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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 49 JUNE 1–7, 2011

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TAK EE E ON E! FEATURE 11

RECYCLING RESULTS Two years later, did Boise’s trash gamble pay off? 1ST THURSDAY 19

MAP AND GUIDE INSIDE The who, what, when and where of First Thursday SCREEN 28

THE ANTIWESTERN Meek’s Cutoff: the plot plods but the story impresses FOOD 30

DESERT OASIS Idahoans suck up the water in the desert

“I feel totally kicked around and undervalued.”

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Sheree Whiteley Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Guy Hand, Damon Hunzeker, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall, Jordan Wilson ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Doug Taylor, Doug@boiseweekly.com Nick Thompson, Nick@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Guy Hand, Glenn Landberg, Jeremy Lanningham, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow Photography Interns: Will Jones, John Winn CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2011 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE LAST DAYS, FIRST THURSDAYS AND INTERN TURNOVER The big news for kids in Meridian this week is the last day of school, but for some teachers, it might mean not just the last day of school this year, but the last day of school—period. At Citydesk on boiseweekly.com last week, News Editor George Prentice reported that the Meridian School Board went to work on a plan that would cut seven days from the next school year, nix an unknown number of administrative jobs, and eliminate 100 teaching positions from the district. In this week’s issue, Prentice follows up that story with a look at how the district plans to decide who gets the ax. And that plan looks an awful lot like a very simple form, with points awarded for various aspects of performance. Get the full story in News on Page 8. Next up in this week’s edition is “Recycling Risk: How Boise’s Trash Gamble Paid Off,” from Features Editor Deanna Darr. Two years ago—can you even believe it’s been two years?—the city started rolling out thousands of new trash cans and a new recycling program amid much skepticism and a lot of unknowns. Where are we now? Darr takes a looks at the success of Curb It—success in spite of some of the program’s original detractors. As you thumb through A&E, you’ll find our monthly First Thursday section, devoted to helping you navigate your way to the best art, wine and events. Staff Writer Tara Morgan literally maps out a route for you so that the hard work of initial planning is done (Page 19). In Noise, you’ll read the final assignment from Jordan Wilson, one of last semester’s interns: a piece on Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr., a band with a penchant for pissing off the ultra-patriotic (Page 25). In other intern news, I’d like to welcome our summer crop of interns. We have five new faces joining the editorial team for their summer vacations, and the more we abuse them, the more you’ll see their bylines in print and on the web. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Lara Petitclerc-Stokes TITLE: Jacqueline and Virgil go for a walk under the stars MEDIUM: Oil on paper ARTIST STATEMENT: Greetings from Baker City, Ore., my Boise beauties! Come and enjoy the fresh air, glacier lakes and gorgeous mountains with us sometime. We’d love to see you!

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

GOT SOME ARM FLOATIES? Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter issued a statewide declaration of emergency because of flooding concerns. Live near a river? Better start thinking about some sandbags.

LONGTIME COFFEEHOUSE CLOSES After seven years of hosting live music, brewing coffee and fattening up its regulars one amazing cinnamon roll at a time, The Library Coffeehouse in Meridian shuttered last weekend.

RANDY RUSTLES UP RATTLERS FOR DIN DIN Chef and BW contributor Randy King is at it again with rattlesnakes. Dude loves to kill, skin and cook up some snake. Yes, his wife is a very special and understanding woman. All you want to know about grilling your own rattler at Cobweb.

STUDY TO DETERMINE LIBRARY’S FUTURE In a recent edition of BW, we reported on the growing pains the downtown Boise library is experiencing. This week, a 60-day study gets under way to determine what the best course of action is: a new building, renovation or something else entirely.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Who’s on the chopping block in the Meridian School District?

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CITYDESK

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Recycling Risk

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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FIRST THURSDAY Pick your art path

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FIRST THURSDAY LISTINGS Plus a map 20 DOWNTOWN NEWS

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NOISE On the road with Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Meek’s Cutoff

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SCREEN TV SNL Lives

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FOOD Watering the desert

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BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

ED RUSH—PT. II

The empty promise of charter schools In this Age of Right Wing Social Engineering—and bless you, Newt Gingrich—when an Idahoan gets upset with Tom Luna’s education reforms, it is likely over the emphasis on the virtual alternatives to flesh-and-blood classrooms. The abuse of our teaching professionals, the proposal that school managers need not be from the field of education, the insider conniving by wealthy investors to influence the debate … that may all be unfortunate, yes. But to most parents, I suspect those are peripheral issues, not so relevant as the matter of students spending school hours on a state-provided laptop, allegedly learning functional skills from some faceless tutorial program. Many parents may not even care that Idaho tax revenues would pour out of state into the coffers of a private education machine that has been working behind the curtains for decades to get their paws on all that ed money. But throughout the flap over Luna’s 2011 reforms, we have essentially ignored the evidence of past reforms, some the product of Luna’s influence, and some that pre-date his administration. I’m talking about charter schools, that last great scheme that conservative ed meddlers sold us. In spite of the well-publicized belly flop of the Classical Academy in Nampa last spring, there is a perception that these independently run charter schools are successful alternatives to the abject failure of public schools. Of course, that perception hinges on two assumptions: 1) that public schools are abject failures, and 2) that charter schools are an unqualified success. Both of those assumptions have been promoted extensively by the conservative bloc, and true to conservative form, neither is true. The impetus behind the rush to establish more and more charter schools is that if private concerns are allowed to take the same budget money allotted to public schools, they could run the education of youngsters like a well-oiled business, discarding any teacher or administrator who does not measure up in terms of student performance. To sweeten the pot, charter school advocates insist that improvements can be made with less money. But a large-scale survey (conducted by a Stanford economist) that reviewed math testing in half of the country’s 5,000 charter schools has revealed that when matched with comparable public schools, only 17 percent of charter schools tested better. Thirty-seven percent actually performed worse than comparable public schools, and 46 percent showed no significant difference whatsoever. Those findings are made even more remarkable when we consider the desperate lengths some charter school administrators have taken to demonstrate a superiority to traditional public schools. There are instances of charters spending up to three times the cost per student than is average in public schools. Geoffrey Canada One, a charter school founder in New WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

York, has arranged a broad safety net of social and medical services for not only his students but their families as well. On top of the tax money his organization gets, his solicitations for donations have put $200 million at his disposal, all for the benefit of two schools. And then he uses his position (at a salary of $400,000 a year) to proselytize how public schools use too much money. Even more duplicitous is the questionable achievements of Michelle Rhee. Currently, she is no more than a shill for the ed reform industry, fronting a pressure group called StudentsFirst—sound familiar?—but not so long ago, she was being praised as a miracle worker in her position as the chancellor of the Washington, D.C., school system. Only after she left that job did she admit to grossly exaggerating the claims she had made earlier—the claims that established her reputation in the first place. During her brief reign, she fired almost 700 D.C. teachers and principals, handed over $1.5 million in bonuses, and now we are learning the tests on which she based her management decisions had been fiddled with to make the results appear far better than they really were. In other words, the educators who lost their jobs were most likely the ones who didn’t cheat the test scoring. So this is the future of education into which the laissez-faire fabulists would have us leap: tricks and gimmicks and personnel trying to out-manipulate their co-workers for a bigger piece of the bonus pie. A future where every classroom decision hinges on a test result, which itself can be altered with nothing more than an eraser and a fear of being fired. A future in which your kids are impersonalized to the verge of anonymity as they stare blankly into their laptops. Or we could follow the lead of all those other countries—Korea, Finland, Singapore, Sweden and Japan, to name but a few—that are wiping the floor with American academics. And what is their secret, seeing as how they have not polluted their systems with the empty promises of vouchers and charter schools, have not resorted to the shallow contrivance of online classes or the nepotism of installing business cronies as school managers, have not stripped their teachers of bargaining rights and a voice in policy decisions but have instead allowed unions to proliferate and prosper? The sad truth is, while we piddle around with shady propositions like charter schools and virtual education—all at the instigation of frauds and ideologues who detest public education on principle and would be overjoyed to see the whole system collapse— those other countries will continue to pull ahead of us, farther and farther, until we have no hope of catching up. Their success is not only simple, it’s inescapable. They regard their teachers as valuable and irreplaceable treasures, while we are increasingly treating ours like an infection.

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OPINION/TED RALL

THE EVIL OF TWO LESSERS Two-party system is not democracy

NEW YORK—We get the government we deserve. Don’t get mad at the politicians, it’s your/our fault. You/we elected them. Really, we should get rid of this phony two-party democracy. And we will, but in the meantime, we ought to ignore it. The two-party system made simple: Two worthless scoundrels are on the ballot. If you vote for one of them, a worthless scoundrel will win. If you don’t vote, a worthless scoundrel will win. It’s a pretty unappealing sales pitch. How did it last 200 years? The two-party system, a political mutation unanticipated by the Constitution and dreaded by the Founding Fathers, mainly relies on the “lesser of two evils” argument. Next year, for example, many liberals will hold their noses and vote for President Barack Obama even though he has not delivered for them. They will do this to avoid winding up with someone “even worse”: Michele Bachmann, Mitt Romney, etc. Conservatives will do the same thing. They will vote for whomever—even though they know full well they won’t come through with smaller government or a balanced budget—because Obama is “even worse.” In 2008, one out of three Republican voters told pollsters they were voting against Obama, not for John McCain. One in five Democrats voted against McCain, not for Obama. A quarter of all votes cast in 2008 were “negative votes,” and 38 percent of voters in the 2010 midterm elections crossed party lines from D to R “to send a message.” To “get the government they deserve,” as master curmudgeon H.L. Mencken asserted, we would have to have a wide choice

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of options on the ballot. Two parties isn’t even a facsimile of democracy. Would you shop at a store with two books? Two kinds of cereal? What about third parties? The Dems and Reps conspire to block the Greens, Libertarians, etc. with insurmountable obstacles. Minor parties can’t get campaign financing, ballot access, media coverage or seats at presidential debates, so they rarely win. Politics is not what happens on Election Day. Real politics is the process of arguing about how we want to live. In America, that happens over dinner with our families, over drinks with our friends, over the water cooler at work (if you still have a job). What happens on Election Day is a circus, a farcical distraction meant to siphon away the vitality of real politics. Real politics is dangerous. Real politics, as we saw in Cairo’s Tahrir Square, can actually change things. The two-party system is a twisted con based on fear. If you don’t vote for Party A then Party B, which is slightly more evil, will win. If your Party A wins, all you get is the dubious, incremental pseudo-victory of somewhat less suckiness. But Party A gets something infinitely more valuable: political legitimacy and the right to claim a mandate for policies that you mostly dislike. “Hey, you elected them.” “You got the government you deserve.” Not at all. It’s a lopsided bargain. You get little to nothing. They use your vote to justify their policies: no jobs, one war after another, wasting your tax dollars, corruption, more pollution.

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CITYDESK/NEWS BOISE CYCLISTS ATTEMPT TO FORM LOBBY ORGANIZATION With diverse reasons but a common bond, members of the local cycling community packed into the downtown WaterCooler on May 24 to shift the first-ever Boise Bicycle Congress into gear. Representing everyone from velocachers (geocachers on wheels) to representatives from the Idaho Transportation Department, attendees presented several different agendas. For some, it was disappointment with what they considered toothless laws or absent infrastructure. For others, it was the lack of a decent bike map. What united them was their frustration that despite Boise being thick with bike organizations, there was little advocacy. “What this community is missing is a single organization that will represent the common cause,” said congress co-organizer Rick Overton. “That represents both the challenge and the opportunity before us today.” More than 30 attendees introduced themselves over beer and pizza, sharing their beefs before attempting to form an agenda. Whitney Rearick, executive director of the Idaho Pedestrian and Bicycle Alliance and the meeting’s other organizer, said the group could be different from other local cycling alliances because the specific goal would be advocacy, something either outside the mission or just off the table for other groups like Southwest Idaho Mountain Biking Association, Boise Bicycle Project or Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance. It didn’t take long before an entire wall was covered with sticky notes, representing everything from softer proposals like encouraging more bike-in events to harder proposals like including bicycle education with driver education in schools, changing the building permitting process to ensure construction doesn’t block bike lanes, and getting bike lanes on State Street. More than a brainstorming session, the meeting represented a growing backlash against community organizations seen as lying down on the job. “No one said, ‘Let’s act on this tragedy and get organized,’” said Rearick, referring to the deaths of three cyclists within one month in 2009. “Why? There wasn’t any leadership. We’re trying to provide that.” Several members of the meeting said they had previously looked to TVCA, the group behind Boise Bike Week, but had been told the group wasn’t interested in advocacy, only in community events. After more than a half hour of brainstorming, the congress adjourned for the evening, planning to reconvene in two weeks and figure out what to do about its list of ideas. But the first meeting did not result in the official formation of a group. To further complicate things, Rearick, one of the driving forces of the initiative, announced she was planning to move away from Boise in the near future, meaning the entire effort could easily crumble. But Rearick remained optimistic. “We have some clear ideas to focus on,” she said. “Now we just need to get some leaders to emerge.” —Josh Gross

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NEWS

WHO STAYS? WHO GOES? Meridian reduction in force rubric will determine draconian cuts GEORGE PRENTICE On Wednesday, June 8, when Meridian teachers say goodbye to their students and wish them well on the final day of classes, the roles could well be reversed. Many of the educators in the state’s largest school district will be packing up their lesson plans for good. “People are panicked, they’re totally panicked,” said one teacher who asked to be anonymous. “It’s all people are talking about, especially the kids. They’re point-blank asking us, ‘Are you going to lose your job? Will you be here next year?’” Each teacher BW spoke to asked that their identity not be revealed, in fear of being singled out or ostracized in a process that could lead to dismissal. “I feel totally kicked around and undervalued,” another teacher told BW. But a numerical value is precisely what each teacher in the district is being tagged with. A so-called “rubric” has been completed by administrators, which will be the ultimate arbiter of who stays and who goes in the next school year. When Meridian voters turned thumbs down on an $18.5 million-a-year supplemental levy by a 57 percent to 42 percent margin on May 17, the school district went into a tailspin. Facing an approximate $21.8 million shortfall, the district Board of Trustees proposed taking a cleaver to Negative points the alreadywill be included if a teacher’s file lean school includes docucalendar. If mented concerns, approved, reprimands or seven school violations. days could be eliminated in 2011-2012, totaling a 14-day reduction in just two years. Administrative positions are also expected to be on the guillotine. But the stunner that has everyone talking is the possible elimination of 100 teaching positions, and that’s where Extra points the rubric for assistant comes in. coaches or In endorsements. academia, Meridian administrators said a rubric they’ve already originally seen many ties. referred to a teacher’s red ink on a

graded paper. The irony wasn’t lost on teachers that the red ink in this particular case comes from the school district’s fiscal crisis, and this time, a rubric could put them out of a job. The worksheet requires a series of points derived from performance evaluations, credentials (advanced degrees or certificates) and “extras.” In fact, a masters degree or National Board Certification can earn a teacher one point while the head coach of a sports team can score two points. “Most of us are at school to teach,” said one educator. “This really puts the district’s priorities in question.” “I don’t coach,” said another teacher. “But I coach my colleagues to be better teachers. I don’t see any points for that.” But Meridian School Superintendent Linda Clark staunchly defended the extra points for “heads” of extra-curricular activities.

