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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 25 DECEMBER 15–21, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

IMPOVERISHED IN IDAHO A living wage is still out of reach for most Gem State workers FEATURE 11

POOR HEALTH The Department of Health and Welfare’s terrible year NOISE 20

IN THE THICK OF IT Langhorne Slim on the Internet and avoiding labels REC 26

BOUTIQUE SKIS Will personalized planks be the next big thing in skiing?

“I’m popular, but I ain’t famous.”

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreader: Annabel Armstrong, Heather Lile Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Andrew Crisp, Damon Hunzeker, David Kirkpatrick, Andrew Mentzer, Ted Rall, Carissa Wolf Intern: Aaron Lang ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Conner Coughlin, Derf, Mike Flinn, Julia Green, Jeremy Lanningham, Glenn Landberg, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE WE’RE RACING TO THE HOLIDAY BREAK If BW were a college experience, this week would be hell week. Without, unfortunately, a dead week preceding this period of furious work. Longtime readers might recall that BWHQ goes dark for a few days at the end of the year. Whether we like it or not, the bosslady kicks us all out of the office and forces us to find other activities to fill the hours we’d usually spend working our fingers diligently to the bone. This year, thanks to some ingenious scheduling on the part of the universe, we get more than a week. Noon on Wednesday, Dec. 22, is the last time you’ll likely get a human on our end of the phone until after the New Year. We will update boiseweekly.com, and since news will have the audacity to happen during our week off, we’ll have regular updates on our blogs. Exactly how we intend to accomplish that while “not working” on our forced vacation is utterly top secret but let’s just say that we know a band of elves with a bunch of extra time on their hands right around Boxing Day. If you’re one of the dozens of readers who submit events and live music listings for inclusion in our calendar sections, this is your last chance to tell us what you have going on through Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2011. In fact, the deadline was Dec. 14, but I’ll give you stragglers another day to get them in. E-mail calendar@boiseweekly.com before 5 p.m. on Wednesday, Dec. 15, for any event happening through Jan. 5, 2011. As always, inclusion of any listing in print is on a space-available basis, but thanks to the infinite nature of the web, we always try to get it all online. As for this next week, we’re busy putting out three issues at once. Be patient if you don’t hear back from us right away, and if it can wait until we return on Monday, Jan. 3, 2011, even better. Finally, I’d like to thank Mondo Gaga cartoonist Mike Flinn for his years as BW contributor. After many, many years of making us laugh—and sometimes, making us cringe and then laugh—Flinn’s “Mondo Gaga” will no longer appear in the pages of Boise Weekly. We wish him the best of luck in the future. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Onalee Bukovcik TITLE: Positive Spins for Art MEDIUM: Acrylic ARTIST STATEMENT: In good times and bad times, we artists keep creating because we must. Presently hanging at Art on the Creek Gallery in Caldwell.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. JU LIA GR EEN

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE BILL COPE TED RALL NEWS Most Idaho jobs aren’t making the living-wage mark

RED ROVER, RED ROVER, SEND THE NUKE PLANT ON OVER In last week’s News section we reported on Payette County P&Z’s overt enthusiasm about a proposed nuclear power plant in their back yard. Last week the commission made it official with a vote to green light the proposed facility.

THE QUEST CONTINUES Chapter 11 of the Quest for Karaoke continues at Terry’s State Street Saloon. You’ll never believe it, but the place with a go-to rep for karaoke doesn’t exactly wow the picky karaoke judge.

IDAHO HO HO Nope, it’s not a bad U-da-ho joke. It’s a compilation of holiday music from local bands—from indie rockers Faux Bois to honky-tonk legend Pinto Bennett—put out by Moxie Java. Proceeds benefit the Idaho Foodbank and each artist is playing a Moxie Java location in support of the album.

WHAT’S ARABIC FOR TOP GUN? Mountain Home Air Force Base has landed a deal that will help keep it off any base closure lists for the foreseeable future. Starting in 2013, with a serious ramp up in 2014, the base will host a squadron of F-15s from the Royal Saudi Air Force.

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What’s next for Qwest Arena? CITIZEN FEATURE Critical Condition BW PICKS FIND 8 DAYS OUT SUDOKU NOISE Langhorne Slim creates his own Americana MUSIC GUIDE SCREEN Jens Pulver: Driven REC Boutique ski makers open a world of customization PLAY Game night at All About Games FOOD Getting wacky at Wicky Wicky Sushi WINE SIPPER CLASSIFIEDS NYT CROSSWORD FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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OPINION/BILL COPE

AN EX-XIAN’S XMAS Part One: Faux la la la la

Holiday Bike Sale Dec. 15-17

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“So are we gonna swap presents this year, Cope, or ain’t we?” “Why now, Red? We’ve never done it before.” “Yeah, wull, I was athinking maybe we’ve done tightened up our inner-buddy relationship a considerable bit over the last year or two. What with all them enuncication lessons and grammar coaching and speech therapathics, we done spent a gob of time together, ain’t we? Sos that got me athinking, since we’re all close and snuggly now, maybe we ought to take a fresh looky-see at our traditional patterns when it comes to birthdays and Christmas and such. Sos you can probably see where that got me, athinking-wise, when it comes to whether we’re gonna swap presents or ain’t we.” “Our ‘traditional patterns?’ Red, I don’t believe I ever realized we had any ‘traditional patterns,’ you and me. I would have said our entire relationship amounted to you coming over here whenever you have something to bitch about and me bitching back.” “Cope, if’n you do something the same way over and over, it’s what they call a ‘pattern,’ ain’t that right? It’s like when my wife crochets them dangly Christmas tree doo-dads what’re shaped like Glenn Beck’s head. She can’t do that without a pattern, you know. If’n she didn’t follow the pattern on each one, them things would start looking like clumps of bacon fat on a string or something. And it’s the same way with how you and me relates to one another, don’t you see? If’n I come over here and don’t bitch, then you wouldn’t know what to make of it, and you’d probably get all discomboobylated and start twitching and flopping around like that robot feller in that scary alien movie, remember that? But I make sure ever’thing works out the same way as it’s supposed to by getting into a big whoopee-do with you whenever I show up. See? That’s the tradition what we done have between us, resulting from the pattern what is doing the same thing over an over. That ain’t too hard to follow, is it?” “I think so, Red. It’s all sort of like Christmas, huh? We keep doing it over and over … same crud, different year … because we wouldn’t know what to do with ourselves if we didn’t.” “You’re sorta forgetting something, ain’t ya’, Cope? Like, the reason for what the season is? Like, that little baby what grows up to be the End Times commandant-in-chief over the Rapture Marines what will whomp Satan’s keister in the War of Armaggideon, and what was born on that old holy night what’s coming up here in just 10 more shopping days? Ain’t you forgetting that?” “Bud, you’ve known me long enough to know I don’t believe in that stuff.” “Wull I knows you say you’re an atheist,

but even you gotta believe in the baby Jesus, don’t ya’? What about them wise Maggy fellers what were bearin’ that frankenstein and mirth? What do you suppose they were showing up for if’n there weren’t no baby Jesus when they got there? Why do you suppose ol’ Joseph stuck around if’n he weren’t purdy dang sure Mary’s conceptioning was one of them immaculate sorts? Why do you suppose all them donkeys and ducks and goats were gathered around that manger if’n there weren’t someone in it?” “Ducks?” “You heard me! Ducks!” “Calm down, pal. It’s just that this is the first I’ve ever heard about ducks being in the Nativity.” “Wull gull durnit, I don’t know about ever’ Nativity, but there’s ducks in the Nativity what’s set up out front of the church I goes to. Seems like last year when they were putting it all back in the storage shed, somebody dropped the plastic lamb and broke her little head off. Sos this year, they threw in some mallard decoys to balance it out. There’s a big ol’ Canadian honker, too, carved totally out of styrofoam.” “Red, let’s not argue. If you want to believe that stuff, fine. Just don’t waste my time and yours trying to convince me there’s much of anything to Christmas beyond the commercial bullshit and phony sentiments.” “Phony sentiments? Cope, you done gone too far! My gull durned sentiments ain’t phony! My sentiments are as real as the Frosty balloon what’s set up in my yard. He makes my kids so dang happy, they cain’t hardly wait ’til I pump up the Red-Nosed Reindeer to go next to him. Them are real, Cope! Rudolph, Frosty, Santa, Snoopy! They might not be real in the way we think of real things being, but they all come together this time of year to make kids happy and dump some joy around and ...” “OK, OK, Red, I apologize. I didn’t mean to say your sentiments are phony. I know how sincere your sentiments are, and I sure as heck didn’t mean to dis Frosty and Rudolph. And believe me, I love a good joy dump as much as the next guy. Maybe more. But you don’t have to buy into the whole religious package to want some joy to the world and a little peace on Earth.” “Hypocrite! You don’t want nothing to do with what makes Christmas so holy and rejoicy and such. But then you wanna a share in all the goodies what comes with it. Pick your side, Cope! You cain’t not believe in the sweet cake o’ Jesus, then eat it, too!” (Join Red and me next week as we crack the tough nut of how an atheist can reject the holy rejoiciness of Xmas and still want a piece of all that jolly cheer.) WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


TED RALL/OPINION

THE DEVILS WE KNOW

Cables reveal background of pro-dictator America NEW YORK—After the Soviet collapse, U.S. policy toward Central Asia was cynical: Support the dictators, screw the people. As the United States stood by and watched, corrupt autocrats looted the former Soviet republics of Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan and Tajikistan. Dissidents were jailed, massacred—even boiled. Well, actually, the United States was anything but passive. They negotiated deals for oil and gas pipelines, rented air bases after 9/11, poured in tens of millions of tax dollars—all of which wound up in secret bank accounts of dictators and their families. Meanwhile, average citizens lived in abject poverty. Central Asia only had one democratically elected president, Askar Akayev of Kyrgyzstan. George W. Bush ordered the CIA to depose him in a coup. Americans who care about human rights have wondered: Is the U.S. State Department stupid or naive? Did the diplomats in Tashkent and other capitals of misery understand the brutal, vile nature of authoritarian leaders? In the WikiLeaks cables, Turkmenistan President Gurbanguly Berdimuhamedov, a U.S. “ally in the war on terror” who seized power in a coup following the death of Saparmurat “Turkmenbashi” Niyazov, is described as “the ‘decider’ for the state of Turkmenistan.” This is true. Turkmenistan is a dictatorship in which millions starve while Berdimuhamedov’s inner circle feasts on profits from the world’s largest reserves of natural gas. According to an unnamed source, the outwardly conservative dictator has a mistress, with whom he has a daughter. Though Berdy’s power may be limitless, his intellect is not.

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“Berdimuhamedov does not like people who are smarter than he is,” says the cable. “Since he’s not a very bright guy, our source offered, he is suspicious of a lot of people.” In Kazakhstan, President Nursultan Nazarbayev presides over the world’s largest oil reserves with an iron fist. Among his greatest hits: the convenient “suicides” of his top two political opponents a few months before a presidential election. The men apparently shot themselves in the back of the head, then bound their own hands behind their backs and dropped into a ditch outside Almaty. “In 2007, President Nazarbayev’s sonin-law, Timur Kulibayev, celebrated his 41st birthday in grand style,” explains an April 2008 cable. “He hosted a private concert with some of Russia’s biggest pop stars. The headliner, however, was Elton John, to whom he reportedly paid 1 million pounds for this one-time appearance.” Where did he get the money? “Timur Kulibayev is currently the favored presidential son-in-law, on the Forbes 500 list of billionaires [as is his wife, separately] and the ultimate controller of 90 percent of the economy of Kazakhstan,” states a January 2010 missive. Interestingly, Central Asia’s overlords have a dismal view of corruption in the U.S. government. “Listen, almost everyone at the top [of the Kazakh regime] is confused,” First Vice President Maksat Idenov told the U.S. ambassador to Kazakhstan early this year. “They’re confused by the corrupt excesses of capitalism. ‘If Goldman Sachs executives can make $50 million a year and then run America’s economy in Washington, what’s so different about what we do?’ they ask.”

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CITYDESK/NEWS JUMP APPROVED BY P&Z For a volunteer city commission, Planning and Zoning has dominated the headlines of late. Last week, commissioners green-lighted the long-stalled 5.66-acre Whole Foods development. And on Dec. 13, in front of a packed audience, P&Z unanimously overturned Design Review’s Oct. 13, 4-3 vote denying Jack’s Urban Meeting Place. The J.R. Simplot Foundation—which wants to drop $70 million on a 7-acre, eightstory educational and cultural development with above and underground parking—appealed the committee’s decision to P&Z, alleging that the committee had overstepped its authority, among other things. “The commission can reverse the decision of the committee. The commission can retain jurisdiction over this project,” said JoAnn Butler, speaking on behalf of the Simplot Foundation. Though city planning staff recommended approving the project in September with conditions, Design Review denied JUMP in mid-October. The committee cited concerns about the building’s elevated parking structure, which includes visible spray-on fireproofing, the project’s vague landscaping plan and general worries about the building’s architectural design and color scheme. “The design is overly aggressive and overly complicated and the disparate components distract from its function,” said Committee Member Elizabeth Wolf at the Sept. 29 meeting. But the Simplot Foundation urged P&Z to take another look at the memorial project, which will include an amphitheater, meeting rooms, a rooftop sculpture garden, multistory slides and artists’ studio spaces. “JUMP is definitely a departure in architectural style,” explained Butler. “It does not attempt to mimic existing buildings.” Jon Swarthout, founder of the children’s arts center TRICA, urged the commission not to be afraid of “fantastical design.” “We’re being given a gift in a package wrapped with a bow on top of it, completely funded by the Simplot Family Foundation and that is worth so much,” Swarthout said as the room erupted in applause. To counter Design Review’s arguments that JUMP is merely a parking garage without substantial retail or mixed-use components, the Simplot Foundation dropped a familiar line: future phases. All aspects of the project—from the 26-foot-tall ceilings to the ramp-less, column-less, above-ground steel parking structure design—allow for future development. “The flexibility is in place to convert spaces within these areas ... they’re designed to be retrofitted, converted to office, retail, whatever is required that the market demands later,” said Butler. Ultimately, commissioner Brandy Wilson motioned to overturn the Design Review committee’s decision on a technicality. “When they started talking about floorarea ratio ... that overstepped the bounds of their authority,” said Wilson. Wilson’s motion—which also recommended adopting the staff’s previous conditions of approval with some exceptions— was unanimously approved. Applause, once again, echoed through the room. Construction on JUMP could begin as early as next summer. —Tara Morgan

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NEWS

LIVING LOW Study finds paychecks don’t add up for Idaho’s working families

BY CARISSA WOLF

How does your paycheck look? Do you earn at least $27 per hour? If you’re the breadwinner in the family and you don’t meet that mark, you’re earning less than a living wage. And you’ve got plenty of company. A wage report released Dec. 9 by the Alliance for a Just Society looked at what it takes to earn a decent living in Idaho’s economy. The 2010 Northwest Job Gap study found that Idaho wages often don’t meet family needs and many workers struggle to find employment that pays a living wage. A two-income household with two children must earn a combined $36.24 per hour to take home a living wage while a single parent needs to earn at least $26.44 per hour. A single person must make at least $14.25 per hour to earn a living wage—or at least a salary that covers basic needs like health care or savings for emergencies without public assistance. Of current job openings in Idaho, 88 percent pay less than a living wage for a family of three to four. Salima Gahigiro of Boise stands as one of thousands of Idahoans whose wages don’t meet her family’s needs. The Tanzanian immigrant serves as the sole breadwinner for her four children and grandchild. The bread comes from Gahigiro’s $7.25 per-hour work as a hotel housekeeper, but it’s not enough to keep the family fed the entire month. And it’s not enough to spare her from the constant psychological stress of economic uncertainty. “I haven’t been able to pay rent in two months. Yesterday my landlord gave us a three-day eviction notice. I ignored the notice, but I don’t know what we are going to do. We are facing homelessness,” Gahigiro told Job Gap researchers. “The financial stress is very hard on my family. I don’t think it is psychologically healthy for them.” The report’s authors note that the harm

done to those working in low-wage jobs is enough to warrant an effective response from policy-makers. Leo Morales, policy director with the Idaho Community Action Network—an economic justice advocacy organization—called on lawmakers to address low wages through policy measures including support for living wage job growth, affordable housing and health-care reforms.

