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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 17 OCTOBER 20–26, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

GLASSHOLE Boise’s mounting glass recycling problem PICKS 18

WHAT TO DO, WHAT TO DO BW’s Picks are filled with entertainment, education and the theme from Star Wars SCREEN 26

EDUCATION 101 Waiting for Superman gives public schools a failing grade FOOD 30

HYDE OUT Ducking into the 13th Street Pub and Grill

“President Eisenhower was trying to spring that on the Russians.”

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com New Media Czar: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Heather Lile Heather@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreader: Annabel Armstrong, Heather Lile Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Andrew Crisp, David Kirkpatrick, Michael Lafferty, Zach Hagadone Intern: Aaron Lang

ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Sabra Brue, Sabra@boiseweekly.com Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com Jen Grable, Jen@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Steve Klamm, Jeremy Lanningham, Glenn Landberg, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE BIG AND BIGGER OK, readers, this isn’t fair, but I’m going to do it anyway. We have big changes coming up at Boise Weekly. Big. Huge. Often, by the time you see the big changes we’ve made here at Boise Weekly, we’ve been immersed in the details for weeks or months. By the time things go public, it’s old news to us, but to you it feels like we’ve sprung big change with little warning. So without giving too much away here, I’ll give you this: big changes are coming. We’re revamping two sections of the paper, one of which is possibly our most widely read. It’s an entire shift in direction—a complete re-envisioning of our mission in that section and it’s radical. In fact, I’m willing to wager there hasn’t been a change this big in our content since we added a second restaurant reviewer to our Food section each week back in 2001. In fact, I’m willing to wager that this may be the most dramatic change Boise Weekly has ever made in its editorial content. No, I’m not exaggerating. It is that big. And though we’ve been plotting for months, you will have to wait another few editions before we let you in on the secret. In the meantime, I suggest this week’s main feature “Nuclear Idaho” from Zach Hagadone. This is exactly the kind of meaty, detail-driven story that alt weeklies were meant to tell. We’re not breaking any news here—after all, the story starts in 1955—rather, we’re re-framing the dialogue about the news. We’ve taken a few steps back from the daily reporting to take a wide-angle view and refocus what an atomic Idaho means. As home to one of the world’s first nuclear power plants and the possible home of the first nuclear power plant built since the Carter administration, Idaho has a complicated nuclear history. Hagadone’s story closely examines where we’ve been in an effort to better understand where we might be heading. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Keith Farnsworth TITLE: Harvest MEDIUM: Colored inks, used watercolor paper, colored pencil ARTIST STATEMENT: Surrealistic backgrounds, juxtaposed objects, dreams, pens, markers, absurdities, all mixed together and then recorded on secondhand paper, sanded and then redrawn. I’m inspired by pop surrealism, rock concert promotion posters, nature, faded signs and blinding white light.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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INSIDE MONDO GAGA 4 BILL COPE 7 NEWS Boise’s mountain of glass 8 CITIZEN 10 FEATURE Nuclear Idaho 11 PICKS 18 FIND 19 8 DAYS OUT 20

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SUDOKU NOISE Blitzen Trapper MUSIC GUIDE SCREEN Waiting for Superman MOVIE LISTINGS REC Nordic team launches refugee program

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FOOD 13th Street Pub and Grill

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WINE SIPPER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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MAIL IT’S ALL ABOUT NOV. 2 Republicans, Democrats and Independents of Idaho: If you don’t take a serious look at Keith Allred for governor, you are missing the best opportunity our state has had in a very long time. It’s not just a campaign slogan—Keith is truly a candidate for all Idaho. It would seem like a dream to have a governor who has the skill, the intelligence and the desire to bring all sides together to work on bettering our future. Make that dream come true—vote Allred. —Judy L. McHone, Stites The race for governor of Idaho is starting to turn nasty. Jana Kemp, the Independent, has been running a David and Goliath battle against Butch using beatbutch.com for almost a year. Recently on a Cadillac Eldorado, I saw a “Butch” bumper sticker next to an altered beatbutch.com bumper sticker. “Beatbutch.com” had been changed in a way that most women would find very offensive. —Pete Petersen, Boise I am distressed about the ads running in support of HJR4. The ads talk of “mandates from Washington” and “Washington taking more and more control of health care in Idaho.” The ad then asks voters to say “yes” to HJR4. The problem? HJR4 addresses an issue that has nothing whatsoever to do with Washington, mandates or control. It addresses an Idaho law that state-run hospitals must put forth a ballot measure in order to raise money for expansions of facilities, staff or equipment. This is an Idaho-only situation, but is being marketed with a Tea

Party style “down with big Washington” line that has nothing to do with the reality of the situation. HJR4 might be worth voting for, as it eliminates the need for an election for every hospital expansion, but the marketing is so dishonest and inflammatory that it almost deserves to be defeated just on principle. —Patrick Storey, Boise Government was invented to do what people could not do and what corporations would not do. Hence we are blessed with social security, minimum wage, clean drinking water, safe food, effective medicines, mining safety laws, well maintained highways and public education. The debate is not about big or small government, it is about whose side the government is on. To you Tea Partiers out there shaking the bushes: Do you really think the economy will do better if we just let the banks and the oil companies and the insurance companies do whatever they please? We have already tried these ideas. For a good part of the last decade we tried these ideas, and see where they led us. The Bush economy was based on personal debt, the housing bubble, trade deficits, stagnant wages and a growing gap between rich and middle class. Now, Republicans want to repeal progressive legislation, reinstate tax cuts for the wealthy and return to the same old economic agenda that got us into this mess. We can return to what we know did not work or we can build a stronger future. We can go backward or forward. The November election is about that very choice. —Sherrie Goff, Pocatello

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message. 6 | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | BOISEweekly

REGARDING BW’S RECENT LOCAVORE REVIEW Your article was nothing more than a pre-determined assassination campaign against our 6-monthyoung restaurant which abused the liberty implied by your self-imposed license for slander and bias (BW, Food, “Locavore,” Oct. 20, 2010). What objective food reviewer utilizes threequarters of her article to create and exploit a chasm between our name and our evolving practice in learning and navigating the tricky waters of this particular farm-to-table market? Incidentally, over 60 percent of our menu is either made in-house or sourced locally. Was it just low-hanging journalistic fruit or the thrill of an easy kill that fueled your motivation? You were too quick to conclude and too harsh to judge. We certainly do apologize for the quality of the chicken that was served to you on your single visit. I can assure you that particular incident represented the rarest of quality escapes in the history of our kitchens. We have never had a Heath Department violation or anything other than perfect inspections of our inventory, facilities and our handling and storage procedures. Why did you not allow us any chance to address, explain or correct something that has never happened to us before? It appeared that the review was already written before your visit, letting your preconceptions taint and tarnish your experience. Celebrating our locality within a neighborhood is our mission. Utilizing as many local ingredients as possible, when seasonally appropriate and economically sensible is our practice ... making a buck off a buzzword is not. —Mitchell Thompson, co-owner Locavore, Boise

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GET A NEW

BILL COPE/OPINION

ASK BILL Advice for the worried Dear Bill, I am an Independent. I voted for Barack Obama, and in 2004 I voted for George W. Bush. In 2000 I voted for Al Gore. I switch my vote every presidential election, and as a policy, half the people I vote for are Democrats and the other half are Republicans. If there are an odd number of candidates on the ballot, I will vote for a Libertarian or one of those other joke parties, all so that I can continue to be what they call “fiercely independent.” I like being called that because in other aspects of my life, I am a “gelatinous blob of wussiness.” That is what my wife calls me when I cannot decide which restaurant to go to, or what to order when I get there, or which pants to put on, or what to tell a barber when he asks, “What’ll it be today, Jerry?”, or what movie to rent, or whether to get a Ford or a Chevy, or whether to go to Home Depot or Lowe’s, or ... well, maybe now you can see why I truly enjoy being called “fiercely independent” by politicians, even if they are just trying to butter me up for my vote. However, in 2008, due to a mathematical miscalculation, I voted for more Democrats than Republicans, so this year I am obliged to make up for it by voting for more Republicans than Democrats. I must do this if I want to remain fiercely independent. Which I do. The trouble is, I did not keep up with politics since the last election because I was concentrating on other stuff, like fantasy football and Dancing With the Stars. Only lately have I been paying attention, and it looks to me that the Republican party has slipped through what I call “the Crazy Crack.” There is that Paladino nut in New York e-mailing pictures of a horse doing it to a non-horse woman. Or what about that O’Donnell woman in Delaware? Does she really believe anything she says? And there’s the Angle woman in Nevada acting like a Saturday Night Live character, or that Rand Paul in Kentucky and the Nazi-dresser-upper in Ohio and the twitchy Robertson guy from Oregon who goes around calling himself a scientist. Mr. Cope, what is going on? When did they start talking about doing away with Social Security and public schools, minimum wage and making girls who have been raped have the baby and all sorts of crazy, crazy, crazy stuff? Where did these creepy people come from and most importantly, how can a political party even be taken seriously when it is so full of creeps like these? Also, do you think I could still be considered fiercely independent if I decided the Republicans were just too creepy and crazy to vote for this year? Signed: Jerry Dear Jerry, I share your concern, yet it is not up to me to say if your slavish commitment to that fierce independence of yours would excuse you for helping put such demented fringies in power. I can tell you, though, from whence these people have come, and I believe I am the only one who has discovered their deepest secret. Surely, you are aware that the scariest of them floated to the surface of the Tea Party movement, and I have to assume you have not been so oblivious that you don’t know the Tea Party is a wholly fabricated phenomenon that popped up within the Republican party while you were fiddling with your distractions. Astute observers will note that there are elements within the Tea Party of everything from the old John Birch Society to Jerry Falwell’s Religious Right, with a generous sprinkling of white supremacism, Apocalyptic fervor, fascist nostalgia and unabashed disdain for anything more intellectually or culturally refined than a Carl’s Jr. hamburger commercial. And you are entirely right: The candidates fielded by the Tea Party are both creepy and crazy. In fact, the crazier a candidate talks, the farther he or she goes within Tea Party circles. All of which led me to ask: From what Lovecraftian grotto could so many bactrian mutants have crawled? My instincts told me there was more to their histories than mere ideological atrophy, promoted and financed by corporate puppet masters such as the grim Koch brothers and that oily Texas huckster, Dick Armey. Then, thumbing through the TV listings for something Halloweeny to watch, I stumbled across the answer. Suddenly, I knew where I’d seen these people before—or at least their onscreen representations. Sharron Angle, Rand Paul, O’Donnell, Paladino, the Ohio Nazi, the Connecticut wrestling maven … all of them … they are the Children of the Corn, all grown up and passing themselves off as normal. Remember Children of the Corn? The Stephen King chiller about twisted fundamentalist kids who eliminated all the adults in their community with sharp farm implements and worshipped “He Who Walks Behind the Rows”? What you may not realize is that the story and ensuing movies were based on events that might well have happened, had certain criteria of a factual nature been satisfied. And it’s obvious to me that it must have happened, if only on the evidence of the presence among us of these twisted, fundamentalist zealots who are now what passes for adults in their community, yet still speak like wholly self-educated children. I even have a suspicion as to who “He Who Walks Behind the Rows” may be, only it is not a “He,” and these days, she prefers to call herself “Momma Grizzly.” I repeat, it is a decision you must make on your own, whether to squelch your fierce independence for this election cycle, or go GOP and subject our nation to the horrors of Tea Party governance. But when the scythes and hoes come out, don’t say I didn’t warn you. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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CITYDESK/NEWS OH, HENRY’S. It looks like Boise won’t be seeing a Whole Foods market anytime soon (BW, News,“Whole Foods on Hold,” Oct. 13, 2010), but another smaller-scale grocer appears ready to try its luck with Boise’s Planning and Zoning Commission. Guessing just who it might be has become a bit of a parlor game. Trader Joe’s? Nope. Bristol Farms? Sunflower? No and no. It’s Henry’s Farmers Market. Who? Don’t worry if you haven’t heard of them. This would be the first location outside of Southern California or Arizona. The Persimmon II development company is asking for a conditional use permit to build a 25,000-square-foot specialty grocery store and a nearby 1,800-square-foot building for specialty retail and residential units. The proposed location is a block bordered by 15th, 16th, Idaho and Bannock streets. Henry’s began in the 1940s by selling local peaches on a San Diego street corner. The family-owned business grew into a chain of specialty grocery stores with particular emphasis on local produce. Each store also includes meat, seafood, wine and beer, as well as floral, bakery, deli and holistic health departments. The company also touts a health and wellness center on its website. But if we’ve learned anything in 2010, the best laid plans don’t get anywhere until you make nice with Boise’s P & Z .The commission will review the application at a public hearing on Monday, Nov. 1, at Boise City Hall.

Next week in par t two: Boise mulls options to shatter its glass pr oblem.

NEWS

THE GLASS CEILING Boise’s glass recycling program isn’t really recycling anything GEORGE PRENTICE

Meanwhile, City Hall is still reeling from the administrative carnage at the Oct. 11 meeting of Boise’s Design Review Committee. The panel voted 4-3 to deny construction of JUMP, a privately funded arts center, green space, meeting facility and memorial to J.R. Simplot and Idaho’s agricultural history. Two weeks earlier, the committee deadlocked on a 3-3 vote, with one member absent, so the issue was tabled. On Oct. 11, previously absent member Robert Anderson decided to vote for the project, so it was safe to assume that JUMP would move forward. But committee Chairman Rodney Evans changed his vote to no, and JUMP went down to defeat. JUMP spokesman David Cuoio told Citydesk that neither he nor the family had any clue why Evans changed his vote. And as of press time, Evans had not returned BW’s messages. “The family and the JUMP team have put their hearts and souls into this design,” said Cuoio. “We already implemented one major redesign, and it’s unlikely that we would be interested in making any significant changes to the current design.” On Oct. 11, Anderson practically begged his fellow committee members to find a way to work toward a solution by offering to hold a series of additional work sessions. But the committee voted 4-3 against his proposal. Committee member Elizabeth Wolf was visceral in her criticism of the JUMP project. “It’s a parking garage on stilts with theme-park elements,” said Wolf. Wolf motioned to deny the project, and three of her colleagues agreed, enough to trip up JUMP. —George Prentice

“In addition to the 17 public sites, we have 13 private companies who pay for their own glass dumpsters and special collection,” Kershner said. “The Cottonwood Grille, Main Street Bistro, the Basque Block, Idaho Shakespeare ... they’re to be commended because it’s one of the most expensive services we offer. It would certainly be cheaper for them to simply put all their glass in with the garbage.” Each of the containers is transported by Allied Waste (in a special contract with the city) out to the ACHD facility. Seven years ago, ACHD and the city thought that was a pretty good idea. The highway district envisioned crushing the glass and using the material as a sub base aggregate below concrete or asphalt when building roads. The problem is, ACHD really hasn’t been building too many roads. And when they do, they usually subcontract with someone else to do the job. The last time any glass was crushed was nearly four years ago. But the glass keeps coming. Three or four times week, the silence at the ACHD site is broken by a thunderous sound of a clattering cascade of glass being dumped. And then, about once a week an ACHD employee drives a caterpillar tractor over the newly arrived bottles, breaking some in an attempt to compact the space. The glass is then shoved into a pile that quickly becomes a bigger pile, which becomes a hill, which becomes the surreal site it is now. Both city and ACHD officials confirmed at least 60,000 cubic yards Log on to boiseweekly.com for a photo slideshow of Boise’s growing glass problem, of glass is at the location. And ACHD has as well as additional video coverage on this story. said enough. In fact, ACHD wants the glass removed. Agency officials don’t expect to use it at any point in the future and need the Every day, scores of Boiseans haul their Department, quoted the frat-house comedy space to mine sand and gravel. empty beer, wine and liquor bottles and their classic Animal House when describing the So, what are Boise’s options? In part two empty glass food jars to 17 glass collection growing predicament in which the city of of our reporting next week, we’ll examine sites. Three are at traditional drop-off locaBoise finds itself. Woods oversees the city’s issues with solid and hazardous waste, air and tions: Boise, Pacific and Western recycling cen- how the city has to act fast to find a longterm solution. City water quality, and climate protection, but glass ters. Six are at Boise officials are considerfire stations. And the may be his biggest challenge. ing a curbside glass city has an agreeYou see, Boise has a mountain of glass. recycling option. Or ment to place its most Actually, there are two small mountains. But possibly partnering popular collection don’t plan on taking a tour anytime soon. with a for-profit firm sites outside of AlbThey’re far behind a locked gate south of to crush all of the ertsons grocery stores Boise on land owned by the Ada County city’s glass into a Highway District. Imagine two football fields, on State Street and marketable construceach filled with glass about 30 feet high—bot- Vista Avenue in Boise. tion base. Or better The Vista location tles, some broken, some whole–as far as you yet, a major effort has been operating can see. It’s a bizarrely beautiful sight when to discourage the for less than a month the sunlight streams across the acres of multiImagine two football fields, purchase of products in glass colored glass. But it’s also unsettling a tangible but already has reached capaceach filled with glass about containers to begin with. ity each week. BW visited the 30 feet high—bottles, some exhibit of consumption and sloth. broken, some whole–as far “Reduce, reuse, recycle,” The “double-secret probation” that Woods State Street site on a Monday as you can see. said Catherine Chertudi, city morning, and the trailer-sized referred to came from a letter to the city from hall’s so-called czarina of dumpster was packed to the top ACHD. Simply put, it told Boise officials to trash. “Before we even talk with beer and wine empties. stop hauling glass to ACHD. Woods said about reusing or recycling, why can’t we just “We empty each at least twice a week. the city has since been able to sit down with reduce all the glass?” Highway District officials to ask for some time Some are picked up three times weekly,” said “We’re bringing back wine in a box,” Megan Kershner, the city’s Solid Waste proto craft a plan B or even a plan C. smiled Woods. gram coordinator. BW decided to follow the glass and along

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the way, we learned that good intentions quickly led to a burning problem where flames were fanned by a failing economy and Idaho’s dramatic lack of recycling solutions. “You’re catching us at a very interesting time,” said Woods. “We can’t continue with the status quo.”

