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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 24 DECEMBER 8–14, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 9

PAYETTE: THE YES COUNTY Unless you’re with Snake River Alliance FEATURE 11

THE AMERICAN DREAM (ACT) For undocumented youth, the Dream Act could mean everything PICKS 16

GET OFF YOUR COUCH And find something to do in this week’s BW SCREEN 26

WHAT WOULD WALT DO? He’d keep making movies like Tangled

“It’s like that Disney fan turned into a whore.”

NOISE 22


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NOTE IN THE EYES OF IDAHO LAW, WOMEN ARE STILL SECOND CLASS I love Idaho. I do. But I find myself more frequently these days re-evaluating my decision to continue living here. The reason for my second-guessing: the yahoos who pass laws or neglect to change archaic laws that diminish my rights as a woman. Last week, several news outlets reported a story about a woman who was duped into having sex with a man she thought was her boyfriend. Though the offender and the accomplice boyfriend appeared in court on rape charges, Judge Cheri Copsey was forced to drop the charges because of what’s being called a “quirk” in Idaho law. That little idiosyncrasy: the victim’s marital status. Had the victim been married and been tricked into sex with someone other than her hubby, the offender’s alleged actions would have certainly violated the law. However, as the law is written, rape by trickery only applies to women who are married— not the unwed. So a word to would-be rapists: Find a buddy with a girlfriend rather than a wife, and you’re in the clear. Declo Republican Sen. Denton Darrington has stated he’d like to change the law in the 2011 legislative session to include unmarried women, but I’ll believe it when I see it. After all, he voted yes to the erosion of women’s reproductive rights with the Freedom of Conscience bill, which allows health-care professionals to deny a patient services they deem immoral. Hopefully, rape is one area in which he’s willing to stand up for the women he represents. And hopefully, enough of his colleagues follow suit, ensuring that a woman’s body is more important in the eyes of the law than a legal quirk or her official connection to a man. As for this week’s issue, the main feature is a piece that I wrote about in last week’s Note. It was first published at boiseweekly.com and was so well received by online readers that we’d be remiss not to share it with those of you who are print-only readers. As of press time, a vote on the Dream Act was slated the day this issue hits stands, but it’s difficult to predict what will happen by the end of this issue’s shelf life. Perhaps Aaron’s future will have been decided. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Amy Westover TITLE: Untitled (surrender) MEDIUM: Monotype print ARTIST STATEMENT: Surrender is like the wind. I cannot tell you about surrender just like I cannot tell you about the wind. In a split second it is here and simultaneously gone.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 3


WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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MAIL / MONDO GAGA

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Is the nuclear fight in Payette County a foregone conclusion? 9 CITIZEN

A SIGN WITH SOMETHING ON ITS MIND Think about the do-not-cross signs at intersections in downtown Boise. Hint: flashing red hands. Now think about what one of those flashing red hands looks like missing a few red lights—like, say, the red dots that make up the first, fourth and pinky fingers. Visit Cobweb for the stor y about a Spokane pedestrian sign that resembled a bird. The non-flying kind.

WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER How do you win a two-night stay, dinner for two and two lift tickets to Mt. Bachelor, plus a tour and tastings at Deschutes Brewery? You put together a kick-ass video featuring snow, enter it into BW’s Frosty Goes to Hollywood competition at frosty.boiseweekly.com, and get everyone you know to vote for you. Details on Page 26.

TRADING ONE “EFF” FOR ANOTHER Idaho may have lost the F-35 but it looks like Mountain Home Air Force Base has a plan B: supporting a squadron of Saudi F-15s. More at Citydesk.

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Getting to know gender bender Jeffree Star

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Not your childhood’s Rapunzel

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SCREEN TV Sarah Palin’s Alaska

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FOOD Two reviewers get reacquainted with TableRock Brewpub and Grill 28 BEER GUZZLER

LIVIN’ ON A PRAYER Last week, Lt. Gov. Brad Little told the annual taxpayers conference that his advice for the 2011 legislative season was prayer. No shit.

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FEATURE Dream Act Rising

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 5


MAIL SIN TAX

ON BUSH TAX CUTS

Our legislators will soon begin their annual migration to Boise, and they and the governor have a difficult and thankless task ahead. But if they pay attention to public opinion, there is a real opportunity to raise money, spare further cuts to Medicaid and save lives. According to the poll that just came out, I am one of the vast majority of Idahoans who think that an increase in the state tobacco tax is a great common sense approach to dealing with budget woes. More accurately seen as a user fee than as a tax, a significant increase—$1.50 per pack of cigarettes—will save lives, protect children and health-care funding. It’s a win-win and should be an easy decision for the Legislature. They may even find themselves thanked for it. —Jan Teter, Boise

Bush’s tax cuts, designed to expire by January, have cost the treasury hundreds of billions and helped transform Clinton’s $230 billion budget surplus into a yawning deficit. Today we have three alternatives: 1. Many say these tax cuts, that we clearly can’t afford, have to go. We need the revenue too much. Let them all expire. Everyone must sacrifice to help reduce our country’s budget deficit and national debt. (The downside is that removing tax breaks for 130 million households will stall the already sluggish economy as families have even less to spend and cut back even further. Our fragile recovery doesn’t need another hit. Due to tough times, this option is unwise.) 2. The middle-grounders want to let the tax cuts expire for the top 2 percent

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message.

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and reinstate tax cuts for the remaining 98 percent, which are households making less than $250,000. They argue that out of the 300 million people in this country, the top 2 percent of us do not need tax relief while we are trying to climb out of a desperate recession. (This option would cost about $255 billion a year but emphasis on the middle class would be a stimulus for the economy. Since 66 percent of the growth this decade went to the top 1 percent of the population, this is a fair and sensible compromise.) 3. Republicans prefer to restore the tax cuts for everybody, whether rich or poor, even though borrowing to keep unneeded tax breaks for the richest 2 percent among us would add another $700 billion to the budget deficit. (We need the revenue too badly to reinstate tax breaks across the board. If conservatives were as serious about reducing the national debt as they claim, they would choose option one or two over option three’s $700 billion fiscal mistake.) —Sherrie Goff, Pocatello

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BILL COPE/OPINION

I AM AN IDIOT And the proof lies below

(The following e-mail was sent objecting to the column “Mass Murder, Inc.” Except changing the author’s name, it is reproduced exactly as it was received.) Bill Cope you are an idiot. To suggest that the left mass murders are okay because some of the right have also killed is stupid to say the least, and it is even dumber to suggest that capitalism society is as bad. Just another way to justify a liberal agenda, justify the means. THe world is full of people who have taken over other territories or countries, in many cases for many reasons, to say it is all capitalism fault is ignorant. You also ignore the fact that native cultures in the US, South America as well as other counties were just as brutal and took over territory form other tribes but I guess that would defeat your argument you hack. The Incas and Mayan were a brutal race, but I guess since capitalism was not there goal you can ignore that. Tribal warfare in African and the middle east produced the slave trade but in your eyes the south is solely responsible because it would defeat your agenda to take about blacks capturing and selling other blacks into slavery. Get your history straight before you hack it up.I know you won’t respond because like a idiots in the left you don’t have the balls. —Gerry Dear Gerry: You are entirely right. I don’t have the balls to respond to you. Raised as I was to be “a idiots in the left,” I was instructed never to engage in discussion with people who don’t know when to use “their” instead of “there.” (A little heads up, Ger: spell check doesn’t catch things like that. You have to do it yourself.) Warnings to avoid verbal entanglements with smart fellows like you generally came during our senior year at Teddy Kennedy High, although some of us got them as early as the ninth grade in Mr. Alinsky’s algebra for community organizers class. It was there that I was alerted to the perils of crossing words with guys so keen, they can read things in print that aren’t actually there—e.g., “To suggest that the left mass murders are okay because some of the right have also killed … ” Gerry, I can’t imagine where you came up with such a notion, but I assure you, I didn’t say anything remotely like that in the column that has you so incensed. What I’m pretty sure I said was that mass murders, whether they come from socialist or capitalist backgrounds, are nasty business and should be considered a stain on humanity. (Another useful hint, Ger: Sometimes it helps to read something over a few times if your comprehension levels aren’t quite up to snuff for a one-time perusal.) Yet another caveat we received was to steer clear of geniuses who are so adept at history, they could turn any debate into an opportunity to tell how all the evils to befall people of color over the centuries, be they in the New World or the Old, were largely brought on by themselves. In specific terms, since there were black people involved in the slave trade, ergo, black people must take some responsibility for their slavery. What a moron I am for not understanding that from the beginning! And how come you know all this stuff I never heard of, huh? But then, as you so clearly pointed out, were I to have included the record of “… blacks capturing and selling other blacks ... ” in my column, it would have totally kerplooyed my whole presentation, and my agenda would have come tumbling down like a Lego ladder. Jeez, I feel so stupid. How could I not see that blacks selling other blacks couldn’t possibly have anything to do with the capitalist instinct? Furthermore, why couldn’t I have come to such splendiferous deductions as you when I wrote “Mass Murder, Inc?” I guess it was because I thought I was writing about the atrocities that often accompany economic decisions, no matter the philosophical foundations from which they come. Silly me not to have realized all along it is just about race. So, Gerry, not only don’t I have the balls to respond as you predicted, but I truly must be an idiot or I wouldn’t have even written back in this non-responsive capacity. But I felt obliged to let you know I intend to use your letter as an instruction tool in our regular Wednesday night liberal agenda plotting session. I don’t actually lead the group. We Skype up with Bill Ayers in Chicago and he directs the discussion. But we are encouraged to bring anything we pick up over the course of the week that might in any way further our plans to take over the whole world by getting every single thing wrong, as astute citizens like you are so eager to point out. And since you did challenge me to respond—a challenge that I, without a ball to my name, cannot meet—I assume I don’t need your permission to show my liberal soulmates what you sent. Who knows? It might be that your brilliance is just the thing we need to shake us free of this tragic idiocy of ours. To open our brains and let the non-hacked-up history come gushing in. Thank you so much for your contribution. —Bill Cope Dearest Comrades: I am looking forward to the Wednesday plotting session with great anticipation. Have I got something to show you! It’s an e-mail from this guy who couldn’t follow Pokey Little Puppy without pictures to go with the words. I’m certain you’ll get a good laugh out of it. And believe me, forcing our liberal agenda off on America will be a snap if this guy is any indication of what we’re up against. —Your fellow traveler, B.C. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 7


OPINION/TED RALL

CONNING THE TALIBAN

Confessions of a phony American peace negotiator ANN ARBOR, MICH.—For much of 2010, U.S. and NATO bigwigs conducted secret peace talks with Mullah Akhtar Mohammad Mansour, the No. 2 Taliban official. They paid him tens, possibly hundreds, of thousands of dollars to show good will. “But now, it turns out, Mr. Mansour was apparently not Mr. Mansour at all,” reports The New York Times. The phony Mansour, Afghan intelligence agents say, was actually “a shopkeeper from the Pakistani city of Quetta” who looked nothing like the real guy. Yes, our government and military are headed by dumb-as-rocks hillbillies. But the Taliban can be fooled, too—as I learned during my own secret mission deep in the valleys between the mountains of the Hindu Kush. I found myself short of cash while in Afghanistan in August, so I devised an ingenious scheme. Call it Operation Turnabout: Why not present myself to the Taliban as a high-ranking American official eager to end the war? Finding Talibs didn’t take long. I walked up to two guys planting an IED—or they were stoning some chick. I don’t remember. “Salaam,” I greeted them. “I am American Vice President Joe Biden. Take me forthwith to your leader, Mullah Omar.” The rogues chucked me into the back of their Land Cruiser, wrapped in duct tape. Eventually, we stopped. They ripped the tape off. “American dog!” they cried in unison. My animal cunning was too much for the two undereducated brutes. “Alas,” I replied, “my White House Amex card is not accepted by yon locals. Might I ‘borrow’ some money?” Soon I was 17 afghanis richer. A day or two later, I was carried into an empty concrete

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room somewhere in the remote tribal areas along the border of Afghanistan and Pakistan. A bearded man with an eye patch walked in. “I am Mullah Mohammed Omar, head of the Supreme Council and commander of the faithful of the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan,” he said. “Hi there,” I said. “I am American Vice President Joe Biden.” “How do I know you are who you say you are?” he asked. “Ask me anything,” I said. “The combination to the safe where the Oval Office porn is kept. Vladimir Putin’s cell number. I can even identify most of the American states.” “But you could say anything,” he said. “We have no way to check it out. The United States is a distant country. Its leaders have never been seen in public, certainly not by Afghans. We don’t even know if there is a ‘Joe Biden.’” “We must trust one another if there is to be peace,” I pointed out. “As you may have heard, we Americans have spent all our money on bonuses for bank CEOs and hedge fund managers. So if our quest for peace is to have a future, you must front me cash.” Sated with watery tea and partially cooked goat parts, I headed for the Peshawar bus terminal, where I reserved two full seats in coach. My ruse continued throughout the month. Sometimes the two cartoonists with whom I was traveling asked me where I was spending nights. “With Mullah Omar!” I wanted to shout. “Eating his nan and blowing through dozens of his afghanis!” But I couldn’t. Yes, we are a dumber-than-dumb people led by a stupider-than-stupid government. But the Taliban aren’t much smarter.

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NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS JU LIA GR EEN

PAYETTE: THE COUNTY OF “YES” P & Z commissioner says he’s offended by anti-nuke activists GEORGE PRENTICE The meeting of the Payette County Planning and Zoning commission began promptly at 7 p.m. on Dec. 9. And for the next five and a half hours, a long night’s journey into day was filled with overwhelming testimony in favor of a nuclear reactor for Payette. The evening also included an ex-reporter sharing a the story of why he turned away from journalism, and a P & Z commissioner telling a group of environmental activists that they had worn out their welcome. The commission traditionally meets to consider items such as dog kennel expansions or building new beauty salons. But through much of 2010, the dozen commissioners have been faced with the history-making task of deciding whether to launch a new commercial nuclear age for Idaho. Don Gillispie, CEO of Alternate Energy Holdings Inc., has so far gotten nothing but green lights from officials in each corner of Payette County in his attempt to build a $10 billion nuclear reactor on a parcel of rural land not far from New Plymouth. Gillispie has been all-smiles at each of the Payette meetings, formal and informal. After several years of hearing “no” or “a conditional maybe” from officials in Elmore and Owyhee counties, Gillispie brought the concept to Payette where—one by one—mayors of Fruitland, New Plymouth and Payette echoed their unconditional support. Gillispie wants to build the reactor on 5,000 acres near Big Willow and Stone Quarry roads. Good luck, if you’re trying to find it. The location is the very definition of remote— a series of rolling foothills off a rugged gravel WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

road. The land is about 20 miles, as the crow flies, from the Snake River. So it came as no surprise that Snake River Alliance, Idaho’s oldest and most visible anti-nuke activists, would lead a charge against AEHI’s proposal. As the evening of Dec. 2 wore on at the public hearing and a half-dozen SRA representatives took to the microphone, P & Z commissioner Farrell Rawlings ripped into the group. “Look here,” Rawlings lectured. “Our governor is in favor of this. Every mayor in our county is in favor of this. Our chamber of commerce is in favor of this. I’m offended that there’s not one positive thing that you and your group has contributed to this discussion.” Rawlings and his 11 colleagues on the commission sat in the jury box at the courthouse for their final deliberation on swinging the doors open to Gillispie and his plans. P & Z is considering a rezone of the parcel of the land from agricultural to industrial. If approved, county commissioners will get a chance to sign off on the deal sometime in January. Gillispie’s next step would be the onerous task of developing a license application. He said he expected more than 120 scientists, engineers and nuclear experts to craft the request, which would be subject to review from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The entire licensing process could take five to seven years. Tack on another three to four years for construction, and Payette could see a reactor as soon as 2020. Gillispie’s official spokesman is Dan Hamilton, a familiar face to television viewers in

the Treasure Valley. He’s a former anchor for KTRV Fox 12. It’s one thing for a spokesman to pump out press releases and manage the media, but it’s something else for a spokesman to offer testimony at a public hearing. The hearing on Dec. 2 was anything but ordinary. “When I was with Fox 12, I reported on AEHI,” Hamilton testified. He told commissioners how he initially agreed with opponents. “But it wasn’t long before I asked [AEHI] for a job,” said Hamilton. When BW asked Hamilton about the unusual move to testify, he remained on-message. “I testified from my own personal perspective. As I was reporting, it got to the point where I thought something was weird,” said Hamilton. He said he felt duped by opponents of the planned reactor. “Pretty soon, a completely different story was coming out. That’s why I support AEHI, and that’s why I work for them.” Public testimony ran 2-1 in favor of the nuclear proposal. By the time a Thursday evening spilled into a Friday morning, the commission closed all testimony. On Thursday, Dec. 9, P & Z commissioners will give AEHI more time to rebut opponents’ testimony. But they may not need it. When Gillispie told commissioners, “This county will have more money than you’ll know what to do with,” many of the commissioners beamed. Practically everyone who survived the marathon predicted that commissioners won’t take much more time to give Gillispie another green light.

