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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 04 JULY 21–27, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 10

POWER TRIO Some new energy sources are green, some are brown FEATURE 13

JAIALDI 2010 Your guide to where, when and how to fake being Basque for the week FIND 19

BARBECUE CHALLENGED? The insta-grill has your one-time answer FOOD 30

SLOW FOOD Eagle’s Blue Moose Cafe pulls a sandwich out of its hat. Presto.

“Boise Weekly etxean.” (Translation: “Boise Weekly in the house.”)

FEATURE 13

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Business Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreader: Annabel Armstrong Videographer: Blair Davison Interns: Philip Alexander, Stephen Foster, Rachel Krause, Jacob Lyman Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Patrick Flanary, Jennifer Hernandez, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Lucas Wackerli, Lucas@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com Intern: Veronika Grewelding CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Adam Rosenlund Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Steve Klamm, Noah Kroese, Jeremy Lanningham, Glenn Landberg, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE I WANT THE WHOLE WORLD IN MY HAND. NOW. About every six months, I write something in this space about the alternative newsweekly industry while attending one of several annual conferences put on by the Association of Alternative Newsweeklies, BW’s trade association. I spent the better part of last week in Toronto at one such conference, and I walked away with one resounding conclusion: Boise Weekly has it together pretty well for a paper of our size in a market as difficult as ours. By difficult, I mean that we’re not in a community in which the majority fully understands, much less supports, anything truly alternative—especially when it comes to media. Last summer, the bulk of our (inter)national conference in Tucson, Ariz., centered on why alt weeklies should commit to a daily news cycle with blogging, social networking and online-only content when, historically, daily news hasn’t been their strength and, more importantly, no one had figured out how to monetize that kind of content. In January, those of us who had fully embraced the digital revolution of our industry attended a Web conference in an effort to find real solutions to some of the issues that had arisen with our increased participation in cyberspace. In Toronto last week, the discussion certainly felt larger than it had in a long time—at least from an editorial standpoint. This year, editors were not divided into the haves and have-nots of blogging. We were all friending and retweeting one another rather than explaining to the have-nots the benefits of joining the real-time news stream. And this year, in many cases, rather than looking back at what we should have seen coming, we cautiously looked forward. So what does the future hold? In short, it holds more news consumers like me. Aside from my subscriptions to the New Yorker and Newsweek, the entirety of the media I consume away from work is delivered to me via the Internet. And not only is it digital, it’s handheld. I don’t have a paper delivered to my house (gasp!), and I while I do own a 10-inch TV, it stays in a closet because I never bothered to get a converter box. Will the last newspaper ever be delivered on the last doorstep? I don’t know. What’s important for us isn’t that we worry about what may or may not be inevitable and instead, reach those readers who, like me, want on-demand, real-time, location-based news in the palm of their hands. Yes, BW is a newspaper, but it’s not just on newsprint anymore. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Nancy Brossman TITLE: Appaloosa MEDIUM: Hand-printed linoleum block print ARTIST STATEMENT: I have been a printmaker doing engravings and etchings for many years. It is nice to see a resurgence of printmaking in the art world, especially here in Idaho.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Square formats are preferred and all mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. NANC Y ELLIS ON

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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MAIL / MONDO GAGA

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Alt energy comes to Idaho, but is it good for us? 10

THE ARTS HAVE FEELINGS, TOO Michael Kaiser, president of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, spoke in Boise last week, offering solutions for arts organizations tackling the current economy. And, boy, did he have some advice.

HAS PETA EVEN BEEN TO BOISE? PETA names Boise as one of North America’s best small cities for the non-meat-eater. BW blogs it. Readers scoff.

IT ALL COMES DOWN TO PERSPECTIVE Here’s a great headline: “Governor, Republicans Risk Injury in Patting Each Other on Back.” All that patting was the result of the state’s balanced budget, but here’s one budget figure all those back-(butt-)patters left out of the feel-good news: Participation in Idaho’s food stamp program increased 42.5 percent in the past year.

THE BOX IS THE NEW BOTTLE BW’s longtime wine authority says get over yourself and think inside the box, you snob, you. Though he’s uncertain that Franzia is even wine, what he is certain of is that you should be buying boxed wine—just not of the Franzia variety.

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CITIZEN

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FEATURE Basque for Beginners

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Toad the Wet Sprocket reunites, kind of.

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MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Micmacs: It’s all about revenge.

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MOVIE TIMES

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FOOD Kickin’ back at Eagle’s Blue Moose Cafe

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BEER GUZZLER

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CLASSIFIEDS

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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Reef July Music Most shows start at 9:00

22nd Mystic Roots 23rd Pilot Error 24th Forrest

Day Album Release

28th Thomas Hutchings 29th Nappy

Roots

visit www.reefboise.com for details

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BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 5

MAIL PIZZA POLITICS In reference to a June 23 food review of Twig’s Cellar by Tara Morgan (BW, Food, “Twig’s Cellar”), my first thought when reading Tara’s review was that if she was “hankering” for pizza, then along with her pedestrian wording she should have frequented a pedestrian venue. Perhaps her expectations were more along the line of Domino’s or Pizza Hut. First of all Twig’s is not a “pizza joint.” Pizza is just one of a variety of items on the delectable menu. One is not only presented with a variety of gourmet pizzas on this menu—the witty proprietress allows one to design their own. I am a “gourmet pizza” aficionado and have sampled more than my share from many different corners of the world. I must say Twig’s ranks in my top five favorites. The crust is a perfection of crisp and tasty flavor along with a great blend of my preferred ingredients. The secret recipe

sauce allows for a tangy infusion to delight any palate. I only discovered this secret hideaway about a month ago and it will be one of my frequent stops when I am “craving” a gourmet pizza and a glass of champagne in a warm downtown establishment with an uptown atmosphere. —Penny Sheldon, Boise

ONE STATE SHOW So the unrestrained invisible hand of the free market drills a hole in the Gulf that pops its cork and lets out untold gallons of oil to despoil the coasts and sea life, while destroying the work prospects of all fishing and tourism sectors. The same invisible hand fumbles time after time, trying to shove the cork back into the hole, illustrating that one should always have a solution ready in case of an emergency. Speaking of solutions, the same ineptness has allowed “experts” to destroy the economy on a world

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact info. Submit letters to editor@boiseweekly.com. Letters may be edited for length or clarity. Ever y item of correspondence is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message.

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scale and any solutions have only yielded weak results in rectifying the problem. In the current debate of solutions, one side wants more stimulus, which did work for FDR, while the other side wants to cut Medicare, Social Security and education in the hopes of satiating the “bond vigilantes.” One solution not being considered seriously by either camp—unless you’re outside the beltway—is a public-bank option. North Dakota, ironically a conservative red state, has been operating a government run bank since 1919. They have a $1.3 billion surplus, full employment and can fully fund all public services. They are divorced from Wall Street and run their own show. You’d think Idaho could show some independence and do the same, but I guess serving Wall Street rules is the order of the day. One brave soul, James Stivers, ran on a public-bank platform, but lost his bid in the last primary. I guess the invisible hand will continue to steal from Idahoans by gutting their services and privatizing their future. —Kevin Bayhouse, Boise

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BILL COPE/OPINION

MEA SORTA CULPA

I take responsibility for whatever you don’t get Before whatever future I have as a writer comes tumbling apart like Mel Gibson’s next movie proposal, I must apologize for some offensive stuff I have produced of late. The first offense was pointed out by S.M.—a nice lady I’m sure—who writes to remind us that good grammar is one of those ephemeral qualities that separates civilized humanity from dolphins, chimpanzees, crows, tea baggers or any other species alleged to communicate with one another. It would seem I put into a recent column the construction, “... that allows you and I to vote ...” I should be, and am, ashamed! “... you and I?” Absolutely not! In the architecture of proper sentences, when the consideration is of object rather than subject, it is “... you and me.” So sorry, S.M. The only excuse I have is that I suspect my wife is slipping me decaf. Me will grammarize more better in the here on. U In the column printed June 30, I suggested that Rep. Mike Simpson might object to Nancy Pelosi being the most powerful person in the House and second in line for the presidency because the history of his religious tradition has been purdy darn male dominant. In offering that possibility, I must have made it sound like I don’t like Mormons and at least one Mormon was offended. He asked “What did we ever do to you, Bill?” I apologize to “cominginsecond” for not being more precise in my condemnation. I have nothing against Mormons. I grew up surrounded by Mormons, and except for them always getting a building to themselves right next to school property, I never much cared what they were up to. Many of my current neighbors are LDS, and more gracious and considerate people I have seldom met. No, “cominginsecond,” I do not hate Mormons. Mormon-ism, however, is a whole nudder matter. I don’t like Mormonism. Same with Catholicism. Some of my oldest, dearest friends are Catholics, but I don’t hold them responsible for their church having become what appears to be an equal-opportunity hiring agency for pedophiles. Other old friends are Methodists. My very own Mom was as devout a Methodist as you could find without going all the way back to John Wesley, yet I never once blamed her for belonging to the same denomination that gave us George W. Bush. Likewise, I don’t blame the Mormon on the street for the sins of Mormonism, one of the most egregious being the fervor with which that institution promoted California’s Proposition 8 during the last election. Nor do I accuse Mormonism for being any more hateful toward homosexuals than an Ark-load of other “isms” that taint the naturally kindly natures of most Americans. Baptist-ism, IsWWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

lam-ism, James Dobson-ism, etc. But the truth remains that it was primarily the Holy See of Salt Lake City that lent its heft to the passage of that proposition, and if the Mormon on the street resents being resented for what their church is doing socially and politically, maybe he’d better take it up with his church. As to my unnecessarily catty implication that the LDS Church isn’t the first thought to pop into people’s heads when a discussion of remarkable women arises, I meant no offense to Mormon women. Yet it is not unusual for non-Mormons to hold such prejudices about an international mega-organization that was born in polygamy and to this day hasn’t allowed a woman into the ranks of church leadership. U Lastly, I apologize to one of my regular hangers-on who signs his (her?) comments with the precious alias “Patience Dogood.” After presenting my theory that rampant mad cow disease might shed some light on what has become of the GOP, Mr. (Ms.?) Dogood wonders how I could be so venomous. Poor Patience, it is truly tragic that you missed out on the gift of reading comprehension. Venomous? ... certainly not. That mad cow theory was me being nice. Generous of spirit, even. But for less perceptive readers, I should have explained why I am compelled to develop theories that would help us understand Republicans. The mad cow idea wasn’t the first. I have speculated that whatever the GOP has become is simply an inevitable result of somebody having to occupy the bottom rungs of the intelligence ladder, and there is no mystery in how such unimaginative minds would all eventually come to think alike. I have also played with the notion it might be something colon-probing aliens have done to holler-dwelling Southerners in particular, which has since spread like mange from bumpkin to bumpkin across the land, leaving us with an entire demographic that can no longer tell their assholes from their elbows. I don’t pretend to know the ultimate answer. But I would rather idle my time away speculating on external, organic and natural causes for why the GOP would do such awful things—(resist extending unemployment benefits to Americans that misguided conservative policies deprived of employment, for instance, or their demonic hatred of all things Barack Obama)—than let my mind come to the most obvious conclusion ... the Occam’s Razor solution to why Republicans are behaving as they do ... being: They are evil. Be thankful then, Ms. Dogood, that I look for answers in mad cow disease or too many anal probes to account for people such as you. I’m sorry you don’t like it, but it’s better for both of us if I steer clear of that old tar baby of whose side God is on. You understand, I’m sure. Or maybe you can find someone to explain it to you.

BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 7

OPINION/TED RALL

HELP? NOT SOON On economy, pessimism abounds

TORONTO—Twenty years ago, the American economy was in the third year of a deep recession. But help was on the way. Something called the World Wide Web appeared in 1991. Two years later, the Internet boom began and tens of millions of Americans collected higher paychecks. Consumer spending and tax revenues exploded. When Bill Clinton left office, the Office of Management and Budget projected a $5 trillion surplus over the next 10 years— enough to pay off the national debt and fund Social Security for decades. Unemployment had fallen to 4 percent, and the U.S. GDP accounted for a quarter of the global economy. It’s different this time. We are in a deep depression. Calculated the same way as it was in the 1930s, the unemployment rate is the same as it was in 1934. Global credit markets have stalled. Investment has ceased. No one knows where the recovery will come from for a simple reason: It isn’t coming. Not any time soon. “A robust rebound in retail sales earlier in the spring had fueled hopes that consumer spending—which makes up about 70 percent of U.S. economic activity—would give a strong lift to the recovery. But now that is looking increasingly unlikely,” reported The Los Angeles Times. Forget about Congress. The feds wasted hundreds of billions of dollars on bailouts. Meanwhile, the stimulus that needed to happen—bailing out homeowners, small businesses and individuals—never happened. Now Congress is worried about the

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deficit. So read my lips: no new bailouts. Some think the United States could export its way out of the depression. But a radical restructuring of trade agreements and infrastructure would have to come first, followed by years of expansion. Moreover, the rest of the world isn’t in a position to buy our stuff. The rate of expansion of the economies of China and Japan is slowing down. Germany and other European Union nations are imposing austerity measures. Globalization is key. Writing in The Wall Street Journal, John H. Makin argues that the actions of individual G20 nations threaten to bring the whole system crashing down in a Keynesian “paradox of thrift.” Makin says: “Because all governments are simultaneously tightening fiscal policy, growth is cut so much that revenues collapse and budget deficits actually rise.” Adds Mike Whitney of Eurasia Review: “[President Barack] Obama intends to double exports within the next decade. Every other nation has the exact same plan.” One can hardly blame workers for fighting back. Two weeks after protesters rioted at the G20 summit meeting, Toronto police are pouring through photos to track down offenders. Whether the anti-globalization protesters are motivated by the struggle for liberation and economic equality, they symbolize the best chance to save the economy. If the system cannot be saved, it must be revamped and replaced. If the cops were smart, they would track down and arrest those who are ruining the economy. They could start by releasing the photos of the G20 attendees.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 9

