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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 23 DECEMBER 1–7, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! INSIDE

GIFT GUIDE BW’s spankin’ new guide to your holiday shopping NEWS 9

PUSHING OUT PANHANDLERS City says give to the homeless, just not directly FEATURE 11

BAD CARTOON CONTEST WINNER Who is so bad they’re good? FIRST THURSDAY 20

PLAN YOUR ATTACK Map and listings inside

“There is no Democratic party in Idaho.”

CITIZEN 10


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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreader: Annabel Armstrong, Heather Lile Contributing Writers: Amy Pence-Brown, Bill Cope, Damon Hunzeker, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall Intern: Aaron Lang ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Steve Klamm, Jeremy Lanningham, Glenn Landberg, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Patrick Sweeney, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE DRAWING THE LINE As the effects of the release of the latest government documents by Wikileak ripple into the diplomatic community, and as the world debates the ethics of publishing highly sensitive information, I’ve been grappling with my own decision along the same lines. While the information I’ve debated over may not be imprudently written descriptions of foreign leaders or reports containing very candid quotes from top Middle Eastern officials, the impact could be devastating, if only for a handful of people. At boiseweekly.com this week, you’ll find a feature story from former BW News Editor-turned-independent journalist Nathaniel Hoffman. The report details the social movement astir in support of the Dream Act. It’s a bill that, if passed, would provide a path to citizenship for undocumented persons younger than 35 who came to the United States before the age of 16. As of BW’s press time, the bill had yet to be voted on by Congress but was expected to make its way through the Senate this week. Interspersed throughout Hoffman’s piece are first-person accounts from a high school student living here in Idaho who would benefit from the Dream Act. In the first draft of Hoffman’s piece, the source published as only “Aaron” divulged his entire name, as well as his town of residence and high school. After much deliberation, I made the decision to remove some of that information from the story and use only Aaron’s first name. Aaron wants to be fully “out” as undocumented and doing so semi-anonymously—by using only his first name— perhaps defeats that wish. But Aaron also lives in a very small town in a very conservative area of the state and his entire family is undocumented. At age 17, Aaron was willing to risk his future and that of his family’s to come out in Hoffman’s story. However, the story is no less powerful without Aaron’s last name or the name of the town in which he lives. And, perhaps, withholding that information removes him from danger. To read Hoffman’s story, log on to boiseweekly.com and click on “Features.” —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Heather Miller TITLE: Postcards at Random

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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MEDIUM: Screen print ARTIST STATEMENT: These postcards made their debut appearance at Modern Art 2010. Other screen prints and art are available at empirestudios.etsy.com.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 3


WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

’TIS THE SEASON FOR HOOPS Cobweb checks in with the Idaho Stampede after its home opener against New Mexico with a who’s who in the team’s lineup.

TRANSGENDER COMMENTS STIR HORNET’S NEST Whoa, Nellie. Citydesk readers have a few things to say about gender, practicing medicine, discrimination and hooters in the comments on “Transgender Community: Prosecutor’s Comments Were Out of Line.”

JOAQUIN, MATT AND THE ROAD Matt Hopper checked in from the road with pics of Joaquin Phoenix (who caught the Los Angles show—the clean-shaven Phoenix, mind you) and two thumbs down for a Seattle club that stiffed the band.

DINNER THE OLD FASHIONED WAY Almost 1,800 BW readers have seen what happens when chef Randy King has his gun, a pheasant and a video camera at his mom’s house. Do you?

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EDITOR’S NOTE 3 MAIL / MONDO GAGA 6 BILL COPE 7 TED RALL 8 NEWS City of Boise’s new drive to address panhandling 9 CITIZEN 10 FEATURE Ninth annual Bad Cartoon Contest 11 BW PICKS 14 FIND 15 8 DAYS OUT 16 SUDOKU 18 FIRST THURSDAY Trey McIntyre Project returns with 9+1 19 FIRST THURSDAY LISTINGS Plan your attack with events and a map 20 NOISE Getting cozy with Horse Feathers 24 MUSIC GUIDE 26 SCREEN Idaho technology could change Hollywood’s tune 28 Conan is back 29 FOOD BW heads to breakfast Mecca The Egg Factory 30 WINE SIPPER 32 CLASSIFIEDS 33 NYT CROSSWORD 36 FREEWILL ASTROLOGY 38

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 5


MAIL

“

CHRI S FARLEY C ALLED FR OM THE DEAD, HE WA NTS HIS JOK E B AC K !� —Luke Cavener, facebook.com/boiseweekly (Citydesk, “The Very Long Range Forecast,� Nov. 23, 2010)

SECOND AIN’T BAD Cheer up Bronco Nation. A second place ďŹ nish in the WAC is very respectable. —Wayne Ferrell, Weiser

THE PEE PARTY On facing pages of the Nov. 10-16 issue, Bill Cope and Ted Rall presented almost opposite views about the future of our country. Since I may choose to run for ofďŹ ce some day, I agree with both. Cope, however, made the point that in taking a longer-range view at our history may give a more useful and positive conception of our future. It seems

that until we face almost unsolvable and frightening problems, we are unable or unwilling to make basic changes to the political system. We now have a Pee Party, a group of citizens who are really pissed off. They have made few positive steps to improve the system, but a group of angry progressive folks may come together with the goal to change the system. It will not change from within. Those who are embedded in the system and who beneďŹ t from it as it is will never, ever change it. We have the electronic tools in hand to organize

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact info and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@ boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor to editor@boiseweekly.com. Letters may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted.

and ďŹ nance a movement. The anger is clearly here. Wearing funny costumes with wigs and velvet coats can be fun, even cute, but change will come only through the work of the citizens. One example: The Supreme Court was intended to help keep a balance of power between the judicial, legislative and administrative branches. However, the court has become a power over both. It recently decided that corporations were citizens. Hopefully there is enough anger to have a constitutional convention of sorts to develop amendments to the original document. Don’t ever expect those in Congress to do it. They like the beneďŹ ts of the system as it is. —Tom Edgar, Boise

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BILL COPE/OPINION

MORTALS AT LABOR

Could even Hercules have lasted five more years? I worked with Tiny in my first full-time, year-round job 37 years ago. After school, I’d trekked east, seeking adventure in the wild Ohio territories. For the next 10 years, I lived as a Buckeye—which is infinitely better than passing as a Hoosier, believe me. I found a job with a construction company owned and operated by a family who remembered FDR with slightly less admiration than they had for Judas Iscariot. Judas was bad, yes, but at least he hadn’t started Social Security. This construction magnate and his sons didn’t have much use for anything in the way of worker accommodation: unions, unemployment benefits, workmen’s comp, and particularly the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. The old man, who had largely excused himself from the day-today functions of the company, spent his time looking for cheap deals on used equipment— extension ladders, come-alongs, lathes, drills, grinders, band saws, sheet metal brakes—and the further out of compliance with OSHA regulations, the better. He was determined to show those feds they couldn’t tell him how to run his business. Were a man to lose an arm, an eye, maybe worse, it was for a godly cause. And besides, there would always be another man along. The workers themselves, almost to a man, were from across the river. They owned or rented in Ohio, but every Friday night, they and tens of thousands like them would clog I-75, going back to their native hills and hollers, to Kentucky homes they had never stopped thinking of as home, even after years or decades working in Ohio. Sunday night, they scooted back in time to report to work in steel mills, paper plants or construction jobs of varying scale. (Derisively, they were called “briar-hoppers”; the hills below the Mason-Dixon line of the Ohio River are swathed with thorn bushes thick enough to hide bankrupt farms. In southern Ohio, all those Polish jokes the rest of the country was telling translated to briar-hopper jokes.) They were not a highly educated lot, these guys. Most had never finished high school. There was no end to the work to be found in the Ohio factories, mills and plants; it paid far better than anything they could find in those Kentucky briar patches; and little of that work required a thorough grasp of reading, writing and ’rithmetic. So they usually started young and stayed long. I worked with several sets of fathers and sons, none of whom had ever seen their name on a diploma. Tiny wasn’t tiny. In a painted hood and bathing trunks, he could have passed as a TV wrestler. His biceps were as big around as my chest and I once saw him lift one end of a 20-by-2-foot I beam so we could get a chain under it. He was admired by the others for his strength, but I could see early on that his strength would probably be the ruin of him. The heavier something was, the more likely WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

it would fall on Tiny to lift it. Steel beam and concrete block, jackhammer and rock drill, these were Tiny’s materials and tools, if not his destiny. And of course, he was proud to be the most reliable muscle in the crew, even if it had him looking—and walking and breathing—like he was 20 years older than he was. Not that Tiny was the only one who worked like a mule. Unless you moved up into a supervisory position—and those were generally reserved either for men with some training or someone’s nephew—everyone had to work like a mule. That could well be the job description: “Work like a mule for eight hours, then be back tomorrow.” There was nothing subtle about it. If the wet concrete had to be pushed 100 yards through mud in wheelbarrows, that is what you were there for. If you had to spend a month toting tools and material up and down 60 feet of scaffolding, so be it. If a 150-year-old floor had to be jackhammered out of a disgusting paper mill sub-basement with a 5-foot-high ceiling and filthy water pouring down your bent-over back? ... well, it’s not like they were going to bring in Alan Simpson or Erskine Bowles to do it for you. I did this work for three years. Many of the men I worked with had been at it for 20 years—a few for 30. I question how many of them lived to be as old as I am now, judging by the stoop in their backs and the drag of their feet. And if they did reach retirement age, it would surprise me to learn they survived long enough to find much joy in their leisure. No matter how strong a man is, there is still many a job that will grind him down and crush him. I owe this column idea to John, an old Navy salt I met recently. John was steaming mad at Erskine Bowles, Alan Simpson and the rest of the Deficit Reduction Commission, which has recommended the retirement age be extended to age 69 or 70. “I tell you,” said John, “those suited-up sons-a-bitches don’t know what a lifetime of real work does to a person.” Fact is, I don’t either. I can only extrapolate from my few years of real work what happens to the human body after a lifetime of it. But before we go to making men and women hang on for another four or five years before they can rest, we need to understand that a great many people won’t have that long. We need to question if wealthy politicians and policy wonks whose most exhausting daily task is picking out a tie are appropriate judges of how long other men and women should slog through life. We need to acknowledge the difference between a career and what a hell of a lot of citizens put themselves through for decades to feed and house a family. And we need to ask ourselves, once more, if some people are less deserving of a little peace than others.

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 7


OPINION/TED RALL

DON’T TOUCH MY JUNK Why TSA molesters are striking a nerve

NEW YORK—“Don’t touch my junk!” Will this be the battle cry of the next revolution? If you think about it, it’s amazing. Why this? “This,” of course, is the intrusive new security-screening regimen at 68 major U.S. airports. You can walk through one of the new “backscatter” body-image X-ray scanners, suck up 2.4 microrems of radiation and live with the knowledge that a high-res version of your nude body is being stored on some database so that the Palin administration will be able to kill you for food and use your cyborg doppelganger as a slave laborer. Or you can choose the pat-down. But think twice. By all accounts, the pat-down procedure is thorough. Extremely thorough. “I didn’t really expect her to touch my vagina through my pants,” Kaya McLaren, an elementary schoolteacher from Washington told The New York Times about her experience at Dallas-Fort Worth Airport. A visit to the TSA’s official blog (blog.tsa. gov) furthers the impression that the Obama administration has jumped the security shark. One citizen asks: “Is touching the genitals a mandatory or discretionary part of the pat-down? Will the screener give notice and ask for consent prior to touching the breasts, vagina, penis or scrotum?” Another asks: “Can they spread the buttocks to feel if something is concealed between them?” There’s something terribly wrong when a federal government website gets too racy for online parental control software. In Charlotte, N.C., a flight attendant was ordered to remove and display her prosthetic breast. Men wearing baggy pants report TSA personnel sticking their hands down their

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trousers and ferreting out their naughty bits. TSA workers at Miami Airport passed around printed scans of a man they thought fell short in the endowment department. A 61-year-old cancer survivor wound up “humiliated, crying and covered with his own urine after an enhanced pat-down by TSA officers” at the Detroit Airport broke the seal on his urostomy bag. If Richard Nixon had been accused of listening to every American’s phone calls and reading their mail, there would have been riots. But that’s exactly what the National Security Agency has been doing since 9/11. They’re reading your e-mail, listening to your calls and tracking your bank statements. Personally, I’d rather have the government touch my junk than rape my brain. Now that they’re feeling our privates at the airport—with considerably more justification than the NSA has for reading your Facebook status updates—the American people are freaking out. Which should come as little surprise to Obama’s pet louts at the TSA. The United States, after all, was founded by Puritans. The folks were religious fanatics, prudes and so far off the charts that they were too uptight to get along with the British. Immigration has helped loosen us up, but that’s still our national culture. I had hoped that when the revolution came, it would be about economic injustice or torture or racism. But, to paraphrase Donald Rumsfeld, you don’t revolt with the revolutionaries you wish you had. If this is the beginning of the end, so be it. Say it together: Don’t touch my junk!

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NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS

TO HAVE AND HAVE NOT Boise expands effort to deny panhandlers GEORGE PRENTICE Chris panhandles every day. Some days are better than others. “I got $150 in one hour,” he said. “I’m pretty sure it was because I was begging with three of my children by my side.” On Black Friday, a day when a lot of cash was swapping hands across the Treasure Valley, Chris wasn’t getting too much of it. At the driveway in front of the Northgate Plaza on State Street in Boise, most passersby avoided eye contact. Some smiled, a few waved. In one hour’s time, two drivers offered part of their lunch from a nearby Jack In The Box. Chris quickly handed the food to one of his 16-yearold boys (one of a set of triplets). “The kids always eat before me,” he said, but grabbed a fistful of fries. Chris is a big man: about 6 feet tall, nearly 300 pounds. Bony white skin poked out from a full beard. We talked about how he used to work for Hewlett-Packard and Domino’s Pizza and about how he still has four of his five children (his oldest daughter is in foster care). The conversation was sad but spirited. “I still have my arrogance, but not my pride,” said Chris. “Pride doesn’t pay the bills.” The conversation took a turn when asked about “Have a Heart. Give Smart,” Boise’s effort to combat panhandling and divert funds directly to charities. “They want to take food out of my mouth.” His voice escalated. “Out of my children’s mouths!” When asked about the logic behind the program, Chris walked away. “Don’t talk to me anymore,” his voice trailed off. A sociologist, philanthropist, or simply a good citizen might define “real life change” for a person in need to be health care, a job or a home. But for Chris, one of the hundreds of Boise men and women who don’t have health care, a job or a home, “real life change” is a hamburger, a beer or toilet paper. And there you have the gaping chasm between good intentions and great need. Yet Boise Mayor Dave Bieter is risking criticism and limited resources in what may be the biggest of gambles but noblest of efforts: helping the homeless BEN WILSON with day-to-day needs while waging a marathon war against chronic homelessness. Long-gone is the city’s multi-million dollar venture WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

to operate the homeless shelter Community House. The city recognized that it should not be a landlord for Boise’s homeless. A federal lawsuit and subsequent transition of ownership to Boise Rescue Mission confirmed that. That facility is now known as the River of Life and is run by Boise Rescue Mission. “The mayor recognized that there are bigger community issues that affect the livability of everyone,” said Theresa McLeod, Bieter’s special assistant. “He would like us to be demonstrating leadership and convening groups together for solutions.” McLeod said she spends anywhere from 60 to 80 percent of her time with those groups, brainstorming on homelessness and other social service issues. That includes CATCH (the city’s program to provide permanent housing for homeless families), Allumbaugh House (Boise’s new detox center) and the newly created Continuum Care Coordinating Team, which oversees a 10-year plan to eradicate chronic homelessness. It was an increasing number of citizen com-

plaints that led to the Have a Heart campaign. In particular, police bicycle patrols reported an increase of panhandling outside the Albertsons grocery store at State and 16th streets. The city was granted permission to borrow a similar campaign from Seattle, and last summer, posters and flyers began appearing at the Albertsons, urging shoppers not to give to panhandlers but rather donate to charities that could provide assistance to the homeless “The city has an aggressive panhandling ordinance on the books now,” said Bieter spokesman Adam Park. “If someone is demonstrating threatening behavior, that would be prosecuted. But simply asking for money in a public space is legal. There are some discussions about revising the ordinance but we don’t expect to see that until sometime next year.” In the meantime, city leaders considered the pilot program a success. “Police told us that panhandling decreased at the Albertsons by at least 10 percent. More importantly, store employees said they felt really good about the program. They said they had new tools about where to direct a homeless person for services,” said McLeod. The Boise City Council agreed to expand the program, voting unanimously to add $15,000 to the $10,000 already set aside from last year’s economic development fund. Even more posters, flyers and stickers are expected to surface at about 100 retail locations, with most going to grocery stores and downtown merchants. Simply put, the flyers ask citizens not to give to panhandlers. But if Boiseans want to engage, they’re encouraged to point the homeless toward a list of providers including shelters, food sources and caregivers. Addresses and phone numbers are included to encourage donations to the charitable organizations. Chris the panhandler didn’t want to hear about the brochures. But another panhandler, Dan, who was asking for help at 15th and Front streets said he regularly took advantage of the services listed in the tri-fold. “You bet, I take advantage of nearly all of them,” he said. “But I still want the cash. Can you blame me?”