“You have to do that,” said Clark. “In the practical running of a school, you couldn’t have all the people responsible for those extracurricular programs gone.” Clark said the district painstakingly crafted the rubric. “We’ve run this past our attorney a dozen times,” she said. Clark said the district will be hard pressed when coming up with a final list of cuts, because there will be so many “ties.” As a result, tiebreakers were included on the rubric, and yes, one of the tiebreakers is an extra point for anyone who may be an assistant coach. Another debate erupted when some teachers told BW that they were told they could not be labeled “distinguished,” which could garner five much-needed points. Three teachers confirmed to BW that an administrator told a gathering of teachers that, “Nobody lives in the world of distinguished. You only visit there.” “If that was said, it was absolutely inappropriate,” said Clark. “And I will deal directly with the person who would have Teachers have been evaluated said that.” on 25 indicators, Clark including teaching said on a strengths, lesson scale of one planning and interaction with to 10, her peers. stress level lately is about a 20. She said when the 20112012 school year begins, at $3,900 per student, the Meridian School District will be the lowest-funded school district in the country among all One point for higher degrees districts or certification. with enrollTwo points for ment above head coaches or 25,000. extra-curricular advisors. Teachers, parents, students and the general public will have one more opportunity to weigh in on the matter at a public hearing set for Tuesday, June 14, at 7 p.m. in the Mountain View High School auditorium.

When Meridian teachers asked how a reduction in force would be determined, they were handed this “rubric.”

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CITIZEN

HOWARD BERGER One foot in Idaho, another in Israel GEORGE PRENTICE

Can I ask how old you are? This would remain a secret, of course. Don’t tell us if we can’t publish it. I will be 61 in June. How old were you when you took your first trip to Israel. I was 20 in the summer of 1970. I was searching and drifting like much of my generation. I had an edge of rebellion. So I went to a desert kibbutz in the Negev [in southern Israel]. I loved the newness of the land. After all, in 1970, Israel was only 22 years old. I returned to Israel in 1972 to work at another kibbutz but that only lasted about eight months. Do you ever regret returning to the United States? I came back to go to graduate school at the University of Washington. That fall, the Yom Kippur War of 1972 broke out. Had I remained, I’m convinced that I would have fought and stayed there the rest of my days.

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Is there anything similar in both? No. But I love having one foot in this world and another in that world. I cry when my plane leaves Boise on my way to Israel, thinking of what would happen if I never came back. But then I also get teary eyed as my plane leaves Tel-Aviv. I wonder if it’s the last time I’ll see Israel. Can you speak to the experience of being a Jew in Idaho? Most Jews don’t come to Idaho to see their jewishness flourish. But I felt early on that I had an especially important responsibility to teach and share whom the Jewish people are and what our traditions are. How actively do you participate in your faith’s traditions here? Again, more than I ever would have imagined. On Rosh Hashanah, I brought a shofar [ram’s horn] to campus. We had a huge Hanukkah party at the college last year. And we just had a knockout Passover seder with over 180 people attending. Give me a rundown of the courses you teach. Western Civilization, Intro to American History, History of American Ideas, Intro to Modern Europe, Jewish History and I teach a course on the Nazis: National Socialism and the Final Solution. I understand your course on Nazism is quite popular. Students are always attracted to blood and guts. If I were to teach a course on the history of peace moments in America, I’d probably get three students. If I taught a course on medieval torture, with a lab, I’d get 300 students.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Dr. Howard Berger leaves for Israel on Sunday, June 5. Like most every other summer of his adult life, he’ll spend some time showing students and friends around a land that he calls his second home. His “other” home is the College of Idaho, where he can often be spotted at the Berger Bench, in the middle of campus, where he says he can spot anyone coming or going. Berger is approaching 30 years as a professor of history, influencing thousands of students to explore the themes of human rights and social justice through his courses on Jewish history and the Holocaust. He calls C of I his personal Brigadoon or Shangri-La, the fictional locales of perpetual youth.

Do you have a favorite? I love every course I teach. If I don’t love it, I try to dump it off on another teacher. Do you get sentimental in the spring when it’s time to say goodbye to students? When they say goodbye, I get emotional because 98 percent of them will never see me again. Do you see yourself spending the rest of your days in Idaho? I have no idea what I would do if I retired. Until I can think of another life that would hold my emotions as much as this, there is no way that I would leave. You had a bit of a health issue last year. Cancer. It was an inconvenience [laughter]. Where are you with that? When I had surgery, they told me it would knock me out for a semester. Nonsense. When I started radiation, they told me I wouldn’t be able to teach for a month. Nonsense. I handled it well. As far as I know, I should be OK. What’s your secret? Write this down. Haagen Dazs. Does it matter what flavor it is? No. It’s Haagen Dazs. Occasionally, if you’re in a pinch, it could be Ben and Jerry’s.

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T

wo years ago, the City of Boise decided there had been enough talking and coaxing: It was time to do something substantive about recycling and trash in the City of Trees. Partnering with Allied Waste, the company that the city contracts to haul trash, Boise came up with the Curb It program, marking the first time the city had ever felt inspired to create a brand name for trash service other than, well, trash day. The shiny new campaign came complete with educational outreach programs, standardized carts for the entire city, fully automated pickup and, most importantly, no-sort curbside recycling. City leaders were betting that more residents would step up and recycle if it were made as simple as possible, and those who participated would get a break on their trash bill. After an initial outlay of roughly

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$4.5 million, city leaders held their collective breath and waited—so did nearly every other municipality in the valley. Everyone waited to see if Boise would fly or go crashing off a cliff. The program sounded intriguing, but no one wanted to hitch their political clout to what might be a burning wagon. Initially, reaction from the public was mixed. While many said it was about time the city had a more comprehensive recycling program, others bristled at the idea. In the spring of 2009, calls to the mayor’s hotline echoed with claims that there was no way the new containers would hold all the trash and yard waste; that the monstrous cans would never fit in garages; that the elderly could never manage to move them and that the cans would be unsightly. Others felt the trash program was an attack on

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personal freedoms. “I think it’s the most communist thing I’ve ever heard of when they tell us we have to use a garbage can; we’re not being asked to use it. I don’t approve of it. I don’t like it a bit,” stated one hotline caller. “The concept of forcing people to participate in recycling is un-American. Frankly, it’s un-American to penalize us to do that,” said another. City officials expected some negative feedback, which is why they undertook a carefully planned, professionally executed marketing strategy that included a user-friendly website (curbit.cityofboise.org), multiple mailings and meetings with neighborhood associations in an effort to slowly and carefully make their case while helping ease residents through the largest

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change to the city’s trash program ever. Now, not only is Boise’s program thriving, but nearly every city in the valley has a similar trash and recycling program. “There was a lot of pressure, and it is gratifying,” said Paul Woods, Boise’s environmental division manager, as a smile spread across his face. City managers have reason to have a little swagger in their step when it comes to recycling. With a roughly 95 percent participation rate among the just fewer than 70,000 households serviced by Allied Waste in Boise, Woods and others say the program has exceeded all of their expectations. In fact, a recent survey conducted by the Boise Public Works Department reported that 42 percent of respondents felt trash service

was much better, and 67 percent felt that recycling was much better than before the new program started. Allied Waste also services Eagle, Garden City, Star, outlying areas of Meridian and unincorporated Ada County. While recycling participation isn’t quite as high in some of these areas as it is in Boise, participation across Ada County is roughly 90 percent, estimates Rachele Klein, business development manager for Allied Waste in Idaho. Kuna is the only city in Ada County that is not part of the recycling program. “We’re really pleasantly surprised in all the municipalities,” Klein said. “New people joined the ranks of recyclers because it was easy and they had the space.” According to Allied Waste, the average home

produces 200 pounds of waste per month. Currently, about 35 pounds of that is going into recycling, double the rate before the Curb It program began. Klein said while those numbers are good, the company and city hope to have that number up to 50 pounds of recycling per month. Some in the community have raised concerns that some of their neighbors are signing up for recycling for the $4 per month credit on their bill, without actually recycling. While this may happen, officials said they aren’t concerned about it occurring on a large scale. Besides, if you’re a recycling scofflaw, they know who you are. “We don’t have concerns that people are abusing it,” Klein said. “You see nearly all the carts out if you drive up any street. Drivers know which houses recycle and don’t.” And, she said, they’ll eventually flag homes who fail to put out any recycling. The slightly controversial RFID chips embedded in each trash and recycling cart also give officials the ability to track just how often carts are put out for collection (although city officials stress there is no way the scanners can record what’s actually in the carts, despite initial big-brother conspiracy theories that the government was tracking exactly what was in our trash). While only a few trial routes are testing the scanners, the system is slated to be used citywide eventually. Catherine Chertudi, who heads the trash program for the city’s Environmental Division, said roughly 68 percent of those who are part of the recycling program put their carts out every time a pickup is scheduled (every other week), adding that others put recycling out less frequently. If a customer fails to use his or her recycling cart, the city and Allied have the ability to remove the house from the program, and thereby take the discount away. But so far, that hasn’t happened. “I think people are better about being honest,” Klein said. Drivers also have the ability to tag recycling carts filled with what officials call “contaminated” materials—basically anything you’re not supposed to put in the recycling carts, including yard waste, Styrofoam and glass. Drivers will refuse to empty these carts and leave a note explaining why. If people persist in breaking the rules, the city can take the cart. Public education efforts are ongoing, but now they’re based on teaching people what they can’t recycle—no Styrofoam, plastic film or hazardous waste. But getting a true measure of just how much trash is being diverted from the landfill is a challenge in itself. Recycling is measured by weight but trash put into the landfill is measured in cubic yards. And while officials have rough guesses of just how much a cubic yard of trash weighs, comparisons are difficult. To help streamline the process, the Seaman’s Gulch Landfill has installed massive scales to actually weigh incoming trash. The system is undergoing testing and should be running later this year. “We’ll have a better estimate on what’s going on,” Klein said. The switch also means a change in how the city is billed for trash but just what that WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


Residential recycling jumped dramatically after the Curb It program was introduced in Boise.

change means is anybody’s guess. Woods said he doesn’t expect a cost increase but a lot of work and calibration needs to be done before anyone knows the exact repercussions of the change. Still there are some major hurdles the city has to jump, namely figuring out how to expand recycling by businesses and what to do with glass. While residential customers get a discount for recycling, commercial customers don’t enjoy the same incentives. Businesses can reduce the cost they pay for trash removal by diverting recycling, but Woods said the challenge is in finding a way to tailor a commercial recycling program that works for mom-and-pop shops and Micron-sized corporations alike, as well as dealing with an array of materials and businesses’ needs for security and privacy with sensitive materials. “It’s not one-size-fits-all,” Chertudi said. “It has to be broad and tailored.” So far the city as struggled to make it work but Woods said officials are trying to be responsive to the needs of customers. He added that he expects more substantive movement within the next year. Lately the recycling business has been far from a money-making venture. Klein said the prices for selling recyclable commodities has been “horrible for the last several years.” The price paid for recyclable materials tracks the economy. With the decline in manufacturing, there is less demand for raw materials. Klein said Allied and other recycling programs were actually losing money by having to pay to have recycling processed. With revenues upside down, several programs across the nation folded. Additionally, the price paid for mixed recycling is less than that for those that are pre-sorted. Boise’s mixed recycling is bailed before being sent to recycling recovery centers in Oregon and Washington, where the materials are sorted using an array of technology, before being sent to processing facilities. “There’s an extra layer of labor and transportation,” Klein said. While the value of recyclables has recently WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

begun to increase, she said the recycling program will never fully pay for itself, but there are no plans by either the city or Allied to change the program. “It’s absolutely the right thing to do,” Klein said. The same skyrocketing fuel costs that have drivers carefully mapping their trips has also had a major impact on businesses based on transportation, including Allied Waste. But she said things could have been a lot worse were it not for a move made when Boise switched to the Curb It program. “Fuel is such a large component of our expenses,” said Klein. While the company still uses some diesel trucks in Canyon County, it purchased 12 compressed natural gas-powered trucks as part of its contract with Boise, and since then has been slowly replacing its fleet with CNG trucks. Klein said that within the next three to five years, the entire fleet of 52 trucks will be run on CNG. The fuel savings in the past several years— as well as the fact that the new trucks run both quieter and cleaner—have been marked. CNG costs between $1.50 and $2 per gallon equivalent, compared with costs of more than $4 per gallon for diesel. The savings to the company have been reflected in the city’s ability to avoid a price increase to customers. “It was a huge risk,” Chertudi said of the investment in CNG trucks. “No community had [CNG trucks] with the weather and elevation we do ... it was a critical component.” In an effort to continue the trend, Allied will open two public CNG stations on Thursday, June 30—one at the Allied Boise offices in West Boise and the other in Nampa. “Now, it’s the chicken or egg situation,” Klein said. First the infrastructure had to be in place before demand for CNG followed. The stations will sell CNG at roughly cost to the public, which will be less than $1.50 per gallon equivalent, depending on the final costs of the infrastructure, Klein said. Already, Klein said more people have been either buying CNG cars or bringing them in from areas with established