CITYDESK/NEWS IT’S ALL ABOUT BIG OIL

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NEWS ALTER NATIVE POW ER DEVELOPM ENT, NOR THW ES T, LLC

New developments have arisen in the ongoing conversations surrounding a proposal to ship more than 200 oversize loads across U.S. Highway 12. BW covered the controversy in “Taking the Scenic Route” in the July 7 edition. Idaho’s Department of Transportation officially closed its comment period on the issue last week and more than 400 comments were logged. ITD promises to answer the questions and concerns “sometime in August” before deciding whether to issue permits to Exxon/Mobil/Imperial. The oil superpower wants to ship the massive oil drilling equipment from South Korea over the Pacific, up the Columbia River, across U.S. Highway 12, through Montana and up to the Kearl Lake region of Alberta, Canada. Among the comments is a 10-page missive from three non-profits—Advocates for the West, Idaho Rivers United and Friends of the Clearwater—saying they want ITD to review state code regarding “legal limits” before offering the permits. Mel Coulter, a spokesman for ITD, said the issue has been referred to Idaho’s Attorney General’s Office for review. Meanwhile, there are some interesting developments in Montana, where Exxon is spending millions of dollars to raise or bury hundreds of utility lines to possibly make way for the loads. Exxon has confirmed that it will be spending more than $21 million for relocation of the power lines at approximately 200 crossings. About 50 have already been taken down and buried. The majority are in and around Missoula, but there are others in the Helena and Great Falls districts. One more wrinkle: The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers plans to shut down barge traffic on the Columbia River system for extended repairs beginning in December. Might that hamper Exxon’s plans? Not a chance. Exxon plans to position about 40 of the loads (some bigger than a T-rex) before the barging is halted. Forty would be enough for them to stay “on schedule” when the river traffic resumes in mid-March. One more big story involving big oil is about to play out in a federal courtroom in Boise. The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court has hand-picked a panel of seven federal judges to decide how to proceed with lawsuits related to BP’s spill in the Gulf of Mexico. To date, BP faces more than 300 lawsuits seeking billions of dollars in potential claims as damage from the worst oil spill in U.S. history. The Boise panel, also known as a Multidistrict Litigation, will be split into two phases. One MDL will cover economic loss and environmental damage claims in a dozen states. The other MDL will cover lawsuits by investors in BP U.S. shares who claim the company’s officers failed to disclose safety problems or artificially inflated stock value. No word yet on who the judges will be, but an Associated Press analysis of financial disclosure reports found that 37 of the 64 active or senior judges in Gulf Coast districts have links to the oil and gas industry. Citydesk will cover the historymaking MDL beginning Thursday, July 29, at boiseweekly.com. —George Prentice

THE GOOD, THE GREEN AND THE UGLY

Powering your iPad with sun, wind and poop RACHEL KRAUSE AND GEORGE PRENTICE There he was on the July 14 front page of the New York Times. Those scheming eyes. That devil-may-care grin. And that big-as-Texas cowboy hat. The ultimate bad-ass of big oil, J.R. Ewing (or at least actor Larry Hagman, reviving the ’70s icon who double-dealt his way to fictional fortune on the TV series Dallas). But the 2010 version of J.R. was promoting—brace yourself—solar energy. Instead of “drill baby drill,” this J.R. is extolling “shine baby shine.” Conventional wisdom maintains that alternative energy evolves from concept into reality once the marketplace drives the conversation. “That’s exactly right,” said Robert Paul, managing member of Alternative Power Development. “For years, there’s been a lot of talk about renewable energy in Idaho. This is reality.” This reality is Paul’s 20-year agreement with Idaho Power to sell the sun. Specifically, it will come from something called Grand View Solar PV One, a field of solar panels on land leased from the J.R. Simplot Company about 16 miles west of Mountain Home. It’s to be the largest commercial operation of its kind in Idaho and the only agreement of its kind with Idaho Power. Picture 180 structures, each about the size of a hay barn, on 200 acres. The “solar barns” will have a one-sided slanted roof, at a right angle, with the high side to the north and the low side to the south. Paul said Idaho is the solar industry’s best kept secret. “Southwest Idaho is just about as good as California or the Southwest. Given the lay of the land and the number of sunny, cloudless days, the insolate rate is very high,” said Paul. Insolation is the measure of solar radiation energy received on a given surface in a given time. Pending a green light from Idaho’s Public Utilities Commission, Paul is expecting to break ground in the fourth quarter of 2010. The $75 million construction project is expected to generate 100 plus construction jobs and should take six to eight months for completion. “But we can begin generating power as early as December or January, as the solar barns are built in phases,” said Paul. Paul is an alternative energy veteran.

Waiting for the “green” light. Soon 180 “solar barns” will be built on land owned by J.R. Simplot Company.

He was a project developer of some of the first commercial wind farms in the West. So he nodded approvingly when we spoke of another of Idaho’s green energy landmarks, this one on a rural windswept ridge 10 miles east of Idaho Falls. The $300 million Goshen North Wind Farm will boast massive turbines, measuring 270 feet in diameter, more than the length of a Boeing 747. But there is an unexpected tint to this green project. One need look no further than its investor: British Petroleum. Yes, that BP. Amanda Abbot, director of Government and Public Affairs at BP Wind Energy, said her parent company’s immediate priority is managing the massive oil spill in the Gulf, but the focus of its “green” subsidiary is to “manage our wind energy businesses and continue to deliver on our strategy. We’re in this for the long haul.” Citing her company’s interests in eight wind farms nationwide, Abbot scoffs at the idea of questioning their motives. “I don’t think a $4 billion investment is a publicity stunt.” BP’s Goshen North collaborator is Northwest-based Ridgeline Energy. Rich Rayhill, its vice president, said most regional energy companies need a bigger partner. “A lot of the studies are hundreds of thousands of dollars. And when you’re signing up for turbines, that’s millions of dollars of checks you’re writing. It’s economically overwhelming, and you need someone that’s got the money.” Rayhill said he would have preferred if the wind-power were heading for the Idaho grid. “We tried to sell it to both Idaho Power and Rocky Mountain Power. We entered into competitive bidding processes, but we weren’t successful.” He said even though the project won’t generate power for Idaho residents (it’s heading to California), he estimates a $20 million

impact to the local economy during construction alone. But something very different in the wind is swirling around a third alternative energy proposal. Simply put, they want to power your iPad with poop. At a Concentrated Animal Feeding Operation, manure is collected, liquid is separated from solid, the solids are composted and the liquid goes into a heated digester that speeds decomposition, releasing methane gas. The methane is burned, and the heat is used to power a turbine, creating electricity. The formal name is anaerobic digesting. Idaho Power has the green light to enter into sales agreements to buy cow patty power from three such projects, all from the same developer, New Energy One of Meridian. We’re guessing that New Energy takes calls from Idaho Power. They didn’t take ours. We wanted to ask about hundreds of thousands of dollars in federal subsidization for such projects in Idaho, and if CAFO-derived methane should indeed be included in a renewable energy portfolio. But they didn’t return our first call. Or our second. Or third. The company didn’t return any of the six calls BW placed. Maybe they were worried we might read a New York Times op-ed from cattle rancher and lawyer Nicolette Hahn Niman who called the concept a “load of manure.” Or maybe they were concerned that we’d read the Sierra Club’s official guidance on methane digesters that claimed “the benefits are so small for CAFO digesters, that they’re not consistent with good energy policy.” Or maybe they were nervous we’d stumble upon the Grace Factory Farm Project’s position statement on methane digesters that says “they do almost nothing to make a very serious problem less serious.” The sun, the wind and the poop are clearly alternative, but some are greener than others. And one is, let’s say, more brown than green. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 11

CITIZEN

DANA KEHR

Fighting for a healthy education system, not a health-care lawsuit ZACH HAGADONE

What led to the founding of Citizens for the Future of Idaho? Camille Meadows—a friend of mine— and I had been talking over bridge about what was going on with the Legislature and the economy in general, and then when we saw that [Idaho] filed the lawsuit after the Legislature passed the Idaho Health Freedom Act, it seemed to us that the state is focused on lower priority things. From our perspective, the focus should be on the things that would make Idaho grow. That would be education so that our children can get good jobs and draw new business into the state, improve the economy as a whole and our infrastructure ...

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We’ve got to prioritize where we spend our money. If you can’t put food on the table you don’t plan a family trip to Europe. Your organization is focused on the health-care-reform lawsuit, but your name implies a much broader mandate. What other areas do you plan to target? We’re really trying to target refocusing on education. Our belief is that to give our children a good future they need to have a strong education. Equally, to draw new business into the state we need to have a strong educational system. You can’t just keep cutting taxes to attract new business ... How are we going to attract new business if we have an education system that everybody pans? Whether you agree or disagree with the law, this isn’t how we should be spending money … What we’ve committed to is participating in this lawsuit and sharing the cost, and that commitment appears to be open-ended over multiple years. That’s a drain on the state budget, which doesn’t allow us money for the educational system … or rebuilding our roads to employ more people who are already here. That’s why our name wasn’t “We’re Against the Health-Care Lawsuit.” Idaho’s leading role in the lawsuit is viewed by many as a lightning rod for partisan opposition not only to the healthcare reform bill, but the role of the federal government in general. Is the Citizens for the Future of Idaho affiliated with any one party? Whose interests are you representing? We’re trying to represent parents and

JER EMY LANNINGHAM

Dana Kehr, a retired IBM marketing executive, thinks Idaho’s staunch opposition to health-care reform—illustrated by its role in a controversial, multi-state lawsuit against the feds to bar reform measures—is a colossal waste of money. Especially at a time when education budgets are being slashed and burned. Together with a friend, Camille Meadows, Kehr founded the informal, grass-roots organization Citizens for the Future of Idaho. Its goal: hand a petition to Attorney General Lawrence Wasden by early October demanding the Gem State get out of the suit and restore support for education. The petition—which goes under the heading “Classrooms Not Courtrooms”—is available online at petitiononline.com/cncidaho/petition.html. Kehr, who admits that this is her first time getting involved in any type of protest, spoke with BW about the origins of the group and what it hopes to accomplish.

children and small business, and we’re really concerned about the future of the state as a whole. It also includes the Main Street Alliance, which is a small business group. Our group is comprised of educators, small business people, parents, grandparents, people who are just concerned about where the state is going and the priorities that the Legislature and governor have. What do you hope to achieve through this effort? Is there a definite goal—like getting Idaho out of the lawsuit—or is that not enough? Our petition has two components: one is that the state withdraws from the lawsuit because we shouldn’t be committing our money to that when we don’t have the money to begin with. The other is that the 2010-2011 state Legislature improves the educational system ... They were just looking at across the board cuts and let the school districts take care of themselves. We needed some leadership—whether it was Gov. Otter or State Superintendent Tom Luna—to say we should cut strategically, so there’s some plan. There wasn’t a plan ... it was thoughtless.

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BASQUE FOR

BEGINNERS A guide to getting your Basque on during Jaialdi B Y TA R A MO R G A N

A

AD AM RO SENLUND

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nyone who grew up in Boise is privy to one indisputable fact: Basques know how to party. Whether they’re dancing jotas, drinking kalimotxos or eating croquetas, Basque people live it up with an unrivaled zeal. That’s why for Jaialdi 2010—a massive quinquennial Basque festival that runs from Tuesday, July 27, through Sunday, Aug. 1, and is expected to draw 35,000-40,000 people to Boise— we’re bringing you the unofficial guide to Basque culture, a Basque for Dummies, if you will. We’ve got a rundown on how to drink, eat, dance, speak and play sports like the Basques. So, study up; the pop quiz is on the streets. And it’ll come five drinks deep, when you least expect it.

EDATEKO (DRINKING) Red wine and Coca Cola—the drink of the gods meets the drink of the masses. Though at first blush, this combo sounds like a botched high school stab at mixing whatever is in your parents’ fridge, it is, in fact, one of the most well-known Basque cocktails, the kalimotxo (callie-MO-cho). Served over ice with a 50/50 Coke-tocheap-red-wine ratio, the kalimotxo is a popular drink among Basque youth, who often mix up a batch while gathered on the streets for the pre-party tradition, botellon (bow-TIE-ohn). And though you’re not going to feel as fresh as a daisy after a night of drinking gut-rot red wine with a sugary carbonated fizz, these refreshing little headaches will be

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thrust into your hot hands at Jaialdi faster than you can say “eskerrik asko” (es-KARI-gaas-go, thank you). “Kalimotxo is definitely the most popular [drink we sell],” said Matthew Mayer, a server at the Basque Block eatery Bar Gernika. “We also sell a Basque cider, it’s a dry cider. A lot of people when they order it, they expect something sweeter, like an Ace Pear Cider.” That dry cider, or sagardo, is a good booze option for those with less of a sweet tooth. The non-sparkling, low-alcohol beverage (4-6 percent) is generally consumed soon after it has been produced at sagardotegi, or Basque cider houses. If it’s not poured directly from a barrel, sagardo is served with the bottle held high in the air above the glass to aerate it. This aerating tradition is also instrumental in serving another Basque hooch staple: Txakoli (CHALK-o-lee). This light green, slightly effervescent white wine is frequently poured from above in small portions known as txikito (cheek-EE-toe), and the wine often accompanies pintxos (PEEN-chose), or Basque tapas. Much like the dry, effervescent Portuguese white wine, vinho verde, txakoli is swiftly making its name stateside as a refreshing summer drink. For the more experimental, there’s the ever-popular Basque booze bomb picon punch. Served on the rocks with pecan liqueur, grenadine and soda water with a float of brandy and a twist of lemon, picon punch is more well-known among the French Basques than the Spanish Basques, though you’ll still find it on the menu at both Leku Ona and the Basque Center.

JATEKO (EATING)

The txikiteo (chee-kee-TAYo), or pintxos crawl, is a large part of the Basque socializing experience. In cities large and small throughout the Basque country, friends move from bar to bar, sipping small pours of wine, beer or cider and scarfing down an array of Basque tapas. The pintxos are usually set out on the bar counter on platters, sometimes with giant, dripping pigs’ legs hanging nearby. Patrons grab a plate and load it up with whatever tapas look appealing—seafood, fried morsels, meats,

cheeses, olives—then they pay per item. “Txikiteo is going from one little bar to the next and they have the txikitos, which is a small wine, like 2 to 3 ounces,” said Tara McElhose-Eiguren, co-owner of the Basque Market. “Then you can get maybe a little bit to eat there and then you go to the next place, and that’s basically how you get to see all your friends.” Some of the more popular pintxos you’ll find the Basque Market serving up during Jaialdi include tortilla (Basque omelet), a quichelike egg wedge filled with potatoes, onions and often pimento peppers; croquetas, deep fried flour balls with various fillings including cod, chicken and cheese with piquillo peppers; and assorted bocadillos, or mini sandwiches. In addition to hand-rolling 38,000 croquetas, the Basque Market also has a few other culinary surprises in store for Jaialdi. “We’re going to be making paella every few hours during the busy times,” said McElhose-Eiguren. “We’re also going to be doing lots of the [frozen] white sangria … during the busier hours we’ll pull out more tapas and have more variety.” Another Basque food staple is chorizo: sausage made from coarsely chopped pork, pork fat, peppers, garlic and salt. Chorizos vary throughout the different regions of Spain (and Mexico) depending on the type of pork, the spices and how the chorizos are cured. “They use lots of paprika, which is Spanish, we use the pepper in the Basque country, the choricero, we call it,” said Ramon Barquin, executive chef at Leku Ona. “We let it dry and we use it for the chorizo we make in the Basque country … In Mexico, they use the ancho, a different pepper.” For the more adventurous Basque eaters, a popular jet-black Basque delicacy is squid served in its own ink. For an idea of how special this dish is, note that it takes a whopping 2 pounds of baby squid to produce just one-half teaspoon of ink. Leku Ona carries this creepy—but delicious—plate on its full dinner menu. “We stew the squid with onions, green bell peppers, tomatoes until the squid is tender. We puree the rest and add the black ink,” explained Barquin. Another trippy Basque treat served up on

Saturdays at Gernika is beef tongue, prepared in a rich tomato and garlic piperade base. Because of the sheer number of people flooding the Basque Block for Jaialdi, Gernika will be condensing its menu, which might temporarily mean no beef tongue. “We’re scaling down our menu, because we know it’s going to be super, super busy, so if you do come down and you’re missing one of your favorite things on the menu, know that it’s just gone temporarily,” said Gernika server Matthew Mayer. “We have to streamline our prep work so we can make sure we have enough food for the amount of people who are here.”