BIETER’S CHOICE The City of Boise still has one more election, of sorts, in 2010. But only one vote will be cast: that of Mayor Dave Bieter. In a matter of weeks, hizzoner will “elect” a new city council member. Bieter will handpick a replacement for Vern Bisterfeldt who steps down at month’s end to return as Ada County Commissioner. Bisterfeldt won a primary last spring and was unopposed in the November general election. As BW was going to press, Bieter was culling a list of 53 applicants down to approximately one dozen. The initial 53 applicants are: Brett Adler (executive director, Boise Rec Fest), Justin Ahlin (owner, Native Born Creations), Chet Bowers (retired), William Boyer (retired), Liz Boyno (psycho-social rehab counselor), Chris Carpenter (technician, Intermountain Gas), Richard Cooke (self employed), Randy Eardley (deputy chief, Bureau of Land Management), Dale Eaton (ombudsman, Agency on Aging), Terri Franks-Smith (CFO, Idaho House), Christopher Geibel (private security officer), Douglas Gibson (architect), Chris Grant (records clerk, Citizens and Immigration Services), James Hallyburton (executive director, Boise Bicycle Project), Teresa Hammer (senior management analyst, Idaho State Police), Kent Kembree (president, Mondial Partners), Marisa Hendrix (staff coordinator, Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center), Amy Herzfeld (executive director, Idaho Human Rights Education Center), Greg Hoetker (teacher, Riverglen and South Junior High schools), David Honey (auto parts salesman), Greg Kaslo (architect), Joy Kealey (owner, Silver Creek Holding), Michelle Kelly (auditor, Idaho Transportation Department), James Kennedy (retired), David Litster (marketing director, Litster, Frost Injury Lawyers), Stephen Loop (engineer, Idaho Transportation Department), John Magnan (sales manager, Graphisoft North America), Jerome Mapp (former City Council member), Michael McClanahan (flooring contractor), Michael McCully (owner, Integrity Sales), Lauren McLean (owner, The Confluence Group), Andrew Mentzer (owner, Idahostel), Ray Mickelson (land use consultant), Daniel Moore (collections manager, Singers Insta Cash), Lance Muckelroy (records specialist, Idaho Transportation Department), Katherine Odziemek (DJ, Neurolux), Richard O’Hara (director of environmental affairs, American Ecology Corporation), Shirley O’Neal (president, Step Ahead Idaho), Margaret Oliver (retired), Mitch Owen (quality manager, Chelton Flight Systems), Abubakar Mohamed (executive director, Somali-Bantu Community Organization), Mark Perison (attorney), Shane Pielli (software architect, CQG), Richard Porter (retired), Ben Quintana (public relations director, Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce), Jennifer Quintero (senior research analyst, Idaho Department of Labor), Craig Richey (human resources director, Thomas Cuisine Management), Ana Maria Schachtell (Latino community leader), Brian Scigliano (vice president, Wedbush Securities), Kristin Sinclair (independent marketing and advertising professional), George Slaughter (architect), Bryan Smith (emergency program manager, Idaho Transportation Department), David Sneddon (real estate agent). Phew. —George Prentice

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 9


CITIZEN

JOHN FOSTER Minnick rep on lost elections and lost causes GEORGE PRENTICE

Is Rep. Minnick clearing his schedule? Losing pretty much takes care of that. It clears itself. Politics is a harsh business, especially after an election. Is there regular communication with Representative-elect Raul Labrador? I know that the two have talked a few times since the election, and it’s been very cordial. But it’s not like we’re transitioning any part of our operation over to his. Congressional offices are not similar to executive offices where you’ll see more formal transition. To the extent that there’s work to be done, we’re trying to do it in the least impactful way. How can you best characterize your professional relationship with the congressman? We’re very different personalities, which is one reason why our professional relationship was productive. I wasn’t always an easy person for him to have around, but he kept me around and sought my counsel because we were different. He recognized that. It’s difficult for a lot of outsiders to relate to.

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A lot of the post-election punditry and second-guessing might have had me screaming years ago, but I’m a little older and wiser now. I recognize that most of the people opining about what happened are doing it because they weren’t in the middle of it and never will be. So they’re inconsequential as a result.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Journalism to politics to public policy. John Foster thinks that it’s a natural progression. A Boise native, Foster returned to Idaho from New Mexico to serve as managing editor of the Idaho Business Review. Then he became the executive director of the Idaho Democratic Party. And now, after suffering the slings and arrows of a losing effort to re-elect Rep. Walt Minnick, Foster is making another change. Most people know him as an active political figurehead, but first, he’s a husband to wife Andrea and father of three to 7-year-old Jack, 4-year-old Naomi and 1-year old Josephine.

Did you give credence to some of the early polling that showed Rep. Minnick with a measurable lead? We were ahead in all of our internal polling all the way up to the final days. Every single undecided voter broke against Walt. I’ll make one comment about some of the post-election analysis: There seems to be an assumption that Democrats stayed home. The reality is that there are a lot fewer of them. The state has become a lot more red. More Democrats became independent and more independents became Republicans.

and move on. Do not assume that you’re going to get the state to change. It’s Republican. It’s conservative. Your strategy needs to be built around that reality.

What’s the state of the Democratic Party in Idaho? I say this as a former executive director of the state Democratic Party. There is no Democratic Party in Idaho. A party is infrastructure. A party is operation and fundraising. There is simply no party.

Have you accepted a new job? I will be the vice president in charge of Idaho operations for Strategies 360.

But you’re a Democrat and your counsel is solicited. No, it’s not. Maybe by a very small group of people. But if you did have a few minutes with some people who could rebuild the party, where would you start? By not worrying about rebuilding the Democratic Party. The state is ruby-red Republican, and likely always will be. Any advice I would have to give would be to accept that reality

Do you think Keith Allred has another race in him? I’d prefer not to comment on other candidates. Do you think Dave Bieter has a political future outside of Boise City Hall? Absolutely.

Who are they? They’re a public affairs firm based in Seattle. They have offices in Washington State, Oregon, Montana and Alaska. We agreed that Idaho had some unique challenges and opportunities in the business and non-profit sectors. Are you happy with your change? This is exactly what I wanted to do. I was planning to leave whether Walt won or lost. Not because of any particular falling out, but as campaign manager, it was 100-hour weeks. My family deserved for me to step back and assess whatever credibility I had built up and cash in my chips, as it were, and see what these last several years of work were worth.

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NINTH ANNUAL

BAD CARTOON CONTEST REDEFINING “BAD” FOR NEARLY A DECADE L ike beauty, “bad” is in the eye of the beholder. Or in the case of BW’s annual Bad Cartoon contest, just what constitutes “bad” is up to the panel of judges that selects the winning entry. “Bad” might mean roll-your-eyes humor, it might mean slightly uncomfortable insights, or it could just be something so strange, it is undeniably intriguing. Most of all, a winning bad cartoon has to have something to say and somewhere to go, promising that readers will have something to look forward to—or dread—for 52 weeks. This year’s judging panel—BW Art Director Leila Ramella-Rader, BW Graphic Designer (and resident artist) Adam Rosenlund, longtime BW contributing cartoonist Mike Flinn, and myself—saw that kind of promise in the work submitted by Connor Coughlin, who pledges to explore the unique relationship between a man and his skeleton. We’re not sure how said man will be doing much exploring without the internal support of his skeleton, but it’s best not to get too wrapped up in those unfortunate scientific details. Coughlin’s work topped a diverse field of entries this year. We saw the requisite political commentary, entries that appeared to have been created after the artist took a sharp blow to the head, and a few that we’re still a bit confused about. This time around, there were an unusually high number of “protest cartoons” by those who took the time to point out what a waste of time Bad Cartoon is. The funny thing about Bad Cartoon is that “bad” ain’t so bad, and no one would read something called “Good Cartoon.” —Deanna Darr

FIRST PLACE

CONNOR COUGHLIN CALDWELL

SECOND PLACE

STORIE GRUBB BOISE

THIRD PLACE

JONATHAN HAWK NAMPA WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 11


“A CREATIONIST’S WORST NIGHTMARE” AWARD

“IRONIC WOLF SWEATSHIRT” AWARD KELLY KNOPP, BOISE

ADAM AMIEVA, BOISE

“BITING THE HAND THAT PRINTS YOU” AWARD DUMPLING AND CHIX, BOISE

“NOT THE WORST THING WE’VE FOUND IN A TOILET” AWARD QUINN AIKELE, BOISE

“HE’S ON THE LAMB” AWARD JIM MAYS, BOISE

“NOT YOUR GRANDAD’S POST HOLER” AWARD JERIMIAH CAMPBELL, BOISE

“ACTUALLY, THERE ARE ONLY 105 CALORIES IN A BANANA” AWARD TIM PRIEBE, BOISE

GET OFF YOUR COUCH

AND GET INTO OUR PASSPORT TO LEARN – ski or snowboard

package for ages 12+. Includes beginner lessons, equipment & season pass for only

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“SPEAK SOFTLY AND CARRY A BIG SICK” AWARD

“NINJA, PLEASE” AWARD

AL GOODWYN, HERNDON, VA.

TREVOR BERNARD, BOISE

“PERIPHERAL PORN” AWARD TIM WOLF, BOISE

“AND I THOUGHT THE BIRD CRAP SITUATION WAS BAD” AWARD ALEX AND FIONA KING, BOISE

“BUTT AFICIONADO” AWARD LANE PETERSON, BOISE

“PIXEL PUSHER” AWARD JOE PULLIN, BOISE

“KEEPING IT REEL” AWARD PAUL HEART, BOISE

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“DOUBLE DOODIE” AWARDS

OLIVER MOFFITT, BOISE

ERIK BERGSET, BOISE

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 13


COURTNEY COOK

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Dane Cook does his best over-my-dead-body glare.

FRIDAY DEC. 3 comedy DANE COOK

Ewe have no idea how humiliating this is.

THURSDAY DEC. 2 Basques BASQUE MUSEUM AND CULTURAL CENTER HOLIDAY BAZAAR You’ve likely passed the Cyrus Jacobs-Uberuaga boarding house on your way to procure a piping-hot basket of croquetas from Gernika or sip on an ice-cold cocktail at Bardenay. And maybe you wondered to yourself, “Why is there an old brick house with a lawn sitting smack in the middle of the Basque Block?” Well, besides the fact that the Cyrus Jacobs-Uberuaga boarding house is the oldest surviving brick structure in the city of Boise, it is also one of a handful of remaining Basque boarding houses in the Western United States. According to Basque scholars John and Mark Bieter in An Enduring Legacy: the Story of Basques in Idaho, Basque boarding houses played an instrumental role in the preservation and continuation of Basque culture in the United States: “For young Basque immigrants a long way from home, the boardinghouses became the village church, the town tavern, the bank and health dispensary.” If you’ve never been inside the Cyrus Jacobs-Uberuaga boarding house, head over to the Basque Block on First Thursday, Dec. 2, for a free tour during the Basque Museum and Cultural Center’s Holiday Bazaar. The holiday fundraiser will offer 10 percent off gifts from the Basque Country—20 percent for museum members—along with free tapas, hot cider and wine by the glass for purchase. 5:30-8:30 p.m., FREE. Basque Museum, 611 Grove St., 208-343-2671, basquemuseum.com.

SATURDAY DEC. 4 bacteria CULTURING YOGURT Scan Boise Co-op’s beverage shelves and you’ll find a number of bottles bulging with friendly bacteria. Dozens

of varieties of drinkable yogurt shakes, kefir and kombucha tout the benefits of “probiotics.” Scientists claim that probiotic foodstuffs— items that contain helpful bacteria like Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium—can help regulate digestion, prevent irritable bowel syndrome, reduce the risk of colon cancer, strengthen the

14 | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | BOISEweekly

immune system and help prevent yeast infections. Some studies show that friendly bacteria can help manage mild lactose intolerance because the bacteria convert lactose into lactic acid, which is more readily digestible. Well, if you’re feeling cash strapped from all your health-conscious probiotic purchases, College of West-

Sometimes fame is a nasty bitch. The bigger a guy becomes, the harder he may fall—or the harder some people may try to bring him down. Rock ’n’ roll comic Dane Cook has been plagued with as many lows as he has enjoyed highs: He has been flogged for suspected plagiarism; his half-brother was convicted of embezzling millions from the comedian; TMZ.com reported that Cook’s landlord was threatening to evict him for not curbing his dog. On the kiss-his-ass flip side, he is a triple threat—comic, musician, actor. His 2005 comedy album, Retaliation, debuted at No. 4 on the Billboard 200, making him the highest charting comedian in nearly three decades. Cook has been performing for 20 years and still puts butts in thousands of seats on arena tours, like the one he is currently on, which brings him to the Idaho Center on Friday, Dec. 3. When 38-year-old Cook started his career at the age of 18, it was partly in response to a childhood lived in a cloud of social anxiety. Bullies could smell his fear. “I had my share of run-ins with some scary characters in my day,” Cook told BW. “You have to remember that before I was this guy in the spotlight, I was a scared kid, too. I had a lot of fear. A lot of fear. I was not, ‘Joe Popular.’ I was not the cool kid in school ... I was in a pretty fragile place.” That insecure kid did what sets many a comic on his/her career path: He used humor to diffuse situations. Cook then parlayed making a couple of bullies laugh into making thousands of new friends. “That scared kid learned that humor is a ... great way to infuse yourself into social environments,” Cook said seriously. “I found that flinging a joke from time to time when I was younger was not only kind of helping my family in dark times and keeping us a little lighter and keeping a smile on my mom’s face or my dad’s face in some troubling times, but it also was kind of my handshake. I couldn’t even handshake. I was so insecure it was tough for me to even do that, but I could say something amusing and kind of break the ice. And I’ve been breaking ice for 20 years now.” Cook marks that 20-year history with a brand-new best-of CD, I Did My Best: Greatest Hits (Comedy Central Records, November 2010)—which includes previously unreleased material—an aggressive touring schedule and a continuation of his longtime practice of connecting with his fans via Myspace.com, Twitter and Youtube. Some people are still going to want to bring Cook down, but as he’s done for the last 20 years, he’ll just give his detractors the SuFi and get right back up. Read BW’s interview with Cook at Cobweb on boiseweekly.com. With guests Al Del Bene and Ben Gleib, 8 p.m., $35-$65. The Idaho Center, 16114 Idaho Center Blvd., 208-468-1000, idahocenter.com.

ern Idaho is now offering a one-day class on culturing yogurt from 12:30-2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 4. The class is taught by Cindy Fry, who can show you how to make your own yogurt at home with only milk, a yogurt starter, a thermometer and a heating pad. No word yet on whether Fry will also show you how to make your own Go-gurt. 12:30-2:30 p.m., $19. College of Western IdahoCanyon County Campus, 2407 Caldwell Blvd., Nampa, 208-562-3000, cwidaho.cc.

SUNDAY DEC. 5 snooping WARM SPRINGS HOLIDAY HOME TOUR Have you ever wondered what that huge Tudor mansion on Warm Springs Avenue is like on the inside? What about that adorable Craftsman-style cottage? Now you can check them out for yourself and do the community a solid at the same time. Originally the

gorgeous homes that line the historic street belonged to the owners of the water line that pumped the naturally hot water from Kelly Hot Springs east of Table Rock into the hear t of the city. In fact, those homes were among the first in the world to go geothermal. There’s your history lesson, now let’s get to the good stuff—actually getting inside. For starters, purchase a ticket at the Children’s Home Society for $25. If you’re a card-carrying member of Preservation Idaho or if you bring three cans of WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


FIND POSTCARDEN

They should rename it You-tuba.

