy land. Situated academic levels,” Quissell said. “And kids at the corner of 12th and Fort streets, the coming from out of the country. All of the space could easily have lived out the rest of students at high-school level will continue to its life as a parking lot. Fortunately, for a couple of years, it found a rebirth as a com- need more science and math credits to graduate. On my mind was that some of those kids munity garden. ... might not want to take AP classes. I got But while a backyard garden takes a great deal of work to maintain, imagine the to thinking, ‘What if we could get a garden space and teach kids at Boise High gardenwork involved in the upkeep of a commuing, planting, real-life skills? [We could] use nity garden that takes up one-fourth of a the garden to talk about botany, genetics, a city block. The space had again begun to whole variety of science concepts.” resemble a weed farm—until Boise High Quissell put his head together with fellow School science teachers Erik Quissell and Boise High science teacher Ali Ward, and Ali Ward decided to get a little dirty. In January, the Treasure Valley Food Co- the two began to imagine what an incredible teaching tool a garden alition hosted a luncheon for so close to the school could a number of people involved be. Not only would it benefit in food production to kick off For more information and students, but Ward said she the Year of Idaho Food after contacts, visit downtownteachingfarm.blogspot.com. saw it as a way to benefit the a resolution to support Idaho community as a whole. food growers was passed by “We can use this as a the Idaho Legislature. From model of how to rehabilitate that luncheon, the seeds of the a space,” Ward said. Downtown Teaching Farm were sown. As an added benefit, they realized they Quissell was at the “education” table, could blend science and community-buildand the stories and ideas flew like casserole ing lessons with the school’s family and dishes being passed around a Thanksgivconsumer science classes (what we used to ing meal. Diana Ellis, who used to teach at North Junior High School, talked about her call home economics). But before they could school’s garden-to-plate program, and Quis- start digging up dirt and planting potatoes, they had to receive permission to use the sell began to formulate an idea that Boise property, which belongs to the First United High School could turn the community Methodist Church Cathedral of the Rockies garden into a learning experience. across the street. Boise High science students needed Quissell, who happens to be a member practical application lessons (and credits)

of the church’s congregation, said it was simple: He just asked the church if they could lease the space. The church said “yes,” and now Boise High currently has a one-year lease for the property. What grows on the farm will be used to supplement local food banks like the Idaho Foodbank and the church’s pantry and will help with the church’s weekly “friendship feast,” which feeds the poor and underserved. At the Downtown Teaching Farm, lime, kelly and olive green colors are sprouting from raised beds and mostly even rows of produce that run the length of the farm, which Ward affectionately but tiredly calls “humongous.” Quissell guessed that there are at least a dozen different types of vegetables growing—pumpkins, potatoes, corn, chard, peppers and more—and there’s even a “pizza garden” (a suggestion that came from Ward’s daughter) that includes basil, wheat and tomatoes. That humongousness coupled with a late start and an extra crop that is Ward and Quissell’s bane—goatheads—means that the farm needs more than two science teachers and a few volunteer students to keep it alive and well this season. Ward said they got a generous water donation from United Water, but they are also going to need a few thousand gallons of elbow grease to make this season’s farm a success, and volunteers are very welcome. They also need to get rid of the goatheads. “If anyone out there has an organic way to remove weeds, we’d love to hear from them,” Quissell said. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BEER GUZZLER/FOOD DISH/FOOD Restaurants get one chance to hit BW with their best shot. LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

Sapphire Bar and Grill’s Garnet Burger is a juicy gem.