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City officials hope to keep increasing the amount of materials diverted from the trash to recycling.

programs. Additionally, Valley Ride has ordered new CNG buses for Canyon County. The greatest lingering issue facing city officials is what to do with glass. BW broke the story in October 2010 that a literal mountain of glass had been building up south of town from glass residents had dropped off in recycling bins across the community (BW, News, “The Glass Ceiling,” Oct. 20, 2010). Roughly 60,000 cubic yards of glass had built up, with no end in sight and no purpose in mind. The Ada County Highway District, which owns the land under the mountain, put an end to the arrangement late last year and the city scrambled for a solution. The city was able to buy a used glasscrusher from Mountain Home Air Force Base, paying just $250 for the piece of equipment valued at roughly $20,000. Tests have been ongoing, and Boise-based Environmental Abrasives, a subsidiary of Nelson Construction, is working with the city to use the discarded glass by grinding it into a super-fine powder that can be used for industrial cleaning and sandblasting. Chertudi said the company has assured city officials that it cannot only use all incoming glass but will be able to work down the massive pile of existing glass. The city is also working with a start-up company, Idaho Glass Recycling, that plans to salvage wine bottles by running them through an industrial washing process and selling them back to wineries to reuse. But the most anticipated piece of the glass puzzle is curbside recycling, something that has been long requested in the community. City officials have been analyzing the issue for years but only recently have come up with a plan to start offering the service as early as this fall. The pressure is on to iron out the details since Boise Mayor Dave Bieter announced the plan at his State of the City address in mid-May. Chertudi said details will be finalized this summer, and residents will have their first chance to sign up for the program after June 15.

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Officials are careful to stress that curbside glass recycling will be a voluntary program, for which participants will pay roughly $10 per month for the dedicated truck and driver required to pick up glass across the city. Glass recycling will be a self-supporting program, and it will be reevaluated every year to ensure that it is in fact paying for itself. City officials are aware that the price tag may limit the amount of participation. Two surveys conducted by the city showed that roughly 30 percent of customers would be willing to pay for some form of curbside glass recycling, but that number drops as the price of the service increases. Because of that, the city is designing its program around the assumption that only 3 percent to 5 percent of customers will participate. If more residents sign up for glass recycling, Chertudi said the city would be able to expand the program. She added that the city hopes to work closely with area bars and restaurants—which tend to use the most glass waste—to collect glass directly at the source. For those who choose not to participate in the glass recycling program, the city will maintain public glass drop-off sites, although the number of those locations may be cut down. In addition to boosting recycling numbers, Woods said by keeping more glass out of the trash, the weight of material headed to the landfill will be reduced. “It’s absolutely been worth it,” Woods said of the push to start the glass recycling program. Chertudi—whose knowledge of the Curb It program is nearly encyclopedic—gets philosophical when asked about the future of recycling in the Treasure Valley. “The long-term goal is to create a community that is not wasteful and values all our resources,” she said. “We have to create that value, that ethic. What can we do to help people reduce waste and make good choices? “We still have a lot of challenges,” she said. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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IDAHO S TATE HIS TOR IC AL S OC IETY

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

The Idaho State Historical Museum demonstrates the im-press-ive art of printmaking. Isn’t it obvious? Julia Green’s cute work on the right and Rick Walter’s creepy contribution on the left. Er ... wait, maybe we have that mixed up.

SATURDAY JUNE 4

FRIDAY JUNE 3

printmaking

art

HANDS ON HISTORY: THE PRINTMAKER’S ART

CUTE AND CREEPY SHOW AT VAC Like that gushy, borderline stalker note you stuffed in your crush’s locker in sixth grade, the line between cute and creepy can be regrettably thin. Take the recent unfortunate cupcaketopping trend: life-like gumpaste babies. Nothing triggers a gag reflex—or a deluge of dead baby jokes—like popping a fleshy pink edible newborn in your mouth. Then there’s the punfilled Photoshop blog breadpeople.com, which masterfully morphs celebrity faces into realistic, totally creepy starches and sweets. Pumper-Nickelback, Oreoprah, Madonut and Gwar-lic bread are all breadfully awesome. Continuing along this trajectory, local artists Julia Green and Rick Walter have collaborated on a new exhibit, aptly titled The Cute and Creepy Show: The Work of Julia Green and Rick Walter. The exhibit will showcase Green’s whimsical, fairy tale-esque pieces alongside Walter’s darker, sometimes creepy pop surrealist work. The show opens on Friday, June 3, at 7 p.m. at Visual Arts Collective and runs through July 31. Here are some words of advice from Green on the show’s Facebook page: “All of you going to The Cute and Creepy Show: The Work of Julia Green and Rick Walter better save around $25 (at least) and buy some artwork because I am going to have almost 100 pieces in the show.” 7 p.m., FREE. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com. For more information on these two artists, visit juliagreenart.com or earlybirdillustration.blogspot.com.

FRIDAYSUNDAY JUNE 3-5 film I48 Films usually take months, sometimes years,

to make. But with advances in digital technology, they no longer have to take that long. Something can be shot, cut and distributed within hours, no film processing or shipping required. Producers take their time by choice, to make sure the final product is high-quality. And though the product is usually better when the film-

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maker doesn’t rush, creativity can thrive on a deadline. Time restrictions force people to not second-guess themselves, something that can be devastating to the creative process. The mad sort of genius that may have been cast aside as too risky on a longer timeline gets its chance and shines bright. In 2001, a film contest

Though Twitter’s 140-character limit seems restrictive by today’s communication standards, brevity was once a commendable characteristic when conveying information. Take, for example, Samuel Morse’s first telegram, “what hath God wrought?” or Oscar Wilde’s famously to-the-point telegram asking his publisher about book sales: “?” (The reply was “!”) But long before there were telegraphs, word processors or typewriters, printing presses were used to convey information to the community. Printmakers had to painstakingly assemble each individual letter, comma and dash in every sentence they wanted to print. On Saturday, June 4, the Idaho State Historical Museum will demonstrate the arduous art of printmaking in its Family Hands on History series. Aspiring printmakers are invited to head over to the museum and get some ink on their hands from noon to 3 p.m. Regular museum admission applies. Noon-3 p.m., $5 adults, $4 seniors, $3 children and students, 6 and younger FREE. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov.

was created to embrace that principle: The 48 Hour Film Project. Teams of filmmakers were given a genre, a prop, a line of dialog, a character’s name and then had 48 hours to create a finished film from scratch. Originally a novelty, the idea has become an international phenomena, with competitions in more than 80 cities on five continents. Other creative industries have embraced the idea as well. There are now 48-hour competitions for stage and fiction writing, video game development, design and

even Frankenbike construction. In 2010, i48, Boise’s independent and unaffiliated version of the film contest, had more than 50 teams of filmmakers sprinting around the city shooting thrillers, animated musicals, love stories between a man and a butterfly net, mockumentaries about trying to read every book in the library and more. Exhausted, dark-eyed and rapturous, they brought their finished products to the event’s organizers for screening at The Flicks and a chance at the $1,000

grand prize. This year’s contest promises to be just as exhausting and thrilling. Interested filmmakers can still get in on the action until the start of the contest on Friday, June 3, at 5:30 p.m. Registration packets and more information are available at thislovelymachine. com/idaho48. Friday, June 3-Sunday, June 5. $100. For more information, visit thislovelymachine.com/idaho48.

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M ATTHEW W OR DELL

FIND LEILA R AM ELLA- R ADER

Check out a bar-rage of local art at Art in the Bar III.

SATURDAY JUNE 4 FLYING M MANTIES

boozy art ART IN THE BAR III

popular that in 1986, President Ronald Reagan named it the official floral emblem of the United States. The rose was even instrumental in the discovery of America. According to lore, Christopher Columbus’ crew became overjoyed when they plucked a rose branch from the ocean because it signaled the presence of land. The following day, Columbus discovered America.

SUNDAY JUNE 5 rosy art ART AND ROSES Ah, roses. A generic symbol of love and a totally overdone tattoo design. But despite their ubiquity, 85 percent of Americans list roses as their favorite flowers. In fact, the rose is so

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When Ellen DeAngelis and her husband Wayne Crans opened the teeny Dead Bird Gallery in the basement of the Idaho Building, the idea was to “promote local artists who were having a hard time going through the political atmosphere of getting into a gallery,” DeAngelis said. “It seems to be a lot about who you know. We wanted to erase that circus of a process and let any artist of any age and any medium have a place where they can show their art to the public.” Business was tough and DeAngelis and Crans closed Dead Bird last summer after about six months but wanted to continue to promote local art and artists. So they hooked up with the Knitting Factory and began the series of shows they call Art in the Bar, presented by Dead Bird Gallery. DeAngelis puts in temporary walls, hangs work from the ceiling and covers every square inch of space in the concert venue. Art in the Bar III, which takes place on Saturday, June 4, will showcase 44 artists who work in a variety of mediums, including returning artist Brandy Davis, who paints scenes of Native Americans on feathers and up-and-coming painter Cody Rutty, who will be showing at Art in the Bar for the first time. “That’s the part that gives me goosebumps,” DeAngelis said. “When you find these people whose art you get so excited to share with the rest of Boise and they haven’t had an opportunity. It’s fun to be a part of that.” Art is often viewed in large, echo-y halls, where hushed tones and “no touching” are de rigueur. Bars are places where touching and yelling are often the norm and where the art is neon beer signs and, if you’re lucky, dusky black velvet paintings of naked ladies. But art and bar don’t have to be mutually exclusive and at Art in the Bar III, they aren’t. And even though a full bar will be available, the event is family friendly, so take the kids. There probably won’t be any naked ladies on black velvet to worry about. Noon-10 p.m., FREE. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

Fill your flask and hear Cotman read from his collection of stories.

TUESDAY JUNE 7 lit THE JACK DANIELS SESSIONS EP BOOK TOUR The name of author Elwin Cotman’s blog says it all: Look Ma, No Agent! After graduating from the University of Pittsburgh with a BA in fiction writing at age 20, he founded a writer’s co-op, offering residencies and support to new voices, as well as working as an independent author and performance artist. But why stop there? Heavily influenced by DIY and punk culture, Cotman took another page from their playbook and booked his own tour to promote the book he put out himself: The Jack Daniels Sessions EP. The book is a collection of five sci-fi/urban folklore stories, combining elements of fantasy and music culture and spinning them as contemporary mythology. Though it’s available on Amazon, Cotman would prefer that you buy it from an independent shop or website. Or you can just buy it from him directly. Cotman will be stopping in Boise on his tour, reading from his book at Hyde Park Books along with poet Kim Vodicka. 7:30 p.m.-9 p.m., FREE. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., 208-429-8220, hydeparkbookstore.com.

Celebrate this beloved flower—and its thorny hold on the American heart—at Julia Davis Park on Sunday, June 5, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. during the 21st annual Art and Roses fine art sale.

Pants are exhausting. Especially when you have to put them on in the morning—one painstaking leg at a time—before you bike down to Flying M for your first nervous systemactivating cup of coffee. Well, the M feels for you. That’s why it sells its locally roasted coffee by the pound, so you can sit in your skivvies sipping Sumatra before you attempt dexterous feats like dressing yourself. But if that just doesn’t quite do enough to recreate the coffeehouse vibe you’ve come to know and love, Flying M now offers another way to show your, ahem, support: Flying M men’s briefs. FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE The M’s new manties come 500 W. Idaho St. in four Play Doh-bright American 208-345-4320 Apparel colors—mustardy gold, flyingmcoffee.com turquoise blue, mossy green, traffic cone orange—and are emblazoned with the M’s iconic winged logo. Now you can flash your goods with pride as you spend the forthcoming sweltering months pantsless in front of the open window, swilling iced coffee with the ceiling fan cranked up on high. Butt if tighty-brighties aren’t your preferred bottom-coverer, Flying M also has a new line of slightly less-scandalous, white-piped ’70s track shorts as well. —Tara Morgan

A percentage of sales benefits the upkeep of the lovely Julia Davis Rose Garden. 10 a.m.-6 p.m., FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-938-5741 or 208-362-2228.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 Festivals & Events ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Unwind midweek with friends, live music and a cold beverage during this family friendly concert series. 5 p.m. FREE, downtownboise.org. The Grove, downtown, Boise. LIQUID FORUM—Learn about and celebrate the work nonprofit organizations do for the community. 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP AND HAIKU BATTLE—A performance poetry workshop followed by a poetry slam. There is a $25 prize for the haiku champ. 6 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, boisepoetry.com. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632.

Literature SCOTT MARCHANT PRESENTATION AND SIGNING—The hiking expert and local author will discuss his favorite hikes in the area and sign copies of his book The Hikers Guide to McCall and Cascade. 7 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org.