SATURDAY DEC. 4 horny BOISE TUBA CHRISTMAS Instruments in the lower registers were overlooked for much of music history. They filled in the beat and gave a sense of presence but weren’t considered as flashy or versatile as altos or sopranos. And while in some cases that allowed musicians to truck ahead with the bare necessities, sticking to the roots, some, like Les Claypool (bass player for Primus) or the great Jaco Pastorius, relished the wide-open field and ran with it. Tubas are the quintessential overlooked low-register instrument. They’re given to the fat kid who gets stuck in the back and never gets a solo. There are no “famous” tuba players. Tubas are enormous, expensive and the hippest thing they’re likely to be associated with is oom-pah music. But hop on Youtube and you’ll find tons of videos of standalone beat box tuba by everyone from kids in their bedrooms to members of Dallas Brass performing onstage at Brigham Young University. Tuba might even have found its first star: Tuba Gooding Jr., a session musician currently performing with hip-hop megastars The Roots. The long-overlooked instrument has tones and techniques only now being mined by musicians and loved by audiences for its rich percussive sound. In kind, Tuba Christmas brings together more than 60 tuba and baritone horn players to make downtown Boise rumble with 20 traditional holiday carols. Tuba Christmas will per form two half-hour sets on Saturday, Dec. 4, one at the Grove Plaza and the other in the Capitol Rotunda. 3:30 p.m., FREE, the Grove; 4:30 p.m., FREE, State Capitol Rotunda, downtown Boise. For more information, call 208-4261685 or visit tubachristmas.com.

food to donate to the Idaho Food Bank you’ll get a $5 break on the ticket price. Your cash will get you a map showing which homes are open to visitors. Proceeds from the event benefit the Historic Lighting Project, which has plans

S U B M I T

to make the Warm Springs Historic District a well-lit and safe place. Noon-5 p.m., $25. Children’s Home Center, 740 Warm Springs Ave. For more information, call 208-342-4731.

Frosty says, “It’s hip to be round.”

SATURDAY DEC. 4 crafts ANNUAL HIP HOLIDAY CRAFT MARKET EXTRAVAGANZA

Postcards are the old Facebook wall message. They’re moderately public—any nosy postal worker can peek at your pal’s wish-you-were-here’s—and they’re an inexpensive, low-commitment way to tell someone you’re thinking about them. Still, there’s something infinitely more swoony about opening up your mailbox to see a colorful, stamped postcard than opening your e-mail to find a new Facebook notification. Now, imagine if you could smoosh together all the warm fuzzies of a handscrawled postcard with the mild entertainment value of a Chia Pet. That lovely little mash-up is postcarden.com called a Postcarden. Made by Another Studio for Design, a company based in London, Postcarden are 3D, pop-up postcards that come with cress seeds and a waterproof tray. All you need is a splash of water to transform the card into a lush garden over the span of a few days. The postcards come in five different designs: allotment, botanical, city, football and Christmas. The Christmas design is, perhaps, the most adorable and season-appropriate, featuring a starry, snow-covered mountain backdrop with a little log cabin and a few popup ice skaters surrounding the patch of green sprouts. Postcarden keep for two to three weeks, which is much longer than any sentiment lasts on Facebook. —Tara Morgan

Nothing says “I really put some thought into your gift and made something special just for you” like a one-ofa-kind hand-crafted thingamajig. But let’s face it—good intentions aside, last-minute scrambles to the mall in search of that one last mass-produced gift are not unheard of. Not this year, though. This year is going to be different and Flying M Coffeegarage has you covered. Put on your walkin’ shoes, grab a friend and make your way to Nampa. What star ted out as some local crafters coming together to sell their stuff five years ago has evolved into the valley’s hippest hot spot for happenin’ gifts, and if you have never been, there’s no time like the present. The White Pine, The Shed, Brass Razoo and Puffy Mondaes all wanted in on the action, and the number of crafters selling their stuff has almost doubled since the market’s inception. With items like candles, jewelr y, toys, knitted hats and scar ves, lotions and metalwork, it’s almost a given that you’ll find something for just about ever yone on your list. Heck, you can even get your handmade holiday cards and specialty coffee while you’re there, and many of the crafters have their own Etsy stores so you can prolong the experience. So even if you didn’t personally make that one-of-a-kind gift, you spent a fab day shopping for just the right thing, stress-free and relaxed. And that is a gift in and of itself. 9 a.m.-5 p.m., FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT REVIEW/SHOW B OIS E C ONTEM POR ARY THEATER

WEDNESDAY DEC. 1 Festivals & Events LIQUID FORUM—Discussion forum that showcases a different local nonprofit each month, along with a silent auction and local music. 5-7:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

On Stage TRU—Jay Presson Allen’s award-winning Broadway hit based on the whirlwind social life and career of Truman Capote. See review, this page. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org. Tom Ford as Capote: Too good to be Tru.

Art GYPSY GALLERY ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION—The eight to 10 local artists who started the Gypsy Gallery as a way of showcasing their work are celebrating their eighth year together. See story, Page 19. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. & 4-6 p.m. FREE. Empire Building, 205 N. 10th St., 208-344-6315.

Talks & Lectures DISTINGUISHED LECTURE SERIES—Jody Williams will speak on “Human Security in an Insecure World.” Visit boisestate.edu/distinguishedlectures for more info. 7 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Citizen CANDLELIGHT VIGIL—In honor of World AIDS Day and in remembrance of those who have been infected. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Blvd., Boise. CUT-A-THON—Get your haircut for a cause. All proceeds go to Allies Linked for the Prevention of HIV and AIDS (a.l.p.h.a.). 2-6 p.m. $10. Hair Masters, 951 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise. FREE HIV TESTING—Free, confidential HIV testing and counseling. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, union. boisestate.edu.

THURSDAY DEC. 2 On Stage A CHRISTMAS CAROL—Performance of the classic Christmas tale by Charles Dickens. 7 p.m. $10-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

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TRU AT BCT Truman Capote is both infamous and highly imitable. His high-pitched, nasally voice and socialite, liquor-swilling swagger have been portrayed by everyone from Philip Seymour Hoffman to Brian the dog from Family Guy. And in Boise Contemporary Theater’s latest one-man production Tru, Tom Ford busts out a convincing Capote. From the first moments Ford shuffles out onto set designer Rick Martin’s enviable ’70s-themed stage dressed in a cardigan and bow tie, past the white retro dining table littered with unwrapped Christmas presents and over to a large bottle of Stolichnaya vodka, there’s no question who we’re watching. But as Capote takes phone calls from friends—peppered with a deluge of self-aggrandizing, name-dropping asides—and records a memo to his biographer recounting the various celebrities he’s befriended over the years, we begin to question why we should care. In the first act of Jay Presson Allen’s Tru, set during Christmastime 1975, Capote comes off as an unrelatable Runs through Saturday, Dec. ego-maniac. His larger-than18. Wednesdays-Fridays, life-of-the-party charm is under8 p.m.; Saturdays, 2 p.m. mined by the fact that there and 8 p.m. is no party. When it’s only BOISE CONTEMPORARY Capote—breaking the fourth THEATER wall to address the audience, 854 Fulton St. lamenting the loss of his 208-331-9224 friends over a gossipy article bctheater.org he published in Esquire and making repeated trips to the liquor cabinet—the character can be mildly insufferable. Though Ford does bring out Capote’s vulnerable side at the end of the first act, tearfully recounting stealing his grandmother’s necklace, the character doesn’t truly become human until the second, more sobering act. The morning after a late night at Studio 54, wearing an open, Japanese-style silk robe (high fives to costume designer Star Moxley), it’s much easier to see Capote for what he is: a lonely, overweight, vulnerable man ticking away the hours in his New York high-rise on Christmas Eve. Capote has come to detest his innumerable vices and the empty socialite life that accompanies them, but all of his promises to clean-up and lose weight come off as oh-so-relatable wishful thinking. Though Tru, which originally premiered in New York in 1989, turns out to be more gossip rag than thought-provoking character-study, under Drew Barr’s direction (At Home at the Zoo, I Am My Own Wife) and Ann Price’s vocal coaching, the play becomes a vehicle for Tom Ford to bring the iconic, longdeceased character to life. Flaws and all. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT TRU—See Wednesday. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org. WHITE CHRISTMAS—The Boise Little Theater performs Irving Berlin’s cheery holiday musical. 7:30 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Concerts OAKRIDGE BOYS CHRISTMAS—The Oakridge Boys perform their hits and favorite Christmas songs. 7:30 p.m. $42-$52. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu.

Food & Drink

Art

On Stage

9 + 1: PART 2—Nine local artists make art based on the TMP dancers using a variety of mediums. Meet the dancers and be among the first to have the chance to purchase these works of art. See story, Page 19. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Trey McIntyre Project headquarters, 775 Fulton St., Boise, 877-867-2320, treymcintyre.com.

A CHRISTMAS CAROL—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $10-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org.

GYPSY GALLERY ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION—See Wednesday. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5-9 p.m. FREE. Empire Building, 205 N. 10th St., Boise, 208344-6315.

FRIDAY DEC. 3 Festivals & Events

TASTE OF BOISE—Sample fare from local restaurants in one convenient spot. Hosted by Boise State Public Relations Student Society of America. Email emmamiller@u.boisestate. edu for more info. 6 p.m. Boise State Center on Main, 1020 W. Main St., Boise.

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—View more than 250,000 lights and special displays. Visit Santa and Prancer and enjoy warm beverages and holiday music as you stroll through the gardens. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

CHRISTMAS SHOW AND HOEDOWN—Starlight Mountain Theatre presents I’ll Be Home For Christmas and Santa’s Holiday Hoedown. 7:30 p.m. $10 Mondays, $12-$20 Fridays and Saturdays. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208898-9425, limelightboise.com. DANE COOK—Comedian Dane Cook brings his Dane Cook Live tour to the Idaho Center. Call 208-442-3232 or visit idahocenter.com for info. See Picks, Page 14, or log onto boiseweekly.com for an interview with the comedian. 8 p.m. $35-$65. Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, idahocenter.com. RODNEY CARRINGTON—The comedian delivers his for-matureaudiences-only stand-up routine. 7 p.m. $44.25. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu. TRU—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org. WHITE CHRISTMAS—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Art ARTIST RECEPTION—Artist Sue Latta’s exhibit “Works of Fiction” will be held over through January, and that is cause for celebration. Meet her, hang out and check out her art. 7 p.m. FREE. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

Literature WORD: A READING SERIES— Listen to the students, staff and faculty read their poetry, short stories and creative non-fiction. Also, check out the first issue of Caliper, a new literary magazine. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com.

SATURDAY DEC. 4 | EASY |

MEDIUM | HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Festivals & Events ANNUAL HIP HOLIDAY CRAFT MARKET EXTRAVAGANZA— Spend a day in downtown Nampa shopping for unique holiday gifts. See Picks, Page 14. E-mail info@ flyingmcoffee.com to learn more. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, flyingmcoffee.com.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 17


8 DAYS OUT HOLIDAY FARMER’S MARKET—Open-air market with all manner of local food and products from local vendors. Live music acts, plus local arts and crafts. Featuring fresh Northwest cranberries, wreaths, floral arrangements, handmade cards and more for the holidays. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Downtown at Eighth and Idaho Streets, Boise. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Friday. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. WINTERLAND PARADE—Annual holiday parade themed A Kid’s Christmas. Meridian School District Superintendent Dr. Linda Clark will be the grand marshal. Parade begins at the intersection of Franklin Road and Main Street. Contact the Meridian Chamber of Commerce at 208888-2817 for more info. 10 a.m. FREE, Meridian.

On Stage A CHRISTMAS CAROL—See Thursday. 6:15 p.m. $10-$39. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions. org. CHRISTMAS SHOW AND HOEDOWN—See Friday. 7:30 p.m. $10 Mondays, $12-$20 Fridays and Saturdays. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425, limelightboise. com. TRU—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org. WHITE CHRISTMAS—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Kids & Teens CITY SANTA—Children get to whisper their Christmas wishes to Santa and get pictures taken with him. Proceeds go to benefit the American Cancer Society. Visit downtownboise.org for more info. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Donation only. Berryhill & Co., 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com. MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Bring your own legos or use the ones they’ve got to share, design and build to your hearts content. 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

SUNDAY DEC. 5 Festivals & Events WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Friday. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

On Stage Odds & Ends MODEL TRAIN AND CHRISTMAS VILLAGE DISPLAY—Visit with Santa and check out the many towns, villages and trains on the mezzanine, sponsored by the Old Boise Merchants Association. Visit oldboise.com for more info. FREE. The Pioneer Building, 106 N. Sixth St., Boise. POKEMON CITY CHAMPIONSHIPS—Here’s your chance to test your skills in a competitive tournament. There will be different age divisions, and the winner could go on to play in other cities. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. FREE. ABU Games, 1825 Wildwood St., Boise, 208-376-6019 , www. abugames.com.

Animals & Pets BIRD SEED SALE—Grab a bag of quality seed that local birds love along with other naturethemed items as a gift for the nature enthusiast in your life during this sale. Proceeds benefit the MK Nature Center’s educational programs. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-3342225, fishandgame.idaho.gov.

WHITE CHRISTMAS—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Concerts ANNUAL HOLIDAY CONCERT— Larry Gebert narrates this holiday concert with performances from Boise State’s Symphony Orchestra, choral groups and the University Percussion Ensemble. Proceeds benefit the Boise State Music Department scholarship fund. For more info call 208-4261596. 7:30 p.m. $1-$8, FREE for Boise State Students, faculty and staff. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261609, mc.boisestate.edu. AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS—See Saturday. 2:30 p.m. $15-$100. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

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Concerts AMAHL AND THE NIGHT VISITORS—Opera Idaho performance of Menotti’s classic holiday story of faith and miracles. Visit operaidaho.org or call 208-387-1273 for more info. 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. $15$100. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net. BOISE TUBA CHRISTMAS—More than 60 local tuba and baritone players will serenade downtown Boise as they stroll from the Grove to the Capitol steps See Picks, Page 14. 3:30 p.m. FREE. The Grove, downtown, Boise. See Picks, Page 15 MERIDIAN SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA—Your favorite holiday music performed by the orchestra. Visit meridiansymphony.org for more info. 7:30 p.m. $10 adult, $8 senior, $25 family. Meridian Middle School, 1507 W. Eighth St., Meridian.

Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

18 | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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V i s i t b o i s e w e e k l y. c o m f o r mor e on these stories.

1ST THURSDAY

ON THE MOVE Gypsy Gallery celebrates eight years AMY PENCE-BROWN Tissue paper sewing patterns, a teacher’s old transparency, a plastic toy horse, a tuna can. It sounds like a pile of junk, but to Boise artist Pam McKnight, the objects helped inspire her unique assemblage High Horse. “I have collected miniatures, including those broken or discarded since I was a little girl,” said McKnight. A lifelong artist and an elementary school art teacher, McKnight’s work evolved into assemblages three years ago after she retired. Her unusual found-objects sculptures can be seen along with nine other local artists’ works through this First Thursday at Gypsy Gallery’s Annual Holiday Art Show. This exhibition marks the eighth year of Gypsy Gallery, a small collective of artists who show their work together four times a year, each time at a different venue. Depending on what space is available, the Gypsy artists are open to manipulating any location into an exhibition hall explained Marianne Konvalinka, Gypsy Gallery founder. Endearingly referred to as the “Queen Gypsy” by her cohorts, Konvalinka envisioned a way that she and other artists could gain more exposure and experience outside the confines of the traditional art gallery world. “Since our first show in the basement of the

In the early days, Gypsy Gallery posted calls to artists in Boise Weekly or at Boise Blue Art Supply, but the group’s popularity and exposure has somewhat eliminated those needs. As artists occasionally leave the group, there are many more interested in joining. Gypsy Gallery doesn’t profit from membership fees, nor does it take any commission from artist sales, something that appeals to Bardsley, who joined the group three years ago. “I’ve been a full-time artist for 20 years and show my work at 12 different galleries. I won’t sign an exclusivity agreement with any art dealer or gallery, as I’d never be able to make it financially if I did,” said Bardsley. Occasionally the venue is large enough to accommodate guest artists, which is the case this time at the former Sleep With Grace space. “It’s a great way for newer Pam McKnight’s High Horse (left) artists to get GYPSY GALLERY ANNUAL a feel for art HOLIDAY ART SHOW fairs and learn Wednesday, Dec. 1, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and 4-6 p.m.; how to better First Thursday, Dec. 2, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. and 5-9 p.m. showcase their Music by Gayle Chapman from 6-8 p.m. and holiday refreshments. work in a supportive enviEMPIRE BUILDING 205 N. 10th St. ronment,” said gypsygalleryart.com Bardsley.

Mode Building in December of 2003, we’ve always kept membership at anywhere from eight to 10 artists, representing a variety of media and subject matter,” Konvalinka said. Currently, the Gypsy artists include Konvalinka and McKnight as well as Zella Bardsley, Miriam Woito, Kevin Flynn, Cherry Woodbury, Michael Falvey, Jenifer Gilliland and Kristy Albrecht.