GEORGE PRENTICE

JUMP DENIED

Paul Woods reached back to the 1970s for a reference to his 21st century problem. “We’re on double secret probation,” Woods said with a half-comic, half-serious expression. Woods, manager of the city’s Environmental Division, part of Boise’s Public Works


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CITIZEN

DAVID SHAMBAUGH The Eagle, the Dragon and the late Frank Church GEORGE PRENTICE

Did you have opportunity to know the late Frank Church? Oh, yes. I was a young student at George Washington University and was quite impressed with his foreign policy views. I thought he was a great candidate so I volunteered to work on his presidential campaign in 1976. A full generation doesn’t know about Frank Church, except for a few references in texts. What would you tell a student today about the late senator? Not many American senators or congressmen are even aware of the outside world. It is said that two-thirds of the American Congress don’t even hold passports. There is a tremendous insularity and parochialism among American politicians these days. But Senator Church exemplified someone who developed an interest and expertise in

10 | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | BOISEweekly

international relations. More than that, he sought to shape it. He wound up being the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. He was very outspoken in questioning the Vietnam War and the Johnson and Nixon administrations’ statistics on the war. I would tell young people today that Frank Church is a role model that we don’t have in American public and political life today. What are you witnessing in students’ ramped-up participation and interest in Chinese studies? I can tell you that international relations are in very high demand with this generation, which is a good sign. China is right near the top of their interest. I teach Chinese foreign policy, Chinese politics, Chinese military and security affairs, and U.S.-China relations. Not only do I have a high subscription to my classes, but I have a growing number of students who have been to China, lived in China, or even speak Chinese. Is China’s currency dramatically undervalued? Well, that’s what many of the world’s top economists are agreeing on lately. There’s been considerable debate about it. In a recent Newsweek article, Robert Samuelson wrote about the possibility of a trade war with China. Is there some reality to that? I would hope not. I would hope that both governments would have the sanity and pragmatism to back away from the cliff. There is a protectionist surge in both countries. Having said that, Samuelson’s arguments are exaggerated. Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo was recently awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. How big a

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Dr. David Shambaugh is recognized across the globe as an authority on contemporary Chinese affairs. He has worked with and for the U.S. State Dept., the National Security Council, the Ford Foundation, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Library of Congress. He serves on several editorial boards including International Security and The China Quarterly. He’s a Senior Fulbright Research Scholar and has taught at the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. He is currently the director of the China Policy Program at the Elliot School of International Affairs at George Washington University. On Thursday, Oct. 28, Shambaugh will be the keynote speaker at the 27th annual Frank Church Conference. The theme of the day-long conference at Boise State is “Eagle and Dragon: The U.S. and China in the 21st Century.”

story is that to the West and how big a concern is that to China? He’s the best known activist and campaigner for human rights in China. He’s someone who has advocated political system reform for a number of years and has paid dearly for it. He’s now serving an 11-year prison term. It’s his third time in prison. The prize is consistent with the ideals of the Nobel committee and the Chinese government isn’t very pleased about it. Have you witnessed a new class of superrich in China? Very much so. The middle class is growing, but there is a class of multi-millionaires and billionaires in China that is growing rapidly. And we’ve also heard about a significant number of Chinese who own automobiles now. Absolutely. Everybody wants their own car. But the roads are completely clogged. You can’t get over 20 mph. It’s an irony that they all want beautiful, powerful cars, but there are so many of them they can’t drive them quickly. For the Western automobile manufacturers, China is nothing short of a savior. We’d go under if it weren’t for the China market. G.M. sells more trucks and light trucks in China than anywhere else in the world. Buick sells far more cars in China than it does in the United States. And now, we’re seeing Chinese companies buying up some Western automotive manufacturers such as Volvo and Saab.

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NUCL EAR IDAHO THE

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n 1955 Charles Pieper was in his early 30s, a veteran of the Pacific theater in World War II and working near his hometown of Arco at the then 6-year-old National Reactor Testing Station, now known as the Idaho National Laboratory. A graduate of U.S. Navy electrical schools in St. Louis, Mo., and Norfolk, Va., Pieper had begun work at the nearby Naval Proving Ground soon after two atomic bombs peacetime use. It was the detonated over Japan and ended the war, sending him home. dawn of the Atomic Age During his time there, he rose to a leading position on the and optimism ran high. electrical crew and was working with the testing station’s As one government contractor, Phillips Petroleum. newsreel of the period It was an exciting time to work on the desolate heroically put it, the testing scrub between Arco and Idaho Falls. The same station in the desert was bombs that devastated Hiroshima and Naga“home of half a dozen major saki in 1945 ushered in a fantastical new technical plants where scientists realm of science that was being and engineers are studying ways of developed—largely in seputting the atom to work for mankind.” cret—for For Pieper, though, most of what he did was “just another job,” maintaining electrical systems and transmission lines. One summer day in ’55 his crew received an order to take the power generated from the Boiling Water Reactor

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III (nicknamed “Borax”) and transfer it onto the lines to power the city of Arco. It was to be the first time that an entire city would be powered with atomic energy—an international showcase for America’s newfound nuclear mastery. “I don’t think we really realized what we were doing at the time—the significance of the occasion,” said Pieper, who at age 88 still lives part-time in Arco. It wasn’t an easy job, though. With a crowd of onlookers eager to witness the dawning of a new epoch, the crew closed the circuit for the first time on or around July 14. Nothing happened. Scrambling to fix the problem on the

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second night, the system failed again. “They tried different methods. There wasn’t anything wrong with the power, it was just those long transmission lines; we couldn’t get enough voltage to push them through,” Pieper said, recalling that on that second night his crew went out to check the lines and found that several poles had broken down. “Broke the cross-poles right down, the lines were shakin’ so bad. It took us all night to get them back up,” he said. By then most all the history-gawkers had gone home, and during that time Pieper’s immediate supervisor had died of a heart attack, making Pieper the lead man on a crew that numbered 10 or 12

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An aerial image shows the expansive Idaho National Laboratory facilities in the Southern Idaho desert.

by July 17, the third day of attempts to light Arco with the brilliance of nuclear power. Finally, a new electrical engineer was assigned to the job—John Yeates, who still lives in Idaho Falls—and he directed the installation of new transformers that everyone on site hoped would be up to the job. With the new transformers in place and all the transmission lines repaired, it was time for one more try. It fell to Pieper, as lead man, to close the circuit. Suddenly, about 20 miles away, the lights in the little town of Arco winked on. History had finally been made. As that same government newsreel triumphantly proclaimed: “On July 17, 1955, this new type of power reactor supplied city-wide the kind of energy which will someday power man’s factories, cook his meals and in many other ways make his life richer and fuller in a peaceful world.” Pieper would stay on the job at the site until January 1981 (“I used to tell people I was born out there, and they built a fence around me,” he joked), but that night on July 17 was a high point—although only in retrospect. “After it started to hit the newspapers and we found out President Eisenhower was trying to spring that on the Russians and waiting to hear the success of it—after that we found out how significant it really was,” Pieper said. “Up until then it was just another job.”

NEXT-GEN NUKE BOOSTERS Though Arco was only bathed in nuclearpowered light for a short time, July 17 is still celebrated in the town of 1,200 with the annual Atomic Days holiday—complete with a rodeo, parade, sports tournaments, arts and crafts, and a car show. A sign above the Arco Chamber of Commerce—which doubles as the city offices—proudly declares in all caps: “THE FIRST CITY IN THE WORLD TO BE LIT BY ATOMIC POWER.” Nuclear science and energy is certainly one of the biggest players in Southeastern Idaho, if not the biggest. The Idaho National Laboratory, with about 4,100 employees, is one of the largest employers in the state and has remained the U.S. Department of Energy’s lead nuclear research center—pioneering most or all of the technologies that harness “the atom to work for mankind.” That includes giving

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birth to the nuclear navy. Retired Vice Adm. John Grossenbacher is the current laboratory director at INL, president of lab operator Battelle Energy Alliance and served from 2000-2003 as commanding officer of the U.S. Navy Submarine Force. His passion for all things nuclear is palpable, even over the phone. “The history of nuclear energy for civilian use and for ship propulsion was technically written here in Idaho,” he told Boise Weekly. “The past [in Idaho] is one of profound importance for the history of nuclear energy worldwide.” Public information officer Lou Riepl, who heads INL’s Boise office, put an even finer point on it. “This is literally where it all began,” he said, referring to the Experimental Breeder Reactor 1 (EBR-1), which preceded Borax in lighting a string of light bulbs, first proving that usable amounts of power could be generated from the atom. “The next reactor that was built on site— the Materials Test Reactor—was an absolutely amazing machine,” he added. “Basically because of what was learned in building and operating that, the operating basis of every other reactor in this country owes its heritage, owes its lineage to that reactor.” Today INL builds on its history by researching new reactor technologies like high-temperature gas reactors that are cooled by helium rather than water; smaller, cheaper modular reactors that can be rolled out en masse from factories; and ways to improve and extend the lives of the 104 nuclear plants that currently supply 20 percent of the country’s energy. That’s not to mention the work the lab does in nuclear medicine—the science behind things like cancer-fighting isotopes, MRI scanners and X-rays—alternative forms of energy and various projects for the Department of Homeland Security. “It’s a very exciting time at the lab,” Grossenbacher said. And that’s not just because of the science. According to INL figures, the lab experienced 9 percent growth from 2008-2009 and saw a business volume of $870 million. INL’s payroll is somewhere around $300 WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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million, and its technologies have spun off more than 40 companies in the past 13 years. Combine that with the millions it funnels into K-12 education and the state’s universities—the latter of which are collaborators in the Center for Advanced Energy Resources—and according to Grossenbacher, “the economic benefits to the state are significant and long term. “In a way, you can view the Idaho National Laboratory as the clean energy, heavy industry in Idaho,” he added. “I don’t think that’s too far off base.” Meanwhile, the French-owned energy giant Areva is navigating the environmental assessment process to build its proposed $3.3 billion Eagle Rock Uranium Enrichment facility outside Idaho Falls. The draft environmental impact statement passed muster with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in August, and if given final approval, the plant will employ about 1,000 workers over 10 years of construction, provide a substantial boost to the state’s tax revenue and become a major supplier of fuel to reactors that Grossenbacher and other nuclear boosters say will crop up as part of a “nuclear renaissance.” “There is a renaissance, a rebirth, of nuclear energy, and the lab is actively engaged in leading that,” Grossenbacher said. “I don’t think that it’s even arguable that it’s happening worldwide.” According to Lane Allgood, a 17-year veteran of the INL public information office and founder of the Partnership for Science and Technology, China has more than 20 plants under construction with another 23 or so on order. At the same time, Russia has 10 reactors under construction and 14 on order, and India has four plants in the works with 20 on order. One of the first to lobby for Areva’s entry into Idaho, Allgood said international growth in nuclear energy also means that Idaho may become a major player in the world’s uranium enrichment industry. “I actually think [the nuclear renaissance] is for real,” he said. “The NRC has, I believe, 18 license applications calling for 13 plants— that’s a pretty good start. The president has put in his budget more money for loan guarantees for nuclear plants, and I think it is going to happen. Even if it is slower in our country, the rest of the world is going full tilt.”