TAMING OF THE SHREW—An adaptation of Shakespeare’s love story set in 1959. Visit kedproductions.org for more info. 7 p.m. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org. THIS DAY AND AGE—Family chaos ensues when a perfectly happy empty-nester’s grown children come home to roost. Visit boiselittletheater.org for more info. 7:30 p.m. $12.50 general, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Farmers Markets MERIDIAN URBAN MARKET— Downtown Meridian on Idaho Avenue between Main and Second streets. 5-9 p.m. FREE, 208-331-3400, facebook.com/ meridianurbanmarket.

Odds & Ends SPANISH CONVERSATION GROUP—Practice rolling/slurring your Rs during this Spanish conversation group hosted by CR Languages. 6 p.m. FREE. Sapphire Bar and Grill, 622 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-7277.

FRIDAY JUNE 3 Festivals & Events

Farmers Markets CALDWELL FARMERS MARKET—Located on the corner of 12th and Dearborn streets next to the library. 5-8 p.m. FREE.

Kids & Teens KIDS HELPING KIDS—Kids get their turn at telling stories that celebrate kids helping other kids. Presented by Story Story Night and United Way of the Treasure Valley. 6:30 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

THURSDAY JUNE 2 Festival & Events CARNEVALE—Three large recycled metal sculptures created by local artist Amber Conger will be unveiled, along with a Venetian-style carnival including fire dancers, aerial silk dancers, musicians and more. Tickets are available at the Record Exchange, tixxfixx.com, Boise Coop and toentertainu.com. 6-10 p.m. $7-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

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HOKUM HOEDOWN—The Hokum Hi-Flyers will provide the dance tunes and a caller will direct you where to go during this monthly square dance. The whole family is welcome, Pie Hole will dish its pizza, and there will be a full bar for those with ID. 7 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding. com.

On Stage HYPNOSIS COMEDY SHOW— Check out hypnotist Rich Guzzi and comedian Nate Ford, followed by Voice of Reason. Visit richguzzi.com to purchase tickets. 8 p.m. $12 adv., $15 door. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Ste. 110, Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. TAMING OF THE SHREW—See Thursday. Dinner is optional and must be purchased at least 24 hours in advance. Visit kedproductions.org for more info. 6:15 p.m. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org. THIS DAY AND AGE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12.50 general, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. WILLIE WANKA—The Prairie Dog players put their own wacky spin on the story of a boy and his love for chocolate. 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208336-7383, pdplayhouse.com.

Workshops & Classes WRITING ABOUT WINE—Draw inspiration from the wines you will taste during this class, and let instructor Elizabeth Sharp McKetta guide you in writing a descriptive narrative about them. 6 p.m. $30. Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-4331208, thebasquemarket.com.

Art CUTE AND CREEPY ART SHOW—Opening reception for artists Julia Green and Rick Walter’s new exhibit. See Picks, Page 16. 7 p.m. FREE. VAC, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Odds & Ends ART AND SCIENCE OF NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE—Open house to meet doctors and ask questions about naturopathic medicine. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Natural Health, 4219 Emerald St., Boise, 208-338-0405, boisenaturalhealth.com.

SATURDAY JUNE 4 On Stage CHUCKLES COMEDY CABARET—Boise’s newest comedy venue will feature someone new each week, from hot young newbies to established stand-up comedians. 8 p.m. $12. China Blue, 100 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-9515. TAMING OF THE SHREW—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $15-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org. THE TWILIGHT ZONE—The Red Light Variety Show brings the horror, fascination and odd beauty of the Twilight Zone to life via ballet, burlesque, hula-hooping, belly dance and more. Purchase tickets at brownpapertickets. com. 9 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, visualartscollective.com. THIS DAY AND AGE—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12.50 general, $9 students and seniors. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. WILLIE WANKA—See Friday. 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, pdplayhouse.com.

Workshops & Classes VINTAGE SWING DANCE—Instructions on classic Lindy Hop moves. All ages. No partner required. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, heirloomdancestudio. com. 23

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1ST THURSDAY

FIRST THURSDAY, TWO WAYS Hands-on vs. take it all in TARA MORGAN Whatever your Myers-Briggs profile, this First Thursday has enough sensory stimulation to keep both your introverted and extroverted sides satisfied. Here’s a breakdown of how to rock First Thursday two different ways: hands-on or take it all in.

HANDS-ON 5 p.m.: Boise Art Factory, 405 S. Eighth St., 208-794-0758 Like Andy Warhol’s Factory, the new Boise Art Factory in BODO is an industrial space where you can let loose your inner eccentric. But instead of pretentious art-world elitism and hard drugs, the Boise Art Factory offers art novices a welcoming environment and an array of custom cocktails crafted by Solid. For $20, you’ll receive a 16-inch by 20-inch canvas to paint on, supplies and instruction. For more info, visit boiseartfactory.com. 6 p.m.: Urban Art Center Open House, 412-420 S. Sixth St. Get your spelunk on with a 3D slideshow by photographer and cave explorer David Kesner, then watch sparks fly with blacksmiths from Alpenglow Metalworks and craft your own paperweight with Boise Art Glass. In the Ming Studios courtyard, you can try your hand at a giant game of electronic bingo while you watch projected short films by local filmmakers and sip on a cup of Roastwerks Coffee, which will be roasted on-site by Mike Johnston. 7 p.m.: Basque Block Street Cart Party, West Grove Street Boise’s newest mobile grub units—B29 Streatery and Archie’s Place—are wheeling onto the Basque Block alongside the Boise Fry Co. Mobile Fry Unit for a special carty party this First Thursday from 5-10 p.m. Gernika will provide cold suds from Payette Brewing Co. to wash back all those sloppy joes and pulled pork sliders. Also, make sure to pop into The Basque Market and get your hard-working hands all gooey with a couple mac and cheese croquetas. Tapas cost from 25 cents to $3, depending on the color of the toothpick they’re on. 7:30 p.m.: Indie Made, 108 N. Sixth St., 208-342-0804 If you want to check out what other crafty hands have created, stop by Indie Made for a First Thursday pop-up shop featuring an array of area crafters, in addition to Indie Made’s selection of Etsy street team creators. And keep the round-food snack train rolling by snagging a couple free cake balls. 8 p.m.: Bricolage, 280 N. Eighth St., lower level, 208-345-3718 Get those frosting-flecked fingers all inked up with a hands-on letterpress demonstration with Bingo Barnes and help Eliza Fernand kick off her Quilt Stories tour. For more information on this project, read Downtown News on Page 22. 8:30 p.m.: The Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 109 W. Main St., 208-343-4611 Cap off your First Thursday creative crazyfest with a cannonball into the Owyhee Plaza Hotel pool. There will be live music and beer flights to keep the party going into the night. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

TAKE IT ALL IN 5 p.m.: Boise Art Museum, 670 S. Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330 After you hoof it through BAM perusing the 120 different eclectic shoe designs in The Perfect Fit: Shoes Tell Stories exhibit, kick up your feet and listen to local shoe designers and experts tell stories about their craft at 5:30 p.m. 6 p.m.: Artist in Residence Program, 8th Street Marketplace, BODO The 8th Street AIR program provides an opportunity to snoop through an artist’s working studio and eye worksin-progress without feeling like a total creepshow. Check out Kathleen Keys’ new installation, featuring altars created by 40 college-student elementary educators, then make your way over to Matt Bodett’s studio for a peek at his new series, Sixty-Four, which features a collection of small paintings paired with poems. Before ducking out, stop by painters Marcus Pierce and Cody Rutty’s shared space for a look into their multi-layered exploration of “fractal geometry and consciousness.” 7 p.m.: Snake River Winery, 786 W. Broad St., 208-345-9463 Before you take flight from BODO, swing by Snake River Winery for free wine flights and cubes of local cheese—like the Idaho Golden Greek halloumi or the salted truffle white cheddar—from Ballard Family Dairy. 7:30 p.m.: Basement Gallery, 928 Main St., 208-333-0309 After you fill up on wine and cheese, pop on over to Basement Gallery for a new exhibit featuring work by contemporary figurative painter Ruth Franklin. Her color-saturated sketches and paintings were recently used on the set of Mean Girls 2 and TV show The Vampire Diaries. Basement will also be showcasing work by Lisa Kaser, Jackie Hurlbert and British printmaker Trevor Price. 8 p.m.: The Alaska Center, 1020 Main St. Top your art-viewing evening off by taking in a group show at the Alaska Building, new home to Radio Boise. The Earth Visions art show highlights mediums like sculpture, oils and colored pencil by artists Tony Caprai, Bobby Gaytan, Chi E Shenam Westin, Christine Barrietua and Alejandro Anastasio. 8:30 p.m.: The Chocolat Bar, 805 W. Bannock St., 208-338-7771 Now that you’ve got an art-senal of visual images to process, head over to the Chocolat Bar to wash back all that culture with cold brews from Widmer Brewery and The Front Door and an array of free chocolate samples.

ARTISTS IN 1 S T THURS DA Y RESIDENCE 8TH STREET ARKETPLAC JU N E 2, 5- 9 P M

ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE PROGRAM WWW.8THSTREETMARKETPLACE.COM WWW.BOI SEARTSANDHI STORY.ORG

8THSTREETMARKETPLACE.COM

Wine, hors d’oeuvres and stimulating creativity

Artists & Writers at 8th Street Marketplace

CODY RUTTY & M ARCUS PIERCE Painters: Experience artwork bridging worlds of chaos theory and staring. Paintings on display are first of a synthesis between two artists whose collaboration touches on the very heart of human experiences through the lens of science’s newest discoveries in thought.

KATHLEEN KEYS Community Artist: Unveiling a collaborative eclectic collection and installation of everyday altars by 40 university student elementary educators studying ways to take art into their future classrooms.

M ATTHEW BODET Painter: Artwork ranging from small printmaking to large paintings.

M EGAN WILLIAM S Poet: Third installment of GHOSTS & PROJECTORS reading series at Cole/Marr Coffeehouse on Thursday, June 16th at 7pm. Reading hosted by poet Megan Williams, FEATURING translations by: Clyde Moneyhun, Torin Jensen, Genevieve Kohlhardt, Charles Gabel, and Daniel Clausen

NATHANI EL HOFFM AN Non-fiction Writer: Last Thursday Writing Series: Exploring Amor and Exile at Cole Marr Coffeehouse June 30th, 7pm. Interactive audience participation from Boise and Mexico via Skype and social media.

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE AT RENEWAL UNDERGROUND AT 8TH AND FULTON STREET

SARATOPS M CDONALD Mixed-media Sculptor: Audience interactive plaster and metals casting; seeking volunteers for body part casts that will be part of larger sculpture. Public can create own molds that will be cast and ready to take home at end of evening.

ARTIST IN RESIDENCE AT BRICOLAGE IN THE IDAHO BUILDING

JULI A GREEN Illustrator & Installation Artist: Displaying works-in-progress; sketches and plush art.

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS East Side BASQUE BLOCK FOOD TRUCK PARTY—Welcoming food truck Archie’s Place along with B29 Streatery and Boise Fry Company’s Mobile Fry Unit. Hosted by Bar Gernika on the Basque Block. Grove St. between Sixth St. and Capitol Blvd. 5-10 p.m. FREE. BASQUE MARKET—Snag a seat on the patio and enjoy mac and cheese croquetas and tapas. 5-8 p.m. 608 W. Grove St., 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com.

BASQUE MUSEUM AND CUL1 TURAL CENTER—Take in the gallery exhibit Hidden in Plain Sight: The Basques, or take a tour of the Jacobs/Uberuaga house. 6:30 p.m. FREE. 611 Grove St., 208-343-2671, basquemuseum.com. BOISE ART GLASS—Make your 2 own paperweight and check out a 3D slide show of caving images by David Kesner and more presented by Ming Studios and Classic Design Studios. 5-11 p.m. FREE. 530 W. Myrtle St., 208-345-1825, boiseartglass. com.

THE COTTON CLUB—Featuring quilts made with New Dawn fabrics and a sewing machine light made locally. 106 N. Sixth St. (in the basement of the Old Pioneer Building), 208-3455567, cottonclub.com. THE DISTRICT COFFEEHOUSE—Take part in an improv workshop then enjoy an improv jam in which the audience participates. 5-9 p.m. 110 S. Fifth St., 208-343-1089, ccboise.org. DRAGONFLY—Stop by to check out the sidewalk sale. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 414 W. Main St., 208-338-9234, gama-go.com.

FLATBREAD COMMUNITY 3 OVEN—Check out Amber Grubb’s photographs with $6 happy hour deals. Bottles of wine are $20, and kids eat free with purchase. 615 W. Main St., Boise, 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com. FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE—View 4 local artist Allison Demarest’s vibrant watercolors. FREE. 500 W. Idaho St., 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com.

INDIE MADE—Local artists set up shop in popup tents in the Pioneer Building across the hall. There will be wine tasting and live music as well. FREE. 108 N. Sixth St. MELTING POT—Enjoy happy hour all evening along with a $5 build-your-own Bloody Mary bar. 200 N. Sixth St., 208-383-0900, meltingpot.com. PENGILLY’S—The Frim Fram Four will play. 8:45 p.m. FREE. 513 W. Main St., 208-345-6344. SAPPHIRE BAR & GRILL—Enjoy fish tacos and $3 Coronas along with live music from Rebecca Scott. 622 W. Idaho St., 208-363-7277. WILLI B’S SANDWICH SALOON—Start your night here, or end it with Treasure Hunt Karaoke, $2.50 well drinks and draft beer, $3 Salmon Creek wine and $1.50 PBR cans. 225 N. Fifth St., 208-331-5666, willibs.com.