SEPARATE BUT EQUAL TMP’s “9+1” Part 2 splits in two new directions TARA MORGAN opening night in 2009, the former J Crist These last few weeks, there hasn’t been much Gallery was a chaotic carnival of activity— dancing going on at the Trey McIntyre Project oil-on-canvas portraits shared wall space headquarters. For the second installment of with abstract glass work and limited-edition “9+1,” McIntyre decided to transform his Fulton Street digs into two drastically different interpretive booklets. This year, McIntyre environs. His airy practice studio has morphed wanted more structure to the chaos. “I thought, ‘What if we have two really into a traditional, groomed gallery space. The walls are hung with paintings and photographs different experiencand the floors are lined with thick protective plastic. The company’s office area, on the other es? Two separate hand, has gone completely wild. A giant pile of jagged sticks juts toward the ceiling and live rooms where we Christmas trees line the space. could have “I think it’s kind of fun to be at an event the best where you can have different experiences. possible You can choose where you feel right,” said McIntyre. Last year’s inaugural “9+1” exhib- environit sprang from an ambitious concept: Invite local artists— Susan Valiquette’s portraits painters, photographers, glass (right) workers, musicians, bartendTMP 9+1, PART 2 ers—to render interpretations Thursday, Dec. 2, 5 p.m. of the contemporary ballet TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT company’s nine dancers and 775 Fulton St. treymcintyre.com one artistic director. On WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

ment to understand what something is?’” First Thursday, Dec. 2, in the traditional gallery space you’ll find everything from Susan Valiquette’s photo light-boxes, to Ben Wilson’s sold-out illustrations, to Amy O’Brien and Kerry Tullis’ colorful furniture pieces. The other room, which will feature beer and go-go dancers, takes a more tactile approach. Amy Westover and Jennifer Wood’s “Dance O’Matic” machine will rub elbows with E.J. Pettinger’s bright, carwash-themed calendars, while a video by Nick Garcia’s loops in the background. “I took the idea of making a portrait of Trey McIntyre through the eyes of someone who isn’t so familiar with them ... anything you look at, most of how it’s perceived is dependent on the person looking at it,” explained Garcia. Garcia’s video will feature actors watching TMP perform on TV while his stream-of-consciousness narration rolls by in subtitles. All of the pieces in the show will be for sale, with proceeds split between the artist and the company.

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 19


1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS East Side BASQUE MARKET—Warm up with a glass of wine or seasonal tapas while shopping for items to fill a gift basket for a loved one. 5-8 p.m. 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, thebasquemarket.com. BASQUE MUSEUM & CULTURAL CENTER—Exhibit “Hidden in Plain Sight: The Basques.” Jam session and tours of the Cyrus Jacobs/ Uberuaga house starting at 6:30. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. 611 Grove St., 208-343-2671, basquemuseum.com.

THE CHIROPRACTIC STUDIO— 1 Artist Gina Baiamonte’s acrylic and oil paintings will be on display. 6-8 p.m. FREE. 500 W. Idaho St., Ste. 240, Boise, 208-955-7272. DRAGONFLY—Shop, shop, shop. Moon River Distributing will be pouring wine for a free wine tasting. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 414 W. Main St., Boise, 208-338-9234, gama-go.com. EPITOME HOME AND GARDEN— Check out the holiday open house. 6 p.m. FREE. 121 N. Fifth St., Boise, 208-333-0123.

FLATBREAD COMMUNITY OVENDOWNTOWN—Cast a vote for your favorite annual Eco-House Design Competition logo and win a chance for a $20 gift certificate. 6-10 p.m. FREE. 615 W. Main St., Boise, 208287-4757.

2

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE—View artwork created by Tony Rios (see Downtown News, Page 22) and shop for unique holiday gifts. And, of course, warm up with a hot bev. FREE. 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208345-4320, flyingmcoffee.com.

IDAHO BLUEPRINT AND SUPPLY COMPANY—Stop in for refreshments and enter to win prizes. Great selection of gift ideas. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 619 Main St., Boise, 208-344-7878, idahoblueprint.com. IDAHO INDIE WORKS—Check 3 out fun recycled jewelry, children’s furniture and much more. Also enjoy a glass of wine, craft projects and free gift wrapping on gifts purchased. FREE. 106 N. Sixth St., Boise. LE BELLE EPOQUE—Enjoy champagne and chocolate while checking out Voluspa candles and other gift

ideas. 6-8 p.m. FREE. 106 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-426-8688. MELTING POT—Complimentary wine tasting and an extended happy hour in the bar. 4-10 p.m. FREE. 200 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-383-0900, meltingpot.com. MOXIE JAVA—Twenty percent off any espresso or coffee drink or a free cookie with drink purchase. 570 W. Main St., Boise, 208-343-9033, moxiejava.com. PENGILLY’S—The Frim Fram Four. 8:45 p.m. FREE. 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344.

South Side ATOMIC TREASURES—An eclectic mix of 4 vintage, retro, art and found objects on sale for the holidays. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-0811, atomictreasures.com. BALLET IDAHO—Nutcracker Preview. Get a 5 glance at the dancers and costumes for the upcoming holiday performance of the Nutcracker. Hot chocolate and candy canes will be served. 5-6:30 p.m. FREE. 501 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208343-0556, balletidaho.org. BOISE ART GLASS—Make your own orna6 ment or just enjoy snacks and a demonstration. 5-11 p.m. $35. 530 W. Myrtle, Boise, 208-345-1825, boiseartglass.com. BOISE ART MUSEUM—Studio Art Explora7 tion: View the photographs and prints from the Gary Bettis Collection and experiment with black and white materials to make your own art from 5-8 p.m. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. FREE. 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. BROWN’S GALLERY—Shop for one-of-a-kind 8 artistic gifts made by local artists and enjoy wine from Sawtooth Winery and chair massages by Yvette Zoe. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 408 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-342-6661. CASA DEL SOL—$5 margaritas, $2 tacos and live music by Miguel Gonzales. FREE. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-3660. HAIRLINES—Stop in and make a holiday hair appointment. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3839009. HAPPY FISH SUSHI & MARTINI BAR—Hap9 py hour martinis and sake all evening, along with artwork by local artist Jany Rae Seda. 855 Broad St., 208-343-4810, happyfishsushi.com. IDAHO STATE HISTORICAL MUSEUM— 10 Opening night for “Power to Play: From Trash to Treasure” exhibit featuring toys made from found objects by children from impoverished nations around the world. See Downtown News, Page 22. 5-9 p.m. Donation. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov. QUE PASA—Check out the best selection of Mexican artwork in town, including wall fountains, silver, pottery and blown glass. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9018. R. GREY GALLERY JEWELRY AND ART 11 GLASS—R. Grey Jewelry Gallery. See all of Robert Grey Kaylor’s new designs or create a custom piece with the artist. 5-9 p.m. FREE. 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, rgreygallery. com. RENEWAL CONSIGNMENT HOME12 WARES—Renewal Underground’s Artist in Residency program featuring the work of artists Ed Anderson and Gus Johnson in the Fulton Street Showroom. 517 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208338-5444. SALON 162—Collaborative works by Peter 13 Schott and Jeff Baker: Mixed medium on random flat surfaces. 404 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-386-9908. SNAKE RIVER WINERY—Enjoy hot mulled wine and complimentary wine tastings while shopping for holiday gifts. 786 W. Broad St., Boise, 208345-9463. TREY MCINTYRE PROJECT HEADQUAR14 TERS—Meet the artists and dancers involved in the “9+1: Part 2” project and be one of the first to have the chance to purchase the works of art modeled after the TMP dancers. See story, Page 19. 5-9 p.m. 775 Fulton St., Boise, 877-867-2320, treymcintyre.com.

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS Central Downtown

BERRYHILL & CO. RESTAURANT—Visit Santa and get your picture taken for a small donation to benefit the American Cancer Society. Champagne tasting with Hayden Beverage and live music. 5-8 p.m. 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com.

4Q GALLERY—Featuring 15 works by the Treasure Valley Artists’ Alliance along with art demos and snacks. 280 N. Eighth St., Boise. AMERICAN CLOTHING 16 GALLERY—Check out Native American jewelry by Craig

BOISE CENTRE—Visit Concierge Corner and Visitor Services on the Grove to get the low-down on all Boise has to offer. 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com.

Blanchard and enjoy 25 percent off denim. 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 121A, Boise, 208-4330872.

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BASEMENT GALLERY— “Not For Squares” exhibit debuts a group of new local artists. FREE. 928 W. Main St., Boise, 208-333-0309.

CITY PEANUT SHOP—One-year anniversary celebration with beer and nut pairings. 803 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-433-3931. D.L. EVANS BANK—Celebrate Christmas in the City with artwork made by North Junior High students. Representatives from downtown businesses can pick up Christmas in the City information. 5-8 p.m. 213 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208331-1399.

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BELLE BOUTIQUE—Live models show off the hottest winter trends. Enjoy complimentary cider and cookies while you shop. 224 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-1039.

ART WALK Locations featuring artists

GRAEBER’S—Graeber and Company Salon and Spa. Enjoy complimentary hand and chair massages, make-up touch ups, holiday hair consultations and sale prices on your favorite products. 6-8 p.m. 350 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-343-4915. HEIRLOOM DANCE STUDIO— Drop in for free dance lessons in a variety of styles. 5-11 p.m. 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-8716352, heirloomdancestudio.com. LE CAFE DE PARIS—Special tapas, live music and wine tasting. 204 N. Capitol Blvd., 208336-0889, lecafedeparis.com. LISK GALLERY—Cera19 mist Liz James, jewelry maker Ben Harju, artists Kay Seurat and Adrian Kershaw display their art work, along with new pieces from resident artists. Chocolates and wine sampling from Sawtooth Winery. FREE. 850 W. Main St., Boise, 208342-3773, liskgallery.com. MAI THAI—Enjoy happy hour specials: 2-for-1 drinks at the bar, sushi starting at $1.59, and buy-two-get-one-free appetizers up to $6.95 from 5-6:30 p.m. and then again from 9 p.m.close. 750 W. Idaho St., 208344-8424, maithaigroup.com. MCU SPORTS—Get some great deals on holiday gifts for the sports enthusiast in your life. 822 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-342-7734, mcusports.com.

JEFFERSON

BANNOCK

MOXIE JAVA—Twenty percent off coffee or espresso or a free cookie with drink purchase. Grove Plaza, 208-345-1744.

IDAHO

OLD CHICAGO—Old Chicago. Kids eat free. Karaoke from 10 p.m.-close in the bar. 730 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-0037, oldchicago.com.

MAIN

GROVE

5TH

9TH

10TH

11TH

12TH

13TH

GROVE

6TH

CAPITOL

PIAZZA DI VINO—Mulled 20 wine, chocolate brownies and new artwork by Kelly Rose

FRONT BROAD MYRTLE

8TH 1. The Chiropractic Studio 2. Flying M Coffeehouse 3. Idaho Indie Works 4. Atomic Treasures

B AT T E RY 20. Piazza Di Vino

12. Renewal Consignment Homewares

22. Twig’s Cellar

13. Salon 162

24. Ward Hooper Galler y

their book about Idaho wines and local distributors will be pouring tastes. 816 Bannock St., 208-344-8944, twigscellar.com. THE VANDAL STORE— 23 Signing with author Terry Armstrong and samples of

21. Thomas Hammer 23. The Vandal Store

7. Boise Ar t Museum

15. 4Q Galler y

25. Allies Linked for the Prevention of HIV and AIDS

8. Brown’s Galler y

16. American Clothing Galler y

26. Ar t Source Galler y

17. Basement Galler y

27. Empire Building

18. D.L. Evans Bank

29. Owyhee Room

10. Idaho State Historical Museum

mochas. Yum! FREE. 298 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-4338004, hammercoffee.com.

11. R. Grey Galler y Jewelr y and Ar t Glass

6. Boise Ar t Glass

9. Happy Fish Sushi & Mar tini Bar

REDISCOVERED BOOKSHOP— Live music by Jack Brown of Pig and Bear Music. 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, rdbooks.org.

THOMAS HAMMER— 21 Featuring photography by David Wuerth and peppermint

14. Trey McIntyre Project Headquarters

5. Ballet Idaho

PIPER PUB & GRILL—Happy hour from 3-6 p.m. and a special entree all night. 150 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-2444, thepiperpub.com.

SOLEMATES—Receive up to $100 off on comfy footwear for Christmas. FREE. 120 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-433-9394.

F U LT O N

RIVER

and Mika Belle. 212 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-336-9577.

19. Lisk Galler y

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28. Galler y 601

TWIG’S CELLAR—Au22 thors Alan Minskoff and Paul Hosefros will be signing

Dream Chocolates. 821 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-433-1889. WARD HOOPER GAL24 LERY—View this year’s Christmas images, including All I Want For Christmas Is a Bowl Game, the new Boise State print. 745 W. Idaho St., wardhooper. com.

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS West Side

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1ST THURSDAY/NEWS TONY R IOS

ALLIES LINKED FOR THE PREVENTION OF HIV AND AIDS—Holiday arts and crafts fundraising sale in conjunction with World AIDS Day. 213 N. 10th St., Boise, 208433-1889, alphaidaho.org.

ART SOURCE GAL26 LERY—PT Fisher’s “Evolution” exhibit featuring photos and graphic designs. Enjoy wine and munchies, too. FREE. 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3313374, artsourcegallery.com. BEN AND JERRY’S SCOOP SHOP—Ben and Jerry’s. It’s $1-a-scoop night. 103 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-342-1992, benjerry.com. EMPIRE BUILDING— Check out the art show 27 and sale by the artists of the Gypsy Gallery. Twenty percent of proceeds goes to the Idaho Humane Society. See story, Page 19. 205 N. 10th St., Boise, 208344-6315. GALLERY 601—Shop 28 for the perfect holiday gifts at 20-50 percent off and enjoy cider and cookies during the 29th annual Holiday Open House. FREE. 211 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-336-5899, gallery601.com. OWYHEE PLAZA HOTEL—Enjoy wine flights from Wood River cellars, cake samples, music by the Ben Burdick Trio, food and drink specials and Tamarack season pass sales and giveaways. 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com. OWYHEE ROOM—Idaho 29 Photographic Works artists will have their fine photos for sale. Donations of canned food or cash will be accepted at the door. 1109 Main St., Boise, 208343-4611, owyheeplaza.com. PLATINUM BEAUTY LOUNGE— Enjoy cupcakes and beverages and enter your name in a free raffle. Also enjoy 10 percent off retail products. 1020 W. Main St. Ste. 108, Boise, 208-3445000. THE RECORD EXCHANGE—Featuring local artists’ new releases for in-store play, deals on coffee and buy-backs. FREE. 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8010, therecordexchange.com.

Winter Window Art Gallery STROLL THROUGH DOWNTOWN AND VIEW WORK FROM LOCAL ARTISTS ON THE WINDOWS OF THESE LOCATIONS— a.l.p.h.a., American Clothing Gallery, Artisan Optics, Bonefish Grill, Brick Oven Bistro, Cassis, Cheers, City Santa at Plaza 121, Flatbread Community Oven, DL Evans Bank, Dunkley Music, Floating Feather Day Spa, Flying M Coffeehouse, Graeber & Company Salon and Spa, Hampton Inn & Suites, Idaho Candy Company, Idaho Mountain Touring, Idaho State Historical Museum, Idaho Trust Bank, Le Cafe de Paris, MacLife, Modern Hotel, Renewal, Snake River Winery, Zen Bento.

22 | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | BOISEweekly

View work from Tony Rios in not one, but two spaces, this First Thursday.

DOWNTOWN NEWS The phrase “from trash to treasure” is often accompanied by a winky grin from a way-too-chipper host on an early morning talk show: “In this segment, we’ll show you how to turn your old dryer sheets into a fresh-smelling winter scarf.” Well, Idaho State Historical Museum’s new exhibit, “The Power to Play: From Trash to Treasure” will make you feel guilty for ever getting excited about fashioning your old skis into a game-room coat rack. Heck, it will probably make you feel guilty for having a game room. Or a coat. The new exhibition, from ChildFund International, features toys fashioned from trash by children across the globe who live in poverty. Old flip flops, plastic bottles, tin cans and grocery bags become inventive playthings at the hands of these kids. According to the museum’s website, the exhibit is meant to highlight the fact that “even when circumstances are difficult, children show resiliency, imagination and ingenuity in their play. Children have a remarkable power to create—and play.” Whether you go to assuage your guilt or to see an eye-opening exhibit, be sure to swing by Idaho State Historical Museum on First Thursday, Dec. 2, from 5-9 p.m. 610 Julia Davis Drive, 208-334-2120, history.idaho.gov/museum. A less-heartwrenching, but equally intense must-see First Thursday stop is Basement Gallery. The subterranean gallery hosts its new winter exhibition, “Not for Squares,” which features an assortment of familiar faces like Ben Wilson, Mike Flynn, April VanDeGrift, John Padlo, Keith Farnsworth, Tony Rios and John Warfel alongside Basement newbies like Misty Benson, Gary McCauley, Shelley Jund, Emily Wenner and Joseph Cowman. 928 Main St., 208-333-0309, basementgalleryboise.com. If you didn’t get enough of Tony Rios’ work at Basement Gallery, swing by Flying M Coffeehouse for the opening of Rios’ solo show. The pop surrealist illustrator and bronze artist moved to Boise two years ago from San Diego and has exhibited at a number of local galleries since. His work will be up through the end of December. 500 W. Idaho St., 208-3454320, flyingmcoffee.com. —Tara Morgan WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends

MONDAY DEC. 6

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HOLIDAY TEA PARTY— Have a cuppa, watch a vintage fashion show and demonstrations on decorating for the holidays with Georgia White. Sponsored by the Idaho Horticulture Society. 1:30-5 p.m. $25. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208345-9116.

