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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 28 JANUARY 5–11, 2011

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TAK EE E ON E! CITIZEN 10

A HAND FOR BW’S NEW GUY Guy Hand on food and swimsuit models FEATURE 11

FICTION 101 The winners of the shortest fiction contest in town PICKS 14

OVER EASY Learn egg-actly how to raise backyard chickens 1ST THURSDAY 20

PLAN YOUR ATTACK Map and listings inside

“We’re raising tuition and fees and dumping it on the kids’ backs.”

NEWS 8


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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreader: Annabel Armstrong, Heather Lile Contributing Writers: Sarah Barber, Bill Cope, Andrew Crisp, Guy Hand, Damon Hunzeker, David Kirkpatrick, Michael Lafferty, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Melissa Vera, Sheree Whiteley, Carissa Wolf ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Julia Green, Jeremy Lanningham, Glenn Landberg, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE THE EVOLUTION OF FOOD Change is afoot in the Food section. Last week, we welcomed Guy Hand to Boise Weekly with his first piece, “The Grub Chronicles,” which introduced the Year of Idaho Food. For those who don’t know Hand, here’s the short version: He’s the brains behind online food and agriculture magazine Northwest Food News, the voice of Boise State Public Radio’s “Edible Idaho” and former restaurant critic for the Idaho Statesman. (For the long version—the one that includes his hardship stint as a Sports Illustrated swimsuit photographer—check out Citizen on Page 10.) Starting this week, Hand will publish one piece each week for a year in tandem with the Year of Idaho Food, a year-long, hyper-local, community-driven dialogue on food in Idaho, conceived by the Treasure Valley Food Coalition. I suspect that as 2011 finds its stride, you’ll start to hear a lot more about the Year of Idaho Food. Hand’s “Edible Idaho” on Boise State Public Radio will offer weekly stories on the Year of Idaho Food, events are planned throughout the year in conjunction with the project, and Monday, Sept. 5, has been named the Day of Idaho Food. But it’s not just a giant media/locavore lovefest. Many of the stories you’ll read or hear in this series are about the ways in which we can circumvent the industrial food system, but many explore the economic, cultural and social challenges of doing so. And perhaps most importantly, anyone is invited to contribute— even you, BW readers. Submissions are being accepted for stories, photographs and videos of food and agriculture in Idaho. Visit nwfoodnews.com and click on “Year of Idaho Food” for submission guidelines. Between Hand and the Year of Idaho Food, there’s much to … ahem, digest … about our changing food coverage, and I’ll continue to walk you through the evolution of the Food space in the weeks to come. One final note on this edition: Congratulations to the winners of the ninth annual Fiction 101 contest. For the first year ever, we’ll ask our winners to read their prize-winning entries for an audience. That’ll go down First Thursday in February at Rediscovered Bookshop. Details at boiseweekly. com and in coming editions of Boise Weekly. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Jenny Rice TITLE: As a matter of fact MEDIUM: Mixed, of course. ARTIST STATEMENT: I like this part best, full stop.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

TWO WORDS, SOUNDS LIKE ONE: SUCK IT When does a kitchen appliance become must-have outdoor gear? When it sucks. What the what?!? The answer to that riddle and more on Cobweb.

FROSTY DEADLINE EXTENDED It’s your last chance to win a trip for two to Mt. Bachelor in Bend, Ore., that includes lift tickets, lodging, food and beer. Upload your video of anything snow-related before Friday, Jan. 7, at midnight for a chance to win. Readers’ choice wins. Voting is Saturday, Jan. 8, through Sunday, Jan. 16.

DEAR MR. PREZ: BOXERS OR BRIEFS? White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs Tweeted (gotta love a Tweeting White House) that he’d spend 30 minutes on Monday taking questions from anyone who had one. One BW Facebook fan wanted to know about legalizing weed, non-existent jobs and the budget. See Citydesk for a selection of the questions and Gibbs’ answers.

MONEY MONEY MONEY Just what is the economic impact of the arts in Boise? In 2005 it was an estimated $38 million. We’re about to get an update on that figure thanks to a study from Americans for the Arts. More at Citydesk.

EDITOR’S NOTE 3 BILL COPE 6 TED RALL 7 NEWS State of the State according to the people 8 CITIZEN 10 FEATURE Fiction 101 11 BW PICKS 14 FIND 15 8 DAYS OUT 16 SUDOKU 17 FIRST THURSDAY Stephen Knapp lights up 19 FIRST THURSDAY LISTINGS AND MAP 20 NOISE Up and coming in music this year 24 MUSIC GUIDE 25 SCREEN All Good Things 27 SCREEN TV The Simpsons 27 REC Salim Stoudamire brings a new outlook to the Idaho Stampede 29 FOOD Growing food through the cold and snow 31 WINE SIPPER 32 CLASSIFIEDS 33 NYT CROSSWORD 36 FREEWILL ASTROLOGY 38

HAPPY

NEW

GEAR FROM YOUR FRIENDS AT

1021 Broadway Ave Boise ID 208 385-9300

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OPINION/BILL COPE

FORE TALES Nostril Bill’s Spuds & Duds for 2011 “Nostril Bill” is the name I assume when I peer into the future and tell what I see. It comes from a time when a drunken acquaintance was rambling on about the famous 16th century seer Nostradamus, whom he slurringly called “Nostril Damus.” I stole the “Nostril” and never looked back. It has been four years since Nostril Bill did any prognosticating, due in large part to my involvement in the Spuds and Duds issue, BW’s recap of a past year’s notable news. As it happens, the end of a year is also when soothsayers get 90 percent of their work, as non-soothsayers are always curious what the new year will bring. Had I not been slogging away at “Spuds and Duds,” Nostril Bill would have been divining up a storm, I assure you. But alas, one cannot peer into the future and the past at the same time—not without risking one hell of a headache. Yet I have missed predicting the future. I’m not saying I’m great at it, but then, who is? And I have figured out a way to complete my duties to the Spuds and Duds continuum and get in a few rounds of prophecizing, simply by delaying the 2011 predictions a week. To make the transition smoother, I am continuing with the “Spud” or “Dud” designations to indicate how I will rate those events when they do unfold. You may or may not agree with how I prejudge any particular and not-yettranspired histories, but without even trying hard, Nostril Bill can foresee he won’t give a damn what you think, whenever you think it. George W. Bush will release his second autobiography in as many years, having forgotten he hired two ghost writers in case one of them didn’t work out. A new, hugely popular competition series will make its debut during the summer. It will be called So You Think You Can Dance Better Than a Fifth Grader. This time, Bristol wins. Alex Rodriguez, better known as “ARod,” will be caught texting pictures of a penis to an attractive female sportscaster. Funny thing, the genital in question will turn out to belong to Derek Jeter. In February, House Speaker John Boehner will be applauded for leading mankind beyond the archaic attitude that real men don’t blubber up like gin-house boobs and slobbersob all over themselves during interviews. Closet bawlers from the rocky shores of Maine to the muscle beaches of Southern Cal rejoice that they can now, with Boehner’s lead, crank up those tear ducts in public without being called “girly men.” However, by summer, everyone is sick of seeing grown men cry. The call goes out to all girly men, “Pull yourself together, dude!” and Boehner is stripped of his speaker position on CSPAN. It takes him almost an hour to dry his eyes and say something coherent.

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Mid-summer, Mitt Romney will renounce his Mormon faith on the steps of the Iowa Capitol, and then deny it has anything to do with whether he intends to run for president, saying, “I have yet to consult with my bish … er, uh, minister on that matter.” On Sarah Palin’s Alaska, Sarah Palin will go hunting with ex-Vice President Dick Cheney. All of America will watch, curious to see who returns to Wasilla tied over the fender of the limousine. Once again, Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter will try to cut all state funding to Idaho Public Television, and once again, the resulting furor will lead to a compromise. IdahoPTV will stay on the air, but from then on it will have to show Blue Collar Comedy Tour during festival week. William marries Kate but not precisely as planned. The wedding had been set for April, but by mid-January, Kate is showing a tad more tummy than one would expect in a royal wedding. A secret MI-5 sonogram reveals that twins are on the way. It seems the Anglican prince was playing a bit of Vatican roulette and lost. By February, the union is complete. The Queen’s spokesman, Lord Twittlebom, will explain to the public that the couple chose to enter marriage in a more private manner—specifically, in a four-minute ceremony in one of those cash-up-front wedding chapels in Brighton. In July, the world is introduced to little Henry IX and Henry X. In late November, Fox News will release the results of a survey undertaken in early January. The intent is to refute a survey released in December 2010 (by the University of Maryland) which proved that people who watch Fox News on a regular basis are the most misinformed and have the weakest grasp of reality out of all Americans. The Fox survey will take so long to complete because of the enormous difficulty they will have finding people from their audience who understand the questions. Come spring, the Boise State Athletic Department will tear up the blue turf and replace it with orange turf. When an ESPN announcer jokes that the stadium now looks like a giant fondue pot, Athletic Director Gene Bleymaier will respond, “That’s fine by us. We discovered years ago that with Bronco Nation, the cheesier, the better.” Money will be approved for Boise to purchase a streetcar, although money for streetcar tracks will be denied. Until further notice, the vehicle will be towed around downtown by teams of DUI convicts working off their community service sentences. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


TED RALL/OPINION

DIGITAL TOTALITARIANISM The conspiracy to abolish cash NEW YORK—For years, figures on the political fringe have claimed the government and its corporate owners want a cashless society. Their warnings about the conspiracy against paper money fell on deaf ears. Now, those who want to do away with liquid currency are stepping out of the shadows, talking about increased efficiency and profit potential, but their real agenda is nothing less than enslavement of the human race. “Physical currency is a bulky, germsmeared, carbon-intensive, expensive medium of exchange. Let’s dump it,” argued David Wolman in Wired. Citing a 2002 study for the Organization for Economic Development that states “money’s destiny is to become digital,” Jonathan Lipow, a Defense Departmentaffiliated economics professor, has authored an op/ed in The New York Times that asks: “Why not eliminate the use of physical cash worldwide?” Lipow urges President Barack Obama to “push for an international agreement to eliminate the largest-denomination bills” and urges the replacement of cash by “smart cards with biometric security features.” Lipow’s justification is fighting terrorism, but terrorism is a mere fig leaf. According to the annual Patterns of Global Terrorism report by the U.S. State Department, the highest total death toll attributed to terrorism in the last 20 years occurred in 2001. Including 9/11, 3,547 people were killed in 346 acts of violence worldwide. But according to the United Nations, 36 million people die annually from hunger and malnutrition. A more legitimate concern is the loss of taxes on the under-

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ground economy, estimated by the IMF at 15 percent of transactions in developed nations. What the anti-cash movement really wants is digital totalitarianism in which the entire human race is enslaved by international corporations and their pet governments. Decashification would establish a form of corporo-government control so rigid and allencompassing that it would make Hitler and Stalin look like easygoing surfer dudes. The abolition of unregulated financial transactions would freeze the political configuration of the world, making it impossible for opposition movements—much less revolutionary ones— to challenge the status quo. We’re already more than halfway to a cashless society. In the United States few young adults still use checks, and in many countries debit and credit card transactions exceed those made via cash and checks combined. As things stand, we know the big banks can’t be trusted. Remember when they introduced ATM cards? They instituted “convenience fees,” which they have raised to the point that taking $20 out of an out-of-town ATM could cost you $5 in fees. Americans are skipping into the digital inferno wearing a smile and relishing the smell of their own burning flesh. Countless friends and acquaintances pay all their bills online. “I’m all about using my checking account in place of cash and would love to be able to eliminate cash entirely from my life,” gushed PCWorld’s Tony Bradley recently. Give Me Convenience Or Give Me Death was the title of an album by the punk band Dead Kennedys. We’ll get both.

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CITYDESK/NEWS WHEN A ‘PROBLEM’ ISN’T NECESSARILY A PROBLEM The bad news is that four Idaho lending institutions made the 2010 unofficial problem bank list. The good news is: Thank goodness you live in Idaho. There are more than 900 other banks on the list put together by Calculated Risk, a finance and economics blog credited with being one of the first new-media outlets to predict the burst of the U.S. housing bubble. The list is comprised of banks under formal enforcement actions with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, Federal Reserve Board or other regulatory agency. Included are: Boise-based Syringa Bank and Idaho Banking Company, McCall-based Idaho First Bank and the Farmers National Bank of Buhl. Each agreed to a consent order or written agreement to improve their financial condition. “The good news is they’re all making progress,” Gavin Gee, Idaho’s director of finance, told Citydesk. “Some are further along than others, but we’re encouraged.” Gee said there are other banks—not headquartered but operating in Idaho—that are under similar enforcement actions. They include the Bank of the Cascades and Sterling Savings Bank. There were 157 bank failures in the United States during 2010, the highest level since 1992. Gee doesn’t see anything of the sort occurring in Idaho in 2011. “In my 33 years with the department, all but one Idaho-regulated bank have been able to comply with orders and avoid failure. A state-chartered bank [First Bank & Trust of Idaho] failed in 1986. That’s only one of dozens that have been subject to enforcement orders over the years,” said Gee. In addition, 2009 saw the federally chartered First Bank of Idaho fail. Idaho does not regulate national banks. “And while states around us have had several bank failures, we’ve been very fortunate in Idaho,” said Gee. “We’re confident that the banks we regulate will be able to address the problems they’re experiencing. It’s all related to the economy. Banks are challenged by the fact that we still have high unemployment, high bankruptcy filings and high mortgage foreclosures.” The Farmers National Bank of Buhl, the largest of the four Idaho banks to make the list, reported assets of more than $360 million for the third quarter of 2010. Idaho Banking in Boise reported assets over $300 million, Syringa reported $250 million and Idaho First in McCall reported $85 million. Gee’s finance department oversees licenses and regulation for 15 industries, including Idaho banks, with total assets in the banking industry alone of over $5.5 billion. The total number of entities regulated is over 146,000 including collection agencies and credit unions. “It would be incorrect to assume that just because a bank has been designated by some rating agency that they’re a ‘problem,’ that indeed there’s a problem,” said Gee. “And in a worst-case scenario, it’s important for the consumer to understand that as long as their deposits are within the FDIC limitations [usually up to $250,000], their money is insured.” —George Prentice

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NEWS

WHAT STATE ARE WE IN? An alternative preview to the State of the State ANDREW CRISP, GEORGE PRENTICE, MELISSA VERA, SHEREE WHITELEY, CARISSA WOLF

MY HOPE IS THAT THEY DON’T FURTHER CUT, BECAUSE THESE FOLKS ARE ALREADY A DEVALUED, UNDERSER VED POPULATION.”

—Sabrina Swope, Car egiver

On Thursday, Jan. 6, a journalistic tradition will get under way in Room W-53 of the Idaho State Capitol. The Associated Press will put out a spread of pastries and beverages as Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter leads a parade of power. Otter, House Speaker Lawerence Denney, Senate President Pro Tem Brent Hill and a half-dozen more will begin a carousel of spin, each telling reporters what to expect from the 2011 Idaho Legislature. While munching away on croissants and muffins, reporters will be spoon-fed quotes and anecdotes from the men and women who also determine how much, or how little, many Idaho families may eat in the next year. The very basics of health and safety hang in the balance: taxes on groceries, health care for the infirm, dwindling funds for textbooks, a strained correction system, and fewer dollars for our natural resources. Far from Room W-53, Idahoans from every walk of life anxiously await a State of the State and a legislative session that will either sustain or weaken already-fragile infrastructures. In anticipation of Otter’s Monday, Jan. 10, State of the State Address, BW chose not to turn to the usual collection of politicians for analysis but rather to citizens, who have much to gain or lose when lawmakers consider the fates of Health and Welfare, higher education, K-12 public education and our environment.

THE CAREGIVER Like a lot of CEOs, Sabrina Swope watches budgets. But she was quick to say that she needs to put people before profits—her heart gives her no choice. She worries that a call for deeper state budget cuts could leave Idaho’s most vulnerable citizens with even less support. “My hypothesis is that hospitalizations are going to increase, which are more expensive than community services,” Swope said. “This is going to hurt a lot of people because they are not going to get that wrap-around care.”

As president and CEO of Affinity Inc., Swope and her staff of social workers, psychologists and nurses work to keep people with mental illness out of hospitals and prisons by providing disease management and coping skills through psychosocial rehabilitation and other services. “They have the right to live in our communities. Some of them are just going to need support to do it,” Swope said. But deep budget cuts in 2010 made it harder for Swope and her colleagues to serve clients battling mental disabilities. Last year’s cuts to Medicaid slashed hours for mental health services. And as Swope sees it, more pieces have yet to fall. “The clients are the ones that are really going to suffer,” Swope said. The Medicaid cuts forced mental-health providers to scale back or eliminate services such as psychosocial rehabilitation. But rather than lay off staff, shutter programs or close doors, Swope kept providing the care— free of charge. “Affinity would just eat those hours up because you can’t just leave them,” Swope said. “Our philosophy is that we don’t turn anyone away … We just stop billing, which is a double-edged sword. We need to be fiscally responsible to keep the doors open.” But Swope remains cautiously optimistic that the budget of 2011 spares mental-health services. “My hope is that they don’t further cut these folks because they’re already a devalued, underserved population … I have faith in our Legislature and our governor that someone, somewhere along the way is going to stop and ask, ‘What is this cut really going to do to these folks?’”

THE PROFESSOR “When you go to university, you expect to have top-notch professors around,” said Alex Neiwirth of the Idaho Association of Government Employees. “I think a lot of stu-

dents are disappointed to find that graduate students are teaching them that may not have had any experience or training before.” Last year, the Idaho Legislature approved a 7.8 percent cut to funding for higher education. To make up for that loss of funding, Idaho school officials and universities approved a 9.8 increase in tuition fees.