SAPPHIRE BAR AND GRILL Downtown has no shortage of places where you can get your grind on while shouting yourself hoarse and drinking yourself stupid. What it’s short on is the sorts of places to have a good sit, a nice beer and maybe something delicious and fried. That’s co-owner Mario Rojas’ goal with Sapphire Bar and Grill. “I just wanted to open the kind of place people are going to love to come to and have a good time and have some stiff fucking drinks,” said Rojas. Sapphire’s location at Capitol Boulevard and Idaho Street is the perfect venue for that. The interior is a combo of dark wood and copper, with high ceilings and stylish glass shelves. It’s equal parts old-time saloon and modern steakhouse and has the potential to fill a much-needed culinary gap in downtown. Rojas insists that nothing he serves comes from a box. Sapphire presses its own burger patties, gets its bread from the bakery next door and handcuts its fries. It also make its own Guinness batter for the black-and-tan onion rings. But after being open less than a year, Rojas admits they’re still workSAPPHIRE BAR AND GRILL ing out some kinks. 622 W. Idaho St. On a recent Tuesday, the 208-363-7277 atmosphere was sterile and awkward. Instead of music to sooth the savage ambiance, the Dallas Mavericks were playing the Miami Heat on multiple screens with the sound up. The Garnet Burger ($8.95), a patty glazed with balsamic and dressed up in smoked cheddar, bacon and crispy fried onion straws, sounded delicious. But it arrived sans bacon, and with the balsamic and crispy onion straws sparsely concentrated, making the intended overall flavor combination inconsistent. It had the potential to be great but didn’t quite make it. Instead, like most burgers, it was just satisfying. To be fair, apparently the chef that day had only been on the job a week and was still learning the menu. The fries, however, were already great: unpeeled potatolength wedges like sections of an orange, lightly battered and crusted with seasoning. They were thick and wonderfully textured outside and in. Served with a housemade fry sauce, they were practically a meal in themselves. These are fries fit for a state known for its potatoes. Downtown needs the sort of place that Sapphire Bar and Grill can be. And it has all the pieces of the puzzle. Only time will tell if it can put them together into something great. —Josh Gross WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BLACK IPAS This decidedly American entry (credit is given to Vermont brewer Greg Noonan) combines roasted malts, which add flavor and color, with a fairly aggressive hop profile that gives it a nice bite. Just the thing for our unseasonably cool latespring weather. REEL SWORDFISH DOUBLE CASCADIAN DARK ALE Cascadian Dark is an alternative moniker for the style, and this one from Washington’s Fish Brewing is about as dark as they come. It’s a floral hit of pinelaced hops and citrus on the nose, with just a touch of roasted malt. On the palate, you get a mix of toasty, mochatinged malt, backed by fruity, nicely bitter hops, with a lightly sweet, red fruit finish.

10TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION! Tuesday, June 21st THANK YOU TO ALL OF YOUR SUPPORT AND BUSINESS! FOOD SPECIALS BBQ Crab Omelet with hollandaise Free Mimosas on the patio

501 Main St. (5th and Main) Old Boise | 388-1198

ROGUE DAD’S LITTLE HELPER BLACK IPA Just in time for Father’s Day, this Oregon brew pours a dense mahogany with a thin tan head. The aromas are marked by roasted grain, fruity hops, coffee and vanilla. Very dry on the palate, pine-spiked hops dominate up front, with earthy malt and mocha punching through, then giving way to more pine resin and heady hops on the finish. Not for the faint of heart. UINTA DUBHE IMPERIAL BLACK IPA This beer has a deep ebony color with just a touch of froth. The nose is a light mix of fruity hops, creamy toffee, licorice and malt. The palate is an intriguing combo of toasted bread, coconut, caramel, crushed espresso beans and bitter hops. Though it’s a bit scary at 9.2 percent alcohol, this beer is another worthy effort from the Utah-based brewery. —David Kirkpatrick

BOISEweekly | JUNE 15–21, 2011 | 31

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MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

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DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

REA L ESTATE BW ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com

BW FOR RENT GREAT LOCATION 1BD, apt. Central air & heat, DW , W/D. Call 208-495-2484 or come by 4023 W. State St., Boise. OR COAST RENTAL SLEEPS 8 Gull’s Nest Vacation rental in quiet Waldport, OR, 3BD & a queen sofa sleeper in living room. Basic cable, internet, games, dvds, bbq. Partial ocean view from most rooms. Two blocks to easy beach access. Call 1-866-5405951 to reserve or email beachsidevac@peak.org. Additional pictures at: https://sites.google. com/site/atgullsnest/home WALK TO BSU- DOWNTOWN-ST. LUKE’S Studio apartment is on 2nd floor of Victorian home which has 3 units. Rent is $415/mo., plus tenants share in the cost of heat ($26/month) and basic cable TV ($25/month). Total cost per month is $466/mo. Call 8677435. Property is at 323 East Bannock Street - between St Lukes Hospital and the Pioneer Cemetery (On the Warm Springs side of Broadway).