DANTZAN (DANCING)

If you’ve waltzed down the Basque Block in the summertime, you’ve likely seen a number of teens and adults grasping hands, tapping feet, snapping fingers and shouting in the middle of the street. The Oinkari (oh-inn-CAR-ee) Basque dancers, who are celebrating their 50th anniversary, are a group of local dancers with Basque heritage who frequently perform around town. Dressed in traditional garb—white slacks and shirts with red hats and sashes for the men and flowing red or green skirts and nubby kneehigh white socks for the ladies—the Oinkari perform an array of folk dances from a variety of Basque country provinces. “The two popular dances are going to be the jota (HOE-tah) and the porrusalda (POURoo-sal-dah),” explained Oinkari President Tyler Smith. “Basically there’s different types and each group has their own jota and porrusalda. [Ours is] a three-part jota, meaning that there’s three different steps and you typically do them two to three times.” According to the North American Basque Organizations, Basque dances are split into three basic categories: the romerias, or openair dances, sword dances and end of festival dances, which wrap up feast days and carnival festivities. One of the most well-known Basque dances is the dantzari dantza or jantzari jantza, which is danced throughout many of the Basque provinces on the evening of a feast day. But Basque dancing isn’t only for the welltrained. At big celebrations like Jaialdi, you

JAIALDI HISTORY Sometimes, a party is so good, it takes on a life of its own, growing and evolving into a whole new being. That’s exactly what happened to Jaialdi. It started in 1987 as a onetime weekend festival held at the Old Idaho State Penitentiary, and a way for Basques in the area to get together. But it went off so well that three years later, then Gov. Cecil Andrus asked that the local Basque community put on another celebration to help mark Idaho’s centennial in 1990. It was at that point that a tradition was born. “We had so many friends

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getting together, we thought we should do this every five years,” said Dave Eiguren, a Jaialdi board member since the first celebration. By 1995, the event had outgrown the Old Pen and had to be moved to the fairgrounds at Expo Idaho. Now, it’s regarded as the largest gathering of Basques in the world, and organizers expect it will draw between 35,000 and 40,000 people to Boise for the oneweek event. The success of the event is credited largely to the fact that the primary focus of the festival is fun.

“It’s not political at all,” Eiguren said. “It’s all fun. The city is easy to get around and it’s friendly and it’s reasonable to get here. “We didn’t build the festival to make money,” he said. “We built it to have fun first.” In fact, Eiguren points out that event prices haven’t changed since 1987. Beyond drawing Basques from across the country, Jaialdi provides those from the Basque region the perfect excuse to visit friends and relatives in the United States. This year, two planes have been chartered to bring revelers from Europe, in-

cluding several groups of dancers and traditional athletes. Of course, Basque lineage is not required to appreciate Jaialdi. “It’s gotten to be less Basque and more friends,” Eiguren said with a laugh. “Everyone has their own definition of ‘Jaialdi,’” he said. “Some love the [Catholic] mass. Some love the drinks. Some people love the dancing ... it shows you can be Basque and you can be American and people don’t know the difference. They’re all Basque for the week.” —Deanna Darr

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JAIALDI 2010

SCHEDULE TUESDAY, JULY 27 WELCOME TO JAIALDI—5-11 p.m. on the Basque Block in downtown Boise, FREE. Food, drink and music throughout the evening, with pelota and handball exhibitions in the Fronton Building. The Basque Museum will feature an exhibit highlighting Basque immigration through Ellis Island.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 28 WELCOME TO JAIALDI—5-11 p.m., see description above. BASQUE CULTURAL CONFERENCE—7-9 p.m. at the Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., FREE. Prominent experts from around the world will discuss Basque immigration.

THURSDAY, JULY 29 SPORTS NIGHT—7 p.m. at Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., $12. Professional Basque athletes from the Basque Countr y will demonstrate traditional weight lifting, wood chopping and farm sports competitions, including throwing bales of hay, lifting wagons and carr ying milk cans. Tickets available at qwestarenaidaho.com.

FRIDAY, JULY 30 BASQUEING ON THE BLOCK—Noon-6 p.m. on the Basque Block in downtown Boise, FREE. Food, drink and music throughout the afternoon. FESTA’RA—7 p.m. at the Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, $28. An evening of music and dance featuring two dance groups from the Basque Country, the Oinkari Basque Dancers bertzolariak and the debut of a Basque-inspired dance by the Trey McIntyre Project. Tickets available at idahotickets.com.

HITZ (SPEAKING)

The Basque language, for all of its unpronounceable k’s and x’s, is the glue that holds the Basque culture together. Officially called Euskara, the Basque language is the last remaining pre-Indo European language in Western Europe. Though the language had to slink underground during Spanish dictator Francisco Franco’s reign from 1936-1975, there’s a new generation of Basques who are sending their kids to Basque language preschools, like the Boiseko Ikastola, to preserve their cultural heritage. And while we can’t explain the first thing about how the Basque language works, we did have some Basque experts translate a few key phrases you’ll need for Jaialdi. A word to the wise: pronouncing any of these phrases even moderately correct might land you in a bar stool next to a rosy-cheeked old Basque dude as he explains every last detail of his childhood growing up in the old country. In Basque. Hello. Kaixo. Goodbye. Agur.

SATURDAY, JULY 31

Yes/No. Bai/Ez.

BASQUEING AT THE FAIRGROUNDS—10 a.m.6 p.m. at Expo Idaho, 5610 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, $3 children, $5 adults. Official opening ceremonies are followed by 36 dance groups from six states, as well as vendor booths, sporting events, food and drink, as well as a display of traditional sheep wagons. Tickets available at idahotickets.com.

How are you? Zer moduz?

CATHOLIC MASS—7 p.m., St. John’s Cathedral, 775 N. Eighth St., FREE. Mass will be celebrated in the Basque language with a performance by the Onati dancers. BASQUE STREET DANCE—9 p.m.-1:30 a.m., Expo Idaho, 5610 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, $5 children, $10 adults. Music by Amuma Says No and groups from the Basque Country. Tickets available at idahotickets.com.

SUNDAY, AUG. 1 BASQUEING AT THE FAIRGROUNDS—11 a.m.-5 p.m., Expo Idaho, 5610 N. Glenwood St., Garden City, $3 children, $5 adults. Official closing ceremonies as well as music, weight lifting demonstrations, vendors and food booths. Tickets available at idahotickets. com. For more information, visit jaialdi.com.

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can expect to be swept into a conga line-like frenzy of shuffling feet and whirling partners. But those with two left oinak (feet) needn’t worry. One of the popular festival dances you’re likely to see at Jaialdi is the jautzi, similar in nature to the American square dance. “There are different festival dances, basically, one of them is what we call jautzi dances which are the call dances,” said Smith. “Probably one of the most popular ones is zaspi jautzi. That is a call dance so people playing the song will actually call and tell you what steps to do.” But should you care to prepare for the moment you find yourself face-to-face, grasping hands with a smiling Basque amuma (ahMOO-mah, grandma), check out the helpful Basque dancing video tutorials at the North American Basque Organizations website.

I’m wonderful. Oso ondo. I’m drunk. Mozkortuta nago. Where are you from? Nongoa zara? I’m from Boise. Boise-koa naiz. How is your family? Zer moduz familia? Where is the bathroom? Non dago komuna? How much for a kalimotxo? Zenbat balio du kalimotxo batek? Take your hands off my drink! Ez ukitu nire edaria! Can I have a pull off your bota bag? Zatoa pasatzen? My drink is not strong enough. Edari hau ez da nahiko sendoa. Put this drink on his/her tab. Berak ordainduko du edari hau. My grandma could dance you under the table. Nire amumak zuk baino mila aldiz hobeto dantzatzen du. I did not order the beef tongue. Ez dut mingaina eskatu. I have squid ink in my eye. Txipiroi tinta dut begian. That is a fine-looking sheep. Bai ardi ederra.

The Boise Weekly is amazing. Boise Weekly apartakoa da.

JOLAZTU (PLAYING)

Basque sports tend toward minimalism. Esku is one of many varieties of pelota (ball), all played on a regulation 36-meter court. Esku is the most basic form, requiring only a leather ball that’s a bit smaller than a baseball with a solid core. “The object of the game is similar to that of racquetball or squash,” explained Edu Sarria, member of the Boise Fronton Association. “The ball has to hit the front wall. It can hit the side wall first if it wants, but it has to hit the front wall at least every time and then you get one bounce to reach the wall … You score points on every point, not like side-out volleyball.” The sport’s other varieties all have to do with different paleta (paddle) and ball sizes. Paleta goma, for example, is the style most frequently played in Boise that utilizes a hard rubber ball and a paddle. Other variations of Basque pelota include the well-known jai alai, which is played on a larger court and uses an elongated xistera (chees-TARE-ah, hand basket), and baleen— popular among women—which uses a thin, wide paddle with a super bouncy ball. Because only 50 or so people can fit on the Boise pelota court—which is located in the Fronton Building, at 619 Grove St., and is 6 meters smaller than regulation courts—the Jaialdi games will be simulcast at the Basque Center a few buildings down. “We’ve aligned our court so that it looks like a 36-meter court, it feels like a 36-meter court, all of the lines are equidistant from one another, but it’s six meters shorter,” explained Sarria. Another popular Basque sport, one that is perhaps the most baffling to Westerners, is stone-lifting. According to John Arrieta, weight lifter and Eusko Karolk board member, the sport is rooted in necessity. “From what they understand, in the old country, it’s one of our oldest sports, if not the oldest,” said Arrieta. “All the houses and cathedrals and everything is made from stone, so in order to build them up, you have to lift it in place. You also have stone pulling in the old country, by man and animals, and they still do that as sport. They didn’t have forklifts and cranes and stuff.” Stone lifting is one of many Basque rural sports (herri kirolak)—which include stone pulling, wood chopping, hay bale tossing and wagon lifting—that measure strength and endurance. To be a champion lifter, you have to be able to hoist 220-550 pound rocks as many times in a row as possible. “In competition, a person is given a type of stone of whatever dimension and whatever weight and given a period of time to see how many times they can lift that up to their shoulder and back again,” said Arrieta. “They drop it on the ground and then they do it again.”

AGUR (GOODBYE)

Now that you know pintxos from pelotas and porrusaldas, we hope you take this newfound Basque-pertise and use it to make Boise’s thousands of out-of-town guests feel more at home during Jaialdi. Or, at the very least, we hope you’ve learned how to properly slur out an order for a kalimotxo to wash down your chorizo. Baby steps. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Holy cow! The Swingin’ Utters are coming to Boise.

THURSDAY JULY 22 punk SWINGIN’ UTTERS Situated along Myrtle Street near WinCo Foods is a white-trimmed gray garage with a reader board holding a curious statement: “Swingin’ Utters & Cute Lepers July 22 at Redroom 601 W. Main St.” Although this may appear to be some unfortunate rearrangement of lettering by local hooligans, this is no practical joke. Swingin’ Utters, which formed in the ’80s in San Francisco, is coming to Boise on Thursday, July 22. Add the Cute Lepers and local-trio Roofied Resistance into the equation and what results is a boisterous street-punk evening. Swingin’ Utters have stayed true to their self-proclaimed “proletariat roots and blue-collar attitude” throughout the years and have maintained a strong following of fans despite not releasing an original studio album in seven years. However, their latest release Here, Under Protest comes out later this fall. Seattle favorites the Cute Lepers, who cite influences by the Clash and the Buzzcocks, are currently on tour until September when the band will make a stop at Bumbershoot Music and Arts Festival in Seattle. 9 p.m., $12, Red Room Tavern, 601 W. Main St., 208-343-7034. You won’t find mint juleps and giant sun hats at this derby.

WEDNESDAY JULY 21 roller skating HELL ON WHEELS For those of you who remember your adolescent trips to the roller rink, Bob Ray’s documentary Hell on Wheels may remind you of a junior high birthday party gone bad. Bob Ray, an award-winning independent film director, is bringing his documentary film to the Egyptian Theatre for its Idaho debut. The movie follows a rough group of women from Austin, Texas, who in 2001 decided to usher in a revival of the relatively unknown sport roller derby. Roller derby is an odd mix of the ’80s roller-skating craze and the smash-your-face-in attitude of rugby. Interestingly enough, the sport is most popular among tattooed, Betty Page-esque ladies—likely because of its scrappy, punk rock ethos. The film takes a look at the inner turmoil and hardship faced by these independent fems and how their eventual success marked the birth of 21st century roller derby, a sport that has spread all around the globe. Boise is the fourth stop on Bob Ray’s Down and Dirty Austin Film Tour 2010. Hell on Wheels will be playing at the Egyptian Theatre on Wednesday, July 21, at 8 p.m. with doors at 7 p.m. This event is sponsored by Boise’s own Treasure Valley Roller Girls, a local all-girls roller derby league. 7 p.m. doors, $8, The Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-345-0454, egyptiantheatre.net.