Political Economy Research Institute, found that boosting wages doesn’t necessarily come at great expense to businesses, nor does it lead to job loss. Luce said higher wages could cost businesses an additional 1 percent of their operating costs, but offer significant and immediate improvements in the lives of cash-strapped workers. The Job Gap study notes that the failure

I HAV E N’ T BEEN AB LE TO PAY R ENT IN TWO MONTHS . YES TER DAY MY LANDLOR D GAV E U S A THREE-DAY EVIC TION NOTIC E. I I GNORE D THE N OTIC E B UT I DON’T K NOW WHAT WE A RE GOING TO DO. WE AR E FAC ING HOME LE SSNE SS .” —S a lima Ga h igir o Some communities aim to boost earnings by adopting living wage mandates. About 140 laws across the country ensure that workers—mostly public employees and government contractors—earn a living wage. The City of Moscow adopted Idaho’s first living wage ordinance in 2006 but not all proposals meet a welcoming response. Proposed measures often face objection from business owners who fear wage ordinances would force lay-offs and redden their bottom line. Other opponents see wage mandates as a political manipulation of market forces. But economic justice advocates and scholars have found positive effects of living wage laws that boost the economy and the immediate well-being of individuals and families. Stephanie Luce, a sociologist with the

of many jobs to pay a living wage is not a new phenomenon, but part of a larger trend toward income inequality that preceded the economy’s collapse. “From 2001 to 2007, two-thirds of the income generated by the economy was absorbed by the top 1 percent of households in the country,” Job Gap authors wrote. “In 2007, this top 1 percent also accounted for the greatest share of income since 1928.” Economic justice advocates note that while the Idaho job openings that offer families a living wage are few and far between, U.S. corporations closed a record third quarter, raking in profits of $1.66 trillion. “Companies continue to make quite a bit of profit,” Morales said. “It’s quite a contrast to what working families are facing now.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS

CONVENTION KERFUFFLE The future of Boise’s convention business unclear ANDREW CRISP The Greater Boise Auditorium District wants more space, but just where that space will be, what form it will take and how it will be paid for remain sticking points in the grand plans. From building an entirely new facility, revamping the existing Boise Centre or even tearing down Qwest Arena to put a bigger, better facility in its place, an array of options are on the table, but the group behind them is facing some serious hurdles and opposition. The motivation behind the issue is relatively simple: GBAD wants to attract what it considers top-tier conventions, something that the roughly 7,000-square-foot Boise Centre can’t do. The district wants to create an 85,000-square-foot facility, either by building on a new site between 11th and 13th streets or by adding on to Boise Centre. The most controversial of the options involves razing Qwest Arena and building a state-of-the-art facility. That option hasn’t met with much support. “The district never, of its own initiative, sought to purchase the Qwest Arena ... the arena has never made money for its investors,” said GBAD Board Chairman Stephenson Youngerman at a Dec. 13 meeting. He paraphrased the investors of Block 22, who own the Qwest Arena: “Our problem isn’t that we’re going to lose $500,000 this year ... but we’re going to lose $500,000 year after year after year.” Still, Youngerman threw his support behind the most ambitious option. “The proposal to renovate this building has my approval, and I think we should get started,” he said before introducing architect Neil Hosford to break down the possible Qwest Arena options. That feeling wasn’t necessarily shared by his fellow board members. “We’re getting the cart before the horse,” responded board member Gail May. Youngerman clarified by adding that by knowing the options, they could better approach the forthcoming report by George Illis and Collier’s International on the possibility of GBAD buying Qwest Arena. Hosford outlined two building options, each with multiple pieces. Option A calls for transforming Qwest Arena into a convention space. Option B would see the arena torn down for a new facility. Both face physical hurdles due largely to the fact that the floor is sunk 10 feet below grade for the ice rink, which doesn’t leave much room for service area loading and unloading. A new facility would need an entirely new foundation—the two story parking garage beneath can’t support more weight. The board wants to look into the arena’s options, and Youngerman suggests it could take an extra $10,000 to hammer out the details. Before pulling the trigger, though, the board will wait for the Illis report in January WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

2011 to make a decision. But beyond mapping a future for Boise’s convention industry, GBAD is still being dogged by the specter of the Boise Convention and Visitors Bureau. Earlier this summer, after supposed budget concerns and an Idaho Supreme Court decision involving a similar auditorium district in Pocatello, GBAD announced it would cut BCVB’s $1.3 million operating budget, shutting down the group responsible for marketing the city to the country. The bureau recently received a grant for more than $400,000 from the Idaho Travel Council, but since it doesn’t provide for salaries, the staff is working pro-bono. A GBAD working group recently finished a report looking into the district’s relationship with BCVB. “Boise Centre can only pay for activities relating to Boise Centre,” said Stephanie Astorquia. The analysis found that using GBAD funds to promote other businesses was unconstitutional, echoing the Supreme Court’s decision. While GBAD might want to retain the staff of BCVB, it looks like there’s no legal way to do so, short of a specific proposal. “The district will certainly leave the light on for engaging in the bureau’s activities,” she said. Astorquia also outlined the failed effort to contact the United States Chamber of Commerce, which GBAD saw as a way to funnel the money to BCVB to keep the bureau alive to promote the Boise Centre as well as the other venues. “The Department of Commerce, as a matter of policy, precedent or interpretation, does not want to work with the district,” said Astorquia. GBAD Board Member Mike Fitzgerald asked if a different entity could be used to channel money—including the City of Boise or the Idaho Chamber of Commerce—but Karen Ballard, administrator of the Idaho Division of Tourism, stepped in to clarify that the Idaho Chamber has legislative limits on how much it can spend, and that trusting the money to them might be “risky.” Lobbyist and lawyer Michael Kane spoke on behalf of the Pocatello-Chubbuck Auditorium District, the group whose court case set the BCVB-GBAD debacle in motion. Kane offered what sounded like a solution to BCVB’s problems: a bill allowing for a definition of advertising by an entity like GBAD, as well as allowing auditorium districts to contract with an Idaho Travel Grant-funded entity without having to go through a bidding process. While it’s too soon to do much with, GBAD board members will look at the proposal at the group’s January meeting. “Your sister district is asking for your support on this bill,” Kane closed.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 9


CITIZEN

STROBE TALBOTT Climate change and the loss of American hegemony MARCIA FRANKLIN

With everything that’s been written about climate change, why did you want to add your voice and a sense of urgency to it? Because nowhere near enough is being done about it. This is unlike anything we’ve ever had to deal with. It definitely, definitely threatens the human enterprise as we now know it. And it requires near-term action by the United States of America, and our government is kind of dead in the water on the issue.

a journalist into a diplomat, I felt a little bit like Chevy Chase or Dan Aykroyd or Bill Murray in an out-of-body movie. My first reaction was, “Oh my God, I’m not prepared for this.” In fact, journalism had prepared me in a number of ways. And one was that it had taught me to listen carefully to other people and to understand positions before I took a position on them, which I think is an important part of being a diplomat. People are worried about losing American hegemony. Well, we’ve already lost American hegemony ... and I think that’s actually an illusion that we should lose. We are the most powerful state, not only in the world, but in history. But that’s different from saying we are the boss of the world. Absolute sovereignty is an illusion. Our borders are porous. Money can move around the world in an un-moderated way. Pathogens, germs, move around the world. Weather, climate, doesn’t respect national boundaries. So what happens in other parts of the world influences our lives. What happens in this country affects people in other parts of the world.

When you look back on your time in the Clinton administration, do you have Dialogue’s full interview with Talbott any regrets? airs Thursday, Dec. 16, at 8:30 p.m. on You are in charge I have some regrets IdahoPTV, repeating Sunday, Dec. 19, of Brookings. Some about Russia. I wish at 5:30 p.m. call it left-leaning, othwe had used our More information at idahoptv.org. ers centrist. influence and our We call it indepenresources better and dent. The word we use is nonpartisan rather earlier to help head off the degree of corrupthan bipartisan. Bipartisan suggests that truth tion that accompanied the opening up of the and wisdom reside either in the Republican former Soviet Union. Party or in the Democratic Party. Our view is “Well, not necessarily.” Good ideas, sound How did you transition from being a jourideas ... often come from outside either of nalist to being a diplomat? the parties. Really good discussion produces When I was transformed overnight from

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JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Diplomat, journalist, author. Strobe Talbott has not only written about foreign policy, he’s helped shape it. Talbott was a recent lecturer at the Sun Valley Writers’ Conference and is the guest for the Thursday, Dec. 16, edition of Dialogue on Idaho Public Television. Talbott, the current president of the Brookings Institution, was a longtime journalist for Time magazine and deputy secretary of state for the Clinton administration, specializing in U.S.Russia relations. The author of a dozen books, Talbott’s latest work, Fast Forward, examines what he views as the dire need for political action to mitigate global climate change.

really good ideas, and really good discussion involves civility of discourse and listening to the other person and looking for ways to find common ground. You have an offshoot called Brookings Mountain West in Las Vegas. We’re very proud of it. This is a part of the country that represents some bad news that we have to deal with, and some good news that we have to encourage. The bad news is largely economic and also environmental. But the other thing that is going on is that there is more cooperation among cities and communities within the Intermountain West region, and that is, we think, a model for the way this country is increasingly going to govern itself. How are you feeling about the era in which we are living? I’m an inveterate optimist. That said, my optimism is in a kind of a delicate balance with my concern, particularly about the issue of climate change. One of the poignancies and urgencies of the current moment is that your generation, my generation—the same generation—is the first generation really to know that we do live in an era when, for man-made reasons, the climate is changing in potentially dangerous ways. And we’re the last generation that can really do something about it. That puts a huge responsibility on us.

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HEALTH AND WELFARE’S ANNUS HORRIBILIS BY GEORGE PRENTICE

IN CLUD ES MED ICA ID REQ UEST

$ 1, 9 0 2, 47 2, 20 0 (A PPRO XIMATELY 6 4 PERCEN T F ED ERA LLY F UN D ED )

M ED I CA I D EN RO LLM EN T IN IDAHO 20 1 0 : 21 0 ,0 1 4 (9 .5 PERCEN T IN CREA SE SIN CE 20 0 9 ) 20 1 1 : 226 ,0 73 (7.6 PERCEN T IN CREA SE SIN CE 20 1 0 ) 74 PERCEN T O F A LL MED ICA ID RECIPIEN TS IN ID A H O A RE CH ILD REN AVERA GE CH ILD CO ST: $ 1 6 8/ MO N TH O TH ER RECIPIEN TS IN CLUD E A GED , BLIN D , D ISA BLED

calendar, on which 2012 will start Oct. 1, 2011. Each date triggers its own budget, deadlines and challenges. In our review of calendar year 2010, which at times Armstrong described as “awful,” we began with the early days of January when he walked up State Street to the Capitol with some sobering news. BW: In January you announced limited office hours and furloughs. You proposed a $2.1 billion budget, but you had to know you weren’t going to get that. Did you have a sense for how much worse things could be? Armstrong: Furloughs may be an effective short-term tool, but they’re very disruptive when you try to figure out how you’re going to manage your work. And the work was going way up because the recession was continuing to deepen and we hadn’t hit bottom yet. So we knew that free fall would continue for a while. But you weren’t saying that publicly. Well, I can tell you as a management team we were talking about it privately. We didn’t know what the legislature would do, but we did know that it would be substantive reductions. n March 4, 2010, the legislature’s budget writers—the Joint Finance Appropriations Committee—approved

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LA URIE PE ARMA N

ou can’t get any higher than Dick Armstrong at Idaho’s Department of Health and Welfare, literally or figuratively. The elevator on his floor has no up button. His 10th-floor State Street office looks out on downtown Boise and the nearby Foothills. But when BW sat down with Armstrong for a wide-ranging interview on Dec. 7, a thick fog had settled over the Treasure Valley. The backdrop was surreal for an examination of, by many accounts, the most difficult year in the agency’s history, from severe budget cuts to layoffs to shuttering offices to a Medicaid crisis. We asked Armstrong to cut through the misunderstanding and misinformation. When 2010 was just days old, Armstrong warned lawmakers that his agency had drained operating costs and could “no longer guarantee changes would result in good public policy.” Over the course of the next 12 months not only did his prediction of dire cuts come true, but a series of high-impact challenges arose, each more complicated than the one before. Idaho’s Department of Health and Welfare is getting smaller. In the wake of furloughs and layoffs and a shrinking budget, workers in every division across the agency worked fewer hours in 2010 yet continued to serve more clients than ever before. From Medicaid to child protection, from adult mental health to childhood immunizations, the numbers continued to rise. Idaho’s food assistance, for example, now leads the nation in growth of participation—a 41 percent increase in the last 10 years. Participation has doubled since 2007. Though 2010 is coming to a close, Armstrong and his colleagues keep their eye on at least three calendars. The traditional calendar most of us live by begins in January, which is when Armstrong’s boss, Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter gives his State of the State Address. Then there’s Idaho’s fiscal year calendar, on which 2012 will begin on July 1, 2011. And finally, the federal fiscal year

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FISCAL YEAR 2012 DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND WELFARE REQUEST

CRITICAL CONDITION

$ 2, 359 , 6 14, 50 0

Dick Armstrong has a daunting task as the head of the state’s Department of Health and Welfare.

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 11


JANUARY 2010

MARCH 2010

APRIL 2010

MAY 2010

Armstrong submits $2.1 billion budget request (66 percent from federal matching dollars).

JFAC trims $47 million from Medicaid, in effect trimming $191 million.

Health and Welfare announces a 4 percent cut in workforce, closes nine offices.

Health and Welfare tells Medicaid providers that payments will be delayed but to expect money in July.

a Medicaid budget of $1.55 billion, trimming about $47 million. Providers like the Cystic Fibrosis Center of Idaho were victims of major cuts. “This will probably end up costing the county, the state and Medicaid a lot more in the long run,” said Dr. Perry Brown at the time. “Quite simply, patients will end up having more difficulty accessing preventative care.” BW: How dramatic of an impact did cutting state funds have on federal matching funds for Medicaid? Armstrong: In order for us to pull that money down from the federal government, we have to put up our portion. The good news is that we had gone from a 69 percent federal match all the way up to about 79 percent because of extra stimulus funds. So that helped us for fiscal year 2011. But that’s going away. It’s going away pretty rapidly. We’re dropping down from 79 percent to about 68 percent in July of 2011. It’s a real dilemma, 10 percent is a lot of money. Are we talking about millions? Actually, it’s about $140-$150 million. So what are your options? Under current state statute, we can pull down some extra funds from Idaho hospitals and nursing homes in the form of an irrevocable fee. But isn’t that a tax?

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In effect, yes. It can’t be voluntary. It has to be a legal, irrevocable assessment. You see, if we can get some extra monies from hospitals and nursing homes, we can leverage the funds to pull down more federal matching monies. The only other alternative would be to reduce the reimbursement rates to providers. But that’s a lose-lose proposition because everybody would lose money. We’re pretty happy that the hospital and nursing home industries stepped forward. Between the two of them we were able to raise $35 million, which we could use to pull down more federal money. Is this a formula you’re inclined to revisit? We only have the legal authority to assess hospitals and nursing homes. .S. Eliot called April the cruelest month, quite appropriate for April 2010. Armstrong announced the department would cut 4 percent of its work force (126 employees) and close nine of its 29 offices.