YOU CAN’T CUT THE BUDGET WITHOUT AFFECTING KIDS.”

—Sher ri Wood, Educator

John Freemuth, professor of political science and public policy at Boise State and senior fellow at the Andrus Center for Public Policy, is outspoken about the national state of higher education. “We’re raising tuition and fees and dumping it on the kids’ backs,” said Freemuth. With the economic downturn, more people are going back to school. In September 2010, Boise State saw a 5.6 percent increase WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS

T HE STATE OF T HE S TAT E M AY N O T I N C L U D E A NYTHI NG T HAT E NV I R ONM E N TA L I S T S I N ID AHO CAN CE L E BR AT E .”

—Jon Mar vel, ENvir onmentalist

in enrollment. Lewis-Clark State College saw an 8.1 percent increase. But bigger isn’t always better. “There is little doubt that we are doing more with fewer resources. We have a lot more students than just a few years ago, but without a commensurate increase in professors,” said Gary Moncrief with Boise State’s political science department. “I always tell my students, ‘study hard and get the heck out of here,’” Moncrief added. With defunding of higher education, teaching is becoming a difficult gig. “It’s been a continual process of erosion. It’s not like cutting back and doing more with less is anything new,” said Robert McCarl, former IAGE vice president and current professor of sociology at Boise State. McCarl and Neiwirth acknowledged a new facet of the university job: chasing research funding in order to stay relevant. “There’s this trend to have universities serving the private sector as a way to find additional revenue,” said Neiwirth. “The research projects they’re doing aren’t for pure knowledge. They’re looking for applications to benefit local businesses.” It’s a sign of the lengths universities are going to in order to remain accredited to offset waning financial support. College professors have to publish to remain relevant in their communities. “If you can’t play in that pond, you can’t get advancement,” said McCarl. “You relegate yourself to a second-class status.”

THE HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER Nick Parker remembers the way that a college professor was able to light a fire under him. “He had such an amazing mind. I want to give other students what he gave me.” Today, Parker teaches global perspectives, introduction to law, U.S. history and economics at Eagle Academy. Parker’s parents were educators as well, and he remembers spending time with them during holiday and summer breaks from school. “We had such a great family life growing up,” the father of two said. “I wanted that for my family.” Although Parker enjoys the quality time he is able to spend with his family, it’s now a rare perk rather than an expectation. Budget WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

cuts have forced schools to scale back, resulting in larger class sizes, required furlough days for educators and a halt to field trips. Parker used to take students to police officer training facilities and other locations to witness law enforcement first-hand, but now there isn’t enough funding for a bus. Cutbacks have also resulted in rationed supplies. “We have to wait until a dry-erase marker is completely dried up and absolutely cannot be read anymore before we get a new one,” said Carlotta Vaughn, a student-teacher at Whittier Elementary School. “The supplies that we begin the school year with are what we have for the entire year.” Whittier is classified as a low-income school and receives assistance for its students through grants and programs such as Project School Bell. Vaughn said that some children arrive at school on the first day without anything—no paper, pencils or backpacks. Various programs and out-of-pocket contributions from dedicated teachers get children the supplies and education they need. Parker, Vaughn and teachers across Idaho will be watching and listening closely to the governor’s State of the State Address. “Money put into education is money put into the economy,” Idaho Education Association President Sherri Wood said. “I hope to hear that governmental leaders will focus on public schools and funding students’ education. You can’t cut the budget without affecting kids.” Parker acknowledges that the state and country have endured trying times in the past few years. “I think our state is doing its best during the economic crisis that’s going on,” Parker said. “Education is the most important thing, and if kids today don’t get an education, we’re going to be worse off in 30 years than we are today.” Wood sees the solution to a turbulent economy in students. “The road to economic recovery is in each one of our classrooms,” Wood said.

THE ENVIRONMENTALIST Jon Marvel is the executive director of Western Watersheds Project, an environmental advocacy group whose mission is to protect and restore watersheds and wildlife through public policy initiatives and litigation. These days, Marvel is frustrated.

“The State of the State Address may not include anything that environmentalists in Idaho can celebrate. “Certainly the governor will mention wolves and probably bighorn sheep along with the controversies surrounding those two species. Other than that, there might be some Environmental Protection Agency and Endangered Species Act bashing, but not much more.” Marvel expressed concern that the governor makes too much political hay out of the wolf debate. “Gov. Otter will make demands for the delisting of wolves and perhaps grizzly bears, and I’m sure he will grandstand for the benefit of ranchers and hunters. Gov. Otter first and foremost wants to align himself politically as sympathetic to these vociferous interests ... Ironically, and perhaps appropriately, [Otter] now finds himself in the awkward position of aligning with some of the most vocal and hateful anti-wolf activists, many of whom are currently under investigation for poaching the very elk for which they claim to be advocating.” Marvel expects a good many of his colleagues to have a voice during the upcoming legislative session. “Speak out, show up, agitate, have fun, call the bastards out, organize and lean extra hard when someone suggests that your effort is out of the norm—especially in Idaho,” said Marvel. “Environmental causes in this state do not have a willing champion in any political party. Idaho Democrats are as afraid of the word ‘environmentalism’ as Republicans are officially spiteful of it. Idaho’s media is largely sympathetic to the powers-that-be and driven by those powers’ canned talking points.” Marvel measures his political fervor with prose. “Our academic, political and media institutions are so far beyond growing an appreciation for our state,” said Marvel. “Those of us whose conviction and heart lie with the wildlife and wild landscapes have a lot of work to do.” Marvel, Moncrief, Neiwirth, Parker, Swope and Vaughn will be busy on Jan. 10, protecting wildlife, teaching a new generation and providing services to the handicapped. But they’ll be anxious to hear Otter’s message. So will we all.

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CITIZEN

GUY HAND Dishing on swimsuit models and fabulous foods GEORGE PRENTICE

We know that for a good many years you made a living from images rather than words. Do you still consider yourself a professional photographer? I have a really mixed relationship with photography. I started out wanting to be a photojournalist, but all of the opportunities were in advertising. It opened so many doors, and I started traveling all over the world. We’d go to amazing places but shoot stupid pictures, so the initial rush wore off, and I realized it was a big mistake. I worked on the highest level of advertising photography, and we’d be shooting a car in a desert somewhere, but I always thought something else over my shoulder was much more interesting. The photography would take me to amazing places but not to the subjects I was interested in. So, tell us what a Sports Illustrated swimsuit shoot is like. It was surreal, but it was a job. For six weeks we’d be shooting all day long in Bora Bora and all over the Tahitian islands with these beautiful models like Elle Macpherson and Paulina Porizkova, but after about two weeks, the other assistant photographer and I were bored. We’d wake up in the morning and say, “Ugh. There’s the alarm. Here we go. All swimsuits, all day.”

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We started chatting up the waitresses in restaurants because they were different than the girls we were spending all day with. Now I’m more interested in taking pictures as an aside or in context with my writing. I actually wrote several articles on my dissatisfaction with photography. Where is your passion right now? Photography and writing are good excuses to be curious and to be in interesting places, talking with interesting people. The writing gets me closer to that than the photography does. It’s much more satisfying, but I have to say, looking at that blank page each time just terrifies me. Do you have ideas for the stories you want to tell? I’m going to focus on the Year of Idaho Food. We’re going to collect stories from all over the state on food and agriculture. For instance, this week we’re learning about growing food in winter (“If Weather Were All That Mattered,” Page 31). Did you ever get tired of doing restaurant reviews? I quit the Idaho Statesman because I was running out of things to say about the restaurant scene in Boise. Did you ever have a situation where there was really negative feedback from a restaurateur? Yes. Jon Mortimer said the reason he closed his restaurant [Mortimer’s] was my review. *Editor’s note: From the Mortimer’s website in June 2008: “For those of you who wonder why we are closing after eight years, the answer is simple: Last month, Jon

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Guy Hand’s birthday is on the Fourth of July. Until he was about 5 years old, he thought the celebrating and fireworks were all about him. We at BW are doing a bit of celebrating this month, and it’s all about Hand. He has joined the staff to write a weekly column about food and agriculture. But before traveling to the gardens, kitchens and dining rooms across the region, we ordered a main course of food for thought.

received the worst review of his career by Hand. Although we were devastated by the review, we both [Jon and his wife Shara] agreed with most of the criticism.” Can you speak a bit about the pop-culture phenomenon of food television? It’s great that more people are becoming more aware and more interested in food, but I think there’s a carnival side to it. I think most of the Food Network is just reality television. The competitiveness that they’ve interjected—that, to me, is a big mistake. What interests me about food is the contemplative, quiet part. Turning food into a spectator sport just doesn’t interest me at all. Do you have any food heroes? M.F.K. Fisher [The Art of Eating] is a great food writer. And Elizabeth David is a favorite. I love those older-era food writers. Do you own a lot of cookbooks or food books? I have about 300. Even before I started writing about food, I would buy books that my friends would make fun of, like The Story of Corn. What’s your favorite comfort food on a cold weekend night? A slow-braised roast with mashed potatoes.

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TELLING TALES IN JUST 101 WORDS 2011 JUDGES

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ERIN RUIZ

t’s not a matter of how many words you use but which words you use. That’s a statement that is as true in fiction writing as it is in journalism, and one that is proved by the multitude of entries in this year’s annual Fiction 101 contest. Once again, readers stepped up to the literary plate with stories that captivated, challenged and intrigued our esteemed panel of judges, who evaluated more than 100 entries to select the cream of the written crop. From the funny to the heart wrenching, and the ridiculous to the slightly disturbing, this year’s entries didn’t disappoint. —Deanna Darr

Rick Ardinger: Executive director of the Idaho Humanities Council and owner of Limberlost Press. | Laura DeLaney: Owner of Rediscovered Bookshop. Alan Heathcock: Board member of The Cabin and author whose first book, Volt, will be released in March. | Michael Faison: Executive director of the Idaho Commission on the Arts. Christian Winn: Adjunct professor of creative writing at Boise State and frequent BW contributor.

JESUS SILVEYRA TAPIA , JUAREZ, MEXICO

e was famous for his uncanny depiction of two lovers at the beach. Legend says he recorded the introductory stroll using salt and eggshells; the tide was warm club soda, wood pipes and pebbles; he formed the kisses with a complex rubbing of his wet hands. Last night his body was found inside his apartment, murdered with two halves of a coconut clapped together. The culprit left behind a broken transistor radio, an old spy glass and a trail of sand leading to the bedroom. When drawn, the sketch of the murderer sounded like the wild sea under a full moon.

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MICHAEL PRENN, STAR

he old man finally punched out. The tires caught first. We drank his beers as black smoke piled into the desert sky. Hank spat. “Should’ve sold it.” “Shut up,” I said. “Get the Winchester.” Hank tried running them off, but the run was gone from these dogs. They were part of this. He put them down. I dug the graves. Two church kids pulled over, looking like FBI agents in white shirts and black ties. Their eyes were like soft jelly candies. We jumped in the back, smelling like burnt carrion. Life folded over the dead and the story moved on.

ELISABETH SHARP MCKETTA, BOISE

odd trapped a sow and four piglets at the ranch. “Will you shoot the mother first?” I asked. Todd answered: “They make moon-craters in the cornfields,” which was not an answer. The next day blood streaked the dirt and red clay. One of the piglets escaped, and Todd cursed as he dragged the bristly mother to the fire-pit next to her babies’ ashes. I was pregnant at the time but didn’t know it. That night I dreamt of milk and hunger and corn. Months later, when Todd said, “All my traps catch nursing sows,” I finally knew enough to know why.

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K. TYLER CHRISTENSEN, BOISE

DANIEL CLAUSEN, BOISE

he bag next to Christina was pink with crunchy paper stuffing inside. Alvin pecked at the leftover food on his plate. Christina reached into the guts of the bag and pulled out a toy polar bear that pooped jellybeans when pressed on its hind legs. She squinted, “I don’t get it.” “It’s funny.” He loaded a jellybean into the gullet and the bean plopped down onto the table linen, “See.” He grinned. They both grabbed for the candy at the same time, but Alvin had it half chewed, sugar exploding between his molars. Arms folded, Christina said, “This isn’t working, Alvin.”

e knelt on his stiff knee. It was not a day for absolutes, though it was as cold as ever, and the sky said nothing. The black rocks and the bitterbrush had the same motions, same softs overlain with angles. He wondered about Ruth, as his finger nudged the leather strap. He willed some doe to wander up from the dry wash. She would be eating breakfast in the grey which would linger. And when the moment came, if it came, he would be able to see nothing. He would never touch her, even if he opened her. The gulf returns.

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CHRIS ULLERY, BOISE

ne day, Daniel Day Lewis will part the clouds like a hurricane. He’ll come down from the heavens on a chariot of guts, asphalt and bone. Unmoved by the pleas of man, he’ll cobble a shoe from this earth and slip it onto his left foot. “I will find you,” he’ll say. “I’m an oil man,” he’ll explain. “I’ll teach you to speak English with this fucking knife!” And this is how the world ends. Not with a bang, not with a whimper, but with a thin, mustachioed actor screaming “Drainage!” as he eats the Milky Way like a Milky Way.

GREG LIKINS, NAMPA SARAH LANGER, BOISE

swald stood at the edge of the mud bank with his back turned to his fellow pigs while they rolled around in delight. They called out to him and tried to convince him to join their dirty games, but Oswald could not conceive the thought of mud on his perfectly shiny pink skin. Rather, he imagined dressing himself in a French smoking jacket and puffing circles high into the air while standing on a balcony overlooking the spoiled city. His dreams proclaimed this to be the perfect life. “Pigs don’t wear clothes,” his lady pig interrupted. “Now get in the mud.”

ucinda whispered her own sermon from the pew behind me. “Men built a tower, that part’s true. But they reached heaven’s shore, found it teeming with beautiful girls.” My cheeks burned. “In the excitement, God’s loveliest daughter snuck to Earth. She roamed the countryside teaching new kinds of love, but jealous men who couldn’t possess her sought to silence her instead …” Deacon Boreman shushed her, but my ears—my heart—longed for more. That night I dreamed I beckoned Lucinda across the waters of the baptismal pond. Ripples rose to support her feet while her disciples, drunk on naked moonlight, rejoiced.

MARGARET E. O’NEIL, BOISE

ALEX THATCHER, BOISE

remember most my Daddy’s feet. His feet would stick out from under the sheets. Momma would constantly pull the covers back over them, but he’d just kick his feet free again. I was just a girl when he came home to die. Leukemia. The combination of cancer and chemo had made his body frail and small. I felt like a mighty giant beside his bed. “What do you want for your birthday, Kiddo?” he’d asked, though my birthday had passed months before. “I don’t know, maybe a new dolly.” He looked pleased. “One new dolly, it is. Maybe even two.”

hodes Skatepark—the gloomiest of days. A stranger appeared looking all retro. He sat and stared at the city. He drew a crowd. As we looked hungrily at the “Wheels Down Zone” he spoke. “There is a thing there. A thing that is older than time itself. They don’t want you there because of it and what’s under.” Everyone broke into laughter, but the laughter faded. His eyes told us his words were true. There was death behind those eyes. Fear crept in and he was gone. No one ever saw him again, but the story still echoes under the overpass.

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events JAPAN FOU NDATION/ B OIS E S TATE U NIVERSITY STU DENT U NION FINE ARTS

Is Santa he who shall not be named?

FRIDAY-SATURDAY JAN. 7-8 theater LARRY POTTER, IT’S A WONDERFUL SANTA’S STONES Ishimoto Yasuhiro documents the interior of the Shokintei Pavilion.

WEDNESDAY-SUNDAY JAN. 5-9 photography KATSURA EXHIBIT Ishimoto Yasuhiro is considered one of the most influential figures in Japanese photography, but he started on a different path. He was an architecture student at the University of Chicago when WWII began. From 1942 to 1944, he was interred at the Granada War Relocation Center along with 7,000 other Japanese-Americans. It was there that he found the medium that would become his life’s work. After the war, he returned to Chicago to study photography, winning numerous awards and eventually a commission from the Museum of Modern Art in New York. That commission—a black-and-white photographic study of Katsura Imperial Villa in Kyoto—was later published as the book Katsura: Tradition and Creation in Japanese Architecture. The book put him on the map and led to an illustrious career of fellowships, professorships and even the high honor of being named a “Person of Cultural Merit” by the Japanese government. Fifty of Yasuhiro’s stunning black-and-white photos are on display at Boise State this week. They examine themes of architecture and street life in an attempt to place longstanding cultural traditions in a modern context. Through Sunday, Jan. 9, FREE. Boise State SUB Gallery, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-5800, finearts.boisestate.edu.