Festivals & Events WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Friday. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

WARM SPRINGS HOLIDAY HOME TOUR—Tour some of Boise’s historic homes in the spirit of the holiday season. Tickets are on sale at the Children’s Home offices on Warm Springs Avenue and will go to benefit the Historic Lighting Project. Receive $5 off ticket price if you are a Preservation Idaho member or if you bring three cans of food to donate to the Idaho Food Bank. E-mail sarawilliams@cableone.net for more info. Noon-4 p.m. $25.

On Stage INSERT FOOT THEATRE—Local improv comedy. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, heirloomdancestudio.com.

Workshops & Classes

Animals & Pets

BASIC WATERCOLOR PAINTING—Learn to paint during this four-week class. For ages 18 and older. 6 p.m. $60. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

ART UNLEASHED SHOW AND SALE—Join local artists and Spay Neuter Idaho Pets for a day of free wine, cheese and chocolate tasting and live music. Artist exhibitions on display and for sale include old chairs that have been given a new coat of paint and new life. A portion of the sales will go to benefit SNIP. E-mail snipit@snipidaho.org or call 208-968-1338 for more info. Noon-6 p.m. FREE, snipidaho. org. Clubhouse Event Center, 7311 W. Potomac Drive, Boise, 208-322-5550.

TUESDAY DEC. 7 Festivals & Events BW CARD MEMBER PARTY—If you’re a card-carrying member, listen up. Boise Weekly appreciates you—this is our way of showing it. We’ll provide the food and drinks, you just show up and enjoy. 6-9 p.m. FREE for BW card members. Regular admission applies to non-card holders. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

POETRY SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Part of The idaho Loud Writers’ Program. Includes a performance poetry workshop followed by an all-ages poetry slam. For more information e-mail cheryl_maddalena@ yahoo.com. 6 p.m. $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, boisepoetry.com. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208331-5632. WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Friday. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Art ARTIST DIALOGUE—Participate in a discussion about Boise artist Bryan Moore’s work and exhibit “Urban Natives.” 5:30 p.m. FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

WEDNESDAY DEC. 8

December 3-5, Expo Idaho

This Weekend

Festivals & Events WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—See Friday. 6-9 p.m. $8, $4 for Idaho Botanical Garden members and children 4-12 years old, FREE for children younger than 3. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

On Stage

Boise Christmas Show

Admission $4 Kids 12 & under get in Free! Come create a Christmas Craft project sponsored by Quality Art.

BoiseChristmasShow.com

TRU—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$20. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

Workshops & Classes ATLAS SNOWSHOEING WORKSHOP—Atlas Snowshoes presents info on gear, where to go and will introduce you to snowshoes.com. Raffle for gear to follow presentation. Register online at rei.com/boise. 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald, Boise, 208-322-1141, rei.com/ stores/boise.

Odds & Ends BOISE UKULELE GROUP—This ukulele group offers instruction and a chance to jam. All levels welcome with no age limit and no membership fees. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Meadow Lakes Village Senior Center, 650 Arbor Circle, Meridian.

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 23


NEWS/NOISE NOISE

These skinny mammys will get their revenge.

THE HILLFOLK, PT3, AUDIOLAB’S NEW SPACE, THE TRAIL BEYOND Hillfolk Noir invites everyone to help them celebrate the release of two new albums: Hillfolk Noir: Live from the Old Pen and Skinny Mammy’s Revenge at the Linen Building on Sunday, Dec. 5, at 5 p.m. It’s family friendly—the youngest Ward can sometimes be seen strapped to Mom’s back during a performance—with a coloring contest and an egg toss for the tykes. Washboard rhythms, heavy guitar, melancholy banjo and the dark profundity of a stand-up bass give Hillfolk Noir’s music a foot-stompin’, two-steppin’ vibe, but their inky, folky sounds reverberate with creepy things hiding in forest shadows ... or coming right at you. In “The North Idaho Zombie Rag,” HN frontman Travis Ward sings a sweet, spooky warning: “The zombies can come to your window / zombies can get you in the dark / If you’re dead well you’ve got nothing to worry about / because soon your life will be cut short. / You better run, run, run as fast as you can / you better run, run, run, run, run, run.” Run, run, run to the Linen Building on Sunday, Dec. 5. General admission is $5, families get in for $20. Hear songs from the new albums at petometz.com. Just like Santa Claus, Paul Tillotson returns to Boise year after year bearing gifts of music. This year, you can hear the Paul Tillotson Trio for free at Lock, Stock and Barrel Dec. 14-18 at 8 p.m., and at their annual concert at Borah High School on Monday, Jan. 10. PT3 will be joined by the Borah Jazz Orchestra, Choir, Squids and Jazz Band. Donations go toward a $1,000 scholarship for a Borah High music student. Back in 2007, we told you the exciting news that Audiolab would be moving across the street into Garden City’s art gallery/ performance space, Visual Arts Collective. At least once a year, we’d mention “any day now, Audiolab will be moved into the space and open for business.” By the time 2010 rolled around, we weren’t sure if owners Steve Fulton and Pat Storey would ever make that few-hundred-yard trek across Chinden. Well, guess what? Audiolab is completely moved in and fully functioning. At boiseweekly.com, we have a video interview with Fulton who talks about the new space, recording and more. Shamsuddin “Noah” Kadre of Candread and the Rizing Rezistance is striking out on his own with a new band: The Trail Beyond. The country/Americana/rock project will celebrate the release of their debut CD, Treat Your Sisters Right at the WC Lounge in Eagle on Friday, Dec. 3, at 7 p.m. They’ll be joined by Candread and Organized Sound. —Amy Atkins

24 | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | BOISEweekly

SLOW SPRING THAW Warming up with Horse Feathers’ Thistled Spring TARA MORGAN Lewiston is about as far from William Faulkner’s fictional Yoknapatawpha County as you can get. Nonetheless, Lewiston-native Justin Ringle’s lyrics have provoked countless comparisons to the Southern Gothic writer. But if you set aside his rigid, churchpew imagery—“Like a finch on Saturday, sin with wings / Give your tongue to God, on Sunday sing”—and dour allusions to death—“Them bones they move, they talk / Their bones, they bleed they rot”—Ringle’s chamber indie-folk project Horse Feathers Justin Ringle and crew crawl with the curs in the weeds. feels far more at home in the Northwest than the Deep South. and Sam Cooper on banjo, mandolin, piano, With some of his first album, Words Are “I’ve always wanted to be responsive to Dead (2006), already written, Ringle moved violin, accordion, percussion and vocals. the sense of place in music, in the mood, This fuller, lush instrumentation is to Portland, Ore. Broke and unemployed, and try to let it be a subconscious thing,” nowhere more stirring than on the album’s he spent months polishing the album, said Ringle. “Having lived in Idaho most title track. The song’s first few notes bring a eventually hooking up with multi-instruof my life, I don’t see how I could—even if swell of quartet strings that dissolves into a mentalist Peter Broderick to accentuate his I wanted to deliberately—separate that elesimple piano melody framing Ringle’s tragiBon Iver-eqsue mumbled vocals with subtle ment from the music.” cally hushed lyrics: “An old love of mine to swirls of viola, violin, banjo, mandolin, Though Lewiston wasn’t the most fertile wed the worst man she finds / A blossom cello and piano. soil for a budding young artist, Ringle grew “I could’ve never done [Words Are Dead] that’s bloomed / in a house that’s a tomb / up with a lot of free time to fuss around on trapped in the rhododendron fumes / Bit by in Idaho, just because the musicians are the guitar—his primary songwriting tool. the spring / Hurt by the thing / Plagued by just so few and far between and it’s just not “There wasn’t a lot of cultural outlets, the memories that it brings.” and I’d say that was one of the biggest things the same type of community,” said Ringle. Even on the album’s more seemingly “That kind of opened my mind to different influencing me—the type of alone time that upbeat tracks like the banjo-laden “Belly of kinds of instrumentation in music … Now I I had and focusing so much on a creative endeavor,” said Ringle. “A lot of my contem- have a whole cast of characters playing with June,” Ringle’s lyrics still add a contrasting depth to the instrumental glee: “In a June, me that add all kinds of different instruporaries at the time were taking their fourmentation and textures. It’s quite a bit more that up and bloomed / and quickly died / Bewheel-drive vehicles to lakes and driving on tween the two and under the sun / It’s a war muddy roads … I didn’t really relate to that. evolved now than when I first started.” that’s always fought and is never won.” Though Words Are Dead established Instead, I played guitar and wrote songs.” “People oftentimes treat music as a Horse Feathers as an And something mood elevator or one that is a depressant up-and-coming indiein the mountainous … the lyrics match those moods,” explained folk force—NPR Northern Idaho landWith Y La Bamba, Wednesday, Dec. 8 opined: “Often recall- Ringle. “In a way, isn’t that kind of boring; scape seeped in. As $8 adv., $10 door ing the rustic delicacy kind of simplistic? There’s a whole other Ringle wrapped up his NEUROLUX range of emotion that I would say is a lot of Iron and Wine—if time at the University 111 N. 11th St. more of a gray area.” it were soaked in of Idaho and grew 208-3430886 And that gray area is an apt metaphor strings and robbed of tired of playing in traneurolux.com some of its stark clar- for Thistled Spring. Though the album ditional guitar/drums/ undoubtedly marks a puddly thaw from ity—Horse Feathers’ bass rock bands, he music radiates homey the wintery House With No Home and the began to explore more starkly bitter Words Are Dead, Ringle is still intimacy”—the band didn’t gain wider acoustic, roots-based folk music. thankfully a long way from penning syrupy acclaim until their second release, 2008’s “There’s a weird power in using traditional music because it immediately evokes a House With No Home. With the addition of summer love songs. “Spring is definitely a weird season Heather Broderick’s lovely vocal harmonies sense of nostalgia which can have a tremenand cello, the album took on a chillier, more because it can be kind of a type of purgadous subjective effect on whoever listens to tory … there’s a lot of welled-up emotion haunting air. the song,” said Ringle. “It’s not necessarily that you have coming out of the winter and Horse Feathers’ most recent, slightly less my story in the song. People relate to those being cooped up and stationary and inside somber, release Thistled Spring brought musical elements in their particular ways and being forced to live as an introvert for a yet another line-up change, with Nathan that makes them think about and allows while … everybody’s so desperately hoping Crockett taking over violin, viola, saw and them to attach the song to their experiences for the summer to start.” vocals; Catherine Odell on cello and vocals; in some way.” WWW. 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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 25


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE Junior Rocket Scientist

GUIDE

FIFTH ANNUAL PRACTICE NEW YEAR’S EVE, DEC. 4, EMPIRE BUILDING Radio Boise wants you to be good and ready for year’s end, and they need to raise some money toward their goal of getting on the radio airwaves. So they’re throwing a big shindig to meet both goals: a Practice New Year’s Eve party. With plans to be at 89.9 on your FM dial by this spring, this year’s Practice NYE on Saturday, Dec. 4, will include silent auction items like a cruiser from BBP, vacations in Cabo San Lucas and Teton Valley, Bogus Basin tickets and more. They’ll also get you ready for some serious NYE dancing with music from Boise Rock School, Junior Rocket Scientist, Mickey the Jump, Jonn E. Combat, Boy Eats Drum Machine and DJs Art Hodge, Chris Wagener and Dave Foster. It’s an all-ages event and costs only $5 to get in, which means even if you’re really good at NYE, you’ll have plenty left over for a cab ride home. —Amy Atkins

WEDNESDAY DEC. 1

THURSDAY DEC. 2

FRIDAY DEC. 3

BILLY ZERA—7 p.m. FREE. Sully’s

ARTSWEST LIVE—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

A TASTY JAMM—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

BEN BURDICK TRIO—With Amy Weber. 7 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper

THE BAREFOOT BOYS—7 p.m. FREE. Buddie’s

BRIANNE GRAY—7 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

DAN COSTELLO—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

GIZZARD STONE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

HIGH DESERT BAND—6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater Pizza

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

JAMES ORR—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KEN HARRIS AND RICO WEISMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES—With Jeff Crosby and Cary Judd. 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux

SPONDEE AND APPLE HORSE—7 p.m. FREE. Student Union Brava! Stage

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club

STEVE EATON—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown Way

SOUL SERENE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZNIK—With Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

YAMN—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SATURDAY DEC. 4

FORREST DAY—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

APPLE HORSE ALBUM RELEASE PARTY—With Youth Lagoon, Wood Notes, Wasilla. 7:30 p.m. $8 adv., $10 at the door. The Venue

FRANK MARRA—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers NATHAN J. MOODY—6 p.m. FREE. Solid THE NEW TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper PRAIRIE SKY PILOTS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS— 9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s

THE RHYTHM RANGERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. Hannah’s

Kevin Kirk

TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BRANDON PRITCHETT—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

REBECCA SCOTT—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

DJs start at 6 p.m., live music at 7 p.m. $5 donation. Empire Building Showroom, 201 N. 10th St., radioboise.org.

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

BLACK ANGELS—8 p.m. $14. Neurolux BLAZE AND KELLY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub THE BLUE DOOR FOUR—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door BRIANNE GRAY—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown THE CONVENTION 3—8 p.m. $8. Knitting Factory ERIC GRAE—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill FORREST DAY—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef JOHN HANSEN—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JOHNNY DOWNING—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s

THRILLING FAMILIES FOR OVER 75 YEARS!

AMERICA’S FAVORITE HOLIDAY SHOW

Taco Bell Arena " Dec 21-22 TICKETS ON SALE NOW! Go to www.idahotickets.com

Visit Taco Bell Arena Box Office

Call 208-426-1766

Save on Groups 10+ 208-426-1766

FAMILY FRIENDLY PRICING STARTS AT $ 25 ROCKETTE MEET-AND-GREET Packages, GOLD CIRCLE SEATING and easily accessible, SILVER SEATING are available. CHILDREN’S TICKETS ARE HALF-PRICE ON ALL PERFORMANCES. For more information visit RADIOCITYCHRISTMAS.COM.

Children’s offer excludes Gold Circle Seating and Meet-and-Greet Packages. Offer not valid on previously purchased tickets. Offer may be revoked or modified at any time without notice. Radio City, Radio City Christmas Spectacular, Radio City Rockettes, Rockettes, Radio City Music Hall and Christmas Spectacular are trademarks of Radio City Trademarks, LLC. ©2010 Madison Square Garden, L.P. All rights reserved.

26 | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE Tame Impala

GUIDE JON HYNEMAN—With Sally Tibbs and Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers PRACTICE NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY— See Listen Here, Page 27. 6 p.m. $5 donation. Empire Building THE QUICK AND EASY BOYS— 9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper ROCCI JOHNSON BAND— House Party with DJ Naomi Sioux. 9:30 p.m. $5 after 10 p.m. Hannah’s THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

SUNDAY DEC. 5 BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY DEC. 6 BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek BILL MCKEETH AND FRIENDS—6 p.m. FREE. Cobby’s-Overland BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge THE EXPENDABLES—With Jon Brown’s Body and C-Money and the Players. 8 p.m. $14 adv., $15 day of show. Knitting Factory ROB PAPER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers SONNY MOON FOR FOUR—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door STEVE POLTZ—8 p.m. $7. Reef STEVEN TONEY—6 p.m. FREE. Solid TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

HILLFOLK NOIR CD RELEASE PARTY—5 p.m. $5, $20 per family. Linen Building

TUESDAY DEC. 7

JIM LEWIS—11 a.m. FREE. Focaccia’s

BEN BURDICK & FRIENDS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

TERRY JONES—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

DAN COSTELLO AND THE TRUCK STOP TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

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DANKO JONES—With Oceans Divide. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Knitting Factory GREELEY ESTATES—With Tides Of Man, Vanna, A Bullet For Pretty Boy and The Dude Abides. 6:30 p.m. $10 adv., $12 at the door. The Venue KEVIN KIRK—With John Jones. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers TAME IMPALA— See Listen Here, this page. With Star Death and White Dwarfs. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 at the door. Neurolux TERRI EBERLEIN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill TREVOR EYRE QUINTET—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

WEDNESDAY DEC. 8 BILLY ZERA—7 p.m. FREE. Sully’s BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge BRIANNE GRAY—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown

DAN COSTELLO—6 p.m. FREE. Solid GIZZARD STONE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s HORSE FEATHERS— See Noise, Page 24. With Y La Bamba. 8 p.m. $8-$10. Neurolux HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS—With The Grouch, DJ Fresh, Brother Ali, DJ Snuggles, Eligh and Los Rakas. 8 p.m. $14-$35. Knitting Factory JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow KEN HARRIS—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers PAUL GROVE—7:30 p.m. $5$10. Linen Building STEVE EATON—5:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian TRAVIS MCDANIEL—6 p.m. FREE. Lulu’s WILSON ROBERTS—7 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown More music events at boiseweekly.com.