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BW: Were the layoffs inevitable? Armstrong: We weren’t talking about letting people go who were not good performers. It became an issue of how we could consolidate services so that citizens of Idaho would have access to the services they need. How did you decide which offices to close? We had to consider things like travel time to the nearest office and which services each

office provided. In some instances, we decided to station an employee in the community but not have an office there. That’s what we did in McCall, for example. Are there other offices that could be closed? Well, our list was more than nine when we went through it initially. We’re not expecting to close any other offices. How many offices were evaluated? Twenty. At the same time, you were experiencing record-high applications for food stamps. We knew there was a pent-up demand out there. We have a very proud and independent culture in Idaho. We always knew that there were more people who qualified for food assistance yet weren’t accessing services. But the recession deepened, and dualwage earners became single-wage earners. More people said, “I can’t do this anymore,” and now they’ve been asking for help at a record pace. Our food stamp participation growth-rate is now at 41 percent. We’re the highest in the nation. Currently, we have more than 200,000 Idahoans accessing food assistance. And let me tell you, this food stamp growth rate is the early warning system. This is the canary in the coal mine. Because it reacts quickly to economic changes. So what might be correlated to this growth? Child protection for one. In the last quarter, our number of child-protection cases have started going up again. And that’s a function of

poverty. As households lose resources, adults don’t always cope with that stress effectively and the children become an unintended victim. Are your social workers stressed out? Absolutely. Our turnover rate is unsustainable. We’re losing our front-line social workers. Today, in fact, I just got a report that shows that social work is the No. 1 category in the state for turnover. It’s a 31 percent turnover rate right now. n May 2010 Idaho hospitals and nursing homes were told that any Medicaid reimbursements wouldn’t be coming for up to three months. The state’s Medicaid fund had simply run out of money. Smaller providers such as physicians, nurse practitioners, therapists and counselors were told in June that they wouldn’t be paid for three months, but they would receive their funding in early July. Concurrently Molina Health Systems had acquired an information management system from Unisys, taking over management of Idaho’s Medicaid reimbursement program.

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BW: When did you first have an inkling that something wasn’t right with the Medicaid reimbursement system? Armstrong: Actually in June we started seeing a major decline in reimbursement claims. But we had already told hospitals and other providers: “We can’t even pay your claims, so don’t even send them to us right now.” Needless to say, we

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JULY 2010

AUGUST 2010

SEPTEMBER 2010

JANUARY 2011

Providers not paid. Health and Welfare says “system is working.”

Medicaid problem “massive, pervasive and fundamental.”

Health and Welfare agrees to seek independent review of its action in Robert Manwill case.

Idaho legislature convenes.

were a bit anxious. But that smaller issue actually masked the reality that there was something larger wrong with the transition of the system management. Is it fair to say that Molina wasn’t ready? That’s absolutely fair to say. There was a combination of factors. Unisys was coming out, Molina was coming in, and then we had the delay in funding on top of that. It was a collision of forces. As I now look back, Unisys was inadequately staffed to begin with, so Molina actually inherited an understaffed and undertrained workforce. Did you do as much due diligence on this change as you should have? In hindsight, I would have kept the old claims on the old system, and the claims that we held up could have been paid out of the old system. That wouldn’t have burdened the new system with the old claims. Was that even possible to do? I don’t know. It’s all hindsight. But I can tell you looking back, that’s exactly what I would have done because that way we would have had purity between the two systems, and we could have paid those claims in early July. n spite of an official statement from Health and Welfare that all payments should be sent by July 9, providers across the state were reporting empty bank accounts. Many caregivers told BW that they tried calling Molina, spending hours on the phone only to get recorded messages. When BW asked Health and Welfare for a statement, we were told the “system is working.” But according to clients, it wasn’t. “If we hadn’t dipped into our own personal reserves, we would have had to close our doors,” said Kathy Tidwell owner of Tidwell Social Work in Boise. On Aug. 3, the Idaho Medical Association called the Medicaid problem “massive, pervasive and fundamental.” IMA CEO Susie Pouliot told BW thousands of her organization’s members “experienced a major cash flow issue.” Dr. J. Mario Molina, president of Molina, flew to Idaho to offer a public mea-culpa while standing next to Otter and Armstrong. “I’m not here to make excuses,” said Molina. “I want to apologize to providers and to the State of Idaho.” But that same week, Molina reported

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I T ’ S A CHI LD: 7 4 P E RCE NT OF A LL M E DI CA I D CLI E NTS A RE CHI LDRE N. I T ’S A L M O ST A LWAY S A CHI LD. ”

premium revenue of $977 million—6 percent more than the previous year—and an overall operating income profit margin of approximately 24 percent. BW: For a company that talks about millions in profits, why didn’t Idaho slap them with a fine? Armstrong: I can tell you that Idaho has served them notice of cure. In other words, under the contractual structure that we have, we’ve put them on legal notice that they’ve failed to meet the contract benchmarks. We’re going to go through the legal process of determining damage to the State of Idaho. It’s now a matter of demonstrating the injury and how much that’s worth. Where are you with that process? It’s active right now. But there’s a more immediate reality. I can tell you that we haven’t paid them for their services. For how long? We haven’t paid them since June. And I’m not going to pay them until we’re satisfied. Is that hundreds of thousands of dollars? It’s millions of dollars. It’s probably now approaching $10 million. That’s real money. How close are you to fixing the problems? We identified 18 defects. They’ve solved half of them. The others are to be solved by the end of this year. This is an automated claims processing system which, when it’s working well, doesn’t require a lot of human intervention. But when it’s not working well, you have a whole lot of people manually trying to fix transactions. Back in July and August, how difficult were your days? It was awful. We were flooded with calls ringing off the hook. Everything got focused into crisis management.

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n September, Ada County prosecutors were readying their case against Melissa Jenkins

and Daniel Ehrlick, who were charged with the abuse and murder of Jenkins’ 8-year-old son Robert Manwill in July 2009. At the same time, Robert Fellmeth, a law professor who directs the Children’s Advocacy Institute at the University of San Diego Law School, said Idaho’s Department of Health and Welfare could have done a better job to protect Manwill. Soon thereafter, the department announced it would seek an independent outside review. “Forget about hindsight,” said Fellmeth about Health and Welfare. “I’m sorry. They weren’t doing their job.” BW: What prompted you to order an outside review? Armstrong: There is something called a Keeping Children Safe Panel Process that we use. It’s a community review of all of the facts. The panel publishes recommendations but nothing about the case. So an internal review was done? Yes. It’s not just a review of what the department did but also a review of what law enforcement did. It included anything surrounding the case. Because this is a criminal trial, there will be other facts coming out, so we’re going to wait until then for the outside review. Because there’s no other way for us to get access to some of those criminal files. But do you want to wait that long? We have no choice. For us to convene a panel prior to the trial could jeopardize the legal proceedings. Have any of the lessons learned resulted in changes of how the department acts? We’ve already implemented them. Can you tell us about any of them? No, I can’t do that yet. Even with internal reviews we have to be careful not to taint a possible witness.

n Jan. 10, 2011, Otter will deliver his State of the State address. That will launch a 2011 legislative session expected to be more fiscally conservative than 2010. On Jan. 17, 2011, Armstrong is scheduled to once more make the trek to the Capitol and ask lawmakers to fund his already-lean agency.

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BW: So how bleak will your message be? Armstrong: It’s going to be extremely difficult. While the State of Idaho has been careful about how we use our rainy day funds and other one-time revenues, this will be the third year of us trying to stretch that money. What we don’t know are the revenue forecasts. Will the list of revenues be shorter for 2012? Absolutely. What we’ll have to do then is prepare for any further reductions that will have to take place. Once cuts are announced, we’ll have to put a plan together to achieve those savings. But getting there will be a whole new ball game. Isn’t Medicaid in the red right now? We’re forecasting to be short about $42 million. Can you put a face to Medicaid? It’s a child: 74 percent of all Medicaid clients are children. It’s almost always a child. And quite often, there’s a disability. So we have children’s mental health benefits available. t the end of the interview, BW took note of a framed cartoon on Armstrong’s desk. In it, two deer stand upright. On the belly of one deer is a big, red bulls-eye. “Bummer of a birthmark there,” says the other deer. “It kind of depicts the impossible situation that we’re in,” said Armstrong. “Everything we deal with is highly charged with emotion. I’m having more difficulty with this job than I had years ago. This recession has made it more difficult. On every front we’re being challenged to deliver more services and have fewer employees. Our budget is down 19 percent from what it was in 2008. This is a very finite game. There’s only so much money. If we’re not careful, we’ll push people into the Department of Correction. Well, their budget is no better than ours.”

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BOISE ART MUSEUM

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Boise Bicycle Project knows how to pimp a ride.

SATURDAY DEC. 18

Philip Govedare, Flood, oil on canvas, 59” x 55”, 2009

trikes CHRISTMAS KIDS’ BIKE GIVEAWAY It seems like every warm and gooey holiday commercial features some version of the following scenario: a kid clomps downstairs to find a brand-new bicycle glistening under the tree with a bow stuck to the handlebars. But that’s only on television. Many parents in the Treasure Valley can’t afford to give their kids that oh-so-classic holiday moment. And for the last four years, Boise Bicycle Project has done something about it. In the months leading up to BBP’s annual Christmas Kids’ Bike Giveaway, an army of BBP volunteers spend hours repairing bikes, screwing on training wheels and attaching streamers to donated kids’ bicycles. Last year alone, BBP gave away 150 bicycles, and this year they plan to give away even more on Saturday, Dec. 18, from 9 a.m.-4 p.m. BBP is also searching for volunteers to work the giveaway—teaching bicycle safety, fitting helmets and snacking on cookies and candy galore. Two optional volunteer-training courses are offered, one on Wednesday, Dec. 15, from 6-8 p.m. and another on Saturday, Dec. 18, at 8 a.m. BBP is also looking for a few baking whizzes—“cookie mom-sters”—to whip up some holiday treats for the youngsters and volunteers to snack on. They’re also seeking training wheel donations. 9 a.m.-4 p.m., FREE. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 S. Lusk St., 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

SATURDAY DEC. 18 camp ELVIS CHRISTMAS SHOW It’s that magical time of year, when we let ourselves believe in the spirit of Christmas—that a jolly fat man leads a merry band of elves and leaves gifts and goodies for us while we’re sleeping.

And that Elvis is alive. Wait a sec. Don’t buy it? Get your merry self to the Nampa Civic Center on Saturday, Dec. 18, for the Elvis Christmas Show. Though it’s not the actual Elvis (aliens got him, remember?), Boise’s own Stacey Wayne comes damn close and is considered one of the country’s top Elvis impersonators. He’s got the slicked-back pompadour, the hip-swiveling dance moves and a voice that causes girls to swoon.

14 | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Elvis’ favorite Christmas song was “Blue Christmas,” and chances are pretty good that unless you’ve been living under a (jailhouse) rock for the past 50 years, you’ve heard it a gazillion times and have mentally added it to your own list of Christmas classic faves. Guess we’ll soon find out if it’s one of Wayne’s favorites, too. 7 p.m., $15. Nampa Civic Center, 208-468-5500, nampaciviccenter.com.

SATURDAY DEC. 18 art CRITICAL MESSAGES Many things have been said about the environment. Talk of climate change, threats posed to ecosystems by water contamination, the increasing rates of asthma and heart disease from air pollution, soil quality degradation and more. There have even been questions raised about shipping giant oil rigs down winding, narrow rural highways during winter weather. Sometimes it seems that there are so many discussions that people are drowning in them—meaning precious little information sinks in and makes a difference. So maybe it’s time to try something different: something with fewer words. And no, not Twitter. “Contemporary Northwest Artists on the Environment,” the new exhibition opening at Boise Art Museum, showcases how regional artists are responding to environmental issues in their work. Those issues include growth management, waste management (on both land and sea), mass production/consumption, transportation, preservation of wilderness and wetlands, biodiversity, climate change and energy. William Dietrich, a Pulitzer Prize-winning science reporter for the Seattle Times who teaches environmental journalism at Western Washington University, wrote the words that accompany the exhibit. “Technological cleverness has outrun stewardship wisdom,” Dietrich told crosscut.com in an interview about the exhibition. “And we look to artists to help us make sense of our handiwork and folly as they contemplate the most dramatic ecological change the planet has experienced since the end of the last Ice Age.” Pieces in the exhibit range from paintings of oil slicks and vultures with lobster beaks to a cedar stump made entirely from recycled cardboard. The exhibit was organized and first shown at Western Washington University. It will be on display at BAM beginning Saturday, Dec. 18, and running through April 10, 2011. And for those worried about the old adage that a picture is worth a thousand words, don’t fret. A 1997 study from Cambridge University found they’re actually worth about 84.1. It may not be Twitter-length but it is certainly concise. Saturday, Dec. 18, through April 10, 2011. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-3465-2671, boiseartmuseum.org.

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PAUL KOLNIK/MSG ENTERTAINMENT NYC

NOR M AN S EEF

Curtis Stigers is one sax-y dude.

SUNDAY-MONDAY DEC. 19-20

Kickin’ it with the Rockettes.

music FIFTH ANNUAL XTREME HOLIDAY XTRAVAGANZA When the word extreme—whether spelled correctly or cutely—precedes the name of an item or a crazy sports competition, it usually indicates that the item will be painfully spicy or the event will be rife with death-defying stunts. Or it might just be a way to give an event an adorably alliterative title. Case in point: Curtis Stigers’ annual Xtreme Holiday Xtravaganza. And although it’s a highly anticipated event each year, this time Stigers is definitely working toward “extreme.” The internationally famous singer/songwriter/saxophonist always throws this annual festive holiday party at the Egyptian Theatre and asks the Fool Squad’s Joe Golden and Tom Willmorth to assist him in hosting duties. He then invites several local luminaries to share the stage, and for a few hours, everyone laughs and plays and sings and shimmies and shakes until they can’t shimmy or shake anymore. For the last four years, that’s pretty much how it has been. The problem is that with so many performers, someone has to go on late. And tickets sell out so quickly, somebody is always left wanting. So Stigers came up with terrifically smart plan for this year’s event: Do it twice. That’s right. The fifth annual Xtreme Holiday Xtravaganza will take place on both Sunday, Dec. 19, and Monday, Dec. 20, meaning the acts will be spread across the two nights and twice as many people can attend. But what that really means is that Interfaith Sanctuary, where 100 percent of the event’s proceeds always go, will receive double the usual donation. Now that is xtremely generous. Sunday, Dec. 19, and Monday, Dec. 20; 6:30 p.m. doors, $25 general admission. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Christian interpretation of Jesus Christ being anointed the “chosen one.” During that time, Handel didn’t eat or sleep much, which perhaps led to his claim that he saw “the great God himself” upon finalizing the piece. The musicians of Boise Philharmonic and Boise Master Chorale have been

SATURDAY DEC. 18 philharmonic THE MESSIAH It only took George Frideric Handel 24 days in 1741 to compose Messiah, a composition based on the

S U B M I T

TUESDAY-WEDNESDAY DEC. 21-22 legs THE RADIO CITY CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR For those of us with the flexibility of the Tin Man, executing an eye-high leg kick is a thing of dreams. But nailing 1,500 high-kicks in a single day? You’ve got to be effing kidding. During their annual Radio City Christmas Spectacular, the New York-based Rockettes perform up to five shows a day— at around 300 kicks per show—for weeks on end. According to The New York Times’ Susan Dominus, the Rockettes are such hardasses that they ease their sore legs and backs not with a massage and a glass of wine but with a 45-degree ice bath. Machines. Luckily, this year you don’t have to make the trek all the way to New York City to watch the Rockettes execute their perfect kick-lines with gleaming white teeth and nary a grimace. On Tuesday, Dec. 21, and Wednesday, Dec. 22, the ladies are making a special stop in Boise at Taco Bell Arena. The whole fam can watch dazzling classic dance numbers like “The Living Nativity” and “Parade of the Wooden Soldiers,” which have been included in the Christmas Spectacular show since its inception in 1933, along with snazzy, modern skits. The touring Rockettes crew will perform two shows on Tuesday, Dec. 21, and three shows on Wednesday, Dec. 22, during their stay in the Treasure Valley. Tuesday, Dec. 21, 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.; Wednesday, Dec. 22, 1 p.m., 4 p.m. and 7 p.m.; $25-$89. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-1900, tacobellarena.com.

rehearsing for their upcoming holiday performance of Messiah for more than 24 days, and we’re guessing they’ve probably taken time out to eat and sleep. But that doesn’t mean the concert won’t have any less passion or emotion

FIND MXYPLYZYK The New York Times’ dining section recently featured a neato gadget that caught our attention: a silicon turkey timer with tiny drumstick legs that pop up when the bird is done. As it turns out, a ton of other poultry fanatics thought the contraption, made by designers Kikkerland, was cool. It is now completely out of stock at the website listed in the Grey Lady, mxyplyzyk.com. But after perusing the design-friendly mxyplyzyk.com, inspired by Superman villain Mr. Mxyzptlk, we came across some even more awesome thingamajigs. One is a set of white plastic Russian matryoshka-doll dry measuring cups. Six dolls fit mxyplyzyk.com adorably inside of each other and their bases each measure from one-quarter cup to 1 cup. Another is the Hopside Down beer glass, which features a hand-blown half-beer bottle shape submerged upside down in a pint glass. Mxyplyzyk, which originally opened as a storefront in Greenwich Village in 1992, now offers its “quirky mix of well-designed but affordable items” on its online store, which is divided into living wares, office, furniture and lighting, kids and pets, bath, odds and ends, and body wares. —Tara Morgan

than Handel would expect. 7:30 p.m., $15-$35. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY DEC. 15 On Stage SEX A.K.A WIENERS AND BOOBS—Welsh/Garcia Productions brings back last year’s hit comedy show about a corrupt town in New Jersey. 8 p.m. $12. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, visualartscollective.com. TRU—Award-winning Broadway hit based on the whirlwind social life and career of Truman Capote. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

Sports & Fitness STEELHEADS HOCKEY—Vs. the Victoria Salmon Kings. 7:10 p.m. Four tickets for $44. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, qwestarenaidaho.com.