FRIDAY JAN. 7 dance BEGINNING SWING DANCE LESSONS Some people are insecure in their ability to

boogie and require glugs of alcohol to get in the groove. Others will take any minor event and hold a dance par ty in its honor—whenever, wherever. If one of your New Year’s resolutions is to become freer with your footsteps, a good place to star t is the four-week Simply Swing Series for Beginners

14 | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | BOISEweekly

at the Dance Ar ts Academy. For only $45 per person, you can learn how to jump, jive and wail in the East Coast swing-style with teacher Lori Anne Gonzalez, a credentialed Americanstyle ballroom instructor. Gonzalez will go over things like timing, footwork and leading/following at a stu-

TV is dead. Viral-video is the future. But unlike the structured production and distribution of TV, viral-video is chaos theor y in practice. And for it to take over fully as the dominant enter tainment medium, it needs to get its house in order. How? By playing up the war on Christmas. For years, religious traditionalists have rallied against the more secular aspects of Christmas. So much so that a group of them in Texas even staged an execution of Santa by firing squad, which they posted on Youtube. Though their mock drumhead trial of Santa Claus was intended as a serious work, the clip is hysterical. Especially when they talk about their love of peace moments after shooting Santa point blank in the face. So despite the fact that the war on Christmas exists nowhere except in the imaginations of a few loony people, if the fictional conflict is going to produce quality viral-video like that, then it needs to be ramped up. And what better way to do that than with Christian undesirable No. 2: Harr y Potter. Since the moment they hit the bestseller list, Harr y Potter books have been repeatedly banned by gangs of fundamental Christians who believe they promote witchcraft. An ar ticle in the Edmonton Sun even repor ted the Salvation Army now refuses to accept donations of Harr y Potter books or toys because they are incompatible with the charity’s Christian beliefs. Potter has also generated no shor tage of Youtube clips documenting his clearly “satanic” influence. But to get the best possible viral-video out of this, Potter needs to team up with Mr. Claus right quick. Luckily, the good folks at Prairie Dog Playhouse have created just such a per fect storm of heretical pop culture. Larr y Potter, It’s a Wonder ful Santa’s Stones, is a parody of the first Harr y Potter stor y featuring appearances by other secular icons like Santa, Elvis and Jimmy Stewar t. (Remember Har vey? What is a 6-foot invisible rabbit if not a witch’s familiar?) With a mashup like that, Larr y Potter is sure to engage—and enrage. Go see the play and take your ultra-religious friends. Then just sit back and wait for the next genius season of Youtube to star t. Friday, Jan. 7, and Saturday, Jan. 8, 6:45 p.m. doors, $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., 208-336-7383, pdplayhouse.com.

dio located in the El Dorado business campus on the southwest corner of Eagle and Overland in Meridian. Though ballroom shoes aren’t required for the class, it still requires a little planning on your par t. Dancers are encouraged to sign up early, as the class

fills up fast. There is also a one-time registration fee of $15.90 per person or $26.54 per couple. And if swing isn’t exactly your thang, be sure to check out the other classes offered—like Social Success for Beginners and Pre-competitive Internation-

al Style for Beginners—at teachmetango.com. Four-week course beginning Friday, Jan. 7, and running through Friday, Jan. 28, 7 p.m., $45. Dance Ar ts Academy, 2989 Copper Point, Meridian, 208-9365760, teachmetango.com. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


LAU R IE PEAR M AN

FIND

THE UNOFFICIAL MACGYVER HOW-TO HANDBOOK

Thomas Paul basks in the glow of his new album, Goodbye, Waterloo.

MONDAY JAN. 10 music THOMAS PAUL CD RELEASES

Boise Urban Garden School teaches you how to pick up chicks.

SATURDAY JAN. 8 eggs BUGS BACKYARD CHICKENS WORKSHOP Chickens have it rough. There’s no shor tage of chickenthemed insults: “chicken out,” “no spring chicken,” “running around like a chicken with your head cut off.” Not only have chickens been turned into the KFC Double Down and forced to take the bottom bunk in the Turducken, but to add insult to injur y, they can’t even cross a street without their motives being called into question. For the new year, we suggest you take it easy on the little cluckers and adopt a chicken amnesty policy. One way to do that is by learning how to raise these feathered friends in your own back yard—a trend that has piggybacked on the local-foods movement and swept the countr y. Boise Urban Garden School is offering a one-time intro workshop on Backyard Chickens on Saturday, Jan. 8, from 9:30 a.m. to noon at 5323 Hill Road. The class will be taught at the home of sustainable- and local-foods suppor ter Susan Medlin and will explore “handling big birds, chicken psychology, chickens and other pets, eggs, pest control, poop, health and hygiene, food and water, weather, predator protection, coops/tractors/coop-design/ fencing/landscaping [and] bio-security.” 9:30 a.m.-noon, $40. 5323 Hill Road, 208-424-6665, boiseurbangardenschool.org.

S U B M I T

With the advent of software like Garage Band, producing a CD is now fairly easy. To reiterate, producing a CD is easy. Producing a good CD still takes money, help from your friends and a mountain of hard work. For the last couple of years, local musician Thomas Paul has learned a little something about hard work: Even working on something you love can take ever ything out of you. But if you’re lucky, you come out on the other side with a result you can proudly stand behind. During the month of Januar y, when Paul celebrates his new release, Goodbye, Waterloo—with no fewer than 10 parties—he will have an album that he not only can support, but that might just support him. It highlights both his multi-instrumental talents as well as his impressive vocal range and the music that influences him. When Paul per forms around town—which he does at least once a week—he usually has only his voice and his guitar as instruments. When we spoke to him last year about the release of his debut album, House on Fire, Paul predicted his next CD would be more stripped down. “It will be me with a guitar and just a couple of guest musicians,” he said. As it turns out, Paul was wrong. His new album pulses with organ, vibraphone, cello, electric piano, trumpet, upright bass, flute and a host of other instruments. He has moved in the opposite direction of his solo per forming and added a variety of sounds and textures—and his spot-on falsetto—to give Waterloo a heavily layered sound that differs from one song to the next. Paul summed up the hard work in a Facebook post: “What I would really like to do is be able to run down a deer or gazelletype animal on the fly and sort of tackle it and provide for my family or clan of friends in that manner. Until then, putting out the new album and touring will have to do.” Monday, Jan. 10, 8 p.m., FREE. Red Feather, 246 N. Eighth St., justeatlocal.com/redfeather; Saturday, Jan. 15, 8 p.m., $5, $3 with canned food. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Indiana Jones had the lost ark of the covenant. King Arthur had the sword in the stone. Juan Ponce de Leone had the fountain of youth. This past Christmas, we discovered our own Holy Grail. The Unofficial MacGyver How-to Handbook blasts the phrase “kids, don’t try this at The Unofficial MacGyver How-to Handbook, $14.95 home” to smithereens. Now, you, at macgyverbook.com. too, can disarm a laser beam alarm system with a cigar, make homemade tear gas and use a paperclip to undress a woman and disarm a missile. The nearly 200-page manual is not a joke book. Authors Bret Terrill and Greg Dierkers detail every episode (141 in all) of the iconic ABC series, give a brief synopsis of each adventure (“MacGyver is tasked to rescue scientists trapped in an underground lab protected by a deadly security system”), descriptions of needed materials (a nuclear warhead missile and a paperclip) and step-by-step instructions complete with illustrations (open the missile’s access panel, jam paperclip deep into the electronic innards, wriggle paperclip, breathe sigh of relief). The life-saving primer contains six chapters, among them: Great Escapes, Breaking and Entering (Use Only for Good, Not for Evil), and Bombs and Booby Traps. While most of us won’t be able to re-create the thrill of breaking into a high-security laboratory, we can still learn how to develop our photos with orange juice and seal an acid leak with a chocolate bar. —George Prentice

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JAN. 5 Festivals & Events LIQUID FORUM—A discussion forum showcasing a different local nonprofit each month, along with a silent auction and local music. 5-7:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—A dazzling display of light. The garden is decorated for the holiday season with more than 250,000 lights and special displays. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Workshops & Classes 2011 CANYON COUNTY MASTER GARDENER COURSE—By the end of this course you will be a certified Idaho Master Gardener. Receive horticultural tips, learn how to test soil and receive a copy of the Idaho Master Gardener Handbook. Application info can be obtained by calling 208-459-6003 or by e-mailing canyon@uidaho.edu. 9 a.m.-noon. $95 for the course. University of Idaho Canyon County Extension Office, 501 Main St., Caldwell. LEAN START PROGRAM—Interactive series of six classes designed to help incorporate healthy lifestyle choices into your routine for the new year. Class meets on Wednesday evenings. 7-8 p.m. $60. BridgeTower Chiropractic, 3120 W. Belltower Drive, Meridian, 208-846-8898, btchiropractormeridian.com.

Odds & Ends PEACE CORPS ANNIVERSARY PARTY—Help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Peace Corps with returned volunteers. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Idaho Pizza Company, 1677 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-343-1011, idahopizzacompany.com.

THURSDAY JAN. 6 Festivals & Events ARABIAN NIGHTS AT THE CAZBA—Music, good food and belly dancers make for an evening of excitement. 7-9 p.m. Cazba Restaurant and Opa Lounge, 211 N. Eighth St., 208-381-0222 WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Wednesday. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

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Food & Drink

Workshops & Classes

BEER AND WINE TASTINGS— Rotating selection. 5-8 p.m. $10. Tres Bonne Cuisine, 6555 W. Overland Road, 208-658-1364, tresbonnescuisine.com.

INTRO TO POTTERY—Learn to center clay and make simple pots with instructor Dave Crawford. Class meets every Thursday night in January. 7-9 p.m. $58 for fourclass session. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208407-3359, puffymondaes.com.

TEA AND TAROT—Midge Woods pairs tea and tarot cards. 7:15 p.m. $10. Spirit at Work Books and Beyond, 710 N. Orchard, 208-388-3884, spiritatworkbooks.com.

NOISE/CD REVIEW TU FAWNING: HEARTS ON HOLD If you know Beirut and pioneering member Zach Condon’s talent of mixing Balkan folk songs with Western pop music via cavernous vocals, you’ll welcome Tu Fawning. Their music is less babushka-swathed oma and more coffeehouse Francophile, but the sound clutches you. Their combination of heartfelt lyrics with reverberating piano is particularly clinging. The brainchild of Joe Haege and Corrina Repp, Tu Fawning generated naturally from collaboration between the two on their individual projects. While fusing their talents on both Repp’s The Absent and the Distant and Haege’s project 31Knots on an EP, as well as full-length The Days and Nights of Ever ything Ever ywhere, the two laid the real foundation and enlisted fellow Portland, Ore., music scene veterans Toussaint Perrault and Lisa Reitz for horns/guitar and piano/ violin, respectively. After an EP, Secession, the foursome evolved and recorded their first full-length album. Beginning with “Multiply a House,” Tu Fawning’s Hearts on Hold opens with a steady drum and trumpet, paired with a chanting hymn of ghostly female voices. The haunting repetition in Repp’s robust voice creates a siren song of hope and despair. “I Know You Now” lays a circus-music accordion base below a broken line of vocals. “I only want one thing / to be myself again,” states the song. It lapses into a chorus of “I know you now / I know you now / I know you now / and I won’t forget you.” It’s a frightening chant that pairs per fectly with their music video, which is replete with reflections, weapons and an appearance by the uber creepy little girl twins straight out of The Shining. Hearts on Hold sounds like a break between the self and the outside world. The whole album is like an Edgar Allan Poe stor y with the darkness and despair of Romanticism, centered on the loss of love. The production feels like a Victorian-era invention mastered with 21st centur y equipment. In “Mouths of Young” Repp implores, “Don’t let a man be your sad stor y,” and questions, “How does a song bird sing for the world?” Their music seems to question the ver y idea of per formance. —Andrew Crisp WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT WATERCOLOR PAINTING— Four-week class that covers watercolor painting techniques. Students will create four paintings. Classes held every Thursday night in January. 7-9 p.m. $58. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-407-3359, puffymondaes.com.

GOLDFISH RACING— Goldfish are placed in a raingutter, and it’s your job to urge them on toward the other end by blowing through a straw. Winner gets a big effin’ bar tab and their fish. 10 p.m. FREE. Mack and Charlie’s, 507 W. Main St., Boise, 208-8309977, mackandcharlies.com.

LARRY POTTER—The cast of Prairie Dog Playhouse puts a wizardly spin on a holiday tale in this family friendly production. For reservations call 208-3367383 or e-mail iveseenelvis@ yahoo.com. 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-3367383, pdplayhouse.com.

FRIDAY JAN. 7

Workshops & Classes

Sports & Fitness TRICYCLE RACES—The disclaimer at the beginning of Jackass was about exactly this sort of thing, which is why it’s awesome. 10 p.m. FREE. The Lobby, 760 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-2183, thelobbyboise. com.

Kids & Teens ROCK THE LIBRARY—Teens are invited to learn to shred with the Boise Rock School. 4 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Odds & Ends EEK-A MOUSE! COMPUTER CLASS—Learn how to use a mouse and keyboard. For those with no computer experience. 10:15 a.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Festivals & Events WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Wednesday. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

On Stage CHRISTMAS SHOW AND HOEDOWN—Starlight Mountain Theatre presents I’ll Be Home For Christmas and Santa’s Holiday Hoedown. 7:30 p.m. $12-$20. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

VASTU: SECRETS TO A SUCCESSFUL LIFE—Learn how to increase your productivity, reduce expenses, improve relationships and more in accordance with the balance of the five elements of nature with Vastu architect Michael Mastro. 7 p.m. $10. Idaho Community Action Network, 3450 Hill Road, Boise, 208-3859146, icanweb.net.

Art FIRST FRIDAY ART IN EAGLE— Take a stroll through downtown Eagle and visit local merchants and galleries along the way. First Friday invites the public to stop in to shops and enjoy a drink, art and music. 4:30-8:30 p.m. Old State Street and Eagle Road, Eagle. OPENING RECEPTION: DUAL EXHIBIT—Opening reception for the new “Line and Language” exhibition featuring artwork by Benjamin Jones and Troy Passey. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Stewart Gallery, 1110 W. Jefferson, Boise, 208433-0593, stewartgallery.com.

Literature AUTHOR READING AND SIGNING—Author Carter Niemeyer will read from his book Wolfer: A Memoir and sign your copy. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE—Friends of Ada Community Library’s annual winter book sale. Don’t miss the deals on hardcover books, movies and music—most things are on sale for $1. Proceeds help fund library events and programs. 9:30 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, adalib.org.

Odds & Ends ART AND SCIENCE OF NATUROPATHIC MEDICINE—Open house to meet doctors and ask questions about naturopathic medicine. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Natural Health, 4219 Emerald St., Boise, 208-338-0405, boisenaturalhealth.com.

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

HOKUM HOEDOWN—Bring the family to this old-fashioned square dance. The Hokum Flyers will provide the music, and Dorothy Shue will call for y’all. 7 p.m. $5 individual, $15 per family. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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8 DAYS OUT SATURDAY JAN. 8

SUNDAY JAN. 9

MONDAY JAN. 10

Festivals & Events

Festivals & Events

Concerts

ANNUAL WEDDING PARTY SHOW—More than 100 local merchants will be on hand to offer their services to help you plan your big day. Fashion shows will be held at noon and 3 p.m. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $5. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208336-8900, boisecentre.com.

ANNUAL WEDDING PARTY SHOW—See Saturday. 11 a.m.4 p.m. (Fashion show will be held at 2 p.m.) $5. Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208336-8900, boisecentre.com.

PAUL TILLOTSON BENEFIT CONCERT—The Borah High School jazz band, orchestra and The Squids will perform. 7 p.m. FREE, donations accepted. Borah High School, 6001 Cassia, Boise, 208-322-3855, sd01. k12.id.us/schools/borah.

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Wednesday. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

On Stage CHRISTMAS SHOW AND HOEDOWN—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $12-$20 Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208898-9425. GOT MILK? TRIBUTE SHOW— This show featuring the Imperial Sovereign Gem Court of Idaho pays tribute to Harvey Milk. 9 p.m. $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th, Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux. com. LARRY POTTER—See Friday. 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, pdplayhouse.com.

Workshops & Classes

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Wednesday. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Odds & Ends THAT’S WHAT SHE SAID SUNDAYS—Free pool tournament and karaoke. Noon-6 p.m. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3223430.

Animals & Pets SALT AND PEPPER BLACK DOG WALK—Raise awareness of black dog syndrome by bringing your dogs to participate in this walk. There will be a raffle and training tips also. Noon-1 p.m. FREE. The Ram, 709 E. Park Blvd., Boise, 208-3452929, theram.com.

Workshops & Classes VASECTOMY INFORMATION CLASS—Are your child-rearing days over or do you just want them to be? 6-7 p.m. FREE. Central District Health Department, 707 N. Armstrong Place, Boise, 208-375-5211, cdhd.idaho.gov.

Kids & Teens MARVELOUS MASK-MAKING CLASS—Children in kindergarten through third grade will create multi-medium masks from various cultures. E-mail will. bogdanoff@ymcatvidaho.org to register. 4:15-5:15 p.m. $15 + registration fee. Sage International School, 457 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-343-7243, sageinternationalschool.org.

Odds & Ends BEER PONG—Play for prizes and bar tabs while drinking $5 pitchers. 9 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s Saloon, 5467 Glenwood, Garden 23 City, 208-322-6699.

BACKYARD CHICKENS WORKSHOP—Learn everything you need to know about keeping and raising chickens in your own back yard. Class to be held at 5323 Hill Road. Call 208-424-6665 ext. 6 for more info. 9:30 a.m.-noon. $40. BUGS Garden, 4821 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-4246665, boiseurbangardenschool. org.

Art KIKAI ART GROUP—Join other anime fans to draw and perfect your technique with this art form. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

Literature FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE—See Friday. 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

Odds & Ends RETRO GAMING—Remember playing Pac-Man and Super Mario Brothers on your old Atari? Revisit your youth by playing classic video games at the library. All ages welcome. 1 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, 208-562-4996.

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Skeleton Blues by Conner Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT TEAM IN TRAINING INFO MEETING—Learn how you can help raise funds to fight blood cancers, and achieve personal fitness goals at the same time with mentoring and coaching from pros in the field. See Rec News Page 29. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

KNITTING CLUB—Bring your projects to work on or come to learn. All ages welcome. 7 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, adalib.org. 18

TUESDAY JAN. 11

WEDNESDAY JAN. 12

Art ARTIST SIGNING AND RECEPTION—Artist Toni McMillan will be signing keepsake boxes, coasters, coffee mugs and other items with her Idaho-inspired art printed on them. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 West Jefferson St., Boise, 208-433-9705.