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WEDNESDAY JULY 21 lecture URBAN LUNCH When the appeal of spending an entire weekend loafing on the couch watching marathons of The Hills, Real Housewives of New Jersey or Law and Order begins to wane, you’ll be thankful you live in a town where going on a date with Mother Nature is no more than 10 minutes away. The Greenbelt, Foothills, Boise River, Lucky Peak Reservoir, MK Nature Center and countless parks keep Boise from facing a tragic fate as an asphalt hellhole in the

middle of the Idaho desert. Local entrepreneurial incubator, Boise WaterCooler, hosts monthly panel discussions during afternoon lunch breaks, and this month’s focus is “Wild (Nature) in the City.” A four-person panel consisting of Andy Brunelle of the U.S. Forest Ser vice and Trout Unlimited; Rob Teidemann, ecologist for Ecological Design; Julia Grant, Foothills open space manager for Boise City Parks and Recreation; and Wendy Larimore, development coordinator with Parks and Rec, will address the question of how to sustain and improve the scenic elements of the city. The talk is free, but if you’d like to reser ve a $10 lunch by

Jenny’s Lunch Line, email urbanlunch@gmail.com. Noon-1 p.m., FREE, Boise WaterCooler, 1401 W. Idaho St., 208-908-0624, watercoolerboise.com.

THURSDAYSATURDAY JULY 22-24 theater DOUBLE FEATURE For the past 10 years or so, CERN laboratories in Switzerland has been in the process of discovering the origin of the universe. Specifically, by developing the Large Hadron Collider, a cavernous device, located WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

R OB B IE AU GS PU R GER

FIND

DISPOSABLE BARBECUE White Fang gets amped for their upcoming Ziesta performance.

FRIDAY-SUNDAY JULY 23-25

Lift your spirits at Bogus in the summertime.

music zestival ZIESTA Long-time partners in crime, “siesta” and “fiesta,” are cut from the same linguistic cloth. When you fiesta at night, you siesta the next afternoon. But what the heck is a ziesta? “Ziesta was originally conceived as a backyard barbecue to help celebrate Jaialdi, which is the following weekend,” said Sam Tibbs, co-founder of the new two-day music festival. “The more we started talking about it, the more we thought it would have a greater impact if we increased the number of bands and made it more of an event.” Long-time friends who both recently lived in Memphis, Tenn., Tibbs and Jon Zubizarreta networked and got an assortment of out-of-town garage rock acts to sign on for a weekend-long music festival. On Friday, July 23, at Neurolux you can rock out to Thee Headliners (Portland, Ore.), Broken Spells (Provo, Utah), White Fang (Portland, Ore.), Bare Wires (Oakland, Calif.) and the Goodnight Loving (Milwaukee, Wisc.). Then, on Saturday, July 24, beginning at noon, there’s a barbecue behind the Boise Depot catered by Basque restaurant Leku Ona with music by Thee Headliners, La Knots (Boise), Low-fi (Boise), Sallie Ford and the Sound Outside (Portland, Ore.) and Pure Country Gold (Portland, Ore.). Finally, on Saturday night, Neurolux will host Colleen Green (Oakland, Calif.), Girlfriends (Boston, Mass.), Thee Goochi Boiz (Boulder, Colo.), the Parallels (Vancouver, BC), the Mean Jeans (Portland, Ore.) and the Mystery Lights (Salinas, Calif.). “All these bands ... kind of have rock ’n’ roll attitude,” said Tibbs. “There’s a bit of swagger. There’s some stage antics. I don’t know if I’m going to go so far as to say there’s going to be high leg kicks, but you might see some windmill guitar riffs.” Ziesta wraps up on Sunday, July 25, with a float down the Boise River starting at Barber Park at 1 p.m. After that, you’re gonna need a mad siesta. Friday, July 23-Saturday, July 25, $10-$12, Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886. Barbecue: Saturday, July 24, Noon-4 p.m., FREE, behind the Boise Depot, ziesta-rocks.com. downside is the potential formation of a black hole that could destroy the Earth. Rich Orloff’s comedy, The Whole Shebang—part of the Stage Coach Theatre’s double feature—isn’t quite as scientifically privy (or devastating) as the CERN

about 100 meters underground and circling roughly 30 kilometers. The primary purpose of this machine is to smash two proton beams into each other, which could potentially reveal how the universe was created and where we came from. The

S U B M I T

SATURDAY JULY 24 mountain biking SUMMER SUMMIT FEST TWENTY TEN The withdrawals are setting in—the early morning sweats, dreams of fluffy white powder, itching for that “on top of the world” feeling, forgetting about day jobs or family, sailing into a white abyss. Unfortunately, ski season doesn’t start for another five or six months, but if you’re looking for a good excuse to get on top of the mountain—a temporary fix—Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area is opening up the chair lift for Summer Summit Fest Twenty Ten. Load up your mountain bike and helmet and breathe easy as the chairlift carries you to the top of the hill. Then get on your bike and topple down the rocky gradient. Repeat as many times as necessar y. Or, if you’re too worried about hitting a rock and diving head first over your handlebars, pack a lunch and take a quiet hike with the kids. But don’t miss out. This is one of only two days this summer that the lift will be running, other wise you’ll just have to wait until the snow falls. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., $15, Bogus Basin Mountain Recreation Area, 2600 N. Bogus Basin Road, 208-332-5100.

experiments but the plot is similar. God is working on a science project—the creation of Earth and its inhabitants. The project could go up in smoke at anytime, so God seeks the help of two other nerds in completing the job. Again, the lives of everyday people are put in jeopardy by dorks in lab coats. In a similar mash up of science and religion, Mitch Albom’s play And The Winner Is is the story of egotistical movie star Tyler Johnes,

Hypothetically, let’s say you graduated college in the midst of a recession so buried in oppressive student debt that even when you manage to find a job, you’re still going to be living in a studio apartment for a long, long time. As a studio-dweller you would likely lack a patio/porch/ yard, so you would also theoretically lack a barbecue. And what if, on top of that, your friends are mired in the same situation and also sans Hibachi. Under such a barbecue-less nightmare scenario, how would you ever accomplish the Ameriezgrill.com can dream of having a drunken barbecue at the river/sporting event/roof of Boise State with scantily clad members of the opposite sex? Well fear not because the geniuses—nay, “heroes”—at EZ Grill have the solution: the disposable instant grill. For less than $10 you get a complete barbecue and grill packed with natural match-ready charcoal and fold-out legs that gives you 90 minutes of fire on which to roast a slab of the dead animal or vegetable of your choice. When you’re done, no need to pack it up or scrape off burnt chunks of flotsam. Just trash it and you’re gold, Ponyboy. The only other thing you’ll need to feel like you’re in a beer commercial is a single match to light it with. Game effin’ on. —Josh Gross

who dreams of winning an Oscar. After finally receiving a nomination, Johnes dies. Pissed off and downtrodden, Johnes pleads with God to let him return to Earth and claim his prize. God obliges and Johnes drags his friends into a whirlwind of comedy. Thursday, July 22, 7:30 p.m., $12; Friday, July 23-Saturday, July 24, 8:15 p.m. $15; Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 Overland Road, 208-342-2000, stagecoachtheatre.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JULY 21 On Stage THE 39 STEPS—Monty-Pythonesque adaptation of the Hitchcock Film by the same name, in which a man must go on the run from the law in order to clear his name of a murder he did not commit, exposing an international conspiracy in the process. 7 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208578-9122, www.companyoffools. org. AN IDEAL HUSBAND—Oscar Wilde-penned comedy of manners in which a woman tries to blackmail her former lover into leaving his wife and taking her back. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208429-9908, box office 208-3369221, www.idahoshakespeare. org.

HONK JUNIOR—Musical adaptation of The Ugly Duckling, performed by actors ages 6-18. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, www.boiselittletheater.org.

Citizen ALLRED FOR IDAHO TOWN HALL MEETING—Democratic candidate for governor, Keith Allred, will take questions from Idaho voters and talk about his campaign. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, www. egyptiantheatre.net.

Odds & Ends LIQUID’S BAD-ASS BEACH PARTY—Barbecue, limbo contest and giveaways from Mike’s Hard Lemonade, Budweiser and Jagermeister. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, www.liquidboise. com.

Food & Drink DRINKING LIBERALLY—A leftleaning group that meets to talk politics, share ideas and inspire change. 7 p.m. drinkingliberally. org. Solid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-6620.

FRIDAY JULY 23

Talks & Lectures

ADAMS FAMILY CIRCUS— Standup comedy from Jen Adams, her brother Josh Adams and Danny Amspacher. Followed by a hip-hop DJ and after party. 8 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, www. liquidboise.com.

URBAN LUNCH—Panel discussion on nature in the city featuring panelists from the Boise Parks and Rec, the U.S. Forest Service and Ecological Design. Talk is free, lunch from Jenny’s Lunch Line is available for $10. See Picks, Page 18. Noon-1 p.m. FREE. Boise Water Cooler, 1401 W. Idaho, Boise.

On Stage

BAT BOY THE MUSICAL—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org.

THE 39 STEPS—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www.companyoffools.org. DOUBLE FEATURE— Back-to-back comedies. The Whole Schebang by Rich Orloff posits that the universe is nothing more than God’s science project, one he/ she needs tutoring from two “nerds” to get an A on. And The Winner Is by Mitch Albom is the story of an actor trying to escape the afterlife to find out if he won an Oscar. See Picks, Page 18. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-342-2000, www.stagecoachtheatre.com. HONK JUNIOR—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, www.boiselittletheater.org. ISGCI OUT OF TOWN SHOW— Drag show for performers from all over the Western states. Pub crawl after show. 8 p.m. $15. Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., second floor, Capitol Terrace, Boise, 208-336-1313, www. thebalconyclub.com.

Sports & Fitness WESTERN REGIONAL WATER SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS—450 competitors will compete for regional titles in slalom, trick, jump and overall events. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. 21600 Look Lane, off Exit 26 in Caldwell. www.broadsideharbor.com.

Odds & Ends PING PONG AND PITCHERS—7 p.m. FREE. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, www. visualartscollective.com.

Kids & Teens BOISE RIVER LIFE—Art activities for kids to learn about the local aquatic ecosystem. 10 a.m.-noon FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-489-1284, www. cityofboise.org/bee/watershed.

THURSDAY JULY 22 On Stage ALLEY REPERTORY READING—Head by Oliver Russell Stoddard. 7 p.m. FREE. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, www.visualartscollective.com. BAT BOY THE MUSICAL—Musical based off the perennial cover-boy for the Weekly World News, in which the feral half-bat/ half-boy is discovered living in a cave and attempts to gain acceptance from the community of a small Southern town. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, www. idahoshakespeare.org.

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Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT SATURDAY JULY 24 Festivals & Events MASQUERADE CORONATION 2010—The new royal court of the Imperial Sovereign Gem Court of Idaho will be crowned to celebrate 30 years of giving to local charities. 6 p.m. $35. Red Lion Downtowner, 1800 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-344-7691

Workshops & Classes

Kids & Teens

INTRO TO CANNING AND FOOD PRESERVING—Learn the basics of canning, pickling and dehydrating. Fee covers basic supplies for the class. Register by emailing info@northendnursery. com. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $10. North End Organic Nursery, 2350 Hill Road, Boise, 208-389-4769, northendnursery.com.

MR. PATRICK’S WORKSHOP— Young inventors, designers and engineers can create and build with technology and different media. Ages 9-12. 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, www.adalib.org.

WATER-WISE GARDENING WORKSHOP—Learn the basics of native landscape design from Elaine Walker of High Prairie Landscape Design. 11 a.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2940, www.gardencity. lili.org.

On Stage THE 39 STEPS—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www.companyoffools.org.

Sports & Fitness

DOUBLE FEATURE— See Friday. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-342-2000, www.stagecoachtheatre.com.

WESTERN REGIONAL WATER SKI CHAMPIONSHIPS—See Saturday. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. 21600 Look Lane, off Exit 26 in Caldwell. www.broadsideharbor. com.

HONK JUNIOR—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $5-$8. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, www.boiselittletheater.org.

Green PLOW TO CHOW—Local food and farm tour. Includes lunch. Noon-5 p.m. $35. Bittercreek Ale House, 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-345-1813, www.bittercreekalehouse.com.

SUMMER ICE SHOWS—Performances by Olympic Bronze Medalist Joannie Rochette and three-time U.S. champion Johnny Weir. Dusk. $32-$98. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley, Idaho. www. visitsunvalley.com

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

SHOP TIL YOU ROCK—Musicand fashion-related activities and promotions for teens in the mall, including live music from Bank the Band. 1-6 p.m. FREE. Boise Towne Square, 925 N. Milwaukee St., Boise, 208-375-1200.

SUNDAY JULY 25 Festivals & Events CHURCH OF CRAFT—Bring any project you’ve been working on, from guitar pedals to video editing to sewing. Expect good things. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, www.visualartscollective.com.

Literature BOISE NOVEL ORCHARD—Writers meet to critique their work. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229, www. rdbooks.org.

On Stage THE 39 STEPS—See Wednesday. 3 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www.companyoffools.org. HONK JUNIOR—See Thursday. 2 p.m. $5-$8. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, www.boiselittletheater.org. A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—Shakespeare’s chickflick, orchestrated with a ’60s mod-twist. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org.

Food & Drink WINE N DINE II—Dinner and wine by Liquid and Solid. Music by Amy Weber and the Ben Burdick Trio. 4-9 p.m. $10. The Waterfront at Lake Harbor, 3050 N. Lakeharbor Lane, Boise, www. thewaterfrontboise.com.

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Workshops & Classes URBAN PERMACULTURE WORKSHOP—Morning session covers design principles and permaculture philosophy. Then an outdoor lunch. Afternoon session covers practical application. Contact 208-284-3712 or casey@ earthlydelightsfarm.com to sign up. 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. $20-$95. Draggin’ Wing Farm, 5211 Hill Road, Boise, 208-345-4199, www.waterthriftyplants.com.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 21

8 DAYS OUT MONDAY JULY 26 Festivals & Events HANDS AROUND THE CAPITOL—Celebration of the 20th anniversary of the Americans with Disability Act, featuring special guest speakers, live music, food vendors, educational booths, Capitol tours and more. 11 a.m.6 p.m. FREE. Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson, Boise.

On Stage PLAYS FROM THE ALLEY— Reading of Jef Peterson’s The Apple Doesn’t Fall, which follows Marza Hansen as she returns to her childhood home after 20 years, hoping to revisit happy childhood memories and share them with her husband and daughters. 8 p.m. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, www.visualartscollective.com.

Concerts EDGAR M. BRONFMAN CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS—Featuring selections by Brahms, Schubert, Shostakovich, Mozart and Tchaikovsky. 6:30 p.m. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley, www.sunvalley.com.

TUESDAY JULY 27 Festivals & Events JAIALDI—Music, food, sports, mustaches and chaos from the old country. It’s Basque-a-palooza. See Feature, Page 13. July 27-Aug. 1. Basque Block, 601 Grove St., Boise.