BW FOR SALE CUSTOM HOME; 12+ ACRES Wonderful custom home on acreage, with 2 additional land parcels included. Live in one of the most beautiful spots that exist within 30 minutes of Boise. Secluded, peaceful make a perfect bed & breakfast! Has a small vineyard and two of the nicest rock gardens in Treasure Valley! Send e-mail inquiry jrb4jc@hotmail.com or call 793-3837 and leave a message.

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

32 | JUNE 15–21, 2011 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

BW COMMERCIAL

BW VOLUNTEERS

OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE 2 offices. Approximately 140 sq. ft. each. $165 each or both for $300/mo. Includes heat, lights, water, trash. Secure building. 3010 W. State St. Contact Jan 345-7777.

CATCH MENTORS NEEDED Volunteers needed to mentor CATCH participants. This entails teaching individuals how to formulate a household budget and build upon Job Development skills. The purpose of CATCH is to move these families toward self-sufficiency. Your help would be greatly appreciated in pulling this all together; So volunteer now. maowen@cityofboise.org

COMMUNITY BW CLASSES

BW ANNOUNCEMENTS

JR HIGH VOLLEYBALL CAMP VOLLEYBALL CAMP FOR 7TH9TH GRADE GIRLS. (Based on 2011-2012 school year) ** Limited to first 50 Athletes ** JUNE 21, 22, 23rd 2011 9am4pm each day at West Junior High. Cost: $95. Intermediate to Advanced players. - Fine tune fundamentals, learn advanced skills. Must have proof of current health insurance. Register: VbCoachHill@gmail.com 208-830-9312.

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 www.continentalacademy.com

BW GARAGE SALE YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

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SALES PEOPLE WANTED Local alarm company is seeking sales people in the Boise area. Base pay, commissions, car and phone allowance. Sales or alarm experience preferred but not required. Please apply at 11770 W. President suite G, Boise ID. 8:30am to 4pm M-F. ACTORS/MOVIE EXTRAS Needed immediately for upcoming roles $150-$300/day depending on job requirements. No experience, all looks. 1-800-560-8672 A-109. For casting times/locations. COOK EXTRAORDINAIRE Willow Park Assisted Living is seeking a FT Relief Cook. Benefits after 6 mo. of employment. We are currently looking for someone who loves to cook with nothing but the freshest ingredients. This is not an institutional food setting but you will be working with Executive Chef in preparation of meals and special events. If you have the passion to cook & experience, please come apply at 2600 N. Milwaukee, Boise, between Ustick & Northview. No Phone calls or emails please.

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES GREEN JOBS Green Jobs are the way of the future. Don’t get left behind! Learn more at www.greenjobsandproducts.com

BW CAREER TRAINING BARTER BW HAVE SWAPCAFE.COM Come join us! Trade your stuff, your skills, your inventory. Submit via SwapCafe.Net for personal swaps or SwapCafe.Com for B2B. Good luck trading! Questions Info@SwapCafe.Net

C A RE E RS BW HELP WANTED EARN $75 - $200 HOUR. Media Makeup Artist Training. Ads, TV, Film, Fashion. One week class. Stable job in weak economy. Details at http://www.AwardMakeUpSchool.com 310-364-0665 $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http://www.easywork-greatpay. com NOW HIRING The ID Dept. of Finance is seeking a full-time IT Programmer Analyst, Sr. to join their team. $18.73 -$26.17/hr. DOE. Apply online at dhr.idaho.gov or call 334-2263. Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

RIGHT SCHOOL, RIGHT DEGREE, RIGHT NOW!

Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

FOR SALE BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. BUG-DETECTION EQUIPMENT www.dpl-surveillance-equipment. com/detection_devices.html Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. HOTPOINT WASHER & DRYER For sale, in great condition! $120 OBO. Please contact me at 208989-8003. Text/call. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643.

Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. LOCAL HONEY Local beekeeping family has extra honey to sell this year. Our honey is all natural, pure, and UNFILTERED. It tastes amazing! $10/pint, $15/quart. If interested, please call Alex at 208-921-1503. Thank you! check us out on facebook: idaho bee shop Must sell. Companion niche woodlawn columbarium. Can be used for exchange at other sites Cloverdale Cemetery 322-0317. NANNY CAMERA RENTALS dpl-surveillance-equipment.com/ dvr_based_hidden_cameras. html PLAYSTATION 3 Playstation 3, 1 DualShock controller, 2 PS Move motion controllers, 1 PS Eye camera, 1 Singstar Dance game and 2 SS microphones - won in contest, brand new. $350. Dan at 208-936-8343. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. RED SCHWINN MOPED FOR SALE Custom-built mo-ped 70cc 2-stroke engine 85 miles per gallon New retro Schwinn bicycle. It was built in June & July by a great mechanic in Twin Falls. It has been ridden less than 5 mi. all together; I just don’t have much use for it as pretty as it is. $800. 208-859-2987. CAMPING EQUIPMENT WANTED Camping equipment to rent for two weeks: propane stove, cooler, full or queen inflatable mattress, cooking pots, folding chairs (2), and other miscellaneous equipment for two people. 352-220-6759. PAINT ZOOM POWER SPRAYER Paint Zoom is undeniably the most compact and easy to use power paint sprayer on the market. www.paintzoomsprayer.com RECALL LUNA T-SHIRTS Recall Luna T-shirts in Andrus blue. S - XL. 10 Bucks; XXL XXXL 12 Bucks. Cash only. Call Pete 853-0932. Thanks. SOLAR PANELS FOR LIFE! Did you ever wonder why solar manufacturers have a 5-8 year warranty on construction and 25 years on power output? What good is working solar cells if the panel falls apart. They would be useless, and would have to be replaced.....at a cost to you! Through many hours of research and development, SolarVolt Power is now able to offer a limited “Lifetime Warranty” on all of our solar modules. No other solar module manufacturer offers this kind of warranty. www.solarvoltpower.net

TRADE

Accepting Knick Knacks for in store trade at Thrift Store with a Twist. Jewelry, DVD’s, Clothes. 4610 W. State St. 570-7962.

TRANSPORTATION BW 4 WHEELS Junk cars, trucks, vans. Paying up to $200. 208-963-0492.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BW RECREATIONAL/ OTHER JAYCO EAGLE TRAVEL TRAILER 2005 30’ Jayco Eagle Travel trailer. Barely used; maybe 4-5 trips. Nice features. Excellent quality. Divorce forces sale. Only $11,500 obo. jrb4jc@hotmail.com

M U S IC

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B OISE W E E KLY

NEED BEATS You Boise MC’s or electronic DJs want some great beats. Give us a call Gwop Ghettas. We got some instrumentals that have the fire. Our producers have made beats tracked by big artist like WC, Game, Jeezy, Waka Flocka, and more. Give us a call for free listening session. 801-673-3624. STUDY GUITAR WITH JOHANN Openings are available for lessons with award-winning teacher Johann Helton. Mornings/afternoons in two locations, downtown and at BSU. All levels, ages. Call 208-336-3024

BW MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE SINGER WANTED For Indie project. Looking for a singer to work with & finish some songs that I am working on. I have the recording gear. I am open to ideas & interested in bringing your music to life so collaboration is welcomed & a continued working relationship would be great. Live performance is in the future. My sound is somewhere between the Smiths, The Pretenders, Chris Isaak, Johnny Cash and Black Rebel Motorcycle Club. Go to reverbnation.com/superloser or facebook.com/Super Loser to give a few songs a listen. If this interests you, please call or text J.P. at 208-540-0928.

BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION

BW OTHER CURBSIDE AUDIO RECORDING Curbside Audio Recording Services offers multi-track recording at a great rate. Rates are $35/hr. or $300/10hr. block. We can also help with duplication, graphic design, & photography. Visit us at www.curbsideaudio.com for a full list of services. For a custom quote call us at 250-6944, or email us at michael.hammer@ curbsideaudio.com. Mention this ad and your first song is free.

NOTICES BW LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS Case No. CV FE 1103997 (Idaho Code 15-3-801) IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estate of WANDA MAXENE SMITH, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN That the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 25th day of May, 2011. Gailyn R. Combs, Personal Representative Stephen W. Beane Attorney at Law P.O. Box 2694 Boise, ID 83701-2694 Telephone: (208) 336-2690. Pub. June 8, 15 & 22, 2011.

BW HEALING ARTS

BW SPIRITUAL

ANGEL HEALING READINGS Angel Readings open the lines of communication. As we seek out a loving message from a loving God-the most amazing things will begin to happen. SEX THERAPIST / HEALER For more information or to schedule a free 30 minute consultation please respond to this email jncrl9@gmail.com

Work & Live Buddhist center, Northern CA. Book bindery work, no exp. req’d. Also seeking experienced maintenance, groundskeeping, gardening. Includes living allowance, classes. No religious affiliation needed. 510-981-1987 contact@nyingma.org

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GUITAR LESSONS Beginning to advanced. All music styles. 20+ yrs. experience. Making it affordable to all who want to learn to play. Just $20/hr. Call Mitch 297-7642. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy!.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 15–21, 2011 | 33

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A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas.

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com 24/7. Quality full body by Terrance. $45/hr. In home studio, shower. 841-1320.

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

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Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

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BW BEAUTY DAVID THE BARBER Now accepting Visa/MC/Discover. Open early mornings & Saturdays. Senior Tuesdays $8 haircuts. 10th St. Hair Co. at 105 N. 10th St. 389-1000. Ask for David.

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CAREERS - CAREER TRAINING

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

34 | JUNE 15–21, 2011 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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SERVICES BW PROFESSIONAL AFFORDABLE JAPANESE CLASSES Experienced Japanese language tutor/instructor for adults/students/children. Individual and group rates. Flexible on location between Boise-Meridian. Can teach polite (for travel/business) and casual (anime/manga) forms. jncrl9@gmail.com IN-HOME WINE TASTING PARTY! Need a reason to get-together with the girls? Having a housewarming and need help stocking your new wine cellar? Looking for Boise’s exciting, new wine tasting experience? Host a WineShop at Home party! WineShop at Home’s premier, artisan wine will not disappoint you or your guests and will be a great addition to your summer patio parties! Check us out at: www.WineShopatHome.com

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MAC MALWARE TROUBLE? Is your Mac troubled with fake antivirus programs “Mac Defender”, “Mac Protector”, “Mac Security”? MACLIFE WILL REMOVE IT FOR FREE. Call ahead for fastest service. 323-6721 MacLife — Two locations: on Overland & Downtown Boise. www.MacLifeBoise. com Like us on FB! OLD HOME MOVIES OR VIDEOS? Father’s Day is Coming! Give him the gift that will bring back all those old memories. Convert old VHS, MINI-DV or 8MM video to DVD. Only $25/2 hrs. Bulk DVD or CD duplication available. Toll free 888-907-1559 or 353-8342. STORE4PERFUMES The perfume you choose is a mirror reflection of your fashion sense. The ambience you are in, determines the perfume you should use, and www.store4perfumes.com offers you a world of exotic perfume ranges. Pick Store4Perfume.Com to show off your identity.