Workshops & Classes BEGINNING KNITTED MITTEN CLASS—Bring your own size US 6 and 7 needles and be prepared to make your own mittens. This is a two-session class. Call 208-407-3359 to pre-pay and reserve your space. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. $45. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-4073359, puffymondaes.com.

Odds & Ends BEER PONG TOURNEY—Eight tables set up for play, $4 pitchers and a $300 cash prize. What more could you ask for? 10 p.m. FREE. Fatty’s, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-514-2531, drinkfattys.com.

Literature BOISE NOVEL ORCHARD—Writers meet on the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month to edit, critique and encourage the continuation of their work. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208376-4229, rdbooks.org.

COMEDY NIGHT—Test out your routine on patrons during open mic night. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3223430.

THE WRITE TO TELL THE TALE—Nonfiction writers meet to receive and share critiques and ideas in a supportive and helpful atmosphere. 7-9 p.m. FREE, sageecosci.com/writers.html. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995.

PABST BINGO NIGHT—Play bingo for PBR, swag and other random stuff found at secondhand stores. $1 PBR, Oly, or Rainier cans, or get a “ghetto bucket” (two of each) for $4. 7 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008, donniemacgrub.com.

ymcatvidaho.org to register. 4:15-5:15 p.m. $15 + registration fee. Sage International School, 457 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-343-7243, sageinternationalschool.org. MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Young designers, inventors and engineers can bring their creations to life with Legos. Bring a shoebox full of your own if you’ve got them. Some will be provided for you if you don’t. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org. VIDEO GAME CHALLENGE— Play video games such as Super Smash Bros. Brawl, Mario Kart, LEGO Rock Band and more on six screens with other gamers. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib. org.

Odds & Ends ANNIVERSARY PARTY—Celebrate the downtown wine bar’s first anniversary with a complimentary glass of champagne. Twig’s Cellar, 816 Bannock St., Lower Level, Boise, 208-3448944, twigscellar.com. BOISE UKULELE GROUP—This ukulele group offers instruction and a chance to jam. All levels welcome with no age limit and no membership fees. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Meadow Lakes Village Senior Center, 650 Arbor Circle, Meridian. TEAM IN TRAINING INFORMATION MEETING—See Tuesday. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, adalib.org.

Kids & Teens

ON GOING

DIDGERIDOOS AND STORYTELLING CLASS—Children in fourth through eighth grades will explore the ancient Australian Aboriginal culture and create their own didgeridoos and other artwork. E-mail will.bogdanoff@

BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS— Each week’s cover of Boise Weekly is a piece of work from a local artist. BW pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. For more information contact Art Director Leila Rader at leila@boiseweekly. com or 208-344-2055. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., 208-344-2055, boiseweekly. com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

TREASURE VALLEY WEIGHT LOSS CHALLENGE—Challenge others in the Treasure Valley who want to lose weight. Cash prizes are awarded to the three men and three women who lose the greatest percentage of weight. The first place winners receive $3,000, second place wins $1,500 and the third place winners take home $500 each. Receive nutrition and exercise tips via e-mail and attend six weeks of “kick-start” activities. Final weigh-in is June 2. Visit hdiabetescenter.org for more info. Jan. 8-June 2. $50.

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1ST THURSDAY S TEPHEN K NAPP

SITESPECIFICS Stephen Knapp paints with light and pushes pedagogy at BAM E.J. PETTINGER People interested in light and color will find a treat at Boise Art Museum through Sunday, April 17. Visitors can bask in the glow of Stephen Knapp’s large installation in the museum’s darkened sculpture court. The 80-foot-long site-specific creation ingeniously translates the output of six small halogen lights into an enormous and intricate tapestry of pure color and interesting spatial effects. Its only Stephen Knapp’s Social Commentary says a lot about art but little about cultural implications. shortcoming is in being a bit too site-specific. Knapp is a self-trained artist whose fascinarevelations about the social and cultural implimusic, the notes here don’t fade. It’s as if you tion with light has taken him from the field cations of the ways in which we perceive the were looking at a less useful but more visually of fine-art photography into an interest in world. We might, but only barely. The typical sculptural surfaces that rely on the play of light accurate kind of musical notation. My one gripe would be the degree to which scenario involves some intellectual prose with to achieve their full effect. He has worked with interrogational overtones that achieves nothing the piece is promoted as an example of pedaceramic glazes, kiln-formed glass and etched beyond a vague suggestion that perceptions or metals. Lately his concerns have gone from the gogic art. As soon as I saw that this piece of facts—or beliefs or ideas—are in many ways, pure artistry and scientific curiosity was titled play of light on surfaces to the elements and always under further deferment. Yes, it’s a Social Commentary, my stomach tightened behavior of light itself. nudge in the direction of critical inquiry, but and my balance wavered. Don’t attempt to Knapp has created a process that involves it’s often pretentious, distracting and rarely is it conscript this kind of enjoyable art into pedalaminated glass, stainless-steel mounting hardrealized in the artwork in any meaningful way. ware and projected light. Through a calculated gogic servitude. In this case, the indiscretion In the statement used to introduce the first was slight but the distraction was great. It’s as array of these laminated and shaped pieces of “Threads of Perception” show in the series, if the language of grant writing has insinuglass, the small beam of light from a 75-watt ated itself into art. For some reason a majority a work by Lead Pencil Studio, we were told halogen light virtually cascades across space that the artists explored the complex systems creating an impressive elaboration of its hidden of artists and art institutions feel like their greatest usefulness involved in the production of space and were design and power. exposing contemporary thought around the is in the field of The polished impermanence of architectural structures and critical inquiry. glass is treated with Their jobs as good their impact on our collective memories. Even at least 18 layers where it delivered on those claims, it seemed culture workers of a metallic oxide like a depleted duty for art. Devorah Sperber’s are to educate the that turns it into public, and critical contribution to the series, in which thread a selective prism, inquiries are all the spools played the part of pixels and the subject allowing certain rage. Raising ques- was reduced to an optical lens, was the most wave lengths tions is the end all, overtly analogous to the mechanics of seeing, through and rebut once again, we aren’t really exploring the be all. flecting others. The cultural and social implications of the subject’s Knapp’s instalshape and placerole in seeing. It’s like picking up a book by lation is the third ment of the treated Charles Taylor or Richard Rorty and just readshow in a series glass creates what ing the table of contents. It’s suggestive, but BAM has titled might be called the Stephen Knapp: Working light. “Threads of Perhow much have you learned? work’s painterly In the site-specific prompts surrounding ception,” which is score. The dichroic Knapp’s piece, viewers learn that the conceptua three-year project laminates, along Boise Art Museum is open until 9 p.m. al basis for the work is a reflection of how we meant to draw on with the shape and on First Thursday. perceive the causes and effects of our present scientific thought angle of the glass BOISE ART MUSEUM societal environment—war, financial crisis and and technology in pieces, direct the 670 Julia Davis Drive 208-345-8330 political polarization are mentioned. order to visualize light through a seboiseartmuseum.org Social relevance isn’t a requirement for art. the mental act of ries of six interconLight and color are enough. It’s not imposperception and nected installations sible to make really good art that explores the consider its social that have the and cultural implications. Sounds good doesn’t epistemology of social issues, but if I had to appearance of large musical phrasings. choose between hearing a song about the social it? Except, so far, there hasn’t been anything The word “musical” works well here beand cultural implications of contemporary cause there is something in pure colors and the in this series that explores the mental act of perceptions of loneliness and a song about the perception beyond what you might see at the soft edges of the light that brings to mind the mystery of feeling alone, I’ll choose the song Discovery Center of Idaho. It is implied that ethereal qualities of sound more than the viswe will leave the museum with some important about plain old loneliness every time. ceral and tactile qualities of paint. But, unlike WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | 19


1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS East Side BASQUE MARKET—Relax with a glass of wine and seasonal tapas. 5-8 p.m. 608 W. Grove St., 208-4331208, thebasquemarket.com. DRAGONFLY—All clearance merchandise is 50 percent off the lowestmarked price through Jan. 8. 5-9 p.m. 414 W. Main St., 208-338-9234, gama-go.com.

BOISE ART GLASS—Make your 4 own paperweight. $30 for a 30-minute session or enjoy snacks

BROWN’S GALLERY—Check out local artist 6 Wendy Blickenstaff’s oil paintings in her show “Idaho Impressions.” Enjoy wine tasting, music

Idaho St., 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com.

MOXIE JAVA—Your choice of 20 percent off any coffee drink or a free cookie with any drink purchase. 570 W. Main St., 208-343-9033, moxiejava.com.

IDAHO INDIE WORKS—It’s a 2 “craft-in.” Bring your own project or try out something new. Share ideas

and a demonstration for 5-11 p.m. $35. 530 W. Myrtle, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com.

by Todd Palmer and free chair massage from Yvette Zoe. 5-9 p.m. 408 S. Eighth St., 208-3426661.

South Side

BOISE ART MUSEUM—Make 5 your own artwork inspired by the exhibit “Critical Messages: Con-

CASA DEL SOL—$5 margaritas, $2 tacos, $2 Tecate drafts and live music by Miguel Gonzales. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-287-3660.

ATOMIC TREASURES—An eclec3 tic mix of vintage, retro, art and found objects on sale during January.

temporary Northwest Artists on the Environment.” Join scientists, professors, artists and architects as they discuss local environmental issues. 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE—Art1 work by Wren Van Bockel and Bruce Maurey is on display. 500 W.

and techniques with other crafters. See Downtown News, Page 22. 106 N. Sixth St. MELTING POT—$5 wine specials and 25 percent off cheese and chocolate fondue in the bar. 200 N. Sixth St., 208-383-0900, meltingpot.com.

409 S. Eighth St., 208-344-0811, atomictreasures.com.

EIGHTH STREET MARKETPLACE AIR—View 7 Chad Eperling’s mixed-media paintings on the second floor, along with Bryan Moore’s acrylic, oil and mixed media paintings on found boards. The basement is home to Amber Grubb’s photo images. 404 S. Eighth St., Mercantile Building, 208-338-5212, 8thstreetmarketplace.com. HELLY HANSEN—Buy two items and get 10 percent off, buy three or more and get 15 percent off your purchase. 860 W. Broad St., 208-3422888. IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM—Ac8 tivities center around the exhibit “Power to Play—From Trash to Treasure” featuring toys made from found objects by children from impoverished nations. 5-9 p.m. Donations accepted. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, 208-334-2120, history. idaho.gov. MACLIFE—It’s iPad night. Learn everything you need to know. 421 S. Eighth St., 208-323-6721, maclifeboise.com. QUE PASA—Check out the best selection 9 of Mexican artwork in town, including wall fountains, silver, pottery and blown glass. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-385-9018. RENEWAL CONSIGNMENT HOME10 WARES—Part of the Artist in Residence program. Features work from painter Lauren T. Kistner and metalsmith artist Alicia Jane Boswell on the lower level. 517 S. Eighth St., 208-3385444. SALON 162—Collaborative works by Peter 11 Schott and Jeff Baker: Mixed media on random flat surfaces. 404 S. Eighth St., 208386-9908. THE STYLISH STORK—Huge after-Christmas toy sale—up to 60 percent off selected items. 405 S. Eighth St., 208-336-5655.

Central Downtown AMERICAN CLOTHING GALLERY—All fall and winter coats, hats, scarves and gloves are 30 percent off. 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 121A, 208433-0872. THE ART OF WARD HOOPER GALLERY— 12 View new dog breed prints and find out how your pet can be featured in one. 745 W. Idaho St., 208-866-4627. BASEMENT GALLERY—“Not For 13 Squares” exhibit features a baker’s dozen group of local artists and their surreal, eccentric and strange works. See Downtown News, Page 22. 928 W. Main St., 208-333-0309. BRICOLAGE—Local artists Kyler Martz 14 and Rebecca Fuhrman have collaborated to create circus-inspired original artwork. Enjoy coffee tasting and snacks. 280 N. Eighth St., 208-345-3718, bricoshoppe.com. LE CAFE DE PARIS—Special tapas, live music and wine tasting. 204 N. Capitol Blvd., 208-3360889, lecafedeparis.com. LISK GALLERY—New oil paintings by 15 Carl Rowe, photography by Mark Lisk and paintings on aluminum by Jerri Lisk. Enjoy wine tasting and Dream Chocolates. 850 W. Main St., 208-342-3773, liskgallery.com. MAI THAI—Two-for-one drinks at the bar, sushi starting at $1.59, and buy-two-get-one-free appetizers up to $6.95 from 5-6:30 p.m. and then again from 9 p.m.-close. 750 W. Idaho St., 208344-8424, maithaigroup.com. OLD CHICAGO—Kids eat Karaoke from 10 p.m.-close in the bar. 730 W. Idaho St., 208-3630037, oldchicago.com. PIPER PUB & GRILL—Happy hour from 3-6 p.m. and a special entree all night. 150 N. Eighth St., 208-343-2444, thepiperpub.com.

20 | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | BOISEweekly

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS POTTERY GOURMET—Take 30 percent off everything in the store, and enjoy wine and cheese while you shop. 811 W. Bannock St., 208-368-0649 REDISCOVERED BOOKSHOP— Laura DeLaney will discuss the latest book club for adults, Nancy Pearl Readers. 180 N. Eighth St., 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

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THOMAS HAMMER— Check out the first show for musician Lindsay and local artist Sandy Kaufman while enjoying your favorite coffee drink. 298 N. Eighth St., 208-4338004, hammercoffee.com.

TWIG’S CELLAR—Celebrate Idaho wine month. Meet winemaker John Danielson from Vale Winery and sample wines. 816 Bannock St., lower level, 208-344-8944, twigscellar.com.

West Side

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ART SOURCE GALLERY—Juried exhibition of new local artists working in a variety of media. Enjoy music by JB Duo, wine tasting and snacks as well. 1015 W. Main St., 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com.

HOTEL 43—Receive 10 percent off weekend rates in January when you mention First Thursday. 981 Grove St., 208-342-4622, hotel43.com. OWYHEE PLAZA HOTEL—The Ben Burdick Trio with Amy Weber, and wine from Ste. Chapelle Winery. 1109 Main St., 208-3434611, owyheeplaza.com. THE RECORD EXCHANGE—$2 off any used CD or DVD $5.99 or more. All 12-oz. espresso drinks are only $2 and get $2 off any sale gift item more than $5.99. Featuring local artists’ music for in-store play. 1105 W. Idaho St., 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com.

ART WALK Locations featuring artists

1. Flying M Coffeehouse

6. Brown’s Galler y

2. Idaho Indie Works

7. Eighth St. Marketplace

3. Atomic Treasures 4. Boise Ar t Glass 5. Boise Ar t Museum

10. Renewal Consignment Homewares 11. Salon 162

8. Idaho State Historical Museum

12. The Ar t of Ward Cooper Galler y

9. Que Pasa

13. Basement Galler y

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14. Bricolage 15. Lisk Galler y 16. Thomas Hammer 17. Ar t Source Galler y

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | 21


1ST THURSDAY/NEWS LAU R IE PEAR M AN

ARTISTS IN 1 ST TH U RSDAY RESIDENCE 8TH STREET ARKETPLAC JAN U AR Y 6, 5 - 9 P M

ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE PROGRAM WWW.8 TH S TR E E TM A R K E T P L AC E. C O M WWW .B O I S E A R TS A N D H IS T O R Y . O R G

8 T H S T R E E T M A R K E T P L A C E .C O M

NEW ARTISTS & WRITERS AT 8TH STREET MARKETPLACE @ BODO Wine, cheese and crackers & artistic inspiration

A LAN HEATHCO C K Hosting the third installment of his 450-VOLT Reading Series—a story slam with prizes and a champion crowned—at 7 pm at the Cole Marr Coffee House. More information at http://alanheathcock.com/450-volt-series/ Turn on, tune in, craft out at Idaho Indie Works.

E LIZABETH ROGE R S Working on a screenplay for a movie set in Idaho.

OUT TO SEA ON FIRST THURSDAY

CHAD ERPELDIN G Developing a body of work that explores globalization. Erpelding’s current paintings are focused on privatized militaries and gas stations.

A M B ER GRUBB Photographing and manipulating images reflecting Boise’s diversity through architectural sites and historic landmarks.

BRYAN ANTHON Y MO O R E Presenting Urban Natives - pop-surrealist/ Native-American/tribal influenced art - and additional pieces in oils, acrylics, mixed media, and tribal jewelry. Moore’s AiR studio is open Mon-Fri 8am-6pm all month.

ARTISTS IN RESIDENCE AT RENEWAL UNDERGROUND AT 8TH AND FULTON STREET

A LICIA JANE BO S W E L L Metal Artist: Boswell is incorporating the enamel technique of Champlevé. She utilizes etched copper patterns and hand manipulates the surfaces, choosing to expose a more ordered or complete pattern in some pieces and an almost unrecognizable, withered, fragile, or torn pattern in others.

LA UREN T. KIST N E R Painter/Photographer: Allowing her works to oxidize and change long after they are finished, Kistner focuses on the unstoppable force of life in places of great solitude and desolation.

22 | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Kyler Martz (top) and Rebecca Fuhrman (bottom) at Bricolage.