NUCLEAR RELAPSE Even a single new reactor in the United States would be a departure from the norm— no new plants have been ordered since the waning days of the Carter administration in 1979, and the last plant went on line in 1996. Factors like multi-billion-dollar capital costs, a years-long licensing process and market uncertainty over carbon-control legislation that could make nuclear power—with its high energy yield and smaller carbon footprint— more attractive to investors have acted to tamp down atomic ardor. And that’s not to mention a lingering public aversion to the radiological waste nuclear plants produce. While Allgood said concerns about climate change and the potential boon of federal support are reenergizing the nuclear business, environmental watchdog groups like Idaho’s Snake River Alliance don’t buy it. They say the “renaissance” is more like a “nuclear relapse.” “If we’re proposing nuclear energy as this false solution for climate change, let’s look at the timeline realistically: Climate scientists are

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giving us five years before we reach a place where we can’t turn back. It takes 10 to 15 years to build a reactor,” said SRA Executive Director Andrea Shipley. “At the same time, the reality is that we’re bringing in an industry for uranium enrichment when we know that we can actually meet the need for uranium enrichment currently for the 104 currently operating reactors—many of which are due to be decommissioned,” she added. “Here we have the state and federal government throwing out the tax freebie carpet, looking toward an industry that has not proved it’s ready for growth.” Beatrice Brailsford, who serves as program director for SRA out of Pocatello, said that the nuclear industry has had decades to prove itself, but still “has never gotten its feet on the ground except when taxpayers bolster it.” While it’s true that renewable resources like wind, solar and geothermal are also heavily dependent on tax incentives and other government support, Brailsford said “the public [tax] support for renewables is not anything like the same scale as the support for nuclear power.” The subsidy argument comes up frequently when talking about energy—all forms are subsidized to some degree—but the problem is figuring out what makes a subsidy. Even the U.S. Energy Information Administration wrote in a 2008 report that “there is no universally accepted definition of subsidy.” Nonetheless, a 2007 report from Earth Track conducted on behalf of the international policy group Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development put the overall energy subsidy total at $49 billion to $100 billion per year, with fossil fuels accounting for two-thirds of the total, nuclear nabbing 12.4 percent, ethanol 7.6 percent, renewables another 7.5 percent and conservation 2.1 percent. Miscellaneous energy types made up the final 4.2 percent. With climate-protection legislation working its way through Congress, hundreds of billions of dollars could be flowing toward energy research and generation—including, to a large degree, nuclear power. For instance, the American Clean Energy Leadership Act, passed by the Senate Energy Committee, would throw $5.2 billion at nuclear energy research, demonstration projects and commercial application—including a commission to study nuclear waste disposal—and establish a tax-exempt “Green Bank” capitalized with an initial $10 billion to support a range of clean energy projects, including nuclear. The American Power Act of 2010, introduced by Sens. John Kerry, a Democrat from Massachusetts, and Joe Liebermann, a Connecticut Independent, would create $54 billion in loan guarantees and tax credits for nuclear power as well as streamline the licensing process. In the House, the American Clean Energy and Security Act, sponsored by Reps. Henry Waxman, a California Democrat, and Ed Markey, a Democrat from Massachusetts, would authorize $100 billion over 10 years to a range of energy projects and places nuclear development among its priorities. According to the pro-industry Nuclear Energy Institute, provisions in the House bill allow for a 150 percent increase in the amount of nuclear power generation by 2050, amounting to 180 new nuclear plants. The American Power Act suggests 253 gigawatts of nuclear WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


Experimental Breeder Reactor-1 at INL created the first usable amount of electricity ever generated from nuclear power on Dec. 20, 1951.

capacity will be needed in the next 40 years, totaling about 181 new reactors. Here in Idaho, Areva was approved by the DOE for a $2 billion loan guarantee in May— a sum that will cover a large portion of its estimated $3.3 billion price tag. While renewables and energy efficiency would also make out with a hefty chunk of change, the robust support for nuclear power reflects President Barack Obama’s budget priorities, which call for tripling the loan guarantee for new projects to $54.5 billion. “I’m not one of those people who does not think there’s a role for government to play in encouraging efforts that will go to benefit us all,” Brailsford said. “But nuclear power has had decades of that … and nuclear power is just too slow and too expensive to be a reasonable response to some of the problems we’re having.” The prevailing argument among proponents is that rising energy needs coupled with the long-term cost savings and carbon-light output of nuclear energy makes it an attractive alternative. With carbon cap and trade provisions included in the current legislation, boosters also say that nuclear power will finally become attractive to private investors. “If we are serious about greenhouse issues and the fact that our need for electricity and power is going to double in the next 30 years, we’re just not going to get it done with alternative sources and conservation, as some people would like to believe,” Allgood said. “We have to have some more nuclear plants.” Plus, as Grossenbacher said, when you’re married to a reactor, it’s often for life. “You’re building an essentially 100-year piece of energy infrastructure,” he said.

PAYETTE: NUKE TOWN, USA The debate over which is ultimately “cheaper” or the recipient of more government largesse—nuclear or renewables—is a circuitous subject fraught with labyrinthine interpretations and caveats on both sides. But one thing is clear: despite the fact that it is the cradle of nuclear power, Idaho has never hosted a commercial nuclear reactor. According to Grossenbacher, the reasons for that are obvious: too much cheap hydroelecWWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

tric power and not enough energy demand. “If we wanted to build one here we could, but there hasn’t been commercial nuclear plants in this region for economic reasons,” he said. “We’ve never really had to generate that much electricity for the state,” Allgood agreed. “Hydroelectric has been cheap enough.” Still, he is hopeful that nuclear development will someday take place in the state. “We would have to find a utility or a business that has the interest in building a commercial reactor,” he said. “Reactors, the truth of the matter is, use a lot of water. We’d have to find somewhere that water is plentiful. I’m sure there are some places in the state that would work, but still there’s got to be a reason to build one. “I would like to see some people come to Idaho and do a serious search of the opportunities or possibility, but that’s going to have to be something on the commercial grade,” he added. In 2007, billionaire investor and energy magnate Warren Buffet considered bringing a 1,750 megawatt nuclear plant to Payette but ultimately backed away from the concept because the economics didn’t pencil out. “It would have to be somebody like that,” Allgood said. In the years following Buffet’s exit, there has been another nuclear developer fronting a reactor complex in Southwestern Idaho. Alternate Energy Holdings Inc., a startup helmed by Don Gillispie, a hard-charging entrepreneur from Virginia, first approached Owyhee County about its proposed 1,700 megawatt Idaho Energy Complex around the time that Buffet’s goliath Mid American was stepping back from the state. After some initial forays into gaining county approval, AEHI decided to pull the plug on its Owyhee proposal after discovering fault lines at its preferred site. But rather than abandon the idea, the company moved its project east to Elmore County. The plan there got bogged down in the process, first when its application for an amendment to the county’s comprehensive plan was shot down by Planning and Zoning, and later when its request was reconsidered

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Advanced Test Reactor at INL allows researchers to test materials under varied conditions. The blue glow is due to Cherenkov radiation.

and ping-ponged back and forth between the Elmore County Commission and P&Z. What followed was a series of rancorous public meetings, a war of press releases between the company and the Snake River Alliance, a defamation suit filed by AEHI against SRA that was ultimately dismissed and a delay that dragged on for about two years. “It was a pretty highly explosive issue, for and against,” said Connie Cruser, chairwoman of the Elmore County Commission. “We got lots of opinions and a lot of it on both sides. We got a lot of misinformation from both sides, too.” Cruser said a substantial agriculture group was opposed to the plan, but many were in support of the project because of its boon to the job market and county tax base. “You really just have to weigh it out,” she said. “I know people think it’s so easy to say ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to something. It’s not.” By the time commissioners ultimately voted not to amend the comprehensive plan, the company had already shifted its attention to Payette County—to a 5,000-acre parcel not far from where Buffet had dipped his toe. That was almost a year ago, and since then the Payette County Commission has voted to amend its comprehensive plan to make way for a potential rezone—located in the hills north of Payette—and is putting AEHI’s proposal through a series of technical reviews. Once the reviews are finished, the plan, which calls for a facility that would cost between $9 billion and $10 billion, could head to Planning and Zoning for consideration. “We feel like we’re in a good spot because [the commission has] been extremely supportive of what we’re doing,” said AEHI Public Relations Director Dan Hamilton. “We feel very confident that things will move forward for us well there … We could potentially have this thing [the technical review and P&Z ruling] wrapped up by the end of the year.” That sounds optimistic to the Snake River Alliance, which has doggedly opposed AEHI’s plan wherever the company has relocated it. The group has hammered the company’s finances in particular, claiming there’s no way a startup could possibly raise the billions of dollars necessary to construct the plant. It has also been critical of AEHI’s claims that it

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would bring more than 5,000 jobs to the area, taken issue with myriad basic technical issues including water usage and on-site waste storage, and its lack of a chosen reactor type. “They still, after shopping it around for three years in three counties, have not chosen a reactor type,” said SRA’s Shipley. “They have no funding in place, and they have said they will not rely on any federal subsidies to finance this plant.” Listed on the Over-The-Counter Bulletin Board—an exchange for lightly traded and not especially stable stocks—AEHI’s finances have also drawn the attention of exchange trackers, including a recent profile on thestreetsweeper.org (“Alternate Energy: Power Stock or Toxic Waste?” Oct. 4) that characterized the company as flimsy at best and downright shady at worst. Hamilton dismissed the piece as “muckraking stuff that you would expect from the National Enquirer,” and said that big things are on the horizon. Indeed, in early September AEHI issued a press release announcing it would forego a planned reverse stock split—a tactic used to limit available shares and thus increase the price per share—because “milestone events in the near future” would be more than enough to boost the stock “to the major exchange.” “I think you’re going to find in the coming weeks or months that you’re going to hear something,” Hamilton said. Though he wouldn’t go into detail ahead of “ongoing negotiations,” Hamilton alluded to one funding project that would leverage $100 million to $150 million in investor money to purchase water rights and land, and pay for the NRC application. Following permitting and NRC approval, he said, the property value would likely increase to $1.5 billion, which could be used as an asset to attract outside investment. “We’ve already been in contact with several large financial institutions related to that goal,” Hamilton said. Still, Shipley simply doesn’t believe the project is feasible. “We could issue a press release that says, ‘Snake River Alliance no longer takes AEHI seriously and gives up their campaign.’ We’ve talked about that,” she said, comparing the WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


company with what she considered more reputable firms like Mid American and Areva. “With Areva it’s different. Are we going to win? We have to try,” Shipley said. Hamilton said criticism of AEHI’s proposal is a combination of anti-nuclear zealotry and a misunderstanding of how publicly traded companies secure funding for large projects. “Up until now, the only companies who build or are building nuclear plants are utilities. Nobody seems to blink an eye about them raising money because they’re going to raise money from the ratepayer or go after municipal bonds to pay for something like this. We consider ourselves in a much better position than they are because we can go for money they can’t,” he said. “For us it’s not an issue, the financing will come,” he added. “And why would we even go after financing for a project that doesn’t exist yet?” Larry Church, chairman of the Payette County Commission, was tight-lipped about the project but said testimony at the April hearing, when the county voted to change is comprehensive plan, seemed “3to-1 in favor of it.” “We voted unanimously to change the comp plan,” he said. “It’s, you know, against state code to be discussing our feeling beforehand one way or the other. I can’t discuss that part of it … But I suppose there’s some positive and negatives to any big company that would come in.” Among those negatives, he said, were the effects on roads and school crowding. Positives include a “considerable increase to our property tax base” and an influx of jobs. None of that convinces Jeff Weber, who lives and operates Fetch This Kennels on a property within the 5,000 acres marked for the project. As the closest neighbor to the project, Weber said, “Of course I’m very opposed to it, for many different reasons. I’m the outspoken ass hole, according to them.” Weber doesn’t have anything against nuclear power. His concern is for the area’s agricultural way of life, and he doesn’t believe the hype about the economic benefits. “[Gillispie] has got everybody snowballed, getting everybody convinced that they’re going to make a million dollars,” he said, adding that safety is also a concern—and not just because it would be a nuclear plant. “You can’t hardly trust anything the government manages,” Weber said. “Look at the oil spill—that was supposed to be overseen and totally foolproof. The same kind of stuff can happen with a nuclear plant.”

WANT NOT, WASTE NOT Looking to the future, one thing both industry boosters and opponents agreed on was that something has to be done about the byproducts of nuclear energy. The Idaho Cleanup Project at INL has been ongoing for years, cost hundreds of millions of dollars and will continue for years to come. Decades of storing waste from bomb manufacturing at other facilities during the Cold War have made a mess that has done much to erode public confidence in anything nuclear. That’s not to mention the perennial controversy of Idaho’s longtime deal with the Navy to store spent nuclear fuel rods in the state. The government’s decision to scrap a massive radioactive waste storage facility at Yucca Mountain in Nevada has left many WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

waiting for of guidance. It is expected to come ultimately from a blue ribbon commission established by President Obama and headed up by U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu. “The issue of used fuel and the disposition of used fuel is a concern in a lot of people’s minds,” Grossenbacher said. “We’re all waiting to see what the blue ribbon commission recommends.” That’s cold comfort for Shipley, whose organization came into existence out of a desire to protect the Snake River Aquifer from radioactive contamination. “We can talk about this in a lot of different ways, but the fact is that in 50 years we haven’t figured out how to deal with the waste other than: ‘Who don’t we like enough to send this to?’” she said. Grossenbacher’s perspective is that storing spent fuel is not technically difficult or “extraordinarily expensive.” Plus, technology is being developed to re-use much of the spent fuel that is currently in storage. “Is [spent fuel] a factor? You bet. But so is the cost, risk and environmental impacts of carbon,” Grossenbacher said. “In the right concept of time it’s not a show stopper … there’s no free lunch when it comes to energy.” There’s also no single solution to rising energy demand, as Idaho Energy Czar Paul Kjellander repeats. With all the barriers to nuclear power, he said the priority is on speed of delivery, cost and the reduction of carbon. “I think the general message is there is no single silver bullet on the energy front. You have to have a complete and totally integrated resource plan,” said Kjellander, who serves as administrator of the Idaho Office of Energy Resources. “Right now that would appear to be natural gas for baseload resources and renewable resources—including energy efficiency—that can be built relatively quickly.” In other words, the time for nuclear power in Idaho is still a long way off, but with resources like INL and Areva, Kjellander hopes that it will one day play a part. “I would love to see things done tomorrow, sure, but you’ve got to be pragmatic,” he said. “If it’s worth having, it’s worth waiting for. But it’s still going to be sooner than we think. The closest thing to a crystal ball I have is the rearview mirror in my car and those magic words: ‘object in mirror closer than it appears.’” That still leaves the issue of waste, and Kjellander recognizes the anxiety it creates in the public mind. He turns hopefully to work being done at the lab to mitigate the problem. “To have the lab here to help move that issue forward is very critical,” he said. For Charles Pieper, looking back on nuclear power’s infancy, the Atomic Age didn’t quite pan out the way he and others might have envisioned it. And again, he said, waste got in the way. “I fully expected planes, trains, all transportation to be nuclear. I think it’s going to have to have a future, but the only thing I can see standing in the way is the disposal of the radioactive waste,” he said, acknowledging that to some degree, the sins of the past have tarnished the atomic dream. “When this first started, we’d just take the radioactive waste out there, dig a hole in the desert and dump it,” he said. “We didn’t really know better. They thought you just buried it, and it went away; it don’t go away.”

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | 17


BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Wye not?

SATURDAY OCT. 23 music WYE OAK

Luke, I am your conductor.

FRIDAY-SATURDAY OCT. 22-23 Star Wars BOISE PHILHARMONIC’S JOHN WILLIAMS POPS Few people have contributed to cultural phenomenon in the way that American composer John Williams has. From the moment the trumpets begin to blare, the theme to Star Wars resonates with the legions of fans who, more than 30 years later, are still as attached to the film as they are to their Boba Fett action figures. Though he may be best known for Star Wars, Williams is also responsible for the epic music of E.T., Harry Potter, The Terminal, Amistad, Schindler’s List and Saving Private Ryan, all of which you can hear excerpts of live on Friday, Oct. 22, and Saturday, Oct. 23, as Boise Philharmonic presents the highly anticipated “John Williams Pops: A Night at the Movies.” The concert will feature choral guests and a number of Star Wars songs including, of course, the main theme as well as “Princess Leia’s Theme” and “Yoda’s Theme,” “Battle of the Heroes” from Revenge of the Sith, and “Flag Parade,” “Anakin’s Theme” and “Duel of the Fates” from Phantom Menace. Boise Phil Music Director Robert Franz is an animated performer himself, exuding passion for his profession with each stroke of his baton. Last season, for the orchestra’s collaboration with Opera Idaho, Franz included a narrator during the performance to help the audience better understand the narrative of the very complicated Candide. However, Franz also participated from his dais, his facial expressions and interjections contributing to what was a very funny show. He said he plans to participate in a similar way by dressing in costume and encourages audience members to do the same during the Family Series concert on Saturday morning. If you’re not familiar with the philharmonic’s schedule, on performance weekends, they have a concert on Friday nights in Nampa at the Swayne Auditorium, Saturday nights at the Morrison Center and a special Family Series concert on Saturday mornings. While these are shorter performances, you are by no means short-changed, except in price: adult tickets are only $15, kid tickets are only $10 and a family of six can get in for only $60. Plus, at least this weekend, you’ll get to see the usually tuxedoed Franz dressed as a Star Wars character. He wouldn’t reveal which one, but here’s one clue: It’s one of the smart ones. So strap on your Princess Leia hair buns or Darth Vader mask and may the phil be with you. Friday, Oct. 22, 8 p.m., $23-$43, Swayne Auditorium, 707 Fern St., Nampa, nnu.edu. Saturday, Oct. 23, 11 a.m., $10-$15; and 8 p.m., $24-$75, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, mc.boisestate.edu. More information and tickets at boisephilharmonic.org.