Citizen BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT VOLUNTEER NIGHT—Volunteers may donate their time to help build and repair bicycles for the needy. 6-8 p.m. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

THURSDAY DEC. 16 On Stage A CHRISTMAS CAROL—Dinner and a performance of the classic Christmas tale by Charles Dickens. 7 p.m. $10-$39. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org. A CHRISTMAS TWIST—The Illegitimate Players combine the characters and events from A Christmas Carol, Oliver Twist and Little Orphan Annie in this twisted take on classic Christmas stories. Family friendly. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com. THE NUTCRACKER—The traditional holiday ballet performed by the Eagle Performing Arts Center featuring Chalnessa Eames and Benjamin Griffiths from the Pacific Northwest Ballet. Tickets are for sale online at epacdance.com. 7 p.m. $17$22. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. SEX A.K.A WIENERS AND BOOBS—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com. TRU—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

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ARTS/BOOK REVIEW TATTOOS, TEQUILA AND TEDIUM: MIKE SAGER IS SAVING GRACE ON VINCE NEIL BIO “Celebrities have nothing to say.” It’s a phrase that journalist Mike Sager will repeat. He’ll clarify that it’s not because they’re idiots (well, not all of them) but because they spend their lives saying someone else’s words. When it comes time for them to speak for themselves, they’re often at a loss. Sager—who has interviewed the likes of Jennifer Lopez, Oliver Stone, George Clooney, Roseanne Barr and hundreds more—never is. The award-winning author has penned several books, writes a column for sandiego.com, has contributed to GQ, Rolling Stone and Playboy and is a writer-at-large for Esquire Magazine. He speaks to compelling people, certainly, but it’s his ability to take what they say and turn it into engaging, enchanting stories that makes Sager a master. But even a master has to eat. A while back, Sager received a sweet offer: good money to ghostwrite Vince Neil’s new autobiography, Tattoos & Tequila: To Hell and Back with One of Rock’s Most Notorious Frontmen (Grand Central, November 2010). For the die-hard Motley Crue/Vince Neil fan, Tattoos & Tequila is a behind-the-scenes leer at the over-indulgence of ’80s rock and Motley Crue as some of the genre’s baddest boys. Big hair, big arenas, big tits, big lines of coke ... all of the excess is in Neil’s tale and part of what made him such a great frontman. But for the fan of a well-written biography, the book is kind of a bummer for two reasons: One, these stories were already in The Dirt: Confessions of the World’s Most Notorious Rock Band (Harper, 2001). Two, the book reads like a verbatim transcript, a narcissistic, syntactically confusing traipse down memory lane. Neil has plenty to say, he just doesn’t always say it very well, even with Sager’s help. According to Sager, it could have been worse. “When you write an authorized biography, it is a personal memoir that has been ghostwritten by someone else. That’s what we’re doing here,” Sager said. “This is not a piece of journalism. It’s not like at Esquire and Rolling Stone. I’m used to going through rigorous fact checking, sometimes with lawyers and always with fact checkers. There is none of that in this process ... and I quickly figured out that Vince is not very eloquent to begin with.” The book includes interviews with Neil’s current wife and his exes, his kids and Motley bassist Nikki Sixx, the only band member who agreed to be interviewed. The sad part is, Sager said, those voices were by and large far more interesting than Neil’s. But it isn’t their story. So with two hours a day over the course of two weeks of interviews and three months to finish the book, Sager did what he does best. He wrote. “I created the backbone out of his interviews,” Sager said. “Most of what is in there are his sentiments but not his words. It’s like if he said one sentence, I wrote four paragraphs. And there is a lot of that in there. I’ve written about this shit, I’ve done the drugs, I’ve been in the scene. I know what he’s talking about, and I’m a better writer than him.” That is so true. The best part of Tattoos & Tequila is Sager’s 12-page introduction, which if you’ve already read The Dirt, is the best reason to pick up this book. —Amy Atkins WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT Workshops & Classes

CHRISTMAS SHOW AND HOEDOWN—Starlight Mountain Theatre presents I’ll Be Home For Christmas and Santa’s Holiday Hoedown. 7:30 p.m. $12-$20. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425, limelightboise.com.

KICKSTART YOUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS—Make a plan for your fitness goals. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE. Your Fitness Your Life, 199 N. Capitol Blvd., Ste. 301, Boise, 208-841-5433, yourfitnessyourlife.com.

A CHRISTMAS TWIST—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

Citizen

LARRY POTTER—A wizardly spin on a holiday tale. For reservations call 208-336-7383 or e-mail iveseenelvis@yahoo.com. 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., 208-336-7383, pdplayhouse. com.

HOPKINS FOUNDATION FUNDRAISER—The non-profit is working in with Picture Book Productions—Disney and Pixar artists—in an effort to raise money to build an orphanage in Ghana. Join them for a chance to preview the art work and a silent auction. Books featuring their art work will be available to buy. For more info visit hopkinsfoundation.org. 6 p.m. $20 donation. Courtyard Marriott, 1789 S. Eagle Road, Meridian.

THE NUTCRACKER—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $17-$22. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. SEX A.K.A WIENERS AND BOOBS—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

FRIDAY DEC. 17 On Stage

TRU—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

A CHRISTMAS CAROL— See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $10$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

WHITE CHRISTMAS—Irving Berlin’s cheery holiday musical. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Workshops & Classes WATERCOLOR CARDS—Paint your own holiday cards. 7-9 p.m. $30. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-407-3359, puffymondaes.com.

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Literature BOOKSIGNING—Local author Nick Collias and artist John Collias will be signing copies of their book John Collias: Round About the Boise Valley. The book is a collection of John’s illustrations, cartoons and portraits from 1936 through 2010. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3764229, rdbooks.org.

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railtees@gmail.com

COLD-HEARTED CHRISTMAS— David Guiotto, Samantha Silva and Megan Williams will read their wintry tales to warm your heart. 7 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Books, 1507 N. 13th St., Boise, 208-338-1152, hydeparkbooks. com.

SATURDAY DEC. 18 Festivals & Events HOLIDAY FARMERS MARKET—Open-air market dishing up fresh food and products from local vendors. Live music acts, plus local arts and crafts. Featuring fresh Northwest cranberries, wreaths, floral arrangements, handmade cards and more for the holidays. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Downtown at Eighth and Idaho streets, Boise.

On Stage A CHRISTMAS CAROL—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $10-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org. CHRISTMAS SHOW AND HOEDOWN—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $10 Mondays, $12-$20. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425, limelightboise.com. A CHRISTMAS TWIST—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

CHRISTMAS WITH ELVIS—Boise’s own Elvis impersonator extraordinaire Stacey Wayne performs Christmas favorites and Elvis’ hits. See Picks, Page 14. 7 p.m. $15. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. See Picks, Page 14 THE EIGHT: REINDEER MONOLOGUES— A dark take on how Rudolph rose to the top and other mysteries surrounding the North Pole from Daisy’s Madhouse. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., second floor, Capitol Terrace, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 17


8 DAYS OUT IMPERIAL SOVEREIGN GEM COURT OF IDAHO SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS SHOW—Cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, photo opportunities with the court and a fab holiday-themed show round out this evening of entertainment that benefits the ISGCI. 7-11 p.m. $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th, Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux. com. LARRY POTTER—See Friday. 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, pdplayhouse.com. THE NUTCRACKER—See Thursday. 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. $17-$22. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. SEX A.K.A WIENERS AND BOOBS—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com. TRU—See Wednesday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org. WHITE CHRISTMAS—See Friday. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Concerts MESSIAH—Boise Philharmonic and Boise Master Chorale perform Handel’s holiday classic. See Picks, Page 15. 7:30 p.m. $15-$35. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

SUNDAY DEC. 19

MONDAY DEC. 20

Festivals & Events

On Stage

SUNDAY MARKET—Indoor market where shoppers can find locally produced food and goods. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

CHRISTMAS SHOW AND HOEDOWN—See Friday. 7 p.m. $10, Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425, limelightboise.com.

On Stage A CHRISTMAS CAROL—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $6-$10. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu. A CHRISTMAS TWIST—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3422000, stagecoachtheatre.com. LARRY POTTER—See Friday. 2 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, pdplayhouse. com. XTREME HOLIDAY XTRAVAGANZA—Curtis Stigers hosts an evening of music, comedy and local talent. Proceeds from the annual holiday show benefit the Interfaith Sanctuary. Purchase tickets at egyptiantheatre.net or curtisstigers.com. See Picks, Page 15. 7:30 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

ELEVEN AND FRIENDS FAMILY CHRISTMAS SHOW—Miss Idaho Kylie Kofoed hosts this annual Christmas show featuring the Epic Ballet Company, Eagle High School Sign Language Club, swing dancers and more. Santa will also make an appearance. 7 p.m. $20 family pass, $7 adult, $5 senior, 208-468-5555. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, nampaciviccenter.com. XTREME HOLIDAY XTRAVAGANZA—Curtis Stigers hosts an evening of music, comedy and local talent. Proceeds from the annual holiday show benefit the Interfaith Sanctuary. Purchase tickets at egyptiantheatre.net or curtisstigers.com. See Picks, Page 15. 7:30 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Literature POETRY SLAM DELUX—The winner wins $100 cash. Contact Cheryl at 208-426-0383 for more info. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

Art ENVIRONMENTAL EXHIBIT—New exhibit titled ”Contemporary Northwest Artists On the Environment.” Participating artists’ work reflects the environmental issues society is dealing with today and includes a variety of mediums. See Picks, Page 14. Shows through April 2011. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

Citizen CHRISTMAS KIDS BIKE GIVEAWAY—Volunteer for a day of putting smiles on kids’ faces as bikes are given away, lessons are given to new riders and many holiday treats are consumed. See Picks, Page 14. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

Odds & Ends MODEL TRAIN AND CHRISTMAS VILLAGE DISPLAY—Visit with Santa and check out the many towns, villages and trains on the mezzanine, sponsored by the Old Boise Merchants Association. Visit oldboise.com for more info. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. The Pioneer Building, 106 N. Sixth St. (third floor), Boise.

18 | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Skeleton Blues by Conner Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT THE RADIO CITY CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR—See Tuesday. See Picks, Page 15. 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. $47.50-$89. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1900, tacobellarena.com.

TUESDAY DEC. 21 On Stage DICKENS—Benefit performance of the partially true story of how The Christmas Carol came to be. 7 p.m. $50. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

SEX A.K.A WIENERS AND BOOBS—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

THE RADIO CITY CHRISTMAS SPECTACULAR—The Rockettes kick-start the holiday season. See Picks, Page 15. 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. $47.50-$89. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1900, tacobellarena.com.

Literature WEDNESDAY NIGHT BOOK CLUB—Adult readers meet monthly to discuss the featured selection. For more information and to register, call 208-5624996. 7 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996.

Workshops & Classes THE SCREENWRITERS GROUP—Practice pitching your screenplay. 6:30 p.m. Idaho Pizza Company, 405 E. Fairview Ave, Meridian, 208-375-4100, idahopizzacompany.com.

Workshops & Classes DROP-IN WRITING WORKSHOP—Authors and teachers Malia Collins and Adrian Kien offer writers of all levels a chance to create and share work in a friendly, informal atmosphere. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208331-8000, thecabinidaho.org.

Odds & Ends COMEDY NIGHT—Test out your routine on patrons during open mic night. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3223430.

ZUMBA—A class that combines Latin dance and aerobics for a full workout. 7:30 p.m. $12. Ophidia Dance and Art Studio, 4464 Chinden Blvd., Ste. A, Garden City, 208-409-2403, ophidiastudio.com.

WEDNESDAY DEC. 22

ON GOING Festivals & Events HELICOPTER CHRISTMAS LIGHT TOUR—Get a bird’s-eye view of Boise all done up for Christmas. Highlights include flying over downtown, the Capitol, Idaho Botanical Garden and the Foothills. Tours depart nightly beginning Friday, Dec. 18, through Sunday, Jan 2. E-mail fly@silverhawkaviation.net for more info. 7 p.m. $50. Boise Airport, 3201 Airport Way, Boise, 208-384-5000. HOLIDAY LIGHTS TOUR—Openair tour on the Molly Trolley. Bring your parka, grab a warm drink, and enjoy vintage holiday music while taking in holiday light displays. Tours runs though Thursday, Dec. 30 at 6 p.m. and 7 p.m., with an additional tour at 8 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights. $4-$14. Moxie Java, 3301 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208322-1315, moxiejava.com. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—A dazzling display of light. The garden is decorated for the holiday season with more than 250,000 lights and special displays. Catch a glimpse of Santa and Prancer and enjoy warm beverages and holiday music as you stroll through the gardens. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Odds & Ends VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO— Buy, sell, trade and listen to vinyl records with other analog musical enthusiasts. Guest speakers and DJs. 7-10 p.m. FREE, vpsidaho.org. Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244.

On Stage GENERATION ME COMEDY TOUR—Comedy show hosted by Ben Hess, featuring comics Ryan Novak, Heath Harrison and Reggie Melbrough. 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th, Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

CALLS TO ARTISTS FROSTY GOES TO HOLLYWOOD—Get out in the snow, get it on camera, and win a chance to go play in the snow. We want your funny, crazy, silly, stupid, picturesque, amazing, original, homemade video of you, your pet, your friends or your mother-in-law doing whatever it is you do in the snow. Upload your video to frosty.boiseweekly.com by midnight on Tuesday, Jan. 4. Prize package includes a two-night stay at The Riverhouse Hotel in Bend, Ore., two lift tickets to Mt. Bachelor, dinner for two both nights, two passes to Winterfest, a tour and tasting at Deschutes Brewery and a Rock Star energy drink gift pack. For more information contact Office Manager Shea Sutton at 208-344-2055. Visit frosty. boiseweekly.com to size up the competition. BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS—Every week Boise Weekly chooses one submitted original work for the cover. BW will pay $150 for every published cover. We request that all published original covers be donated to a charity cover auction in the fall benefiting the arts. Works must be original, in any medium including digital and photography. Artworks not selected are available for pickup anytime. Drop your artwork by the BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Direct questions to leila@ boiseweekly.com.