P & Z UNANIMOUSLY APPROVES WHOLE FOODS “We’re ecstatic,” beamed Brad Schlosser, president of Schlosser Development, amid a sea of back-pats at the Dec. 6 Planning and Zoning Committee meeting. This was the third time in two months that the Austin, Texas-based developer had traveled to Boise to make his case for a proposed 35,000-square-foot Whole Foods grocery and adjacent 15,000-square-foot Walgreens retail store, which would both occupy the vacant lot bordered by Broadway Avenue and Front and Myrtle streets. Though initial requests to rezone the long-fallow 5.66 acre site from residential/ office to commercial were shot down at an Oct. 4 P & Z meeting, the developers were granted a reconsideration on the grounds that they tweak their proposal to better comply with the River-Myrtle Plan and apply for a special exception for the Walgreens drive-through instead of a rezone. “The special exception … applies to a specific-use project, it does not change the range of uses allowed or the dimensional standards of the existing zone,” explained P & Z City Planner Cody Riddle. “The special exception is only required for the small retail building at the corner. The grocery store … is a conditionally allowed use.” New plans presented at the Dec. 6 meeting by Schlosser’s Rick Duggan included a number of changes: a 10 percent decrease in surface parking spaces, reductions in parking setbacks, alterations to the Walgreens retail drive-through and a pedestrian node adjacent to Julia Davis Park to shield the buildings from the street. “With its polished-granite boulders rising from shallow pools surrounded by evergreens and seating areas, this corner will become an important landmark for the surrounding community,” explained Duggan. But one element that was not altered was a request for small (3 to 8 feet) variances from front and street-side building setbacks. Citing no obvious hardships, P & Z staff recommended denying the variances. But Schlosser explained their necessity. “The hardship is the fact that we are proposing that we build the project in a phased arrangement … you would therefore push phase two into a situation where you would disorient the opportunity to build structured parking, the very essence of the vertical mixed use,” said Schlosser. “Every foot counts here,” added Duggan. Property owner Jim Kissler also assured commissioners that phase two of the project—vertical mixed-use retail and residential development—will proceed as planned. “I’ll continue to own the 1.77 acres that’s going to be the space for future development,” said Kissler. “It’s got to go vertical for the amount of money we’ve got in the total lot.” Commissioners voted unanimously to approve the CUP and the variances, and to recommend approval of the special exception for the drive-through to the City Council on the condition that both buildings are completed within six months of each other. “The next step is to go in front of the Design Review Committee … [Hopefully] we can start construction by the second or third quarter of next year,” said Schlosser. —Tara Morgan

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 9


CITIZEN

ANDREA SHIPLEY The no-nuke activist moves to ICAN GEORGE PRENTICE

Where did you grow up? The small town of Worland, Wyo., nestled in the Bighorn Mountains. My father is the plant foreman for Devon Energy’s natural gas facility in Worland. Did that inform you as a young girl? Definitely. I kind of sprung out of the oil fields of Wyoming. Did you see the oil field and gas field culture through your father’s eyes? My dad worked really, really hard to get where he is. In much of rural America, there aren’t a lot of good-paying jobs to raise a family on. Which is why I thought my position with the Snake River Alliance was so unique. It’s not about targeting people who need work but it is about how do we make work safe for employees and good for the state. Putting the Idaho National Laboratory aside, is it fair to say that Idaho is entering into a new commercial nuclear age? We have Areva, the French-owned nuclear giant, on its way to building a reactor in Eastern Idaho. Areva touts the benefit of nuclear energy without talking about its legacy of waste. But the Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s hearings were packed with officials from Eastern Idaho pleading for approval because of a perceived economic benefit. We recognize that Idaho needs jobs.

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Areva says it’s bringing 250 jobs to Eastern Idaho. But big-box stores or call centers have provided far more jobs and haven’t left a toxic legacy. Meanwhile, in Western Idaho, Alternate Energy Holdings’ plan to build a nuclear reactor has been met with open arms by officials in Payette County. The people in Payette believe economic development can be built around energy, so when AEHI stepped into the picture, they were ready. I think they’re making a huge mistake for even humoring a company that is so unreasonable. Give us a sense of how you viewed the recent political season and its eventual outcome. We saw a very radicalized Tea Party come to life nationally. There are a lot of people out there who say Obama hasn’t done enough. But a fair amount of those same people voted for Obama. Well, that’s right. I can’t blame them for wanting more change faster. But by electing a lot of Tea Party candidates, voters aren’t going to get a more civil tone. Did you have any particular reaction to the tack that Congressman Minnick’s campaign took regarding immigration? Look, he stood on the right side of history when he voted on hate-crime legislation. He stood his ground on how he saw financial reform. But during the campaign, the ads he ran were, at best, racist. He lost votes from his base, and if he gained votes, it was a wash. The rap on ICAN from conservatives is that you are anti-business.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Right about this time three years ago, Andrea Shipley was settling in as the new executive director of Snake River Alliance. She’s since become one of the most visible activists in the state and recently became executive director of the Idaho Community Action Network.

We are absolutely not. The population we work with are the very ones that need jobs. ICAN is pro-business. The push-back that we’re feeling is about the resources needed for businesses to run in a fair way: good health care, sustainable jobs and fair wages. All of those things require money. And that, in turn, somehow comes across as anti-business. Being an activist in Idaho puts you in a small group. Being a woman puts you in an even smaller group. Can you talk about being marginalized? I don’t want to burn any bridges. Have you been marginalized by the media? Yes. Have you been marginalized by other nonprofits or NGOs? Yes. Does that make you stronger or better at what you do? Yes, absolutely. If you were to counsel the Snake River Alliance in how they choose your successor, what would you say? Look for someone who’s incredibly nimble, has a good sense of humor, who can fundraise like crazy and bring unique people together in meaningful ways, whether or not they agree.

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DREAM ACT RISING Immigrant youth find their voice in a movement for the American Dream by Nathaniel Hoffman with testimony from Aaron, an undocumented Idaho high school student

Editor’s Note: This story first ran online at boiseweekly.com. As of press time, Congress was slated to vote on the Dream Act this week.

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NL UN D AD AM RO SE

n April 2009, a recent UCLA grad appeared on CNN in a suit and tie to urge passage of the Dream Act. He spoke about escaping Argentina with his family just before a major economic collapse, growing up essentially American and graduating from the University of California-Los Angeles. CNN anchor Heidi Collins did not disclose his last name, but Matias Ramos was already a well known proponent of the Dream Act and this was the most public coming out yet for a young, undocumented American. “When my parents decided to come to this country, they told me ... that we wanted to be in a place where we could work hard and be rewarded, and that is what the United States has historically been,” Ramos said on national television. “We really want the Dream Act to let us be a part of society, like we feel like we have been all our lives.” Since that interview a year and a half ago, hundreds of undocumented students—perhaps a thousand—have gone public with their immigration statuses, whether telling a teacher or trusted friend, declaring it from a podium at a rally or speaking to elected officials and reporters about the difficulties they face after high school. “First you feel all alone, then you feel like other people have your back,” Ramos told BW recently, as Congress headed back into the lame duck session, expected to bring the Dream Act to a vote again. Ramos said that the human side of the immigration debate was too easily ignored until undocumented youth started speaking out. “The voice of the student in asking for the Dream Act has really changed that,” he said. At least seven versions of the Dream Act, formally

the Development, Relief and Education for Alien Minors Act, have been introduced to both the House and the Senate since 2001. A new version, S. 3992, introduced in recent weeks, made some significant changes. The Dream Act would grant provisional visas to young people who were brought to the United States as children (under 16), have lived here for five years, have or will graduate from American high schools, and who already have or plan to attend college or join the military. These students and soldiers would also have to demonstrate that they have “good moral character.” Under the new version of the bill introduced Nov. 30 to garner more Republican support, the provisional visa would last 10 years, rather than six, as originally proposed. If they complete two years of study or military service during that decade, the Dreamers, as they now call themselves, would be able to apply for permanent resident status and eventually citizenship. A 7-year-old study from Pew Hispanic Center demographer Jeffrey Passell estimated that 65,000 undocumented teens graduate from U.S. high schools every year. A more recent estimate from the Migration Policy Institute shows that about 2.1 million people would qualify for the conditional Dream Act visa, but that only about 825,000 would be likely to meet the requirements in the end. Most of these Dreamers are found in states like California and Texas, with large immigrant populations. But there are Dream students in every nook and cranny of the country, even nestled in the one-horse town, potato and dairy country of Idaho’s Magic Valley. In his desire to see the Dream Act pass, one of these students, Aaron, wanted Boise Weekly to use his full name and identify his hometown and high school. Boise Weekly declined to name him because he is a minor and could be put at risk for deportation, but this is his story in his own words:

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Inside I want to say I am American. But in reality, I’m not American because of my legal status in the United States. I came here when I was in second grade. I was 7 years old. Now I’m in 11th grade and will graduate in 2012. When my parents brought me to this country I had no idea we were doing something wrong. I was told that we were finally going to visit my dad, to live with him. Of course, after two years without seeing him, I was very eager to visit. I had no idea what the right/ wrong way was. The journey was not like you see it in the movies. We got very lucky that good people crossed us over. All I remember was walking in the desert holding my mom’s arm, my mom carrying my sister in the other arm, and walking in a line of about 15 people. I don’t quite remember how much we walked; the walk wasn’t too bad though. Once in a while people would start freaking out and we ran a few times. Eventually, someone came to pick us up and take us to Idaho. There are people out there who think people like me are criminals. Is being raised here in Idaho, never getting to know my own mother country a crime? Over the years, I came to love America as my own nation. Pretty soon, without even noticing, I fully assimilated. I learned the language fluently. I followed the rules and laws. I did everything a good American kid does. I rode my bike around, played video games and hung out with friends. If I were to be deported I’d have to start from scratch, having missed a childhood in Mexico. I don’t think I would be able to do it. Deportation would have huge consequences for me, for my friends and family, and for my dream of pursuing higher education.

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n 2001, California passed a law that gave undocumented students like Matias Ramos the opportunity to attend state colleges and pay in-state tuition. Congress technically barred in-state tuition for undocumented students in 1996, but California and 10 other states (Oklahoma has since rescinded its law) found a way around the ban by liberalizing residency requirements for all students, a move that the California Supreme Court upheld earlier this month. In addition to its other provisions, the Dream Act would have lifted the federal ban on offering in-state tuition to undocumented students, allowing states to make their own policies regarding residency and higher education. But the new version of the bill, reports dreamactivist.org, removes this provision. As more undocumented students in California entered university in the early 2000s, they gradually found one another. “Against the odds, students were able to get into places like UCLA and they started meeting each other there … at first it was a really big deal for six or seven undocumented students to be in the same room together,” said Flavia de la Fuente, a U.S. citizen, UCLA graduate and volunteer editor of dreamactivist.org, a national network of groups advocating for the Dream Act. Ramos said these meetings were at first more like support groups for undocumented students, who discussed how to fill out paperwork and scholarship options, but the meetings soon evolved into advocacy, and Ramos began to study political organizing. “Since our lives are on hold basically until

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Congress takes real action on immigration, then why not be outspoken,” Ramos said. Ramos became more public about his status around 2007, when a friend’s deportation was publicized. He appeared on panel discussions and spoke to the media as a student who would benefit from the Dream Act. Then he went on CNN. “You start testing the waters and going up to bigger media markets,” he said. In early 2010, as pro-immigrant groups grew increasingly frustrated with the Obama administration’s lack of progress on immigration reform, immigrant youth began to organize in earnest. In February, youth from about 20 states—many of them undocumented—met in Minneapolis to strategize. Encouraged by activists from the Chicago Immigrant Youth Justice League, they planned a national coming out day in March. “This idea of coming out has been something very powerful for the people we work with,” said Tania Unzueta, a graduate student in Chicago who is also undocumented. Unzueta and the IYJL had coalesced in 2009, fighting the deportation of Rigoberto Padilla an honors student at the University of Illinois-Chicago who was detained after a minor traffic stop. The support of activists and the public attention it brought to the case earned Padilla a one-year stay. In the process of organizing around Padilla, the IYJL realized that many of the activists who had rallied were also undocumented and so the group offered them a space to tell their stories and to control their own destinies, Unzueta said. “It always felt like citizens were making the decision about how much undocumented students can risk,” Unzueta said. “Every time the Dream Act becomes mainstream news, the people who tend to dominate the airwaves are still adults and politicians from the national organizations.” But that changed this past summer as undocumented youth took center stage, successfully demanding that the Dream Act become the first priority for the immigrant rights movement. My name is Aaron. I live on the outskirts of a small town in Idaho’s Magic Valley, though I lived in Jerome for most of my childhood. I think it was easier on me when I was younger. I didn’t know what being undocumented was, so I wasn’t worried about it. I had other worries then: second grade had to be one of the hardest years. But once I could speak the language, I had no trouble in the rest of elementary or middle school. By the time I entered high school, I was aware of my undocumented status. Nervous run-ins with traffic police, the news that I was not eligible for a driver’s license and the revelation that I would have to pay out-of-state tuition to go to college, if they even let me in, drove that message home. I faced the hardest phase of my life starting in ninth grade. The average teenager only worries about passing their classes and getting ready to graduate, but an undocumented teenager goes through much more. For example, I wanted to get into some type of after-school club, and maybe a sport, like soccer or track, but because I lacked a license, and I often lacked a ride, I was unWWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


A cop on the road could mean a nightmare to me. They could decide any day to stop us and put us in the hands of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. And ICE could then decide whether I stay (unlikely) or get deported.” — Aaron, an undocumented Idaho high school student able to. In a way, my status even disrupts my ability to learn. At the end of ninth grade, I found out I had to move to a new town about an hour away. Anyone who has moved before knows how it feels. You feel a lot of loss in your heart. I knew I would be able to see my friends once in a while, and we still stay connected online but it just isn’t the same. This school proved a lot more challenging for me. It’s farther from my house. If I were to walk to school, it would take four to five hours, so I ride the bus. But that means I’m not able to stay after and take advantage of extra help that some teachers offer after school. Everything in this new hometown of mine is really far. By car, the nearest town takes almost 30 minutes to reach, and the place we do our shopping for food and clothes is about 40 minutes to an hour away. A cop on the road could mean a nightmare to me. They could decide any day to stop us and put us in the hands of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. And ICE could then decide whether I stay (unlikely) or get deported. They can also decide to put my parents in jail, but since I don’t drive, they can’t do that to me … unless they do it like Arizona, and put everyone in jail just for being here. Being undocumented is my biggest fear, yet I’m living it. It’s my personal nightmare.