PLAYING IN THE PLAZA—Food and craft vendors, along with live music by Perhaps Never Better. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Generations Plaza, corner of Main Street and Idaho Avenue, Meridian, www.meridiancity.org.

Odds & Ends NO FEAR CHESS TOURNAMENT—Informal open competition. Cash prizes for top three competitors. 6 p.m. $3. A Novel Adventure, 906 W. Main St., Boise, 208-344-8088.

On Stage THE 39 STEPS—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www.companyoffools.org.

WEDNESDAY JULY 28

AN IDEAL HUSBAND—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org.

Festivals & Events

Talks & Lectures GOING NUCLEAR AT TWIN SPRINGS—Discussion of the sordid history of Twin Springs, a spot on the Boise River five miles above Arrowrock Dam. 7 p.m. $4. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, www. idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Boise.

JAIALDI—See Tuesday. July 27-Aug. 1. Basque Block, 601 Grove St.,

On Stage THE 39 STEPS—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www.companyoffools.org. AN IDEAL HUSBAND—See Wednesday. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org.

Kids & Teens COLLEGE ADMISSIONS FAIR— Session on how to refine your college admissions presented by the California Institute of Technology, Columbia University, Cornell University, Princeton and more. Register online at www. rpi.edu. 6 p.m. FREE. Riverstone School, 5493 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-424-5000, www.riverstonecs.org. ENVIRONMENTAL CRAFT CAMP—Learn to reuse products for your craft projects, including tin-can lanterns, mosaics and paper-making. For ages 5-8. 9:30-11:30 a.m. $45-$75. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-5501, www.ymcaboise. org.

Concerts EDGAR M. BRONFMAN CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERTS—See Monday. 6:30 p.m. Sun Valley Pavilion, Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley, www.sunvalley.com.

Odds & Ends VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO— Buy, sell, trade and listen to vinyl records with other analog musical enthusiasts. 7-10 p.m. FREE, www.vpsidaho. org. Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-4248244.

Calls to Artists

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

CRAFTY BASTARDS CRAFTERS—Handy with the handmade? Then we want you. BW has a few coveted booth spaces left for local artists to sell their handmade wares at our Crafty Bastards block party on Saturday, Aug. 28, at 10 a.m. sharp. Booth selection is juried. Photos of your work required with application. Booth space is $40 for 10-feet by 10-feet. Equipment rental is provided by Brown Rentals at $100 for tents, $10 for tables and $3 per folding chair. For information or for an application contact Meshel Miller at meshel@boiseweekly.com. HOUSE OF ART—Developer Scott Kimball will make nine condominiums on the seventh floor of a new building available to nine artists to display and sell their work on First Thursday, Aug. 5. Artists of all media may apply but are subject to panel approval. Contact szabel78@ gmail.com.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 23

NOISE

It’s toad-ally awesome to see these guys together again.

REUNITED (FOR NOW ANYWAY) Toad the Wet Sprocket, a dozen years after split PATRICK FLANARY Toad into the studio to record its debut, When Toad the Wet Sprocket recently enBread and Circus. Before long, word of the tered the studio for the first time since they group’s sound spread beyond Santa Barbara, broke up in 1998, the group made progress and by 1990, Toad’s second album, Pale, had but no promises. The Santa Barbara, Calif., the ear of several major labels, including Cofoursome feels like a band again. The men, lumbia Records. This from a band that never in or near their 40s, are recording together sent out a demo tape. and acknowledging a future for the first time “It went from no one being interested to in more than a decade. But frontman Glen every company wanting it,” said Pale proPhillips warns against any expectations of ducer Marvin Etzioni, who has since worked new material. with Counting Crows. “It really captured “It’s a distant possibility, but that’s all,” the soulful innocence of a very young band. Phillips, 39, said in an interview with Boise It was like Polaroid film, like watching the Weekly. “We’re enjoying each other’s compicture come to life. Had they stayed together pany and the lack of heaviness and tension. without breaks and maybe taken more chancThat’s a great starting place.” es, maybe it could have been America’s U2.” The quartet—comprised of Phillips, coOn the strength of melodic rock gems songwriter and guitarist Todd Nichols, bassist like “All I Want,” “Walk on the Ocean,” Dean Dinning and drummer Randy Guss— and “Something’s Always Wrong,” Toad’s has been recording new versions of Toad hits next two albums, Fear and Dulcinea, went from the band’s ’90s heyday for licensing platinum during a time when grunge ruled purposes. But no new stuff, at least for now. rock radio. The band didn’t play to pick up Saying otherwise would imply a commitment, chicks; they played for women’s rights rallies something Toad has avoided since the band and at President Bill Clinton’s inauguration. called it quits. Toad had come a long way from their first “The breakup had to happen,” Dinning tour, when “the band didn’t want to get out said. “It was clear at that time people in the of the van because they were all reading,” band wanted to go in completely different diremembered Nack, rections. Half the band Toad’s first manager. wanted to get louder, “So much for trashing half the band wanted Toad the Wet Sprocket with Hey Marseilles, Tuesday, July 27, 8 p.m., $25-$55 hotel rooms.” to get quieter.” While Toad’s 1997 Toad had been KNITTING FACTORY 416 S. Ninth St. swan song, Coil, together since Phillips 208-367-1212 proved to be the was 15, when the band bo.knittingfactory.com band’s highest-chartwas known as Three ing record, it failed Young Studs and Glen. to outsell the group’s Phillips’ mother taught previous albums. Band members clashed over chemistry, his father physics, and the guitarist how to proceed, and the following summer planned to teach high school theater after they decided to preserve morale and parted graduation. But then opportunity knocked. ways. During the next decade, Toad spoMusician Brad Nack caught the band—then radically regrouped for a handful of shows, called Toad the Wet Sprocket—at Pat’s Grass usually as an afterthought—side projects Shack in nearby Goleta. consumed each member, and Phillips toured “They were super young and already heavily to support solo records and earn a amazing,” he remembered. Nack ushered

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living for his wife and three daughters. “Given long enough, all bands become Spinal Tap,” Phillips said. “[Toad] got together previous times and there would be managers or agents trying to force us into a corner. And we would get psycho, all of us. Especially me.” But they gave it another try earlier this year, and they’ve never felt closer. Toad reformed to re-record selections from the band’s six-album catalog. With the advent of digital download websites like iTunes, many musicians argue MP3 song and album sales entitle artists to more money. Surviving members of the Allman Brothers are the latest to challenge their record company on such grounds and are suing for a bigger cut of the label’s licensing fee. Similarly, roots-rockers Cracker (“Low,” “Get Off This”) once took on Virgin by recording an independent greatest hits compilation to compete with the label’s similar collection. In the meantime, Dinning and Nichols have frequently traveled to Nashville to write songs with several musicians. One of them was an old friend, Darius Rucker, whose solo career has flourished as a major country artist since his days with Hootie and the Blowfish. Mark Bryan, Hootie’s lead guitarist, remembers touring with Toad during the ’90s. “They always take an interesting lyrical approach and write about obscure subject matter that you never expect,” Bryan said. Earlier this month, Phillips wrapped a tour with Works Progress Administration, his Americana project featuring Nickel Creek’s Sean and Sara Watkins. Toad’s Tuesday, July 27, stop at Knitting Factory will mark 12 years to the day since the band’s split. Phillips now admits Toad’s recent studio time has helped him reflect on what brought the group together 24 years ago. “We said, ‘Enough with managers and defining what it is we’re doing. If we want to play, let’s play,’” Dinning added. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 25

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY JULY 21 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Staxx Brothers and Bank. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza THE BRIDGE—With Prairie Sky Pilots. 8 p.m. $15 adv., $17 door. Bouquet

PRIZM, JULY 24, VAC The next time a movie director needs an atmospheric soundtrack for a knife-edged indie drama, sci-fi thriller or fantasy, he or she would do well to call Portland, Ore.’s Prizm. For almost two years, Jef Drawbaugh, Jason “Azmo” Walker and Kim Hansen have been wrapping dramatic synth riffs around live drums in a psychedelic Tangerine Dream-like state. Drawbaugh and Azmo played together for years, performing mostly dancey IDM laptop pop. With this project, they were looking for something different. “We were listening to a lot of ’70s German stuff,” Drawbaugh said. “We were really inspired by that. But we wanted to make it kind of current and play with hardware instead of the laptops. We just stacked them all up and started playing loud.” In keeping with the cinematic feel of their music, Prizm always employs visuals at their shows, so expect both your ears and your eyes to be fully sated. —Amy Atkins With Fleshtone and LNDA, 9 p.m., $5. VAC, 3638 Osage St., visualartscollective.com.

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GERRY AND THE DREAMBENDERS—5:30 p.m. FREE. Downtown Nampa Nights HUGE BEACH BASH—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid KEVIN KIRK AND ONOMATOPOEIA—With Idaho Collegiate Chamber of Orchestra Players. 7 p.m. $25. Idaho Botanical Garden

DAN COSTELLO TRIO—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

KRYTERION—With Ink Dot Boy. 9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

DANGER BABY REUNION SHOW—10 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement

MYSTIC ROOTS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

DAVID OLNEY—With Sergio Webb. 8 p.m. $15 adv., $18 door. VAC HOTEL INDIA—7 p.m. FREE. Reef

SWINGIN’ UTTERS— With Cute Lepers and Roofied Resistance. See Picks, Page 18. 9 p.m. $12. Red Room

MONGOLOIDS—With Brawl, Lambs Become Lions, Silence the Reign. 6:30 p.m. $5, Brawl Studio

TOBY KEITH—With Trace Adkins. 7 p.m. $40-$65. Taco Bell Arena

OSO NEGRO—With Brookside Bodega and ArthurMaddox. 9 p.m. Red Room

FRIDAY JULY 23

SHAPES MAKE STARS—With Red Hands Black Feet and In the Pause. 9 p.m. $3. Terrapin

THURSDAY JULY 22 BEACH FOSSILS—With RevoltRevolt. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

BLACK JACK MOONSHINE—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye ELISABETH BLIN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Papa Joe’s HELLO THE MIND CONTROL— With Waytansea Point and Junior Rocket Scientist. 8 p.m. $2. Flying M Coffeegarage

KARIN COMES KILLING— 9 p.m. $3. Terrapin MANSFIELD—WIth Mortal Enemy and Aces and Eights. 9 p.m. FREE. Dino’s PAUL PETERSON BLUES CLUB—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s RED HANDS BLACK FEET—With Blacksmith and Bukkit. 9 p.m. $2. Red Room SOUL HONEY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub TICKET OUT OF TOWN BATTLE OF THE BANDS—Boats, The Offbeat, Auburn Jakobi, Jessy, Nine Dead, Wasilla, Attack This, The Paris Funds, Self Martid, Threshold, For My Own and Wolfman Fever. 5:30 p.m. $8. The Venue ZIESTA: BOISE’S ROCK AND ROLL PARTY—Thee Headliners, The Broken Spells, Bare Wires, White Fang and Goodnight Loving. Followed by DJ Kathy O’. See Picks, Page 18. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux

SATURDAY JULY 24 BOISE MUSIC FESTIVAL—Bret Michaels, Macy Gray, Backstreet Boys, Green River Ordinance, Poke, Jerry Fee, Elena Coats,

Denae, Bank, Desirae Bronson, Bellamy Rose, Danger Beard, Aka Belle, The Fabulous Chancellors, JR and the Stingrays, Workin’ On Fire, Flipside, The Girlfriend Season, A Rotterdam November, Sway, Meech, BoDo Brothers, Pilot Error, Soul Serene, Steve Fulton, The Rocci Johnson Band, Moira, Travis McDaniel, Nate Fowler, Marcus Eaton, Boise Rock School, Brandon Pritchett, Rebecca Scott, School of Rock, One Second Til Forever, All Hands Go, Enzyme Dynamite, Light the Sky, Stop Drop and Party, Ohadi, Days Difference, Ryan Star and Alex Band. 10 a.m.-10 p.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park. FORREST DAY ALBUM RELEASE—9 p.m. Followed by Macy Gray Afterparty and DJ set. $10. Reef JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—9 p.m. FREE. The Plank JOSHUA TREE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s LOW-FI—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid MAN OF STRAW—With The Deep, Dissumulate the Marred, World These Kings, Nourish the Wolves. 6 p.m., $5, Brawl Studio MATRIX—9 p.m. $5. Dino’s MIKE QUINN—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub PRIZM—With Fleshtone and LNDA. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $5. VAC

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE TRASHER—With Razormaze and Krystos. 9 p.m. $3. Red Room TICKET OUT OF TOWN BATTLE OF THE BANDS—The Unashamed, Here Till We’re Dead, Psycho Jake and the Hypnocrisis, Dangergrip, Under the Wicked Sky, Primolodic, Losing Sight, Silence the Reign, Red Hands Black Feet, Scorch the Fallen, Triumphant Tragedy, Dada Sol, Riah, Swich, Ella Ferrari, The Dude Abides, Double O Productions, Pull Out Quick, Far Beyond Victory, The Fear Between You, Gernika, Stop, Drop and Party and Cringer: the Battle Cat. 11 a.m. $8. The Venue ZIESTA: BOISE’S ROCK AND ROLL PARTY—Barbecue and live music from Pure Country Gold, Sallie Ford and the Sound Outside, La Knots and Low-fi. Noon-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Train Depot. ZIESTA: BOISE’S ROCK AND ROLL PARTY—Colleen Green, Girlfriends, Indian Wars, The Parallels, The Mean Jeans and The Mystery Lights. 7 p.m. $10$12. Neurolux

SUNDAY JULY 25 THE BROOK LEE CATASTROPHE—9:30 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station

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HED P.E.—With Kurt Calhoun, Johnny Richter, Big B. and Slaine. 7:30 p.m. $17-$35. Knitting Factory MUSIC FROM STANLEY—Jonathan Warren and the Billygoats. FREE. Redfish Lake Lodge SLICK IDIOT—With Mona Mur. 10 p.m. $7. Liquid THESE UNITED STATES—See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $11 door. Bouquet

TOAD THE WET SPROCKET— With Hey Marseilles. See Noise, Page 24. 8 p.m. $25-$55. Knitting Factory

WEDNESDAY JULY 28 THE ATARIS—With Gasoline Heart, All Hands Go and Strings and Chemicals. 9 p.m. $10. Red Room

MONDAY JULY 26

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Basque Night with Amuma Says No. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza

PUNK MONDAY—Forth Yeer Aces and Eights, Roofied Resistance. 9 p.m. $2. Liquid

GAME—With Elco and Linx. 8 p.m. $25-$50. Knitting Factory

ROB PAPER—With John Jones and Friends. 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers Steakhouse THOMAS PAUL—7:30 p.m. FREE. Red Feather Lounge

TUESDAY JULY 27 INTER ARMA—With Bastard Sapling, Uzala. 8 p.m. $5. VAC OILSLAVE—With Lone Rider of the Apocalypse and Fuegogo. 9 p.m. FREE. Terrapin

THE CONGRESS—With Gizzard Stone. 9 p.m. $3. Terrapin

GIZZARD STONE—With The Congress. 9 p.m. $4. Terrapin NATHAN J. MOODY—With The Quartertons. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE PYKNIC PARTERY TOUR— Drop Dead Gorgeous, Sleeping With Sirens, Attila, Abandon All Ships, For All Those Sleeping, Woe Is Me and Scarlett O Hara. 5 p.m. $13-$15. The Venue

SONG & DANCE DJS—Wed: Bad Irish, Balcony. Thu: Balcony. Fri: Bad Irish, Balcony. Sat: Balcony, Dirty Little Roddy’s, Neurolux, Terrapin Station. Mon: Bad Irish, Balcony. Tue: Balcony. KARAOKE—Wed: 44 Club, Dirty Little Roddy’s, Ha’Penny, Overland, Savvy’s, Sin, Terr y’s. Thu: 44 Club, Hannah’s, Overland, The Plank, Quarter Barrel, Savvy’s, Shorty’s, Terr y’s. Fri: 44 Club, Nuthouse, Overland, Savvy’s, Sunshine Lounge, Terr y’s. Sat: 44 Club, Crickets, Hooligans, Savvy’s, Terr y’s. Sun: 44 Club, Bad Irish, Balcony, Liquid, Overland, Ranch Club, Savvy’s, Terr y’s. Mon: 44 Club. Tue: 44 Club, Crickets, Lucky Dog, Overland, Savvy’s, Shorty’s, Terr y’s. OPEN MICS—Wed: Donnie Mac’s, The Plank. Thu: O’Michael’s. Fri: Rembrandt’s. Sun: Bouquet. Mon: Terrapin Station, Pengilly’s, Library Coffeehouse. For the week’s complete schedule of music, visit boiseweekly.com.