THE GADGET DESTINATION It’s a gadget paradise that we have at www.rightgadgets.in for all you gadget freaks. www.rightgadgets

BW HOME D’S PAINTING 20+ years experience. Interior/ Exterior paint, stain and more. Free estimates. Call Derrick at 208-880-7199 or Toby at 208994-9075. GONE GREEN LAWNCARE All Electric, No Emissions. Services incl. spring cleanup, mowing, trimming & pruning, organic fertilization & weed control. Call 208-861-3017. TREASURE VALLEY HOME INVENTORY Professional & Confidential Home Inventory Services. Be prepared & take inventory before disaster strikes! www.TreasureValleyInventory.com 208-830-7564.

BW CHILD

BOISE WEEKLY

PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois). FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please. YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

PETS

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

LAYLA: 8-year-old female border collie mix. Very loving and loyal. House-trained, good with other dogs and people. (Kennel 416#13268902)

WALLY: 3-year-old male red Lab mix. House-trained and very energetic. Loves families and needs an active owner. (Kennel 407- #5815279)

BODEE: 6-year-old female terrier/pit bull mix. Shy at first but warms up quickly. Good on the leash and with other dogs. (Kennel 426- #12909494)

GIZZY: 1-year-old female domestic shorthair. She is very talkative, personable and loving. Gentle and loves other cats. (Kennel 24- #13261589)

LILLY: 1-year-old female domestic shorthair. Sweet and lovable. Litterbox-trained and good with children. (Kennel 65- #13292477)

EMILA: 2-year-old female domestic shorthair mix. Shy at first but warms up quickly. Independent, cuddly couch potato. (Kennel 125- #13316054)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

S’MORES: Spunky declawed DLH seeks a spacious indoor home.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

EDEN: Demure calico lady hoping for a quiet loving companion.

DONOVAN: Handsome gentleman looking for an active family.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 15–21, 2011 | 35

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NYT CROSSWORD | CAGEY ANSWERS BY YAAKOV BENDAVID / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Chickens, e.g. 6 Workers with hammers

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Playbook figures Pulled off Reinforcing bracket Bygone copy Suffix with Ecuador Software basis Spanish article Countess bankrupts St. Louis N.H.L. team? 55 Some 35mm cameras 57 Actor Wilson 58 Digital communication?: Abbr. 59 Words on an “Animal House” cake float 60 Legendary Onondaga chief 63 Alien craft 66 Cackler 67 Warning before driving past the town dump? 73 Some Windows systems 74 Start of a selection process 75 Break up 77 Down time 80 100% 82 Marvel Comics hero 84 Denials 85 Wayne Gretzky? 91 Soph. and jr. 92 Holder of a runoff? 93 French river or department 94 Reliever 95 Must 97 Fr. holy title 98 Ancient Cretan writing system 100 ___ Pictures 101 Readily recite, with “off” 103 Being too large to fail? 110 Onetime Robin Williams co-star 114 So-called Mother of Presidents 115 “Shucks!” 116 Singles bar pickup strategy? 119 Flying monster of film 120 “Baywatch” actress ___ Lee Nolin 121 Rocket from China 122 Notice

123 Bit of Weather Channel news 124 By all ___ 125 Kind of card 126 Chucks 127 Pick up

DOWN 1 Israel’s Ehud 2 Grammatically proper identification 3 Nail polish ingredient 4 Loser of 1988 5 “Casino Royale,” for one 6 Animals with blacktipped tails 7 One of a dozen 8 “If ___ you …” 9 Subject of Genghis Khan 10 Princely abbr. 11 Arms race inits. 12 Diving seabirds 13 “Nuts!” 14 Make a queen, e.g. 15 Present at birth 16 Deleted 17 Maurice Chevalier song 18 Ecuador and Venezuela are in it 25 Zilch 26 Friends of Francois 31 Crumbly cheese 32 Symbols of strength 33 Dilbert co-worker 37 Safari equipment 38 “Matilda” author, 1988 40 As above, in a footnote 41 Not those, in Brooklyn 42 Ooh and aah 43 Dark 44 Hebrew matriarch 45 Classic song that begins “And now the end is near” 46 Vapour trail? 47 Jiffy 49 Ike or Billy at the O.K. Corral 52 Qatar’s capital 53 Prince Albert’s home: Abbr. 54 Root crop 56 Con 61 N.L. Central player 62 Co. ID’s 64 Flipper