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n March, undocumented youth marched on the Immigration and Customs Enforcement building in Chicago and eight undocumented students told their stories to the crowd, including Unzueta. The immigrant youth movement has borrowed inspiration from many earlier civil rights campaigns including the student arm of the civil rights movement, the farm worker rights movement, the gay rights movement of the ’80s and even the type of organizing typified by the 2008 Obama presidential campaign. Unzueta, who identifies herself as queer and has studied the gay rights movement, said that coming out—whether in regard to sexuality or immigration status—is a powerful tool for organizing. By revealing their statuses to friends, colleagues, neighbors, politicians and even political opponents, undocumented youth give the public a face to identify with their cause. At the February meeting, there was some hesitation to going public as a tactic on the part of activists from border states, Unzueta said. Not everyone was ready to march up to the ICE building in a T-shirt printed with the word “undocumented” but the coming out actions WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

could be done at various levels. A University of Utah student who uses the name Ivette Martinez when speaking publicly, revealed her undocumented status in September at a small rally in Salt Lake City outside the federal building. “I remember the night before I couldn’t sleep and I was really, really nervous,” Martinez said. Martinez is part of the Salt Lake Dream Team, which is made up of mostly undocumented students attending the University of Utah. She recalled that no one had volunteered to provide testimony at the rally, so she raised her hand. Martinez had watched YouTube videos of other students coming out and knew it would be liberating. “Those were empowering for me because it helped me realize that I’m not alone and there’s other people fighting for me,” she said. Like many of the Dreamers, Martinez has high hopes. She wants to go to law school and work as a guardian ad litem, advocating for foster kids. Right now she is paying out-of-state tuition in Utah, with some help from private scholarships and a job at a fast food restaurant. Martinez will graduate next year, and while she won’t benefit from the opportunity for in-state tuition, she would be immediately eligible for a provisional visa under the Dream Act, allowing her to legally work and eventually find a path to citizenship. Aaron would also qualify for a provisional visa and be considered an Idaho resident for purposes of matriculation. My name is Aaron and I am an American teenager, but don’t have the papers to prove it. I’ve recently started to watch the news more often and research both sides of the immigration debate. After all, the new laws that states are passing might affect me. One of the major laws that got my attention was SB 1070, in Arizona, which basically scares people and allows cops to stop and ask you for ID just because you “look” undocumented. Or in other words, if your skin is brown and you look like you came from another country. Some politicians in my state are planning on introducing a law similar to this. Sometimes it feels as if no matter how good you are, and no matter how hard you try, you’re still a loser to the country’s elected representatives. I was glad when most of the provisions of SB 1070 were blocked in court, and I’m glad the federal government and immigrant rights groups were out there ready to oppose it. There’s always going to be two sides to every story, and in the immigration story,

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this is also true. There are people out there trying to help undocumented youth, farm workers and other law-abiding immigrants get their papers. These people realize that we want to be able to study here, serve our country and live our lives. There are others who are trying to keep us illegal. This includes the people behind laws like Arizona’s racial profiling bill and also the horrible employers who depend on undocumented workers, who continue to work for less than a documented worker. If suddenly their undocumented workers got papers, they would have to pay them higher wages because no longer will these employers be able to terrorize them with deportation. As I get closer to graduation, I am starting to think what college I would like to attend. As I do more research and gather information, it feels as if I have reached a dead end in my future. Since I’m undocumented, the college or university of my choice might not accept me, and if they do, I don’t have the resources to pay out-ofstate tuition. I can’t get student loans, and I am not eligible for most financial aid or scholarships. Still, as of today, I’m unsure what I will do in the future. My dream is to study computers and Internet technology. Since my first computer, I fell in love with technology and have learned a lot about networks. I learned how to build a computer, I learned about operating systems and how they work, I learned about software, I learned how to make websites in html and css, and all of this really drives my interest in higher education. Unfortunately I’m unsure if I will ever be able to achieve this dream.

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hough the mere act of declaring one’s undocumented status in public could be considered an act of civil disobedience, the immigrant youth movement stepped it up a notch in May, staging a sit-in at Arizona Sen. John McCain’s Tucson office. Four of the students were arrested, netting an article in The New York Times. The students wanted McCain to declare his support for the Dream Act, something he had done numerous times before, originally co-sponsoring it and advo-

case that is referred to the agency. “When we got arrested in Washington, D.C., I think the police were confused,” Unzueta said. The police, Unzueta surmised, were unclear as to why the students, dressed in caps and gowns, lacked identification—we’re undocumented, she says—and for what cause they sought redress. “Every time we’ve done an action like this we know there is a risk of deportation,” Unzueta said. But the activists who risk arrest know

The reality is that our experience, our whole life, we’ve grown up undocumented. We don’t feel like Mexican citizens; we feel like undocumented Americans.” — Tania Unzueta, undocumented graduate student

cating publicly for it. Four more immigrant youth were arrested in November, after a sit-in at McCain’s Capitol Hill offices. Unzueta joined the May sit-in in Tucson but was not arrested. In July she was arrested protesting at the U.S. Capitol with 20 other activists. She was held in leg irons, detained overnight and is currently on probation. None of the Dream-eligible students who have been arrested in Dream Act actions have faced deportation—one ICE official told the Washington Post that they do not act on every

that there is a national network, skilled in the use of traditional and social media, direct action and lobbying, ready and willing to rally to their cause. De la Fuente, of dreamactivist.org, said that ICE is fully aware that it does not look good to deport young people who grew up in the United States who want to contribute to society. Many Dream activists are valedictorians, future doctors and lawyers and prominent members of their local communities. “The more out people are the easier it is for

us to protect them,” she said. “If you are out and we know about you and you get involved, somebody is going to miss you.” Indeed, just last month, the student body president at Fresno State University publicly declared his undocumented status after pressure from the campus newspaper, and Dreamers rallied to his cause. Miami Dade College student body president Jose Salcedo made the same revelation soon after. All of the activism surrounding the Dream Act over the summer resulted in a September vote in the Senate. But it was tied to the National Defense Reauthorization Act and to the repeal of Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, and Democrats could not muster enough support. Then the midterm elections swept a new crop of anti-immigrant lawmakers into power, dimming prospects for comprehensive immigration reform for the foreseeable future. But immigrant youth have stepped up the pressure rather than retreating, arguing for a stand-alone Dream Act vote during the lame duck session. Many undocumented students went to Nevada to help salvage Senate leader Harry Reid’s political career, exacting a promise from him to bring the Dream Act to a vote. They also went to work on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, the White House and the established immigrant rights groups, netting a general consensus that while comprehensive immigration reform is still desired, the Dream Act is a doable, bipartisan step toward a more just immigration policy. “Right now, with the Dreamers, you are seeing for the first time ever actually undocumented folks leading the way,” said Kyle de Beausette, an American who grew up in

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Guatemala. De Beausette is on leave from Harvard University and has been active in pushing for the Dream Act through his website citizenorange.com on Twitter and in the state of Maine. “They really taught me just how democracy works … it’s amazing to me how you have actually undocumented immigrants moving the president of the United States, moving the Majority Leader.” My name is Aaron and I am an undocumented Idaho high school student. My future is in jeopardy, but I am eager for the Dream Act to pass. Around my school there is no talk about the Dream Act anywhere. The only reason I know about the Dream Act is because I watch Univision news and Channel One, which occasionally airs in our school and sometimes has some news about the Dream Act. I have tried to help however I can. I texted members of Congress and even called some, including Sen. Harry Reid in Nevada. I follow national Dream Act politics from my home in rural Idaho. The only hope for me to be someone, and the only hope for my nightmares to finally end and my fear to cease is some form of immigration reform, the best option being the Dream Act. I want Congress to stop playing around with my dreams. I’m a person. I know some of them are just using me and other people like me to win elections. But I know there must be some out there who actually stand for something. After being undocumented for so long without anything happening that would help me get my documents, I decided to do anything I could to give this Dream Act more chances to pass. This, unfortunately, turned out to be very complicated. In Idaho, there is no activist group pushing for the Dream Act. Idaho, being a conservative state, makes things extra hard. After e-mailing my favorite morning radio stations about the Dream Act and not getting a response, I created a Facebook fan page called “Idaho Dream Act.” This fan page is getting bigger; it’s about to reach 150 fans. I thought long and hard about going public with my undocumented status, and I decided that if my elected congressmen knew a local story from someone suffering because of their actions, maybe they could turn back and fix their mistakes before it’s too late. Sometimes I feel as if we are just a figment of their imaginations and not real people to them. So basically, I want them to look me in the eyes and give me a response. I’m really annoyed that when they do something and say something toward me that will affect me, they do it with their backs to me. I’m very aware that most of the public around here has never met an illegal immigrant or is unaware if they have. I want to see how people and politicians respond after reading a personal story. If they respond in a negative way, that would be a good way to know they don’t care about me. If they respond in a positive way, I will know that there is still a future ahead of me. Right now I feel as if I could lose my future if the law doesn’t pass this time. But I have a lot of support from family and friends. They help me out emotionally and help me take my mind off of these issues. This simple choice before Congress could either ruin my life or help me become a regular American citizen who doesn’t have to worry about the police every time he steps out into the road. I do feel WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

really nervous about this vote on the Dream Act because whichever way it goes will change my life dramatically, either for the worst or for the best. I do hope it’s for the best.

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here is evidence that the personal narratives of Dream students can move politicians. Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo, who opposed the Dream Act when it was part of a larger package, acknowledges that people brought across the border as children warrant “different consideration.” Both Crapo and Idaho Sen. Jim Risch declined to speak specifically about the Dream Act until it is brought up for a final vote. Several Republicans who opposed the bill when tacked onto other measures have said they would support it on its own merits and several Democrats are wavering in their support for the act in the wake of the midterm elections. But Dreamers and all of the major pro-immigrant organizations across the country are pushing hard for lame duck passage. While the bill continues to be attacked from the right—the 6-year conditional visa is still called amnesty by some—it has also faced opposition from some on the left. Immigrant youth who cannot afford college (aside from opening up the possibility of in-state tuition, the Dream Act still precludes undocumented students from getting federal aid) will be under pressure to join the military and the military’s top brass have enthusiastically embraced the bill. In addition, the Dream Act only provides a one-time opportunity for those who qualify when it’s signed into law. A child who is brought to the United States the day after it becomes law would not be eligible. But there are 2 million people who would have an immediate incentive to further their educations or serve their country or both. And the fact that undocumented youth have stood up to advocate for the Dream Act is, for some, enough reason to support it. “It’s not about legislation, it’s about the movement that’s around it,” de Beausette said. Undocumented immigrant youth, in less than a year, have changed the face of the immigrant rights movement, in part by adopting “undocumented” as a feature of their identity. Unzueta’s mother, also an activist, urged her not to embrace her immigration status as her identity, but Unzueta did anyway. “The reality is that our experience, our whole life, we’ve grown up undocumented. We don’t feel like Mexican citizens; we feel like undocumented Americans,” she said. Aaron, one of the youngest immigrant youth to make a public call for passage of the Dream Act, is still not sure where his identity will end up. One draft of this story referred to him as an “undocumented American,” but he said that while “undocumented” reflects his situation, it’s not how he thinks of himself. Aaron is an American teenager and is confident that his friends and teachers will still see him that way. And like any American, he is seeking justice through democracy, even if it’s a lame duck democracy: Sometimes I feel as if we are just a figment of their imaginations, and not real people to them. So basically, I want them to look me in the eyes and give me a response. If they respond in a positive way, I will know that there is still a future ahead of me.

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B ALLET IDAHO

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

The Nutcracker’s conga line takes the stage this weekend. Hang on for deer life.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY DEC. 10-12

FRIDAY-SATURDAY DEC. 10-11

ballet

theater

THE NUTCRACKER

THE EIGHT: REINDEER MONOLOGUES Holiday-themed entertainment offerings have a tendency to lean toward the childish. That sense of wonder and excitement from A Charlie Brown Christmas and Frosty the Snowman is grand and all, but let’s be honest here: Eggnog is a boozy drink, both Lynyrd Skynyrd and Insane Clown Posse have done Christmas albums, and Jenny McCarthy (star of Santa Baby and Santa Baby 2) is an ex-Playmate. The holidays can clearly handle adult themes. One place to find them this year will be during Daisy’s Madhouse production of Jeff Goode’s The Eight: Reindeer Monologues, which director Jennifer Dunn says was picked because “it was the perfect opportunity to have an anti-Christmas play to balance all the sugary sweetness of the holiday shows.” In the play, potentially reputation-ruining charges of sexual harassment have been leveled against a certain jolly fat man, and the police must get to the bottom of things by interviewing his reindeer. But like a cheap sweater, someone pulls too hard on a single thread and the whole sordid tale starts to unravel. Sex, drugs, the truth behind Rudolph’s rise to fame. Can Christmas be saved? “Be warned: These reindeer are nothing like the cute creatures in the Disney movies and no amount of parental guidance could shield children from the scandalous debaucher y described by Jeff Goode’s wickedly funny vision of high times at the North Pole,” wrote the New Zealand Herald. It’s easy to believe. Another of Goode’s plays, Poona the Fuckdog, got Portland, Ore. theater owner Gary Cole kicked out of the Republican Party for producing it. Friday, Dec. 10-Saturday, Dec. 11, 8 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com. Saturday, Dec. 18, 8 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door. The Balcony, 150 N. Eighth St., No. 226, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com.

THURSDAY DEC. 9 catwalk WISH FASHION SHOW According to American Express, for every $100 spent locally, $68 goes back directly into the community. Makes the idea of fighting traffic at the mall sound even more

barfy, right? Good thing you can catch a peep of all the must-have items from local downtown boutiques on Thursday, Dec. 9, at the Wish Fashion Show. Hosted by Ella’s Room and Haute Catwalk, the fashion show will take place at Reef and feature assorted items from American Clothing Gallery, Barbara and Barbara Co., Piece Unique, Shoez, Idaho Indie Works, Belle Boutique,

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Helly Hansen, Ella’s Room and Shoe Fetish. “I think with Macy’s being gone, it’s really important to have some awareness for the downtown stores to keep people out of the mall, supporting the locals,” said Ella’s Room owner Denise Joy. Before the fashion show, the event will feature a performance by the Red Light Variety Show at 6:45 p.m.