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 19


NOISE C R AC K ER FAR M

Chances are Slim you won’t like Langhorne’s folksy tunes.

LANGHORNE SLIM The alt-country troubadour kicks up his boots ANDREW CRISP Slideshow Players also took note. Don’t let Langhorne Slim fool you. He’s a “They saw me play my short set and insham, a phony, a hoax. No modern man vited me to go out on tour with them. They could possibly pick an Antietam-era ballad took me on my first tour in America, my down the neck of a guitar like an Americana first tour in Europe,” said Slim. “They were minstrel. Or pour his soul through his vocal amazing supporters of mine and helped me cords into a ribbon mic, evangelizing like a out a tremendous amount.” revival-era preacher in a tent full of sweaty Slim’s style is often labeled alt-country. Southern Baptists. You just don’t find a Whatever that encompasses, it doesn’t take traditionalist folk artist like this. Langhorne into account the uniqueness of his deep-inSlim is a time traveler. the-diaphragm voice, his Bob Dylan-esque “I picked up the guitar because I knew that I had something that I needed to express guitar work or the rest of his band, The War Eagles (Malachi DeLorenzo, Jeff Ratner and and I didn’t know what it was,” Slim told David Moore). Regardless, Slim shrugs off Boise Weekly. the label. He rejects genre-fication. Born Sean Scolnick, Slim left his small “I think genres are typically set up to Pennsylvania hometown, Langhorne, on his sell something or establish where to keep a way to New York, fresh out of high school. certain band’s music in a record shop,” said Tapping into the artistic culture of the East Village, Slim found a soap box for his oratory. Slim. “I think most people aren’t so black and white ... I wanna be able to explore and “There’s this thing called Sidewalk Cafe go where my heart takes me.” that a lot of great people have come out From those Sidewalk Cafe days, Slim’s of,” said Slim of New York. “The hope that career kept growing. He moved up to gigs at everybody had was that the guy that ran it, Bonnaroo and tours with bands like Cake, this guy Latch, if he liked you, he would give The Violent Femmes and The Avett Brothers. you your own show.” After the indepenHumbly Slim dent release of Slim recounted his own Pickens in 1999 and break. Wednesday, Dec. 15, 7 p.m., $10 advance, $12 door an album with Charles “So I played my Butler, Slim released two songs and he LINEN BUILDING 1402 W. Grove St. an EP, Electric Love was like, ‘Well, what thelinenbuilding.com Letter (2004, Narnack do you guys think?’ Records). People were nice and From “Electric they clapped,” said Love Letter” on that album, which was used Slim. “‘Well Langhorne, we’ll see ya next in the movie Waitress: “It’s like lightning Wednesday.’ That was a big shot.” when she smiles / She tastes just like pumpBut it wasn’t just a polite audience. kin pie / Storm clouds have filled the sky / Latch, the crowd and the other musicians I’ve arrived when she smiles.” he played with noticed something in Slim’s “When it comes easy, it’s like you’re style. The famous Trachtenburg Family

20 | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | BOISEweekly

channeling somebody. Or somebody just dropped it off in your lap or in your brain. A song comes ... and you haven’t had to do any work for it other than sit down,” says Slim. But he acknowledged the rarity of the epiphany. “Sometimes it hits you all at once and feels almost like it’s not your song ... More times than not, for me, it’s not that easy. It definitely takes some work,” said Slim. Slim and the War Eagles were poised to take a pick step up in 2006: They signed to V2 Records, which lasted “16 seconds.” The record label imploded but gifted the unpublished masters back to the band. Slim didn’t relent. After a search, he found Kemando records and recorded Be Set Free. Slim was on The Late Show with David Letterman in March 2008 and by October 2009 “Worries,” off of his self-titled release, was used in a Travelers Insurance commercial. “I think bands are expected to do what I would consider weirder shit now than ever before,” Slim said. “With tweeting and all that kind of stuff: I don’t care what celebrity is drinking a cup of coffee. And to be honest, I don’t know that I like that or am totally comfortable with that.” While Slim may not be the “Web 2.0” guy who’ll tweet every time he goes to the bathroom, he acknowledges that the Internet is engaging fans in some fascinating new ways. “It’s sort of a bizarre state of things,” said the time-traveling Slim. “It’s so great for bands that NPR can put up a cool video of us and then you can check that out, or I can put up [a video] sitting on a back porch playing a song. It’s sort of interesting, widening that medium and seeing how far you are wanting or willing to take it.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 21


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY DEC. 15

THURSDAY DEC. 16

GIZZARD STONE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

100.3 THE X’S UNHOLY NIGHT FEATURING MUSHROOMHEAD, DEC. 16, KNITTING FACTORY Rivalries are often all hype. They make good press but the artists themselves rarely view the conflict in the same terms as their fans. For years fans have been arguing the merits of Des Moines, Iowa--based Slipknot versus Cleveland’s Mushroomhead. Both wear masks and play music heavier than uranium. Slipknot broke first but Mushroomhead started first. Therefore both bands’ fans see the other band as a rip-off. A Google search of Slipknot vs. Mushroomhead returns more than 240,000 hits, and Mushroomhead drummer Steve Felton’s quote that Slipknot is “the N’SYNC of heavy metal” has been posted nearly as many times. So there’s no doubt it’s a good marketing ploy. The question is: After nearly 20 years in existence, does Mushroomhead’s live performance still match their ability to talk some serious shit? Check out their show at Knitting Factory and decide for yourself. —Josh Gross With Black Tooth Grin and Karin Comes Killing, 8 p.m., $15$35. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

22 | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | BOISEweekly

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MUSHROOMHEAD— See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $15-$35. Knitting Factory

LOOSE CHANGE—9 p.m. FREE. Sam’s

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

LANGHORNE SLIM—With Ryan Lauder. See Noise, Page 20. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Linen Building

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—With Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SALLY CRAVEN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown SHAWN MULLINS—94.9 The River’s Concert for Cause benefitting Family Advocates. 6 p.m. $18. Knitting Factory

SPENCER BATT—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

SWEATSHOP UNION— See Listen Here, Page 23. 9:30 p.m. $5. Reef TRAVIS MCDANIEL—8 p.m. FREE. Moxie Java-Nampa Stadium

SLIPPERY ELM—6:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

FRIDAY DEC. 17 A TASTY JAMM—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

THE BLUE DOOR FOUR—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid

BORN TO BE MILD—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

THE DECADE BLUES BAND—8 p.m. TBA. Bouquet

SHON SANDERS AND STEVE FULTON—6 p.m. FREE. Moxie Java-Center Point

FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s FUNKY REGGAE CHRISTMAS PARTY—Featuring Voice of Reason, Danger Beard, Rizing Rezistance and Dude Bro Man and the Funk Yeas. 7 p.m. $6, or bring an unwrapped gift to donate and get in FREE. Knitting Factory GARDEN CITY LIMITS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KEEGAN SMITH AND THE FAM—10 p.m. $5. Reef LIKE A ROCKET—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THE MONEY SHOTS—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s POP CULT KIDS—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

SHON SANDERS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

SATURDAY DEC. 18 THE BLUE DOOR FOUR—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door BRANDON PRITCHETT—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown BUILD YOUR OWN SHOW— Featuring Freezeout Hill with The Anti-Core, Michael Limbert, Tony Randall and Freshman Year. 7:30 p.m. $8. The Venue CHAD GOLD BAND CD RELEASE PARTY—7 p.m. FREE. Piazza Di Vino DAN COSTELLO—8 p.m. FREE. Moxie Java-Vista DJ DOUG MARTSCH— With Pete Ritchey. 11 p.m. $3. Neurolux

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5. Hannah’s

DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

RUSS PFEIFER—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE HAPPY BIRTHDAY JESUS— WIth DJs Dan Kaye, Zacklander, Jeremiah, Distraction and 4 Star Generals. 9:30 p.m., $5, Red Room JOHNNY DOWNING—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s JON HYNEMAN—With Sally Tibbs and Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KEEGAN SMITH AND THE FAM—10 p.m. $5. Reef THE MONEY SHOTS—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s NOISE FOR TOYS—With Black Tooth Grin, Final Underground, Chained Existence and Roofied Resistance. 8 p.m. $6, or bring an unwrapped gift to donate and get in FREE. Knitting Factory REBECCA SCOTT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

TUESDAY DEC. 21

BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

CARTER FREEMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

DAN COSTELLO AND THE TRUCK STOP TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

GIZZARD STONE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

RUSS PFEIFER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

FREUDIAN SLIP—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

XTREME HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA—Featuring Curtis Stigers. See Picks, Page 15. 6:30 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre

JERRY JOSEPH AND WALLY INGRAM—9 p.m. $12 adv., $14 door. Bouquet

MONDAY DEC. 20

PLEASANTVILLE KILLERZ CD RELEASE PARTY—With 33 Deep, P-Dirt and Dice One, Truth, Soulja Thugs and Public Intox. 9 p.m. $5. The Shredder

BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek-Vista

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5. Hannah’s

REX MILLER—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

THE SHAUN BRAZELL BAND— 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TAUGE AND FAULKNER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

STEVEN TONEY—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

KEVIN KIRK—With John Jones. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TERRI EBERLEIN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill TREVOR EYRE QUINTET—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door WINTER SOLSTICE—Red Light Variety Show, Nera, The Shitty Osmonds and Wounded Ox. 8 p.m. $5. VAC

THE CODY JORDAN BAND—8 p.m. TBA. Bouquet EMILY BRADEN—7 p.m. $15$18. Linen Building

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers LUNAR MOLLUSK—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid RYAN WISSINGER—5:45 p.m. FREE. Solid SHIRLEY VANPAEPAEGHEM—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian STEVE EATON—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown WILSON ROBERTS—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. $2. Liquid

XTREME HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA—Featuring Curtis Stigers. See Picks, Page 15. 6:30 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre

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CHUCK SMITH—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

SUNDAY DEC. 19

WEDNESDAY DEC. 22

More live music at boiseweekly.com.

BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

SWEATSHOP UNION, DEC. 16, REEF When this Canadian collective descended on Boise in 2009, they nearly nudged one another off the tiny Terrapin Station stage as they boom-bapped through their 2008 release Water Street. At seven-members strong, they are once again going to be standing ti-i-i-ight when they hit the not-huge Reef stage on Thursday, Dec. 16. Since releasing their debut album in 2002, the group has shown true heart for what they do. Both together and individually, they record, collaborate and tour constantly. SU also understand their fans. They know the people who buy their records do so because they want smart rhymes, big bad beats and messages they can connect with. What’s nice about SU playing Reef is that the restaurant/ bar/venue has taken the “venue” part seriously (remodeling, redesigning) and developed a real voice. Plus, this show is only $5 and you can get right up close to the stage. That way if Kyprios starts to tumble off, you can be there to catch him. —Amy Atkins 9:30 p.m., $5. Reef, 106 S. Sixth St., reefboise.com.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 23


LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings

THE JOURNEY OF NATTIE GANN—Classic Disney film about one girl’s cross-country railroad adventure that is Part of the Let’s Talk About It: Making Tracks series at the library. Saturday, Dec. 18, 1 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE—Your entrance into this special screening of the holiday classic supports the Idaho Foodbank, Northwest Animal Companions and/or the Idaho Humane Society. Bring a can/bag/box of unopened people or pet food, sit back and enjoy. Dec. 22-Dec. 23, Noon, 3 p.m., 6 p.m. Donation. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Opening

BLACK SWAN—Natalie Portman and Mila Kunis star as a ballerina and her understudy in an exploration of vicious backstage rivalry. Suspenseful thriller in the world of professional ballet. (R) Flicks THE FIGHTER—Mark Wahlberg stars as a young “Irish” Micky Ward before the boxer went pro in the ’80s. Also stars Amy Adams, Christian Bale and Melissa Leo. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN GR EGORY B AYNE

FROSTY GOES TO HOLLYWOOD—Get out in the snow, get it on camera, and win a chance to go play in the snow. We want your funny, crazy, silly, stupid, picturesque, amazing, original, homemade video of you, your pet, your friends or your mother-in-law doing whatever it is you do in the snow. Upload your video to frosty.boiseweekly.com by midnight on Tuesday, Jan. 4. Prize package includes a two-night stay at The Riverhouse Hotel in Bend, Ore., two lift tickets to Mt. Bachelor, dinner for two both nights, two passes to Winterfest, a tour and tasting at Deschutes Brewery and a Rock Star energy drink gift pack.

V i s i t b o i s e w e e k l y. c o m a n d c l i c k on Scr een for movie times.

FIGHT BACK Local filmmaker takes on UFC’s first champ AMY ATKINS Some men are coaxed into lives of greatness. Others are pushed, the shoves leaving bruises on their psyches. Mixed martial artist Jens Pulver trod the latter path to become a legend: He was the world’s first UFC lightweight champion. But what comes up, must come down and Pulver’s fall was that much harder because of his struggle to the top. Pulver is the subject of local filmmaker Gregory Bayne’s new documentary Jens Pulver: Driven, which screens on Friday, Dec. 17, at the Egyptian Theatre. Driven is a naked look at a man who suffered abhorrent abuse as a child and, as an adult, became a Jens Pulver fights his demons so he doesn’t pass them on to his children. legend in his field due to a myopic focus on practice, fight, win. Bayne filmed him during end of the film you will have a better idea— this back story that was unreal. Then the the weeks leading up to a career-deciding on both counts. fight came into play.” fight. After garnering the title of champion, When BW called him in Chicago, where The film is made all the more intense Pulver lost four bouts in a row. He returned he is currently training, the one succinct through the anticipatory build up to the to the cage on March 6 to try and regain statement he made was in regard to how he match. It is a combination of shots of Pulver some of his former glory. at home or at the gym preparing for the fight, felt about having Bayne follow him around: Sitting in a diner booth, bright tattoos “I loved it.” and black-and-white conpoking out from Pulver will be in attendance at the Boise fessional scenes in which each of his sleeves, screening. He said he’s a little concerned that Pulver speaks directly Bayne explained Premieres Friday, Dec. 17, 7:30 p.m., no one will be there. Not because it isn’t a to the camera. He holds that getting Pulver $12. Q&A following the film. great film—“Greg is a genius,” Pulver said— nothing back, and Bayne to talk about EGYPTIAN THEATRE was right: Pulver is engag- but because he doesn’t know why anyone himself was not a 700 W. Main St. would want to watch a movie about him. ing. He is also charming, problem. egyptiantheatre.net “I’m popular, but I ain’t famous,” he said. quite emotive and raw to “I met him and But people will want to see this movie. the point that it’s uncomhe talked almost And once they witness this tragic and fortable at times to watch a full hour after triumphant tale of love, loss and redemphim bleed emotionally. But that is also what I asked him maybe two questions,” Bayne tion, Pulver may have more hands than he makes this documentary so utterly viewable. said, adding a slight laugh. “I found a guy can imagine gently tugging him back toward who was engaging to speak with, really open Even if you had no idea what MMA stands and seemed emotionally honest. Then he had for or why anyone cares about Pulver, by the the top.