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

TAME IMPALA, STARDEATH AND WHITE DWARFS, DEC. 7, NEUROLUX Tame Impala has old school psychedelia down pat, but the Perth, Australia, four-piece doesn’t lean on electronic samples, tending instead toward traditional melty, reverb-laden guitars and echoey vocals. Tame Impala—Kevin Parker, Jay Watson Dominic Simper and Nick Allbrook—released their debut album Innerspeaker (2010) on Modular Records, which was dubbed “a psychedelia-heavy outing that toys with paisley pop, stoner vibes and an expansive array of swirling guitars” by Pitchfork. The group recently wrapped up a tour opening for MGMT and were nominated for four 2010 ARIA Music Awards including Album of the Year, Best Rock Album, Best Group and Breakthrough Artist. You can mellow out to Tame Impala along with Flaming Lips’ Dark Side of the Moon re-make collaborators Stardeath and White Dwarfs on Tuesday, Dec. 7, at Neurolux. —Tara Morgan 8 p.m., $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 27


LISTINGS/SCREEN Special Screenings

V i s i t b o i s e w e e k l y. c o m a n d c l i c k on Scr een for movie times.

SCREEN/THE BIG SCREEN S ILVER DR AFT

DINNER FOR SHMUCKS—Steve Carell plays an “idiot” who’s befriended by a rising executive who’s goal is to find and bring the biggest loser to the boss’ monthly dinner. Thursday, Dec. 2, 7 p.m. $1 general, FREE for Boise State students and staff. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. FIRST CIRCLE FILM PREMIER—Documentary that tells the story of local filmmaker Heather Rae’s personal story of the issues surrounding the foster care system. Proceeds benefit the CASA program. Wednesday, Dec. 8, 6:30 p.m. $25. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

Opening

If a poem were meant to be on film, it would have been a screenplay.

TO HOLLYWOOD, LOVE BOISE Local company introduces the next big thing in filmmaking technology GEORGE PRENTICE

THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: THE VOYAGE OF THE DAWN TREADER 3D—Lucy, Edmund and their cousin Eustace set off on another adventure in Narnia, this time on a sea-faring ship with Prince Caspian. Opens Friday, Dec. 10. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

MY DOG TULIP—British novelist J. R. Ackerly had never considered himself a dog lover—until he adopted Tulip as a puppy and found a friend for life. Based on his memoir, this film is the first to be animated using hand-drawn and painted paperless computer technology. Opens Friday, Dec. 10. (NR) Flicks

Dean Klein, Micron’s vice president of The best kept secret in Idaho may be that a Memory System Development. Boise company has rolled out Hollywood’s Mobileviz is rather breathtaking inside. newest game-changer. Imagine a producer’s paradise in which highBoise native Amy Gile gave BW an resolution footage is married with industryexclusive tour of Silverdraft Mobileviz, her leading CGI. And it’s on wheels. Simply put, company’s computer-powered digital and viit moves the most innovative tools for digital sual effects studio-on-wheels. And powering filmmaking right to the filming location. what she calls “the fastest technology in the At one giant console, a visual effects artist entertainment industry” are super-computers was wrangling data directly from digital designed by Micron. cameras. The footage “Growing up is instantly rendered in Boise, Micron is and processed for ingrained for me,” For more on Silverdraft Studios high-resolution 2D said Gile. “It’s family visit silverdraft.com. and 3D footage. CGI and friends. It was a graphics are laid in. no-brainer as far as I Bring in the sound was concerned.” sync. And presto. It was no big stretch to Micron fills orders from all parts of the look at clips of Avatar or The Last Airbendglobe for computer needs, but rarely does it er on overhead monitors to compare to the get calls from a 208 area code for such an lights, camera and magic being performed at elaborate project. workstations below. “It was really surprising to get a call Gile was a bit sly when asked how much locally for something so cutting edge,”said

Silverdraft Mobileviz cost. “We’re a privately held company and I’m not at liberty to say,” Gile said smiling. After some prodding, she offered, “Well over $2 million. You’re certainly looking at the best super-computing film technology here.” Gile showed off Mobileviz to family, friends and investors at a “red carpet” reception at Boise’s Linen Building before rolling off to Hollywood. And she offered some scoop. “I can tell you that we’re in negotiations right now with a major studio where Mobileviz would be on site for an international feature film with Academy Award-winning talent,” she said. For Gile, who has a full resume of acting talent on stage and screen, the innovation offers more than just technology. “This will make movies better because anything and everything will be possible,” said Gile. “This was built for the artist.”

SCREEN/THE TUBE Television became smarter and funnier with the elimination of obvious laugh tracks: consider Arrested Development, The Office, 30 Rock, When Conan O’Brien returned to television in November, he reminded Modern Family. And while the Conan audience is live, they sound exactly his audience that he’s about 42 times funnier than Jay Leno. However, like someone is pushing a big red button that reads “laughter.” his audience—a bunch of “Coco”-shouting, fake-beardTalk-show audiences, which are often comprised of wearing, shrieking sycophants who laugh at anything—isn’t. random tourists looking for cheap diversions, reduce the They whoop and scream like feral teenagers when someone Weeknights medium’s potential and corrode routines like Conan’s “The dances or mentions boobs. at 9 p.m. on TBS. Masturbating Bear” by giggling about its prurient nature inComedians should be applauded for comedy, not for stead of its nonsensical innovation. They never really get it. rubbing their nipples. And, despite O’Brien’s comic acuIf O’Brien would rid himself of the burdensome studio men, he’s susceptible to encouraging the latter. He panaudience, he would be forced to produce consistently imaginative comders to anyone wearing a shirt with his picture on it and then resorts edy—stuff like the Pimpbot 5000 of yore. to the aforementioned torso-touches in an apparent effort to delay the —Damon Hunzeker next “joke.”

CONAN GREAT, AUDIENCE NOT SO MUCH

THE TOURIST—There’s something for ever yone in this thriller set in Europe with Johnny Depp and Angelina Jolie in the lead roles. Plot? Stor y line? Who cares? It’s Angelina Jolie and Johnny Depp for cr ying out loud. Opens Friday, Dec. 10. (PG-13) 29 Edwards 22

28 | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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LISTINGS/SCREEN NEW DVD RELEASE/SCREEN

THE WARRIOR’S WAY—A young warrior is ordered to kill the last member of an enemy clan. His refusal to do so sends him fleeing from his enemies and conspiring with newfound allies to protect the child. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 28

T H E AT E R S EDWARDS 22 BOISE 208-377-9603, regmovies.com EDWARDS 9 BOISE 208-338-3821, regmovies.com

INCEPTION

SALT

Just in time for the holidays, here’s something else to argue over with your relatives. As Inception was becoming one of the breakout box office hits of 2010, a chasm of disagreement split those who absolutely hate this movie and those who thought it was the mind-blowing experience of the summer. Unfortunately, many are in the former group, but there’s no denying that director Christopher Nolan was pushing the envelope with this science fiction mindbender. The cast includes no less than Leonardo DiCaprio, Ellen Page, Marion Cotillard and Michael Caine. Nolan reportedly worked nine years developing Inception. Will it be a Best Picture nominee? Count on it.

Salt was a guilty pleasure of 2010. There have been plenty of action thrillers cluttering the big screen lately, and Salt was among the best. Angelina Jolie plays Evelyn Salt, a KGB sleeper agent (or is she?). She prevents a nuclear attack and a coup at the Pentagon and White House (or does she?). And while the movie has a crackerjack ending, director Phillip Noyce (Patriot Games) left plenty of room for a sequel—let’s hope. Salt had more action and character development than the last three Bond movies combined. This is some of Jolie’s best work. Liev Schreiber co-stars. —George Prentice

EDWARDS 14 NAMPA 208-467-3312, regmovies.com THE FLICKS 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com MAJESTIC CINEMAS MERIDIAN 208-888-2228, hallettcinemas.com

FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: NORTHGATE CINEMA COUNTRY CLUB REEL NAMPA REEL 208-377-2620, reeltheatre.com OVERLAND PARK $1 CINEMA 208-377-3072, opcmovies.com NORTHERN LIGHTS CINEMA AND GRILL 208-475-2999, northernlightscinemagrill.com

WEB/SCREEN SP E NCE R W EIN E R

NEILL BLOMKAMP IS A TEASE

Why is it that the existence of creatures we’ve seen “photos” of—the Loch Ness Monster, Sasquatch, the Montauk Monster—is more difficult to believe than a Hollywood film about something equally unlikely? Director Neill Blomkamp did such fine work on District 9 (with some help from producer Peter Jackson), it was easy to buy into it as not only entertainment but as a possible future. Looks like he may be at it again. Wired magazine’s December 2010 iPad edition—an enhanced digital-only edition— contained a “hidden” teaser from what With that face, Neill Blomkamp is probably we can only hope will be Blomkamp’s next a great poker player. feature film, Elysium. It’s exceptionally short at a 1:02 minute run time, but eerie as hell: supposedly set on another planet—but the Two men drive down a rutted dirt two guys in the trailer are driving a road toward a muddy, dun-colored car and speaking English—should puddle. One of them is laughSee the teaser at supposedly be out in 2012 and is video.boiseweekly.com. ing awkwardly as they step out tied to Key Creatives Studio, the of a car and head toward a pink people who brought us District 9 pig-like creature—that is far more and The Lovely Bones. creature than pig. —Amy Atkins Word on Elysium is nil, other than it is WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 29


NEWS/FOOD GR EATHAR VES TB OIS E.C OM

FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

THE EGG FACTORY RISE & SHINE DAYTIME CAFE The Great-est thing since sliced bread.

30 | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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GETTING CARDED We’re pretty shameless around here about pimping the BW Card. Ask any friend/lover/acquaintance/mailperson of a BW staffer how many times they’ve heard a spiel about the glorious perks of BW Card ownership, and they’ll be quick to roll their eyes. Well, fine. We’re officially done telling you about all the great deals you’re missing out on. Now we’re just going to rub it in your face. On Tuesday, Dec. 7, from 6-9 p.m., we’re throwing an exclusive party for BW Cardowners to congratulate them on being such attractive, awesome, early adopters. Don’t have a BW Card and still plan on crashing our party? You’re going to have to pony up for full-priced admission to Idaho Botanical Garden. Lame. Here’s what you can expect at our party: live music, free food samples from BW Card restaurants like Mai Thai, El Gallo Giro, Willi B’s and Solid, a cozy heated tent, and enough free wine and beer to take the bitter edge off as you wander around the fantastically lit-up botanical garden. To purchase a BW Card of your very own, call Office Manager Shea Sutton at 208-344-2055. Speaking of the BW Card, we recently had a new member sign on: Great Harvest Bread Company on Fairview Avenue. The franchise bakes its own freshly milled whole-grain breads from scratch each day using local Idaho honey. But that’s the yeast of their offerings (no bun intended): Great Harvest also has muffins, cinnamon rolls, cookies, granola, fruit bars and made-to-order sammys. For more info, visit greatharvestboise.com. And finally, in better-late-than-never, used-to-be-on-the-BW-Card-news, Jeffrey’s Next Door, which was situated next to the recently shutdown Ves’s Broadway Bar, closed its doors at the end of October. But the good news for fans of Jeffrey’s downhome cooking is that chef and owner Josh Jeffrey is now taking his talents to Eighth Street wine shop Grape Escape. Jeffrey has big plans to revamp the menu, bringing in his own recipes, specials and soups.

GLENN LANDBERG

—Tara Morgan

Strip mall eateries suffer from the initial pause potential patrons may Let’s start with the worst of The Egg Factory: the location. Yes, it’s in an have at walking under a neon sign in search of food. And though The aging strip mall in a congested part of town and without a solid recomEgg Factory’s exterior isn’t exactly homey, if diners can get past it—and mendation from a friend, you might neither notice it, nor be tempted to the 30-minute-plus weekend wait—they’ll discover a menu as full as the check it out. But it seems as though healthy word-of-mouth advertising people-packed vestibule on a Saturday morning. is trumping the old location, location, location maxim. So much so, Myriad egg, potato, waffle, pancake, burger, sandwich and salad in fact, that my recent visit was the first in which I was seated without options share menu bunk space, but breakfast gets the biggest room in some sort of initial wait. So if it’s not what’s on the outside that counts the house. Traditional eggs Benny ($7.99) is joined by fancier siblings when it comes to The Egg Factory, then it must be what’s on the inside. on the menu accesInside, though, sorized with Philly Egg Factory isn’t steak, bell peppers much of a looker. and mushrooms on a Two rooms join croissant ($8.99); baawkwardly to form con, Monterrey Jack the dining room. The cheese and avocado decor isn’t in any way ($8.79); or tomato, memorable and the fresh sauteed spinach, whole place has a avocado and mushsort of impermanent rooms ($7.99). But air about it. To evenall stay true to the tually secure a table, family name by dressone must “sign in” ing in real, if slightly on a spiral notebook. under-salted, HolDespite all that, the landaise sauce. The place possesses a traditional Benny’s certain inviting familperfectly poached iarity. Thanks in that eggs gently oozed department is due, in sun-colored yoke part, to the waitstaff, that mixed with the all of whom have a light sauce, softening penchant for cooing crispy muffins and over guests with hot tender meat beneath. pots of coffee and the So many Canadian occasional “babe” or bacon slices dressed “hon” or “sweets.” THE EGG FACTORY RISE the dish that we committed the ultimate breakfast sin The menu should also take some credit. The sheer & SHINE DAYTIME CAFE 8061 W. Fairview Ave. and left some on the plate. volume of the options means diners with a morning 208-322-0191 Eggs were disappointingly cool on one plate, but sweet tooth can sit in happy harmony with their salty eggfactorycafe.com forgiven after a count of more than 40 hungry heads meat-loving companions, and there’s so much to choose Open seven days a week, filling the restaurant (and still more waiting) and server from one visit simply will not satisfy curiosity. More 6:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Judi’s friendly downhome demeanor. Once smooshed importantly the menu is full of stuff you’d perhaps only on warm toast and topped with a slice of beautifully give a go in your own kitchen—like Key lime pancakes crispy bacon and a forkful of hashbrowns ($7.99), the eggs soaked up or oatmeal pancakes ($3.79/$4.79), with oats, raisins, walnuts and some of the other items’ warmth. A buttermilk drop biscuit ($3.99) was cinnamon folded into the batter. The latter were not only an indulgent covered in a peppery—but not quite salty enough—white gravy laden hit but also conveyed a confidence to diners that said, “Hey, we’re going with huge chunks of sausage in a serving big enough for everyone in our to do something we only share with family, but we trust that you’ll be party to have a satisfying forkful. open minded. And p.s. we make our own syrup.” Other hits were the One of the weekly specials was The Egg Factory’s version of a Monte homemade cinnamon rolls, super-sized coils of chewy dough that easily Cristo ($7.99): French toast smothered in ham and melted Swiss cheese host ladles of thin white icing, and crispy hashbrowns loaded with a dusted with powdered sugar and sided by two eggs and choice of web of melted cheddar, salty bits of bacon and ribbons of sour cream. potatoes. A request to omit the powdered sugar caused Judi to raise an Soft, fluffy biscuits properly smothered in sausage country gravy were eyebrow—“But it’s so delicious”—before happily obliging. An unidenti- also a mark in the hits column, as were choose-your-own-adventure fiable too-sweetness permeated the dish and after searching for a hidden omelets, which were gigantically portioned. The misses, though, equally pile of powdered sugar, Judi explained that The Egg Factory’s French match the hits. A hand-breaded chicken fried steak ($8.99) usurped the toast is dipped in a batter made with vanilla custard. Brilliant. “Factory previous title holder of “worst chicken fried steak ever” without much Potatoes” are diced, lightly seasoned and fried to a rich, crispy brown, competition. The Hollandaise was a bland, opaque and gelatinous subthe hesitation marks on the cubes signifying home-cut spuds. A quick stance more like a glaze than the velvety, lush sauce it should be, relegatslide of the ham and cheese over to top the potatoes afforded separate ing a California Benedict ($8.79) to the “misses” list. From the lunch but equally mouthwatering savory bites and sweet ones. menu, a grilled ham, cheese and bacon sandwich called the Electric Pig There’s a lot riding on a restaurant with a specific food item in its ($7.59) was too well-named to resist but proved to be more of a minor name. For a place called The Egg Factory, expectations are that the shock than truly electric. So what’s the draw? I haven’t quite figured it eponymous product will take center stage. The Egg Factory has earned out as a reviewer, but as a diner, it’s one of my regular no-frills stops. its name. —Amy Atkins likes to break breakfast rules. —Rachael Daigle beggs to eggsperience an eggcellent meal.