South Side ART FACTORY—Learn to print while enjoying 5 a glass of wine. The $20 fee includes supplies and instruction. In BODO across the street from Cafe Ole. 405 S. Eighth St., 208-794-0758. ATOMIC TREASURES—An eclectic mix of vintage, retro, art and found objects on sale. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-344-0811, atomictreasures.com. BOISE ART MUSEUM—Join local shoe 6 designers, listen to their design stories and check out The Perfect Fit: Shoes Tell Stories exhibit. Design your own colorful shoes during Studio Art Exploration from 5-8 p.m. FREE. 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. BOISE PUBLIC LIBRARY—Spend a relaxing evening with live music from jazz duo The Sidemen. 715 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org. BROWN’S GALLERY—Check out local artist 7 Charles Sites’ New Directions exhibit featuring mixed-media encaustics, music by Dr. Todd Palmer and free chair massage from Yvette Zoe. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 408 S. Eighth St., 208-342-6661. CASA DEL SOL—Enjoy $2 tacos, $5 margaritas and live music. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-3660. THE COLE MARR GALLERY/COFFEE8 HOUSE—David Marr and Kristin Cole’s Images of Idaho photos will be on display. Also take advantage of the annual print sale, now in full swing. 404 S. Eighth St., Ste. 134, 208-3367630. EIGHTH STREET MARKETPLACE—Kathleen 9 Keys unveils a collection of everyday altars. Matt Bodett, Marcus Pierce and Cody Rutty will all be featuring artwork as well. 404 S. Eighth St., Mercantile Building, 208-338-5212, 8thstreetmarketplace.com. HAIRLINES—Stop in and make an appointment for a new summer ’do. 409 S. Eighth St., 208383-9009. HELLY HANSEN—Take 20 percent off swimwear, including Reef and Helly Hansen suits. FREE. 860 W. Broad St., 208-342-2888. IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM— 10 Check out the aprons in the Tie One On exhibit in the downstairs gallery. Kids can participate in an apron-themed craft. 5-9 p.m. Donation requested. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, 208-3342120, history.idaho.gov. QUE PASA—Check out the best selection of Mexican artwork in town, including wall fountains, silver, pottery and blown glass. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-385-9018. R. GREY GALLERY JEWELRY AND ART 11 GLASS—Check out the new bug jewelry collection, glass vases and more. Support local art and find the perfect gift for a special someone. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 415 S. Eighth St., 208-3859337, rgreygallery.com. RENEWAL CONSIGNMENT HOME12 WARES—Part of the Artist in Residence program, featuring mixed-media sculptor Saratops McDonald. 517 S. Eighth St., 208-338-5444. SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Stop in for Idaho wines paired with Ballard cheeses. 786 W. Broad St., 208-345-9463.

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LISTINGS/1ST THURSDAY SOLID—Enjoy spirit 13 tasting, two-for-one drink specials, David Day’s artwork,

THE ART OF WARD 15 HOOPER GALLERY— Check out the new line of

music from Robert James, appetizers, and a $5 happy hour menu. FREE. 405 S. Eighth St., 208-345-6620.

T-shirts and artwork featuring biking, boating and outdoor Idaho. 745 W. Idaho St., 208866-4627.

Central Downtown AMERICAN CLOTHING GALLERY—Stop in and check out new summer styles and receive 10 percent off your entire purchase when you mention this listing. Pick up some custom Dawson Taylor Buckaroo Brew to support the Idaho Buckaroo Project. 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 121A, 208-433-0872, americanclothinggallery.com.

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ART GLASS ETC.—Support and encourage kids’ creativity with David MacDonald and his children, who will be showing their artwork. 5-9 p.m. 280 N. Eighth St.

BASEMENT GALLERY— Artists Ruth Franklin, Lisa Kaser, Jackie Hurlbert and Trevor Price will be showing their artwork. FREE. 928 W. Main St., 208-333-0309.

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BOISE CENTRE—Visit Concierge Corner and Visitor Services on the Grove to get the low-down on all Boise has to offer. 850 W. Front St., 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com. BRICOLAGE—Check out Eliza Ferdnand’s Quilt Stories, letterpress demonstrations from Bingo Barnes and get a chance to make your own print on his press. See Downtown News, Page 22, for more. 5-8 p.m. 280 N. Eighth St., 3453718, bricoshoppe.com.

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ART WALK Locations featuring artists

CHOCOLAT BAR—The Front Door and Widmere Brothers Brewing get together to pair beer with chocolate. 805 W. Bannock St., 208-338-7771, thechocolatbar.com. GALLERY ALEXA 18 ROSE—Julia Green will show her artwork. 6-9 p.m. 280 N. Eighth St. IDAHO ADVANTAGE CREDIT UNION—Stop in to get info on becoming a member of the credit union. 6-8 p.m. 249 N. Ninth St., 208-342-5660. IDAHOSTEL—Check out 19 the recently completed mural during the open house. 280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 103, 208-286-6476, idahostel.com. LISK GALLERY—Featur20 ing Mark Lisk’s large scale images of his recent trip to the Grand Canyon, Cindy Hall’s jewelry and a drawing for an Electra cruiser bike. Proceeds go to help fund Caitlin Stanley’s bike trip across America to raise awareness for the affordablehousing cause. FREE. 850 W. Main St., 208-342-3773, liskgallery.com. LOONEY UNDER21 GROUND ART—Meet artist Dan Looney during this open house and painting demo in the lower level of the Garro Building. 816 W. Bannock St., 208-870-9563. LUX FASHION LOUNGE—Check out great deals and live music from the local band Sweetarts. 785 W. Idaho St., 208-3444589. MAI THAI—Enjoy two-for-one drinks at the bar from 5-6:30 p.m. and then again from 9 p.m.close. Also check out the new izakaya Japanese pub food. 750 W. Idaho St., 208-344-8424, maithaigroup.com. MCU SPORTS—Scott 22 Marchant will be signing books and Jeri Rutherford’s Carbon Comfort bike seat will be featured. 822 W. Jefferson St., 208-342-7734, mcusports.com. OLD CHICAGO—Kids eat free. Karaoke from 10 p.m.-close in the bar. 730 W. Idaho St., 208363-0037, oldchicago.com. PIPER PUB & GRILL—Happy hour from 3-6 p.m. features two-for-one drinks and a special menu. 150 N. Eighth St., 208343-2444, thepiperpub.com. REDISCOVERED BOOK23 SHOP—Meet Cry Baby Ranch and Fairy Tale Blues author Tina Welling. 180 N. Eighth St., 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org. SAGE YOGA AND WELL24 NESS—Sip a glass of Indian Creek wine and watch

1. Basque Museum

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4. Flying M Coffeehouse 5. Ar t Factor y

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25. Thomas Hammer 26. The Alaska Center 27. Ar t Source Galler y 28. Galler y 601

artist Dana Logan paint as musician Kris Hartung plays. 242 N. Eighth St., Ste 200, 208-3385430, sageyogaboise.com. TANZANITE SALON AND SPA— Learn how spray tanning and body jewels can help get you ready for summer, and enjoy snacks and drinks. 220 N. Ninth St., 208-344-1700. THOMAS HAMMER—En25 joy a Jack Hammer while checking out artwork by Niccolet Larson. FREE. 298 N. Eighth St., 208-433-8004, hammercoffee. com.

29. Linen Building 30. Studio J

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS West Side

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1ST THURSDAY/NEWS ELIZ A FER NAND

ALASKA BUILDING— View the Earth Visions Art Show featuring mixed media work by Tony Caprai, Bobby Gaytan, Chieshenam Westin, Christine Barrietua and Alejandro Anastasio. 1020 Main St.

ART SOURCE GAL27 LERY—The members of the professional artist organization BOSCO will be displaying their works in oil, sculpture, fiber, mixed media and more. JB Duo will perform while you enjoy wine tasting by Indian Creek Winery and snacks. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 1015 W. Main St., 208-3313374, artsourcegallery.com. DV8 SALON—Premiere jewelry will donate 50 percent of all sales to the Elijah Flores Fund, and the staff will offer cuts or curls for $10, which will go to purchase paint for Paint the Town. 1025 W. Main St., 208342-1003. EL KORAH SHRINE CENTER— Enjoy food and drinks, tour the century-old building and check out the classic car show. 1118 W. Idaho St., elkorah.org. GALLERY 601—Tenth 28 annual Art for the Animal fundraiser for the Idaho Humane Society includes Paws for a Cause, auctions, pet adoptions and more. FREE. 211 N. 10th St., 208-336-5899, gallery601. com. GEM NOBLE LOFTS—Check out the renovations and Boise’s downtown residential lifestyle. 5-7 p.m. 101 N. 10th St. THE LINEN BUILDING— 29 Check out Bill Blahd’s new exhibit In Our Name in the gallery. 7-9:30 p.m. FREE. 1402 W. Grove St., 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com. THE RECORD EXCHANGE— Take $2 off any used CD or DVD $5.99 and above all day. In the coffee shop, all 12 oz. espresso drinks are only $2, and get $2 off any sale gift item over $5.99. The Record Exchange also features local artists’ new releases for in-store play . FREE. 1105 W. Idaho St., 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com. OWYHEE PLAZA HOTEL—All-ages poolside party with live music and beer flights. 1109 Main St., 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza. com. STUDIO J—Meet new 30 people, bid on artwork and help change a child’s life during this ACT for the Children event. Proceeds benefit the St. Luke’s Children’s Hospital. $2-$10. 1322 W. Main St., 208713-9329.

22 | JUNE 1–7, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Eliza Fernand is drawing at-tent-ion to contemporary quilt-making.

QUILT STORIES TOUR KICK-OFF Quilt-making, as a communal tradition and setting for social interactions, has dissolved just like the moth-eaten seams of your great-grandma’s patchwork masterpiece. But local fiber artist Eliza Fernand is helping to resuscitate the arduous, antiquated art form. Utilizing splashy neon fabrics and triangles of teal and gold lame, Fernand fashions quilts that would make just as much sense on a synth-pop album cover as they would folded delicately at the foot of a bed. To illuminate the art of quilting, and the stories associated with it, Fernand has created a teepee-shaped quilted tent and is hitting the road. First Thursday, June 2, “I’ll be out doing Quilt 5-9 p.m. Stories, which is an interactive performance where I am BRICOLAGE 280 N. Eighth St. inside of the tent and visitors bricoshoppe.com come in and they tell me stories about quilts. All the stories are Visit elizafernand.com for more information. spurred on by quilt memories, but they’re all really different things,” said Fernand. “So I encourage people to go on tangents, and I collect the stories with an audio recorder.” One of Fernand’s favorite quilting stories she’s heard thus far involves a quilting bee with Mormon women and their children in Salt Lake City. “They would get together in a house and stretch a quilt out on a frame that was as big as the room,” said Fernand. “And then all the mothers are around the outside of the quilt and … all the children are underneath ... So the mother pokes the needle down through the quilt and the kid underneath pulls it down and the mother points to where she wants the needle to come back up and then the kid pokes it back up.” In addition to collecting stories, Fernand will also have an Amish-influenced white quilt for people to contribute stitches on during her journey from Palouse, Wash., through towns like Missoula, Mont.; Lincoln, Neb.; and Cedar Rapids, Iowa, up to Minneapolis, where she has a residency. “It really materializes in a different way depending on where I am,” said Fernand. “It could be in an art space or it could be outdoors in the public or it could be in a more traditional fiberarts kind of space or it could be at a barbecue dance party.” Fernand raised money for her project through kickstarter. com, an online, community-based funding platform. “I think that the coolest part of working through Kickstarter are the people who have been contacting me and who are interested in the project, and now I get to go meet them and be hosted by them,” said Fernand. Fernand will kick off her Quilt Stories tour in the Bricolage courtyard this First Thursday, June 2. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT Art

Farmers Markets

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ART IN THE BAR III—More than 40 local artists displaying their artwork and doing live demonstrations. All-ages event, full bar with ID. See Picks, Page 17. Noon-10 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

Sports & Fitness EAGLE FOOTHILLS BMX GRAND OPENING—This Race For Life event is open to all ages and bike styles, and will benefit the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of America. Email efbmx@ cableone.net for more info. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $20. Ada-Eagle Sports Complex, Old Horseshoe Bend Road, Eagle, idahovelopark.org. INTER-GENERATIONAL WELLNESS DAY—People of all ages are invited to participate in activities like tai chi, nature walks, balance training and more from vendors such as the AARP, Boise Parks and Rec and more. 10 a.m.-noon FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-514-3755, cityofboise.org/parks/foothills.

CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, capitalcitypublicmarket.com. EAGLE SATURDAY MARKET—9 a.m.-1 p.m. Heritage Park, 185 E. State St., Eagle. KUNA FARMERS MARKET—9 a.m.-noon. FREE. Bernard Fisher Memorial Park, Swan Falls Road and Avalon Street, Kuna. MERIDIAN FARMERS MARKET—Crossroads shopping center at Eagle Road and Fairview Ave. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. meridianfarmersmarket.com. MIDDLETON FARMERS MARKET—Located in Roadside Park at the corner of Highway 44 and South Middleton Road. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE, middletonfarmersmarket.webs.com. NAMPA FARMERS MARKET— Located on Front Street and 14th Avenue South in Lloyd’s Square. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE, nampafarmersmarket.com.

Animals & Pets GOT NEWF?—Newf is short for Newfoundland, one of the giant breeds of dogs. If you have one, then get together with other dogs and owners and play. For more information, email tandb26@

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

yahoo.com. 5 p.m. FREE. Morris Hill Park, northeast corner of North Roosevelt and Alpine streets, Boise.

Kids & Teens HANDS-ON HISTORY— Bring the family to spend an interactive, educational afternoon at the museum on the first Saturday of each month of the summer. The Printmaker’s Art is the topic. Kids will get the opportunity to make their own accordion book, engrave and print a picture and try out printing equipment that is more than 100 years old. See Picks, Page 16. Noon-3 p.m. $3-$5. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, 208-334-2120, history. idaho.gov.