SCREEN/THE TUBE THE EVENT: UNEVENTFUL BUT KIND OF CREEPY

HOW DO YOU KNOW—Reese Witherspoon, Owen Wilson, Paul Rudd and Jack Nicholson star in James L. Brooks’ story about a girl, the wrong guy and one who might be the right guy. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 TRON—A tech-savvy 27-year-old looks into his father’s disappearance and gets pulled into the digital world where his father has been trapped. They embark on a journey across this advanced cyber world. (PG) 25 Edwards 9, Edwards 22, Edwards IMAX

24 | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | BOISEweekly

You know a show isn’t great when you stop the Hulu feed and open another window to watch Michio Kaku discuss quantum mechanics. The Event makes you do that. NBC’s science fiction, political thriller, possible-time-traveling-aliens-with-monkey-DNA program on Monday nights demands obvious comparisons to Lost—except without the smoke monsters, literary allusions and donkey-wheel time machines. The mythological allure of Lost, with its endlessly fascinating puzzleproducing paradoxes, depended upon interest in character development. It wasn’t that Desmond traveled through time—it was that Desmond in particular traveled through time. In The Event, though, you won’t really give a rat’s ass about what’s-his-name or who’s-her-face. With Lost, viewers were provided narrative threads of genuine imporBut the surprises are unsurprising because everything on The Event tance and ambiguous villains who could represent God, Mephistopheles, turns out to be something else. The fall finale—the show returns in philosophers, even Orwellian animals. The Event, however, feels like all February—still left every question unanswered and perhaps most of the bad guys were recruited from deleted scenes of 24. important, we still don’t know what the hell the titular It’s full of stock villains, maybe-aliens and young event is—unless it was finding out that Hal Holbrook (the girls who look like Helen Thomas. The latter aspect is Watch The Event on hulu.com. person, not the character he plays) isn’t dead. spectacularly disturbing, almost like the first time seeing Gollum, but it’s also weirdly funny. Imagine Benjamin But—Damon Hunzeker ton braiding another old-baby’s hair—that kind of thing. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


LISTINGS/SCREEN NEW DVD RELEASE/SCREEN 24

YOGI BEAR—Yogi and Boo Boo attempt to foil the mayor’s plans to sell Jellystone Park in this animated film. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

VISION: FROM THE LIFE OF HILDEGARD VON BINGEN—Barbara Sukowa stars as the visionary 12th-century Benedictine nun, a woman who has emerged as a forward-thinking, iconoclastic pioneer of faith, change and enlightenment. (NR) Flicks

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com

WALL STREET II: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS “Greed is good.” Those were the chilling words from Michael Douglas as Gordon Gekko in the Oscar-winning 1987 classic Wall Street. Nearly a quarter century has passed, and Gekko still hasn’t learned his lesson. Unfortunately neither has director Oliver Stone. Stone abuses a perfect opportunity to update the scandalous behavior of money changers by instead offering a fairly pedestrian soap opera surrounding Douglas with Shia LaBeouf, Carey Mulligan and Josh Brolin. Rather than show his audience some respect, Stone warms up a leftover script. Unfortunately, it was left over from 1990. Not even worth the rental.

THE ANDY GRIFFITH SHOW 50TH ANNIVERSARY: BEST OF MAYBERRY Yes, it has been 50 years. But revisiting some of these classics reminds us that Andy, Barney, Opie, Gomer, Goober and Aunt Bee are as welcome as Christmas. It was in 1960 in an episode of The Danny Thomas Show that Danny was pulled over by a friendly policeman in the small town of Mayberry, N.C. And a television classic was born. This heartwarming collection includes that original episode, plus one of the best half-hours ever written for the small screen: “Opie the Birdman.” It also includes the only Christmas episode in the eight years that the series ran on CBS. —George Prentice

EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

APPS/SCREEN KISS MY CHRISTMAS APPS Because there really is an app for everything.

FOR THE IPHONE: CHRISTMAS CAROLS by ICHRISTMAS ($.99) has music and lyrics for more than 100 carols. The stocking stuffer? It includes a shakeable jingle bell for those times when your impromptu “Jingle Bells” really needs some sound effects. COUNTDOWN TO CHRISTMAS ($.99) is a stopwatch to the big day. Plus you can email friends so they can count down, too. CHRISTMAS SNOWGLOBE ($.99) lets you control your own snowstorm. By dragging your finger across the screen, you add more snowflakes and decide which way they fall. You can use one of three scenes: a Christmas tree, a snow bunny or a snowman. Or make your own snow globe with any picture on your iPhone.

But who’s counting, right?

AND FOR BLACKBERRY: SANTA TRACKER ($1.99) allows you to follow the big man as he flies across the globe. SLACKER RADIO (FREE) offers some holiday music channels and a sleigh-full of others. —George Prentice

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 25


REC M ATT NEU M AN/ U LLR S K IS

CUSTOM CUTTING Design-them-yourself skis ANDREW MENTZER With the advent and evolution of camber and shape technologies over the last decade, skis resemble their predecessors less and less each year. Manufacturers are constantly jockeying for the “next big thing” in ski design, enabling both novices and mad rippers to ski where they want, how they want. Top riders are now schussing through terrain that wasn’t thought accessible just a few years ago. A pair of perfectly good Salomon GS skis from the 1990s are now as obsolete as a homing pigeon. Contrary to several corporate market trends, a handful of custom, handmade ski All you need is some design ideas—and your own pair of coveralls— and you can help Ullr owner Matt Neuman create your perfect skis. builders—or boutique builders—have, in many ways, trumped the big manufacturers come with particularly fancy graphics or a Neuman got into building his own skis by fusing some old-school techniques with matching wardrobe but that’s kind of the after many years of tuning skis new-school technologies. They point. Boutique skis are meant to appeal to professionally and a six-week have found a manufacturing purists who just want the right ski for what apprenticeship with 333 Skis in balance that isn’t likely to get they do. Mammoth Lakes, Calif. too big or complex—after all, On the other hand, custom skis aren’t for According to Neuman, both many of these guys operate out Ullr and 333 share the common everyone. Former U.S. Ski Team freestyle of a garage or small warehouse. mogul guru Holt Haga says that custom goal “to promote open-source They’re happy to create buildhandmade skis “are generally for the 10 manufacturing in the ski industo-order skis, but they also percent or so of skiers who know exactly try.” Neuman hopes to start offer their customers a design what they want out of a ski and will test the his own apprentice program template and the opportunity full capabilities of that ski ... Most people soon and he always encourages to participate in the creation of who purchase a pair of high-end Rossignols customers to participate in the their customized skis. Customers or Dynastars from a retailer do so strictly construction of their skis. can be involved in every design based on what the manufacturer claims and “If people want to drive up element—shape, tip-to-tail stiff[the] trends in skiing at the time. to McCall and get their hands ness, etc.—to help make the skis “If a ski is both cool and functional, it will dirty, we’re into that,” says of their dreams. generally do well in this market,” Haga says. Neuman. One factor in building bouAnd the market itself seems to be doing While Ullr Skis uses the tique skis is using traditional well—Ullr and 333 are not alone. Bluesame design technologies that or old-school wood materials, house skis in Salt Lake City also makes large manufacturers do, they including core and top-sheet affordable limited-production skis at the also enjoy the flexibility of options. These give the skis a implementing virtually any new local level. Not necessarily dedicated to vintage look and feel. The newwood technology, Bluehouse focuses more design trend in real time—no school elements include utilizing on rider feedback in their production line more waiting around for next the most advanced designs availfrom year to year. Igneous Skis in Jackson, year’s highly anticipated ski able from the most reputable Wyo., makes a similar product to Ullr, with widget. Customers design what ski makers in the world. With a they want, and Ullr builds it for extensive emphasis on wood core and wood chainsaw, router, sander, some top-sheet designs. them. And if they don’t know hand tools, and core, base, edge Whatever your poison on the slopes— what they want, Neuman and and veneer materials, these park, big mountain, groomers—the bouhis crew will help them identify boutique manufacturers have tique custom ski industry has taken aim at the type, style and size of ski created a market that is both the standard for how people ski and even that will work best for them. flexible and cost conscious. how they get their skis. Ullr uses the same base, core Named after the Norse ski They may not be for everybody, but and edge materials as top manugod, Ullr Skis out of McCall facturers, like Kevlar, fiberglass, it may not be long before an old class of is pushing the aforementioned weekend warriors joins forces with these VDS foil and bamboo, which trend and finding regional success mom-and-pop ski builders to create that Neuman says give Ullr’s skis doing it. Ullr Skis owner Matt illusive “next big thing.” They have introcomparable durability to anyNeuman says his garage-based thing from a large manufacturer. duced information and technology to a marbusiness is focused on “buildket that will directly react to community The surprise is in the price. ing a community of skismiths,” feedback. It roughly translates to having an Ullr’s custom handmade skis most of whom live in the McCall ULLR SKIS McCall infinite number of ski designers working on start at around $350—half as area, with a handful of custom 208-315-1709 your behalf from Thanksgiving to late April much as a pair of comparable orders coming in from California, ullrskis.com every single year. name-brand skis. Ullr skis don’t Canada and Washington.

26 | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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LISTINGS/REC Recurring ADULT CLIMBING LESSONS— Designed to allow families to learn a new hobby together. Participants must be age 14 or older. New classes begin the first Tuesday of the month and run four consecutive weeks. 7-8 p.m. $36 member, $72 nonmember. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-5501, ymcaboise.org.

ZUMBA—Class that fuses hypnotic Latin rhythms and easyto-follow moves to tone, sculpt and burn fat. Thursdays, Noon-1 p.m. $10 drop-in per class, www. zumba.com. Fort Boise Community Center, 700 Robbins Road, Boise, 208-384-4486.

Fish & Game WOOLLYBUGGER MEETING— Children ages 7-16 are invited to join the largest fly fishing club in North America for monthly meetings. $20 per year for the whole family. Idaho Fish and Game Headquarters, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-322-8118, bvff. com.

PLAY/REC PATRICK SWEENEY

BELAY CERTIFICATION CLASSES—Participants learn basic safety principles and proper belay technique during this onehour course, which is the safest and most efficient introduction to the climbing wall. Upon completion, students receive a certification card that enables them to skip introduction prior to each climbing wall experience at the YMCA. Noon-1 p.m. $5. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-5501, ymcaboise.org.

TREASURE VALLEY SCRABBLE CLUB—Scrabble Heads of the world, unite! First and third Sunday of every month. For information, call Ben at 208-8886938 (evenings). 6-9 p.m. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 1315 N. Milwaukee, Boise, barnesandnoble.com.

BENCHMARK TRAINING—Run socially or train? Shu’s has got you covered. Members meet up Saturday mornings to run local trails, including Robie Creek, Les Bois, Barking Spider and more. Members also get discounts to various local races, tons of training information and access to coaches who can answer questions about everything from nutrition to clothing. 8:30 a.m. $70 one-time membership fee, 208-888-2122, benchmarktraining.homestead.com. Parkcenter Mall, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise. BOISE BICYCLE PROJECT OPEN SHOP—Donate unwanted bicycles or equipment to a good cause and receive a tax writeoff. The shop is also open for volunteers interested in working on bicycles for children of lowincome families, refugees and Boise’s homeless population. During open shop time on Saturdays, use tools and stands to work on your own bike or bikes for the community. No experience is necessary. Volunteer orientations are on the first and third Saturdays of the month at 11 a.m. For more information, e-mail boisebicycleproject@ gmail.com. FREE. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org. BOISE WOMEN’S HIKING NETWORK—Women’s hiking group with about 800 members. Members post invitations for day hikes, camping trips, backpacking, snowshoeing and more. Schedule varies. For more information, contact Joyce Fabre at 208-384-8582. FREE. groups. yahoo.com/group/boisewhn/. EARLY BIRD MEDITATION—Rise and shine during two meditation periods, a morning chant and Dharma tidbits, with walking in between. Tuesdays at 7 a.m. FREE. Yoga for Wellness Studio, 300 Main St., Ste. 107, Boise, 208-484-1053, yogaforwellnesspro.com. JUMP ROPE CLASSES—Beginners and novices are encouraged to join. Ages 6 to adult can learn moves on single rope, double dutch and the Chinese wheel, in small class sizes, from professional national and world champion teachers, the Summerwind Skippers. Contact Kathy Moe at kmoe@cableone.net. $35 per month, 208-631-5294. Irish Dance Idaho, 1909 Wildwood, Boise, irishdanceidaho.com.

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NO MORE BORING BOARD GAMES Every Tuesday night, All About Games opens its doors to anyone who wants to try out a new game without forking over a ton of money first. And they carry the most popular options out there—and there are many—in light of what appears to be a renaissance for board games. “I love social interaction and community building,” says coowner Bruce DeLaney. “This place is like Cheers.” On a recent Tuesday night, five strangers broke out Hotel Samoa, a new German import. None of us had played the game before, but together we learned the rules and about each other as we fumbled through it. We figured out strategies and just who employed them best while we critiqued the game. “That’s the big difference between playing a game on a computer,” DeLaney says. “It’s Game Night sitting down and playing a game Tuesdays, 6 p.m.-midnight together. Making jokes, getting ALL ABOUT GAMES to know one another on a per7079 W. Overland Rd. sonal level.” 208-343-5653 The board-game market allaboutgamesboise.com seems to be hitting a new stride. Whether it’s the cost associated with video gaming or a desire to get back to basics, the resurgence of board games is gaining speed. And with the help of places like AAG, boards games are reaching a broader demographic. The appeal of board gaming in real life is the interaction with other people. It’s not the 2 a.m. World of Warcraft binge, with a side of Coke and Cheetos. Rather, it’s team building and strategy gaming, the side effects of which are strong bonds with actual human beings. On Tuesday nights, AAG also hosts large-scale Magic: The Gathering game nights. Fans also spend time together working on intricate scale-models of fantasy kingdoms or tricking out hotels in order to net tourist dollars. [Playing board games] teaches you how to think,” says DeLaney. “And helps you see weaknesses in your own thinking.” —Andrew Crisp