98 Puddle producer, perhaps 99 Incantation opener 100 Hybrid clothing for women 102 Actresses Best and Purviance 104 Marina sights 105 “Now I see” 106 Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, to J.F.K. 107 City south of Brigham City 108 Raises 109 “Fiddler on the Roof” role 110 When doubled, a Samoan port 111 Wowed 112 Start of some congregation names 113 Land in Genesis 117 Summer hours in L.A. 118 Auto monogram

65 Biblical breastplate stones 66 Part of 10-Down, maybe 68 Mirror image? 69 Old ballad “Robin ___” 70 Philatelist George, founder of the largest weekly newspaper for stamp collectors 71 Frank ___, two-time Oscar-winning director 72 Turn outward 76 Onetime Texaco competitor 77 GPS options: Abbr. 78 Answer to the old riddle “What lies flat when empty, sits up when full?” 79 “Forget I said anything” 80 Score right before a win, maybe 81 Unique 83 G.I.’s food 86 Train systems 87 Actress Hatcher 88 Den ___, Nederland 89 Cluster 90 Wives in São Paulo 96 Mask feature

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BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. It’s worth a shot. I won’t make you gag on some uber-corny “Recipe for love” or try to impre3ss you with my physical attributes. I’m a 28 yr. old SWM who’s not from around here. I’m looking for a F friend to write and maybe come visit. If you think you might be interested, hit me up. You won’t be disappointed. Dustyn Reinardy #65675 ISCI Unit 14 Boise, ID 83707. F ISO someone between the ages of 25-40 to write me. I’m blondish red hairwith blueish green eyes. I am 136 lbs., 5’4”, and single. I live in Burley but will be moving to the Boise area in 2 years when I get out. If wantingto write please send a picture if possible. Kristina Hathaway #80650 P.W.C.C. 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): The film Tuck Everlasting tells the story of a family that becomes immortal after drinking from a magical spring. They hide their gift from the world, but eventually, a mysterious man in a yellow suit finds out about their secret and stalks them. At one point in his search, this man has a conversation with a young pastor. “What if you could be eternal?” he asks the priest. “Without having to face the uncertainty of death. Invincible to disease. Forever young.” The priest is rattled. “You speak blasphemy, sir,” he protests. “Fluently,” replies the man in the yellow suit. You have that mandate right now Aries: to speak blasphemy fluently, as well as any other rebellious diction. It’s time to rise up and express the unspeakable, the controversial, the revolutionary. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): There’s substantial evidence that the Amazon River used to flow in the opposite direction from what it does now. Ages ago, its currents traveled westward from the Atlantic Ocean toward the Pacific (tinyurl.com/ amazonreversal). I’d like you to hold that image firmly in mind as you contemplate a monumental shift of course in your own life. Let it serve as a surprising symbol of what’s possible—as a promise that you could actually manage to reverse a current that may seem immutable. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In Mark Harris’ novel Bang the Drum Slowly, professional baseball players cheat their fans out of money by engaging them in a card game called TEGWAR, which is an acronym for The Exciting Game Without Any Rules. Judging from your current astrological omens, Gemini, I’d say it’s prime time for you to play a more ethical version of this game. Strictly speaking, the game can have rules, but they may be changed at any time, and new ones may be added as needed. The object of your brand of TEGWAR is to have as much smart fun as possible without anyone getting hurt. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “The only way to let your dreams come true is to wake up,” said poet Paul Valery. Here’s how I think that applies to you right now. You’ve become too engrossed in the mythic, phantasmagorical feelings of your fantasies, and that’s interfering with your ability to muster all of the kick-ass pragmatism and supercharged willpower you will need to actually make your fantasies come to life. In other words, Cancerian, I advise you to snap out of your creamy dreamy haze with a self-induced wake-up call.