DINING/FOOD Bench ANDRADE’S—From albondigas to zopes, Javier Andrade ser ves up some of the best authentic Mexican fare in town. Great ser vice, generous portions, decent prices. 4903 Overland Road, 208-424-8890. $-$$ SU BAD BOY BURGERS—This Bench burger joint offers all the requisite fare of a classic walk-up/drive-thru, plus some tasty surprises: it will take two of you to get through one of their burritos. 815 S. Vista Ave., 208331-1580. $ BAGUETTE DELI— Choose from 18 different 12-inch sub sandwich choices at the Vietnamese deli. Spring rolls, smoothies and French pastries round out the super value menu, on which no sandwich will set you back more than $5. 5204 W. Franklin Rd., 208-336-2989. $ CASANOVA PIZZERIA—This Italian restaurant offers “neo-Neapolitan” eats, many cooked in their wood-fired brick oven. Standard pizza and sandwiches are perfect for purists, and more adventurous eaters will also find daring choices. 1204 S. Vista Ave., 208-331-3535. casanovapizzeria.com. $-$$ OM CHAPALA—The same great Jaliscan food Idaho expects Chapala to deliver. 1201 S. Vista Ave., 208-429-1155. chapalarestaurants.com. $-$$ SU OM CHIANG MAI THAI RESTAURANT—Casual for the whole family but elegant for just two. Traditional Thai food named after the infamous Thai cuisine capitol. 4898 W. Emerald St., 208-342-4051. $-$$ SU THE COOKIE LADY DELI— Fresh, handmade sandwiches offered in a variety of choices, including a tasty chicken salad. Don’t forget your homemade cookie on the way out. 880 Vista Ave., 208-385-7727. clbakerydeli.com. $-$$ OM CRESCENT NO LAWYERS BAR/ GRILL—To eat and drink at the Crescent, one must follow a small, but important set of rules: One must enjoy cold beer, a varied selection of delicious pub food; one must, if not love, at least like, sports; one must enjoy kick-ass happy hour prices; and above all, one must not be a lawyer. Don’t believe us? Just try taking your solicitor in for Scotch with a beer back. We dare you. 5500 W. Franklin Road, 208-322-9856. no-lawyers.com. SU OM $ CUCINA DI PAOLO—After years of catering in the valley, Cucina di Paolo now offers heat-andserve gourmet entrees, as well as a deli case full of goodies to enjoy in the small dining area.

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ —Less than $8 $$ —$8 to $14 $$$ —$14 to $20 $$$$ —Over $20

1504 Vista Ave., 208-345-7150. cucinadipaolo.com. $$-$$$ OM DAIRY QUEEN—Sure, they have burgers and fries. But this fastfood chain specializes in dessert 5711 W. Franklin Rd., 208-343SU OM 0239. $ DELI GEORGE—Behind the upside-down sign on Fairview, look for more than 30 sandwich options full of homemade ingredients and plenty of imagination. 5602 Fairview Ave., 208-3232582. deligeorge.com. $ OM DENNY’S—Chain best known as the home of the grand-slam breakfast. 2580 Airport Way, 208-344-9092. dennys.com. $-$$ SU OM DIN FUNG BUFFET—Chinese buffet with dozens of items. 925 S. Vista Ave., 208-367-1688. $$ DINO GRILL—Offering a sports bar and BBQ atmosphere. 5220 W. Fairview Ave., 208-375-5870. $-$$ EL PUEBLO—Mexican restaurant offering a homemade fresh salsa bar. 5234 W. Fairview Ave. # 7c, 208-375-5108. $-$$ EUROPE DELICIOUS—Bosnian bakery/deli/grocery with an adjacent restaurant/sports bar/ banquet hall. 9958 W. Fairview, 208-367-9109. $ GOLDEN STAR—Delicious Chinese/American cuisine served at one of the best preserved old storefronts in town. 1142 N. Orchard St., 208-336-0191. golden-star.us. $

THE GYRO SHACK—The best lamb-on-a-pita value in town. Walk in or drive-thru. 6935 W. Overland Avenue, 208-3757424. $ HONEY BAKED HAM AND CAFE—Meat shop and catering company that also serves sandwiches. 6103 W. Fairview Ave., 208-377-8664. $-$$ IDAHO PIZZA COMPANY— Pizza, sandwiches and an all-youcan-eat salad bar with prices that won’t break the bank. 4218 W Overland Road, 208-343-5455. idahopizzacompany.com. $-$$ OM JUMPIN’ JANETS—The best thing about Janet’s is her retirement fund: it’s on the ceiling. We tried our hand at throwing tack-stuck dollars onto the ceiling but after many near misses, we asked for help. It’s a cozy bar with entertainment and drink specials aplenty, and the staff laughs as hard as they work. 574 Vista Ave., 208-342SU 7620. $ KOPPER KITCHEN—Chain restaurant offering a family style atmosphere and serving steaks and sandwiches. 2661 Airport Way, 208-344-4271. kopperkitchen.com. $$ SU OM MANDARIN PALACE—Bo-bo, moo-goo, sub-gum and bacon cheeseburgers all under one roof. 5020 Franklin Rd., 208345-6682. $ SU NATIVE TATERS CAFE—Food cooked from the kind of home that comes on wheels. Best potato soup around. Corner of Protest and Boise avenues. $

Berryhill’s Restaurant · Bar

RECENTLY REVIEWED/FOOD MOON’S KITCHEN CAFE 712 W. Idaho St., 208-385-0472, moonskitchen.com “Hubby vowed to help me polish off the Guinness shake ($6.50) but then promptly ordered the colossal Reuben ($9.95).” —Sarah Barber

TRES BONNE CUISINE 6555 Overland Road, 208-658-1364, tresbonnecuisine.com “Haute cuisine it’s not, at Tres Bonne Cuisine. But as the loyal regular crowd will tell you, it’s one of the homiest restaurants in the city.” —Rachael Daigle

EIGHTEEN ONE 605 N. Edgewood Lane, Eagle, 208-939-0402, eaglehillsgolfcourse.com “A few days later, it was left to Sunday brunch to redeem Eighteen One. And at the risk of mixing sports metaphors, I’ll happily say that the restaurant birdied. ” —Rachael Daigle

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RE S —Reservations

needed/recommended —Patio S U —Open on Sunday O M —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Banquets · Catering 121 N. 9th Downtown Boise 387.3553 www.berryhillandco.com

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Gift Cards

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Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

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BOISEweekly | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 31


FOOD/DINING PANDA GARDEN—Small but comfortable, it has a huge selection of items, generous portions from Chinese to sushi, and it’s all good stuff. 2801 Overland Road, 208-433-1188. boisepandagarden.com. $-$$ SU THE PLANK—The bar sports two patios and more than 55 international beers. Beer and wine only at The Plank, but grub, darts, live music and a crowd of scallywags make for plenty of merriment even without Captain Morgan. They also serve a pub style menu until close. Arrggg. 650 S. Vista Ave., 208-336SU 1790. $-$$ QUIK-WOK—Chinese on the go. 4858 W. Overland Road, 208342-2626. quikwok.com. $-$$ SU OM

QUINN’S RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE—The Bench denizen has a family friendly atmosphere on the restaurant side and drinkers can now imbibe with impunity. And Quinn’s is a must-stop on any St. Patrick’s day bar tour. 1005 S. Vista Ave., 208-345-0135. $ SU RAEDEANS—Homey little chain that makes a killer sweet roll. 4969 W. Overland Road, 208-336-2201. $ RAW—The owners of conjoined and very popular Willowcreek Bar and Grill opened up RAW to sate the sushi cravings up on the bench. Striving for sushi art in a comfortably atmosphere and promising rolls that make your money worth it. 2237 Vista Ave., 208-343-0270. rawsushiboise. com. $-$$ OM

ROCKIES DINER—This old-school diner blends in with the rest of Overland Road, but once inside, customers are greeted with perky servers on roller skates, classic rock in the jukebox and guitars in the ceiling. The burgers are big and tasty. Even if you weren’t born before the ’50s, you’ll have flashbacks. A DJ booth to boot. 3900 Overland Road, 208-3362878. $ SU ROOSTER’S EATERY—Located in historic Vista Village, Rooster’s offers fine lunch fare. If you’re in the mood for salad try the San Diego with their own creamy Q-min dressing. For a hot sandwich, try the tri tip melt. For a cold one, check out the albacore tuna. 930 S. Vista Ave., 208-336-9300. $-$$ SONO BANA—Boise’s oldest Japanese joint can still hold its own against more stylish newcomers. Chef Yugi Hagino even offers ginger and adzuki bean ice cream. 303 N. Orchard St., 208-323-8822. sonobanasushi.com. $$ SU OM

FOOD/WINE SIPPER

STAN’S CHAR-BROILED HOT DOGS—New York hot dogs arrive fresh from the East Coast courtesy of Sahlen’s Smokehouse and are char-broiled to perfection by well-trained and friendly employees. 818 S. Vista Ave., 208-342-1199. stanshotdogs. SU OM com. $ TACOS EL TORITO—An excellent neighborhood taqueria. 4518 W. Overland Road, 208-343-4235. $

TEMPRANILLO The tempranillo grape is native to Spain where it is the most popular red variety. It is used in the full-bodied reds that put Rioja on the map, and it is often viewed as that region’s answer to cabernet sauvignon. In recent years it has gained popularity in other wine producing countries and is even found here in Idaho. But as this tasting proves, great values still come from the grape’s country of origin. Here are the panel’s top tempranillo picks: 2006 COSME PALACIO RIOJA, $14.50 This one takes a little time to open up, but when it does, it reveals an elegantly styled wine with nice complexity. The aromas are a mix of floral violet, blueberry and strawberry rhubarb, all backed by basil, mocha and mushroom. This Rioja is silky smooth and beautifully balanced in the mouth, offering ripe cherry and berry flavors with touches of leather and earth. Soft tannins come through on the finish. 2007 FINCA SOBRENA RED, $18.50 While the other two wines hail from Rioja, this standout is from the Toro region of Spain. This is a beautifully aromatic wine that opens with enticing apple blossom and clover aromas, followed by cherry and violet. On the palate, it’s filled with ripe blackberry and cherry fruit, nicely balanced by food friendly, crisp acidity that turns supple on the finish. 2007 TORRES IBERICES TEMPRANILLO, $15.50 This wine offers deep, dark, dusty aromas of vanilla-laced cherry and raspberry, layered with cedar, spice, mushroom, thyme and a meaty touch of earth. A pleasant hint of that cedar colors the palate along with light tannins that serve as a backbone for the creamy, red fruit flavors. The finish—where chocolate, anise and leather come through—lingers nicely. —David Kirkpatrick

32 | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | BOISEweekly

TANGO’S SUBS AND EMPANADAS—Empanadas: an exotic word that roughly translates to “to-die-for $2 treat.” Tango’s 16 different styles of savory and sweet empanadas. The owner likens the subs, to the style of the torta sold on the street in Cuba. 701 N. Orchard St., 208-3222090. tangos-empanadas.com. $ OM TRES BONNE CUISINE—European style deli inside a wine and beer shop. Sandwiches focus on German-style meats. 6555 W. Overland Road, 208-658-1364. tresbonnescuisine.com. $-$$ OM WILLOWCREEK GRILL—Contemporary cuisine in a casual atmosphere and a fine place to dine with friends and family for lunch or dinner. The extensive menu features Northwest favorites such as salmon served up a little different in a fish and twigs option (twigs are fries at Willowcreek). Choose from a selection of yummies like fried portobello sticks and a wide selection of burgers topped with treats like pastrami and Swiss. 2273 S. Vista Ave., Ste. 150, 208-343-5544. willowcreekgrill. OM com. $-$$ YOKOZUNA TERIYAKI—Delish contemporary Japanese cuisine on the cheap. Chicken, salmon, steak or shrimp meet bright crispy vegetables on a huge bed of steamed rice under a blanket of teriyaki sauce while gyoza. yakisoba, curry, tonkatsu and bubble tea round out the menu. Get there early for the daily lunch special and to score an order of daily made sushi. 824 S Vista Ave., 208-377-3064. yokozunateriyaki.com. $-$$ SU OM More restaurant ideas at boiseweekly.com.

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BW RENTALS 25TH & IRENE 1,154 sq. ft., 3BD, 2BA, grg. Gas heat & central air. W/D hook-ups. 9 to 15 month lease preferred. No smoking. Cat would be considered. Available mid-December. Call 867-7435. AVAILABLE DECEMBER 1! Large 1BD apt available. W/D, DW incld. Please call 208-495-2484. Located on State St. DOWNTOWN HIGHRISE studio or 1BD. 3rd/Idaho. $450/mo. 343-5476. DUPLEX BY COLLEGE Only 3 yrs. old. 2BD, 2BA large nice duplex by BSU great location. Ready for new tenants Jan. 2011 $850/mo. + some util. Call for photos and more info Cheryl 841-8949. GREAT APT. FOR RENT! I need to find someone to take over my lease for $605/mo. 2BD, 1BA, W/D. I am only requesting a $200 deposit refund and prorated rent, depending on when you would move in. Call with any questions 208-861-8508. HOME ON BENCH 3BD, 1BA central heat and air great location. $750/mo. + util. Photos or more info call Cheryl 841-8949. N. BOISE-ELM GROVE PARK Charming and private triplex - includes 1 car grg. 1,154 sq. ft. 3BD, 2BA. 9 or 15 mo. lease preferred. Credit report and landlord references required. Cat would be considered. No smoking. 8677435. Available 12/20 or sooner! NORTHEND CHARMER 4BD, 1.5BA. Charming 2 story North End home near 26th & Hill Rd. 1815 sq. ft. home borders the foothill trails. No smoking, dogs negotiable, credit report and references required, sorry no cats. $1100/mo., $600 deposit and first month’s rent due at lease signing. Lease length negotiable. 208-608-1032. NW HOME AVAIL. IMMEDIATELY! 3BD, 2BA. Foothill Views! Pets welcome! Private Party! 353-6529.

BW FOR SALE SOUTHWEST BOISE 1440 sq. ft., 3BD, 2.5BA. Located in Ironwood Sub. Not a short sale or REO. Call Greg Long 859-1182. The Village Co. Inc. YARD SALE SALE HERE! Call Boise Weekly to advertise your Yard Sale. 4 lines of text and a free Yard Sale kit for an unbeatable price of $20. Kit includes 3 large signs, pricing stickers, success tips and checklist. Extra signs avail. for purchase. Call Boise Weekly by 10AM on Monday to post your Yard Sale for the next Wednesday edition. 344-2055.

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BW HEALTH & FITNESS KETTLEBELL CHALLENGE Lose a pant size between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Idaho Kettlebells is hosting a December kettlebell fitness challenge to keep you on track with fitness goals during the holidays. Just sensible, hard training. You will work hard, but will see results fast. Call Jim at Idaho Kettlebells 208-412-6079.

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34 | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

PSR Affinity Inc. is a human service corporation, devoted to providing the highest quality and professional human services. A qualified applicant for this PSR position must possess, at minimum, a bachelor’s degree from a nationally accredited university or college in one of the following: Primary, Special or Adult Education; Counseling; Human Services; Early Childhood Development; Psychology; Sociology; or Applied Behavioral Analysis or must hold a license as a Social Worker; Counselor; Marriage and Family Therapist; or Occupational Therapist. This will be a fulltime position in Boise. Applicant MUST: - be INDEPENDENT and SELF-MOTIVATED - able to write thoughtfully, professionally and legibly - have valid ID/DL - pass a background check -have an acceptable driving record. Send cover letter and resume via email averrinder@e-affinityinc.com. No phone calls. Paid In Advance! Make $1,000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www.homemailerprogram.net TELEPHONE OPERATORS Entertainment Company is seeking reliable, friendly, outgoing telephone operators with excellent customer service skills. Operators must be upbeat and imaginative. FT/PT. All shifts available. Flexible schedules. Must be able to to work a minimum of 20 hrs./wk. Operators work from home and must have a landline telephone. Training is provided. Please contact us at 800-211-3152. Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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CHRISTMAS SPONSORS NEEDED CATCH (Charitable Assistance to Community’s Homeless) is a program that provides housing first to homeless families with children living in emergency shelters. CATCH needs Christmas sponsors for these families. Please help us fulfill children’s dreams and wishes for Christmas! For more information regarding the C.A.T.C.H. program please visit our website at www. cityofboise.org/catch To donate please contact: Jennifer Marrow CATCH Social Work Intern 208384-4087 or fax 208-343-0529. 1276 W. River St., Suite 201, Boise.