SUNDAY JUNE 5 Festivals & Events OUTPOST DAYS—See Friday. 5-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee County Historical Museum, 17085 Basey St., Murphy, 208-4952319.

On Stage WILLIE WANKA—See Friday. 2 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., 208336-7383, pdplayhouse.com.

Art ART AND ROSES—Find the perfect piece of art among the roses at the 21st annual fine art sale to benefit the Julia Davis Rose Garden. See Picks, Page 17. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise.

Citizen

| EASY

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HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

IDAHO PATRIOT THUNDER—Charity ride to benefit the Wounded Warrior Project, the Idaho Guard and Reserve Family Support Fund and Mountain Home Air Force Base’s Operation Warmheart. The ride begins at High Desert Harley Davidson, proceeds to Mountain Home Air Force Base and back to the Nampa Warhawk Museum for lunch and music. There will be a raffle to win a ride in one of the museum’s WWII P-40 fighters. Call Col. Bruce Wong at 208-860-7621 for more info. 11 a.m. $25. High Desert Harley Davidson, 2310 Cinema Drive, Meridian, 208-338-5599, highdeserthd.com.

Farmers Markets

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

EAST END MARKET—10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Bown Crossing, Bown Street, end of Parkcenter Boulevard, Boise.

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8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends THE DIVERSITY WALK—Celebrate Boise’s diversity and help raise funds for The Community Center during this walk from the east end of Julia Davis Park to the Balcony Club for auctions and raffles. 1 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise.

MONDAY JUNE 6 On Stage INSERT FOOT THEATRE—Local improv comedy. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, heirloomdancestudio.com.

Concerts DARKWOOD CONSORT—The duo from the College of Idaho perform Renaissance music, favorite hymns and a little Gershwin. 7 p.m. Donations accepted. McCall Community Congregational Church, 901 First St., McCall, 208-634-5430.

Odds & Ends PIONEER TOASTMASTERS— Participants are invited to work on their public speaking with the Pioneer Toastmasters speaking club. For more information, email personalityonpaper@yahoo.com. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE, 208-5594434. Perkins Family Restaurant, 300 Broadway Ave., Boise.

PABST BINGO NIGHT—Play for PBR, swag and other random stuff found at secondhand stores. 7 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3849008, donniemacgrub.com.

to edit, critique and encourage the continuation of their work. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks. org.

Sports & Fitness

WEDNESDAY JUNE 8 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—See Wednesday, June 1. 5 p.m. FREE, downtownboise.org. The Grove, downtown, Boise.

MATCH FOR PATCH TOURNAMENT—Proceeds from this tournament will benefit Project Patch and includes practice balls, 18 holes, cart, hole contests, prizes, an awards lunch, live auction and stories from Patch alumni. Visit projectpatch.org to register. 8 a.m. $110. Shadow Valley Golf Course, 15711 Hwy. 55, Eagle, 208-939-6699, shadowvalley.com.

On Stage

Calls to Artists

MISS IDAHO 2011 PAGEANT—Contestants compete for scholarships and the chance to represent Idaho in the Miss America pageant. 7:30 p.m. $15-$25. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

BLACK AND WHITE PHOTO CONTEST—Submit your best/fave/ unique/quirky original black and white photo for entry into BW’s Black and White Photo Contest. Categories are people, places or things. Prints must be at least 8 inches in one dimension, mounted on white 16-inch by 20-inch mat board. Digital images are permitted also. Cash prizes will be awarded for the top three entries in all three categories, and the overall winner will grace the BW cover on June 22. Deadline is 5 p.m., Wednesday, June 8. $5 per entry. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com.

Festivals & Events

Food & Drink INTRO TO BASQUE CUISINE— See Tuesday. Basque Center, 601 W. Grove St., Boise, 208331-5097 or 208-342-9983, basquecenter.com.

Literature BOISE NOVEL ORCHARD—Writers meet on the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month

TUESDAY JUNE 7 Food & Drink INTRO TO BASQUE CUISINE— Four chefs and a sommelier from Bizkaia, Basque Country, will be in Boise to share their culinary expertise. Seminars and prices vary. For more information on this event, see Food News on Page 30. Email totoricaguena@ yahoo.com for more info. Basque Center, 601 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-331-5097 or 208-3429983, basquecenter.com.

Literature THE JACK DANIELS SESSIONS EP BOOK TOUR—Elwin Cotman will read from his recently released book, The Jack Daniels Sessions EP, and lyrical poet Kim Vodicka will read from hers. See Picks, Page 17. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-429-8220, hydeparkbookstore.com.

Odds & Ends STAND-UP COMEDY NIGHT— Open mic night, hosted by Danny Amspacher. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., 208-322-3430.

24 | JUNE 1–7, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Skeleton Blues by Connor Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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NOISE JEFF S NOW

RACING TO THE TOP Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.’s first headlining tour JORDAN WILSON Somewhere along the East Coast, Josh Epstein of indie band Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. was riding in a van. It was no ordinary trip. On that day, Epstein and bandmate Daniel Zott were on their way to their very first show of their very first headlining tour promoting their very first LP, It’s a Corporate World. But no pressure. The band—which rolled through Boise in March to open for Tapes N Tapes—anticipated smooth sailing as headliners. Hopefully. “I think headlining will be less stressful,” Epstein said, optimistically. “Openers have to worry about timing, about getting their equipment out. We can just relax.” Then he paused. It’s hard to say what was going through his mind at the moment. That day was a big day and Epstein and Zott had gotThey may look more like the pit crew than racers here but just wait until Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr.’s ten to that point very quickly. Josh Epstein and Daniel Zott start their engines. Just over a year ago, someone handed Epstein a copy of Atropos, Zott’s solo “All I have to say is, we try to be way sound is the best of indie rock infused with album. Epstein loved it. He called up Zott more respectful of America now,” he said, ’60s pop psychedelia, which could easily and asked if he wanted to write some songs closing the subject. be two irreconcilable styles. DEJJ’s music together. Though it was hard to tell if The so-called altercation might have splits the difference between the Beach Boys Epstein’s moment of silence was thoughtful them thinking a little differently about their and Beach House. It’s dreamy rock with reflection or bad phone reception, it’s the stage presence, and it’s clear Epstein took nostalgic roots. Plenty of the band’s songs stuff of prototypical rock band movies. the so-called altercation to heart. He made feature melodic harmonies with keyboard, “OK, so it’s stressful as an headliner,” sure to say “Boy-see” rather than “Boyupbeat drums and a necessary rhythmic Epstein finally said, still sounding lost in zee.” He talked about playing at Visual Arts thought. “I guess we do have to sell tickets.” guitar—imagine a modern update of “God Collective and the Bouquet with his band Only Knows” by the Beach Boys, which the But Epstein shouldn’t be too worried. The Silent Years. For a duo that has been all band covers and is a fan favorite. But make As the name Dale Earnhardt Jr. Jr. suggests, Epstein and Zott know a thing or two about no mistake: Their indie sound matched with over the country in the short time they’ve been together, Epstein remembered Boise— their Americana-gone-wild getup are two quirky showmanship, and they have gotten and probably the thousands of other places essential pieces of the band. plenty of buzz about their look and their “There’s two different aspects to being in he’s been—with astonishing clarity. It’s clear music. Paste Magazine recently named It’s a that he loves being in a band. Corporate World one of “five summer debut a band, especially in the current climate,” Maybe that’s why Epstein is so cool Epstein said excitedly. “There’s the introalbums to get excited about.” spective side: the emotionally cathartic writ- and collected about DEJJ’s first headlining The duo is known for wearing the uniing and recording aspect. And then it comes tour: It isn’t really anything new. While form of their namesake: racing outfits covtime to perform, and some bands can’t sepa- he misses his dog and being at home in ered in a slew of corporate sponsors. Spin, rate themselves from the writing process. We Detroit, the excitement of being on tour is in a write-up for the band’s new album, believe that performing means sharing some- front and center. wrote, “Clap your hands and say NAS“We get to be a part of a different comthing positive with a room full of people. CAR.” And when DEJJ played Neurolux in munity every night. We get to walk into a March, the stage was noticeably more decor- Performing, for us, is extroverted.” town and meet new people by sharing our Not everyone appreciates the juxtaposioriented than the headlining band’s stage music,” he said. tion of these styles. set up. Two giant And that’s what the band plans to bring “Last time we were “JR JR” light boxes back to Boise when they play Neurolux on in Boise, there was a illuminated the stage With EMA. Tuesday, June 9, 8 p.m., little altercation.” Ep- Tuesday, June 9. As headliners, DEJJ will and framed the band. $10 adv., $12 door. have more freedom—and they plan to use it. stein said hesitantly. Epstein and Zott comNEUROLUX “We’re mixing it up,” Epstein hinted. “There was a man ... mitted to the pageant111 N 11th St. “Just wait and see.” neurolux.com outside of our show. ry, wearing captain’s While Epstein is reluctant to share specifHe wanted to talk outfits complete with ics, rumor has it that the band is not only about our props.” hats. At the end of the More specifically, the flag the band waved getting new outfits for themselves but for show, they waved an enormous American concertgoers, too. And that same rumor sugover the crowd while they performed the flag over the crowd. gests they might be skeleton outfits. If that song “It’s a Corporate World” might have However, their music contrasts their isn’t extroverted, what is? been the catalyst. image. While they might don outfits, their WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2011 | 25


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE LIZ DEVINE

GUIDE WEDNESDAY JUNE 1 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring Finn Riggins and Fitz and the Tantrums. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire BILLY ZERA—7 p.m. FREE. Sully’s

THE DEVIL WHALE, JUNE 2, FLYING M COFFEEGARAGE

THE BOURBON DOGS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

Last month, Salt Lake City-based popsters The Devil Whale opened for Seattle’s The Head and the Heart at Neurolux. Readers know of BW’s love affair with THATH—reason enough to catch this act when they hit our shores again this week. Devil Whale’s recently released second album, Teeth (Young Wives), has more bite than the debut. “Earthquake Dreams” evokes the emotion that has become the signature of songwriter Brinton Jones and longtime collaborator Jake Fish. Add bandmates Cameron Runyan, Wren Kennedy and Jamie Timm to the mix and The Devil Whale swims with the best of them. Whether they had the May 21 end-of-the-world deadline in mind when writing “The End (Isn’t Coming),” lyrics like “You can keep screaming at your crystal ball / but it just needs a hug / The end isn’t coming / it’s having buyer’s remorse,” are timely—and serenely humorous. —Heather Lile

DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

8 p.m., $3. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, flyingmcoffee.com.

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

GREAT GARDEN ESCAPE—Featuring Blaze and Kelly. 6:30 p.m. $7 member, $10 nonmember, $6 kids ages 4-12. IBG

JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

THE NEW TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

KEVIN KIRK—With Steve Eaton and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

PILOT ERROR—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

REBECCA SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper RESTLESS SOULS—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s SIGNAL PATH—With The Malah. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux SOUL SERENE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub YAMN—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

LAST BAND STANDING—9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s REBECCA SCOTT—7 p.m. FREE. Sapphire ROBERT JAMES—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

DAVID MARR—6 p.m. FREE. Cole Marr

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

THURSDAY JUNE 2

TRAVIS MCDANIEL—6 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY WEBER—7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

FRIDAY JUNE 3

I DECLARE WAR—6 p.m. $TBA. The Venue JAM NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel JENNY AND JOHNNY—With Nik Freitas. 7:30 p.m. $15-$35. Knitting Factory JESSICA FULGHUM—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown JOHN HEART JACKIE—8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BENEFIT CONCERT FOR ZAMBIA—Featuring Shakin’ Not Stirred and Chad Summervill. 8 p.m. $15. The Flicks CALLING MOROCCO—With New Transit. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE DEVIL WHALE— See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL— 9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s FURIOUS JONES—See Listen Here, Page 27. With Bukkit. 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux

POKE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s RANDOM CANYON GROWLERS—9 p.m. $5. Bouquet RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SOUL SERENE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

SATURDAY JUNE 4 A DOUG BROWN COLLECTIVE—1 p.m. FREE. Solid A TASTY JAMM—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s BRENT AMAKER AND THE RODEO—9 p.m. $5. Red Room DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL— 9:30 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

10TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION! Tuesday, June 21st THANK YOU TO ALL OF YOUR SUPPORT AND BUSINESS! FOOD SPECIALS BBQ Crab Omelet with hollandaise Free Mimosas on the patio

501 Main St. (5th and Main) Old Boise | 388-1198 26 | JUNE 1–7, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

HAMBONES ON THE BEACH—4 p.m. FREE. Sun Ray Cafe

GAYLE CHAPMAN—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

JIM LEWIS—11 a.m. FREE. Focaccia’s

JON HYNEMAN—With Sally Tibbs and Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KILL THE NOISE—10 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Reef

MARDI GRAS WITCH DOCTOR PRODUCTIONS—Featuring Mortal Enemy, Final Underground, Threshold and Kunk. 7:30 p.m. $5. Mardi Gras

THE RISE RECORDS TOUR— Featuring Decoder, That’s Outrageous and Ten After Two. 7 p.m. $10. The Venue YOUNG WIDOWS—With My Disco. 8 p.m. $8. Neurolux

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club TAUGE AND FAULKNER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s VOICE OF REASON—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—8 p.m. FREE. Bouquet BROCK BARTEL—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

A DOUG BROWN COLLECTIVE—1 p.m. FREE. Solid BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape BOBAFLEX—Featuring Shaun and Marty McCoy. 8 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

