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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 19, ISSUE 01 JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 10

DOCTOR WHO? New law says your drug dealer can veto your doc 1ST THURSDAY 19

PLAN YOUR FIRST THURSDAY ATTACK Map, listings, picks and two ways to the pool party FEATURE 21

BOISE’S COLDEST BEER BW crowns a new coldest beer champ NOISE 39

IN LIVING COLOR Envisioning Boise’s new all-ages venue

“... assemble a list of the most accomplished women to come out of Utah in the last 150 years.”

COPE 8

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Business Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice George@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreader: Annabel Armstrong Videographer: Blair Davison Interns: Philip Alexander, Stephen Foster, Rachel Krause, Jacob Lyman Contributing Writers: Amy Pence-Brown, Bill Cope, Andrew Crisp, Jennifer Hernandez, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall, Ben Wickham ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Lucas Wackerli, Lucas@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Adam Rosenlund Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Steve Klamm, Glenn Landberg, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow, Ben Wilson CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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NOTE BEER. IT’S WHAT FOR READING. The infamous Coldest Beer issue. Yes, that’s a sentence fragment and consider “fragmented” what Coldest Beer does to our collective psyche at BW. At least temporarily. (Don’t worry we’ll be back on track for next week’s big Black and White Photo issue.) There are a few issues every year that people inevitably ask about repeatedly. Occasionally, I still get comments asking if BW was really sold to Rupert Murdoch (2009 April Fool’s issue). Less often, someone will tell me they think Best of Boise balloting is biased (Best of Boise issue). And I can guarantee you that a few dozen times over the next year, I’ll be at a cocktail party and someone will ask: “So how do you test the temperature of beer?” (Answer: a cheap kitchen thermometer you pick up at any grocery store.) Or, I’ll walk out of a meeting with a group of journalists from other media outlets and someone will ask: “How do I sign up to be a Coldest Beer tester?” (If you’re a journalist, just ask. The Associated Press’ Todd Dvorak did, and now he’s stuck with us.) This year, it’s already started with Coldest Beer. I’ve heard a few times that a joint’s cooler/fridge/lines/you-name-it was down and it’s imperative that we retest. I’ve been told once that the beer testers were holding the thermometer all wrong. I’ve been lectured on how flawed our testing method is scientifically speaking. Without doubt, some people take this Coldest Beer thing seriously. Some, I have no doubt, take it more seriously than we do. Our Coldest Beer mission: to get you thinking about beer after we’ve consumed copious amounts in the name of work, science and the future of mankind … and, of course, there’s the part about stumbling upon the coldest beer. Who has it? Turn to Page 21 to find out. And if you just have to have a guide to the Coldest Beer in Boise on your person at all times, pull that sucker out of the middle. We set it up so that you could pull the center pages out of the paper, fold ’em up and put ’em in your back pocket. I’ll also direct your attention to the warmest beer. It’s a dubious honor, for sure, but one that should be taken as seriously as the coldest beer honors. Here’s my advice to the bartender who has to deal with any flak from it: tell your patrons to order a cocktail instead and shut up. On a personal note, I’d like to thank my beer testing crew. Andy, Bob, Dick and Danny, thanks for the help and the hangover. Let’s do it again next year. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST

ARTIST: Rick Hopkins TITLE: Easy Rider MEDIUM: Acrylic on canvas ARTIST STATEMENT: I enjoy bicycles as an art form. The bicycle will carry you anywhere you are willing to pedal, across town or around the world. Ride safe, Boise.

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Square formats are preferred and all mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

COBWEB SNARES A BOUNTY OF FOOD From lion burgers to Anthony Bourdain’s new book to Deli Days and on to Seasons Bistro’s annual crawfish fry, Cobweb was dripping with food last week.

HEY, FAMOUS DUDE ... SORRY ABOUT THAT The band Tonic sneaked into Boise to play a free show at Bad Irish last week. Head to Cobweb for video footage and BW contributor Travis Estvold’s apology to Tonic.

IT’S A BIRD, IT’S A PLANE ... From one of Citydesk’s many, many posts over the last week: “Its price tag is $1.5 million. There are only two in the world. And one of them will spend this fire season in Boise.” Find out what it is and watch video footage of it in action at Citydesk.

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EDITOR’S NOTE MAIL / MONDO GAGA BILL COPE TED RALL NEWS Do you have a right to your own prescription? CITIZEN BW PICKS FIND 8 DAYS OUT SUDOKU FIRST THURSDAY Map and guide inside FEATURE Boise Weekly’s ninth annual Coldest Beer NOISE Colorcube adds color to the all-ages club scene MUSIC GUIDE ARTS Cleo’s trail to discovery SCREEN Mother and Child MOVIE TIMES REC Way, way in the backcountry in the Sierras FOOD Two reviewers head to the 2C to check out Copper Canyon BEER GUZZLER CLASSIFIEDS HOME SWEET HOME NYT CROSSWORD FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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MAIL I read your article in this week’s Boise Weekly (Citizen, “Andrew Mentzer,” June 23, 2010) about the new youth hostel. My wife and I are some of the residents in the Idaho Building that Mr. Mentzer overlooked in his planning. I found his response to your question “What about the actual residents?” appalling. Downtown dwellers are often the forgotten factor in planning decisions. If Boise hopes to encourage the further expansion of its downtown residential core, it needs to be more inclusive, and certainly more forthcoming, to its existing downtown residents. —Michael Smith, Boise

devastation of animal life by the Gulf oil spill, yet subsidize the systematic killing of other animals for their dinner table. They know meat and dairy harm the environment and their family’s health but compartmentalize this knowledge when shopping for food. It goes beyond dietary flaws. We tolerate the killing of innocent people when our government and media label them terrorists. We ignore the suffering and starvation of a billion people, except when an earthquake or tsunami has struck. Our society would benefit greatly from more original thinkers, and our personal diet is a great place to start. —Glenn Newkirk, Boise

BIRDS OF A FEATHER

ET TU, AMERICA?