“The children were nestled, all snug in their beds, while visions of sugarplums danced in their heads …” Oh wait. Wrong Christmas story. But there’s a good chance that visions of sugarplum fairies will be dancing through your memories for some time after taking in the scenery, music and performances of Ballet Idaho’s The Nutcracker. Tchaikovsky’s music alongside the dancers’ plies and pirouettes tell the story of Clara and her fantastical adventures. Christmas trees magically grow, the Nutcracker turns into a prince, the Mouse King comes to life, and the Snow King and Queen lead dancing snowflakes as it snows on stage. In the Land of the Sweets, the Dewdrop and Sugarplum Fairies get their chance to lead the Waltz of the Flowers and a finale for the Sweets who dance to entertain their young visitor. Artistic director and choreographer Peter Anastos directs 24 company dancers and 125 children from the Treasure Valley in Ballet Idaho’s biggest production of the year. A. Christina Giannini designed the original scenery and costumes. Her resume includes the Joffrey Ballet, American Ballet Theatre, Broadway and more. It’s no small feat (pardon the pun) to produce a show like The Nutcracker, and in Boise it’s become a beloved holiday tradition. Friday, Dec. 10, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Dec. 11, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Sunday, Dec. 12, 2 p.m., $25-$55, Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1494, balletidaho.org.

Proceeds benefit the Make-AWish Foundation. “We will have an emcee explaining what’s going on, and then somebody from Make-A-Wish will get up and speak about their foundation and the little girl named Hope that they’re featuring,” said Joy. A suggested donation of $5 or an unwrapped toy for a child between the ages of two and 18 will get you in the door beginning at 5:30 p.m. 5:30 p.m. doors, 6:45 p.m. show, $5 donation. Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., 208287-9200. For more information, call 208-331-3552.

SATURDAY DEC. 11 art ART IN THE BAR Galleries have long suckered folks in with the promise of free wine. There’s something delightfully bourgeois about sipping a cold pinot gris and debating the merits of postmodern ar t. Well, tiny cups of wine and pretentious conversations have nothing on a full liquorlicious bar. At Dead Bird Galler y’s upcoming Ar t in the Bar event, you can check out work from more

than 30 local ar tists while getting sufficiently sauced on the booze of your choice. “It’s sor t of an extension from Dead Bird Galler y where we really just wanted to provide a space for local ar tists who maybe haven’t been given the oppor tunity or don’t have the notoriety behind them yet to get oppor tunities to bring their work to the public,” said Dead Bird Galler y co-owner Ellen DeAngelis. Because DeAngelis and galler y par tner Wayne Crans got a smoking deal on renting out the Knitting Factor y bar space, they were able to keep the space fees low WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FIND DR. SCIENCE MOUSE CATNIP TOY

There’s not time like the present to check out Idaho Ice World.

SATURDAY DEC. 11

Jim Budde’s burning ring of fired clay.

ice skating TINY (ICE) DANCERS The hockey sticks are nowhere to be seen. The pucks, goals and even the players themselves have disappeared—at least for one night. That is, unless they get decked out in holiday garb and perform with fellow figure skaters in the rink that will be transformed into “Santa’s Workshop” for Idaho Ice World’s Festival on Ice. The lights will be out and the spotlights on as skaters from 3 to 70 years old prepare to put their own spin on the holidays. The holiday train-based theme will carry through the 90-minute program, starting with the competitive skaters who call Idaho Ice World home. The Jinglettes will make their way across the ice, visiting reindeer, elves and Santa’s workshop along the way. After the opening number, younger kids who participate in skating classes get a chance to show their stuff, making grand entrances via igloos and fireplaces. Competitive skaters will perform solo or duet dances in-between to traditional and contemporary Christmas music. Pretending you’re at the North Pole isn’t much of a stretch for the performance in this chilly locale, but no worries … whether you’re seated in the stands or at one of the VIP tables set up on the ice, cookies, hot cocoa and the holiday spirit should keep you warm. 3 p.m. and 6 p.m., $7 adults, $5 children 12 and younger, $10 VIP (includes beverage and snack). Idaho Ice World, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, 208-331-0044, idahoiceworld.cityofboise.org.

cross-section of ar tists in Boise, which I love,” said DeAngelis. Noon-10 p.m., FREE. Knitting Factor y Concer t House, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactor y.com.

and ensure that ar tists get to keep 100 percent of their proceeds from the event. “We’ve got ever ything from high school kids all the way up to Alan Ansel who has been a photographer in Boise for 30 years, so it’s a really cool

S U B M I T

SATURDAY-MONDAY DEC. 11-13 pottery CLAY AND FIRE EXHIBIT Ceramics professor Jim Budde star ted teaching at Boise State in 1994. But he says the depar tment’s twiceyearly Clay and Fire sale goes back even fur ther. So far back he doesn’t even know when it star ted (he guesses about 40 years ago). But what he does know is that it’s the place to get screaming deals on all things potted. Anything from sculpture to dishes to ar twork, even jewelr y. “If you had a good eye, you can go through that thing and pick out some fantastic work for ver y little money,” said Budde. “There’s some pieces I regret not buying. There’s some work where the students don’t even know how good it is.” In addition to hundreds of pieces by faculty and primarily upper-division students, the sale features alumni of the program, many of whom are now professional potters but return to this sale because Boise State takes a smaller cut than the galler y would. It’s an even better deal for them since the proceeds fund visiting ar tists programs and workshops, which are free for alumni to attend. Between the free workshops, the great deals and the chance for up-and-coming students to get their work out there, this really is the rare moment when ever ybody wins. The sale will go on until Monday, Dec. 13, at 5 p.m. But if you’re any sor t of potter y fan at all, you’ll want to get there right at the star t on Saturday, Dec. 11, at 10 a.m. sharp. Saturday Dec. 11-Monday Dec. 13, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Visual Ar ts Center, Galler y One, Liberal Ar ts Building, Boise State campus. For more information visit ar tdept.boisestate.edu/vac.

Recently, someone casually asked, “I know what to get a dog for Christmas, but what would you get for a cat?” “Nothing,” I replied in all seriousness. “It’s a cat.” Before you cat lovers get your fur up, it’s not because cats are less deserving than their canine counterparts. It’s because cats don’t care. They are just as happy pawing at a piece of thread dangling from your sweater or jumping in and out of a paper grocery bag as they are batting Available at Boise Co-Op, Zamzow’s and around a $30 The Cat Doctor. plastic toy made in China. However, if your feline takes to catnip like a hippie to hemp, it’s worth it to plop down the suggested retail price of $8.99 for the locally made, well-constructed, mostly claw-proof Dr. Science Mouse just to watch kitty wriggle and writhe across the living room floor. Made with “supreme organic catnip” grown on Lil Bobcat Farm in Garden Valley, the bag is extra attractive to cats because the catnip go to seed. Once it has gone to seed, the essential oils are released. Between the oils, the tough industrial-hemp bag—which is sewn three times for added strength—and the embroidered face of Dr. Science Mouse himself, if you are looking to buy your catnip-happy kitty a gift for this holiday season, the Dr. Science Mouse catnip toy will be as much fun for you as it is for your feline. And face it, your cat doesn’t really care anyway. —Amy Atkins

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 17


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY DEC. 8 On Stage TRU—Jay Presson Allen’s awardwinning Broadway hit based on the whirlwind social life and career of Truman Capote. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

Sports & Fitness IDAHO STAMPEDE BASKETBALL—Vs. the Dakota Wizards. 7 p.m. $12-$20. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208424-2200 or box office 208-3318497, qwestarenaidaho.com.

Odds & Ends POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Avenue., Boise, 208-321-1811.

THURSDAY DEC. 9 On Stage A CHRISTMAS CAROL—Performance of the classic Christmas tale by Charles Dickens. 7 p.m. $10-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org. TRU—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org. WHITE CHRISTMAS—Boise Little Theater performs Irving Berlin’s cheery holiday musical. 7:30 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Citizen

THE EIGHT: REINDEER MONOLOGUES—Daisy’s Madhouse’s dark take on how Rudolph rose to the top. See Picks, Page 16. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th, Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

MISSION FOR THE MISSION— Drop off your donation of a gift card, toy or cash for those in need in the Treasure Valley. For more info contact 208-884-4635. 6 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. Idaho Athletic Club, 2999 N. Lakeharbour Lane, Boise, 208-853-4181, idahoathleticclub.com.

LARRY POTTER—A wizardly spin on a holiday tale in this family friendly production. 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, pdplayhouse.com.

WISH FASHION SHOW—Fashion show hosted by Ella’s Room and Haute Catwalk, featuring the latest looks from Downtown Boise retailers. Proceeds benefit the Make-a-Wish Foundation of Idaho. See Picks, Page 16. 6:45 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Reef, 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9200, reefboise.com.

LIPSINC! HOLIDAY SHOW—The gals from LipsInc! are getting ready to wreck the halls with “Away in a Manger.” Call 208-368-0405 to make reservations. 8:30 p.m. $15. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., second floor, Capitol Terrace, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com.

Odds & Ends

THE NUTCRACKER— Idaho Ballet performs the traditional holiday ballet to Tchaikovsky’s classic score, performed by Boise Philharmonic. See Picks, Page 16. 8 p.m. $25-$55. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

THREE OUNCES PLUS ICE— Check out Tri-Digital’s new digs and join the Boise Advertising Federation for an open house. Wear your school colors— custom-made Boise State and Vandals boards will be auctioned off. Proceeds benefit BAF. 5:30-8 p.m. $10. Tri-Digital Group, 2340 S. Vista, Boise, 208-433-9939, tri-digitalgroup2.com.

TRU—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org. WHITE CHRISTMAS—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

FRIDAY DEC. 10 On Stage

Sports & Fitness

A CHRISTMAS CAROL—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $10-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208-3850021, kedproductions.org.

IDAHO STAMPEDE BASKETBALL—Vs. the Utah Flash. 7 p.m. $12-$20. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-4242200 or box office 208-3318497, qwestarenaidaho.com.

CHRISTMAS SHOW AND HOEDOWN—Starlight Mountain Theatre presents I’ll Be Home For Christmas and Santa’s Holiday Hoedown. 7:30 p.m. $12-$20. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425, limelightboise.com.

Workshops & Classes WATERCOLOR CARDS—Learn techniques to paint your own holiday cards. 10 a.m.-noon. $30. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-407-3359, puffymondaes.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Sports & Fitness THE XFS NIGHT OF CHAMPIONS—Fourteen action-packed cage fights, with four championships on the line, including Aric Iverson’s return to Idaho to defend his Bantam Weight XFS World Championship belt against the undefeated Lonny Burton. Local band Workin’ On Fire provides music for the night. 6 p.m. $5+. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-4242200 or box office 208-3318497, qwestarenaidaho.com.

18 | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 19


SUDOKU |

THE MEPHAM GROUP

8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends

On Stage

THE NOT SO LATE SHOW— Comic Sherry Japhet hosts the late night-style talk show featuring local musicians, entertainers and interviews with guests. Local comedian Pete Peterson cohosts. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-2875379, liquidboise.com.

A CHRISTMAS CAROL—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $10-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org.

SATURDAY DEC. 11 Festivals & Events

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

20 | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | BOISEweekly

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

FRUITCAKE FOLLIES CAROLING CONTEST—Sing your hearts out in this competition sponsored by the Downtown Boise Association and Capitol City Market. Groups will be judged by volunteers based on presentation, movement, and quality of singing. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. The Grove, Downtown Boise, downtownboise.org. HOLIDAY FARMERS MARKET—Open-air market dishing up fresh food and products from local vendors. Featuring fresh Northwest cranberries, wreaths, floral arrangements, handmade cards and more for the holidays. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Downtown at Eighth Street and Idaho streets, Boise.

CHRISTMAS SHOW AND HOEDOWN—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $12-$20. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208898-9425, limelightboise.com. THE EIGHT: REINDEER MONOLOGUES—See Friday. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th, Boise, 208-343-0886, neurolux.com. LARRY POTTER—See Friday. 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, pdplayhouse.com. LIPSINC! HOLIDAY SHOW—See Friday. 8:30 p.m. $15. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., second floor, Capitol Terrace, Boise, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub. com. THE NUTCRACKER— See Friday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $25-$55. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu.

TRU—See Wednesday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

16. 6 p.m. $5-$10. Idaho IceWorld, 7072 S. Eisenman Road, Boise, 208-331-0044, idahoiceworld.com.

WHITE CHRISTMAS—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Kids & Teens

Art ART IN THE BAR—The Dead Bird Gallery presents artwork from more than 30 local artists during this one-day show and sale. Family friendly, with a full bar for those 21 and older. See Picks, Page 16. Noon-10 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com. CLAY AND FIRE SALE—See Picks, Page 16. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Liberal Arts Building at Boise State. More information at artdept.boisestate.edu/vac.

Sports & Fitness FESTIVAL ON ICE—Skaters of all skills and ages will perform— complete with sparkling lights and Santa Claus handing out candy canes. See Picks, Page

CITY SANTA—Children visit Santa and get pictures taken with him for a small donation. Proceeds benefit the American Cancer Society. Visit downtownboise.org for more info. 11 a.m.4 p.m. Berryhill & Co., 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com. MODEL TRAIN AND CHRISTMAS VILLAGE DISPLAY—Visit with Santa and check out the many towns, villages and trains on the mezzanine. Visit oldboise. com for more info. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. The Pioneer Building, 106 N. Sixth St., Boise.

SUNDAY DEC. 12 On Stage LARRY POTTER—See Friday. 2 p.m. and 7:15 p.m. $8-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, pdplayhouse.com.

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8 DAYS OUT THE NUTCRACKER— See Friday. 2 p.m. $25-$55. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu. WHITE CHRISTMAS—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Art CLAY AND FIRE SALE—See Picks, Page 16. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Liberal Arts Building at Boise State. More information at artdept.boisestate.edu/vac.

MONDAY DEC. 13 On Stage CHRISTMAS SHOW AND HOEDOWN—See Friday. 7 p.m. $10. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425, limelightboise.com. NEW CLASSICS READING SERIES—Inaugural season of BCT’s New Classics Reading Series. Betrayal is this month’s selection. 7 p.m. $25-$30 for series of three readings. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

Art CLAY AND FIRE SALE—See Picks, Page 16. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Liberal Arts Building at Boise State. More information at artdept.boisestate.edu/vac.

Talks & Lectures

Food & Drink

BROWN BAG LECTURE—Lydia Primavera will speak on the Quong Farmhouse. Noon. $5 adults, $4 seniors, $3 students with ID. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history. idaho.gov.

DRINKING LIBERALLY—Talk politics, share ideas and inspire change. 7 p.m. FREE. Solid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3456620, drinkingliberally.org.

Odds & Ends

STEELHEADS HOCKEY—Vs. the Victoria Salmon Kings. 7:10 p.m. 4 for $44 or $11 individual. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or box office 208-331-8497, qwestarenaidaho.com.

COMEDY NIGHT—Test out your routine on patrons during open mic night. 8:30 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel, 4902 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3223430. MEET AN ATHEIST—Join in positive discussion with other atheists in Boise. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s, 109 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-2505.