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BROCK BARTEL—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe JEFF MOLL AND GUESTS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny JENNIFER BATTEN—8 p.m. $7. Reef KEVIN KIRK—With Cheryl Morrell Trio. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LARRY CONKLIN—11 a.m. FREE. Moon’s

MONDAY JUNE 6

SUNDAY JUNE 5

TUESDAY JUNE 7

LARRY BUTTEL—7 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny PUNK MONDAY—8 p.m. $3. Liquid THE SHAUN BRAZELL TRIO— 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

RUSS PFIEFER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid TERRI EBERLEIN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BARBARA LAING—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe BEN BURDICK—6:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid GIZZARD STONE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s JAM NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel JESSICA FULGHUM—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LIKE A ROCKET—With Parade of Bad Guys. 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux

WEDNESDAY JUNE 8 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Featuring Like a Rocket and David Lindly. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove AMY WEBER AND BEN BURDICK TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Sapphire

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s SOUL SERENE—7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill THE THROWDOWN—Featuring Broken Bends, Terrapin and A Liquid Embrace. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

FURIOUS JONES, JUNE 3, NEUROLUX If you’re in a husband-and-wife music duo living in Cascade and not making the sound you really want, what do you do? If you’re Tom and Sarah Smith, you have Carl Hamilton (he apprenticed under John Bolin) build you a guitar, change your name from Blacksmith to Furious Jones and move to Nashville, Tenn. Tom is a classical guitar player, but when Sarah—originally from England—picked up drums about six years ago, they wanted to rock. Tom uses a pick on his new black-limba wood axe—called the Classical Smith—which allows him to get volume and sound without wearing through the body of his guitar. And the name change to Furious Jones not only stands out but better reflects the duo’s attitude and Led Zeppelin-meetsTownes Van Zandt rock. “We’re both shy, but we’re in our element on stage,” Sarah said laughing. “We’re reclusive exhibitionists.” —Amy Atkins With Bukkit. 8 p.m., $3. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2011 | 27


THE TUBE/SCREEN SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

A CUT ABOVE SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE VS. THE END OF THE WORLD

Meek’s Cutoff blazes new trails in an old genre GEORGE PRENTICE

It’s a good thing Jesus didn’t come down from the sky in a magic chariot and sweep everyone off their feet in a rapturous romp to heaven a week and a half ago—we would’ve missed the Saturday Night Live season finale. People who complain about Saturday Night Live and predict its impending demise are getting as tiresome as an apocalyptic preacher. Both types of doomsayers display similar behavioral patterns. They say the world or SNL is about to end, and then, when it doesn’t and the Earth or opening monologue are just fine, they go back into hiding until some sort of biblical blurb or bad skit catches their attention and propels them to prophesy a new calamity. Harold Camping, a California preacher who concocted the religious quackery of Judgment Day on May 21, quickly revised his prognostication when nothing SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE Airs Saturdays at 11 p.m. on NBC

happened. It will now be Tuesday, Oct. 21, he claims. That’s about when the

Spoiler alert. The ending of Meek’s Cutoff is startling and has caused some debate among filmgoers. Following its world premiere in September 2010 at the Toronto International Film Festival, I witnessed almost half of the audience shaking their heads while just as many raved about the film’s originality. My first reaction was surprise, which morphed into anger but then eased into admiration and ended with praise. Eight months later, I still can’t get it out of my head. There’s nothing meek about the folks who eked out an existence in the 1800s. There is nothing easy about Meek’s Cutoff. The setting is the 1845 Oregon Trail—to be sparest of dialogue, she becomes the moral will see in any movie this year. Long scenes more accurate, it is off the trail. Just how far compass of the doomed journey. Extra kudos contain little to no dialogue. Words yield off is the mystery of Meek’s Cutoff. A small to Rod Rondeaux in a perfectly nuanced porto a rhythmic but silent tension. Halfway wagon train makes its way west across Orthrough the film, I was sweating and breath- trayal of a nameless Native American, sworn egon’s high desert and central Cascade Range. enemy of the travelers, but who may be their ing hard, with a dread of drowning in a Anyone familiar with the landscape will only salvation. And Bruce Greenwood as sea of dust and despair. This is clearly not instantly recognize the setting and credit the Meek is full of spitfire. Somewhere under a Zane Grey wagon film’s authenticity. Meek’s bush of a beard is one of Hollywood’s train with John Three families hire most handsome leading men. Wayne tossing off a blustery mountain MEEK’S CUTOFF (PG) Williams’ performance is crafted with one-liners. If anyman turned trail blazer, Directed by Kelly Reichardt complete trust from director Kelly Reichardt thing, Meek’s Cutoff Stephen Meek, to guide Starring Michelle Williams, Bruce Greenwood, and screenwriter Jonathan Raymond. The is the anti-Western. them through what Paul Dano trio previously collaborated on Wendy and In its genuineness, they presume to be the Opens Friday at The Flicks Lucy. Here, in addition to exploring Central we are transported final leg of a journey to Oregon’s desert, the three explore themes of to a filthy, grueling, the Pacific. But Meek austerity, faith and trust. It’s heady stuff. scorching reality. loses his way, and one Critics have heaped praise on the film but Michelle Williams (Emily Tetherow) again assumes that he never truly knew the way to there has also been a healthy amount of deriproves why she is one of this generation’s begin with. Two weeks become five, and five sion from some who loathe the movie’s pace finest film actresses. Her familiar squint weeks become eternity as all concept of time and paucity. For me, the journey in Meek’s from beneath a weathered bonnet portends and motivation is gone with the wind. wisdom in a mostly silent character. With the Cutoff is arduous but unforgettable. Meek’s Cutoff sets as slow a pace as you

new SNL season begins, so let’s hope he’s wrong—what a shame if next season gets

SCREEN/LISTINGS

ruined by the Rapture. For 36 years, SNL has provided timely satire, cathartic nonsense and some of the most memorable moments in the history of television. Sometimes, it’s also excruciatingly awful—not everything can be Happy Fun Ball—but for the most part, these aren’t the end times. Kristen Wiig, for instance, is as talented as any cast member since Chris Farley. SNL detractors and religious lunatics

Call for Entries I48 FILM FESTIVAL—The deadline to register for the eighth annual 48-hour film festival is coming up. Participating teams have 48 hours to write, cast, shoot and edit an original short film. The late entry deadline is Friday, June 3, and will cost you $100 and must be hand delivered to The Flicks. Get the info you need and download a registration packet at thislovelymachine.com. See Picks, Page 16. Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

always predict events within their own lifetimes. It would be far more credible to do otherwise. With that in mind, take heed—the world will end in 1 billion years, and Saturday Night Live will never make it beyond 200 seasons. —Damon Hunzeker

28 | JUNE 1–7, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Opening MEEK’S CUTOFF—Director Kelly Reichardt tells the true story of three couples who split off from the Oregon Trail to follow Stephen Meek’s supposed shortcut. See review, this page. (PG) The Flicks

POTICHE—When an umbrella factory owner has a heart attack, his pampered wife takes the helm of the family business. Based on the play by Jean-Pierre Gredy and Pierre Barilett, this comedy stars Catherine Deneuve and Gerard Depardieu. In French with English subtitles. (R) The Flicks X-MEN: FIRST CLASS—The story of how the rift between Charles Xavier and Erik Lensherr, who were once best friends, resulted in Magneto and Professor X becoming mortal enemies. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

SUPER 8—J.J. Abrams and Steven Spielberg team up in this sci-fi movie about the mysterious disappearances of the citizens in a small Ohio town after a truck hit and derailed a train. Opening Friday, June 10. (NR) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

For movie times, visit boiseweekly. com or scan this QR code.

WINTER IN WARTIME—A young Dutch boy makes the dangerous decision to help a wounded RAF pilot he discovers hiding in the woods during the German occupation of his hometown. Based on the best-selling autobiography of Jan Terlouw. In Dutch with English subtitles. Opening Friday, June 10. (R) The Flicks

Coming Soon THE FIRST GRADER—Based on a true story, this visually stunning film tells the story of an uneducated 84-year-old man in Kenya who wishes to enroll in a first-grade class to learn to read and write. Opening Friday, June 10. (PG-13) The Flicks

T H E A T E R S : EDWARDS 22 BOISE, 208-377-9603, regmovies. com; EDWARDS 9 BOISE, 208-338-3821, regmovies.com; EDWARDS 14 NAMPA, 208-467-3312, regmovies.com; THE FLICKS, 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com; MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN, 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com. FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL, 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com; OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA, 208377-3072, opcmovies.com; NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL, 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | JUNE 1–7, 2011 | 29


NEWS/FOOD FOOD/YEAR OF IDAHO FOOD GU Y HAND

WATER USAGE 101 Submit your salsational recipe to the Central Bench Spring Festival.

BASQUES, BALLERS, BALLARD AND THE BENCH If you think Basque cuisine is nothing more than pintxos and tart cider, prepare to have your mind melted. Four chefs and a sommelier, all hailing from the Basque Country, will take over Boise for six days to school locals on Basque food and wine during An Introduction to Basque Cuisine. Presented by the Cenarrusa Foundation for Basque Culture and the Bizkaia Department of Culture, the event will kick off with a Basque txakolina wine tasting at the Basque Center on Tuesday, June 7, from 6:30-8:30 p.m. On Wednesday, June 8, and Thursday, June 9, from 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m., there will be two, day-long professional Basque cuisine seminars at the College of Western Idaho Culinary Arts Institute. The public can get its hands on some Basque grub with demonstrations on Wednesday and Thursday from 6:30-8:30 p.m. at CWI’s Culinary Arts Institute. Wednesday’s class will whip up codfish in a reduced parsley sauce and seafood salad, and Thursday’s class will showcase slowcooked chicken and roasted shoulder of lamb stuffed with cinnamon apples. The week’s crowning event—a fivecourse dinner at the Basque Center prepared by some of the Basque Countr y’s premier chefs—goes down on Saturday, June 11. The meal features wine pairings and costs $75 per plate, or $50 for those age 65 and older, and starts at 6:30 p.m. with cocktails. For more information or to RSVP for any of these events, visit cenarrusa.org. Boise’s Cake Ballers is now callin’ shots at its very own downtown HQ. Though the tricked-out space at 720 W. Idaho St., Ste. 40, isn’t technically a storefront, it is a convenient spot to place and pick up orders. For more info, visit thecakeballers.com. Moving from ballers to Ballard, the local cheesemakers recently announced that they’re working on a cookbook with chef Jane Deal, which features recipes using the squeaky Idaho Golden Greek halloumi cheese. Ballard Family Dairy is accepting recipe suggestions from the public through Monday, Nov. 29. Visit ballardcheese.com for more information. In other recipe news, the Central Bench Spring Festival is inviting local salsa-philes to enter their homemade creations in a competition that will take place the day of the fest, Saturday, June 11. There are four categories—local, verde, tropical and traditional—and all canned or fresh salsa must be homemade. For more information, email centralbenchna@gmail.com. —Tara Morgan

30 | JUNE 1–7, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Students at C of I study the effects of agriculture on Idaho’s water GUY HAND The mood was sunny on a spring afternoon as a small crowd collected for a student presentation on the lawn of the College of Idaho campus in Caldwell. It was warm, there was a barbecue afterward and graduation was only days away. Yet one of the photographs the eight student presenters had set on easels next to a row of colorful graphs and pie charts seemed out of place. It was an oversized black-and-white portrait of a longbearded and thoroughly grumpy-looking old man. He stared down on the proceedings like a disapproving grandfather. He was also essential to the students’ program. “Our story of water in the West starts with a man by the name of John Wesley Powell in the year 1869,” said environmental studies student Sam Finch after he stepped to the microphone and began a senior class presentation on the often unseen consequences of food production on the West’s water supply. This capstone presentation on water and agriculture was one of a series of foodcentric programs the College of Idaho is offering as a participant in 2011: The Year of Idaho Food. The college has taught several other courses focusing on the subject of food, brought in guest speakers to talk about food and has two “sustainability stewards” who maintain an organic garden that provides food to the school. They work closely with Bon Appetit, the college’s food service provider, which is well known for sourcing a high percentage of its ingredients from local farmers and ranchers. In addition, the college has chosen a food-related book as its freshman read for next fall, Wendell Berry’s Bringing It to the Table: On Farming and Food. Back in the 1860s, Powell probably looked as perturbed as he did in that black and white portrait. A one-armed American explorer famous for raining on the nation’s parade of development plans for the arid West, Powell warned of the region’s severe lack of water. He cautioned against the kind of development that suited the rain-rich eastern United States and northern European countries that many of America’s western immigrants had recently fled. Powell predicted that even after building countless dams and labyrinthine canal systems, only a small percentage of the West would ever be suitable for agriculture. He predicted the attempt alone would come at great economic and environmental costs.

Sam Finch (left) and Camrin Braun (right) are dipping their feet into the huge pool of Idaho’s agricultural water usage.

“Despite his best efforts,” Finch continued, “Powell’s insight was disregarded.” The western water situation doesn’t appear to have changed much since Powell’s day. Finch and his seven fellow environmental studies students spent 10 weeks immersed in the subject of western water, focusing on agriculture and interviewing farmers, ranchers and winemakers throughout the Treasure Valley. They read books like Cadillac Desert by Marc Reisner and The Snake River: Window to the West by Tim Palmer and others. What they learned stunned them. “With a lot of the reading that we did and the people that we talked to, we really began to understand the water footprint that each individual person had on a daily basis,” said fellow student presenter Camrin Braun. The class learned that in Idaho, our water footprint is massive. According to recent statistics collected by Dr. Robert Mahler at the University of Idaho, the state ranks No. 1 in the nation for per capita water usage. Mahler cautioned that our ranking is so high because we are a relatively small population irrigating a very large amount of agricultural land. Nevertheless, he said, Idahoans use 13,000 gallons of water per person per day—it was once as high as 22,000 gallons. Wyoming’s residents, at No. 2, use 1,000 gallons. Rhode Island uses a diminutive 150. More than 85 percent of that Idaho water is poured on farmers’ fields (another 7 to 9 percent is used to farm fish). Factor in that much of that farmland sits in a desert, which receives less than 10 inches of rainfall per year. “Some of the numbers are very sobering and I think definitely got us on board sort of being water conscious and trying to spread the word,” said Braun.