THOMAS HUTCHINGS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Reef

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

THESE UNITED STATES, JULY 25, THE BOUQUET The music can sometimes be incidental at Alive After Five; some folks frequent the event to see and be seen. But, when beardy fivesome These United States played AA5 last year, all eyes turned to see who was making that jubilant rock and roll. These United States’ mix Strokes-ish redlined East Coast rock, strummy Austin, Texas, guitar rock and Avett Brothersesque daring and timing, resulting in a blend of big, broad American rock and roll that makes your tummy feel all funny. And when vocalist Jesse Elliott starts to sing, the urge to get up and dance may be too much to resist. TUS released their debut full-length album in 2008 and, in two short years, have played more than 500 shows and just released their fourth full-length record, What Lasts (United Interests), on July 20. What lasts? The jangly joy in your head after hearing These United States. —Amy Atkins 9 p.m., $8-$11. The Bouquet, 1010 W. Main St., thebouquet.net.

BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 27

SCREEN

REVENGE IS A DISH BEST SERVED Micmacs celebrates the art of getting even GEORGE PRENTICE A sad sack Parisian is working late one night when he hears a gun battle near his workplace. He steps outside to see the commotion, and he’s accidentally shot in the head by a stray bullet. And so begins one of the most enchanting movies of 2010. Micmacs is the handiwork of director Jean-Pierre Jeunet, both revered (Amelie) and “Bonjour. Would you like to exact a little revenge?” “Oui, monsieur. I would like that very much.” cursed (Alien Insurrection) by cinephiles. Let’s put this one clearly in the Amelie camp. collection of characters is unforgettable and Before the opening titles roll, Bazil (Dany As a matter of fact, it would serve as a nice includes a human cannonball, a contortioncompanion piece. Micmacs is lovely, heartfelt Boon) is orphaned when his father is killed ist, a mechanical puppeteer, a math genius and above all, joyful. It takes us deep into the by a landmine. Years later, Bazil is shot by a and many more. Their inspired episodes of stray bullet that lodges in his skull without souls of the dispossessed and even examrevenge are gleeful, and Micmacs quickly killing him. These separate acts of violence ines war profiteering—but it never fails to inspire him to wreak revenge on the weapons becomes the most imaginative caper movie in entertain. recent memory. manufacturers responsible for taking a piece The full French title of this film is MicSpecial credit to cinematographer Tetsuo of his childhood macs a Tire-Larigot, Nagata for his use of so much color. And exand a piece of his which roughly MICMACS (A TIRE-LARIGOT) (R) tra kudos for his use of atmospheric lighting brain. But the movie translates to “Loads Directed by Jean-Pierre Jeunet to illuminate the cast in soft bronze gels. soars when Bazil is of Dodgy Dealings,” Micmacs won’t solve any of the world’s adopted by a wonor “Nonstop SheStarring Dany Boon, Nicolas Thibault de Fenouillet, Francois Marconi problems, but neither is it a simple funhouse. derful menagerie of nanigans.” Hmmm. characters living in an Whimsy is a rare cinematic treat, and it’s celIt tells you everything In French with English subtitles underworld kingdom ebrated here. There are many motion pictures and reveals nothing. Now playing at Flicks vying for your laughter and admiration this carved deep into an A simple synopsis of summer, but you may want to save a piece of elaborate junkyard. the plot might make your heart for Micmacs. Its humor is shaped you scratch your head and think twice about (It wasn’t until many hours after watching the film that the concept of “salvage” as both through an exquisite understanding of the whether it warrants your entertainment doltragic sense of life. physical and spiritual was realized.) The lar. But here goes.

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings HELL ON WHEELS—Documentary about the Austin Roller Derby. Post-screening talk back session with director Bob Ray. Wednesday, July 21, 7 p.m. $10. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, www. egyptiantheatre.net.

Opening THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE WEIRD—The story of three Korean outlaws in 1940s Manchuria and their rivalry to possess a treasure map while being pursued by the Japanese army and Chinese bandits. English subtitles. (R) Flicks

28 | JULY 21–27, 2010 | BOISEweekly

MICMACS—An orphaned video clerk survives a bullet to the head and decides to form a vigilante gang to avenge himself and his father on gun and ammunition makers. In French with English subtitles. See review, this page. (R) Flicks

iconic ’80s TV show. (PG-13) Edwards 22

SALT—A CIA officer (Angelina Jolie) is accused of being a Russian spy. She eludes capture by superiors as she struggles to uncover the real traitors. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

DESPICABLE ME—Armed with shrink rays, freeze rays and a score of threatening artillery, the villainous Gru, voiced by Steve Carrell, is plotting to steal the moon when three orphaned girls get in his way in this 3D animated film. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

Continuing THE A-TEAM—A group of Iraq War veterans try to clear their names with the U.S. military, which suspects them of crimes for which they were framed. Based on the

CYRUS—John (John C. Reilly) and Molly (Marisa Tomei) are tentative new lovers who must deal with her challenging 21-year-old son (Jonah Hill). (R) Flicks

GROWN UPS—The death of their childhood basketball coach leads some old friends (Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock) to gather at the site of a championship celebration from years ago. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

I AM LOVE—Set in Milan, Italy, this family drama stars Tilda Swinton as a devoted wife who falls in love with another man, changing the wealthy Recchi family forever. (R) Flicks

KNIGHT AND DAY—Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz star in this action-comedy about a fugitive couple on an adventure where nothing and no one is what it seems. (PG13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

INCEPTION—Leonardo DiCaprio stars in this sci-fi thriller as a skilled thief who can steal valuable secrets from someone’s subconscious. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22, Edwards IMAX

THE LAST AIRBENDER— Based on the popular Nickelodeon television series, the future of mankind falls in the hands of a young boy named Aang, who learns he is the last Avatar with the power to manipulate the four elements. (PG) Edwards 22

THE KARATE KID—Twelveyear-old Dre Parker (Jaden Smith) moves with his mother to China, where he arouses the ire of a schoolyard bully and learns kung-fu (not karate) from his apartment’s maintenance man, Mr. Han (Jackie Chan) in order to defend himself and grows up in the process. (PG) Edwards 22

ONDINE—Syracuse (Colin Farrell) is a fisherman from Ireland who catches a beautiful woman (Alicja Bachleda) in his net that his daughter (Alison Berry) believes is a mermaid. (PG-13) Flicks

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SCREEN/LISTINGS SCREEN/MOVIE TIMES WEDNESDAY, JULY 21-TUESDAY, JULY 27 THE A-TEAM— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:20 a.m., 2:05, 5:05, 7:50, 10:30 CYRUS—

Flicks: W-Th: 5:15, 7:15, 9:15; F-Su: 1:10, 3:10, 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; M-Tu: 5:10, 7:10, 9:10

DESPICABLE ME—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:50, 4, 7:10, 9:45 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:25 a.m., 12:30, 1:55, 3, 4:15, 5:30, 6:45, 7:45, 9, 10

DESPICABLE ME 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12, 2:30, 4:45, 7:15, 9:30

GROWN UPS—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:45, 3:55, 7:05, 9:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 7:05, 9:25

I AM LOVE—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:30, 7, 9:30; F-Tu: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30

INCEPTION—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:40, 1, 3:50, 4:10,

PLEASE GIVE—Two young women care for their elderly grandmother while their neighbors, who have already purchased her apartment, wait for grandma to pass away so they can expand their living space. (R) Flicks PREDATORS—After a group of elite warriors formed of cold blooded killers realize they have been sent to an alien planet as prey, it’s up to Adrien Brody to protect the group from becoming extraterrestrial fare. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

7, 7:20, 10:10, 10:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:50 a.m., 12:50, 1:30, 3:10, 4:10, 4:50, 6:25, 7:30, 8, 9:45, 10:45 INCEPTION IMAX—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:20, 3:40, 7, 10:15

THE KARATE KID—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:05, 3:20, 6:40, 9:35

KNIGHT AND DAY—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:30, 4:40, 7:45, 10:15 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:45 a.m., 2:35, 5:25, 8:10

THE LAST AIRBENDER—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:35 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:10, 9:50

MICMACS—

Flicks: F-Su: 12:45, 2:55, 5:05, 7:15, 9:25; M-Tu: 5:05, 7:15, 9:25

ONDINE—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:55, 7:05, 9:20; F-Su: 12:25, 2:35, 4:45, 7:05, 9:20; M-Tu: 4:45, 7:05, 9:20

PLEASE GIVE—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:45, 9:35

PREDATORS—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:05, 4:15, 7:25, 9:55

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:10 a.m., 12:15, 1:50, 2:50, 4:30, 5:35, 6:55, 8:05, 9:20, 10:35 SALT—

Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1:20 4:20 7:20 10:10

Edwards 22: Th: 12:01 a.m.; F-Tu: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:05 THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES—

Flicks: W-Th: 7:10

THE SORCEROR’S APPRENTICE—

THE SECRETS IN THEIR EYES—Ricardo Darin plays a retired lawyer who is haunted by a case that ended in a false conviction for rape and murder. In Spanish with English subtitles. (R) Flicks THE SORCERER’S APPRENTICE—Nicolas Cage is a master sorcerer in modern-day Manhattan, who finds a reluctant protege in his fight against the forces of darkness. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 STANDING OVATION—Inspired by a music-video contest with a million-dollar prize, five young classmates form a music group called “The 5 Ovations.’’ (PG) Edwards 22 TOY STORY 3—The good old toys are back but Andy is all grown up and off to college. The toys are donated and must survive the constant craziness of a daycare center. (G) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:10, 4:20, 7:30, 10:05 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 1, 1:40, 2:20, 3:40, 4:20, 5, 6:30, 7, 7:40, 9:15, 9:40, 10:15 STANDING OVATION—Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:10, 2:40, 5:05, 7:55, 10:20 TOY STORY 3—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:25, 4:35, 7:50, 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 1:25, 4, 6:35, 9:05

TOY STORY 3 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:30 a.m., 2:15, 4:55, 7:25, 9:55

TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4:30, 7:40, 10:25

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:20, 1:35, 3:05, 4:35, 6, 7:35, 8:55, 10:25

T H E A T E R S Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE—Seattle may be ravaged by violence and turmoil, but Bella Swan is up to her usual airheaded ways as she continues on in the critical struggle of deciding who to love: the coiffed and diamond-skinned Edward or Jacob, the ever-shirtless teen heartthrob. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 For a full listing of movie times, including second-run movies, visit boiseweekly.com, click on “Screen,” then click on “movie Times & listings.”

BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 29

FOOD/REVIEWS

You know ever ything about food and r estaurants in Boise. Tell us what’s best. Vote for the Best of Boise at boiseweekly.com.