WEDNESDAY DEC. 15 On Stage SEX A.K.A WIENERS AND BOOBS—Welsh/Garcia Productions brings back last year’s hit comedy show about a corrupt town in New Jersey. 8 p.m. $12. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, visualartscollective.com. TRU—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

Sports & Fitness

ON GOING Festivals & Events WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—The garden is decorated for the holiday season with more than 250,000 lights and special displays. Visit Santa and Prancer and enjoy warm beverages and holiday music as you stroll through the gardens. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. GIVING TREE—Pull a tag from the tree and make a child’s Christmas a little brighter. Drop off new, unwrapped gifts at the Women and Children’s Alliance at 720 W. Washington St. Visit wcaboise.org for more info. The Grove, Downtown Boise.

Citizen COMMIT 65 FUNDRAISER—Silent auction to benefit Commit 65. No-host bar and live music by CastleRock Strings. Afterparty to be held at Tom Grainey’s where The Naughties will be performing. 6:30-9:30 p.m. FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

Odds & Ends VASECTOMY INFORMATION CLASS—Do you feel like your child-rearing days should maybe come to an end? Get all the info you need at this class so that you can make an informed decision. 6-7 p.m. FREE. Central District Health, 707 N. Armstrong Pl., 208-375-5211, Boise.

TUESDAY DEC. 14 Art MEET AND GREET—Meet local artists and shop for unique gifts. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. FREE. Bronco Gallery, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-2601.

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Skeleton Blues by Conner Coughlin was the 1st place winner in the 9th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 21


NEWS/NOISE NOISE

A STAR IS MADE Singer Jeffree Star is loud, proud and in your face, bitches AMY ATKINS Workin’ On Fire is workin’ on being successful.

GUITARS AND MORE GUITARS: PAUL GROVE AND WORKIN’ ON FIRE (BUT NOT TOGETHER) “Times they are a changin’.” Though true, sometimes we want things to stay exactly the same. But with change comes a chance for metamorphosis. Local musician Dan Costello would like to believe that’s what is in the future for Boise’s classical guitar community. According to Costello, last year’s retirement of longtime music professor and wellknown classical guitarist Joe Baldassarre from Boise State and Costello’s departure from his nearly six-year position as adjunct faculty in the department will leave a hole at the university unlikely to be filled. Costello is concerned that without himself and Baldassarre promoting classical guitar through the university, the study will fade into obscurity. To avoid that, he hopes fans of the art will instead support it whenever the opportunity arises. “Now it’s up to the community to help determine the energy that gets put forth to keep classical guitar concerts like this alive,” Costello wrote in an e-mail. The community can show support at concerts like the Wednesday, Dec. 8, performance of classical guitarist Paul Grove at The Gallery at The Linen Building, the beautiful second-floor venue in which the acoustics and intimate setting provide the perfect location for a concert of this style. Grove will perform Hans Werner Henze’s Royal Winter Music, which the San Francisco Classical Voice website described as “Shakespeare for the guitar.” Indeed, this “ambitious music” was inspired by Richard III’s speech, which begins: “Now is the winter of our discontent.” The all-ages show starts at 7:30 p.m. and admission is $8 in advance, $10 at the door and only $5 for students. Tickets are available at brownpapertickets.com. Speaking of students, the local rock trio Workin’ On Fire are starting to get a little heat. Austin Williamson, Zach Bonaminio and Peter Maguire are mere babes in the woods—all three still in high school—but they have a press kit, high-res promo shots and a surprisingly rockin’ debut full-length CD, Mike Smith, which they saved up busking tips to pay for. In the year or so they’ve been around, the baby band has received some accolades: They recently won the latest round of Donnie Mac’s “Boise’s Got Talent” and netted $500 for the win. And on Thursday, Dec. 9, they’ll perform as part of the XFS 55 MMA “Night of Champions” throwdown at Qwest Arena. The show starts at 7 p.m., tickets are $10-$40. For more information on the show, visit qwestarenaidaho.com. For more on the band, visit myspace.com/ workinonfire. —Amy Atkins

22 | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | BOISEweekly

If you want to make people uncomfortable, swear like a sailor. Or dress seductively. Or cover your body in tattoos. Or dye your hair pink and wear makeup and be so androgynous that only your voice belies your gender. Or do it all, like 23-year-old singer Jeffree Star, who will perform at the Venue on Monday, Dec. 13. Star is, in a word, striking. His calves, thighs, forearms, biceps and neck are covered in tattoos, which number around 70. The sunset shades of his penciled eyebrows usually match the lipstick on his pouty lips. He has incredible bone structure framed by thick hair that is sometimes the color of a ripe pumpkin, sometimes the shade of strawberry lip gloss, occasionally the hue of a hothouse tomato and often such a bright fuchsia, he’d be hard to pick out of a field of summertime petunias. Everything about Star seems to be for shock and awe. Several of his tattoos are of “beauty queens” as he calls them: JonBenet Ramsey, Sharon Tate, Princess Diana, Elizabeth Taylor. He also sports images of Kurt Cobain, Elvis Presley, Wednesday Addams and Morticia Gomez. Star is fortunate to call tattoo queen Kat Von D one of his best friends—the woman is a genius with portraits. Star’s rise to fame came about via Myspace. At around age 18, Star put a couple of videos online for fun. By 2009 he was touring with The Vans Warped Tour, and he now has more than 1 million fans on his Myspace page. A few months ago, Star signed to rapper Akon’s record label, Kon Live—his labelmates include Colby O’Donis and Lady Gaga, who is obviously an influence. The cover of Star’s 2009 debut studio release, Beauty Killer (Popsicle Records/ Warner Music Group), featured a glamorous photo of him on the cover, a 1,000-mile stare in his heavily made-up eyes, his hands, held up as if in defense, dripping with blood. Star’s music, a mix of bent vocals, pop, dance and rock driven by electronic beats, is no less provocative than his persona. “I’m not trying to be shocking, that’s just who I am,” Star said. But between his fashion style, songs like “Get Away With Murder,” “Love Rhymes With Fuck You” and “Fame & Riches, Rehab Bitches,” shocking he is. In “Bitch, Please!” Star challenges haters: “Ain’t no bitch who can do it like me / Go F-U-C-K yourself baby / Ain’t no bitch

of the way I look, but I won ‘Best Hair.’ I who can do it like me / The critics and the had pink hair in fourth grade, and I wore press agree / Ain’t no bitch who can do it full makeup in my [senior] yearbook picture. like me / J-E-F-F to the R-E-E.” I looked different Also a little surprisbut not many people ing is that the unWith Abandon All Ships, It Boys and cared. They were bridled confidence in Stop Drop and Party. like, ‘Oh yeah, that’s “Bitch, Please!” is not Doors at 6 p.m., show at 7 p.m. Jeffree.’ All day long, some facade or defense $10 adv./$12 door people stare at me mechanism against the THE VENUE everywhere I go, and trauma of an unhappy 521 Broad St. 208-919-0011 I just don’t care. I childhood. Star proudboisevenue.com love fashion, I love ly includes portraits of makeup, I like being his mother, father and an artist.” grandparents next to Though he may have been lucky in school, those of his more famous idols on his skin. as an adult, Star, who identifies as gay, has Growing up in Orange County, Calif., Star not been able to avoid the slings and arrows (nee Steininger) said he never faced the ugly often thrown at someone so flamboyant. issues so rampant in schools right now. “It’s really sad how homophobic people “I was never bullied,” are still. It’s crazy what people think. 50 Star said. “People Cent posted on his website that Akon signed think I must me and [50 Cent] posted one of my music have been videos. The hardcore rapper fans were because writing the craziest comments. I think it’s funny and I’m not scared of it, but somebody wrote, ‘I want to shoot that faggot in the back of his head and kill him.’ People are scared of what they don’t understand.” Apparently, 12- to 20-year-old girls do understand Star. They are the ones who buy his merchandise and flock to his shows. “It’s like that Disney fan turned into a whore,” Star said laughing. He added that they seem to be a combination of normal girls who listen to Justin Bieber and “alternative kids that don’t feel like they fit anywhere, they dress different.” With his Hello Kitty hair and definitely dancey tunes, it’s easy to see why he appeals to that demographic, but on his next album, he’s hoping to bring older, more discerning fans into the fold. Jeffree Star is growing up. “In the new year, I’ll be working with a lot of people like Dr. Luke, David Guetta and Akon. There are going to be a lot of surprise guests and it’s going to be really big. It’s going to be my dream album … I’ve been through so much drama with my career because people don’t know how to handle my image or what I’m trying to do. Now I feel like I’m in a good place. I’ve paid my dues, I’ve worked hard. Now it’s time to get shit to the next level.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 23


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE Brother Ali

GUIDE THURSDAY DEC. 9

FRIDAY DEC. 10

BRIANNE GRAY—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

ARSIS—With Conducting From The Grave, Threshold and The Deep. 6:30 p.m. $10. The Venue

BEN BURDICK TRIO—With Amy Weber. 8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

ARTSWEST LIVE—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

THE BLUE DOOR FOUR—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BOISE ROCK SCHOOL SESSION GIG—6 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Linen Building

BLUES ADDICTS—8:30 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek Lounge

LOOSE CHANGE—9 p.m. FREE. Sam’s

BRANDON PRITCHETT—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

CANDREAD AND RIZING REZISTANCE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

LOW FI—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

DAN COSTELLO—6 p.m. FREE. Solid GIZZARD STONE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s HORSE FEATHERS—With Y La Bamba. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux

HOW THE GROUCH STOLE CHRISTMAS SHOW, DEC. 8, KNITTING FACTORY Sometimes you hear hip-hop so transgressive and from such a diverse collective that it almost needs its own name. On Wednesday, Dec. 8, the Knitting Factory will host some of the coolest hip-hop happening right now: the How the Grouch Stole Christmas Tour. Gravelly voiced MC The Grouch (Living Legends) with drum-and-bass master DJ Fresh (check out the track “Hypercaine”), the powerful pale Brother Ali and DJ Snuggles, intellectual Eligh (Living Legends) and the Spanish/English dancehall-reggae rappers Los Rakas. Each act, in its own right, is a powerful force in the genre. The Grouch’s two decades of performing have earned him a spot as one of the forefathers of hip-hop. Combine his prowess with the talent and energetic delivery of his tour mates and the result is a show so amazing, it should be called volcanicsupernova-over-the-top-hop. —Amy Atkins 8 p.m., $14-$35. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

24 | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | BOISEweekly

JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock and Barrel

WEDNESDAY DEC. 8

HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS— With The Grouch, DJ Fresh, Brother Ali, DJ Snuggles, Eligh and Los Rakas. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $14-$35. Knitting Factory

HIGH DESERT BAND—6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater Pizza

JOHN LENNON TRIBUTE SHOW—7 p.m. $5. VAC

JOHNNY SHOES—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers PAUL GROVE—7:30 p.m. $5$10. Linen Building STEVE EATON—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian TRAVIS MCDANIEL—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s WILSON ROBERTS—7 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

NANCY KELLY—8 p.m. FREE. Moxie Java-Calderwood THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club SHON SANDERS AND AMY WEBER—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock and Barrel

FIELD GUIDE AKA BELLE—8 p.m. FREE. Moxie Java-State St. FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s HELL’S BELLES—8:30 p.m. $13 - $30. Knitting Factory JAMES ORR—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown JEANNIE MARIE—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

NATHAN J. MOODY—6 p.m. FREE. Solid REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5. Hannah’s THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SOUL SERENE—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef SPINDLEBOMB—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s VOICE OF REASON—10 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

SOUL SERENE—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—With Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Hell’s Belles

Spindlebomb

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE SATURDAY DEC. 11

SUNDAY DEC. 12

BEN BURDICK TRIO—With Amy Weber. 8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

BLACK MARKET REPORT—10 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE BLUE DOOR FOUR—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

JIM LEWIS—11 a.m. FREE. Focaccia’s

BRIANNE GRAY—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

REX MILLER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

JON HYNEMAN—With Sally Tibbs and Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY DEC. 13

MARV ELLIS—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef POKE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek

REX AND BEVERLY—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

BILL MCKEETH AND FRIENDS—6 p.m. FREE. Cobby’s-Overland

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

ROB PAPER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SONNY MOON FOR FOUR—7 p.m. FREE. The Blue Door STEVEN TONEY—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

TUESDAY DEC. 14 ARTSWEST JAZZ INSTITUTE QUARTET—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door BEN BURDICK—7:30 p.m. FREE. Reef BLAZE N KELLY—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye CARTER FREEMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Solid DAN COSTELLO AND THE TRUCK STOP TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock and Barrel

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

KEVIN KIRK—With John Jones. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SOUL SERENE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

DANNY BEAL—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

TERRI EBERLEIN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

SPINDLEBOMB—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

JEFFREE STAR—With Dev, It Boys and Stop Drop and Party. See Noise, Page 22. 6:30 p.m. $10 adv., $12 at the door. The Venue

TREVOR EYRE QUINTET—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

SANTA RAMPAGE—With Tauge and Faulkner. 9 p.m. Liquid

SWEET BRIAR ACOUSTIC—6:30 p.m. FREE. Seasons Bistro

PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. $2. Liquid

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

V E N U E S

WEDNESDAY DEC. 15 CONCERT FOR CAUSE—Featuring Shawn Mullins. See Listen Here, this page. 6 p.m. $18. Knitting Factory DAN COSTELLO—6 p.m. FREE. Solid GIZZARD STONE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s LANGHORNE SLIM—With Ryan Lauder. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 at the door. Linen Building LOOSE CHANGE—9 p.m. FREE. Sam’s SALLY CRAVEN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown SLIPPERY ELM—6:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown Find more live music at boiseweekly.com.

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

GET OFF YOUR COUCH

CONCERT FOR CAUSE: SHAWN MULLINS, DEC. 15, KNITTING FACTORY 94.9 FM The River wants your ticker to tremble with happy feelings, so each year, they present Concert for Cause from which proceeds benefit a worthy charity. This year’s recipient is Family Advocates. Shawn Mullins, who is 20 years into an illustrious singer/ songwriter career, may be best known for his rhythmic guitar and piano, name-dropping tune “Lullaby,” in which he sing-tells the story of a young girl who lives in the City of Angels and is besieged by her own devils. Mullins released a brand-new album, Light You Up, in October, and before his show at the Knitting Factory, he will have been to Melbourne and Sydney in Australia, San Diego, Chicago, New York City and Atlanta—in that order. That he’s taking time to visit Boise and it’s for a good cause? That should make your heart happy. —Amy Atkins With Nate Fowler. 8 p.m., silent auction at 6 p.m., music at 7 p.m., $18-$65. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

AND GET INTO OUR PASSPORT TO LEARN – ski or snowboard package for ages 12+. Includes beginner lessons, equipment & season pass for only

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 25


LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN

FAMILY: THE FIRST CIRCLE FILM PREMIERE— This documentary by local filmmaker Heather Rae takes an in-depth look at the foster care system, particularly in Idaho. Inspired by her own family’s encounters with the system, she and her screenwriter husband Russell Friedenberg follow families who are “struggling to heal” as well as administrators and organizations that are trying to help. Among those are Idaho’s Family Advocate and Court Appointed Special Advocate programs. The score for the film was composed by Robin Zimmerman. Proceeds benefit the Family Advocates organization. Wednesday, Dec. 8, 6:30 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net FROSTY GOES TO HOLLYWOOD—Get out in the snow, get it on camera and win a chance to go play in the snow. We want your funny, crazy, silly, stupid, picturesque, amazing, original, homemade video of you, your pet, your friends or your mother-in-law doing whatever it is you do in the snow. Upload your video to frosty.boiseweekly.com by midnight on Tuesday, Jan. 4. Prize package includes a two-night stay at The Riverhouse Hotel in Bend, Ore., two lift tickets to Mt. Bachelor, dinner for two both nights, two passes to Winterfest, a tour and tasting at Deschutes Brewery and a Rock Star energy drink gift pack.