BW cover lovers will likely recognize artists Kyler Martz and Rebecca Fuhrman. Martz’s Out to Sea (May 12, 2010) depicted a partially submerged octopus-shaped submarine while Fuhrman’s There Will be Dancing Bears (Oct. 28, 2009) featured a circus bear balancing precariously on a ball. Squish those two pieces together, and you’ll get a good idea of what to expect at Bricolage’s January First Thursday exhibit, “Strange as it Seems,” a circus-themed collaboration between the two artists. “They’re a couple—freaking adorable—and they decided to start collaborating on some stuff. He does his pen and ink work and then she does more … photo realism, portrait-y kind of stuff. So, they’re combining those two under the umbrella of the circus theme,” explained Bricolage co-owner Chelsea Snow. The show opens Thursday, Jan. 6, from 5-10 p.m. and will feature fresh, locally roasted coffee from Roastwerks. Both the artwork and limited prints are available for purchase. “It’s going to be pretty amazing, and I do not use that word lightly, mind you,” said Snow. 280 N. Eighth St., Ste. 118, 208-345-3718, bricoshoppe.com. Around the corner, another crafty collective is offering up some hands-on First Thursday fun. Idaho Indie Works is hosting a New Year’s Craft-In from 5-9 p.m. in the Pioneer building. “Instead of doing the traditional First Thursday, we’re doing something where everyone just comes, brings whatever they’re working on and hangs out and makes stuff,” said IIW member Millie Hilgert. If you aren’t currently mid-project, the IIW crew will provide a limited array of supplies and equipment to spark inspiration. “We’ll have some supplies that Etsy had sent us a while back … They sent us some glass-painting things, some different tutorials for doing recycled envelopes and buntings, some silk screening things,” explained Hilgert. 5-9 p.m., 106 N. Sixth St., 208-342-0804, idahoindieworks.blogspot.com. In other First Thursday collaboration news, artists Bruce Maurey and Wren Van Bockel have a joint show going up at Flying M Coffeehouse titled “On the Land and Out to Sea.” Maurey and Van Bockel have collaborated on a number of artistic projects, including live painting at Equaleyes concerts. 500 W. Idaho St., 208-345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS/NOISE ALL THE NEW DIGS Though it might be jumping the gun to declare a rock ’n’ roll renaissance in west downtown, there are a couple of sweet new developments on the live music front hovering on the fringes of the downtown core. Red Room Tavern officially opened its doors in the new space at 1519 W. Main St., which formerly housed Terrapin Station. The venue is sufficiently dark and smoky—and the walls are deep red and lined with enough velour kitsch—to please long-time regulars, but the elevated stage is a giant leap for ward for live music fans. Down the street at 1718 Main St., ColorCube is also flipping over its open sign. Though the venue’s proprietors have faced a number of setbacks in opening the all-ages art consignment and live music space, they finally have their first concert squared away. “Our first show is this Friday, [Jan. 7], and it’s just kind of a practice show with some bands to see how stuff goes and if everything works out well,” said Clint Vickery, ColorCube co-founder. “Our real opening weekend is going to be the last weekend in January.” ColorCube won’t have its official opening party until the last weekend in Januar y, but a few shows already pepper the calendar through the month, including Workin’ On Fire, Wasilla and Leah True on Jan. 7, No Comprendo, Colby Meade, The Maladroids and John E Combat and the Jungle F#*%s on Friday, Jan. 14, and Sonic Minstrel and Unitahs on Saturday, Jan. 15. All three shows are $5 with doors at 7 p.m. “During the weekdays there are going to be some classes and stuff like that,” said Vickery. “Lisa Simpson from Finn Riggins, she’s teaching a guitar class that starts … Tuesday, [Jan. 11].” In addition to art and music classes, the venue will also be providing an art consignment galler y, including a full, painted chalkboard wall. ColorCube will offer a 60-day consignment period and the prices on all items will be capped at $300. “We’ve had a few artists consign stuff, but we really need to get more artists in. But it’s been kind of hard because things have been kind of wishy-washy on the space,” said Vickery. Artists interested in selling their artwork should download forms at colorcubeboise.com or e-mail colorcubeboise@gmail.com to set up an intake review appointment. Inquiries about booking bands should also be shot to colorcubeboise@gmail.com. —Tara Morgan

NOISE

THE SOUNDS OF 2011 What the new year has in store for your ears AMY ATKINS The eggnog is gone, the tree is composted, and since you used recyclable paper to wrap your presents, it’s all tucked neatly in the bin. As you shake off the last of the holiday cheers or jeers, it’s nice to put away the Christmas music and have some new tunes to look forward to in the new year. A slew of highly anticipated albums are due out in early 2011, guaranteeing the year will definitely come in with a sonic bang. In January, Cold War Kids will hopefully climb out of their sophomore slump. Mine Is Yours (Interscope) is the band’s third studio release and is scheduled to hit store shelves on Tuesday, Jan. 11. It promises the same thick, melodic sound CWK is known for but feels more like a record made by grown-ups for grown-ups. Some of that credit goes to producer Jacquire King, known for his work with Kings of Leon. In an interview with Rolling Stone, CWK frontman Nathan Willett said, “We used to share the live aesthetic with White Stripes and Black Keys-type bands, but we really wanted to do something richer and classier.” Success. It’s been a long time since California-based Cake has dropped any new music and people may have forgotten about them—although it’s hard to dismiss the band that gave us “Short Skirt/Long Jacket” and the brilliant “I Will Survive” cover. Fans will find the same Cake on the Tuesday, Jan. 11, release of Showroom of Compassion (Upbeat Records), which is to say you never really know what to expect from Cake. “Sick of You” is a ’70s-sounding trumpet blaster with vocalist John McCrea sounding as laid-back as ever. His signature take it-or-leave-it delivery, in spite of heavy lyrics—“I’m so sick of

24 | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | BOISEweekly

you / so sick of me”—is still there. SoCal punkers Social Distortion, who have been around for more than 30 years, aren’t about to let a little thing like age stop them. On Tuesday, Jan. 18, they’ll release Hard Times and Nursery Rhymes (Epitaph), their seventh studio album and their first release in more than six years. Songs like the single “Already Gone” prove that while the music may have mellowed slightly, the message hasn’t. It’s been a while since Iron and Wine aka Sam Beam released a studio album, but the three years that fans have been waiting for Kiss Each Other Clean (Warner Bros.), out on Tuesday, Jan. 25, will be worth it. Beam lives up to his storyteller reputation with sweet lines like “I was walking far from home / but I carried your letters all the while,” appropriately from the single, “Walking Far From Home”—but then he takes the music in a new direction with the electronic Cat Stevens-esque “Biting Your Tail.” Bright Eyes, fronted by solemn Conor Oberst, has also kept the music close for the past few years but will release The People’s Key (Saddle Creek Records) on Tuesday, Feb. 15. Oberst, Mike Mogis (who co-produced the album) and Nathaniel Walcott will also play Radio City Music Hall and Royal Albert Hall later this year. The Omaha, Neb.-based Bright Eyes has been around for more than 10 years, but rather than grow stale, the band’s moody folk music has stood the test of time. As we spring into spring, Devotchka fans can look forward to Tuesday, March 1. That’s when 100 Lovers (Anti- Records) will crowd store shelves. This romantic Denver-based foursome is known for combining traditional European in-

strumentation and rhythms with American music sensibilities and creating a sound that is at once familiar and exotic. The band will be in Boise on Wednesday, March 2, and since it’s the day after their album comes out, the mood will surely be celebratory. Drive-By Truckers, who will make a stop in Boise on Wednesday, March 16, at the Knitting Factory, release Go-Go Boots (ATO Records) on Tuesday, Feb. 15. Drive-By Truckers aren’t really rock, they aren’t really country, and they aren’t country rock. Alt-country is a term that works but might bring to mind chugging bass and sliding guitar. OK, slide guitar is definitely a country music trope, but in the hands of the Truckers, it becomes something that should never be played in the same set as, say, a Keith Urban tune. Go-Go Boots stays true to the band’s sound but pushes the Truckers even farther into alt territory. Some time in May, the nicer weather will bring Codes and Keys (Atlantic Records) from Death Cab for Cutie. DCFC frontman and Zooey Deschanel spouse Ben Gibbard told spin.com that it is “a testament to where we are as a band ... it’s not a guitar-based record. We’ve been into vintage keyboards and playing with that palette.” The Strokes, R.E.M. and Get Up Kids have releases planned for the new year as well, and word has it that we may hear new stuff from Aerosmith, Beastie Boys, Culture Club, Fiona Apple, My Morning Jacket, Old 97’s, Radiohead, U2 and Wilco as well. Better make some room on your iPods, iPhones, Androids, whatever, kids, because 2011 has enough good new music to fill them up all over again. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

WEDNESDAY JAN. 5

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman, Phil Garonzik and Erin Hall. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BILLY ZERA—7 p.m. FREE. Sully’s THE BLUE DOOR FOUR—With ArtsWest Live. 7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge BRIANNE GRAY—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

HIGH DESERT BAND—6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater Pizza

DJ RYAN BRACKNEY—11 p.m. $3. Neurolux

JON WAYNE AND THE PAIN—9 p.m. FREE for students with ID, $5 general. Reef

ERIC GRAE—5 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

TEENS—7 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

TRAVIS MCDANIEL—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s VANPAEPAEGHEMS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—With Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

WILSON ROBERTS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

FRIDAY JAN. 7

THURSDAY JAN. 6

ADAM NORDELL AND CHURCHMOUSE—With A Seasonal Disguise. 9 p.m. $5. VAC

MEGAN MILLER

THE BLUE DOOR FOUR—With ArtsWest Live. 7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s Jonathan Warren and the Billygoats

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—With Neo Tundra Cowboy. 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux KEYSER SOZE—10 p.m. $5. Reef

WASILLA—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

THE BEN BURDICK TRIO—With Amy Weber. 7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

GIZZARD STONE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

LIKE A ROCKET—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye THE NEW TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper THE RIZING REZISTANCE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. Hannah’s

ARTS WEST JAZZ INSTITUTE QUARTET—With Blue Door Four. 6 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

B3 SIDE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s BLAZE AND KELLY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

26

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE KIRA GALLAGHER

KRYSTOS, JAN. 8, KNITTING FACTORY

IT PREVAILS, JAN. 10, MARDI GRAS

Metal is violence and that has nothing to do with lyrical themes or the behavior of its fans. Metal is a sonic attack against consciousness, an aggressive blow dealt to rational analysis in an attempt to break it down to base instinct wherein one doesn’t think about the sounds so much as experience them directly as primal emotion. Headbanging isn’t a dance. It’s an autonomous reaction, a survival mechanism to channel the savage raw energy a listener is being bombarded with. People who think all metal is the same are wrong. Like getting punched in the nose, the brass-tacks bottom-line practical effect is the same. But there’s a huge difference in delivery between the cold efficiency of a boxer’s jab, the grace of capoeira and the sloppy savagery of a drunken haymaker. And that’s what makes it exciting. Boise shredders Krystos are most comparable to fine kung fu: both badass and graceful to see in action. Their falsetto high notes, superfast synchronized guitar lines and tight arrangements are delivered as effortlessly as Jet Li dancing across rooftops in Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon like it were second nature: Tao te progressive thrash. Catch them with Fault Paradox, Ripchain and The Reptilians.

If the last time you hung out at the Mardi Gras was before you were old enough to drive, now might be a good time to visit: It Prevails is playing on Monday, Jan. 10. The Portland, Ore.-based melodic hardcore band promises to rattle the floors and shake loose the cobwebs when they play as part of an aggressive Januar y tour that takes them through the West, the Midwest and back again. It was anybody’s guess if It Prevails would hit the road again after their 2008 announcement that they were canceling their tour and going on hiatus. On metalunderground.com, frontman Ian Fike explained that after four years, drummer Aaron Marsh had left. “Constantly digging your self out of debt between tours but still having to pay to live and eat on the road is a ver y hard thing to do, some people crack under this pressure. Aaron has.” But you can’t keep a good band down. While the band has seen other lineup changes, Marsh is back on the sticks, and It Prevails is definitely prevailing. They’re joined on this show by Betrayal, Volumes, Counterparts, Bermuda and Our City Skyline. —Amy Atkins

—Josh Gross 8 p.m., $6. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

6:30 p.m., all ages, $10. Mardi Gras, 615 S. Ninth St., 208-342-5553.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | 25


GUIDE 25

SATURDAY JAN. 8

BEN BURDICK AND BILL LYLES—7 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars BRANDON PRITCHETT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub DJ REVOLVE—11 p.m. $3. Neurolux ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FAULT PARADOX—With Ripchain, The Reptilians and Krystos. See Listen Here, Page 25. 8 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel KEYSER SOZE—10 p.m. $5. Reef MIGUEL GONZALES—Noon. FREE. Casa del Sol THE NEW TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper THE RIZING REZISTANCE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. Hannah’s RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

JOHN HASEN—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JOHNNY DOWNING—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

MONDAY JAN. 10

TUESDAY JAN. 11

WEDNESDAY JAN. 12

BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Vista

ARTSWEST CLASSICAL NIGHT AND CHESS—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

BILLY ZERA—7 p.m. FREE. Sully’s

BILL MCKEETH AND FRIENDS—6 p.m. FREE. Cobby’s-Overland

B3 SIDE—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge IT PREVAILS—With Betrayal, Volumes, Counterparts, Bermuda and Our City Skyline. See Listen Here, Page 25. 6:30 p.m. $10. Mardi Gras PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. $2. Liquid

SUNDAY JAN. 9

MEGAN HOLMES

BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CARTER FREEMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Solid DAN COSTELLO AND THE TRUCK STOP TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel KEVIN KIRK—With John Jones. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LARRY CONKLIN—11 a.m. FREE. Moon’s TERRI EBERLEIN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

THE BOURBON DOGS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s SOUL SERENE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid TRAVIS MCDANIEL—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s WILSON ROBERTS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

BRANDON PRITCHETT—8 p.m. FREE. Reef BRIANNE GRAY—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown DAN COSTELLO—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid GIZZARD STONE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

THE SHAUN BRAZELL BAND— With David Veloz and Cody Ramey. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THOMAS PAUL CD RELEASE PARTY—See Picks, Page 15. 8 p.m. FREE. Red Feather

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

MARCUS EATON—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

Dan Costello

REX MILLER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

26 | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | BOISEweekly

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

REX MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

JIM LEWIS—11 a.m. FREE. Focaccia’s

Keyser Soze

THE BLUE DOOR FOUR—With ArtsWest Live. 7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman, Phil Garonzik and Erin Hall. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

Ben Burdick

Kevin Kirk

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


SCREEN/LISTINGS

V i s i t b o i s e w e e k l y. c o m a n d c l i c k on Scr een for movie times.

THE BIG SCREEN/SCREEN

Special Screenings FROSTY GOES TO HOLLYWOOD—Get out in the snow, get it on camera, and win a chance to go play in the snow. We want your funny, crazy, silly, stupid, picturesque, amazing, original, homemade video of you, your pet, your friends or your mother-in-law doing whatever it is you do in the snow. We have extended the deadline, so you now have until midnight on Friday, Jan. 7, to upload your video to frosty.boiseweekly.com. Prize package includes a two-night stay at The Riverhouse Hotel in Bend, Ore., two lift tickets to Mt. Bachelor, dinner for two both nights, two passes to Winterfest, a tour and tasting at Deschutes Brewery and a Rock Star energy drink gift pack. MARTY SOHL/METROPOLITAN OPERA

A NEW ECONOMIC MODEL FOR FILM? All Good Things goes from video to the big screen GEORGE PRENTICE Cinema’s obituary has been rewritten many times. In the 1950s, as television sets became more affordable and I Love Lucy and The All good things come to those who don’t wait and instead get their video on demand. Honeymooners became pop culture staples, movie moguls fretted that they’d lost the but Andrew Jarecki gave the OK for his film to works will open in Boise on Friday, Jan. 7. hearts and pocketbooks of the American be released to the home market because, “the All Good Things stars Ryan Gosling and public. In response, the big screens offered up power of having your movie seen so widely is Ben Hur, On the Waterfront and Around the Kirsten Dunst. It’s a better-than-average extraordinary.” crime thriller, loosely based on one of the World in 80 Days. Of course, it helps that All Good Things is most notorious unsolved murders in New In the 1970s, HBO and video playback a pretty good movie. It’s a “rich boy-poor girl” York history. But it may ultimately be remachines threatened the industry but movies membered as a movie that opened in theaters love story that devolves into corruption, murgot bigger still: Jaws, Star Wars, Out of Afder and very deep, dark secrets. Gosling conweeks after being offered rica. With few extinues to build on his Oscar-nominated career on the home screen. ceptions, each year with a nuanced performance, and Dunst leaves Other art-house films more money pours ALL GOOD THINGS (R) her days as Spider-Man’s girlfriend behind with have been previously through the box Directed by Andrew Jarecki a new maturity. Frank Langella, Kristen Wiig shown on VOD, but none office. Releases in and Phillip Baker Hall co-star. have had a higher profile. 2010 grossed more Stars Kirsten Dunst, Ryan Gosling Adding its initial VOD offering to its select According to the New than $10 billion. Opens this Friday at Flicks showing in a couple dozen theaters, All Good York Times, All Good Movies have been Things has already recouped almost half its Things “performed in recession-proof and $20 million budget and as a result may set the spectacular fashion on even depressionpace for a new economic model to showcase VOD, selling over $4 million in rentals priced proof. The question for 2011 might be: Are more art house films. All Good Things is a at about $10.99.” they VOD-proof? VOD is video on demand, good thing, artistically and fiscally. Most directors have resisted VOD to date, and the best example of whether this system

THE TUBE/SCREEN Park and Family Guy. Homer’s odyssey was great, but he’s reached the end of his journey. Accept it. Move on. It’s done. It’s like an old, blind dog walking around the house A recent episode, obscurely yet somehow predictably titled “Donnie tr ying to find food. Yeah, you feel sentimental about it, and it’s fun to Fatso,” featured a depiction of the baby Jesus as a monkey—or perhaps watch on occasion. But for the most part, you wish you could put it out the converse—in its opening sequence. of its miser y. Perhaps they’re trying to resurrect edginess, but the whole thing The Simpsons is like that dog. There’s nothing more we can do for it. just seemed unaccountably lazy. Jesus had nothing in common with In 2011, the show should be provided an oppormonkeys, who are notoriously incompetent tunity to say goodbye to all of us and exit gracecarpenters. fully after a lifespan of more than 20 years. There are still a few fresh comedy moments Some critics lament the show’s decline by to be had: Homer is fined for “telling it like discussing touching moments and praising its it is,” and Lenny tells him that even though early episodes. Do you recall the earliest epiit’s only the first day of the year, it’s already sodes? They were terrible, precisely because of Homer’s annus horribilis. “My resolution was to those touching lessons. It began unfunny, and it learn Latin,” Lenny says. will probably end unfunny. That’s the way things Perhaps the old dog has sniffed upon some usually go: ashes to ashes, diapers to diapers. sort of amino-acid-injected bowl of youth. Maybe The show was at its best during its (hopefulif we give it one more season, The Simpsons ly) middle years of nonsense and satire. If you will spring back with a renewed energy. Or require cartoon comedy that is actually funny, maybe it’s time to say goodbye for good. you won’t find it coming from the mouths of The —Damon Hunzeker The Simpsons, Sunday nights on Fox. Simpsons or on American Dad—turn to South

CANCEL THE SIMPSONS? MAYBE.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DON CARLO ENCORE—NCM Fathom presents Verdi’s opera starring Roberto Alagna, Ferruccio Furlanetto, Marina Poplavskaya, Anna Smirnova and Simon Keenlyside. Yannick Nezet-Seguin conducts and Director Nicholas Hytner makes his Met debut. Wednesday, Jan. 5, 6:30 p.m., $18, Edwards Spectrum 22, 7709 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-9603, regmovies.com.