BW VOLUNTEERS VOLUNTEER BELL RINGERS! Bell Ringers Volunteer to be a bell ringer at any of our kettle stands in Boise or Meridian. Volunteers are welcome any Mon.-Sat. Shifts are available in 2 or 4 hr. increments. Singers and musicians make great bell ringers! Encourage your family and friends to join you. The money raised helps support our all Salvation Army programs throughout the year. Contact Tina for questions and scheduling. 208-433-4428.

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ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

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TANK: 1-year-old male cat. Litterbox-trained, indoor only. Laid-back and friendly cat who gets along with kids, cats and dogs. (Kennel 29- #11934009)

PIGLET: 7-month-old male cat. Playful and affectionate. Good with other cats. Litterboxtrained. Enjoys being held. (Kennel 101#11898049)

YELO: 7-year-old male golden retriever. Housetrained. Good with dogs, cats and older kids. Loving, loyal, very sweet dog. (Kennel 325-#11942943)

TAZ: 2-year-old male cat. Robust size, beautiful markings and blue eyes. Happily lives with dogs. Friendly and easy going. (Kennel 44#11938088)

BRUNO: 3-year-old male cat. Extra-large cat who could use a diet. Litterbox-trained. Independent and friendly but overly needy. (Kennel 110- #7123581)

MISTER: 7-month-old male Lab mix. Good with kids, cats and dogs. Mostly house-trained. Will need exercise and training. (Kennel 422#11888346)

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | DECEMBER 1â&#x20AC;&#x201C;7, 2010 | 35


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B O I S E W E E K LY BW CLASSES & WORKSHOPS MOTHERHOOD SURVEY Please take 10-15 min. to complete this survey on Motherhood. It’s only 10 questions and completely anonymous. www.surveymonkey. com/s/M99W8Y5

HOLIDAY LOSS RECOVERY GROUP The holidays can be very stressful for someone who has recently lost a loved one. Align Hospice and The Cottages of Meridian are sponsering “Preparing for the Holidays”. This FREE class will cover: Understanding Grief and Loss and the Impact; Methods for Reducing Emotional Pain; Coping Skills and Techniques to Address Anxiety; Tips for Finding Excitement and Motivation; Using Visualization and Imagery to Build Hope; Classes will be every Wednesday 5:30 to 6:30pm at the Cottages of Meridian, 3199 W. Belltower Dr, Meridian. RSVP to Align Hospice 949-9478 or 639-1122. TEEN DATING If you are a teenager or know one, please have them take 5 min. & fill out a survey. They do not provide ANY identifying information - the survey is completely confidential. www.surveymonkey. com/s/MTXL39C FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

NYT CROSSWORD | 1 Judge’s no-no 5 Like some responsibilities 10 German-born tennis star Tommy 14 Start of “A Visit From St. Nicholas” 18 Spree 1

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Yard-Garage Sale. Fri.-Sun., Dec. 3-5. 116 S. 23rd St. near Boise Car Upholstery. 10-4. Huge inventory, high quality. Sun, Rain or Snow will be there.

BW LOST Lost Nov. 5th. Large black cat. 3 miles east of Sand Hollow Store on farm at 26590 Hwy 30. Call 922-4988.

9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464.

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Multiple dealers, two floors of antiques & furniture. Vendor space avail. Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30. 2nd St. South in Downtown Nampa. 4680900.

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BW ART, ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES

CALL TO LOCAL ARTISTS If you are a local artist looking for a venue to sell your artwork through, we are looking for you. Green Chutes Artist Coop is opening December 15th in the Collister Shopping Center, 4716 W. State St., Boise. Come visit our 12,000 SF space as we remodel, we think you’ll be excitied too. For membership information contact Nancy Zurcher 208-695-7156 or email greenchutes@netzero.net

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Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643.

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BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

HAVING ASPIRATIONS BY CLIVE PROBERT / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

19 “The Bad News Bears” actress 20 Film character who actually does not say “Play it again, Sam” 21 “Take it easy!” 22 Robbers’ gain 23 “Winnie-the-Pooh” character

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47 “___ doubt but they were fain o’ ither”: Burns 48 Org. with the motto “For the benefit of all” 49 Fair-hiring inits. 50 Kim Jong-il, for one 53 James or Jackie of Hollywood 56 Carrier with a frequent flier program called EuroBonus 59 It may be snowy or spotted 61 Emmy-winning actress ___ de Matteo 62 Johnny ___ 63 Concerns of middleaged guys in lower Louisiana? 67 Cute 71 Org. for electing candidates 72 Whales, at times 73 Lengthy military signup? 76 Cpl.’s inferior 77 Presidential straw poll city 78 Bauxite, e.g. 79 Place for mounted antlers, maybe 80 Club Meds, e.g. 84 Way in 87 Conductors of many exams, for short 89 R.E.M.’s “The ___ Love” 91 Chit 92 Put the dentures aside while gardening? 98 ___ Park, Queens 99 News show assemblage 100 Eye parts 101 Disco fan on “The Simpsons” 104 Reed in music 105 Shiites or Sunnis 106 View from Catania 108 Starboard food fish? 116 Contest 117 Away from the storm 118 What a beatnik beats 119 Kind of theater

120 Not so tied up 121 Sail problem 122 Maine college 123 [sigh] 124 “___ of the Storm Country” 125 Lawn starters 126 Wear away 127 Vetoes

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Atom modeler “Dies ___” Content of la mar Course outlines Out of one’s mind, in a way, with “up” 6 Vacuous 7 Hawk 8 “Were I the Moor, I would not be ___” 9 Loud ringing 10 It’s symbolized by caviar and Champagne 11 Athol Fugard’s “A Lesson From ___” 12 1930s film pooch 13 Portuguese-speaking island off the African coast 14 Like some spicy food 15 Pain result 16 Honolulu’s ___ Stadium 17 More cunning 21 Very religious 27 Bearing 28 Chaucer piece 29 Actor Dennis 34 Diminutive suffix 35 List ender 36 “Get ___ hence”: I Kings 17:3 37 Replies from the hard of hearing 38 Stop 40 Give due credit 42 Not smooth 43 Result of some time in a bed? 44 Cry of delight 45 Scrub over 46 Seine tributary 51 Nostradamus, for one 52 Soviet news group

54 One who takes people in 55 A Lennon 57 Xanadu river 58 Sobersided 60 Back talk 63 “Alas” 64 Part of a Molière play 65 Snag 66 Huggies competitor 67 Quick-like 68 Item in a music producer’s in-box 69 Cricket units 70 MGM symbol 74 Bordeaux, e.g. 75 Benjamin 80 Old touring car 81 Fair attraction 82 Feature of much ancient Roman statuary 83 Goes after 85 Artist’s workplace 86 Gain access, in a way 88 Roman square 90 Org. with a 2004-05 lockout 93 Chewy treats 94 Apiece L A S T

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95 1976 rescue site 96 Go after 97 Dodge 101 Give a raw deal 102 Third planet from le soleil 103 Impulses 105 Hogan contemporary 106 Pushed, with “on” 107 “___ were the days” 109 Streets of Québec 110 Fleischmann’s product 111 Surf sound 112 Word after bang, break or bump 113 Letters of faux modesty 114 Title for Helen Mirren 115 Couples no more Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

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C R E S E D A N D B A I R A T E R L A D E B C K N A O A R A T O E L O F N A S I M O D D E A R A P I E D N W E T T W E C R A N U E T E D

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B OISE W E E KLY

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PE T S BW PETS BOISE TROPICAL FISH I have some tropical fish for free. In Boise. Checkout the pictures at www.idahoaquariumclub.com Dog & person attached by off leash young Pit Bull following its owner on a mountain bike. Owner in his mid to late 20’s. On Crestline Trail, Nov. 16th, 4pm. Call if you can identify dog or owner 343-2310.

M U S IC BW MUSIC INSTRUCTION DRUM LESSONS All ages & all styles of music. Instructor has 20+ yrs. of performance experience. For registration, available times or more info please Call Frank Mastropaolo 208-573-1020. GUITAR LESSONS-REASONABLE Beginning-Advanced Guitar Lessons. $25/h. 20 yrs. teaching exp. All styles of music. Mitch 208-447-8286. Guitar lessons. Visit JamesLewisMusic.com 371-6163.

Enthusiastic keyboardist wanted. Call Ed 389-9619. Viva Las Vegas! Elvis impersonator for hire. Parties, Weddings, Christmas & New Years parties. Located in Mtn. Home. John 587-5719.

SERVICES BW HOME INTERIOR PAINTING & MORE Offer reasonable prices, help with colors, wall repair, texture, staining, sealing, kitchen cabinet repainting, brush, roll & spray finishing. Also tile, carpentry and handyman work performed. Experienced, dependable, references, licensed & insured! Call Joe-Bohemia Painting for a free estimate! 208-3458558 or 208-392-2094. THE ORGANIC HOUSECLEANERS Professional cleaning services with use of all natural and organic products. Call today for your free estimate. 20% off first month of service. 208-870-8310.

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BW 4 WHEELS 2006 SUBARU IMPREZA OUTBACK Sport wagon, good condition, 84K mi., AWD, 4 cyl., automatic, 6-disc changer. $10,700/best offer. Please call 208-781-1012. Junk cars, trucks, vans. Paying up to $200. 208-963-0492.

pointed Personal Representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barrred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the Clerk of the Court. DATED this 11th day of November, 2010. Marilyn Miller Everhart 3005 S Ladera Place Boise, Idaho 83705 (208) 634-6504 Pub. Nov. 17, 24, Dec. 1, 2010.

CONNECT ION SECT ION

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TALENT SCOUT Talent Scout Urban Talent Management is seeking a part-time Talent Scout to help find prospective talent for the agency. Qualified candidates will be friendly, outgoing, energetic and comfortable approaching potential models and actors. Candidates must also enjoy talking to people, attending public events, are selfmotivated and self-managed and are seeking a part-time job that is flexible with their work or school schedule. No past experience is required though sales experience is preferred. Compensation is a combination of a base wage plus commission. Please call to schedule an interview 208-424-0799.

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BW LEGAL NOTICES 2ND ANOTHER NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE Case No.: CV NC 1002100 A Petition to change the name of Christopher D. Hall, born 2/26/99 in Pensacola, FL residing at 9738 W. Lillywood Dr, Boise, Idaho 83709 has been filed in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Christopher Dylan McDavid, because my son (Christopher) would like his last name to be the same as mine and the rest of his family. The child’s father is living. The child’s mother is living. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on Dec. 9, 2010, at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: Oct. 12, 2010. By D. Price Deputy Clerk IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estate of: TIMOTHY LEE EVERHART, Deceased. Case No. CV IE 1021181 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (I.C. 15-3-801) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been ap-

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | DECEMBER 1–7, 2010 | 37


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Physicist Stephen Hawking believes it would be dangerous to get in touch with extraterrestrial creatures. “If aliens visit us,” he says, “the outcome would be much as when Columbus landed in America, which didn’t turn out well for the Native Americans.” Those who’ve studied the teeming evidence for UFOs would say that Hawking’s warning is too late. Some mysterious nonhuman intelligence has been here for a long time, and the fact that we are still around proves they’re no Spanish conquistadors. Aside from that, though, let’s marvel at the stupidity of Hawking’s lame advice. As any mildly wise person knows, exploring the unknown is not only an aid to our mental and spiritual health—it’s a prerequisite. That’ll be especially true for you Aries in the coming weeks. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “At times, although one is perfectly in the right, one’s legs tremble,” wrote philosopher V.V. Rozanov. “At other times, although one is completely in the wrong, birds sing in one’s soul.” That may have been the case for you last month, Taurus, but these days it’s the exact reverse. If your knees are wobbly, you’re missing the mark, or far from the heart of the matter. If, on the other hand, birds are singing in your soul, it’s because you’re united with the beautiful truth. There are a couple of caveats, though: The beautiful truth won’t be simple and bright; it’ll be dense, convoluted and kaleidoscopic. And the birds’ songs will sound more like a philharmonic orchestra pounding out Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony than a single flute playing a quaint folk song. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Are there any actors who have impersonated as many different characters as Gemini chameleon Johnny Depp? From rogue agent to chocolatier, from psychotic barber to astronaut, he is a model of inconsistency—a master of not imitating himself. (To glimpse 24 of his various personas, go here: bit.ly/GeminiActor.) According to my reading of the omens, you now have a poetic license to follow his lead. There have been few times in the last two years when you’ve had this much freedom and permission to be so multiple, mercurial and mutant. CANCER (June 21-July 22): A tattoo now adorns the neck of pop star Rihanna. It says “rebelle fleur,” which is a French phrase meaning “rebel flower.” The grammar police protested her new body art. They wished she would have rendered it correctly as “fleur rebelle,” since in French, adjectives are supposed to follow, not precede, the nouns they refer to. But I’m guessing Rihanna knew that. In reversing the order, she was double-asserting her

38 | DECEMBER 1–7, 20100 | BOISEweekly

right to commit acts of insurrection. Let’s make “rebelle fleur” your keynote in the coming days, Cancerian. Buck tradition and conventional wisdom with blithe grace and jaunty charm. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Research by German psychologists suggests that positive superstitions may be helpful. Reporting in the journal Psychological Science, they discovered that people who think they are in possession of good luck charms outperform people who don’t. “Superstitioninduced confidence” seems to act in ways akin to how placebos work to heal sick people: It can provide a mysterious boost. (More here: tinyurl.com/ LuckCharm.) Just for the fun of it, Leo—and in accordance with the astrological omens—put this finding to the test: Get yourself a magical object that stimulates your power to achieve success. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Psychologist Carl Jung said we are connected to each other via the collective unconscious. Your psyche and my psyche have taproots that sink deep into the memories and capacities of the entire human race. According to my reading, your taproots are now functioning more vigorously than they have in a long time. You’re in more intimate contact than usual with the primal pool of possibilities. It means you have the power to draw on mojo that transcends your personal abilities. Could you make use of some liquid lightning, ambrosial dreams or healing balm from the beginning of time? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you want to get a gallon of milk directly from the source, you have to squeeze a cow’s udder more than 300 times. I recommend you use that as a metaphor for your task in the days to come. It’s going to take a lot of squirts or tugs or tweaks to get the totality of what you want. Be patient and precise as you fill your cup little by little. There’s no way you can hurry the process by skipping some steps. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth,” says the Bible. That doesn’t mean what most people think it does. The word translated as “meek” is the Greek word “praus,” which in ancient times didn’t mean “weak-willed, passive, mild.” Rather, it referred to great power that was under rigorous control. For example, soldiers’ warhorses were considered praus. They heeded the commands of their riders, but were fierce warriors that fought with tireless fervor. In this spirit, Scorpio, I’m predicting you’re about to get very “meek”: offering your tremendous force of will and intelligence in disciplined service to a noble cause. (Thanks to Merlin Hawk for the info I used in this ‘scope.)

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche wrote a book called Ecce Homo: How One Becomes What One Is. I’d love it if in the next few weeks you would think a lot about how you are on your way to becoming what you were born to be. Current astrological omens suggest you will have special insight into that theme. For inspiration, you might want to borrow some of Nietzsche’s chapter titles, including the following: “Why I Am So Wise,” “Why I Am So Clever” and “Why I Am a Destiny.” CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): During some of her concerts, Capricorn singer Hayley Williams (lead vocalist of Paramore) has worn a tank top that bears the phrase “Brand New Eyes.” I encourage you to consider making that your own guiding principle for a while. By pointedly declaring your intention to view the world with refreshed vision, you will be able to tune in to sights that have been invisible to you. You will discover secrets hidden in plain view and maybe even carve out a window where before there had been a thick, blank wall. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Much of my recent book, Pronoia Is the Antidote for Paranoia, is rated PG, some is R, but there’s one story that’s X. Not in the same way that porn is. While it’s uninhibited in its rendering of ecstatic eroticism, it’s a feminist meditation on spiritual intimacy, not a heap of vulgar stereotypes. Still, when the book came out, I couldn’t bear the thought of sending copies to certain relatives of mine who are a bit prudish. So I came to an honorable compromise: Using a razor blade, I sliced out the nine pages in question and gave my loved ones the mostly intact remainder. May I suggest you consider a comparable editing of your efforts, Aquarius? Your main object right now is to win friends and influence people. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the waters off the southwest coast of Africa, the small fish known as the bearded goby has always been preyed upon by jellyfish—until recently. Now this formerly mild-mannered species, whose diet used to consist of phytoplankton, has overthrown the ancient status quo: It is feasting on the jellyfish that once feasted on it. Scientists aren’t sure why. I foresee a metaphorically comparable development in your life, Pisces. How it will play out exactly, I’m not sure. Maybe you’ll gain an advantage over someone or something that has always had an advantage over you. Maybe you will become the top dog in a place where you’ve been the underdog. Or maybe you’ll begin drawing energy from a source that has in the past sucked your energy.

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