Opening

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3D—The third in a series of films from Disney. Lucy, Edmund and their cousin Eustace join Prince Caspian aboard the Dawn Treader in a journey where they encounter dragons and dwarves in a thinly-veiled examination of their faith. (PG) Edwards 9

MY DOG TULIP—British novelist J. R. Ackerly had never considered himself a dog lover—until he adopted Tulip as a puppy—and found a friend for life. Based on his memoir, this film is the first ever to be animated using hand drawn

V i s i t b o i s e w e e k l y. c o m a n d c l i c k on Scr een for movie times.

27

26 | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | BOISEweekly

WHY WALT DISNEY STILL MATTERS A platinum age for the House of Mouse GEORGE PRENTICE If I were to recommend one of the best movies of 2010 as visually stunning, full-hearted and character-rich, I would hope that you’d put it on a must-see list. But if I were to tell you that it’s a cartoon, would you consider taking a date to see it? If you choose to dismiss Tangled as just another animated feature, of classics including Cinderella, Peter Pan you’ll deny yourself a Christmas present. It and Lady and the Tramp. As a complement, may well be the season’s biggest surprise. his live-action fare included Davey Crockett, With the success of Tangled bundled with Treasure Island and Mary Poppins—genius this year’s Alice In Wonderland, Toy Story 3 filmmaking—but from the late 1960s through and Tron, I dare say we’re currently in a platithe 1980s, Disney sputtered with constant num age for Walt Disney Studios. Pound-forattempts to reinvent itself. pound, the House When Michael Eisner took of Mouse contincharge in the mid-1980s, ues to produce the TANGLED (PG) he had more hits but also a most entertaining, Directed by Nathan Greno and Byron Howard fair number of misses. For story-driven films Stars Mandy Moore, Zachary Levi, every Little Mermaid there of our era. Donna Murphy was Dick Tracy. For each You have to go Now playing at Edwards 9 and Edwards 22 Lion King there was Oliver back to a postand Company. Eisner went war America to to the well too often, and consider Disney’s on his watch, Disney simply made way too golden era. The man had already changed the many movies. In spite of occasional winners, entertainment landscape in the late 1930s and the Disney brand was diluted. 1940s by introducing feature-length animaBut the last several years have been pretty tion. From 1950-1965, Disney gave us a score

Tangled begs the big kids to give animation a chance.

great with Pirates of the Caribbean, Enchanted, The Chronicles of Narnia, Alice In Wonderland, as well as wonderful animated classics that are among the best in the entire canon of animated films: Ratatouille, Wall-E, Cars, Up, Toy Story 3 and now Tangled. DreamWorks has posed a little competition with Madagascar, How to Train Your Dragon, Megamind and Shrek. But there’s a cottoncandy-canyon of difference between the two studios when it comes to how to tell a story. Time and again, Disney films have characters to care for and themes to dream about. Tangled is a prime example of how. Think you know the story of Rapunzel? Think again. It turns out that evil stepmothers may simply be misguided with good intentions and even bad guys can be heroes now and then. And in these uncertain times, dreams can still come true and you can still wish upon a star.

SCREEN/THE TUBE Stickball, Hockeypuck, Fishbait, Tripp. That last one is a real name. It’s Palin daughter Bristol’s son. After a day of fishing for halibut, then bashing the fishes’ heads in with clubs The Learning Channel, which began airing the eight-episode series and bleeding their veins to keep the meat clean, Palin says, “This is Sarah Palin’s Alaska on Sunday nights, offers a fascinating glimpse into exactly what Bristol needed. It allowed her to just get away from it all.” the purportedly private life of a prominent politician. The show is—perMeanwhile, the week that show aired, Bristol was competing on haps apropos of the subject—simultaneously Dancing with the Stars. gorgeous and annoying. A few moments are devoted to author Joe It features episodes titled “Mamma Grizzly” McGinniss (Blind Faith, Fatal Vision), who and “Just for the Halibut.” She offers fishing adrecently moved into a house 15 feet away from vice to her children: “So, kids, when you cast, the Palin family. He is writing a book about don’t aim towards the bear, OK?” them and Mamma Grizzly isn’t happy about The cinematography—untouched mountain that. At one point she gets angry about the inranges, vast snowscapes, dire clouds—are trusion and tells Willow that “he’s stuck inside pure panoramic grandeur, but it’s countered writing an ugly book.” by moments of Palin explaining that the little Palin’s husband, Todd, often referred to as fence on their stairs isn’t there just to restrict her “helpmate,” built a fence to separate the their baby’s curiosity—it’s also to prevent her homes. McGinniss, as demonstrated by the daughter’s boyfriend from getting upstairs. He program, could’ve just ignored the fence and employs a genius strategy: he steps over it. Sarah Palin’s Alaska airs Sunday turned on his TV. The Palin family includes an unusually moni—Damon Hunzeker nights on TLC at 9 p.m. kered litter: Piper, Track, Willow, Bristol, Trig,

SARAH PALIN: JUST A FISH-BEATIN’, BEAR-TAUNTIN’, FREEDOM-LOVIN’ MOUNTAIN GAL

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LISTINGS/SCREEN NEW DVD RELEASE/SCREEN 28

and painted paperless computer technology. (NR) Flicks

THE TOURIST—Paris and Venice star as backdrops in a whirlwind of false identities, espionage and plenty of romance. Oh yeah, Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie co-star, too. If you can’t make it to Europe for the holidays, this will do nicely. (PG-13) Edwards9, Edwards 22

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE

EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP

HAWAII FIVE-O, THE 10TH SEASON

In a year that saw some top-drawer documentaries, Exit Through the Gift Shop was among the best. It’s a hilarious, outrageous look at a corner of the art world few may even know exists. The film documents a French immigrant obsessed with graffiti artist Banksy and viewers are given a front-row seat to some of the most controversial street art on the globe. When the director becomes the subject of his own movie—and the original subject takes over the direction—it’s a complex but thoroughly entertaining examination of commercial art. No wonder it’s on the short list for the Best Documentary Feature Oscar.

Hawaii Five-O is one of the breakout successes of 2010. But long before there were the pretty boys of the current CBS hit, there was the original, which ran for 12 seasons on CBS from 1968-1980. You haven’t seen kitschy ’70s melodrama until you’ve seen Jack Lord as the original Steve McGarrett. Next week, the 10th season of the original Five-O hits the beach—that was the last year that McGarrett teamed up with Danny Williams, Chin Ho and Kono (played by a scarylooking actor known only as Zulu). The original Five-O was surf’s-up when the good guys faced off against the infamous Wo Fat, a criminal mastermind. Aloha! —George Prentice

208-338-3821, regmovies.com EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

NETFLIX/SCREEN J-HORROR BRINGS THE SCARY Asian horror films often follow three leitmotifs: revenge, stories based on urban legends or possession. And especially in J-horror (Japanese horror), one trope usually trumps— a young female ghost with long, stringy black hair is hell-bent on payback against those who caused her death. Following are three particularly suspenseful Asian horror offerings that Netflix has available on DVD or to watch on demand.

strange newspaper clipping about the death of his daughter. But how could that be? She and his wife are waiting for him in the car. When his daughter is killed exactly in the manner the paper said, Hideki’s whole life crumbles. Years later, when he sees precognitive articles popping up in the newspaper again, he takes it upon himself to prevent the tragedies. But for every action, there is sometimes a terrifying consequence. In Japanese with English subtitles. Based on an urban legend.

A TALE OF TWO SISTERS—Sisters PHONE—What if when your cell Su-mi and Su-yeon are hospitalVisit netflix.com to phone rang, death was on the ized after their mother’s death. find these movies and other end? Reporter Ji-won begins Upon their return home, they many, many, many receiving creepy calls. When her find a ruthless stepmother, an more. friend’s daughter accidentally apathetic father and a house answers the phone, the child sudfull of unexplained and terrifying denly begins to act unsettlingly strange. happenings. This one makes Shyamalan Ji-won soon finds that she is not the first to twists look like child’s play. Korean with have that number and that everyone who English subtitles. Revenge and scary had it before her is dead. And somebody ghosts? Check. or something is out for (surprise) revenge. PREMONITION—While using a pay phone to Korean with English subtitles. get help with a stalled car Hideki reads a —Amy Atkins WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 27


FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

TABLEROCK BREWPUB AND GRILL

GLENN LANDBERG

Anyone who has ever tried a liquid diet knows you can make a meal out Tablerock Brewpub and Grill is tin-can-telephone distance from BW of fermented barley and hops. But at Tablerock Brewpub and Grill the headquarters, and it’s a brewpub—two things that should have solidisolid food is every bit as good as the hand-crafted beer. After nearly 20 fied its spot on my dining lineup long ago. But somehow Tablerock years of brewing in the Treasure Valley, it’s easy to forget a spot quietly never quite made it on my gastro short list. Not that they’ve noticed. lurking on the southern edge of downtown Boise. But winter is the time On a recent weekday evening, most tables in the open, ski-lodgey to remember: The cavernous space fills quickly in the evening, creating dining room were full. As were all the swivel seats crowding the long unexpected warmth enhanced by wide-open taps and a bustling kitchen. bar. We found a few empty chairs at a tall wood table and got to work Seeking low-stress parking on a chilly weekend date-night, my scanning the beer list. Scattered among the brewery’s classics—Nut husband and I reacquainted ourselves with Tablerock like it was an old Brown Ale, Whitebird Wheat, Copperhead Red—were an assortment friend. Burgers and sandwiches are the staples of American brewpubs, of seasonal specialties. Though the malty Winter Cheer was temptbut Tablerock also dishes up fare you might find in a pub across the ing, I went with the Sumo Stout ($4 pint, $5.25 22-oz.), a coffee-laced ocean—and I’m not gut-puncher clocking talking just about in at over 9 percent England. We started alcohol. The rest with an edamame of my crew went app ($5.99) as a with the oh-sohealthy alternative to opposite Hopzilla, an fries and onion rings. aromatic hops-bomb The salty crunch with a surprisingly and fibrous chew un-bitter finish. paired well with the The brews were specially brewed holian excellent pairing, day seasonal ale ($4 naturally, for the pint). After salivating pubby apps that folat the thought of lowed. The Sambal bangers and mashers hummus ($7.99) ($8.99) vs. fish and had a not-too-thick, chips ($11.99), my not-too-runny conhusband ordered sistency and made shepherd’s pie ($8.99) a great share plate, in his finest Irish with mounds of diced brogue. I veered tocucumbers, tomatoes ward the more eclecand red onions to tic belly-warmers on sprinkle on top of the the menu, finally setpita points. Though tling on the seafood we debated ordering TABLEROCK BREWPUB jambalaya ($11.99). a side of the Killer AND GRILL Thanks to cold storage technology and expedited Bread ($3.99)—Zeppole’s Village loaf topped with gar705 Fulton St. shipping, I no longer eschew seafood in a landlocked lic, parm, mayo, basil and black olives—the decadent, 208-342-0944 state. My entree featured tiger shrimp and Alaskan cod but not overwhelming, green onion- and parmesan-flecktablerockbrewpub.com Sun.-Thu., surfing on a bed of rice, their mellow flavor dueling ed spinach artichoke dip ($7.99) was more than enough 11 a.m.-9:30 p.m.; with the heat of andouille sausage. Frequent sips of Nut to soak up the suds in our stomachs. Fri.-Sat., 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Brown Ale ($4 pint) chased the zing and quenched my On a return lunch trip, I decided to explore thirst. Delicious as the jambalaya was, hubby’s shepTablerock’s more eclectic side. Though the menu has a herd’s pie upstaged everything else on the table. A scene-stealing moat solid showing of classic American staples—BLT, grilled cheese, Cobb of beef stew surrounded a mound of cheesy mashed potatoes that was a salad, beef and chicken burgers—it also offers a few fusion dishes. In meal in itself, with rich flavors of burgundy. addition to Mulligatawny soup ($3.49 cup, $4.99 bowl)—an East IndiA friend and I made another evening visit when we were still reeling an curried chicken soup with apple—Tablerock also serves the Chisaya from a post-Thanksgiving food coma. Thinking I might negate the Mama salad ($8.99) with quinoa, bell peppers, feta cheese, cucumbers, over-indulgences of the holiday, I chose the Bistro Steak Salad ($9.99) red onions and kalamata olives, and even a seafood jambalaya ($11.99) from among many lettuce-laden options. My good intentions paved with tiger shrimp, cod and andouille sausage. the road to more gluttony, as a giant platter of lettuce was compressed Ultimately, I couldn’t pass up the cod and potato pancakes ($9.99), a under the weight of four strips of grilled marinated flank steak (each hearty combo that instantly plopped my butt down at a dark wood pub the size of my palm), white beans, bleu cheese crumbles and roasted red in Prague. A flat mound of shredded, hash-brownish potatoes mingled peppers. Although I had asked for the balsamic vinaigrette on the side, with pungent, thinly sliced onions under a dollop of chunky, spiced the salad swam in its tang, our server having forgotten my request. My cranberry applesauce and a cool smear of sour cream. But the buttery buddy opted for the roasted red pepper turkey burger ($8.99), which cod—a second-rate white fish when not deep-fried—was underwhelmshe described as “almost like pizza on a bun” with melted swiss driping next to the potato pancakes. ping out of the ciabatta mitt. She, too, was irritated that her request for My lunch date kept it classic with the peppered bleu cheese burger no mayo had not been honored, but conceded that the burger was still ($8.99), which she noted was passable—with a soft bun and flavorful well-worth eating. We shared a side order of crisp fries ($4.99), which bleu cheese tang—though not mind-blowing. What was mind-blowing, put us back over the edge of satiety. we both emphatically agreed, were the french fries. Lightly beer-batWhether you’re in need of a winter warmer or a summer sipper, tered in the brewpub’s own Whitebird Wheat, they alone have nudged Tablerock has what it takes—you just have to remember it’s there. Tablerock to the top of my happy-hour short list. And it’s about time. —Sarah Barber is a serious sipper.