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 27


NEWS/FOOD BW GETS FOUR LO-ADED

28 | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | BOISEweekly

FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

WICKY WICKY SUSHI A nondescript strip mall on the Bench—on a road where Before Todd Wickstrom opened Wicky Wicky Sushi, he used to prepare few accidentally stop to eat, in an odd corner location, wholesale sushi for grocery chains at his Rose Hill business Sushi on the Spot. behind a new stand-alone structure—is not a prime spot Though Wickstrom now focuses on the retail end of the sushi business at for a restaurant. But when Wicky Wicky Sushi owner Todd Wicky Wicky Sushi—a hole-in-the-wall strip-mall joint off Overland Road— Wickstrom moved to his current Overland Road spot, it was you can tell by looking at his tight, square-shaped rolls that the dude has after more than a decade owning and operating Sushi on the spent some serious time with a roll-mat and knife. Spot on an odd parcel on Rose Hill Road, with a sketchyIn fact, between placing loud telephone orders for Kewpie mayo and Kirin looking mechanic on one side and rundown houses on the beer on a recent blustery, overcast afternoon, Wickstrom, a 40-something guy other. So maybe he’s used to that kind of thing. with a beach-bum vibe, explained that he used to sell sushi at Grateful Dead On a weekday afternoon, Wicky Wicky vibed more like a shows. Take one look around at the oddly decorated space, and that instantly diner or a bar. Two middle-aged guys in truckers’ caps and makes sense—a Japanese rising sun wall mural is lined with vacation photos coats sat at the small of Wickstrom holdsushi bar, jawing ing up giant fish and with Wickstrom. a chair made from The three of them old skis sits in one looked like guys who corner. Wicky Wicky catch the fish more doesn’t pour on the than guys who eat atmospheric charm, it—but Wickstrom nor does it try to does that, too. One please raw-fishwall at Wicky Wicky weary palates with is lined with the old teriyaki or tempura Sushi on the Spot dishes. But it does sign and blown-up offer a focused selecphotos of Wickstrom tion of sushi, nigiri and his friends on and temaki. tropical fishing trips. To ease the awkWickstrom remiwardness of sitting nisced about how a alone in the empty, Japanese fisherman music-less space, I taught him how to ordered a carafe of filet and prepare the house hot sake sushi fish many a ($5) and took to year ago. Since then, reading a magazine. Wickstrom has been But when my server adding his own fired up the deep spin: The Volcano fryer to cook my ($12.99) is dressed in jalapenos and pico de gallo to veggie eggrolls ($3.99), the loud pops and spatters of WICKY WICKY SUSHI add heat and the Special K ($13.99) touts sambal hot oil were easily distracting. 6555 Overland Road delek, a chili paste. And then there’s the Dead Cat Bringing out two small rolls—the last of their Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; Tue.-Sat. 5:30-9 p.m. ($17.99), a roll that humorously looks like roadkill. stock—Wickstrom confessed that they were one of Wickstrom and I discussed the beautiful bottles only two things on the menu he doesn’t make himself. of beer and sake that line a back shelf as well as his The other, he said, was the salad. “I’m a sushi guy. I’m record collection while I sipped on hot and sour not set up to make that other stuff.” miso soup ($1.99). The soup was a surprise, with slivers of As for the stuff he does make, the menu is peppered with basics—Philly, seaweed and carrots and a healthy portion of cilantro floatspicy tuna and California rolls—but also includes some notable deviations ing around a wedge of lemon. The density of miso matched from the norm. A number of rolls, like the Spicy Tiger ($7.49) and the Crunchy nicely with the tang of the green herb, and the puckery Yellowtail ($8.99), contain cilantro, while others like the Rosehill ($8.49) and lemon added a welcome splash of sour citrus. the vegetarian Green roll ($6.99), interestingly include red onion. The speEel, hamachi, tempura shrimp, smoked salmon and cialty rolls also incorporate some eyebrow-raising ingredients: The Matterhorn avocado made up the Yummy Roll ($13.95), which, with ($15.99) is draped in arctic surf clam, while the Special K ($13.99) is covered in those ingredients, would have been well-named but the jalapeno slices and sambal delek (fresh ground chili paste). fish was too far gone for me to finish the roll. However, I went with the accurately named Yummy roll ($13.99), which included the texture and taste of tuna poke ($7.99) mostly made up particularly crunchy tempura shrimp, eel, smoked salmon and avocado on the for the loss. Fresh little cerise-colored chunks of tuna were inside and hamachi, avocado and kubiyaki sauce on the outside. Though the blanketed in poppy balls of masago and crispy green onion roll was fresh, the price point struck me as a bit hefty for its moderate size, slices. Spam musubi ($2.95)—two huge, thick slices of not to mention the spot’s out-of-the-way location and odd atmosphere. Spam on sticky rice and wrapped in a ribbon of seaweed— As I finished off my fiery sake, Wickstrom busted out photos of the Dead rounded out my meal. Cat roll ($17.99)—raw arctic surf clam and tuna arranged to look like a runNow that I know where Wicky Wicky sushi is, I may not over cat, complete with nori tire treads—and eagerly presented the store’s latest go back for a roll, but I would definitely snap up another swag: T-shirts with a tag line about rolling a fattie. order of poke, miso soup and musubi. And maybe a takeIf you’re looking for a swank night out, Wicky Wicky isn’t the place. But if home bottle of sake (it’s on sale this month). you like your sushi served up with a side of oddball humor, be sure to sign up for one of Wickstrom’s sure-to-entertain intro sushi rolling classes. —Amy Atkins wants to know why somebody hasn’t come up with Gumby poke yet. —Tara Morgan thinks Overland is still the wicky-wicky Wild Wild West. GLENN LANDBERG

“The FDA should’ve banned this on taste alone,” proclaimed an official BW taste-tester during our investigative video report into the effects of Four Loko—and the drink’s recently banned caffeinated malt beverage peers Tilt, Joose and Core—on general good judgment. With 11 cans of toxic, syrupy booze before us, we embarked on a journey that began with descriptions like “ash-tray-esque,” “barfmouth,” “Mountain Dew left in a Big Gulp under a frat boy’s bed” and ended with a candle-lit Viking funeral procession down to the Boise River. As we soon found out, Four Loko is definitely a hazard to public health. It leads mildly reasonable adults to write ukulele theme songs and recite the Gettysburg Address— “Four Loko and seven beers ago”—wearing paper top hats and beards. To watch the official BW PSA detailing the adverse effects of these candy-flavored malt beverages on our once upstanding reputations, visit video. boiseweekly.com. Speaking of booze-infused candy, manufacturers have finally heeded the desires of teenagers the world over and combined their two favorite brain cell obliterators: Whip-its and sugary alcohol. Whipped Lightning, an alcohol-infused aerosol whipped cream is now on shelves in a number of states across the country. The “whipahol” comes in a variety of flavors, including German chocolate, hazelnut espresso, caramel pecan, white chocolate raspberry and coconut. Though Idaho doesn’t currently carry Whipped Lightning, according to the company’s online map, it’s coming soon to Nevada. Barbacoa—the blingy, pond-side Parkcenter bar and eatery—is slated to re-open one year after a fire completely destroyed the multi-million-dollar establishment. Owner Robert Castoro has updated a number of things in the space, including adding a dance-floor with a DJ booth, a “secret” second story VIP area and rooftop deck. “We’ve got … probably seven figures in new antiquities in there. I have 11 artists that have been working for us full time. Nothing is bought from a store,” said Castoro. “It’s spectacular and it’s over the top—it’s literally five times what is was before.” Regulars will recognize Chef Enrique Martinez’s signature menu and the rad double happy hour. A special preview party will take place New Year’s Eve. For $50 per person you can enjoy appetizers and one complimentary drink. Score tickets for the NYE party by calling 208-3385000. —Tara Morgan

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Berryhill’s Restaurant · Bar 121 N. 9th Boise 387.3553 www.berryhillandco.com [we’re open Dec 24th and 25th]

(YH

1HZ<HDU¶V 1HZ<HDU¶V 

GLQQHUEXIIHWmenu on-line then rock in the new year greg

with john berryhill and friends martinez & don cunningham

Reservations Strongly Suggested

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 29


FOOD/DINING Caldwell THE COFFEE SHOP—Canyon County Courthouse parking lot espresso, drip coffee, fresh baked goods, hot dogs, Polish sausages, cheeseburgers and snow cones. 1115 Albany, 208454-7300. $ DUTCH GOOSE—Homemade finger steaks, fresh steamed clams, soup, sandwiches and great hot wings. They also serve up over 17 beers. 2502 Cleveland Blvd., 208-459-9363, dutchgoose.com. $-$$ SU OM FIESTA GUADALAJARA—Traditional Mexican restaurant specializing in tacos, burritos, and enchiladas. A full menu tempts you to choose a not-so common dish. 3552 S. Findley Ave., 208-424-8580. fiestasguadalajara.com. $-$$ SU OM GARCIA’S TEX-MEX GRILL— Open for breakfast and lunch. Closed on Saturdays, yet open on Sundays. 313 S. Kimball Ave., 208-459-6948. $$-$$$ SU IMELDA’S MEXICAN FOOD— Imelda’s is known for the homemade flour or corn tortillas and a make-your-own-taco option. Select from a wide variety of meats including chile Colorado, beef guisado, and barbacoa, ground beef, cubed pork, chicken, chorizo, shredded beef, bacon and sausage; then choose from a variety of toppings that include rice, onions, lettuce, beans, cilantro, and even potato. 2414 Cleveland Blvd., 208-454-8757. $ MANCINO’S SUBS AND PIZZA—Caldwell’s Mancino’s is home to hot, oven baked sandwiches with melted cheese piled high with deli meats. Appetizers include mozzarella sticks, jalapeno poppers and boneless chicken wings. The menu doesn’t leave out soups, salads and of course, pizza. 2412 Cleveland Blvd., 208-459-7556. $

a cup of pumpkin bisque all topped off with flourless chocolate cake. 320 11th Ave. S., Ste. 100, 208-468-0029. brick29.com. $-$$ SU OM

ELLIOTT’S SPORTS PUB AND GRILL—Nampa pub perfect for watching the game. 1125 Caldwell Blvd., 208-467-6811. $-$$

CHAPALA—The same great Jaliscan food Idaho expects Chapala to deliver. 2117 12th Avenue Road, 208-461-9355. chapalarestaurants.com. $-$$ SU OM

ELMER’S—Using only Northwest ingredients. This is a family friendly restaurant offering breakfast, lunch and dinner. 1411 Shilo Dr., 208-466-7945. $$-$$$ SU OM

CHOCOLATE BLUEBIRD—Speciality cakes that will make your mouth water. 3116 Garrity Boulevard, 208-467-1933. chocolatebluebird.com. $-$$

FIREHOUSE SPORTS PUB—The sports pub features seven 42-inch flat screen TVs, games, billiards and a fully fried menu with chicken strips, fries, tots, fish and chips, French dip ham sandwich, calamari and house salads. 1515 N. Midland Blvd., 208-463-0167, firehousepub.biz. $-$$ SU

COPPER CANYON—Fine dining in downtown Nampa. If you’re looking for a delicious steak, Copper Canyon in downtown Nampa deserves your attention. It may be a little off the beaten path, but well worth the trip to enjoy their fine dining in an intimate setting. 113 13th St. S., 208-461-0887. copppercanyonnampa.com. $$$ RES OM THE EGG FACTORY— Homestyle cooking focused on the details; featuring a new omelette every week and a new benedict every month. 820 Caldwell Blvd., 208-466-2728, eggfactorycafe. com. $-$$ OM EL RINCONCITO—Casual Mexican dining for the family. 824 First St. S., 208-466-6963. $-$$ EL TENAMPA—Authentic and fresh Mexican food. 248 Caldwell Blvd., 208-466-4460. $$-$$$ SU OM

FLYING M COFFEEGARAGE— First Flying M moves out to Canyon County and makes a home out of a former garage shop. Now that space is chock full of coolness in the form of a coffeeshop, gift shop and all-age art and music venue. Food selections to go along with the in-house roasted coffee include pastries made at the in-house bakery. 1314 Second St. S., 208-467-5533. flyingmcoffee.com. $ SU GANDOLFO’S DELI—The Georgia based franchise of New York delicatessens provides sandwich fans with New York style hot and cold deli sands. 16734 N. Marketplace Blvd., 208-466-3354. gandolfosdeli.com. $

FOOD/RECENTLY REVIEWED TABLEROCK BREWPUB AND GRILL

THE ORCHARD HOUSE RESTAURANT—The Orchard House is just that. It has a country style menu and serves meals three times a day. 14949 Sunnyslope Road, 208-4598200. theorchardhouse.us. $$-$$$ SU OM

705 Fulton St., 208-342-0944, tablerockbrewpub.com “Ultimately, I couldn’t pass up the cod and potato pancakes ($9.99), a hearty combo that instantly plopped my butt down at a dark wood pub in Prague.” —Tara Morgan

TACOS MICHOACAN—Authentic neighborhood taqueria where the music is loud and the food isn’t your typical gringo grub. 605 N. Fifth Ave., 208-454-1583. $

THE EGG FACTORY RISE & SHINE DAYTIME CAFE 8061 W. Fairview Ave., 208-322-0191, eggfactorycafe.com “If it’s not what’s on the outside that counts when it comes to The Egg Factory, then it must be what’s on the inside.” —Rachael Daigle

Nampa BRICK 29 BISTRO—Chef Dustan Bristol is co-owner of Nampa’s casually upscale eatery which serves fancy takes on common foods. Asian pork tacos come with a side of apple-almond coleslaw and fancier still, an open-face Reuben sandwich with

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ —Less than $8 $ $ —$8 to $14 $ $ $ —$14 to $20 $ $ $ $ —Over $20

MOON’S KITCHEN CAFE 712 W. Idaho St., 208-385-0472, moonskitchen.com “Hubby vowed to help me polish off the Guinness shake ($6.50) but then promptly ordered the colossal Reuben ($9.95).” —Sarah Barber

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RES —Reservations

needed/recommended —Patio SU —Open on Sunday OM —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

30 | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 31


FOOD/DINING HOUSE OF KIM—Great food, topnotch service and unique ambience makes House of Kim worth a drive to Nampa. The food is fresh, portions are plentiful and the selections aren’t soaked in soy sauce. If that doesn’t get you to gas up the car, maybe this will: HOK offers spicy, spicy, spicy Thai options as well. 1226 1st St. S., 208-466-3237. houseofkim.net. $$ SU OM KRUNG THAI RESTAURANT AND SUSHI BAR—Talk about Asian fusion: We’re talking Thai, Japanese and a little sushi for good measure. 3008 Garrity Blvd., 208-442-5254. krung-thai. OM com. $-$$ LA BELLE VIE—A fine-dining French cafe opened in a historic downtown Nampa home dreamed up by ex-stay-at-home moms and Francophile travelers Julie Free and Cathy O’Connell. Slinging quiches and pastries for breakfast and paninis and soups for lunch. Also open for dinner on Friday and Saturday offering an ever-changing array of dishes like brie in puff pastry with cherries and almonds or turkey roulade with sausage, fig, pine nut, cranberry and rosemary stuffing. If lingering over the weekend is more your style, La Belle Vie is also open for brunch on Saturdays. 220 14th Ave. S., 208-466-0200. labellevienampa. com. $-$$ SU LE BARON HONKER’S—Homecooking feel cafe serving comfort food for the locals. 1210 2nd Street South, 208-466-1551. MONA LISA—This atmospheric restaurant specializes in fondue served in an intimate setting inspired by a single piece of art (you know the one). This isn’t just for fine dining—it’s positively decadent. Great for special occasions or when you just want to take your time over dinner. 102 11th Ave. N., 208-442-1400. mlfondue.com. $$$ RES SU OM PRIMO’S—All-you-can-eat pizza, pasta and salad for only $4.99 for the big kids and $2.99 (ages 4-10) for the wee people. And 3 and under eat for free! Locations in Boise, Meridian and Nampa. 1236 Caldwell Blvd., 208-4687703, primospizza.com. $-$$ SU OM SMOKY MOUNTAIN PIZZA AND PASTA—When you’re in the mood for a good, traditional pizza, this is the place. The pastas, starters, sandwiches and salads are equally delicious, and the list is as long as your arm. 2007 N. Cassia St., 208-461-7333. smokymountainpizza.com. $-$$ SU OM SQUEEZERS—Retro-themed burger joint that makes with the tasty, but leaves the grease on the side. 2121 12th Ave. S., 208-466-5455. squeezersgiantburgers.com. $-$$ SU OM WRAP SHACK—Limited menu, but plenty of options for wraps, salads and rice bowls. 5830 E. Franklin Road, 208-468-8833, SU OM wrapshack.us. $

Star STAR COUNTRY CAFE—A country cafe the Idaho way with a full breakfast and lunch menu. Definitely a favorite stop in the sleepy town of Star. 10883 W. State St., 208-286-7799. $-$$ SU SULLY’S PUB AND GRILL— Serving up burgers, fries, fingersteaks and all manner of Irish pub classics with a contemporary spin in a relaxed

atmosphere. Sunday brunch. 11123 State St., 208-286-7743, sullys-idaho.com. $-$$$ SU OM

Emmett CHERRIES—Feel like a burger? Perhaps some fries to go with it? Cherries is pubtacular. 101 E. Main St., 208-365-3108. $-$$

FOOD/WINE SIPPER

STOCKING STUFFERS With my boys grown and out on their own, Christmas morning is a much more subdued affair than it used to be. No water fall of packages under the tree, no aftermath of bows and torn wrapping paper littering the floor, and we can sleep in past sunrise if we want. When the boys were younger, we told them Santa was probably bored with the milk and icing-laden cookies that greeted him at ever y house. We talked them into leaving a split of sparkling wine and almond biscotti instead. Santa reciprocated by stuffing a small bottle in our stockings: wine for my wife and me, juice for the kids. A split—half of a halfbottle or 187 ml—is the per fect item to top off your own wine lover’s sock. It doesn’t have to be expensive. When it comes to bubbles, $3 will buy you either Segura Vidas Cava (bone-dr y from Spain) or Lunetta Prosecco (just a hint of sweetness from Italy). For around $5, you can go French with the lithe and lovely Charles de Fere Cuvee Jean-Louis, an elegant blanc de blanc. You can even score a true Champagne without breaking the bank. Laurent-Perrier Brut LP is the real deal from a top house, and it retails for less than $12. If you like things more on the sweet side, there are a couple of great choices. A split of Graham’s Six Grapes Reser ve Port sells for less than $10 and is the per fect tipple to enjoy on a cold winter’s eve. One of the more esoteric wines hails from Germany, where they let Riesling grapes freeze on the vine well into winter. The juice becomes extremely concentrated, and the result is an amazingly rich and complex dessert wine. At $20 a split, the 2007 Dr. Loosen Eiswein is a relative bargain that’s sure to make for a happy holiday. — David Kirkpatrick

32 | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY R E A L ES TAT E

BW BEAUTY

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: www.Roommates.com ROOMMATE WANTED I’m a quiet fortysomething y/o male with an extra room for rent in my house in a nice bench neighborhood off Vista Avenue. 2BD, 1BA. House is completely furnished except your room. Some storage area available. $325/mo., $150 dep., 1/2 util., (gas & electric only). Looking for a long term renter who is not a partier or does drugs & is honest. I have a large dog & dog door leading to the fenced backyard. Will consider your dog if they get along. 412-9677.