On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

THE BLUE MOOSE CAFE

GLENN LANDBERG

It’s easy to forget the simple joys in life: a cool breeze on a summer Unlike some Eagle restaurants—beige- and moss green-splashed strip day or a thank you note in the mail. In the case of Eagle’s Blue Moose malls with cascading water treatments—the Blue Moose Cafe has a welCafe, that simple joy is an unhurried lunch in a relaxed atmosphere come dash of funk. But though the sandwich and salad joint is spitting with familiar, yet creative fare. distance from Eagle’s other eccentric stepchild, Rembrandt’s, you’d have The Blue Moose has been an Eagle lunch staple for years, and a hard time stumbling upon it. when it comes to casual summertime dining, it’s hard to beat. The Blue Situated halfway down a residential street, the Blue Moose Cafe is Moose exudes a laid-back vibe with a set of moose antlers splashed a hidden bungalow turned neighborhood lunch spot that is only open with blue paint mounted to the front of the converted house that is during a short, midday window—Monday through Saturday, 11 a.m. home to the eatery. A mishmash of outdoor tables and umbrellas fill to 3 p.m. Kids’ bike trailers litter the lawn and, on summer afternoons, the front and side yards. Inside, customers line up at a long counevery patio table is packed with folks sipping iced tea or light beer. ter, and a small wine bar sits diagonally across, in another corner. Inside the cafe, you’ll find a long counter plastered with an array A window-lined of sandwich, salad addition to the house and wrap descripprovides the majority tions. For the most of seating, and in the part, Blue Moose summer, a battalion sticks to simple of ceiling fans keep American cafe fare, diners cool. often with a CaliRegardless of the fornia or Southwest temperature, though, twist. Sandwiches no one seems to be are loaded up with in much of a hurry. avocados, veggies The menu is filled and fancy cheeses with an assortment and served on artiof sandwiches, wraps san breads like garlic and salads that range cheese, cranberry from a relatively orange or jalapeno basic club sandwich sourdough. Though to more tempting all the classics are concoctions of creaccounted for—the ative ingredients. Reuben, the BLT, The Catalina the club—there are Club ($9.95) is filled also a few surprises with ultra-thin like the Hot Hoofer slices of fresh turkey ($9.95), which breast built on layers boasts roast beef and of crispy bacon, thin pepper jack cheese wedges of avocado, Swiss cheese, lettuce and tomato topped with a whole green chile on grilled jalapeno THE BLUE MOOSE CAFE 79 E. Aikens Road, Eagle on toasted garlic and cheese bread. The simple toastsourdough or the Thai Wrap ($9.95) with baked 208-939-3079 ing of the bread, combined with the crispness of the chicken, rice, pineapple, cucumber, mandarin oranges, thebluemoosecafe.net bacon made the sandwich well worth the trip. cabbage and peanut sauce in a Thai ginger wrap. Mon.-Sat., 11 a.m.-3 p.m. But the chicken salad sandwich ($9.95)—the special I put in an order for a tuna salad sandwich ($9.95) of the day—was far and away the standout of the afterand a side Caesar ($4.95) and snagged a shaded spot on noon. Forget any preconceptions of chicken salad as a the front porch patio. Glancing around, I noticed a shutmayonnaise-drenched lump. The Blue Moose has created a sandwich tered, moveable tiki bar lingering in front of the restaurant, something that transcends stereotypes. Delicate bits of white-meat chicken are I imagine gets good use at Blue Moose’s occasional weekend live music mixed with red and green grapes, house-roasted cashews, raisins, dried and prix-fixe dinner nights. I also noticed lots and lots of flowers, the cranberries, celery and just the faintest touch of curry in the mayonmosaic pattern on my table, a “for rent” sign on a house across the naise that holds it all together. And if that weren’t enough, the heavenly street, a lush lawn with reclining chairs and a few scurrying dogs. As it creation is sandwiched between two slices of cranberry walnut bread. turned out, I had ample time to take everything in while I was waitIt’s available as a wrap or a salad, both of which would be less ing for my meal. Though Blue Moose has nailed the casual cafe vibe, messy, but then you would deprive yourself from experiencing the they’re not a swing in/swing out kind of spot. My order took so long to cranberry walnut bread, which, like all bread at the Blue Moose, is prepare that I eventually asked them to make it to-go—which, oddly, baked locally. they didn’t do, handing me a Styrofoam box instead. The creation is an exploration of flavors and textures: the earthy Slightly annoyed, I sped back to Boise almost late for a wedding. crunch of the cashews playing off the juicy sweetness of the grapes Pulling up to a stoplight, my mood changed as I bit into the sandwich’s and the tangy bite of the cranberries juxtaposing against the cool sweet cranberry-orange bread, through a couple of thin slices of green crisp of the celery, making each bite different than the last. apple and into a mound of white albacore tuna with pecans, dill and While Blue Moose is primarily a lunch spot with limited hours, green onions. It was sublime. The sweet crunch of the apples and Friday nights offer a chance to relax to live jazz music with a prix-fixe cranberry tang contrasted with the creamy heft of the tuna salad. The menu and wine for $20 per person. The idea of stretching a relaxing Caesar, which I didn’t attempt to eat on the road, was also lovely. Big lunch into an equally relaxing dinner is as tempting as the menu. Now, hunks of Parmesan floated atop fresh romaine tossed in just the right if they’ll just start serving breakfast, there will be no need to go home. amount of dressing. The next time I’m in Eagle when Blue Moose Cafe is open—and I have nowhere to rush off to—I’ll definitely be back. —Deanna Darr takes advantage of a mini-vacation wherever she can find one. —Tara Morgan is still finding bits of apple on her steering wheel.

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BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 31

FOOD/DINING Bench ANDRADE’S—From albondigas to zopes, Javier Andrade serves up some of the best authentic Mexican fare in town. Great service, generous portions, decent prices. 4903 Overland Road, 208-424-8890. $-$$ SU. BAD BOY BURGERS—This Bench burger joint offers all the requisite fare of a classic walk-up/drive-thru, plus some tasty surprises: it will take two of you to get through one of their burritos. 815 S. Vista Ave., 208. 331-1580. $ BAGUETTE DELI—Choose from 18 different 12-inch sub sandwich choices at the Vietnamese deli. Spring rolls, smoothies and French pastries round out the super value menu, on which no sandwich will set you back more than a five spot. 5204 W. Frank. lin Road, 208-336-2989. $ CASANOVA PIZZERIA—Pizza made like traditional pizzerias in New York and Naples make. Fresh sauces, thin crusts, and toppings from figs and bleu cheese to prosciutto and arugula. And of course real clam pizza from folks hailing from the homestate of “clam pizza” Connecticut. 1204 S. Vista Ave., 208-331-3535. OM. CHAPALA—The same great Jaliscan food Idaho expects Chapala to deliver. 1201 S. Vista Ave., 208-429-1155. $-$$ SU. CHIANG MAI THAI RESTAURANT—Casual for the whole family but elegant for just two. Traditional Thai food named after the infamous Thai cuisine capitol, Chiang Mai. 4898 Emerald St., 208-342-4051. SU. THE COOKIE LADY DELI— Fresh, handmade sandwiches offered in a variety of choices, including a tasty chicken salad. Don’t forget your homemade cookie on the way out. 880 Vista Ave., 208-385-7727. $-$$. CRESCENT NO LAWYERS BAR/ GRILL—The Crescent “no lawyers” Bar & Grill—Lawyers be damned at this popular bar, restaurant and game-lovers paradise. Though they’re famous for their Lawyer Fries and chicken gizzards, the menu is full of tasty pub food, including burgers, chicken sandwiches, tater tots and a most diggable meatloaf sandwich on sourdough. It’s been a Boise tradition since 1963, with a large patio, horseshoe pits and a rambunctious herd of TVs dialed in to the world of sports. 5500 W. Franklin Road, 208-322SU OM. 9856. $ CUCINA DI PAOLO—After years of catering in the valley, Cucina di Paolo now offers heat and serve gourmet entrees, as well as a deli case full of goodies to

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ —Less than $8 $ $ —$8 to $14 $ $ $ —$14 to $20 $ $ $ $ —Over $20

enjoy in the small dining area. 1504 Vista Ave., 208-345-7150. OM. $$-$$$ DELI GEORGE—Behind the upside-down sign on Fairview, look for over 30 sandwich options full of homemade ingredients and plenty of imagination. 5602 Fair. view Ave., 208-323-2582. $ FLYING PIE PIZZERIA— Boise’s longest-lived and most inventive pizzeria. They have their own beer (the impeccable Triple Pi Belgian-style ale), and pies to please even the pickiest eaters. 6508 Fairview Ave., 208-345-0000. $ OM SU. GOLDEN STAR—Delicious Chinese/American cuisine served at one of the best preserved old storefronts in town. 1142 N. Orchard St., 208-336-0191. $. JUMPIN’ JANETS—Need a beer, a smoke and a meal? Jumpin’ Janet’s is one of the few places left in town where you can do all three. But here’s the real draw for you health conscious out there: you won’t find a deep fryer in the kitchen at Jumpin’ Janet’s, it’s all baked. Loves it. 574 Vista SU. Ave., 208-342-7620. $ MANDARIN PALACE—Bo-bo, moo-goo, sub-gum and bacon cheeseburgers all under one roof. 5020 Franklin Road, 208345-6682. $ SU. MONGO GRILL—The process begins with choosing a size and bowl and then filling it with your favorite food to toss on a Mongolian grill under the direction of a skilled chef. Mongo Grill has a salad bar, AND seven kinds of pho, plus a Chinese

menu with all the usual sweet and sour dishes served on rice noodles or fried rice. 3554 S. Findley Ave., 208-336-2122. $-$$ SU OM. THE OFFICE—This cleverly named sports bar is for the over-21 crowd only. Enjoy a meal, a smoke and a full bar while catching a game on one of The Office’s plasmas. Then, when you’re better half calls looking for you, the simple answer is: “I’m at The Office, honey.” Bar and late night menu until 2 a.m. 6125 E. Fairview, 208-377SU. 2800. $-$$ PANDA GARDEN—Small but comfortable, Panda Garden has a huge selection of menu items. Generous portions from Chinese to sushi, and it’s all good stuff. The staff, too, is friendly and attentive. 2801 Overland Road, SU. 208-433-1188. $-$$ PATTY’S BURGER TIME—The only Idaho Preferred fast food restaurant keeps it good and local by serving Flying M coffee, Cloverleaf milk and local beef. The early riser menu includes breakfast burritos, diced potatoes and breakfast sandwiches using organic eggs and vegetables. Need more reasons to swing by? Patty’s serves fresh fruit milkshakes with more than 40 different varieties and hosts classic cars shows every Saturday night. 1273 S. Orchard, Boise, . 208-424-5073. $ THE PLANK—Excellent finger steaks and chicken strips to wash down all that beer. A special lunch menu and a punch card for extra lunch savings and

FOOD/RECENTLY REVIEWED JENNY’S LUNCH LINE 106 N. Sixth St., 208-433-0092, jennyslunchline.com “I vowed then and there that Jenny’s would become my new downtown lunch destination.” —Tara Morgan

KANA GIRL’S HAWAI’IAN BBQ 1735 W. Franklin Road, Meridian, 208-891-0813, kanagirl.com “The menu is thick with choices, not just for the lau lau- and poi-loving crowd (no poi on the menu, though), but also for the vegetarian and the gluten-free diners.” —Rachael Daigle

COPPER CANYON 113 13th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-461-0887, coppercanyonnampa.com “The braised breast of duck was not only wonderfully tender, but coated in a port wine and sun-dried cherry sauce that made me glad I had chosen the garlic mashed potatoes as a side—all the better to soak up the extra.” —Deanna Darr

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RES —Reservations

needed/recommended —Patio SU —Open on Sunday OM —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

32 | JULY 21–27, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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DINING/FOOD a reverse happy hour Sunday through Thursday from 10 p.m. till midnight with $2 bar bites. 650 S. Vista, 208-336-1790. $-$$ SU. RAW—The owners of the very popular Willowcreek opened up RAW to sate the sushi cravings up on the bench. Striving for “sushi art in a comfortably atmosphere and promising rolls that make your money worth it” RAW is a welcome addition to the Japanese food restaurant family in Boise. 2237 Vista Ave., 208-343-0270. $-$$$ OM.

ROCKIES DINER—This old school diner blends in with the rest of Overland Road, but once inside, customers are greeted with perky waitresses on roller skates, classic rock emanating from the jukebox and guitars puncturing the ceiling-not to mention the massive Harley mounted above the checkerboard floor. The burgers are big and tasty, we recommend the jalapeno peppers. Even if you weren’t born before the ‘50s, you’ll have flashbacks. A DJ booth to boot. 3900 Overland Road, 208-336-2878. $ SU, .

BEER GUZZLER/FOOD

ROOSTER’S EATERY—Located in historic Vista Village, Rooster’s offers fine lunch fare. If you’re in the mood for salad try the San Diego with their own creamy Q-min dressing. For a hot sandwich, try the tri tip melt. For a cold one, check out the albacore tuna. 930 S. Vista Ave., 208-339-9300. $-$$ . SHANGRI-LA TEA ROOM—With their own lines of herbal and organic teas and herbal medicines, Shangri-La Tea Room offers a basic menu of vegan and vegetarian offerings. Some items include five types of soup, pita sandwich and falafel sandwiches, curry and southwestern wraps, and one of the best organic salads in the valley according to customers. Teriyaki tofu, tea cakes, and cookies round out a variety of delightful items. On any given day, choose between 80-100 small batch, limited quantity teas produced on small tea farms. The owners pride themselves on knowing where their teas come from. 1800 W. Overland Road, 208-424-0273. $-$$ OM.

EAT. SLEEP. READ.

SONO BANA—Boise’s oldest sushi joint can still hold its own against more stylish newcomers. Chef Yugi Hagino even offers ginger and adzuki bean ice cream. 303 N. Orchard St. $-$$ SU.

THREE NEW BREWS When you see the word “imperial” on a beer label, it usually indicates a brew that’s a more extreme example of a particular standard. The same is true for “double,” and this week we have a new trio that definitely offers more of everything. They hail from different regions—Stone (California), New Belgium (Colorado), Grand Teton (Idaho)—and are very different in taste and style. All three are bottled in a large format. GRAND TETON TAIL WAGGIN DOUBLE WHITE ALE, CELLAR RESERVE This brew pours a hazy, light gold with a thin head and offers aromas of lemon grass with pleasant sour mash and a touch of spice. It’s very smooth in the mouth, with soft but creamy malt flavors up front melding nicely with balanced spice and a nice hit of baked apple. Touches of lemon zest and white pepper come through on the finish. All in all, it is a refreshingly delicious brew. NEW BELGIUM LIPS OF FAITH IMPERIAL BERLINER STYLE WEISSE ALE Lips of Faith’s aromas are reminiscent of an unbaked loaf of sourdough bread laced with soft lemon and cherry. It is light bodied, as you might expect for the style, with a bare hint of carbonation and just enough of the characteristic tartness to remind one of a Berliner weisse. All in all, it’s an interesting effort that drinks better than the description implies. STONE 14TH ANNIVERSARY IMPERIAL IPA This beer has a golden pour with a thick head that settles slowly. The aromas are filled with heady citrus and hops, colored by green tea and sage. Stone does nothing halfway, and this brew, with its all-Brit ingredients, is no exception. The palate is aggressively delicious with ample peppery hops and a mix of earth, wood and mineral, all playing against smoky herb. Overall, it shows balance, but this one is not for the faint of heart.

STAN’S CHAR-BROILED HOT DOGS—New York hot dogs arrive fresh from the East Coast courtesy of Sahlen’s Smokehouse and are char-broiled to perfection by well-trained and friendly employees. Other menu selections include Italian, Polish or white hot Bockwurst sausages and quarter-pound or half-pound burgers. Add a deep-fried accompaniment such as Stan’s famous onion rings or fries. All the usual sides necessary for serving charbroiled meat are available in addition to a super-secret, coveted Bronco Sauce. The recipe for the sauce took years for Stan to pry out of the hands of a fellow hot dog purveyor. New York frozen custard in vanilla or chocolate is a delicious treat any time. 818 S. Vista Ave, 208-342-1199. $ SU.