As early as 1905, Idaho’s small population was already drawing enough water from the Snake River to dry a 10-mile stretch of the river near Blackfoot. Today dams continue to dramatically squeeze the state’s rivers during the height of the growing season, the most obvious result being the reduction or elimination of Idaho’s native-salmon runs. Most of us don’t see the various impacts of agriculture on water quantity and quality on the environment and recreation. Finch said having a campus located in farm country helped make him and his fellow students more sensitive to the issue. “Maybe it’s because we’re in the middle of Caldwell, which is a more agricultural community than a lot of other college campuses in the West,” Finch said. “And maybe it’s because of that that we see the link between water and food. When we drive down to the Snake River, 15 minutes away, we see that it’s a working river and not a pristine mountain river. We see the canals that run all around the city. Walk a mile in any direction, you’ll hit a canal. The connections between water and agriculture are everywhere. You just have to kind of be knowing what to look for.” The average consumer may not know what to look for, but Finch said the farmers and ranchers his environmental studies class interviewed were only too aware they were growing food in a desert. “They understand that water conservation is an important issue,” he said. “They would all be in favor of conserving water would it be financially feasible. If farmers could afford to save water, I’m sure they would, but I think the cost that they 32 have to incur, both financially and just WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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FOOD/CON’T their time conserving water, makes that pretty difficult.” One third of Idaho’s farm fields are flood irrigated, compared to more efficient watering methods like sprinkling or drip. Flood irrigation is cheaper. The fact that many farmers can’t afford the electricity and equipment that would help them save water is one of many ironies Finch and his fellow environmental studies students found shadowing their research. “Every week we’d be talking about something,” Finch said. “And there would just be this looming irony over the whole discussion about how much water we’re wasting.” The contradictory nature of water politics wasn’t lost on him either. “Idaho, being a conservative state, has probably one of the most socialized public works projects as far as water irrigation in the country goes. There’s just irony in every corner,” Finch said. But the students also found hope. Consumers, they learned, have more influence than they might think. They can vote for water conservation with their forks. “You know, the consumer really has a lot of power that we may not realize,” said Braun in his conclusion of the students’ presentation. “By understanding where our food comes from and what effect its production has on the landscape, we can take advantage of the power of consumption to help shrink our own water footprint and inform those exhibiting wasteful practices that they should do the same.” Although John Wesley Powell’s black and white portrait was still scowling at the end of the program, he would have likely been cheered by the sight of a new generation, some 142 years later, still willing to tackle his favorite subject: water in the West. 30

32 | JUNE 1–7, 2011 | BOISEweekly

FOOD/BEER GUZZLER

SUMMER BREWS It may be a bit hard to believe but the official start of summer is just a few weeks away. I just checked, and the Friday after this article hits the stands, forecasters are predicting a high temperature of 80 degrees. I’ll believe it when I see it, but as the temperature dials up, you want to dial back a bit on your brew, opting for enticingly fresh, somewhat subdued flavors over bold excess. Here are the first three entries on the summer seasonal scene: DESCHUTES TWILIGHT SUMMER ALE It’s a bright amber in the glass with a thick, creamy head, and the resiny hops come through loud and clear on the nose with just a hint of sweetness. The hop flavor is more subdued than those aromas would suggest, but this ale is definitely built around them, though they aren’t overly bitter. As it warms up, nice nuances of soft and floral malt show up. Perfect for summer evenings on the deck. NEW BELGIUM SOMMERSAULT Sommersault offers a clean strawberry-blond pour with a chalk-white head that collapses quickly but leaves a nice lacing. The just sweet, warm biscuit and malt aromas are laced with earthy grain, spice and subtle hops. The palate is filled with fresh citrus and peach flavors with good hits of spice, lemon grass and biscuit on the finish. A worthy homage to the Belgian Blonde style that would go great with Asian cuisine. SIERRA NEVADA SUMMERFEST This brew pours a translucent golden wheat with an egg-white froth that lingers. Grain and fresh bread mark the nose along with touches of malt and citrusy hops. The light carbonation doesn’t fill you up, while the flavors are a nicely balanced mix of floral hops and soft malt backed by notes of just crisp citrus. A ver y refreshing and easy drinking take on a European Pilsner. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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16 Long-range weapon, for short 20 Spa spot 21 It’s got game, often

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35 “Yankee Doodle Dandy” Oscar winner 37 Piggish 38 Spanish treasure 39 Heavy cart 40 Very 41 Go out 43 Norbert Pearlroth spent 52 years of 60-hour weeks in the Library’s Reading Room collecting material for ___ 51 Fabulous writer? 52 “The Creation” composer 53 Ring site 54 Jagged chain 56 Lee, e.g.: Abbr. 58 Big name in country 59 This is not going anywhere 61 Cry of praise 65 Do some grilling 67 Rail org. 68 Amigo 69 The Library’s Special Collections include one of George Washington’s creations, ___ 76 Uganda’s Amin 77 Some chest-pounding, briefly 78 Have something 79 Boxes 80 Progresso offering 85 Take to a higher power 88 Plot thickener 89 Smooth as silk 90 Article used by Einstein 91 Grace in film 93 Fashionable beach resorts 97 The Library’s Periodicals Room was the source of most of the excerpted material in the first issue of ___ 101 Thermal opening? 102 A Lincoln 103 KFC side dish 104 Dye container 105 Hines of jazz 109 Pull-up pullers 112 Fret 113 Tease

114 Pinafores 116 Spot on the staff? 117 Neighbor of Swe. 118 Button ridge 120 The handle of Charles Dickens’s ivory letter opener, in the Library’s collection, is ___ 125 Reddish purple 126 Without digressing 127 John who wrote “The Bastard” 128 Go-between 129 Goes on to say 130 Cartoonist Bil 131 Indolence 132 Irascible

DOWN 1 Bozo 2 Informal talk 3 Stretchy garments 4 Disconnect 5 Hassle 6 Internet option, briefly 7 Vitamin-rich snack 8 Kind of wave 9 Crow 10 Short agreement 11 “Jabberwocky” birds 12 Lyonnaise sauce ingredient 13& 14 Visually investigate 15 Predecessor of Rabin 16 Caller ID? 17 Sign of the times? 18 Ulna and fibula 19 Cartoon criminal 25 Lachrymose 26 Humble 27 Wales, in medieval times 32 Roman squares 34 Torrent 35 Borneo borderer 36 Besides 39 Bank (on) 40 Hag 42 Pear variety 44 The Hub hub 45 Look on 46 Wonderland cake message 47 Inflamed

48 Hockey goal part 49 Small African antelopes 50 Barnstormers 55 Llullaillaco’s locale 57 Shanghai-to-Beijing dir. 60 Easily handled, as a ship 61 Huzzahs 62 Words of worry 63 Hélène or Geneviève 64 Missile paths 66 You may get them in a bunch 70 Products with earbuds 71 Set straight 72 Melancholy, musically 73 Chart checkers, for short 74 Mandatory recycling, e.g. 75 Andalusian port 81 Andalusian aunt 82 Where “Parks and Recreation” is set 83 High-pH solutions 84 Heyday 86 Alphabetical order? 87 Setting of Johnny Depp’s feature film debut 92 Noah Webster’s alma mater L A S T B A N D

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): The film The Men Who Stare at Goats tells the story of the U.S. Army’s efforts to harness psychic powers for military purposes. It’s not entirely a work of the imagination. As the movie begins, a caption on the screen informs viewers that “More of this is true than you would believe.” I suspect there’ll be a comparable situation unfolding in your life in the coming weeks, Aries. As you experience a rather unusual departure from your regularly scheduled reality, fact and fiction may be deeply intertwined. Will you be able to tell them apart? TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I dreamed you were a member of an indigenous tribe in what Westerners call New Guinea. You had begun to show unusual behavior that suggested you were developing enhanced cognitive abilities. You’d solved one of the tribe’s long-standing problems, were spontaneously spouting improvised poetry and had been spotted outside late at night having animated conversations with the stars. Some of your friends and relatives were now referring to you by a new name that in your native tongue meant “the one who dances naked with the deities.” How would you interpret my dream, Taurus? I think it suggests you could be on the verge of growing an intriguing new capacity or two. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the far northern reaches of Ilulissat, a town in Greenland, the sun sets for good on Nov. 29 every year and doesn’t rise again until Jan. 13. Or at least that was the case until 2011. This year, to the shock of locals, sunlight broke over the horizon on Jan. 11—two days ahead of schedule. Though a few alarmists theorized that this disturbance was due to a shift in the Earth’s axis or rotation, scientists suggested that the cause was global warming: Melting ice has caused the horizon to sink. I expect something equally monumental to make an appearance in your world soon, Gemini. Can you handle an increased amount of light? CANCER (June 21-July 22): I’m not a big fan of the “No Pain, No Gain” school of thought. Personally, I have drummed up more marvels and wonders through the power of rowdy bliss than I have from hauling 1,000pound burdens across the wasteland. But I do recognize that, in my own story as well as in others’, hardship can sometimes provoke inspiration. I think it may be one of those moments for you, Cancerian. Please accept this medicinal prod from the ancient Roman poet Horace: “Adversity has the effect of eliciting talents that in times of prosperity would have lain dormant.”

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In his 1934 book Beyond the Mexican Bay, British author Aldous Huxley observed that “The natural rhythm of human life is routine punctuated by orgies.” He was using the word “orgies” in its broadest sense—not to refer to wild sex parties, but rather to cathartic eruptions of passion, uninhibited indulgence in revelry and spirited rituals of relief and release. That’s the kind of orgy you’re due for, Leo. It’s high time to punctuate your routine. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “The great pleasure in life is doing what people say you cannot do,” wrote the essayist Walter Bagehot. Personally, I don’t think that’s the supreme joy possible to a human being; but it definitely has a provocative appeal. May I recommend that you explore it in the coming weeks, Virgo? The astrological omens suggest you’re in an excellent position to succeed at an undertaking you’ve been told is unlikely or even impossible for you to accomplish. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): When people unsubscribe from my newsletter, they’re asked to say why they’re leaving. In a recent note, a dissatisfied customer wrote, “Because you are a crackhead who makes no sense. You sound like you write these horoscopes while you’re stoned on mushrooms.” For the record, I not only refrain from crack and magic mushrooms while crafting your oracles; I don’t partake of any intoxicants at any other time, either—not even beer or pot. I’m secretly a bit proud, however, that the irate ex-reader thinks my drug-free mind is so wild. In the coming week, Libra, I invite you to try an experiment inspired by this scenario: Without losing your mind, see if you can shed some of the habitual restrictions you allow to impinge on the free and creative play of your mind. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The roots of big old trees are your power objects. I advise you to visualize them in your mind’s eye for a few minutes each day, maybe even go look at actual trees whose roots are showing above ground. Doing this will strengthen your resolve and increase your patience and help you find the deeper sources of nurturing your need. Another exercise that’s likely to energize you in just the right way is to picture yourself at age 77. I suggest you create a detailed vision of who you’ll be at that time. See yourself drinking a cup of tea as you gaze out over a verdant valley on a sunny afternoon in June. What are you wearing? What kind of tea is it? What birds do you see? What are your favorite memories of the last 30 years?

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you’re a physicist or Wall Street broker, your assignment this week is to read the poetry of Pablo Neruda (bit.ly/nerudasongs). If you’re a kirtan-chanting yogini or the author of a New Age self-help newsletter, your task is to read up on the scientific method (bit.ly/sciencemethod). If you’re a tight-fisted control freak, try being a laid-back connoisseur of the mellowest vibes imaginable. It’s Mix-It-Up Week, Sagittarius—a time to play with flipping and flopping your usual perspectives, roles and angles. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Describing muckraking journalist Peter Freyne, Sen. Patrick Leahy said, “He knew the difference between healthy skepticism and hollow cynicism.” Mastering that distinction happens to be your next assignment, Capricorn. Can you distinguish between your tendency to make compulsive negative judgments and your skill at practicing thoughtful and compassionate discernment? My reading of the astrological omens suggests that you will have a successful week if you do. Not only that: The universe will conspire to bring you blessings you didn’t even realize you needed. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “There is time for work,” said fashion designer Coco Chanel, “and time for love. That leaves no other time.” I understand and sympathize with that perspective. But I’m going to beg you to make an exception to it in the coming weeks, Aquarius. In addition to getting a healthy quota of work and love, please do your best to carve out a few hours specifically devoted to engaging in unadulterated, unapologetic, unbridled play—the kind of flatout, free-form, full-tilt fun and games that have the effect of permanently increasing your levels of liberation. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Although I have an intimate ongoing relationship with the Divine Wow, it’s perfectly fine with me if other people don’t. Some of my best friends are atheists and agnostics. But I must admit that I laughed derisively when I heard that Stephen Hawking declared, with the fanatical certainty of a religious fundamentalist, that heaven does not exist. How unscientific of him. The intellectually honest perspective is, of course, that there’s no way to know for sure about that possibility. I bring this up, Pisces, as an example of what not to do. It’s particularly important right now that you not be blinded by your theories about the way things work. If you put the emphasis on your raw experience rather than your preconceived biases, you will be blessed with as much beauty and truth as you can handle.

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