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Album sales used to be the barometer for interest in a band. But with Internet distribution raging, most bands on the album sales charts are the ones still on it from the 1970s. But without the quantifiable hard data of sales, fans are left without an effective yardstick, especially since Internet distribution has allowed groups to completely sidestep labels, who often served as an effective crap filter. Unless you count the number of plays on Myspace. No matter what their PR rep or their singer says about how awesome they are, the average band has plays numbering in the hundreds. Of the six songs Maryland neo-folksters Wye Oak have posted on Myspace, none have less than 12,000 plays, and one is even nearing 50,000. Those are pretty respectable numbers. And when listening to Andy Stack and Jenn Wasner’s fuzzy mixture of Americana and dreamy indie pop, it’s easy to understand why. Wasner’s Cat Power-esque vocals capture you from the first sultry notes. And it doesn’t hurt that band has some tour dates with former Pedro the Lion-tamer David Bazan and Portland, Ore.’s Blitzen Trapper. You can put the Myspace barometer to the test by catching Wye Oak at The Flying M Coffeegarage on Saturday, Oct. 23. 8-11 p.m., $5 adv., $8 door, Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-4675533, flyingmcoffee.com.

THURSDAY OCT. 21 grab bag IGNITE BOISE 5 Everyone is an expert on something. Beat-boxing. Online poker. Being an unsuccessful filmmaker. Now, it’s possible to contribute that

knowledge somewhere other than Wikipedia. Ignite Boise, now in its fifth iteration, is a forum for all things random. Presenters get five minutes and 20 PowerPoint slides to convey their vast knowledge on a specific topic in front of a packed crowd at the Egyptian Theatre. This month’s presenters, as usual, are a total grab bag. Here are a few promising ones: “How to be an unsuccessful independent filmmaker,” by Dave Yasuda; “It’s all about the Benjamins … and nine other myths about entrepreneurs,” by Norris Krueger; “LEGOs and Burning Man,” by Richard Mussler-Wright; “The function and importance of unfettered political discourse in a representative

democracy (republic),” by Leo A. Geis; “I challenge you to a duel,” by Gray Battson; “What monsters do when I’m at school,” by Mia Mclenna and “Seasonal eating: Adventures in food,” by Karen Ellis. But perhaps the most intriguing presentation topic comes from BW’s very own ex-News Editor, Nathaniel Hoffman: “12 million hardons.” Um, you’ve gotta go to figure out what that one’s about. Free early admission tickets are already sold out, but you can still wait in line for open admission, which begins at 6:30 p.m. 7 p.m., FREE, Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, igniteboise. com.

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FIND

Author Robin Lee Hatcher.

FRIDAYSATURDAY OCT. 22-23

BUDDIES

This single mother is no shrinking violet.

books IDAHO BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA It used to be that you’d write. Then you’d wait. And wait. And wait. And then, if the patron saint of publishing was smiling on you and the stars were perfectly aligned and maybe you’d come into recent possession of a fourleaf clover, a rabbit’s foot and Dorothy’s ruby shoes, your book might get published. Maybe. Lucky for you, in today’s world of instant information and technology, that’s not the case anymore. Enter, the Idaho Book Extravaganza. Aaron Patterson is the owner of Boise-based publisher StoneHouse Ink and is the organizer of the IBE—the first event of its kind in Idaho. Together with the executive team from local Aloha Publishing, he has created a literary event with the goal of bringing authors, publishers, printers, agents, marketers, readers and writers together under one roof—and will include a discussion with award-winning author Robin Lee Hatcher, who has penned more than 60 books. The IBE hopes to help writers gain an understanding of the world of publishing, learn how to go about getting their work published and help them form relationships with others in the biz. If you’ve written a book or are merely contemplating it, you might want to check it out. IBE is organized into workshops that are held over the course of two days. Visit idahobookextravagan-

S U B M I T

SUNDAY OCT. 24 film FILM SCREENING: AMERICAN VIOLET Being poor and black isn’t a crime. That is, unless the bureaucrats in the town you live in decide it is. Federal money to combat drug trafficking goes to counties with the highest number of drug convictions—legit or not. If you happen to be in the wrong place at the wrong time, you might end up in the fight of your life. Based on the true story of a series of drug raids in the projects of a small town in Texas in 2000, the film American Violet tells the story of a single mother faced with the choice of pleading guilty to dealing drugs or fighting the system for what she knew to be true. She and 15 others filed suit against District Attorney John Paschall and the South Central Texas Narcotics Task Force. The ensuing lawsuit (Regina Kelly v. John Paschall) stated that racially motivated drug sweeps had been going on for more than 15 years and were described as “paramilitary” by the ACLU. The case was settled in 2005 and charges were dismissed. Winner of awards at film festivals including Telluride, SXSW and the Mill Valley Film Festival, American Violet is the last in a series of three films dealing with civil rights issues presented by the ACLU of Idaho during special screenings at The Flicks. 7 p.m., $11, The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., 208-342-4288, theflicksboise.com.

za.com for more information and to register. Friday, Oct. 22, 3:307:30 p.m.; Saturday, Oct. 23, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; FREE, Silverstone Plaza, 3405 E. Overland Road, Meridian, idahobookextravaganza.com.

FRIDAYSUNDAY OCT. 22-24 dance BAROQUE! Ballet Idaho is ready to go all Baroque on your ass. For its second production of the year, Ballet Idaho is teaming up with the Boise

Baroque Orchestra to present Baroque!, a selection of three ballets set to traditional Baroque music with four performances over three days at the Boise State Special Events Center. “There’s no comparison in terms of the audience experience,” Ballet Executive Director Julie Numbers Smith said of a per formance with live music. “To have live music triples the magic the audience can experience by seeing beautiful movement and hearing the live strings ... That’s the magic of live theater, you can’t replicate that.” The first ballet on the program, Trianon, features choreography by Artistic Director Peter Anastos set

We’ve all been there. You wake up in a hazy panic after a particularly debaucherous night with your contacts glued to your eyeballs and your shoes still on. Clawing for a glass of water, you run over the evening in your head. Dinner, drinks, conversation, more drinks, 208-870-7271 after party, more drinks. Somehow you made it buddiesdesignateddriver. weebly.com home. But where did you leave your car? Shit! It’s parked in a metered spot and you’re t-minus 10 minutes away from getting a ticket. How the heck are you going to beat the non-hungover metermaid to your car before you’ve had your first cup of coffee? Lucky for you, that scenario will never have to play out again. Buddies Designated Driver Ser vice will drive your drunk ass home in your own car so you can wake up in a haze the next morning with your ride gleaming, safe and ticketless in the driveway. That way, all you have to stress about is botching Genesis’ “Invisible Touch” on karaoke. A ride home will set you back $15 for less than two miles, $20 for two to five miles, $25 more than five miles, $30 to Meridian, $35 to Nampa/Kuna/Eagle and $45 to Caldwell. Buddies provides female drivers for ladies who request it and are currently in the process of procuring a motorcycle trailer to cart your hog home. —Tara Morgan

to traditional French dance music from the Palace of Versailles, while the second ballet, Violin Concerto #3 is based around music by Johann Sebastian Bach with choreography by Ballet Master Alex Ossadnik. Finally, Handel in the Strand (Concerti Grossi, Op. 6) is a high-energy celebration of the music of George Frederic Handel choreographed by Anastos. And it’s all performed to live music. Friday, Oct. 22, 8 p.m.; Saturday, Oct. 23, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m.; Sunday, Oct. 24, 2 p.m. $25-$55, Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, 208-4261494, balletidaho.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY OCT. 20

THURSDAY OCT. 21

On Stage

Festivals & Events

KILLADELPHIA: MIXTAPE FOR A CITY—Writer/solo performer Sean Christopher Lewis tells the story of the real-life murder of teaching fellow Beau Zabel featuring hip-hop, documentary techniques. 7:30 p.m. $10, $7 for students with ID. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

ELEGANCE ON THIRD THURSDAY—Dress to the nines for a glamorous night of dancing and romancing. Music by Beverly and Rex. Ages 21 and older. 7 p.m.-3 a.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-3434611, owyheeplaza.com.

THE KRUMBLIN FOUNDATION— Satire in which a wealthy widow tries to start an arts foundation to transform her hometown into a cultural Mecca. 8 p.m. $15-$35. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org. THE LIAR—The Fourth Wall players at Eagle High School present Carlo Goldoni’s play about a man who can’t tell the truth when a lie suits him better. 7 p.m. $4. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208-939-2189, ehsmeridianschools.org.

Concerts OCTUBAFEST—Features the Boise State Tuba-Euphonium and guest artist Doug Whitten. 7 p.m. $3-$5, FREE for Boise State students and faculty. Morrison Center Recital Hall, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1609.

Food & Drink MEET THE BREWER—The brewer from the award-winning Grand Teton Brewery located in Victor will be in the store for beer sampling and drawings. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Brewers Haven, 1795 S. Vista Ave., Boise, 208-9914677, brewershaven.com.

Food & Drink BEER AND WINE TASTINGS— Sample a rotating selection of European wines and beers. See website for more info. 5-8 p.m. $10. Tres Bonne Cuisine, 6555 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208658-1364, tresbonnescuisine. com.

Art

IGNITE BOISE—See Picks, Page 18. 7 p.m., FREE, Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, igniteboise.com.

ART SOIREE—Artist demonstrations, live music from Arts West students, wine tasting and more. 6 p.m. FREE. Galerie Belle Ame Silverstone Plaza, 3405 E. Overland Road., Meridian, 208-9381342, galeriebelleame.com.

On Stage

Citizen

BYE BYE BIRDIE—The classic musical comedy. 7 p.m. Price varies. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org.

WHAT NOT TO WEAR—Fashion show fundraiser for Dress for Success, presented by Idaho Women’s Journal and Lia Sophia Jewelry. Tickets includes lunch and a drawing. Call 208-5141129 to register. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $35. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3338000.

DEATH AND TAXES—In this production by Boise Little Theater, an IRS agent is murdered and the entire city council seems to know something about it. 7:30 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. THE GOOD BODY—A play by Eve Ensler, author of The Vagina Monologues. 7 p.m. $10. VAC, 3638 Osage St., 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com. KILLADELPHIA: MIXTAPE FOR A CITY—See Wednesday. 7:30 p.m. $10, $7 for students with ID. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3850111, thelinenbuilding.com. THE KRUMBLIN FOUNDATION—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15-$35. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208442-3232, bctheater.org.

Odds & Ends CHANT MASTER PETER TANORIKIHO—Experience chanting. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Facets of Healing Wellness Emporium, 717 Vista Ave., Boise, 208-4299999, facetsofhealing.com. EXPLORING THE PARANORMAL—The International Paranormal Reporting Group will present tales of local hauntings. 7 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996.

WINE DINNER—Wine from the Kestrel Winery in Prosser, Wash., will be paired with dinner prepared by chef Joe Leseberg. Joe Dewey from Idaho Distributing Company will be on hand to pour and discuss the wine. Call 208-433-5108 to reserve your table. 5:30 p.m. $40. 36th Street Bistro, 3823 N. Garden Center Way, Boise, 208-4335100, 36streetgardencenter. com.

Workshops & Classes CHINESE HERBAL MEDICINE CLASS—Learn how to boost your immunity with Chinese herbal therapy. Preregistration is required. 6:30 p.m. $15 member, $20 nonmember. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3438649, idahobotanicalgarden.org. WILDERNESS MEDICINE BASICS—Learn appropriate responses to injuries that occur in the wilderness. Register online at rei.com/boise. 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald, Boise, 208-322-1141, rei.com. Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

20 | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT THE KRUMBLIN FOUNDATION—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15-$35. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

FRIDAY

OCT. 22 On Stage BAROQUE BALLET— See Picks, Page 18. 8 p.m. $25-$50. Boise State SPEC, 1800 University Dr., sub.boisestate.edu. BROADWAY’S HEROES AND VILLAINS—Starlight Mountain Theater performs favorite Broadway show tunes. 8 p.m. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425, limelightboise.com. BYE BYE BIRDIE—See Thursday. Dinner at 6:15 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Price varies. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org. DEATH AND TAXES—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. THE GOOD BODY—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $10. VAC, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-4248297, visualartscollective.com. JEKYLL AND HYDE—Musical of the Robert Louis Stevenson classic novel. 7:30 p.m. $16 adv. $20 door. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com.

THE LIAR—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $4. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208-9392189, ehsmeridianschools.org. MR. MARMALADE—Black comedy about a precocious 4-year-old girl who has a frighteningly active imagination and an imaginary friend named Mr. Marmalade. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 at the door. Idaho Outdoor Assoc. Grange Hall, corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise. WICKED WONDERS—Vaudeville Productions presents an hourlong “evil” magic show in the spirit of Halloween. 8 p.m., 9:30 p.m. and 11 p.m. $15, includes one drink. Solid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-6620.

Concerts BOISE PHILHARMONIC: A NIGHT AT THE MOVIES—Boise Philharmonic performs works from Harry Potter, Star Wars, Amistad, The Terminal, ET, Olympic Fanfare, Schindler’s List and more. 8 p.m. $23-$43. Brandt Center at NNU, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-467-8790, nnu. edu/brandt.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

Literature IDAHO BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA—An event for authors, publishers, agents, graphic designers and just about anyone else interested in writing and/or publishing books. Network and learn about the industry and how it’s changing. 3:30-7:30 p.m. Price varies. Silverstone Plaza, 3405 E. Overland Road, Meridian.

Citizen BET ON LITERACY—Inaugural Casino Night to benefit the Learning Lab’s family and adult literacy programs. Ticket includes $100 funny money to gamble with. 7 p.m.-midnight. $50, or $90 per couple. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3850111, thelinenbuilding.com. CATWALK AND COCKTAILS—An evening of fun and fashion to benefit Zoo Boise’s educational programs. Includes cocktails, dinner and a fashion show featuring items from local boutiques. 5-8:30 p.m. $40, catwalkandcocktails.com. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483.

SATURDAY OCT. 23

| SUDOKU

Festivals & Events FALL FOR BOISE FINALE—The culminating event of the Fall For Boise season. Performers, artists, winners from this year’s Curb Cup and the organized Thrill the World dance will be on hand to celebrate Boise’s rich cultural diversity. 5-7:30 p.m. FREE. The Grove, downtown, Boise. HARVEST FESTIVAL AND FUNDRAISER—A fundraiser to benefit A New Beginning Adoption Agency. Join local businesses for a family-friendly, fun-filled day of local food, wine and harvest activities from noon to 4 p.m. Adults only beginning at 6 p.m. Finn Riggins, The Quartertons, comedian Heath Harmison and mentalist Mental Wes provide entertainment. $20 adv., $25 at the door. North End Organic Nursery, 2350 Hill Road, Boise, 208-389-4769, northendnursery.com.

On Stage

| EASY | MEDIUM

| HARD |

PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

BAROQUE BALLET— See Friday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $25-$50. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub.boisestate.edu. BROADWAY’S HEROES & VILLAINS—See Friday. 8 p.m. $20, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425, limelightboise.com. BYE BYE BIRDIE—See Thursday. Dinner at 6:15 p.m., show at 8 p.m. Price varies. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021, kedproductions.org.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | 21


8 DAYS OUT DEATH AND TAXES—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org. THE GOOD BODY—See Thursday. 7 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com. JEKYLL AND HYDE—See Friday. 1:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. $16 adv., $20 door. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-468-5555, nampaciviccenter.com. THE KRUMBLIN FOUNDATION— See Wednesday. 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $15-$35. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-442-3232, bctheater.org. THE LIAR—See Friday. 7 p.m. $4. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208-9392189, ehsmeridianschools.org. MR. MARMALADE—See Friday. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 at the door. Idaho Outdoor Assoc. Grange Hall, corner of Brazil and Wright streets, Boise. WICKED WONDERS—See Friday. Kid-friendly shows are those scheduled before 7 p.m. Noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m., 3 p.m., 8 p.m., 9:30 p.m. and 11 p.m. $15, includes one drink. Solid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208345-6620.