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TANGO’S SUBS AND EMPANADAS—Empanadas: an exotic word that roughly translates to “to-die-for two-dollar treat.” At Tango’s you can get your empanadas traditional, fusion or sweet. 701 N. Orchard St., 208322-3090; delivery 1-866-996OM. 8624. $ WILLOWCREEK GRILL—Contemporar y cuisine in a casual atmosphere and a fine place to dine for lunch or dinner. The extensive menu features Northwest favorites such as salmon ser ved up a little different in a fish and twigs option, (twigs are fries at Willowcreek). Choose from a selection of yummies like fried portobello sticks and a wide selection of burgers. There’s always sushi next door at RAW Sushi. One kitchen ser ving something for ever yone; it doesn’t get much better. 2273 S. Vista Ave., Ste. 150, 208-343-5544. $-$$ OM. Visit boiseweekly.com for more reviews and restaurants.

—David Kirkpatrick WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 33

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REAL ESTATE BW SHARED HOUSING ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com ROOMMATE Looking for responsible, trustworthy M/F to share my 2BD, 1BA home. Clean and quiet and located in a good area. $300/mo., half the electric bill as it comes in. Call Dorene 208-353-2377.

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BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Asian Spa For Sale on Overland Rd. Call for info. 336-9900.

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34 | JULY 21–27, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

FOR SALE BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 8881464.

KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

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ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

EVAN: 12-week-old Lab mix puppy. Will need an owner who will train and treat him like part of the family. Smart and independent. (Kennel 320 - #10872152)

KITTENS: These four adorable tabby-marked kittens are well socialized, litterbox-trained and very playful. (Kennel 08 - #10952238, 51, 52 & 57)

MAGGIE: 2-year-old female Catahoula leopard /greyhound mix. House-, crate-trained. Knows some commands. Loves to play fetch. (Kennel 400 - #7656634)

BRANDY: 3-year-old grey/white cat with gold eyes. Friendly and very clean. Litterbox-trained and is friendly to adults and other cats. (Kennel 65 - #10930693)

BABY: 2-year-old female pit bull terrier who is social and very smart. Loves to play with toys and other dogs. Very strong. (Kennel 312 #10799697)

GIZMO: 18-month-old female cat. White with tabby markings. Friendly, well-kept and very clean. Beautiful markings. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 71 - #10926012)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

TENNILLE: I’m a stunning little torti with a quiet personality.

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BREVE: Curious young cat in need of loving and furrever home.

FERN: Petite little tabby seeks loyal and caring companion.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 35

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COMMUNITY - CLASSES

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BEE XPRESS CONSIGNMENT STORE

We buy brand name & stylish clothing for in store credit or CASH. Brand name jeans for men & women. Specializing in replica handbags, sunglasses & accessories. On the Bench at 116 N. Latah, across from Morris Hill Cemetery. 433-9065.

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SERVICES BW CHILD PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois).

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NOTICES

Art Restoration & Appraisals, Inventory Clearance, Matboard, Frames, Moulding. All offers. 388-1188. FREE ON-LINE CLASSIFIED ADS Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484. This is not a job offer.

PROFESSIONAL GUITAR REPAIR Basic Set-ups to complete restoration. Idaho’s only “Gold Level” certified warranty technician! Free & prompt evaluations. 8534141 DORSEY MUSIC, 5015 W. State (between Lakeharbor & Collister)

AS ELMER FUDD WOULD SAY … BY ED SESSA / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

21 “Shouldn’t have done that!” 22 “Amahl and the Night Visitors” composer 23 Part of a biblical warning against growing onions? 25 Garden with an apple tree 26 Livens (up)

1 House extension 8 Deadly African biter 13 Container holding slips of paper with tasks written on them 19 Like a bogey or double bogey 20 Commonplace

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Cartesian conclusion “___ Ben Jonson!” Radio features OPEC unit: Abbr. Closet item, in brief Politico Ralph’s fishing gear? 60 Light of one’s life 62 Lots 63 Georgetown hoopster 64 The ___ One (sobriquet for Satan) 65 Buck 66 Razed 68 Pretty fat, actually? 72 Victorian ___ 73 Sounds at a vaccination center, maybe 74 Garb for Gandhi 75 First Baseball Hall-ofFamer, alphabetically 76 Intent 77 Tabriz native 79 Marco Polo’s destination 80 React to a bitter mouthwash? 84 Big hirer of techies 85 Mae West’s “___ Day’s a Holiday” 86 2003 disease scare 87 Battle of Normandy town 89 Egg container, of sorts 92 PBS staple since 1974 93 Barney of Mayberry 94 Sloven in the coven? 98 Author Umberto 99 Timbales player Puente 100 Loose smock 101 ’33 Chicago World’s Fair style 102 Advice to someone going to the EggBeaters’ Convention? 105 Blanket 108 Thinks 109 Reduce to mush 110 Traditional 111 Spotlight sharer

112 Assists 113 Some dollhouse miniatures

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1 Recover from a blackout 2 Photographer Richard 3 Gets more InStyle, say 4 Lying 5 Make a choice 6 Singer 7 Singer Yearwood 8 Singer’s accompaniment 9 “Put ___ in it!” 10 Nine daughters of Zeus 11 Curmudgeonly cries 12 ___ king 13 Actress Meadows 14 ___ of Solomon 15 Maker of the Z4 roadster 16 Snoopy’s hip alter ego 17 So-so 18 Turn off 21 Totally wasted 24 Things letters have 27 Added-on Medicare provisions 31 Courtesy car 32 Saddam reportedly hid them, briefly 33 Tips, in a way 34 ____-flam 37 Beer brand originating in Brooklyn 38 Marshy tract 39 Collected 41 Gossipy Hopper 42 Nobel laureate Wiesel 43 Stereotypical debate outburst 44 Calf bone 45 Be philanthropic 46 Clay, e.g. 47 Golden Globe winner Pia 52 Rite for a newborn Jewish boy 53 1958 #1 hit by Domenico Modugno

54 King Arthur’s burial place 55 Solidify 57 “Prove it!” 58 Knocks dead 59 “The Fountainhead” writer Rand 60 New Deal inits. 61 “To life!” 64 So-called “Giant Brain” of 1946 67 Bit of crochet work 68 Détentes 69 “___ soit qui mal y pense” (old motto) 70 “Put ___ writing!” 71 English archer’s weapon 74 Rapper with the 6x platinum album “2001” 76 Taj Mahal city 77 Spaced out 78 Fits one inside another 79 Unctuous 80 Kind of code 81 Shade of green 82 Cancels 83 The way things stand L A S T

H A H A I M U S C O M P D E G A R R E M U L I M I S B A L T R E A R A N U S E S C I E T O D A S O R A T P E R S U G L I S E E D E N N E S T E R

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Everything Nicks on a record? Sign of stress Farmer’s to-do list Moral ___ Renaissance ___ (historical reenactment) 95 “No more for me, thanks” 96 Takes a shine to 97 Many people in People 99 “Cheerio!” 100 Carp family fish 103 “Mangia!” 104 New Deal inits. 106 Any of the Marquises, par exemple 107 Child-care writer LeShan Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply doublechecking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

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WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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BW LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE No.: CV NC 1011578. A Petition to change the name of Miguel Navarro, born February 4th, 1996 in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico residing at 5838 N. Applebrook Way, Boise, ID 83713, has been filed in Fourth County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Michael Miguel Na-

varro, because he has only a first name and wants to have a first and middle name. The child’s father is living. The child’s mother is living. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on August 17, 2010 at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: Jun. 15, 2010. By Debra J. Urizar. Deputy Clerk. June 30, July 7, 14 & 21, 2010.

TRANSPORTATION

NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE Case No.:CV NC 1011073. A Petition to change the name of Jyotismita Ghosh, born 01/23/1994 in Kolkata, WB India residing at 2980 S. Zach Place, Boise, ID 83706, has been filed in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Johlea Gewhas, because the old name is not a balanced name, but the new name will be a balanced name, it will have a stronger intrinsic quality as mentioned in the balanced report. The child’s father is living. The child’s mother is living. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on August 10, 2010, at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: Jun. 07, 2010. By Debra J. Urizar, Deputy Clerk. June 30, July 7, 14 & 21, 2010. NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE Case No.:CV NC 1011071. A Petition to change the name of Bhaswati Guha, born 10/11/1958 in Kolkata, WB India residing at 2980 S. Zach Place, Boise, ID 83706, has been filed in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Bhasweti Gewhas, because the old name is not a balanced name, but the new name will be a balanced name, it will have a stronger intrinsic quality as mentioned in the balanced name report. The petitioner’s father has died and the names and addresses of his closest blood relatives are: No one is alive. The petitioner’s mother has died and the names and addresses of her closet blood relatives are: No one is alive. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on August 12, 2010, at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: Jun. 08, 2010. By D. Price, Deputy Clerk. June 30, July 7, 14 & 21, 2010.

COMMUNITY POSTINGS BW ANNOUCEMENTS HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http://www.continentalacademy.com

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JULY 21–27, 2010 | 37

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Revenge fantasies would pollute your consciousness. I advise you to repress them. Wallowing in resentment would have an equally deleterious effect. Don’t you dare give that emotion a foothold. On the other hand, fantasies of experiencing pleasure and joy, even if they’re escapist illusions, will tonify and invigorate your awareness. I recommend that you indulge in them at great length, unleashing your imagination to explore a variety of blissful scenarios in tremendous detail and with ingenious flourishes. In fact, as your part-time soul doctor, I can’t think of anything else that would be more beneficial to your physical and mental health. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): If there were such a thing as the Queen of Heaven—a living goddess whose presence both calmed and excited you, a female magician who lit your longing to see life as it really is—and if this Queen of Heaven came to be with you, what would you say? Would you ask her to help you, and if so, how? Would you seek an answer to the most important question in your life? Would you spill every secret and tell every story, and trust that she’d be able to see the totality of who you are? I advise you to do this imaginative exercise soon. The time has come for you to receive a blessing from the highest expression of feminine power. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): What’s up with your best friends? I mean, what’s really going on for them in the big scheme of things? According to my astrological intuition, at least one of your good buddies is at a turning point in his or her long-range cycle, and could really use the reflection and catalytic help that you might provide. Try this exercise: Put aside all your ideas about who your close allies are, and simply try to see the world as if looking out of their eyes. After you’ve done that, imagine how you could offer yourself to them as a brain-booster and heart-strengthener; brainstorm about how you might blend your life force with theirs so as to empower them to see further than they can by themselves. CANCER (June 21-July 22): In my astrological opinion, you should pay special attention to whatever is embryonic in your life. Rouse the smartest part of your capacity for love and direct it with intensity toward burgeoning possibilities that have recently germinated. There may come a time later in the process when you’ll need to impose discipline and order on your growing things, but that’s not what’s called for now. Be extravagant in your nurturing. Don’t scrimp on generosity and beneficence. Have fun overflowing with profusions of life-giving care.

38 | JULY 21–27, 2010 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): According to Hawaiian mythology, the soul leaves the body during the night to seek the adventures known as dreams. The place of departure and re-entry is the “soul pit” (lua’uhane), which is located in the tear duct of the eye. During the next few nights, I’d love for you to send your soul flying out though your soul pit for some daring exploits that will revitalize your lust for life. Take your backlog of stored-up tears along with you and pour them down like rain on the secret garden you’ve been neglecting. The garden will respond to the downpour with a big growth spurt. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): A woman I know was invited to a party where she would get the chance to meet her favorite musician, psychedelic folk artist Devendra Banhart. On her last look in the mirror before heading out the door, she decided that the small pimple on her chin was unacceptable, and gave it a squeeze. Wrong move. After it popped, it looked worse. She panicked. More squeezing ensued, accompanied by moaning and howling. Soon the tiny blemish had evolved into a major conflagration. Fifteen minutes later, defeated and in tears, she was nibbling chocolate in bed, unable to bring herself to face her hero with her flagrant new wound showing. The moral of the story, as far as you’re concerned: Leave your tiny blemish alone. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the upcoming science movie The Adjustment Bureau, Matt Damon plays a politician with big ambitions. Everything’s going his way until he falls in love with a dancer. Then the representatives of a mysterious group intervene in his life, warning him that he’ll never achieve his dreams if he stays with her. “We are the people who make sure things happen according to plan,” they say. “We monitor the entire world.” I’m happy to inform you, Libra, that this scenario is utterly makebelieve. There is no “Adjustment Bureau” on Earth or in heaven. It is true, however, that if you don’t have a master plan, then your destiny is more likely to be shaped by your conditioning and by other people’s master plans. So get working! This is an excellent time to either formulate or refine a plan. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The United States is the planet’s major player in terms of political, economic and military clout. China is rising fast as a competitor in those three arenas, but lags far behind in a fourth: “soft power,” or cultural influence. The rest of the world finds America’s style, entertainment, art and ideas far more attractive than China’s. As you enter a phase

that will be favorable for enhancing your own leverage and authority, Scorpio, I suggest you put the emphasis on wielding “soft power.” You’ll accomplish more by charming people with your intelligence than by trying to push them or manipulate them. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I think it would be healthy for you to wander out to a frontier and explore a boundary. You might even want to re-examine a taboo you haven’t questioned in a while and tinker with a formula you thought you’d never change. I suspect that you would also learn a lot from gently pushing against a limit you’ve come to believe is permanent. Having said all that, I’m cautious about advising you to go further. If you get urges to actually transgress the boundary and break the taboo and smash through the limit, please do lots of due diligence. Know exactly what you’re getting into and what the consequences might be. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): When mobs stage political demonstrations in Pakistan’s biggest cities, they make sure that some of their signs are written in English. That way their protests are more likely to be filmed by news media like CNN and shown to American audiences. Take a cue from that trick as you plan your actions, Capricorn. It won’t be enough merely to say what you want to say and be who you want to be; you should tailor your messages to people who have the power to actually change what needs to be changed. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I’m putting out a call to the rebel in your heart—not the cranky, vindictive rebel in your mind, but the joyful, yearning rebel in your heart. I am asking this tender renegade to rise up against narcissistic behavior wherever you find it. Don’t shout it down or try to shame it, though. Rather, work around it through outrageous displays of empathy and radical acts of compassion and feisty outbreaks of wild kindness. Your job, according to my analysis, is to be a one-person wrecking crew devoted to smashing the boring inertia of egotism with your zealous concern for the good of all. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): As the economic recovery lags, many frustrated job seekers have decided to take matters into their own hands. As a result, entrepreneurship is thriving. I suggest you catch that spirit. In fact, I advocate a mass entrepreneurial uprising among Pisceans in the coming months. Even if you’re already employed, it’ll be prime time for you to create your own perfect gig, carve out your own special niche, or dream up a role that is designed for your unique talents.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 19 Issue 04