HAIRLINES Stop in or Call Lui Goitia at Hairlines. Make an appointment for a new holiday style. Looking for that perfect gift? A gift certificate at Hairlines! 409 S. 8th St, Boise. 208-383-9009.

BW RENTALS 2BD, 2BA apt. at State St. & Kessinger. $575/mo. Pets welcome. 371-6762. AVAILABLE DECEMBER 1! Large 1BD apt available. W/D, DW incld. Please call 208-495-2484. Located on State St. BOISE DEPOT BENCH HOUSE 2BD +. $875/mo. Call 484-6407. NW HOME AVAIL. IMMEDIATELY! 3BD, 2BA. Foothill Views! Pets welcome! Private Party! 353-6529.

BW FOR SALE LAND LIQUIDATION 20 acres, $0 down, $99/month. Only $12,900. Near growing El Paso, Texas. Guaranteed owner financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Money back guarantee. FREE Map/pictures. 866-257-4555 www.sunsetranches.com ONLY $8500! Mobile home located in the desirable Ponderosa Mobile Home Park, 2725 N. Five Mile Rd. Space # 10, Boise. 2BD, 1BA Includes stackable W/D, stove, refrigerator & outdoor storage shed. Covered carport & porch! Call Deborah with Idaho Properties at 208-484-0752 for a showing or see virtual tour at www.tourfactory.com/630719 Available for immediate occupancy. Make this your holiday present!

BW WANT TO BUY

REAL ESTATE - SERVICES

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

BW ROOMMATES

Here’s to a Wonderful Holiday Season!!!

BW MASSAGE A Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577 Thomas. *A Massage by Terrance. Full body, hot oil, private studio, heated table. In/Out Call. 841-1320. ULM 340-8377.

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

OFFICE HOURS Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Out to Lunch 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS

BLUE ROOSTER REALTY

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

BW HEALTH & FITNESS DAILY TRAIL CONDITIONS Log on to www.ridgetorivers.org to check current conditions daily. That way you will know if the trails are too muddy for traveling on, as well as which trails might be good alternatives.

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

VIP MASSAGE

Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 8805772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Boise & Nampa studios.

COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - BEAUTY

P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly. com

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 33


CA R E ERS BW HELP WANTED $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www.easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net

PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

MOVIE EXTRAS earn up to $150/day to stand in backgrounds of major film. Experience not required. CALL NOW! 1-888-664-0062. Paid In Advance! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net STYLIST NEEDED Stylist needed for 25 hrs./wk. minimum. This is a contract for commission position and you are an independent contractor. 60/40 split or lease $100/wk. E-mail resume atomichairboise@gmail. com Check out atomicsalonboise.com Social Worker

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

M IND, BO DY, SPIR IT - YOGA

34 | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

EAT HERE

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Interfaith Sanctuary Housing Services is accepting applications for a full-time Supportive Services Director. Applications will be accepted through Friday, December 24 at 5 pm. Completed applications must be sent by email only to info@interfaithsanctuary.org. Applications may not be delivered to the shelter, mailed or faxed. For more information about Interfaith Sanctuary, visit our website at www. interfaithsanctuary.org. The job application can be found on the Sanctuary website: www.interfaithsanctuary.org. Application links are located on the ‘Job Announcement’ page tab.

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VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

BW CAREER EDUCATION & TRAINING

C O MMU N IT Y BW ANNOUNCEMENTS

RIGHT SCHOOL, RIGHT DEGREE, RIGHT NOW!

Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800532-6546 Ext. 97 www.continentalacademy.com MUSICIANS NEEDED Musicians needed for Country Music Band. Call Cheri 208-6294974.

BW LOST

EAT HERE

Lost Nov. 5th. Large black cat. 3 miles east of Sand Hollow Store on farm at 26590 Hwy 30. Call 922-4988.

F O R S A LE BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 8881464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

BW ART, ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES CALL TO LOCAL ARTISTS If you are a local artist looking for a venue to sell your artwork through, we are looking for you. Green Chutes Artist Coop is opening December 15th in the Collister Shopping Center, 4716 W. State St., Boise. Come visit our 12,000 SF space as we remodel, we think you’ll be excited too. For membership information contact Nancy Zurcher 208-695-7156 or email greenchutes@netzero.net

SARA’S SECONDHAND

Will pay CASH for furniture. Call 331-2366.

VILLAGE ANTIQUES

Multiple dealers, two floors of antiques & furniture. Vendor space avail. Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30. 2nd St. South in Downtown Nampa. 468-0900.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

TIPPER: 2-year-old male Siamese mix. Large indoor cat who is good with cats and dogs. Litterbox-trained. Self sufficient and friendly. (Kennel 26- #7579195)

MIA: 10-month-old female husky mix. Good with other dogs. Build her confidence by exposing her to new things. (Kennel 322- # 11964989)

PRECIOUS: 4-yearold female cat who is playful and enjoys toys. Good with dogs and cats. Prefers a home without children. (Kennel 111- #11939267)

TYLER: 6-year-old male cat. Declawed front paws. Easy-going house cat who gets along well with everyone. Uses his litterbox. (Kennel 09#11992584)

SPOT: 3-year-old male, rat terrier with a big-dog attitude. Best with adults or teenagers. Indoor-only dog. Gentle on the leash. (Kennel 300- #11926695)

TUCKER: 9-month-old male terrier mix. Needs obedience training to bring out his best. Assertive with other dogs. House-trained. (Kennel 414- #11937555)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

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SPIRIT: I am a spunky young lady with lots of love to give.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | DECEMBER 15–21, 2010 | 35


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NYT CROSSWORD | 1 Hearty drinks 7 Midwest city named for an Indian tribe 12 More sentimental 19 Major diamond exporter 20 Closing to some letters 21 Trapped 1

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22 It makes the hair stand on end 23 First step of instructions for what to do with this finished puzzle 25 N.Y.C.’s ___ of the Americas 26 Goal of a screen test

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Web browser provider ___ fide Part of every month Reveals Instructions, part 2 Prohibition’s start ___ Little, “The Wire” gangster 65 Old Philadelphia stadium, informally, with “the” 66 Earthen pot 67 Bygone Starfire, e.g., informally 68 ___ Rebellion of 185759 70 Evicts 72 Org. in 2005’s Oscarwinning “Crash” 73 Hightail it 74 Alternative to plata 75 Cellar item 76 Bedouin 77 Instructions, part 3 82 Demagnetize, say 83 St. in a children’s rhyme 84 Coupling 85 Previously 87 Half of many a business partnership 88 Ticks off 91 Plug’s place 92 It’s between green and black 95 Viceroy, e.g. 96 Snap 97 Aware of 98 Nile biters 102 “We shun it ___ it comes”: Emily Dickinson 103 “Beat it!” 105 Little bit 106 Moolah 107 Except for 109 Certain tankful 110 ___ alai 112Some funerary ware 114 See 48-Across 115 Last step of the instructions 119 Tie up

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Cell phone plan units “Pick me! Pick me!” Long fights Least puzzling Pedestal toppers Barrels along

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Latin lover’s word Elicit Alpaca relatives Home of minor-league baseball’s Diablos 62 Depress 68 Undersides 69 Greek god whose name is one letter off from 118-Down 70 Soak up rays 71 Second-largest city in Kyrgyzstan 75 “No problemo” 76 “On tap” sign, sometimes 78 Affirms 79 Depressing darkness 80 Scuttlebutt 81 Device for winter sidewalks 86 Virtue 88 Take for granted 89 Superstate in Orwell’s “1984” 90 Good rolls in craps 91 One-named singer/ actress 92 “___-la-la!” L A S T

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93 Stampede 94 [That’s awful!] 96 The rite person? 99 Waste 100 Finished second 101 Gray hair producer, they say 104 Superman’s closetful? 105 Vista 108 Pin holder 110 King in II Kings 111 Brouhahas 113 Trim 116 Packed away 117 Head, in slang 118 Greek goddess whose name is one letter off from 69-Down 120 Virginia’s ___ Highway˙ Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

S A N A I D A H O S T E F O R S E V E R T O A T E D A L L ON R E D I N E N O L A M H O E R I A R D R O P ON I ON V I S C R T S O F T C O L O R C H I P S ON E I R ON A S S A F R A I D G R E T E E N C E ON A U C T I ON A L A K P M S K O A E B B P S E ON T H E B U T T ON G G E C K O S A T O M I B I G ON R I B C A G E ON S J I V M G M L A S S H A O T I ON A L C O N A N I M ON L N A N U Y A Y M E R I S L ON G S T ON Y T ON I T ON E I Y S P E S T O I B E A M W A R D H U E T Z U S M R I F E S E N T E R E D L E E T R E E L I G H T I N G C E R M C O L O C N ON E E V E S H S U E O S S T S P

R O C K E F E L L E R C E N T E R U T E S

I N G S S O O N A R G O W O W R A L E Y S S A S P G A E R G Y T U I S A C E S E S O T A C H O O Y O U N U S ON I S T A C E S T I T B E M O N Y E G E R R A G E

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free will astrology ARIES (March 21-April 19): I vividly remember seeing singer Diamanda Galas in concert. Though classically trained, she didn’t confine herself to mellifluous melodies and elegant tones. She was a whirlwind of elemental sound, veering from animalistic bellows to otherworldly chants to operatic glossolalia. The skill with which she shaped the sound as it escaped her body was prodigious. My companion and I agreed that “she made your ears convulse and your eyes writhe and your skin prickle—but in a good way.” How would you feel about inviting some similar experiences into your life, Aries? The astrological omens suggest this would be an excellent time to seek the rowdy healing that only disciplined wildness can provide. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Here’s a haiku-like poem by Cor van den Heuvel: “the little girl / hangs all the ornaments / on the nearest branch.” My comment: It’s cute that the girl crams all the decorations onto one small section of the tree and maybe her parents will keep them that way. But I recommend that you take a different approach as you work to beautify and enliven your environment. Spread out your offerings; distribute your blessings equally; make sure that everything in need of invigoration gets what it requires. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): This is a good time to go in search of any secrets you’ve been hiding from yourself. I suggest you also try to track down the “missing links” that aren’t really missing but rather are neglected. My advice is similar for the supposedly “lost treasure” you’re wondering about: Clues about its whereabouts are lying around in full view for anyone who is innocent enough to see them. P.S. Being uncomplicated isn’t normally your strong suit, but this is one of those rare times when you’ll have an aptitude for it. CANCER (June 21-July 22): In the TV comedy series Arrested Development, Buster Bluth was an adult character who was a bit over-attached to his mother. It seemed to have to do with the fact that he lingered in her womb for 11 months before agreeing to be born. The obstetrician claimed “there were claw marks on her uterus.” I want to be sure you don’t make a comparable misstep in the coming weeks, Cancerian. It really is time for you to come out and play. Ready or not, leave your protective sanctuary and leap into the jangly, enchanting tumult. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I have imaginary friends who help me. And yes, they sometimes even give me ideas for your horoscopes. Among the many other

38 | December 15–21, 2010 | boiseweekly

perks my secret buddies provide, they show me where my cell phone and car keys are when I’ve misplaced them—a prime sign of their practical value. What’s your current status in regard to imaginary friends, Leo? Do you have any? This would be an excellent time to seek them out and put them to work. In fact, I encourage you to do anything that might attract the input of undiscovered allies, behind-the-scenes collaborators, mysterious guidance and divine assistance. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Might there be a message for you in the mist on the window? Can you find a clue to the next phase of your destiny by scanning a newspaper that the wind blows against your leg as you’re walking? Be alert for the undertones, Virgo. Tune in to the subtexts. Scan the peripheries for the future as it reveals itself a little early. You never know when the hidden world might be trying to slip you a tip. You should be alert for the deeper storylines weaving themselves just below the level where the supposedly main plot is unfolding. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A musician who records under the name of Shamantis took Justin Bieber’s silly pop tune “U Smile,” and slowed it down 800 percent. The new work was a 35-minutelong epic masterpiece of ambient electronica that The New York Times praised as “ghostly” and “oceanic.” More than 2 million people tuned in to hear it on the Internet. Might there be a comparable transformation in your future, Libra? From an astrological perspective, it’s prime time for you to transform a pedestrian exercise into a transcendent excursion or a trivial diversion into an elegant inspiration. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): More than a few wildlife films use deception to fool the audiences into thinking they’re watching animals in the wild. So says Chris Palmer, a producer of many such films. “One classic trick involves hiding jellybeans in carcasses,” he told New Scientist. “If you see a bear feeding on a dead elk in a film, you can be pretty sure that the bear was hired from a game farm and is looking for sweets hidden in the carcass by the filmmakers.” I suspect you will encounter a metaphorically comparable ruse sometime soon, Scorpio. It’ll be your job to be an enforcer of authenticity. Be on the lookout for the jellybeans. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): My favorite news source, The Onion, reported on a proposed law that would prohibit marriage between any two people who don’t actually love each other (Onion.com/LoveLaw). Couples whose unions are rooted in mutual antipathy or indifference

are of course protesting the plan, insisting that they have as much of a right to wed as those who care for each other deeply and treat each other tenderly. Whether or not this proposal becomes a formal part of the legal system, Sagittarius, I urge you to embrace it. In fact, I’ll go so far as to ask you not to do anything at all unless you are at least somewhat motivated by love. The coming months will be a time when your success will depend on your ability to rise to new heights of compassion, romance, eros, tenderness, empathy and affection. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Let’s imagine we’re fifth-century monks living in the land that today is known as the south of France. And let’s say we decide we’re going to build a chapel in a place that has long been a pagan shrine dedicated to the moon goddess Selene. Shouldn’t we consider the possibility that our new house of worship may be imbued with the vibes of the previous sanctuary? Won’t our own spiritual aspirations be colored by those of the people who, for hundreds of years, poured forth their devotions? Now shift your attention to the present day and apply our little thought experiment to what’s going on in your life. Tune in to the influences that may be conditioning the new thing you’d like to create. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I would like to steal your angst, Aquarius. I fantasize about sneaking into your room tonight, plucking your nightmares right out of the heavy air and spiriting them away. I imagine sidling up to you on a crowded street and pickpocketing your bitterness and frustration—maybe even pilfering your doubts, too. I wouldn’t keep any of these ill-gotten goods for myself, of course. I wouldn’t try to profit from them in any way. Instead, I would donate them to the yawning abyss or feed them to a bonfire on a primal beach. P.S. Even though I can’t personally accomplish these things, there is now a force loose in your life that can. Are you willing to be robbed of things you don’t need? PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In 2011, I bet that memory won’t play as big a role in your life as it has up until now. I don’t mean to say that you will neglect or forget about the past. Rather, I expect that you will be less hemmed in by the consequences of what happened way back when. You’ll be able to work around—and maybe even transcend—the limitations that the old days and the old ways used to impose on you. Your free will? It will be freer than maybe it has ever been. Your creative powers will override the inertia of how things have always been done.

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