38 | JUNE 15–21, 2011 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): As we began our first session, the 79-year-old Jungian psychotherapist looked at me and said, “Go ahead—surprise me! What have you got?” I was torn. Part of me felt like rising to meeting her dare: I fantasized about telling her such wild versions of my adventures that they would outstrip any tales she’d heard in her long service as a deep listener. But in the end, I chose to tell the truth. I felt it was more important to explore my life’s actual mysteries than to entertain her. And that was the first healing she helped me achieve. I suspect a similar test is ahead for you, Leo. Would you rather be honest or impress people? VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I predict that at no time in the coming weeks will anyone be justified in saying to you, “Your ego has been writing checks that your body can’t cash.” Nor will anyone have any reason to tell you, “You’d better start running if you hope to catch up with your dreams,” or “You may be an old soul but you’ve been acting like a naive punk.” No, Virgo, I firmly believe that none of those accusations will be hurled at you. Why? Because from what I can tell, all of the various parts of your psyche will be in a greater state of collaborative unity than they’ve been in for a long time. Your alienation from yourself will be at an all-time low, as will your levels of hypocrisy. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I’m brave in some ways, cowardly in others. I’ve gone parasailing, performed on big stages in front of thousands of people, assisted in the birth of two children and explored the abyss of my own unconscious. On the other hand, I’m scared of confined spaces, can’t bring myself to shoot a gun and am a sissy when it comes time to be around people who are dying. I imagine that you, too, have areas of courage and timidity, Libra. And I suspect that in the coming weeks, you will be called to a challenge in both areas. See if you can transfer some of the nervy power you’re able to summon in one sphere to bolster you in the place where you’re a wimp. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The Kinky Dream and Funky Paradise chapter of your astrological cycle has arrived—a phase when you’ll have poetic license to let your imagination run wilder than usual. In fact, it’ll be prime time to escape into fantasyland and try on a new identity, complete with a host of outlandish nicknames. Your new hip-hop name could be Extasy TrixxMaster. Your pro wrestler name could be Velvet Soul Pandora. Your mystic superhero name could be Mountain Wind Storm.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The coming weeks could be a Golden Age for your perceptiveness. If you’re even moderately aligned with the cosmic rhythms, you will be able to discern hidden agendas that no one else has spotted, catch clues that have been hidden and be able to recognize and register interesting sights you’ve previously been blind to. To maximize your ability to cash in on this fantastic opportunity, say this affirmation frequently: “My eyes are working twice as well as usual. I can see things I don’t normally notice.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): If you were the star of a fair y tale in which a spell had been placed on you, you would find a way to break that spell sometime in the next seven months. If you were the hero of a myth about a royal child abandoned in the wasteland by your evil nurse and raised by emotionally clumsy but well-meaning gnomes, your exile would soon end; your real parents, the king and queen, would find you after a long search, and your birthright would be restored. Now translate these themes into the actual circumstances of your life, Capricorn. Are you ready to do what it takes to achieve healing and restoration that have been a long time coming? AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): What is sacred? The philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche said it was anything that you cannot or will not laugh at. But I have the exact opposite view. If I’m unable to crack a joke about what I regard as holy, then it’s not holy. For me, part of what makes an idea, person or object holy is its power to animate my sense of humor and put me in the mood to play. Where do you stand on this issue, Aquarius? If you’re aligned with my view, you will have some wonder ful opportunities to commune with the sacred in the coming days. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the chorus of my band’s song “Apathy and Ignorance,” I sing, “What is the difference between apathy and ignorance?” and the other two singers chant, “I don’t know and I don’t care.” I recommend you make that chant your mantra in the coming days, Pisces: “I don’t know and I don’t care.” You need to experiment with a mischievous state of mind that is blithely heedless of what anyone thinks about anything. You have the right and the privilege to be free of expectations, precedents and dogmas. Trust your intuition above all other influences. It’s an excellent time to at least temporarily declare your independence from ever ything that’s not interesting, useful, helpful or appealing.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 19 Issue 51