Opening ALL GOOD THINGS—Ryan Gosling and Kirsten Dunst star in a love story based on the most infamous murder case in New York history. Set in the ’80s, a wealthy realtor was suspected of killing his wife but was never tried. See review this page. (R) Flicks

COUNTRY STRONG—Gwyneth Paltrow plays a fallen country star striving to resurrect her career with the help of her manager/husband played by real-life country star Tim McGraw. Paltrow does her own singing in this film. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

SEASON OF THE WITCH—Nicolas Cage stars as a heroic crusader in this action/adventure flick set in medieval times. Upon returning home after years away, he finds his village devastated by the plague. He is charged with transporting the young “witch” who is blamed for the curse to a monastery to be cured and ends up taking on more than anybody 28 could’ve guessed. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | 27


SCREEN/LISTINGS Coming Soon 27

MADE IN DAGENHAM—Sally Hawkins, Bob Hoskins and many more star in the true story of women machinists who, after fighting for equal wages, left their jobs at the Ford Motor Company in England in 1968. Opens on Friday, Jan. 14. (R) Flicks

SCREEN/NEW DVD RELEASE

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

MACHETE

PIRANHA 3D

No doubt, Machete will someday be the answer in an experts-only movie trivia contest. Name a movie that co-stars Lindsay Lohan, Cheech Marin, Steven Seagal and Robert DeNiro. Yup. This is the one. Machete started out as a joke. It was a fauxtrailer attached to Robert Rodriguez’s 2007 release Grindhouse. But it generated enough buzz that Rodriguez got the green light to stretch the joke out to 105 minutes of strong violence, nudity and all around tastelessness. It’s a big profane cartoon. Hard to believe, but the DVD is being marketed as a more violent director’s cut.

Name the movie in which a razor-toothed monster threatens a tranquil beach town. Hint: It co-stars Richard Dreyfuss. That’s right, it’s Piranha 3D! (Silly you. You thought it was Jaws?) Dreyfuss abandoned all shame to appear in this horror (and we don’t mean horribly good) film. Director Alexandre Aja (The Hills Have Eyes) surrendered his thriller-cred with this wet piece of drivel. Jerry O’Connell and Elizabeth Shue co-star. Here’s a decent drinking game: Do a shot each time someone goes topless or legless (or both). You’ll be sauced in the first half-hour. —George Prentice

SCREEN/NETFLIX NEW ARRIVALS AT NETFLIX With the holidays done, boxed up and put back in the attic for another year, there is time again for mindless diversions. To wit, movies. To double wit, Netflix streaming movies. Netflix is constantly adding new arrivals for instant watching, and while they may not be brand-new releases, they might be new to you. The Human Centipede (2009) is now available for streaming. This torture tale from Dutch director Tom Six is about a sadistic doctor who creates the titular character out of three lost travelers by sewing them together. The tagline for this one includes: “100 percent medically accurate.” Ick. On a lighter note, Netflix has also recently added some classics including Bob Hope’s 1951 turn as Peanuts White in the mistakenidentity comedy My Favorite Spy. You can also see John Wayne star as a Kentucky rifleman who falls in love with a French ex-patriate in the 1949 The Fighting Kentuckian. Or come full circle with a woman who has been performing since the early ’60s and has had more plastic surgeries than a centipede has socks: Joan Rivers. The acclaimed 2010 documentary Joan Rivers: A Piece of Work is

28 | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | BOISEweekly

Visit netflix.com for more information.

an “uncompromising glimpse” at a woman who not only changed her own face, but changed the face of comedy. —Amy Atkins WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


REC/NEWS DYNAMITE TRAINING

REC

A NEW PERSPECTIVE Salim Stoudamire goes peacefully from NBA to Idaho D-League MICHAEL LAFFERTY

CA RRI E Q UI NN EY

TO KI TS IN R/ NB AE

“You have to show you are passionate about what you are doing and that you care.”

GE

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

As a professional athlete, he understands that he will be cast as a role model. “I think about it every day,” he said. “I am always conscious of every decision I make because I know there is another set of eyes watching me, especially young ones.” Stoudamire’s spiritual side even shows up on the basketball court. Before taking free throws, he crosses his arms over his chest in a sign of reverence. When asked what it means, he smiled and said, “You know about Egyptian mummies, right? They had their arms folded over their chests. It was a sign of resurrection.” There are a lot of expectations riding on Stoudamire’s shoulders— those of fans and those of his teammates. He feels it is his responsibility to give the fans “What they came for ... you have to play with some kind of passion,” he said. “If I went to a concert, and there was an artist up there that was just saying the words of a song and not displaying any passion or enthusiasm, I am not going to pick up on that energy, and it’s not going to be fun to me.

OT

Boise itself, and Idaho, had other allures If home is where the heart is, and family is the that made it a good place for Stoudamire. source of the heartbeat, then it stands to rea“It reminds me a lot of Portland, [Ore.]” he son that home is also where family is. When said. “That is where I grew up. The one thing injury cut short Salim Stoudamire’s time in the I like about it is that it is not as segregated as NBA, he headed home to his father’s house— Atlanta. You can go somewhere [in Atlanta] which just happened to be in Boise. But more than just a home, it became the place where he and it’s all African-Americans. You go to another place and it’s all Europeans. It does not began his basketball career anew. seem like they do a lot of mixing. But here, To some, basketball is just a rule-dictated everybody is cordial and open to different game, but it can be so much more. It is a kinds of people.” maelstrom of organized chaos—the grunt of He admitted there are body against body and the squeak of sneakers on hardwood—that punctuates the symphonic a few stereotypical responses to him in physicality of the sport and offsets the whisper Idaho, and said that of a shot that glides through silken netting. some people “may It can also be an arena of prowess and a look at me condesweat-drenched war zone where tempers are scendingly, or like frayed, passions are spent and the outcome I’m an alien, but I can turn in a matter of seconds. understand that people Stoudamire stands at the eye of the storm: are not as comfortable a study in determination, skill and calm. He with themselves as plays with the Idaho Stampede of the NBA they should be. Development League, but he knows what it is I don’t judge. I like to suit up night after night in the NBA. accept people After he graduated from the University for who they of Arizona, Stoudamire was chosen by the are, and all I Atlanta Hawks in the 2005 NBA draft. He played in 61 games for Atlanta as a rookie and have to offer is love and 61 games the next season, but injuries led to compashis release from the team after his third year. sion.” After a couple of years not playing, he found Walking a place with the Stampede. His father, Charles the aisles Stoudamire, explained how that came about. of Boise “He’s been out of action for two years,” Co-op, chatthe elder Stoudamire said, “and we felt the Dting while League would probably be the best place for Stoudamire him to return to action.” shopped Charles has called Boise home for the for suppast six years, which was “one of the major plies for his determinates in him coming here,” he said. vegan diet, he “The pieces just fell together for Idaho. It just revealed a love seemed like the best place to be.” of poetry and a But Salim Stoudamire is not the same perpassion for muson he was back when he played for Atlanta. sic. And added “In the past I was more concerned with myself because, as athletes, we are conditioned that making it back to the NBA to be that way,” Stoudamire said. “We are is not his primary pampered, everything is just given to us, and focus. we are applauded for what I call negative “I don’t have behavior.” any individual goal, Stoudamire’s injuries allowed him to see and it’s hard for people to understand things from a different perspective. that, but I see it as an opportunity to be “I had to step outside myself because I humbled and to be couldn’t play,” he said. more appreciative “I had to do introspecabout basketball,” he tion because I had The Idaho Stampede season runs through said. “Ultimately, my nothing else to do ... In early April 2011. For game dates and times, father, my little brother the past I put basketvisit idahostampede.com. and little sister live ball before everything, here, and I want to but now I am in a state spend time with them. of mind where my famI haven’t seen much ily is first, and my close of them in the past six years. But I’m a family friends and loved ones are first, and basketball man—without them I am nothing.” is just something extra.”

Have you ever wanted to run a 5K or 10K for a good cause but didn’t know where to begin? You can register to run, but then you need to begin training. Is it enough to log a few miles jogging around your neighborhood? Will you build up enough endurance by hoofing in on the gym treadmill a couple of times each week? Maybe, but maybe not. Since 1988, the Team in Training organization has provided a much-needed but overlooked service: training those who hope to run or walk in charity marathon events, specifically those who could benefit from awareness of different blood cancers, including leukemia, lymphoma, Hodgkin’s disease and myeloma. TNT has chapters all across the countr y, including Oregon, southwest Washington, Idaho and Montana, and they will be holding a free informational meeting at the Boise Public Librar y on Tuesday, Jan. 11, at 6:30 p.m. Those who attend these meetings can meet coaches, mentors and members and learn about upcoming events including Idaho’s Famous Potato marathon, the Dodge Rock ’N’ Roll marathon in San Diego, the appropriately named America’s Most Beautiful Bike Ride in Lake Tahoe, Calif., and the Pacific Crest Triathlon in Bend, Or. Wait. A triathlon? What if you swim like a cat in a straightjacket? TNT coaches are more than happy to help you feel comfortable enough to compete. Not only will they help you train, but they are willing to help you get to your goal, whether it’s to beat your own best time or just to beat everybody else. For more information, visit teamintraining.org and enter your zip code, call 971-230-2292 or e-mail teamintraining_ORP@lls.org. Boise State quarterback Kellen Moore is known for his knowledge of the game, his accuracy and his ability to stay cool under pressure. ESPN.com posted a video on Moore in late December that includes interviews with Moore, his coaches, his teammates and his father about what makes him such a great player and a what made him a good candidate for the Heisman Trophy, which was ultimately awarded to Auburn University’s Cam Newton. —Amy Atkins

We want Moore, Moore, Moore.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | 29


REC/LISTINGS Register

REC/PLAY

DRY CREEK HALF MARATHON—Half marathon to be held on Saturday, April 2, at 10 a.m. Course starts and finishes at the Merc at the Hidden Springs town square and is part of the La Sportiva Mountain Cup Series. Register online at bluecirclesports.com through race day. $38. INSTRUCTIONAL FITNESS PROGRAMS—Boise State Recreation offers a variety of threeand eight-week programs aimed to get you fit. Check out the list of classes and register online at rec.boisestate.edu/fitness. instruction or call 208-4265644. Boise State Rec Center, 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-5641, 208-426-1131, rec.boisestate.edu. LES BOIS 10K TRAIL RUN 2011—10K run to be held on Saturday, March 5. Course is 6.2 miles out and back on a dirt trail course behind Fort Boise Park. Register online at bluecirclesports.com through race day. $28. MOUNTAIN WEST OUTDOOR CLUB—Member-led recreational activities throughout the year including hiking, camping, canoeing and kayaking. Check the members-only group website to keep current on all recently posted and spontaneous activities. For information, call Mike Fritz at 208-323-1383 or e-mail mountainwest@yahoogroups. com. Memberships cost $15 per year, groups.yahoo.com/group/ MountainWest.

Events & Workshops CHI RUNNING CLASS—Learn techniques to help you run more effectively. Contact Karen at Karen@dountil.com for more info or to register. Saturday, Jan. 8. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $75. Shu’s Idaho Running Company, 1758 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-6604, idahorunningcompany.com. IDAHO STAMPEDE BASKETBALL—Vs. New Mexico Thunderbirds. Friday, Jan. 7, and Saturday, Jan. 8. 7 p.m. $12$20. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, qwestarenaidaho.com. INJURY TREATMENT WORKSHOP—Matt Booth, DPT will be discussing the fascial distortion mode—a new manual therapy treatment for sports-related injuries. One winner will be selected to receive a free treatment as part of the demonstration during the seminar. Tuesday, Jan. 11. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Shu’s Idaho Running Company, 1758 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-6604, idahorunningcompany.com. PINK ZONE NIGHT—Join the Borah High School’s girls basketball team in an effort to raise funds for the Susan G. Komen foundation by wearing pink and purchasing raffle tickets. Saturday, Jan. 8, 7:30 p.m. FREE. Borah High School gymnasium, 6001 Cassia, Boise, 208-3223855, sd01.k12.id.us/schools/ borah.

30 | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | BOISEweekly

SKATING BY ON SKI SKILLS After limping off the field last September nearly crippled by an Idaho Nordic Club pre-season cross-country ski training session, I was ready for round two—on snow. Thanks to ample snowfall in late November, I’d been on my sticks since Thanksgiving. I had managed to sneak in some pre-dawn lung-busting at Bear Basin in McCall, accompanied only by my own shadow cast from the light of my headlamp. Under the simultaneous assault of an intense cardio workout coupled with sub-zero temps, my physiology was starting to adapt to the punishment. Still, it was only because I was bolstered by caffeine and the knowledge that I was building ski fitness faster than most weekend warriors, that I soldiered on. Skiing alone under the cover of darkness, I might have been stealthily tuning my aerobic engine. However, I was effectively hiding from my abysmal technique. Although elite Nordic skiers boast some of the greatest VO2 maxes in all athletics, skate skiing is also one of the more technical endurance sports on the planet. I can outrun plenty of people, but those people leave me in a powder flurry when we have skis and poles attached. And I sure as hell For more information, don’t want to be the girl who visit idahonordic.com. always blames her wax for her inability to keep pace. So that’s why I stood in front of the Nordic lodge at Bogus Basin one Saturday morning, geared up to attend a clinic taught by the upper echelon of area Nordic ski racers. I was still struggling to force my snow-caked boots into my bindings when the Idaho Nordic Club’s clinic skated off precisely at the designated start time. I caught up to the gangly herd about a kilometer down the track where instructors had stopped to break everyone into smaller groups. I wound up in the group led by Joe Jensen, who had earned his notoriety with me when he led last fall’s dryland workout with such vigor and intensity that he made Jillian Michaels from The Biggest Loser look like a softy. Of course, once we began a double-poling drill, I was the first person Jensen yelled at. But to my astonishment, this time he was chewing me out for working too hard, shouting, “This is not a race, Sarah! Leave your ego back by that tree, or I’ll leave you bonked by the side of the trail.” As the minutes ticked by, our group went from double-poling, to skating without poles, to using poles with varied timing and varied results. Jensen was ever-present, ever-patient and his technique was ever-perfect as he demonstrated each drill before having us try it during the two-hour clinic. Remarkably, although the 40-some participants at the clinic spanned the spectrum of ability levels, it’s fair to say that we all came away having learned something that will improve our Nordic skiing technique. And the next time I’m out there alone before daybreak, I’ll be working hard—just not too hard. —Sarah Barber

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FOOD/NEWS PATR IC K S W EENEY

FOOD GU Y HAND

IF WEATHER WERE ALL THAT MATTERED

Messenger Pizza sends the right message: pizza and craft beer do a body right.