Literature

Odds & Ends

IDAHO BOOK EXTRAVAGANZA—See Friday. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Price varies by workshop. Silverstone Plaza, 3405 E. Overland Road, Meridian.

STORY STORY NIGHT—This month’s theme is “Spooked: Stories of the Uncanny.” 7 p.m. $5. Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-385-0111, thelinenbuilding.com.

SUNDAY OCT. 24

TUESDAY OCT. 26

On Stage

Food & Drink

BAROQUE BALLET— See Friday. 2 p.m. $25-$50. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, sub. boisestate.edu.

TUESDAY NIGHT FARMERS MARKET—5-7 p.m. North End Organic Nursery, 2350 Hill Road, Boise, 208-389-4769, northendnursery.com.

DEATH AND TAXES—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $9-$12.50. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, boiselittletheater.org.

Talks & Lectures

THE LEGEND OF SLEEPY HOLLOW—Family Reading Series. 2 p.m. $6-$10. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu. WICKED WONDERS—See Friday. Noon, 1 p.m., 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. $15, includes one drink. Solid, 405 S. Eighth St., 208345-6620.

Concerts BOISE PHILHARMONIC: A NIGHT AT THE MOVIES—See Friday. 8 p.m. $24-$75. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1609, mc. boisestate.edu. THE MUSIC OF STAR WARS—Boise Philharmonic performs the Music from Star Wars, composed by John Williams. Star Wars-themed costumes encouraged. 11 a.m. $10-$15, boisephilharmonic.org. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

MONDAY OCT. 25 On Stage BROADWAY’S HEROES & VILLAINS—See Friday. 7 p.m. $10. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208-898-9425, limelightboise.com. INSERT FOOT THEATRE—Improv comedy. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., heirloomdancestudio.com.

SAVING WATER TO COMBAT GLOBAL WARMING—Bevan Griffiths-Sattenspiel from the River Network will talk about ways to conserve water and energy. 6 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2940, gardencity.lili.org.

WEDNESDAY OCT. 27 On Stage THE KRUMBLIN FOUNDATION—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $15-$35. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, bctheater.org.

Workshops & Classes PROMOTING ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS IN KIDS—Learn how to present the seven Leave No Trace principles to kids. Workshop for parents, educators and youth leaders. 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald, Boise, 208-322-1141, rei.com. WOMEN’S SELF-DEFENSE WORKSHOP—Basic self-defense techniques and prevention strategies to avoid becoming a victim. 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Boise State Rec Center, 1515 University Drive, Boise, 208426-5641, 208-426-1131, rec. boisestate.edu.

ON GOING Festivals & Events HAUNTED WORLD—The Northwest’s largest outdoor haunted spot. Fridays-Saturdays, 7 p.m.-midnight, and MondaysThursdays, 7-10 p.m. $18, hauntedworld.org. SCARECROW STROLL—Stroll the garden to view and vote for the most creative scarecrow. $2-$4, IBG members and ages 5 and younger FREE. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

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NOISE

BLITZEN TRAPPER KEEPERS The music is Old West, sci-fi and everything in between ANDREW CRISP Sagebrush and ghost towns, dusty backroads and rusting jail cells. Blitzen Trapper takes the Manifest-Destiny West of early America and exposes the blemishes and pockmarks, bathed in the fading yellow glow of the great frontier. In “Black River Killer,” one of the band’s biggest hits, frontman Eric Earley sings, Who knew the destroyers of the void would look so unassuming and wear hoodies and sweaters? “Well the sheriff let me go with a knife and a song / So I took the first train up to Oregon “Black River Killer” and “Furr,” and the band ultimately mentions staples of Americana, / And I killed the first man that I came upon turned to longtime friend and band photografolk rock and country like Gram Parsons, Bob / ’Cause the devil works quick, you know it pher Jade Harris for the “Furr” music video. Dylan and Neil Young. In their music, Blitzen don’t take long.” They opted for a sweet, meandering stop-moTrapper seems to acknowledge all that “rock” The Portland, Ore.-based sextet, which tion film depicting the band as wolves. signifies, takes what works and hits “frappe” formed in 2000, is comprised of Drew “I’d never actually made a stop-motion,” to blend together something that defies the Laughery, keyboard; Marty Marquis, guitar/ said Harris, who hatched the idea with indie rock genre. keyboard/vocals; Brian Koch, drums/vocals; Laughery when she and Earley were roomHighlighting their Western influences, Michael Van Pelt, bass; Erik Menteer, guitar/ mates. “Four minutes of stop-motion is pretty keyboard; and Earley, vocals and guitar. Blit- both “Black River Killer” and “The Man Who Would Speak True” follow the narrative difficult. It took about four months. I ended up zen Trapper’s late-60s classic rock influencdoing it all by myself.” path of a murder ballad, coupling Earley’s es—like the Beatles and Led Zeppelin—conThe video opens with Earley playing manDylan-esque vocals (it’s impossible to avoid verge like energy particles in a flux capacitor dolin on the pages of a book, singing about the comparison) with driving guitar and with an Old-West-meets-sci-fi inspiration a running with a wolf pack, with howls and drumwork. The former has a synth underla Firefly and Battlestar Galactica. Hitting 1.2 gigawatts, the group rolls into town—not tone reminiscent of the West Coast Whistle of sounds of nature peppering the background. He meets a girl and leaves the wolf pack rap songs, and the latter is almost a retroin a DeLorean but in a van—on Wednesday, behind as he learns to “wear [his] furr.” The Oct. 20, for a show at the Knitting Factory in spective to “Black River” but a bit slower, melodies match Earley’s sweet, lyrical ballad support of their June 2010 release, Destroyer more folksy and acoustic. carried along on the heavy heartbeat of a Before the band was signed to Sub Pop reof the Void (Sub Pop). cords—alongside indie heavyweights The Shins bass drumline. Blitzen Trapper’s influences come not “I found it shocking that it took that long and Iron and Wine—they produced their first only from the music they listened to while for them to get any recognition,” added Harthree albums on their growing up in Salem, ris. “I can’t believe it took almost eight years own. It was with their Ore., but also from ... they’d play tiny bars where like four people third album, 2007’s Earley’s peculiar averWith Pearly Gate Music, 8 p.m., $13-$35. showed up.” Wild Mountain Nasion to purchasing That late recognition has led to a spot on tion, that they caught new albums. Rather, KNITTING FACTORY 416 S. Ninth St. national attention. The Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, glowing praise the man responsible 208-367-1212 title track made its way from pitchfork.com and notice from NPR. for most of his band’s They’ve also earned respect from their fans. bo.knittingfactory.com to No. 98 on Rollsongwriting draws his “A lot of times people will say, ‘Oh I got ing Stone’s “100 Best storytelling from clas[one of your albums] illegally, but then I Songs of 2007.” sic rock and authors “I didn’t really have bought it later,’” Earley said. like Louis L’Amour While Wild Mountain Nation was Blitzen too many expectations,” said Earley of their and Italo Calvino. Trapper’s coming out, and Furr the honing first hit. “I still don’t really. I just sort of do “To me it’s just about songwriting. It’s of their sound and image, Destroyer of the whatever I want to and see what happens.” about writing a song with some meaning to it, Void has been described as a B-sides album of In March 2007 they played SXSW with or a lyrical thing that makes it that much more Furr. Earley describing it as more “experiinteresting,” Earley told Boise Weekly. “I think label mates Fleet Foxes and headlined the mental” than their previous efforts. Earley Bowery Ballroom. Sub Pop signed them that now rock is just kinda … since everybody’s heard everything that’s come before, everybody summer and later that year, they dropped the confided to BW that another album is already in the works. either takes something and runs with it, or they critically acclaimed Furr. It hit No. 13 on “I haven’t even given it to the label yet,” he sort of find a bunch of different ideas from the Rolling Stone’s “50 best albums of 2008,” said. “This next record isn’t quite the same. and the title track made it to No. 4 of the past and blend them together.” It’s more of me doing what I like to do, sort of magazine’s 100 best singles. The band’s music suggests that this band what I’m comfortable with.” Music videos were made for the songs is the latter. Every review of Blitzen Trapper WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | 23


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY OCT. 20 ARMED AND HAMMERED—8 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Pub BILLY ZERA—7 p.m. FREE. Sully’s BLITZEN TRAPPER—6 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange.

LOW-FI, OCT. 22, KNITTING FACTORY When local bands have a show coming up at Knitting Factory, they often say the same thing: “We’re excited to be playing the big stage.” Playing the big stage means a taste of what many of them hope they’ll soon be tasting in large quantities: bigger stages in bigger cities. Beloved local rock trio Low-fi is headed toward a bellyful of big stages after having scooped up some awards, getting tunes on TV (The Big C, One Tree Hill) and lots of touring. Playing the big stage here at home is cool because ticket prices are never more than $6, they aren’t relegated to off nights—Sundays or Mondays—and the headliners get to bring their musical friends along to the lofty heights. This Friday, Low-fi will be joined by Boise bands 57 Heavy, New Transit, A Seasonal Disguise (who have a beautiful new EP, Tickle Arms, out now) and Boise Rock School. See them now because they seem to be headed to a bellyful of fame.

24 | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | BOISEweekly

STEVE EATON AND PHIL GAROZNIK—With Kevin Kirk. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SLIPPERY ELM—7 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

STREET DOGS—With Devil’s Brigade featuring Matt Freeman (of Rancid), Flatfoot 56, Continental featuring Rick Barton (of Dropkick Murphys). 7 p.m. $15-$35. Knitting Factory

STEVE EATON—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Bown TERRY JONES—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BLITZEN TRAPPER— With Pearly Gate Music. See Noise, Page 23. 8 p.m. $13-$35. Knitting Factory

THURSDAY OCT. 21

BRIANNE GRAY—6 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Meridian

ARTSWEST LIVE—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

CYDNEY ROBINSON—With Michael Miller. 9 p.m. $TBA. Bouquet

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

FLEET STREET KLEZMER BAND—With belly dancer Amanda Nies. 7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La

THE GIRLFRIEND SEASON— With Bird by Bird, We Won the Science Fair, Workin’ On Fire and Spring Creek Manor. 6 p.m. $10. The Venue

GIZZARD STONE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s JON HYNEMAN AND PHIL GARONZIK—With Kevin Kirk. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

HIGH DESERT BAND—6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater Pizza THE PECULIAR PRETZELMEN—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

NEW TRANSIT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. Buffalo Club

PATRICIA FOLKNER WITH JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

SCHOOL OF ROCK—4 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library

THE PRIDS—With Lookbook, Le Fleur and The Universal. 8 p.m.

—Amy Atkins 8 p.m., $6. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

SEABEAR—With Grandchildren. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

$5. VAC

SPENCER BATT—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown

TERRY JONES DUO—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

LOW-FI—With 57 Heavy, New Transit, A Seasonal Disguise and Boise Rock School. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory THE MORNING BENDERS—With Twin Sister and Holiday Shores. See Listen Here, Page 25. 8 p.m. $14 adv., $15 door. Neurolux NATHAN J. MOODY—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

FRIDAY OCT. 22 BLAZE AND KELLY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub THE BLUE DOOR FOUR—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door CHUCK SMITH—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill DANNY SCHAFFER—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL— 10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s JAMES ORR—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel JOHN JONES, MIKE SEIFRIT AND JON HYNEMAN—With Kevin Kirk. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

THE POP CULT KIDS—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid REBECCA SCOTT WITH ROB HILL AND DEBBIE SAGER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club SPINDLEBOMB—9 p.m. $5. Dino’s STEVE EATON—8 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper THE WEEPIES—8 p.m. $18 adv., $20 door. Bouquet

SATURDAY OCT. 23 A TASTY JAMM—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel ATREYU—With Blessthefall, Chiodos, Architects UK and Endless Hallway. 6:30 p.m. $20$45. Knitting Factory

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE AUGUST BURNS RED—With Polar Bear Club and This is Hell. 7 p.m. $16. The Venue BRANDON PRITCHETT—9:30 p.m. FREE. Flatbread-Downtown CANDREAD AND RIZING REZISTANCE—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub DUCHESS DOWN THE WELL— 10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s ERIC GRAE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill MEATBALLS—9 p.m. FREE. Plank MIGUEL GONZALES—Noon. FREE. Casa del Sol PEELANDER Z—With John E. Combat and The Jungle Fucks. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux RHYTHM RANGERS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. Buffalo Club

SUNDAY OCT. 24

TUESDAY OCT. 26

adv., $14 door. The Venue

BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

BILL MCKEETH AND FRIENDS—6 p.m. FREE. Cobby’s

DAN COSTELLO—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

DANNY BEAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY: THE SIDEMEN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MONDAY OCT. 25 BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—6 p.m. FREE. Willowcreek BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

SPINDLEBOMB—9 p.m. $5. Dino’s

BULLET FOR MY VALENTINE— With Escape The Fate, Black Tide and Drive A. 7 p.m. $26-$55. Knitting Factory

STEPHANIE SMITH—7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

DANNY BEAL—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

TAUGE AND FAULKNER—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

ROB PAPER—7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

TOM JENSEN—With Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs. 7:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SLOW TRUCKS—With Ugly Winner. 9:30 p.m. $5. Red Room

WYE OAK—With Mickey the Jump. See Picks, Page 18. 8 p.m. $5 adv., $8 door. Flying M Coffeegarage

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STEVEN TONEY—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

CHUCK SMITH—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

CARTER FREEMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Solid

ELECTRIC SIX—With The Constellations. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux

EVETT AND COSTELLO—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

GIZZARD STONE—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s

JIMMY BIVENS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

JIM FISHWILD—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

KEVIN KIRK—With John Jones. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

KEVIN KIRK—With Jon Hyneman and Phil Garonzik. FREE. Chandlers

LARRY CONKLIN—11 a.m. FREE. Moon’s SMOOTH—7 p.m. FREE. Liquid TERRI EBERLEIN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill TREVOR EYRE QUINTET—7 p.m. FREE. Blue Door

WEDNESDAY OCT. 27

LYRICS BORN—With Chali 2na and Raaka. 9 p.m. $18. Reef PATRICIA FOLKNER WITH JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel STICK TO YOUR GUNS, AS BLOOD RUNS BLACK—With Atilla, For the Fallen Dreams and Close Your Eyes. 6 p.m. $12 adv. $15 door. Brawl Studios Get more live music, DJ and Karaoke listings at boiseweekly. com.