28 | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | BOISEweekly

—Tara Morgan wants a tin can telephone line to every local brewery. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 29


FOOD/DINING Eagle AHI SUSHI—Traditional Japanese sushi in swanky Eagle digs. 1193 E. Winding Creek, Ste. 104, 208-938-3474. ahisushibar.com. $$ OM BARDENAY—The little brother of the Boise bar still features the distillery’s own hooch, as well as an impressive array of beer, wine and assorted liquors. The drink menu is longer than the food menu and features unique concoctions from the bar’s award-winning bartenders. The riverside patio is the real highlight of the Eagle location, so be ready to fight for a table on warm summer evenings. 610 Grove St., 208-426-0538; 155 E. Riverside Dr., 208-938-5093. SU OM bardenay.com. $$-$$$ BELLA AQUILA—Brunch arrives with a warm pastry basket, and lunch and dinner are precluded with flatbread accompanied by Bella Spread—a pungent, rosy compote of parmesan romano, garlic, butter and cayenne pepper. Sweet options include sweetened ricotta and mascarpone-filled cannoli dipped in dark chocolate and pistachios. 775 S. Rivershore Lane, 208-938-1900. bellaaquilarestaurant.com. $$-$$$ RES SU OM THE BLUE DOOR CAFE—Pizza, crepes and sandwiches along with live jazz six nights a week. 3300 W. State St. 208-9386128 bluedoorcafe.com. $-$$ SU OM THE BLUE MOOSE CAFE—With moose-inspired decor, an eatery where diners can get tasty bistro fare like soups and salads, sandwiches and wraps. Think about dining in their new sunroom or outside. 79 Aikens Road, 208-939-3079. thebluemooseOM cafe.net. $ BUSTERS BAR AND GRILL— The Boise favorite expanded to Eagle to offer the suburbs a getaway where sports dominate. Between the big TVs and waitresses dressed in tiny little cheerleader outfits, there is a full menu of pub fare, and oh yeah, sports and more sports. The neighborhood sports bar/family restaurant is suburban sports getaway. 1396 E. State St., SU 208-938-1800. $-$$ CAFE RUSSIAN BEAR— Borscht, Russian crepes, beef stroganoff, potato pancakes— it’s all homemade. If you are as hungry as a bear, the cafe serves up borscht in up to 18 ounce servings, or try the “Old Russia” salad, a combination potato, ham, eggs, onion, peas, carrots, pickles and mayo. 600 S. Rivershore Lane, Ste. 160, 208-939-1911. caferussianbear. com. $-$$ OM

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ —Less than $8 $ $ —$8 to $14 $ $ $ —$14 to $20 $ $ $ $ —Over $20

CASA MEXICO—With restaurants all over the Treasure Valley, Casa Mexico is family owned, with an extensive menu and an attentive staff. 393 W. State St., 208-939-7795. casamexicoidaho.com. $-$$ SU OM COOL HAND LUKE’S STEAKHOUSE/SALOON—Think meat and potatoes dressed up with a cowboy hat and a whole lot of Western theme. Of course there’s chicken and seafood, but the star of the menu is beefsteaks in particular. Everything comes ranch-style with sourdough rolls, soup or salad, campfire beans and a bevy of side dishes. 291 E. Shore Dr., 208-939-5853. coolhandlukes.com. $$ SU OM DAVINCI’S—Casual Italian cuisine in quaint downtown Eagle, the “locals’ Italian restaurant” is housed in a historic bank building with a full-service bar area. A wide variety of Italian selections such as lasagna and chicken parmesan are accompanied by warm bread and all-you-can-eat salads. 190 E. State St., 208-939-2500. $$-$$$ SU EIGHTEEN ONE AT EAGLE HILLS GOLF COURSE—Fine dining featuring locally procured, New American cuisine. Catering available. 605 North Edgewood Lane, 208-939-0402. eaglehillsgolfcourse.com. $$-$$$ RES SU OM

FIESTA GUADALAJARA—Traditional Mexican restaurant specializing in tacos, burritos, and enchiladas. A full menu tempts you to choose a not-so common dish. 3210 E. Chinden Blvd., Ste 100, 208-938-1116. fiestasguadalajara.com. $-$$ SU OM THE GRIDDLE IN EAGLE—Eggs, spuds and hotcakes served a hundred different ways for breakfast. Burgers and a selection of grilled and cold sandwiches for lunch, including the popular chicken salad croissant. Dinner reads like grandma’s favorites with chicken fried steak, Southern fried chicken and meatloaf. 177 Eagle River St., 208-939-9070. SU OM thegriddle.com. $ LA TAPATIA—Authentic Jaliscan fare served in a clean and comfortable environment. 1225 E. Winding Creek Drive 130; 401 E. Park Center Blvd., 208-3436403. $-$$ SU BAAN THAI—Doesn’t a Cosmopolitan and a caterpillar roll, a martini and some miang kum or a Long Island iced tea with some lemongrass shrimp sound tantalizing? 78 Eagle River St. Ste. 165, 208-938-8424; 78 Eagle River St. Ste. 165, SU OM 208-938-8424. $$

FOOD/RECENTLY REVIEWED THE EGG FACTORY RISE & SHINE DAYTIME CAFE 8061 W. Fairview Ave., 208-322-0191, eggfactorycafe.com “Myriad egg, potato, waffle, pancake, burger, sandwich and salad options share menu bunk space, but breakfast gets the biggest room in the house.” —Amy Atkins

MOON’S KITCHEN CAFE 712 W. Idaho St., 208-385-0472, moonskitchen.com “Hubby vowed to help me polish off the Guinness shake ($6.50) but then promptly ordered the colossal Reuben ($9.95).” —Sarah Barber

TRES BONNE CUISINE 6555 Overland Road, 208-658-1364, tresbonnecuisine.com “Haute cuisine it’s not, at Tres Bonne Cuisine. But as the loyal regular crowd will tell you, it’s one of the homiest restaurants in the city.” —Rachael Daigle

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RES —Reservations

needed/recommended —Patio SU —Open on Sunday OM —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

30 | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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Berryhill’s Restaurant · Bar Banquets · Catering 121 N. 9th Downtown Boise 387.3553 www.berryhillandco.com

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 31


FOOD/DINING PAMELA’S BAKERY—Pamela’s offers an array of pre-made cold sandwiches, salads and wraps for lunch, as well as homemade soup and quiche. Hot sandwiches are available five days a week. Take a look at a pastry display case full of sweets and a full coffee bar. 360 S. Eagle Road, 208-938-6585. pamelasbakery.com. $-$$ OM

WILLOWCREEK GRILL—The second location in Eagle features a lovely outdoor patio with a river that runs by it. Contemporary cuisine in a casual atmosphere and a fine place to dine with friends and family for lunch or dinner. Keep the party going in the lounge with dancing and live music. 1065 E. Winding Creek Dr., 208-938-3010. willowcreekgrill.com. $-$$ OM

ZEN BENTO—Zen Bento does well by its simple little menu. This mostly take-out, affordable, joint serves up healthy, fresh, tasty salads and bento boxes. 342 E. State St., 208-938-4277. zenbento.com. $ OM Find even more restaurant listings, reviews and food news at boiseweekly.com.

THE PERKS OF LIFE — Coffee shop with big comfy couches, along with wine tasting and live music on the weekends. 1540 E. Iron Eagle Dr., 208-938-7809. , theperksoflife.net. $-$$. SU. REMBRANDT’S COFFEE SHOP—Located in a restored church on Eagle’s main drag, Rembrandt’s has become a neighborhood gathering point for more than just coffee. Rembrandt’s has hot and cold libations aplenty, a pastry case full of homemade muffins, sweets, breads and quiches, and a short lunch menu with largely portioned sandwiches, soups and salads. 93 S. Eagle Rd., 208-938-1564. rembrandtscoffeehouse.net. $ SU OM RIVER ROCK ALEHOUSE— Here, nachos have a reputation, patio hosts live music in the warmer months and the bitty bar area ain’t a bad spot to enjoy a seriously diverse selection of beer. For a $20 annual fee, you can be a part of the Mug Club and have a mug inscribed with your name that holds four extra ounces of liquid gold, not to mention the power to impress the ladies with your “regular” status. 228 E. Plaza Road, 208-938-4788. riverrockaleSU OM house.com. $$-$$$ SAKURA SUSHI—Brightly-lit sushi joint with affordable lunch specials. 3210 E. Chinden Blvd., 208-938-1599. boisesakurasuOM shi.com. $-$$ SEASONS BISTRO WINE BAR AND CATERING—This neighborhood sandwich joint and catering company pours a pretty mean glass of wine. Selections range from some impressive pinots and a mourvedre on the red side to rieslings and sav blancs on the white. With a huge patio and Louisiana-style Sunday brunch, this is a charming (and affordable) place to sit and sip. 1117 E. Winding Creek Road, 208-939-6680. seasonsdelicaOM tering.com. $$-$$$ SMOKY MOUNTAIN PIZZA AND PASTA—When you’re in the mood for a good, traditional pizza, this is the place. The pastas, starters, sandwiches and salads are equally delicious, and the list is as long as your are hungry. 34 E. State St., 208-939-0212. smokymountainOM pizza.com. $-$$ THE STUFFED OLIVE—Eagle has decided to tattle on its “best kept secret” and share this bistro’s fresh sandwiches, pastas, roasted meats and fresh baked desserts with the rest of us. 404 S. Eagle Rd., Suite A, 208-938-5185. thestuffedolive. OM net $$ TULLY’S COFFEE—Small-batch roasted coffee from the Pacific Northwest. 150 E Riverside Dr., Ste. 100, 208-884-2880. tullys. com. $ SU

32 | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | BOISEweekly

FOOD/BEER GUZZLER

WINTER IMPORTS Although the official start is still a few weeks away, winter has arrived with a vengeance. Single-digit temperatures and a heavy hit of snow make the winter seasonals even more appealing. Curl up in front of a roaring fire with any one of these outstanding European imports. AYINGER WEIZEN-BOCK This is only the second year this German seasonal has been available in the United States. A wheat beer brewed with the weight and strength of a Bock, it displays the classic aromas of spicy clove and banana bread. That spice comes through on the palate with the body and warmth you want this time of year. Lots of fresh grain flavors, matched by nice layers of fruit—apple, orange and pear—colored by touches of ginger. This one had me craving a nice pork roast smothered in sauerkraut. Buy while you can because this one has a very limited availability. GOUDEN CAROLUS NOEL This Belgian seasonal in a cork-finished, 750-ml bottle pours a deep brown with a thin head. The sweet caramel on the nose reminds me of pecan pie backed by a nice bit of sour cherry. The flavors are smooth and creamy with a lightly toasted malt backbone surrounded by honeyed plum and pear fruit and touches of anise and spice. The long finish is sweet but with just enough ripe citrus to keep things in balance. LA TRAPPE QUADRUPEL TRAPPIST ALE This mahogany-hued Belgian brew opens with dark fruit aromas of plum, date, dried cherry, baked apple and a little brown sugar. Beautifully balanced in the mouth, the caramellaced malt is sweet, but not overly so, and is colored by hints of spice and orange zest. It goes down so smooth and easy, you’d never guess it weighs in at 10 percent alcohol, so caution is advised. The Quadrupel is not officially a winter release, but it has the flavor profile that fits the season. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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B O I S E W E E K LY R E A L ES TAT E BW ROOMMATES ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES. COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: www.Roommates.com ROOMMATE WANTED I’m a quiet fortysomething y/o male with an extra room for rent in my house in a nice bench neighborhood off of Vista Avenue. 2BD, 1BA. House is completely furnished except your room. Some storage area available. $325/mo., $150 dep., 1/2 util., (gas & electric only). Looking for a long term renter who is not a partier or does drugs & is honest. I have a large dog & dog door leading to the fenced backyard. Will consider your dog if they get along. 412-9677.

BW RENTALS

N. BOISE-ELM GROVE PARK Charming and private triplex - 1 car grg. 1,154 sq. ft. 3BD, 2BA. 9 or 15 mo. lease. Credit report/ landlord references required. Cat would be considered. No smoking. 867-7435. Available 12/20! NW BOISE HOME This is a super clean, vacant home ready for some new tenants. 3BD, 2BA. Good pets are always welcome. No application fee. Please call 208-353-6529 or e-mail fx@boiseidrealty.com

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BW BEAUTY PLUSH HAIR LOUNGE NOW OPEN! PLUSH Hair Lounge is now open to the public! We offer all beauty services in Hair, Nails, and Waxing. Also introducing EasiHair Extensions, and Shellac Nail Services!! We are located on 118 N. Latah in beautiful Boise Bench! Call 392-1946 for your appointment! We also have 1 station left for a talented stylist to lease! Call Crystal for more information 283-7186!

FOR SALE BY OWNER 3BD, 2BA. Desperate! EZ qual! No banks! Minor fixer! $895/mo. $1995 down! Owner will carry with an easy qualification and low down. Call today to move in for Christmas! 850-1284 or 954-6504.

OFFICE HOURS Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Out to Lunch 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

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FAX (208) 342-4733

25TH & IRENE 1,154 sq. ft., 3BD, 2BA, grg. Gas heat & central air. W/D hook-ups. 9 to 15 month lease preferred. No smoking. Cat would be considered. Available mid-December. Call 867-7435. 2BD, 2BA apt. at State St. & Kessinger. $575/mo. Pets welcome. 371-6762. AVAILABLE DECEMBER 1! Large 1BD apt available. W/D, DW incld. Please call 208-495-2484. Located on State St. BOISE DEPOT BENCH HOUSE 2BD +. $875/mo. Call 484-6407.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - ENERGY HEALING

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly. com

BW MASSAGE *A Massage by Terrance. Full body, hot oil, private studio, heated table. In/Out Call. 841-1320.

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 8805772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Boise & Nampa studios.

REAL ESTATE - FOR RENT

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

DISCLAIMER BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577. Thomas.

Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 33


PLACE AN AD

B O I S E W E E K LY COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. ULM 340-8377.

VIP MASSAGE

Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Relief. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

C A RE E RS

C O MMU N IT Y

BW HELP WANTED

BW ANNOUNCEMENTS

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 www. easywork-greatpay.com Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net SOCIAL WORKER Interfaith Sanctuary Housing Services is accepting applications for a full-time Supportive Services Director. Applications will be accepted through Friday, December 24 at 5 pm. Completed applications must be sent by email only to info@interfaithsanctuary.org. Applications may not be delivered to the shelter, mailed or faxed. For more information about Interfaith Sanctuary, visit our website at www.interfaithsanctuary.org. The job application can be found on the Sanctuary website: www.interfaithsanctuary.org. Application links are located on the ‘Job Announcement’ page tab.

4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for $20. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

BW CAREER EDUCATION & TRAINING

EAT HERE

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

CHRISTMAS SPONSORS NEEDED CATCH (Charitable Assistance to Community’s Homeless) is a program that provides housing first to homeless families with children living in emergency shelters. CATCH needs Christmas sponsors for these families. Please help us fulfill children’s dreams and wishes for Christmas! For more information regarding the C.A.T.C.H. program please visit our website at www.cityofboise. org/catch To donate please contact: Jennifer Marrow CATCH Social Work Intern 208-384-4087 or fax 208-343-0529. 1276 W. River St., Suite 201, Boise.