THE REVOLUTION WON’T BE ADVERTISED

The potential for local food in winter GUY HAND Deep into another Idaho winter, I can’t help but think back on a battered greenhouse in an icy Hagerman field that I stumbled toward some three years ago. From the outside, that gray greenhouse all but faded into a snowflecked, gunmetal sky. But as soon as owner Merrily Eckel pushed open its creaky door, an unmistakable, if utterly incongruous scent hit me like a blast of sunlight. In front of us stood a full grown orange tree, heavy with fruit. “Anything you could grow from Baja north, you can grow in here,” Eckel said through a half-contained smile. As I pulled off my coat, I slowly began to comprehend what my eyes were not quite believing. Beyond that orange tree were others: grapefruit, lemon, pomelo—a citrus forest full of day-glow fruit, all coddled in geothermal heat. If ever I thought winter meant months of starchy monotony, this greenhouse blew that misconception out the door. Eckel pulled a tangerine off another tree—an Idaho tangerine. “This is a Satsuma tangerine,” she said. “That’s the kind that the skin comes off like a jacket, really easy, one hand. Lots of kids get these in their stockings Christmas morning in places like California. I had maybe a thousand on this tree last year.” Winter, of course, is a challenging time for those with a hunger for local food. By January or February, an ascetic’s gruel of spuds, onions and wobbly carrots can weaken the resolve of even the most devoted locavore. But Southern Idaho sits on the same latitude as Tuscany, meaning the Snake River Plain is endowed with the same length of winter light as that famously olive-soaked region of Italy. And it’s why some say what we lack in winter warmth we can make up for with our wealth of geothermal heat. Couple that with greenhouses and Tuscan-level light and dreamers say we could blow that tired California lettuce and flaccid Florida orange juice out the door. If only weather were all that mattered. James Reed, who first brought me to Eckel’s stunning little geothermal oasis, was, back then, deep into his own greenhouse dream, housed just down the road. “Right now we’re at the Arches Greenhouse Complex,” Reed said as we drove up to dozens of empty commercial greenhouses just outside of Hagerman. “We’ve leased about 7,000 square feet, and we’re growing food here. It’s WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Surprising spring colors in the dead of winter come from Merrily Eckel’s geothermal greenhouse in Hagerman.

the first time food has been grown in these greenhouses for maybe 30 years.” Traditionally, the hot-springs-heated greenhouses scattered all over Southern Idaho have mostly grown flowers and bedding plants, not food. Reed had hoped to change that by leasing off-season space to grow a winter’s worth of local lettuce, spinach, arugula—and maybe even early tomatoes and peppers—for Idaho’s Bounty, a local food distribution system he helped launch. “These greenhouses are fairly unique,” Reed said as we stepped into a toasty, translucent tunnel filled with baby greens. “They’re heated with artesian geothermal water that comes out at about 130 degrees and enables us to keep [them] warm through the winter with very little energy cost. And that’s why we’re here.” The place smelled like a just-plated salad, the lettuce so fresh it squeaked as we nibbled. Perfectly fresh winter greens are a revelation. Crisp and sweet, they make trucked-in produce taste like yard waste. But even back then, Reed was cautious about how bright the future of Idaho winter greens could be. “It remains to be seen if it’s economic to raise food in greenhouses,” he said. “No one is doing it, and we’re in the process of finding out.” Three years after that conversation, Reed found out. During a recent phone call, he said with an unguarded sigh: “It just has not been economic to do food.” Even with nearly free heat, unused greenhouses and the compelling potential for unbeatably fresh fruit and crisp greens, Reed said he smacked into the cold, hard reason why few Idahoans are growing in winter: Cheap, industrial food. “It’s just too incredibly hard to compete with a truck coming in from California,” said Reed. “I do believe there is an emerging market for locally produced food but that really hasn’t translated in the willingness of people

to pay the prices necessary to interest the more professional greenhouse growers.” Chris Florence of Sweet Valley Organics in Sweet is hoping to grow in geothermal greenhouses but agrees with Reed about the frosty financial realities of local food in winter. “With every advantage that we gain with either geothermal water or season extension techniques, we’re outdone by people who are thousands of miles away who are growing in a totally different climate,” he said. “That’s something that we just can’t compete with. For every advantage we gain, there’s somebody out there that kind of cheats the system, to our way of thinking, and can produce even below what we can with our geothermal hot water. So that’s frustrating, that’s really frustrating.” Walking through crusty snow toward a row of his own greenhouses, Tim Sommer of Purple Sage Farms in Middleton said he understands that frustration. In fact, as one of Idaho’s greenhouse veterans, he lived those frustrations for 20 growing seasons. During that time, Sommer never grew winter vegetables. He blames that, in part, on the North American Free Trade Agreement, which in 1994 let loose a flood of cheap winter produce that surged north from Mexico. Unable to compete, Sommer buys and resells Mexican herbs himself. “So it didn’t work very good for us,” Sommer said as he pushes his hands into his pockets and walks past aging tractors and empty greenhouses. “In some ways I feel like I’m in a ghetto business,” he said in a folksy, Henry Fonda-like cadence, “instead of out front shining.” And yet, in the last two years, Sommer has found a reason to be tentatively optimistic, has even begun to shine, thanks to the burgeoning local food movement. “I’ve been so grateful for this change in people’s observance of the value of food in their lives and what it does to their bodies, their health, what it does to their community. They have this whole new set of values. It’s

Watch out Russia, Idaho is getting all up in your biznass. The potato state is taking on your two most famous exports: revolution and vodka. Revolution Vodka is the new kid in town at Distilled Resources, the Rigby distillery responsible for crafting 44 North, Blue Ice, Teton Glacier, Square One and Zodiac Vodka, among others. Revolution Vodka bills itself as “a small veterans-based company made up of four Idaho natives,” and the business recruited California’s Slightly Stoopid to sign on as brand sponsors. In fact, a few members of the band performed with C-Money and Players Inc. at the official Boise launch party at Gusto last month. You can find Revolution Vodka at a number of local liquor stores, but don’t expect any glitzy ad campaigns anytime soon. According to its website, these hooch purveyors don’t want to play the sleazy corporate vodka game. “Start a revolution in vodka and flip the bird to big foreign corporations. Tell them to take that s**t right back to where it came from. We are Americans and we think ridiculous corporate ad campaigns are bulls**t.” Yeppers. If you prefer your libations a little less fortified—and foul-mouthed—Messenger Pizza, which opened in Nampa in mid-October, is gearing up to offer its own microbrews in the coming months. The beer-brewing side of the operation is currently being tackled by couple Jenn and David Schram, while Shawn and Cassidy McKinley are manning the pizza-making end of things. “It’s kind of a cross between Neapolitan and New York style,” explained Shawn McKinley. “We have regular gas-deck ovens; we’re not wood-fired or anything.” The four partners gutted the old Stockman’s Press Building in downtown Nampa and have revamped it with a “Catholic retro atmosphere.” They’re offering pizza by the slice and some eccentric 12-inch, 18-inch and 24-inch whole pies like the Chuck Norris, Jalapeno Popper and Red Velvet Nun. 1224 First St., Nampa, 208-461-0081. —Tara Morgan

BOISEweeklycJANUARY 5–11, 2011c31


FOOD/CON’T really changing things.” Stepping into one of his greenhouses, Sommer pulls back a thin sheet of agricultural cloth, revealing a long row of dark green kale. “This crop that we’re looking at right now is a perfect example of that,” he said. “Two years ago we never grew winter crops. All of a sudden I found that somebody wanted it. I couldn’t believe it. I found out for the first time ever that people would be interested in winter greens.” Sommer has begun growing and selling cold-season produce to Treasure Valley stores and restaurants that value locally grown winter vegetables and are willing to pay a proper price. He can even afford to bring his son Mike back home to work with him now. In a voice close to breaking, Sommer said, “That’s how much this change in the local food movement [has] brought.” It’s a profound enough shift to warrant walking through hard snow to an empty field so he can show me where he plans to add additional greenhouses designed to grow winter crops for the local market. He doesn’t even have geothermal heat—just sunlight and renewed enthusiasm. “Just changing the orientation to the sun would make this thing work without any fossil fuel or any other external source,” he said, waving his hand over a blank canvas of snow. Back in Hagerman, Reed has found a profitable way to grow winter greens. Instead of losing money on the retail market, he opened a restaurant in Twin Falls called the Local Dish Market & Cafe. There his squeaky-fresh, greenhouse-grown produce is a prominent, profitable part of the menu. Merrily Eckel, on the other hand, never had trouble getting a stellar price for her Idaho citrus. Atkinsons’ Market in Ketchum sells every bit of fruit she delivers. Where else, she asks, can a locavore find a fresh Idaho orange?

32cJANUARY 5–11, 2011cBOISEweekly

FOOD/WINE SIPPER

TOP IDAHO WINE PICKS The new year is a time to reflect on the events of the past year. I’ve tasted a lot of great wine in the last 12 months, but nothing has impressed me more than the evolution of Idaho wines. Gaining our own Snake River viticultural designation seems to have shaken things up, with lots of worthy new wineries joining the ranks of some old favorites. The only downside is their very limited production. Here are three exceptional Idaho wines that are still available in the market. 2009 CINDER CHARDONNAY, $18 My slam against so many American chardonnays is their overwhelming oak. We call them Chateau Two-by-Fours, and they are so colored by wood you risk getting splinters in your tongue. Cinder Wines winemaker Melanie Krause preaches the mantra of balance using mostly neutral oak to let the fruit shine through, while adding structure and texture. Her Cinder chardonnay offers beautiful peach and citrus flavors with just a hint of spice. 2008 COILED SYRAH, $24 Coiled Wines owner/proprietor Leslie Preston is from Idaho, but now lives in Napa, Calif., where she makes this wine using the Snake River grapes she finds so intriguing. Bottled under a screw-cap to preserve all the fresh fruit aromas and flavors, this is world class Syrah with spicy berry fruit on the nose and on the palate. Great structure with nice complexity and amazing length make for an impressive wine. 2007 SNAKE RIVER BARBERA, $17 The 2006 vintage of this Snake River Winer y wine finished in the top three against a line-up of true Italian barberas back in April 2010. The only other Idaho wine to make the cut in a “Wine Sipper” tasting was a riesling, also from Snake River. They must be doing something right, and if anything, this 2007 is even better than the ’06. Rich in ripe cherr y fruit flavors, it is nicely balanced by crisp acidity, making for a food-friendly choice. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole. MOBILE MASSAGE BY EMILY Keeping the Mind Body and Soul Healthy Winter Special!! 2 1-hour massages for $80. Specializing in: Deep Tissue Massage, Swedish Massage, Accupressure, Amma Therapy, Firecupping. Incalls/Outcalls available. 30 Min ~ $25/60 min. ~ $55/90 min. Additional travel charges may apply. For appointments please call 208283-6760.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com PT HOUSING INSPECTOR The Boise City/Ada County Housing Authority is seeking a PT Housing Inspector. Experience with residential inspections required. Familiarity with HUD Housing Quality Standards highly desireable. To obtain an application, go to www.bcacha.org, or pick one up at 1276 River Street, Suite 300. Application deadline is Friday, December 10th at 4:00 pm. NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE! SERVERS & COOK 30-40 hrs./wk. Day & night shifts. Weekly pay & bonus moneys. Experience preferred. Apply in person 2-4pm daily. info@brickovenbistro.com STYLIST NEEDED Stylist needed for 25 hrs./wk. minimum. This is a contract for commission position and you are an independent contractor. 60/40 split or lease $100/wk. E-mail resume atomichairboise@gmail. com Check out atomicsalonboise.com

RIGHT SCHOOL, RIGHT DEGREE, RIGHT NOW!

Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES BLACKBOX COSMETICS BlackBox Cosmetics is a new live, organic skin care line whose main goal is to revitalize the industry by providing the nourishment directly to the dermal layer. We are looking for ISA’s to help us spread the news about our great product. Interested parties should be health conscious, selfmotivated and have some experience in the worlds of beauty and health. Interested parties should e-mail blackboxshae@gmail. com for further information.

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

WANT TO FIRE YOUR BOSS? Candle Distributors needed for a unique, fun home-based business. Visit my website for more info: www.CandlesAreLove.net

CO M M U N I T Y BW CLASSES & WORKSHOPS WORDPRESS HOW TO CLASS With Wordpress, you can maintain a blog, but also create endless web pages just like any other website. In this course, you’ll learn how to host your own WP package, choose templates, and then customize and populate the site. Dates: Jan. 10, 17, 21, 31. For more information visit www. sparkcommission.com CROSS COUNTRY SKIING Interested in learning or improving your techniques this season? Join the coaches & athletes of the Bogus Basin Nordic Team for an early winter clinic. Classic & skate lessons available. All skill levels welcomed. Sunday, Jan. 9, at the Bogus Basin Nordic Center. Online registration at www.bluecirclesports.com All proceeds benefit the Bogus Basin Nordic Team, a nonprofit organization.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - HEALTH

FREE TELESCOPE INST. CLASS Did you get a new telescope for Christmas? Have you always wanted to learn how to use the one buried in your closet? Boise Astronomical Society is hosting their annual FREE telescope instructional class on 1/14 at 7pm at Discovery Center of Idaho. Please bring telescope & all parts including manuals. More information can be found at www. boiseastro.org

SEWING & CRAFT CLASSES AT TWIGS & TWIST’S

Pillows 101, Thurs. Evening Create!, Crafty Teen & many more. For details www.twigsandtwist. com 342-0600.

BW ANNOUNCEMENTS ACTORS-ACTRESSES-MODELS Casting call-Country Music Video. M/F, no experience required. This is not porn. Call Cheri 208-6294874.

BW FOUND FOUND BLACK LAB MIX Found 12/16 in the vicinity of Collister and Bloom. Small black lab mix, no collar. Very sweet & wellbehaved. Please call & be able to describe 429-0656. KITTEN FOUND On about 12/20, black & white, about 7 months old, not neutered, near Glenwood close to D&B. Contact: violetzephyr@ hotmail.com

FO R SA L E BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. BODY-WORN HIDDEN CAMERAS http://www.dpl-surveillance-equipment.com/body-worn_hidden_ cameras.html

34 | JANUARY 5-11, 2011 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 8881464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. KING TUT CONNECTIONS Ancient Egypt’s profound contributions to Middle Eastern religions. Order Superheroes, Pagans & Deities at bookstores or www.corystevens.com Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. PELLET STOVE FOR SALE Older Envirofire FS pedestal style stove. 22”Wx24”Lx30”H. Has 41”x41” blue ceramic tile platform. I bought it new in my old house. Can be installed 6” from back wall & 1” from side wall or corner. No chimney required. Has blower and runs on 120V, 60Hz, 2 amp. $400 obo. Call 208412-7089 leave a message.

PLACE AN AD

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B OISE W E E KLY

QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.”

ANTIQUES

BW ART, ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

SARA’S SECONDHAND

Will pay CASH for furniture. Call 331-2366.

PETS

GOURMET PET TREATS Whimsical Treats for Spoiled Cats and Dogs! Visit www.etsy.com/ shop/PetPatisserie to find gifts for your little buddies & all the pet lovers on your gift list! Treats include Holiday Carob Lollipops in fun shapes, Cat & Dog Holiday Samplers, Stocking Stuffers, and more! PUG PUPPIES FOR SALE. Seven puppies in this litter, both fawn and black. For more info. please call 577-6010.

MUSIC

BW PETS KITTEN FOUND On about 12/20, black & white, about 7 months old, not neutered, near Glenwood close to D&B. Contact: violetzephyr@ hotmail.com

BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION

2011 IS THE YEAR You’ve been talking about it for a while now for yourself, your spouse, your kids, or all of the above. 2011 is the year! Guitar, piano, bass & voice lessons for all ages taught out of Nampa home. Great rates. Sign up multiple family members & save. Individual & group classes now forming but filling up fast! Call today. 208-353-3080. VIOLIN & VIOLA LESSONS Offering private lessons in beginning and intermediate violin and viola. Classical, electric, traditional and non-traditional learning, beginning theory & ear training. Experience: B.A. in Music. E-mail or call for more details or with any questions. brittanym.mcconnell@gmail.com 208-409-5846.

GUITAR LESSONS Visit JamesLewisMusic.com 371-6163.

BW MUSIC SERVICES IDAHO’S GUITAR PRO SHOP Everything acoustic & electric. Nationally competitive low prices. Sales-Rentals-Lessons-Repairs Professional musicians on staff. Dorsey Music, 5015 W. State, by Lakeharbor. 853-4141.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

SERVICES - HOME

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

SHOP HERE

BETTY: Two-year-old female German pointer mix. House- and cratetrained. Good with older children. Knows basic commands. (Kennel 321 - #11997909)

JAKE: Six-month-old male German shepherd mix. Good with children and other animals. Lovable and friendly. Needs training. (Kennel 407 - #11956351)

CHASTITY: Shorthaired, tri-color, 2-yearold cat. Found with no identification in Boise. Litterbox-trained and spayed. (Kennel 118 #11993172)

OLLIE: Ten-month-old male Chihuahua mix. Regular exercise is a must. Walks nicely on leash and likes being held (9 lbs.) (Kennel 303 - #12027113)

TINKER BELL: Four-yearold orange and white tabby-marked cat. Loves to hide but enjoys being petted and handled. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 106 - #12092609)

ELLIOTT: One-year-old retriever mix. Housetrained, good with other dogs and older children. Knows some obedience commands. (Kennel 320 - #11933154)

BOISE WEEKLY

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

LILY BELLE: My color BERRY: I am spunky, does not equate to an tailless and sweet. absence of purrsonality. Take me home today.

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BEEPER: Beep! Beep! I seem to say as I swish around your legs.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 5-11, 2011 | 35


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B O I S E W E E K LY FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

BOISE DUI LAWYER Have you been charged with a DUI? Get the help you need at a price you can afford. Don’t lose your freedom or your right. The Boise DUI Law Center offers experienced and aggressive DUI

SERVICES BW PROFESSIONAL

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

representation. Call 208-4722385 or visit us on the web at http://www.duiboiseid.com Payment plans and flat fees available ISB # 4607.

EAT HERE

BW MUSICIANS’ EXCHANGE GOSPEL, JAZZ, BLUES PLAYERS Lets get some standards down & do gigs! Call Z 208-570-0907. MUSICIANS NEEDED Musicians needed for Country Music Band. Call Cheri 208-629-4974.