CATTLE DECAPITATION—With Devourment, Knights of the Abyss, Burning of the Masses and Son of Aurelius. 6 p.m. $12

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

THE MORNING BENDERS, NEUROLUX, OCT. 22 At the start of The Morning Benders’ viral video hit “Excuses,” lead singer Chris Chu explains the inspiration behind the song’s recording process: “When I was learning about recording, I remember this story about Phil Spector … how he would just pile in 50 people into the studio, multiple drummers, multiple guitars and just blow it out … I just thought it would be really cool to do that with all our friends from San Francisco,” says Chu. Crammed into a warm sepia-toned recording studio—fiddle bows grazing guitar strings dodging gauze-covered drum mallets—The Morning Benders and dozens of their pals built a multi-layered wall of sound. Backed by the sweet lilt of violin and the clack of drums, Chu belts out: “You tried to taste me / and I taped my tongue / to the southern tip of your body.” Check out “Excuses,” from the band’s second full-length album, live at Neurolux on Friday, Oct. 22. —Tara Morgan 9 p.m., $14 adv., $15 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | 25


SCREEN

SCHOOLHOUSE SHOCK Waiting for Superman flies into Boise GEORGE PRENTICE Geoffrey Canada never believed in Santa Claus. The myth of a jolly, giant white man didn’t exactly ring any bells in the projects of Harlem. But Superman—now, there was someone to believe in. Someone who stands for truth and justice and fights really bad guys. But one day, that dream fell apart. “One of the saddest days of my life was It’s a bird ... it’s a plane ... it’s a super well-done critique on the American education system. when my mother told me Superman didn’t exist,” remembered Canada. “’Cause even in of millions of wasted dollars on less-thanWriter and director Davis Guggenheim the depths of the ghetto you just thought he average public school systems. picked up an Oscar for his best-known film, was coming. She thought I was crying because At the world premiere of Waiting for An Inconvenient Truth. Waiting for SuperSanta Claus wasn’t real. I was really crying Superman at the Toronto International Film man is 10 times better. Regardless of the state, because Superman would never come. No one Festival, the viewing audience equally cheered city or neighborhood, the essential question was coming with enough power to save us.” and jeered. Make no mistake, this movie remains: Are our children getting a good eduAnd there you have the opening minutes of cation? The movie dares to say, “Hell no” and has its share of detractors, beginning with Waiting for Superman, a film that will encourteachers’ unions. The film speaks a truth that kicks in the doors of our education system to age and infuriate. It takes no prisoners as it is usually whispered: A good many teachers occupies the rarefied air of great documentaries demand a better look at why. are just not meant for the job. In most fields, The man who opens the film, Canada, is like Harlan Country USA, Hoop Dreams, The people who prove they’re incompetent are the creator and director of something called Last Waltz and The Thin Blue Line. shown the door. Teaching is the exception. Waiting for Superman does what so many the Harlem Children’s Zone, a 97-squareGuggenheim makes the case that teachers’ block area where high school and college documentaries, in spite of good intentions, unions use tenure to prevent schools from firgraduation rates have been sky-rocketing. fail to do. It captures the emotional context ing bad teachers and use campaign financing The Harlem Children’s Zone provides free of its subject and how it relates to its intendprograms to prevent lawmakers from making ed audience. This movie is not for those who support for poverty-stricken children and sweeping reforms to reward good teachers. families by offering parenting workshops, consider the parental refrain, “I would give It’s a terrible accusation. pre-school, three public charter schools my life for my child,” as simple hyperbole. Waiting for Superman illustrates that seekand health care for thousands of kids and Rather, it’s for those parents and caregivers ing the best education for a child is a parent’s inner-city families. who would move right and responsibility. And if your child’s The movie builds to heaven and Earth a thrilling conclusion school isn’t passing the grade, don’t sit back. for the betterment WAITING FOR SUPERMAN (PG) The film advocates political strategizing where we witness of a child. Waiting Directed by Davis Guggenheim and carefully applied pressure and says we the faces of young for Superman speaks Featuring the Black family, Geoffrey Canada, must be our children’s champions in the face of children who are enloud and clear: The the Esparza family tered in a lottery for a teachers, principals and superintendents. The greatest crisis facing Opens this Friday at The Flicks purpose is not to demonize our school systems, chance to participate America today has in Canada’s program. but rather to clarify our expectations and treat little to do with terIt’s heartbreaking, but our educators as partners, not untouchables. rorism, tea parties or Join the debate. You may be your child’s the lesson is simple. Duplicate the program. toxic assets. It is, in fact, the house of cards Superman or Superwoman. Triplicate it. Clone it. Feed it with the tens that makes up our public school system.

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings 180 DEGREES SOUTH— Documentary following adventurer Jeff Johnson through Patagonia. Tuesday, Oct. 26, 7 p.m., $8.50 ($6.50 students), Flicks, 646 Fulton St., 208-3424222, theflicksboise.com. A GATHERING OF FILM FESTIVAL—The inaugural

26 | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | BOISEweekly

film festival to commemorate Sun Valley’s 75th year. Prices and show times vary on Friday, Oct. 22, and Saturday, Oct. 23. Visit sunvalley. com for more information. BICYCLE DREAMS—Special screening of the awardwinning documentary by Stephen Auerbach on Boise Bicycle Project’s new screen. 7 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 23, $8 ($5 if you ride your bike),

boisebicycleproject.org. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., 208-429-6520. CIVIL RIGHTS FILM SERIES—See Picks, Page 18. 7 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 24, $11. Flicks, 646 Fulton St., 208-3424222, theflicksboise.com. IN THE TIME OF THE BUTTERFLIES—About the resistance to dictator Gen. Trujilla

in the Dominican Republic. Wednesday, Oct. 27, Noon. FREE. Boise State Student Union (Hatch). TETON GRAVITY RESEARCH PREMIER—Screening of the snowboarding movie Deeper. Friday, Oct. 22, 6 p.m. and 8:30 p.m. $10. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net.

TRIPLE THREAT TOUR— Screening of Poor Boyz Productions new ski film Revolver and athlete autograph signings. Tickets at Greenwood’s Ski Haus and McU Sports. Wednesday, Oct. 20, 7 p.m. $15 adv., $20 at the door. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net.

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BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | 27


SCREEN/LISTINGS Opening HEREAFTER—Matt Damon plays a psychic in the midst of trying to give up his career as someone who profits from his “curse” when he becomes intertwined in the lives of two people worlds apart in the wake of a natural disaster. Directed by Clint Eastwood. (PG-13) Flicks, Edwards 9, Edwards 22 PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2— This follow-up to last year’s supernatural thriller Paranormal Activity depicts a family unable to explain mysterious goings on in their home. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 WAITING FOR SUPERMAN—Documentary about the educational system in the United States and how it is failing the children in our country. From Davis Guggenheim, the director of An Inconvenient Truth. See review, Page 26. (PG) The Flicks

SCREEN/MOVIE TIMES WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20-TUESDAY, OCT. 26 180 DEGREES SOUTH—

Flicks: Tu: 7

CASE 39—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:30, 5:15, 10:10

EASY A—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 3:40, 9:55 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:10, 9:40

THE EXPENDABLES—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:45, 4:10, 6:50, 9:15

GET LOW—

Flicks: W-Th: 5, 9

JACK GOES BOATING—

Flicks: W-Th: 7

HEARTBREAKER (L’ARNACOEUR)— HEREAFTER—

Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1, 4, 7, 9:40 Edwards 22: F-Tu: 1, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15 Flicks: F-Sa: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; Su: 2, 4:30, 9:30; Tu: 4:30, 7, 9:30; Tu: 4:30, 9:30

INCEPTION—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:35, 4:45, 7:50

Continuing

IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY— Flicks: W-Th: 5:10, 7:20, 9:35; F-Su: 12:45, 2:55, 5:10, 7:20, 9:35; M-Tu: 5:10, 7:20, 9:35

CASE 39—(R) Edwards 22

JACKASS 3—

EASY A—(PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:50, 3:20, 6:20, 8:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:05, 3:20, 5:40, 7:55, 10:05

JACKASS 3 IN 3D—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:30, 4, 7:20, 9:40 Edwards 22: W-Th: 2:35, 4:50, 7:05, 9:20

THE EXPENDABLES—(R) Edwards 22 GET LOW—(PG-13) Flicks JACK GOES BOATING—(R) Flicks HEARTBREAKER (L’ARNACOEUR)—(NR) Flicks INCEPTION—(PG-13) Edwards 22

LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE— Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:10, 3:25, 5:45 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE 3D— Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:05, 2:20, 4:40, 7:05 LET ME IN—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:55, 4:35, 7:15, 10

LIFE AS WE KNOW IT— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:10, 4:10, 6:50, 10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1, 2:35, 3:35, 5:05, 6:45, 7:40, 9:30, 10:15

IT’S KIND OF A FUNNY STORY—(PG-13) Flicks

LIKE DANDELION DUST— Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40

JACKASS 3—(R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

MY SOUL TO TAKE 3D—

JACKASS 3D— (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

NEVER LET ME GO—

LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE —PG) Edwards 22 LEGEND OF THE GUARDIANS: THE OWLS OF GA’HOOLE 3D— (PG) Edwards 22 LET ME IN—(R) Edwards 22 LIFE AS WE KNOW IT—(PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 LIKE DANDELION DUST—(PG13) Edwards 22 MY SOUL TO TAKE—(R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 NEVER LET ME GO—(R) Flicks

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4:40, 7:50, 10:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12, 2:25, 4:50, 7:30, 10:15

RED—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:10, 3, 7:10, 9:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:25, 1:30, 3, 4:05, 5:35, 7, 8:10, 9:35

RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE 3D—

THE SOCIAL NETWORK— Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:30, 3:30, 7:30, 10:20 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:20, 4:15, 6:55, 8:05, 9:50 THE TILLMAN STORY—

RESIDENT EVIL: AFTERLIFE 3D—(R) Edwards 22

WAITING FOR SUPERMAN—

THE TILLMAN STORY—(R) Edwards 22 THE TOWN—(R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS—(PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 THE WILDEST DREAM: CONQUEST OF EVEREST—(PG) Edwards 22 IMAX YOU AGAIN—(PG) Edwards 22

Edwards 22: W-Th: 9:25

SECRETARIAT— Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:20, 3:10, 6:30, 9:10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12, 1:25, 2:45, 4:20, 5:30, 7, 8:15, 9:45

THE TOWN—

THE SOCIAL NETWORK-—(PG13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

Flicks: W-Th: 4:55, 7:15, 9:30; F-Su: 12:55, 5:05, 9:10; M-Tu: 5:05, 9:10

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY 2— Edwards 9: F-Tu: 2:30, 4:40, 7:20, 9:30 Edwards 22: F-Tu: 12:15, 1:15, 2:30, 3:30, 4:45, 5:45, 7, 8, 9:20, 10:20

RED—(PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

SECRETARIAT—(PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

28 | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Flicks: W-Th: 5:05, 7:10, 9:20; F-Su: 3, 7:05; M-Tu: 7:05

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:50, 3:05, 5:20, 7:35, 9:55 Edwards 9: W-Th: 1, 3:50, 6:40, 9:20 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:40, 4:30, 7:25, 10:10 Flicks: F-Su: 12:35, 2:45, 5, 7:15, 9:25; M-Tu: 5, 7:15, 9:25

WALL STREET: MONEY NEVER SLEEPS— Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:40, 7 Edwards 22: W-Th: 2:10, 5:10, 8 THE WILDEST DREAM: CONQUEST OF EVEREST (IMAX)— Edwards 22: W-Th: 12, 2:10, 4:20, 6:50, 9 YOU AGAIN—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 2:55, 7:45

T H E A T E R S Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


REC ADAM R OS ENLU ND

A NEW ADVENTURE Bogus Basin Nordic Team gives back MICHAEL LAFFERTY

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As the Bogus Basin Nordic Team began gearing up for this year’s season, the group started to think not only about snow, but also about how they could raise funds and give a little something back to the community—especially some of its youngest, newest members. So organizers formed a new refugee program and began planning the Tour of Boise Adventure Race, a scavenger hunt in downtown Boise. “Basically, our whole mission, or philosophy is to create good citizens,” said nordic team Head Coach and Program Director, Patrick Harper. “We want to give all kids the opportunity to try not just cross country skiing but multiple sports. With such a large number of refugees within the community, we decided to start a refugee program to help some of these kids—or new Americans as a lot of people call them—and give them an opportunity to get into our society in a good, healthy and positive environment.” Harper also said that a mentoring proThe program kicked off the week of Oct. 11 with two young skiers. Neither had ever gram will be in place with the older, established members of the nordic team helping skied before and may never have even seen the new skiers. He is hopeful that there will snow. And one of the new recruits is an be benefits on both sides of the equation. adaptive skier: he is missing a foot. “We are going to have the older kids on As with any new venture, it can be difficult to go it alone, so the nordic team-spon- the ski team—we call them Big Buddies— look after the new kids to integrate them. sored program is looking to create partnerships with schools and other foundations to They will learn about what classes to take give these refugee children a chance to learn in school, who the cool teachers are—the social setting that, I think, really breeds a more about the Treasure Valley. healthy lifestyle. These kids don’t always But students must meet the criteria behave that opportunity,” Harper said. fore they can enter the program. The program will start small to ensure “We would like the kids to be able to get along with their English and to be comfort- that everything flows smoothly, but the plan is to continue to accept more kids. By next able being away from their families, so 13 year, they hope to or 14 years old is a have 20 or 30 kids good start,” Harper Register for the Tour of Boise Adventure Race participating. said. “It’s difficult for at bluecirclesports.com. The cost is $30 “It’s just a matter the transportation for individuals, $65 for teams of up to four of figuring out how to and funding side of people. Registration ends Friday, Oct. 22. fund it,” Harper said. things, but down the Race is Sunday, Oct. 24. One inventive way road we are hoping the non-profit nordic to get them much team will raise funds is by partnering with younger. the City of Boise Arts and History Depart“The program is in place, we have the ment for the inaugural Tour of Boise Adcoaches, we have the equipment, we have venture Race, which takes place on Sunday, the clothing and we can get these kids out Oct. 24. Individuals and teams will set out there skiing. It’s just a matter of starting all across downtown Boise on a scavenger small and making sure it works and then hunt of sorts; they’ll explore the area lookadding more,” he said. “Since we started ing for answers to a set of questions. the program, a lot of people have stepped Kay Hummel and Shawn Del Ysursa, up and said, ‘This is cool, we really want to both parents of Bogus Basin Nordic Team get involved and what can we do to help?’ members, came up with the idea and then I think that says a lot about the Treasure contacted the city. Valley community.”

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“It was a natural to connect with city’s Department of Arts and History for help with the clues and questions,” Hummel said. “A representative of the mayor’s office heard about this and informed our office that it could be an exciting new community activity,” said Josh Olson, public program specialist with the department. “We decided to participate as a co-sponsor because the event focuses on the unique cultural locations of Boise. Nearly all of the answers that participants will be searching for are focused on public art and or Boise’s historic locations, and the race starts and ends in Julia Davis Park.” Questions likely to be asked include identifying an artist who created art on a traffic control box downtown, counting the number of features in a various sculptures in the Grove or around the Capitol, listing the dominant colors of a Greenbelt feature or gathering data from bridges spanning the Boise River. There are two courses for the Adventure Race: a short course expected to last about two-and-a-half hours and a longer course that should take about three hours. Along with supporting the nordic team and the new refugee program, as well as learning more about some of Boise’s public art and historic locales, participants will receive a T-shirt, healthy snacks and a bag full of coupons and one special treat: “Bragging rights of having done the first-ever Tour of Boise,” said Hummel.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | 29


FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

13TH STREET PUB AND GRILL

LAU RIE PEARMAN

I have always had a fondness for homemade macaroni and cheese, so Aside from sheer convenience of location, positive memories deit was no surprise the first menu item at 13th Street Pub and Grill that termine a return visit to a restaurant for many of us. A particularly grabbed my attention was the baked mac appetizer ($4.95). I agreed memorable dish sticks with us and begs our return. Or sometimes, it’s to share the starter with my husband, who was more intrigued by the the negative memory of service or a dish or even circumstances that selection of beer, which rivals any in Boise. Aficionados of barley and have nothing to do with the restaurant that keep us from going back. hops will understand the significance of 16 different taps, including two After writing a rather nasty review of 13th Street Pub and Grill’s cask-conditioned brews. But our drinks were quickly forgotten when predecessor about a year ago, I returned a few times—out of sheer the over-sized ramekin of creamy four-cheese macaroni arrived. It was convenience—until the restaurant closed. It was the only place to get so warm and comforting that I wanted to crawl into the dish and cuddle a cocktail and a proper meal within walking distance of my house. up with the salty chunks of pancetta that punctuated every other bite. There was, however, nothing particularly memorable on that menu. The helping could have easily been an entire meal—lucky for me, it has With the opening of 13th Street Pub and Grill, I hoped for more. tenure on the limited A recent remodel late-night menu, stripped down the which is served inside and replaced Thursday-Saturday carpet and plush until 12 a.m. chairs with dark Always game for wood everywhere— a house specialty, the tables, the floors. hubby went for the In the bar, where signature 13th Street a decent Monday ribeye ($20.95), a Night Football crowd 13-ounce mediumrecently gathered to rare masterpiece, take in the game on hogging plate space several flat screens, from a mountain the “pub” part of of garlic mashed “pub and grill” won potatoes and a trio of hands down. The grilled zucchini strips. patio, as has always Perhaps still basking been the case at this in the afterglow of location, is where the mac and cheese, it’s at in the warmer my usually ravenmonths, but if 13th ous other half had Street Pub and Grill enough leftovers for a hopes to capture that second meal. crowd year round, 13th Street Pub the dining room 13TH STREET PUB and Grill offers more desperately needs a AND GRILL than a smattering of vegetarian options, so I decided to designer’s touch to rid the place of the echoey, sterile, 1520 13th St., try a meatless main course, the mushroom Wellington cafeteria feel it currently wears. 208-639-8888, ($13.95). The carnivore in me didn’t miss a thing. Flaky As for the food, I’d rate it about the same as the Sun.-Wed. 11 a.m.10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-11 puff pastry enshrouded chopped mushrooms, carrots bar-patio-dining room combination. It gets two out of p.m.; Late-night tapas menu and celery—the veggies were perfectly cooked to yield three with the understanding that I’m satisfied but still Thu.-Sat. until midnight to my tooth without the mushiness common to the expecting better. slow-cooker movement. I also enjoyed a mountain of A starter of brie en croute ($7.95) with a lightly mashers and grilled zukes wading in a creamy mustard sauce. Shameless in jalapenoed apricot chutney passed muster handily, especially for the my enjoyment of the dish, I practically licked my plate clean at the finish. soft focaccia as a base. A steak salad ($10.95) with polenta crouOn another evening visit, the Indian summer made seating on the tons, Double R beef, roma tomatoes, green apples and a gorgonzola packed Hyde Park patio pleasant, but I had to wonder if it was at the cost aioli was a bowl of ingredients that played nicely together, though of good service. A pal and I listened to our stomachs growl longer than we it lacked the overall cohesiveness that a truly successful entree salad would have liked while we perused the lengthy wine list. However, when brings to the table. The hands-down favorite of the night was a our hummus and pita plate ($5.95) arrived, its ample size and dill-marinat- beef grinder ($9.95) on a giant, fluffy loaf with roasted red peppers, ed asparagus accompaniment confirmed that all was gastronomically well onions and mushrooms, and a solid dose of thinly sliced beef. The again. The thick-cut, skin-on fries on my friend’s entree plate outshined the sandwich was far too large for even a healthy appetite, and the server roast beef grinder ($9.95), but she still gobbled every scrap of the tender racked up a few bonus points for an unsolicited side of to-go au jus meaty sandwich. Equally generous in size, my Greek salad with grilled with the leftovers. The night’s disappointment rested squarely on a salmon added ($11.95, with grilled salmon) didn’t stand a chance against rack of lamb ($19.95) and earthy, vinegary beans. Though it looked my appetite. Creamy feta and tangy vinaigrette made the pile of spinach as like a beautiful fall dish, the lamb itself didn’t have the flavor chutzrich as the salmon that topped it. pah to stand up against the overpowering tang of the beans. When quality and quantity come together in equal proportion, the A few days after our visit, a friend asked what I’d thought about result is a dining establishment that makes my personal Top 10 list, even if the food. I paused before I answered, trying to remember what we’d service is inconsistent. Besides, I have a birthday coming up. I know I can eaten. I may not have found that one stand-out dish on 13th Street count on 13th Street Pub and Grill to serve up my childhood favorite on Pub and Grill’s menu just yet, the one that’ll keep me coming back. steroids, and that beats cake and ice cream any day in my book—even if But I’m willing to keep trying. you can’t put candles in macaroni and cheese. —Rachael Daigle relies on her memory to, uh, let’s see, um, —Sarah Barber thinks macaroni and cheese takes the cake. something that starts with an E ...

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FOOD/DINING West Boise BAD BOY BURGERS—This burger joint offers all the requisite fare of a classic walk-up/ drive-thru, plus some tasty surprises: it will take two of you to get through one of their burritos. 7000 W. Fairview Ave., 208-3730020. $ BAJA FRESH—Chain taqueria that does a reasonable imitation of authentic in a more sterile environment. 992 N. Milwaukee St., 208-327-0099. bajafresh. com. $ SU OM BANGKOK THAI—Local Thai joint with quality lunch specials. 477 N. Milwaukee St., 208-375-0946. bangkokthaiSU OM boise.com. $-$$ BASILIO’S—The most genuine of all possible taquerias: the truck. 8061 W. Fairview Ave., 208-658-4501. $ BLUE JEANS CAFE—Breakfast (starting at 6 a.m. for you early birds) and lunch with some of the biggest biscuits-and-gravy in the state. Freshly baked pastries, salads and sandwiches. 9140 W. Emerald St., #300, 208-658-5053. $ BOSNIAN EXPRESS—EasternEuropean style gyros, quick and cheap. 4846 Emerald St., 208433-9955. $ CASA MEXICO—With restaurants all over the Treasure Valley, Casa Mexico is family owned, with an extensive menu and an attentive staff. 10332 Fairview Ave., 208-375-0342; 1605 N. 13th St. # B, 208-333-8330. casamexicoidaho.com. $-$$ SU OM CHEESECAKE FACTORY—This chain offers pizza, sandwiches, salads, appetizers and of course, cheesecake. 350 N Milwaukee St., 208-377-0175. thecheesecakefactory.com. $-$$ SU OM CHICAGO CONNECTION—Standard pizza and sandwich fare, but the stellar beer menu more than makes up for it. 7070 W. Fairview Ave., 208-377-5551. chicagoconnection.com. $$ OM CHUCK E CHEESE’S—Chain pizza offering every kid’s dream and every parent’s potential migraine. 6255 W. Fairview Ave., 208-322-4734. chuckecheese. com. $$ RES OM CINCO DE MAYO—Family-owned restaurant serving Americanized Jaliscan fare. 10386 West Ustick Road, 208-377-7959. $$ CONFUCIUS RESTAURANT— Fine Chinese restaurant offering a variety of Chinese food options. 8775 W. Fairview Ave., 208-322-7851. $$ RES SU OM

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ —Less than $8 $ $ —$8 to $14 $ $ $ —$14 to $20 $ $ $ $ —Over $20

DAIRY QUEEN—Sure, they have burgers and fries. But this fast-food chain specializes in dessert. 350 N. Milwaukee St., #2087, 208-378-0303. $ SU OM DELSA’S ICE CREAM PARLOUR—If it is ice cream you crave, Delsa’s Ice Cream Parlour has it. With specialty flavors like Licorice, Lemon Custard and Swiss Orange Chip, Delsa’s provides necessary relief for that hurtin’ sweet tooth. They also offer a diner menu with burgers, fries and sandwiches. So go for the ice cream, stay for a bite to eat, and then finish up with some more ice cream. Yum. 7923 W. Ustick Road, 208-377SU 3700. $ EDDIE’S DINER—’50s style diner with burgers and fries. 3095 N. Lakeharbor Ln., 208853-9800. $ THE EGG FACTORY—Homestyle cooking focused on the details; featuring a new omelette every week and a new benedict every month. 8061 W. Fairview Ave., 208-322-0191. eggfactorycafe. com. $-$$ OM EL GALLO GIRO—The authentic Mexican restaurant named after a white rooster has appetizers, salads and big ‘ol burritos plus famous tacos and tortas. Seafood orders come with oysters, shrimp and octopus. The fish tacos are fantastic but the real draw is the sizzling fajitas and any other house specialty. 5285 Glenwood St., 208-321-0355. elgallogiroidaho. com. $-$$ SU OM

EL TENAMPA—Offering authentic and fresh Mexican food. 3423 N. Cole Road, RES 208-377-0250. $$-$$$ SU OM FLYING PIE PIZZERIA— Boise’s longest-lived and most inventive pizzeria. They have their own beer and pies to please even the pickiest eaters. This pizza joint lands on BW’s radar for one reason and one reason only: Triple Pi. Brewed exclusively for Flying Pie by Sockeye Brewery, any restaurant that has its very own beer is worthy. 6508 Fairview Ave., 208-376-3454. flyingpie. com. $-$$ SU OM FRESH OFF THE HOOK—Gourmet seafood in a casual setting. Try the Halibut bruschetta or coconut prawns. It’s the best place in town for fresh, inexpensive seafood. 507 N. Milwaukee St., 208-322-9224. freshoffthehookseafood.com. $-$$ SU OM FUJIYAMA—Fresh sushi in a serene atmosphere incongruously nestled in a strip mall. For the sushi-phobes out there, they have an extensive selection of teriyaki and tempura dishes, soups and salads. Reserve one of the tatami rooms for the ultimate in private dining. 283 N. Milwaukee St., 208-672-8227. $$ SU GOLDEN CORRAL BUFFET AND GRILL—Offering an all-you-caneat buffet. 8460 W. Emerald St., SU OM 208-373-7118. $$-$$$

FOOD/RECENTLY REVIEWED LOCAVORE 3110 S. Bown Way, 208-338-8887 “Soon we are salivating over eggs Benny ser ved with countr y ham on homemade focaccia flecked with rosemar y and fennel.” —Jennifer Hernandez

SULLY’S PUB AND GRILL 11123 State St., Star, 208-286-7743, sullys-idaho.com “The stuffed French toast was as thick as a Stephen King novel, its almond-cornflake and brown crust crispy like a freshbaked loaf of bread.” —Amy Atkins

LA BELLE VIE 220 14th Avenue South, Nampa, 208-466-0200, labellevienampa.com “The soup of the day, a Southwestern corn chowder, was at once delicate and hearty, with flecks of bell pepper and sweet corn swirled in a creamy broth so light and comforting it made me ache for my slippers.” —Tara Morgan

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RES —Reservations

needed/recommended —Patio SU —Open on Sunday OM —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

32 | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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DINING/FOOD GOLDEN WHEEL DRIVE-IN— An old-style American drive-in. 11100 W. Fairview Ave., 208375-4262. GOOD TIMES—’50s style American drive-in. 118 N. Milwaukee St., 208-323-4400. GUIDO’S ORIGINAL NEW YORK STYLE PIZZERIA—There’s nothing like a slice (or three) of Guido’s New York-style pizza for lunch. Their giant pies are inexpensive and addictive. 12375 Chinden Blvd., Ste. G, 208-376-1008. guidosdowntown. com. $ SU OM IHOP—Rooty tooty fresh and fruity all night long at this 24-hour pancake chain. 7959 W. Emerald St., 208-322-4467. SU OM ihop.com. $-$$

JERRY’S STATE COURT CAFE—Big windows, booths and hashbrowns. Jerry’s is the kind of diner chain diners imitate. 6767 W. Fairview Ave., 208-376-6767. jerrysstatecourtcafeboise.com. $$ OM LE COQ ROUGE—This quaint French restaurant is familyowned and run. They highly suggest reservations. 1320 S. Maple Grove Road, 208-3769463. $$-$$$ RES SU LOS BETOS—Street-style Mexican food—like a burrito as big as a baby—available all night. 5220 W. Fairview Ave., SU 208-658-1185. $

WINE SIPPER/FOOD

LOS MARIACHI’S—Los Mariachi’s bills themselves as the happiest Mexican restaurant in town. And with their affordably priced lunch buffet, it’s hard to disagree. 6565 W. Fairview Ave., 208-323-5917. losmariachis. com. $-$$ SU OM MANILA BAY—Filipino buffet line that does new and unexpected things with seafood. 8716 West Fairview Avenue, 208-375-5547. $-$$ MARIE CALLENDER’S—Upscale diner chain that specializes in pies. 8574 W. Fairview Ave., SU 208-375-7744. $$ MONGOLIAN STIR FRY—Look over the wide selection of Asian meats and vegetable. You pick it, they grill it. Culinary collaboration at its tastiest. 8037 W. Fairview Ave, 208-376-3662. $$ NAM KING—Neighborhood Chinese focused on wok cooking. 4624 W. State St., 208-345SU 0260. $-$$ PANDA EXPRESS—The original mall Chinese food. 1124 N. Milwaukee St. 208-321-0350. OM pandagarden.com. $ PAPA JOHNS—Chain pizzeria. 1323 Broadway Ave., 208-3679200; 3379 N. Five Mile Rd., 208-377-5050. papajohns.com. SU OM $-$$

MONTEPULCIANO There’s a town in Tuscany called Montepulciano where they make wine from sangiovese, the same grape that forms the backbone of chianti. Those are labeled Rosso or Vino Nobile d’Montepulciano. Then there is the grape variety, also called Montepulciano. Since it ripens late, the grape needs the warmer climate of southern Italy and is most widely planted in Abruzzo. These wines typically provide good quality at a great price. Here are three top picks: 2008 CAPESTRANO MONTEPULCIANO D’ABRUZZO, $10.99 This wine opens with heady aromas that are a nice mix of ripe cherry and plum fruit backed by toasty oak, sweet licorice, herb and a pleasant hint of smoke. Juicy blueberry, tart cherry and red currant flavors fill the mouth and are matched by zesty acidity and light tannins on the fresh, fruity finish. A food friendly bargain. 2008 QUATTRO MANI MONTEPULCIANO D’ABRUZZO, $9.99 Robust, earthy aromas pour from the glass highlighted by dark berry, dried cherry, rose petal and mushroom. Made in a very approachable, lithe and lively style that’s filled with bright cherry fruit flavors, smooth ripe tannins, soft but ample acidity and a nice touch of cinnamon. This wine has a definite crowdpleasing value. 2003 VIZZARRO BARONE CORNACCHIA MONTEPULCIANO D’ABRUZZO, $32.50 And now for something completely different. This is a seriously intense wine on a different plateau from the other two entries. The aromas are a brooding mix of big berry fruit with layers of cedar, earth, leather and licorice. Elegant and beautifully balanced on the palate, this wine offers seamless berry and plum flavors with dusty tannins and a finish that lingers on and on. It’s more expensive, but worth the splurge. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

ROBBIE’S DRIVE-IN—The menu features everything a diner would want in a drive-in including grilled sandwiches, award-winning chili, burgers and homemade sauces for the fries. The owner shares his love of hot rods with classic car shows on Saturday nights. An old drive-in location is now Robbie’s Drive-In serving good and grilled food, award-winning chili and burgers accompanied by fries and homemade fry sauce. The menu also includes salads and shakes and options for the kids. 4822 Fairview Ave., 208-376-3150. SENOR FRESH—Fast-casual Mexican dining with all the usual suspects—burritos, enchiladas, nachos and fish tacos, to name a few. If you’re really hungry, try the Gordo Burrito. 12375 W. Chinden Blvd. # F, 208-3781888. $ SIZZLER—Seafood, steak, and traditional American cuisine at this chain. 459 N. Cole Rd., 208322-2930. $$ SOCKEYE GRILL AND BREWERY—Sockeye is the serious beer connoisseur’s brewpub. When the double IPA Hopnoxious is on tap, it’s a hophead’s liquid dream, and the Hell Diver Pale Ale gets rave reviews. The menu is pub fare with a healthy bent and free live music happens every Tuesday and Friday. 3019 Cole Road, 208-658-1533. sockeyebrew. com. $-$$ SU OM SUB ZERO ICE CREAM—Ice cream crafted from scratch while you wait, from ingredients of your choosing to create flavors no tongue has ever tasted before. Fairview and Milwaukee., 208906-8813. subzeroicecream. com. $ Get more restaurant listings, reviews and food gossip at boiseweekly.com.