BW CLASSES & WORKSHOPS MOTHERHOOD SURVEY Please take 10-15 min. to complete this survey on Motherhood. It’s only 10 questions and completely anonymous. www.surveymonkey. com/s/M99W8Y5 TEEN DATING If you are a teenager or know one, please have them take 5 min. & fill out a survey. They do not provide ANY identifying information - the survey is completely confidential. www.surveymonkey. com/s/MTXL39C

The hippest craft store! Local artist, colorful fabrics, craft books & supplies. Classes always forming! 1304 W. Eastman. 342-0600. HOLIDAY LOSS RECOVERY GROUP The holidays can be very stressful for someone who has recently lost a loved one. Align Hospice and The Cottages of Meridian are sponsoring “Preparing for the Holidays”. This FREE class will cover: Understanding Grief and Loss and the Impact; Methods for Reducing Emotional Pain; Coping Skills and Techniques to Address Anxiety; Tips for Finding Excitement and Motivation; Using Visualization and Imagery to Build Hope; Classes will be every Wednesday 5:30 to 6:30pm at the Cottages of Meridian, 3199 W. Belltower Dr, Meridian. RSVP to Align Hospice 949-9478 or 639-1122.

BW LOST Lost Nov. 5th. Large black cat. 3 miles east of Sand Hollow Store on farm at 26590 Hwy 30. Call 922-4988.

FO R SA L E

SHOP H ERE BW STUFF

RIGHT SCHOOL, RIGHT DEGREE, RIGHT NOW!

Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

M IND, BO DY, SPIR IT - YOGA

TWIGS & TWIST IN HYDE PARK

COMMUN ITY - AN NOUNC EM ENT S

9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464.

BW ART, ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

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BW BW ART, ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

CALL TO LOCAL ARTISTS If you are a local artist looking for a venue to sell your artwork through, we are looking for you. Green Chutes Artist Coop is opening December 15th in the Collister Shopping Center, 4716 W. State St., Boise. Come visit our 12,000 SF space as we remodel, we think you’ll be excited too. For membership information contact Nancy Zurcher 208-6957156 or email greenchutes@ netzero.net

SARA’S SECONDHAND

Will pay CASH for furniture. Call 331-2366.

JAPANESE PACHINKO MACHINE One Sankyo electronic Japanese video/slot Pachinko machine. Good working order. Comes with balls and catch bucket for balls. Three video slot reels & side video window. Search “Pachinko Wanted” on youtube. $100 cash firm. Call & come see the machine in action. Call 890-7274. Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

C A R E E R S - E DU C AT ION

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | DECEMBER 8–14, 2010 | 35


PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B O I S E W E E K LY SHOP HERE

NYT CROSSWORD | ACROSS 1 Passes with flying colors 8 Home of Hells Gate State Park 13 A lot of an orchestra 20 Really, really want 21 Break off 22 “Are we not joking about that yet?” 23 Sounded sheepish? 1

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68 Strong aversion, colloquially 70 Kind of moment 71 10 Downing St. figures 73 R.V. refuge org. 74 Reflux 76 Places for needles 77 Go by 79 Exactly right 82 Mythological triad 83 Porker’s place 84 Creatures known to lick their own eyeballs 86 Itty-bitty 88 “Cómo es ___?” (Spanish “Why?”) 89 Nuts about 90 It guards the heart 94 Kind of romance between actors 96 One of the Gandhis 99 ___ Grand 101 Vegas opening? 102 ___ Na Na 104 What might go for a dip? 108 Worked up 110 Big name in late-night 112 “Don’t try any more tricks!” 114 Brooks or Blanc 115 When repeated, an old sitcom farewell 116 Cry of self-pride 117 Beginning 118 Preceders of xis 119 Stretched figures 121 R&B funk trio with the 1990 hit “Feels Good” 124 One using twisted humor 126 Is worth doing 127 Trattoria topper 129 Letter-shaped support 131 Provides service that can’t be beat? 132 Stave (off) 134 Part of a sunbow 136 Shih ___ (dog) 137 Blue stuff 139 Bitter quarrels 142 Input 144 Beatles’ last studio album 148 Annual Manhattan event (represented symbolically in this puzzle) 151 Transmission repair franchise 152 Footnote abbr. 153 Zero

154 Christmas ___ 155 Leader of the Silver Bullet Band 156 Lillian of silents 157 Seek damages 158 Org. that infiltrated Nazi Germany 159 Rx amount: Abbr. 160 In thing

DOWN 1 Doesn’t shut up 2 Razzle-dazzle 3 With 5-Down, when 148-Across traditionally takes place 4 Pirate’s realm 5 See 3-Down 6 Ceaselessly 7 Intense heat 8 La Palma, e.g. 9 Canned foods giant 10 Cosmetics giant 11 Title for Judge Judy 12 Cookie with creme 13 Wakens 14 Picker-upper 15 Where 148-Across takes place 16 “Yes, Virginia, there ___ Santa Claus” 17 Traditional centerpiece of 148-Across 18 “Diary of a Madman” author 19 December fall 24 Dinner in a can 25 “Whip It” band 34 Discus path 35 Mount in myth 37 Here, in Dijon 39 “Deus ___” (1976 sci-fi novel) 40 Low-___ 43 Hardly a plain Jane 44 Capital of Iceland? 46 Winds 47 Detach, in a way 48 Movie co. behind “Wordplay” and “My Big Fat Greek Wedding” 49 Ready 52 Blind guess 53 French seasoning 54 Texas A&M athletes 55 Asserts something 58 Magnetic disruption in space 60 1960s girl group, with “the” 63 Literary inits. 65 It’s picked in Maui

66 Part of an ear 67 Torque’s symbol 69 Gate projection, for short 72 Man in the hood? 75 One-named rock star 78 Stream of consciousness, for short? 80 Chu ___ (legendary Confucian sage) 81 What it must do 82 PX patrons 85 Fraudster 87 Frenchman’s term of address 89 Shtick 91 Swell 92 Echo producer 93 “Right there with you” 95 Chinese “way” 96 Clean again, as a floor 97 Tiny creature 98 Like St. Nick 100 Overfills 103 Firm newbie 105 Sarcastic sort 106 Take in, as guests 107 Sends packing 109 Bingeing 110 Award named for a Hall-of-Fame pitcher 111 Blogger, e.g. L A S T

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113 Just below the boiling point 120 Start for 148-Across? 122 Not benched, as in hockey 123 Not overspending 125 Set to go off, say 128 Flops in lots 130 Out 133 Extra-large top? 135 Start for -centric 136 Essays 138 Western tribe 139 Kind of party 140 Cuisine with pad see ew noodles 141 Signs of dreaming 143 Wide-lapel jackets 145 It was wrapped around the Forum 146 Rare blood type, for short 147 Jane at Thornfield 149 Funny Costello 150 Walgreens rival Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

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PLACE AN AD

VISIT | www.boiseweekly.com E-MAIL | classified@boiseweekly.com CALL | (208) 344-2055 ask for Jill

B OISE W E E KLY

S ER V IC E S - HO M E

BW SHOP HERE ATOMIC TREASURES Atomic Treasures 409 S. 8th St Boise, Idaho Between Broad and Myrtle. 208-344-0811 Celebrating Reuse. Vintage and Retro clothing, accessories, books, barware, houseware, tie dye T’s, art, and so much more. Many unique and usual items for that perfect gift. Stop soon and check it out! LOCAL HONEY We are a local beekeeping family and we have 100% pure, all natural, unfiltered, honey for sale. Our honey is produced organically & tastes amazing. You can tell the difference between our honey and the store bought honey! $10/pint, $15/quart. If interested, please call Alex at 208-921-1503. Check us out on facebook, Idaho Bee Shop. Thank you!

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

BW HAVE SWAPCAFE.COM SwapCafe.Com Come Join Us! Trade your stuff, your skills, your inventory. Submit via SwapCafe.net for personal swaps or SwapCafe. com for B@B. Good luck trading! Questions to info@SwapCafe.Net.

PETS SILVER: 1-year-old female cat. Very beautiful coat with unique markings like silver over orange patches. Relaxed, easy-to-like cat. (Kennel 105- #11950106)

MONA: 2-year-old female cat. Indoor only. Litterbox-trained. Good with kids, cats and dogs. Talkative and social with everyone. (Kennel 75- #11933973)

BW PETS Dog & person attacked by off leash young Pit Bull following its owner on a mountain bike. Owner in his mid to late 20’s. On Crestline Trail, Nov. 16th, 4pm. Call if you can identify dog or owner 343-2310.

N O T I CE S BW LEGAL NOTICES Elmer-Lee: Defoor- Declaration, Arizona Pinal County Recorder # 2010-096357, 2010-096358, 2010-106631, 2010-108049, Pinal, Arizona.

BW MUSICIANS’ EXCHANGE Enthusiastic keyboardist wanted. Call Ed 389-9619. Viva Las Vegas! Elvis impersonator for hire. Parties, Weddings, Christmas & New Years parties. Located in Mtn. Home. John 587-5719.

BA RT E R

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

ZAANTI: 10-month-old male Australian cattle dog mix. House- and crate-trained. Needs a home with continued training. (Kennel 323#11863791)

BW MUSIC SERVICES

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BW I SAW YOU IN LINE AT THE FLICKS I got a discount to see the movie thanks to your friend & you said, “Now you have to be my date.” What I wanted to say was, “Good, because you’re damn cute, & I like meeting new people.” But I didn’t say it. I wish you would have asked for my number because I would have given it to you.

BW 4 WHEELS Junk cars, trucks, vans. Paying up to $200. 208-963-0492.

MUSIC CODY: 7-year-old male yellow Lab. Housetrained and great with everyone. Gentle on the leash. Needs a diet and light exercise. (Kennel 426- #11915545)

DYLAN: 1-year-old male cat. Robust, friendly, talkative and interactive. Still has the playfulness of a kitten. Litterbox-rained. (Kennel 02- #11937524)

MADISON: 1-year-old female American pit bull terrier. Gentle and loving dog who bonds quickly. Good with other dogs. (Kennel 315#11870978)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

BW INSTRUMENTS IDAHO’S GUITAR PRO SHOP Everything acoustic & electric. Nationally competitive low prices. Sales-Rentals-Lessons-Repairs Professional musicians on staff. Dorsey Music, 5015 W. State, by Lakeharbor. 853-4141.

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CORDILLIA: I am a declawed manx with a lovely disposition.

LANE: My extra-toed, mittened feet will keep you warm.

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LIAM: I hope it will not be a dream to be home for Christmas.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the coming weeks, life will beguile you with secrets and riddles but probably not reveal as much as you’d like. I think this is an opportunity, not a problem. In my opinion, your task isn’t to press for shiny clarity but rather to revel in the luxuriant mysteries. Let them confer their blessings on you through the magic of teasing and tantalizing. And what is the nature of those blessings? To enlighten your irrational mind, stimulate your imagination, teach you patience and nurture your connection with eternity. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Butterflies recall at least some of what they’ve learned during their time as caterpillars. The metamorphosis they go through is dramatic, and yet they retain the gist of the lessons they mastered while in their earlier form. I see something comparable ahead for you in 2011, Taurus. It’s as if you will undergo a kind of reincarnation without having to endure the inconvenience of actually dying. Like a butterfly, the wisdom you’ve earned in your old self will accompany you into your new life. Are you ready?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): What nourishes you emotionally and spiritually, Gemini? I’m not talking about what entertains you or takes your mind off your problems. I’m referring to the influences that make you stronger and the situations that teach you life-long lessons. Take inventory of these precious assets. And then make a special point of nurturing them back. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Twothirds of American elementary school teachers spend their own money to buy food for their poor students. Meanwhile, there’s a 50 percent chance that an American kid will, at some point in his or her young life, resort to using government aid in the form of food stamps. Those facts make me angry and motivate me to volunteer to distribute free food at the local food bank. I encourage you, my fellow Cancerian, to summon your own good reasons to get riled up on behalf of people who have less luck and goodness than you do. It’s always therapeutic to stretch your generosity and spread your wealth but doing so will especially redound to your advantage in the coming weeks. Unselfish acts will bring profound selfish benefits.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): According to some sources, the ancient Greek philosopher Socrates practiced the art of sculpture as a young man. But he abandoned it early on, deciding that he wanted to “carve his soul rather than marble.” Can I interest you in turning your attention to that noble, gritty task, Leo? It would be a fine time to do some intensive soul-carving. Soul-scouring, too, would be both fun and wise, as well as soul-etching and soul-emblazoning and soul-accessorizing. I highly recommend that you enjoy a prolonged phase of renovating and replenishing your most precious work of art. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In her haunting tune “One Blood,” Virgo singer Lila Downs confesses that “the deepest fear [is] my desire.” I personally know many Virgos who make a similar lament. How about you? Is there any way in which you are scared of the power of your longing? Do you ever find yourself reluctant to unleash the full force of your passion, worried that it could drive you out of control or lead you astray? If so, the coming weeks will be prime time to face down your misgivings. It’s time to liberate your desires, at least a little.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here are your words of power: hybrid, amalgamation, composite, aggregate, medley, alloy, ensemble. Now here are your words of disempowerment: welter, mishmash, jumble, hodgepodge, patchwork. Strive to accentuate the first category and avoid the second. Your task is to create a pleasing, synergetic arrangement from a multiplicity of factors, even as you avoid throwing together a hash of diverse influences into a mess. Be strategic, not rash and random, as you do your blending. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I posted this excerpt from a Pablo Neruda love poem: “Our love is like a well in the wilderness where time watches over the wandering lightning. Our sleep is a secret tunnel that leads to the scent of apples carried on the wind.” Reader John F. Gamboa said this: “I once found a well in the desert. There was a rope and a bucket. The bucket had a small hole in it. While pulling up the bucket of water, about half of it drained. But I suppose a decent bucket would have been stolen. So a bucket with a small hole was perfect; I got what I needed!” Like Gamboa, a bucket with a hole is what you need right now.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’ve arrived at a delicate yet boisterous turning point when one-of-a-kind opportunities are budding. I’m going to give you seven phrases that I think capture the essence of this pregnant moment: 1. wise innocence; 2. primal elegance; 3. raw holiness; 4. electrifying poise; 5. curative teasing; 6. rigorous play; 7 volcanic tenderness. To maximize your ability to capitalize on the transformations that are available, I suggest you seek out and cultivate these seemingly paradoxical states of being. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For years I’ve had recurring dreams of finding treasure amidst trash. I interpret this to mean that I should always be alert for the possibility that I might come across beautiful or valuable stuff mixed in with what has been discarded. Recently I heard that a sewage treatment plant in Japan announced that it has been culling huge amounts of gold from the scum and slop—so much so that their haul outstrips the yield at the country’s top gold mine. I urge you to make this your metaphor of the week, Capricorn. What riches might you be able to pluck out of the dirt and shadows?

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Should you store up your energy and postpone your gratification for a more opportune time? Hell, no! Should you await further data before making a conclusion? Double hell, no! If thoughts like those have been poking up into your awareness, exorcise them immediately. It is high time for you to grab the best goodies and reveal the whole truth. You are primed to make a big play. Call on all the help you’ve been promised and transform the “what ifs” into “no doubts.” PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In Taio Cruz’s mega-hit pop song “Dynamite,” he describes how excited he is to go dancing. “I throw my hands up in the air,” he exults. “I wanna celebrate and live my life.” I’ll use Cruz as both a role model and an anti-role model. Right now it’s your sacred duty to intensify your commitment to revelry and find every excuse to celebrate your life. On the other hand, to get the full benefits from this time of festive release, you will need, as much as humanly possible, to declare your independence from corporate brainwashing and escape the intelligence-sapping mindset of consumerism.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 19 Issue 24