NYT CROSSWORD |

10 High-school class 14 On the 73-Across, e.g. 19 Élan 20 Lampblack

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44 “He wore a diamond” in “Copacabana” 45 Ryan’s “Love Story” co-star 46 Origin 47 Hotel’s ask-your-greeteranything approach? 53 Popular portal 54 Swift 55 Modern pentathlon event 56 Difference in days between the lunar and solar year 61 “All clear” 64 Honoree’s spot 65 Singer Carey 66 “South Park” character leading a walk around a paddock? 71 Patronized a restaurant 72 One ___ (ball game) 73 W.W. II carrier praised by Churchill for its ability to “sting twice” 74 Vaults 75 Aspersion 76 Brazilian name for six popes 79 Speak lovingly 80 What Dustin Hoffman gets to do often, thanks to royalties? 85 Advantages 89 Scoundrel 90 Steve McQueen’s first major movie, with “The” 91 Sled dog 92 Actor Hugh involved in every swap shop deal? 98 W.W. I hero played by Gary Cooper 99 Pre-1868 Tokyo 100 “Don’t strain” 101 Song on an album 104 ___ Gillis of 1960s TV 105 Colloquialism 107 Bar activity 110 Like some gases 111 Actor John playing Wayne Knight’s role on “Seinfeld”? 114 Inhabitant of the Pribilof Islands 115 Razor brand

116 Quotable Hall-ofFamer, informally 117 Excoriate 118 “Viva ___!” 119 Pastoral sounds 120 Sign 121 Dummkopfs

DOWN 1 Modern party summons 2 Element in strobe lights 3 Confession of faith 4 Square 5 Mother of Helen 6 Retreat 7 ___ Eisley, “Star Wars” cantina town 8 Dad 9 Attempt 10 Winter Olympics powerhouse 11 Whence the phrase “Murder most foul” 12 So-so 13 Pound 14 Harshly bright 15 Prickly plants 16 Onetime home for Georgia O’Keeffe 17 Expunction 18 Sinatra’s “Softly, ___ Leave You” 24 Hand, in slang 25 Charged particle 29 Third-degree, in math 32 Vermont city 33 Cartoon genre 35 Contradict 36 Old-time cartoonist Hoff 37 Hopper 38 Plus 39 Vamoose 40 Most fit 41 Funny 42 Like Rochester, N.Y. 43 Literally, “guilty mind” 48 Run ___ the mouth 49 Author Robert ___ Butler 50 Nectar flavor 51 1960s TV boy 52 Chorus of approvals 57 Projecting front

58 The Red Baron and others 59 Clerical robe 60 Stir 62 “Uncle!” 63 Something that’s not optional 64 E-mail address component 65 Quark/antiquark particle 67 Slow dance with quick turns 68 S. American land 69 Actress Diane of “Numb3rs” 70 ___ Bowl 75 Shut out 76 Tiresomely disagreeable sort 77 Make ___ of 78 Planetary shadow 81 Without ___ (nonchalantly) 82 Flowering 83 “El ___ vive!” (revolutionary catchphrase) 84 Czech martyr Jan 85 Comfy bedwear 86 Ann or Andy

L A S T

O N T A B O U T S T R I A F T H O W O N A DIM V E R A G BRIGHT E N I N U T D A R E E R S T A M E R A T A J A L O M L I T E L A S A T A G A S C A S T O P H E P E E W

P O P E Y E A C E S E M B A R G O I L E

E D N A E M DARK R O M A P O N E P P E L E R O A Y A T L I A T E R Y A R A T I N E S T A L R E N G I A E S

87 When Canada celebrates Thanksgiving 88 Azure 93 Half 94 Topper for Ol’ Blue Eyes 95 Nike competitor 96 Welcomes warmly 97 Actress Cannon 101 Results of some accidents 102 Decree 103 Backpackers’ gear 105 Wee bit 106 Spread for lunch, maybe 108 First name in country 109 Woodworking tools 110 Dundee dissent 111 Yak 112 Passeport info 113 Dating service datum Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A H L A V I A S MOON A N Y S D E I O T U R N R O S G T R S E A B R A S T I A L T O O R D M E A T H E EARTH S R A U R A S T N M O E K E N N E T I A M T O T E L U N A R O G O E SUN D I N B U I C O W P O

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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY BW KISSES

EAT HERE

ALL MY SONS MOVING A HUGE thank you to All My Sons Moving for helping tow my car out of the ditch when another car swerved me off the road outside of Donnely. You guys were fantastic. If I ever need help moving, I know who to call. THANK YOU! To the wonderful generous family who gave me a $100 tip Wednesday night at Golden Corral... THANK YOU! You made my night! ~Your Grateful Server. T.K. Every day you make me laugh, we love you soooo much. Our future is as bright as the sun, don’t ever forget that! Love, Cealy and your adoring boys. MAC BOOK PRO FOR SALE New 13”, 2.4GHz Mac Book Pro, $1,200 value. Purchased 9/28/10 from Mac Life. Barely used. Price includes receipt, cords, charger, box, etc. & Microsoft Office Mac 2008 software with snap on leatherette case. Cash or cashier’s check only. $1,000 firm. Call 424-0409. RESUME WRITING Effective resumes drafted by a professional writer. Contact 208-8916358.

A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on 01/27/2011 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Dec. 7, 2010. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: D. Price Deputy Clerk Pub. Jan. 5, 12, 19, 26, 2010.

MEET LOCAL SINGLES. Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7584, 18+. Where Hot Men Hook Up! Call 208-489-2162 or 800-777-8000. Free w/code 2982.

BARTER BW HOME INTERIOR PAINTING Reasonable prices! Help with colors, wall repair, texture, stain blocking & sealing, kitchen cabinets repainting, brush, roll & spray finishing. Attention to detail, 25 years exp., dependable & references available. Licensed & insured ! Call Joe Bohemia Painting for a free estimate! 208-345-8558 or 208-392-2094. LOOKING FOR WORK I am looking for work. I’ll do outside work, cleaning gutters, raking leaves, shoveling snow, taking down your Christmas lights, whatever you might have. I can also paint, do wallpaper removal, help you move or do a landfill run. I charge $10/hr. E-mail me anytime. mgudgus@yahoo.com JT’S SEAMLESS GUTTERS Seamless rain gutters, leaf covers, clean outs, repair & replace. Please call for a free estimate 9419887 thank you! Jeremy Todd.

N O T I C ES BW LEGAL NOTICES IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Tyler Jerid Sharp Case No. CV NC 1023358 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (ADULT) A Petition to change the name of Tyler Jerid Sharp, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Tyler Jerid Piek. The reason for the change in name is: I would like to go by my aunt & uncle’s last name because they raised me.

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BW HAVE SWAPCAFE.COM Come join us! Trade your stuff, your skills, your inventory. Submit via SwapCafe.Net for personal swaps or SwapCafe.Com for B2B. Good luck trading! Questions Info@ SwapCafe.Net FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

BW CHAT LINES

BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. SWM, 25 yrs. Old, 175 lbs, with hazel eyes and black hair. 20 months to top. Looking for a woman who will ride the rest of my timeout with me for friendship and possibly more. If interested write me. Jeremy De La Cruz #77133A B215 ICC PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. F looking for a pen pal. I’m 44 yrs. Old, 5’4, brown hair and eyes. Michelle Hall #65926 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Road Kuna, ID 83634.

I am 39 yrs. Old with brown hair and eyes. I am in good shape. I work out every day and I like sports, working on old cars, and Harleys. I enjoy camping, fishing, hanging out, movies, and rock concerts. I am currently in prison looking for a good F pen pal. I am a kind and caring person. Robert Pakard #83100 Unit 16-B-66 ISCI PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I’m a 23 yr. old guy serving time and looking for some girls to write while I finish up my time. 6’, 175 lbs. with brown eyes and hair. I’m easy going and open minded. Kegan Kolander #83882 ICC B119B PO Box 70010 Boise, ID 83707. I’m a 28 yr. old SWF ISO a pen pal to have some fun with. Kalli Lindauer #1034516 7210 Barrister Dr. Boise, ID 83704. F looking for a pen pal. I’m 33 yrs. Old, 5’2 with brown hair and eyes. Margarita Zepeda #59764 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Road Kuna, ID 83634. My name is Michael Taylor. I’m currently doing time in the Idaho Prison. Was wondering if there is anyone out there willing to write a 20 yr. old M. Just as friends to talk too. Maybe a few laughs. I hope there is someone out there with a kind heart. Michael Taylor #90949 IMSI A-Block PO Box 51 Boise,ID 83707. My name is Levi Hancock. I’m 24 yrs. Old, 6’1, 170 lbs., SWM. I like to draw cards, portraits, write poems and anything that is creative. I like to have a fun time. I’m very laid back. Looking for a pen pal 18-45 yrs. Of age. Someone who likes to have fun day in and out. Levi Hancock #82361 ISCI Unit 14B 15B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. My name is Russell Foster. I’m 40 yrs. Old, 5’7, 165 lbs. with long hair and blue eyes. I have no family and am looking for a pen pal, possibly more. I have only up to 3 years to do. Russell Foster #81114 ISCI Unit 14-A-60B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707.

Hello, I’m 32 yr. old SWM. I like the outdoors and movies. I’m interested in starting a pen pal relationship with SF’s between 20-45. Fantasies are ok. Jesse Massey #91253 1-32A CAPP 15505 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83634. 44 yr. old M changing my life for the better. I like to laugh and have fun. I love full figured women. Needing a pen pal and more. John Stone #42520 ICI-O Colvens Hall N. 23 Orofino, ID 83544. I’m 58 yrs. Old, 5’8, brown hair, blue eyes and weigh 198 lbs. I enjoy reading, watching TV., camping, fishing and music. If there is someone out there that wants to write to me they can. Thomas Coffeit #30459 IMSI B-45 PO Box 51 Boise, ID 83707. 26 yr. old M seeking F 18-40 for correspondence and friendship. Must have a positive outlook on life and hold happiness and freedom as a cherished blessing. Dumarce M. Dexter #831747 R-B57 AHCC PO Box 2049 Airway Heights, WA 99001. I’m 24 yrs. Old, 5’3, Puerto Rican, athletic and single. Pictures on facebook.com/hxcspidey. I’m a laid back, no nonsense or drama kind of guy. Hoping to find a woman with the same qualities to write and connect with. Someone down to earth. Michael T. Berdeja #81677 ISCI Unit MA PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I’m 37 yrs. Old with brown hair and eyes. 5’5 and very cute. I would like someone to write. Selia Padron #75209 239C SBWCC 13200 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83634. SWM, 29 yrs. Old ISO F for companionship... If interested check out my profile at friendsbeyondthewall.com (last name search Ewell). Eric Ewell #88556 ISCI Unit 14 PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. 24 yr. old SWM ISO a pen pal. James Sprayberry #873555 WCC PO Box 900 Shelton, WA 98584.

CON N E C T I ON S EC T I ON - ADULT

Real People, Real Chat, Real Hot! Call 208-287-0343. FREE w/code 5500. Call 800-210-1010.

C ON N EC TION S EC TIO N BW ADULT ENTERTAINMENT BUYER BEWARE Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services. ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+. SEEKING SEXY SINGLES? Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7583. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. READY FOR A HOT TIME? Find local singles & couples for hot encounters today. It’s free to join! Don’t waste your time looking at phony ads - this is the real deal. Meet a lady or man or couple today! Sign Up Free! www.mateysworld.com/horny.php

BW I SAW YOU HIGHLANDS HOLLOW You were at the bar Dec.10th. I, a few seats down - blonde long hair. You finished, but looked before leaving. A moment or my imagination? Let me know! MACK & CHARLIE’S X-MAS NITE You: X-ray vision superhero. We chatted about life, river rafting, rural Idaho & local real estate. I regret not getting your phone number.

BW I AM HERE IN LINE AT THE FLICKS My friend saw your ad and told me that it was exactly like my story. “Must be fate” she said, “you have to reply”. So if it is you, meet me at the Flicks one month to the day at the same time. Perhaps you will get my number & another discount?

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 5-11, 2011 | 37


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “A man may fulfill the object of his existence by asking a question he cannot answer and attempting a task he cannot achieve,” mused 19th century author Oliver Wendell Holmes Sr. Advice that wild could just as well have been dispensed by a feral saint living in a cave in the woods. And now I’m passing it on to you, Aries, just in time for the beginning of what may be your wildest year in a decade. In my astrological opinion, you are ready to be a connoisseur of mysteries that purify the mind and nurture the soul ... a daredevil of the spirit in quest of seemingly impossible dreams ... a fierce adept of the wisdom of uncertainty who’s in love with unpredictable teachings. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What confusing commotion would you like to walk away from and never come back to? What lessons have you learned so well that you’re overdue to graduate from them? What long-term healing process would you like to finish so you can finally get started on the building phase that your healing will give you the power to carry out? These are excellent questions to ask yourself as you plan your life in the next six months. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The Strait of Gibraltar is the narrow passage between Europe and Africa where the Mediterranean Sea joins the Atlantic Ocean. According to legend, in ancient times the Latin phrase “ne plus ultra” was inscribed in the rock overlooking this gateway. It meant “not further beyond” and served as a warning to sailors not to venture out to the wild waters past the strait. Eventually, that cautionary advice became irrelevant. With a sturdy vessel, skilled crew, good preparation and expert knowledge based on the experience of others, venturing out past the “ne plus ultra” point wasn’t dangerous. I hope you’ll take that as your cue in 2011, Gemini. CANCER (June 21-July 22): There were problems with the soccer balls used in the World Cup last year. Many players felt they were difficult to control and their trajectory was unpredictable. Brazilian forward Luis Fabiano went so far as to say that the ball “doesn’t want to be kicked.” Other players said the balls were poorly made, like those “you buy in a supermarket.” I bring this to your attention as a cautionary metaphor, Cancerian. In 2011 you will be taking part in your equivalent of the World Cup. It will be crucial to have the very best tools and accessories. You can’t afford to play with balls that don’t respond accurately to your skillful means.

38 | JANUARY 5–11, 2011 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Biological diversity refers to the variety of life forms in any particular area, while cultural diversity measures the richness of social forms of expression. Then there’s biocultural diversity, which measures both together. Can you guess the places on the planet where biocultural diversity is highest? They’re Indonesia, Malaysia, Melanesia, the Amazon Basin and Central Africa. I would love it if you had a chance to immerse yourself in environments like those in 2011, Leo. If you can’t manage that, find the next best thing. You will thrive by exposing yourself to a kaleidoscopic mix of human types and natural influences. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): When I started my rock band World Entertainment War, I was guided by a vision of us having two lead singers, me and another person. Ultimately I chose Darby Gould as my collaborator. While I have decent skills as a vocalist, her talent is geniuslevel. I knew that our work together would push me to be at the top of my game and allow me to write ambitious songs that I didn’t have the chops to sing by myself. I’ve always been pleased with how that strategy worked. Would you consider giving yourself a similar challenge in 2011, Virgo? It’ll be the Year of Collaboration for you. Why not put yourself in a position to transcend the limitations you have when operating solely under your own power? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Africa is cracking open in preparation for the birth of a new ocean. The whole process will take 10 million years, but the first sign occurred in 2005, when a 37-mile-long fissure appeared in Ethiopia. Eventually, say geologists, the rift will grow enormous and fill up with seawater. I expect a metaphorically comparable development for you in 2011, Libra: the subtle yet monumental beginning of a new “ocean” you’ll be enjoying and learning from and dealing with for many years to come. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 1967 the United States had 31,225 nuclear warheads. But by 2010 it had a mere 5,113. The world’s most militarized nation hopes to scale down to an even more modest 3,000 or so by 2021. In the coming year, Scorpio, I’d love to see you be inspired by that example to begin reducing your own levels of anger and combativeness. You don’t have to do away entirely with your ability to fight everyone who doesn’t agree with you and everything you don’t like; just cut back some. I’m sure that’ll still leave you with plenty of firepower.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “The heart is forever inexperienced,” said Henry David Thoreau. He believed our feeling nature is eternally innocent; that no matter how much we learn about life, sadness, lust, rage or joy hits us as hard the thousandth time as it did in the beginning. But is that really true? Over the years, haven’t you acquired wisdom about your reactive tendencies and hasn’t that transformed them? I disagree with Thoreau. I say that for the person who wants to cultivate emotional intelligence, the heart sure as hell better be capable of gaining experience. What do you think, Sagittarius? If you’re aligned with my view, 2011 will educate and ripen your heart as never before. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “We have to stumble through so much dirt and humbug before we reach home,” wrote novelist Herman Hesse. “And we have no one to guide us. Our only guide is homesickness.” That’s the bad news, Capricorn. The good news, according to my analysis, is that 2011 could very well be the year that your homesickness drives you all the way home. For best results, keep this tip in mind: To get the full benefit of the homesickness, you shouldn’t suppress it. Only by feeling it deeply, as a burning, grinding ache, will you be able to ride it all the way home. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the past, few dog shows allowed mutts to compete. Purebreds were prized above all others. That’s changing, though, now that the American Kennel Club has opened a new category just for mongrels. They won’t be judged by guidelines specific to a particular breed but rather according to their natural talents. This shift in standards mirrors a comparable development in your world, Aquarius. In 2011, it’ll be easier to find success simply by being your mottled, speckled, variegated self. There’ll be less pressure for you to live up to standards of perfection meant for the purebreds. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “All your longings know where to go,” writes poet Nick Piombino, “but you have to tell them to open their eyes.” That’s one of your big assignments in 2011, Pisces: to make sure your longings keep their eyes open. It’s not as easy as it might sound. Sometimes your longings get so entranced by obsessive fantasies—so distracted by the stories that are swirling around in your imagination—that they’re blind to what’s right in front of them. You must speak to your longings tenderly and patiently, as you would a beloved animal, coaxing them to trust that life will bring more interesting and useful blessings than anything fantasy could provide.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 19 Issue 28