BOISEweekly | OCTOBER 20–26, 2010 | 33


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2BD, 2BA. State St. & Kessinger. $575/mo. Pets welcome. 371-6762. 3127 Jordan. Clean & nice. New remodel. 850 sq. ft., 2BD, 1BA. Call Fred 384-0438. Sun Valley Condo. 2BD, full kitchen. Nov. 15-21. $700. Call 4840711 or 424-1337. Studio. Bench area. W/S/T pd. Avail. Nov.1. $425/mo. 343-9562. Townhouse for rent. 2BD, 1.5BA. Parkcenter area. $850/mo. Call for details. 602-7890.

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BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577. Thomas.

VIP MASSAGE

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COME EXPERIENCE MASSAGE BY SAM

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/Weekends. Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Prof. therapeutic massage only by trained & experienced masseur. New client special. Robert 4846251.

CAREERS

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Paid In Advance! Make $1000 a Week mailing brochures from home! Guaranteed Income! FREE Supplies! No experience required. Start Immediately! www. homemailerprogram.net HAIRVANA STATION FOR LEASE Hairvana is looking for a dynamic stylist to join our team and grow your clientele in this exciting salon located at 4414 Overland Road. 6 mo. lease option and you carry your own product! If you are interested in joining this great salon, please call Jackie at 794-1929. $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com LAND LIQUIDATION. 20 Acres $0 Down $99/mo. ONLY $12,900 near growing El Paso, Texas, Guaranteed Owner Financing, NO CREDIT CHECKS! Money back Guarantee. FREE Map/Pictures. 800-755-8953 www.sunsetranches.com

Junk cars, trucks, vans. Paying up to $200. 208-963-0492.

FOR SALE BW STUFF QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643.

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BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464.

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COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 www.continentalacademy.com TOUR OF BOISE ADVENTURE RACE Take an adventure tour of downtown Boise on Oct. 24. Two courses to choose from. Great activity for families, individuals & teams. Show us what you know about Boise! Sponsored by the Bogus Basin Nordic Team & Shu’s Running Company. bogusbasinnordicteam.com

SARA’S SECONDHAND

We buy general household items for CASH. Call 331-2366.

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Multiple dealers, two floors of antiques & furniture. Vendor space avail. Mon.-Sat. 10-5:30. 2nd St. South in Downtown Nampa. 468-0900.

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Asian Spa For Sale on Overland Rd. Call for info. 703-3606.

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ADOPT-A-PET

NAMPA CAMPUS NOW OPEN! Get the career education you want, where you want it. StevensHenager College’s Boise campus is opening a satellite campus on North Marketplace Blvd in Nampa. Call Right Now! 800-716-5645. www.StevensHenager.info

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

RIGHT SCHOOL, RIGHT DEGREE, RIGHT NOW!

Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

BARTER

REX: 2-year-old male longhaired dachshund. Can be aloof and independent. Best with adults only. Needs a loving owners. (Kennel 306- #11615476)

REMINGTON: 19-monthold male Lab/great Pyrenees. House-trained and good with dogs. Polite on the leash. Affectionate. (Kennel 315- #11548445)

BELLA: 7-year-old female manx cat. Longhair needs regular grooming. Relaxed cat. Social and enjoys attention. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 7- #11651280)

DAPHNE: 2-year-old female cat. Playful, indoor cat. Gets along with other cats and dogs. Litterbox-trained. Loves to play in bags. (Kennel 01- #11663095)

COMET: 8-year-old male Siberian husky mix. Would do great in a quiet home with a gentle owner. Good with other dogs. (Kennel 307- #11516182)

TOM: 2-year-old male cat. Declawed on his front paws, needs an indoor only home. Litterbox-trained. Playful and talkative. (Kennel 04- #11681220)

BW NEED Want baritone ukulele. Need used chain link dog run or any size chain link panel. Barter for items to equal value for fair trade. Juice Man juicer, Rocket Grill, XL dog crate, dog waste digesters, bicycles/helmets/gloves or XC skis/ poles/boots, hand knit afghans or chair & ottoman. 336-9127.

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NEW LOCATION-HYDE PARK Coming Soon! Opening Oct. 4, Twigs & Twist is moving to Hyde Park. Come see our new line of fabrics, patterns & crafting classes. www.twigsandtwists.com or call 342-0600.

ACROSS 1 “Applesauce!” 6 The pulp in pulp fiction 11 “That ticked me off!” 16 Bob and pageboy 19 1987 #1 Heart song that starts “I hear the ticking of the clock”

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IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA In the Matter of the Estate of: ANITA LEE SOLMON, Deceased.

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PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES

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UPSIDE DOWN ON YOUR HOME? House value dropped? Loss of Income? Behind on your payment? If you own a home and answered yes to any of these 3 questions you may be a candidate for a short sale of your home. Don’t just walk away from your home!! This could lead to severe consequences to you in the future. Let us negotiate with your bank on your behalf and help you to unburden yourself! Unsure what your options are or how a short sale works? We offer a FREE consultation. Simply visit www.ChallengerBoiseHomes.com and click the Short Sale link to get started. There is no obligation, but we feel you deserve to know what options are available to you. We are fast to respond and helping our clients is our top priority! Krista 860-1650 and Heidi 440-5997. Market Pro Real Estate, Your first and last stop for short sale help!

GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-2898484. This is not a job offer.

Case No. CV IE 1012959 NOTICE TO CREDITORS (I. C. 15-3-801) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed Personal representative of the above-named decedent. All persons having claims against the decedent or the estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, and filed with the Clerk of Court. DATED this 14th day of September, 2010. Richard G. Solmon 3324 Tucker Road Boise, ID 83703 Phone: 208-389-1490

DRIVERS’ TRANSLATIONS BY PATRICK MERRELL / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

20 Sauce made with garlic and olive oil 21 Adrenaline producer 22 Dog show org. 23 YOUR TAX DOLLARS AT WORK … 26 Call of support 27 Some run to get in it 28 “Batman” fight scene sound

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Flea Market held at Maple Grove Grange. Oct. 22 thru 23 from 9-5 both days. 11692 President between Five Mile & Cloverdale. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls.

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59 It’s often pointed in gymnastics 60 Ermine, e.g. 61 CONGESTION NEXT 10 MILES … 65 Wearers of jeweled turbans 71 Neurotransmitter associated with sleep 72 NO THRU TRAFFIC … 76 However, briefly 77 Genetic material 78 Open mike night format, perhaps 80 From ___ Z 81 Wizened woman 84 Winged celestial being 88 STAY IN LANE … 91 Kind of translation 93 Setting for the biggest movie of 1939 94 Sailing 95 Number system with only 0’s and 1’s 98 Cheesesteak capital 101 Earthlings 103 NO STOPPING OR STANDING … 106 Ultimate degree 107 Like some legal proceedings 108 Has an angle 109 Syrian president 111 Comprehend 112 SPEED LIMIT 65 M.P.H. … 119 Guffaw syllable 120 “None for me, thanks” 121 Field Marshal Rommel 122 Feeling when called to the principal’s office 123 Literary monogram 124 Cockeyed 125 Requiring an umbrella 126 Brings in

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1 Unchallenging reading material 2 ___-mo 3 Roughhousing 4 Egyptian symbol of life 5 Online program

6 City in a “Can-Can” song 7 Common inhalant 8 Creator of the detective C. Auguste Dupin 9 Architectural addition 10 Oriole who played in a record 2,632 straight games 11 Small crustacean 12 Low-level position 13 Queen of double entendres 14 Cannonball’s path 15 Took an alternate route 16 The Wright brothers’ Ohio home 17 Michael of “Caddyshack” 18 Gobbles (down) 24 Mortgage figs. 25 Part of 24-Down 30 Awakens 31 Swiftly 32 Kind of commentator 34 Pub order 35 Don Marquis’s six-legged poet 36 Lion or tiger or bear 37 Tony Hillerman detective Jim 39 ___ Intrepid 43 Connections 44 Investment unit 46 Roadies work on them 47 First name in TV talk 48 Spanish bear 49 Actress Thurman 50 Gallivants 52 School for Prince Harry 53 Anderson of “WKRP in Cincinnati” 54 Spotted 58 Harm 60 Troll dolls or Silly Bandz 62 Gambino boss after Castellano 63 Group values 64 Place with feeding times 65 Supermarket V.I.P.’s: Abbr. 66 Best-of-the-best 67 Frozen dew

68 Betty, Bobbie and Billie followers on “Petticoat Junction” 69 Bandleader Shaw 70 Woodlands male 73 “The Situation Room” airer 74 Japanese vegetable 75 Slowpoke 79 “The Power of Positive Thinking” author 80 “I get it now” 81 Like some matching pairs 82 Representative 83 Grind together 85 Anacin alternative 86 Famed Russian battleship 87 “That’s just ___ feel” 89 “___ Little Tenderness” 90 Houston after whom the Texas city is named 92 Toilet tissue superlative 95 Worry for a farmer 96 Leader whom Virgil called “the virtuous” 97 Jean-Paul who wrote “Words are loaded pistols” L A S T

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LOW POWER PUBLIC NOTICE K47BE, Boise, ID On September 14, 2010, Trinity Christian Center of Santa Ana, Inc. filed an assignment application with the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) seeking approval to transfer the license for K47BE, Channel 47, Boise, ID to Minority Media Telecommunications Council, Inc. K47BE is authorized to broadcast at 59.6kw kilowatts from its transmitter site located atop Table Rock in Boise ID, at geographical coordinates 43 degrees, 35 min-

utes, 41 seconds North Latitude, 116 degrees, 08 minutes, 39 seconds West Longitude. Individuals who wish to advise the FCC about any facts relevant to this assignment application or the public interest can contact the FCC at Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC 20554. ANOTHER NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE Case No.: CVNC1015009 A Petition to change the name of Eamon T. Baker, born 10/19/05 in Boise, ID residing at 234 W. Elwood Dr, Boise, ID 83706 has been filed

in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Eamon Timothy McManus , because his current name is that of his previous adopted family, needs to reflect his birth parents. The child’s father is living. The child’s mother is living. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock pm on December 2nd, 2010, at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: October 8, 2010. By D. Price Deputy Clerk Pub. Oct. 20, 27, Nov. 3, 10, 2010.

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BW KISSES LOST TONKINESE CAT UPDATE Lost Tonkinese Cat, Little Cat, in SW Boise near Overland and Five Mile was found Saturday, September 18 in a neighbor’s garage. Thanks everyone for keeping your eyes out for him! He is home and fully recovered now. TO R. VEG. & L.R. Thanks for trading adult favors for berries. Meet us for a lemonade on State St. C you @ the game. T&T.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): “There’s one ultimate goal during sex,” says Cosmopolitan magazine, a source of erotic guidance for women. That is “to be as sensually stimulated as possible.” I don’t agree. Having emotionally pleasing fun is also important, as well as creating a playful ambience and invoking spiritual grace. So what, in the view of Cosmopolitan, is the key to cultivating maximum bliss? “Having lots of steamy info at your disposal.” That’s sound advice for you right now, Aries. You’re in a favorable phase for finding out more about everything that will enhance your access to delight, including the sexual kind.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “I wish I treated my feet with the same tender loving care as I do my face,” wrote Catherine Saint Louis in The New York Times. “But I don’t.” She quotes a study that says more than half of all women are embarrassed about their feet and notes that Facebook has many “I Hate Feet” groups. You Leos can’t afford to be under this spell right now. Even more than usual, it’s crucial for you to be well-grounded. So I suggest you maneuver yourself into a state of mind in which earthiness is beautiful and appealing to you. Celebrate your body and improve your relationship with it. How to start? Love your feet better.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): When the tide is coming in, the creek I live near flows vigorously toward the south. When the tide is going out, the water heads north. Every day, there’s an inbetween time when the creek seems confused. According to my understanding of the astrological omens, Taurus, you are temporarily in a phase that resembles my creek’s time of contrary flows. It’s a perfectly natural place to be.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): At this phase of my life, I’m not canvassing door-to-door asking people to donate money to save old growth forests. I’m not a member of groups fighting for an end to the war in Afghanistan or agitating in behalf of animal rights. My struggle for social and environmental justice is waged primarily through the power of my writing. I subscribe to the attitude of author Ingrid Bengis, who said, “Words are a form of action, capable of influencing change.” In the coming weeks, I suggest you increase your awareness of how you could transform your world with the power of your language.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In fifth grade I was in love with Calley, the prettiest girl in school. She didn’t return my affection, so I had to be content with adoring her from afar. Eventually I moved away and lost touch, but I’ve wondered if she suffered the fate that befalls too many gorgeous women: relying so entirely on her looks that she never developed many skills. I recently tracked Calley down via Google and discovered that she had beaten the curse: She has a career as an activist bringing first-rate education to poor children. My question to you is this, Gemini: Are there any qualities you regarded as assets earlier in life but that eventually turned into liabilities? Any strengths that became weaknesses? And what are you doing to adjust? CANCER (June 21-July 22): Think back to the last half of 1998. What was going on in your life back then? According to my astrological projections, you were probably carrying out experiments in a wild frontier ... or getting your mind rearranged by rousing teachings and provocative revelations ... or breaking through artificial limits that had been quashing your freedom ... or all of the above. Now you’ve come around again to a similar phase of your grand cycle. Are you ready for action? If you’d like to gather up all the grace flowing in your vicinity, start having fun with escapes, experiments and expansions.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the weeks ahead, Libra, you’re going to be tested on your follow-through. People will want you to work harder on what has previously come fairly easily. You will be pressured to make good on your promises; you’ll be asked to refine the details that are central to the success of the good new ideas that are floating around. As much as you might be tempted to slip away and fly off in pursuit of things that are more fun, I encourage you to stick with the program. You can’t imagine how important it is for you to learn how to be a more committed builder. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “If you’re strong enough there are no precedents,” said novelist F. Scott Fitzgerald. I think that describes you in the immediate future, Scorpio. I bet you won’t have to answer to ghosts or pay homage to the way things have always been done. You’ll be free to ignore icons that the conventional wisdom idolizes, and there’ll be no need for you to give undeserved respect to experts who have stopped being relevant. By my astrological reckoning, you will be so smart and plucky and energetic that you can work wonders simply by emptying your mind, starting from scratch and making things up as you go along.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Scientists have discovered an animal that feeds on the bones of dead whales lying on the ocean floor. Known informally as the bone-eating snot-flower worm, it looks like a frilly pink plume growing up out of sheer bone. Believe it or not, Sagittarius, you could take a cue from this creature in the coming weeks. It will be a favorable time for you to draw sustenance from the skeletal remains of big things that were once vital. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): What is the wild and instinctual nature? Radiance magazine posed that question to storyteller Clarissa Pinkola Estes. Here’s her reply: “to establish territory, to find one’s pack, to be in one’s body with certainty and pride regardless of the body’s gifts and limitations, to speak and act in one’s behalf, to be aware, alert, to draw on the innate feminine powers of intuition and sensing, to come into one’s cycles, to find what one belongs to.” I would love to see you specialize in these wild and instinctual arts in the coming weeks, Capricorn. According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you are ready to tap into the deeper reserves of your animal intelligence. Your body is primed to make you very smart about what you need and how to get what you need. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When I think of the extraordinary feats of strength you will be capable of in the coming weeks, my mind turns to Chinese martial artist Dong Changsheng. Last May, he attached one end of a rope to his eyelids and the other end to a small airplane, then pulled the thousand-pound load 15 feet in a minute. I don’t think your demonstration of power will be as literal as his, and I suspect it will be more useful and meaningful. But in certain respects it could be just as amazing. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Scottish scientists decided to see if they could find evidence for the existence of the Loch Ness monster. They took a research submarine into the murky depths, scanning with sonar. The creature was nowhere in sight, but a surprising discovery emerged: Thousands of golf balls litter the bottom of the loch, presumably because the place has been used as an unofficial driving range for years. I predict that you will soon experience a reverse version of this sequence, Pisces: You will go in search of your personal equivalent of lost golf balls—some trivial treasure—but on the way you will have a brush with a living myth.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 19 Issue 17