THAT’S MY ’HOOD

I wonder how many of the dedicated volunteers who helped save a pelican from the deadly Gulf oil have other birds for dinner. They are not alone. Most people are appalled by the

In his letter (BW, Mail, June 23, 2010), David Theiler made the point that our people in Congress were merely interested in maintaining the status quo. I agree and would like to give

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name and city of residence. Submit letters via e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message.

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my own meaning to that term. Our status quo as a nation is to continue working to build our global empire, nation by nation. We are trying so hard to copy the ultimate idiocy of the Roman Empire. We members of the American Empire have established over 500 military bases around the world. I taught for three years under a contract with Boston University on Air Force bases in Europe. Why are we there over a half century since WWII? We simply cannot afford to stop building warplanes, aircraft carriers, tanks and guns. We would face a financial disaster—a real depression—if we simply decided to say, “Enough is enough. Start coming home, folks.” And all those countries around the world would cry out, “Don’t leave. We need your business.” The status quo is probably leading us to the same end as the Roman Empire: Collapse from our inability to maintain the status quo. President Obama doesn’t wear a toga, but he may be in office watching us on the decline. —Tom Edgar, Boise

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 7

OPINION/BILL COPE

HATING PELOSI II

Where misogyny is the 11th commandment Hi-dee hi, Sweetie. It’s me again from the Cope’s Latest Column Discussion Group, and Sweetie—do you mind if I call you “Sweetie”? I call everyone “Sweetie,” so I thought why not you, too? Except my husband, who I called “Sugar.” Except not anymore. He’s dead and it doesn’t seem right to call a dead person “Sugar,” does it? The reason I’m writing again is that three months ago, I asked why Republicans hate Nancy Pelosi so much. Remember? That was the letter where I told you about the split up between the CLC Discussion Group and the What’s Cope Talking About? Club. By the way, most of the people have left the WCTA? Club and come back to the CLC Discussion Group. That woman I told you about who’s so nasty told them she would serve Domino’s and pops at her meetings, but by the third meeting, she was giving them Cheez-Puffs and Kool-Aid. So one by one, and sometimes by two, they are coming back to our good old cookies-and-punch group, and I am not making them feel nearly as guilty as I could. Anywho, in your answer about why Republicans hate Nancy so much, you wrote, “it follows that along with their infantile attitudes of nationalism, faith and racial identity, we must include gender roles. Among such circles, it is natural their hatred would be directed toward smart and independent women—e.g., Nancy Pelosi, Hillary Clinton—just as it is has been among every ignorant fundamentalist sludge the species has ever belched up.” When I read that, I thought to myself, “Darn tootin’, Sweetie!,” (I call myself “Sweetie,” too. But not in front of other people.) that sounded just exactly like what I would have thought if I’d thoughted of it first!” And it sure does explain why you don’t see many women doctors and women professors and women outer space scientists in that Taliban outfit or the Baptists, either. Then last week, I read this article by Mr. Dan Popkey about how our Idaho Rep. Mike Simpson may be trying to talk our other Idaho Rep. Walt Minnick into helping boot Nancy Pelosi out of her job as Speaker of that House. And I thought to myself, “Wait a gosh darn minute here!” I happen to like Nancy Pelosi, and I happen to think she’s doing a super job. She hasn’t been caught in one of those sexual scandal situations like so many Speakers of that House get caught in, and also, I think she’s a heck of a lot better role model for young girls than flouncy-pants Palin or anything else the Republicans can come up with, women-wise. But I also voted for Walt Minnick, and the thought that I voted for a man who might help boot Nancy Pelosi out of her seat makes my belly area go all quivery on me. Sweetie, could you tell me there’s no way that Walt would do that to Nancy. Please please please please! It would sure make me

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feel better./ Yours Faithfully, Anonymous; Chairperson; CLC Disc. Gr. U Hello again, dear Chairperson, Mind if I call you “Toots”? I have never called anyone “Toots” before but have always felt the urge. OK then, I’m pleased to hear about your group reconstituting itself. I’m not sure why, but it was disconcerting to learn there were two competing factions dedicated to figuring out what the hell I’m talking about. The fact that your side is prevailing is, if nothing else, testament to the undeniable potency of cookies and punch. I, too, read Mr. Popkey’s article and was appalled by Simpson’s suggestion that John Boehner (that awkward orange man from Ohio you see on TV all the time saying the stupidest things) would be a better Speaker than Ms. Pelosi. I wouldn’t trust that creep to cut my hair. Toots, did you happen to notice the quote from a Simplot company exec implying that Pelosi is somehow bad for business? That must come as quite the shock to Pelosi’s home district, San Francisco, headquarters to at least 100 major concerns for every one that calls Idaho home. Perhaps Simpson, a son of Burley, would care to compare his grody little corner of America to Pelosi’s in terms of commerce and trade. Go ahead, Mikey, tell us how Burley is better than the Bay. Frankly, though, I can’t help but feel Simpson’s real issue with Pelosi is likely something other than her affinity—or lack of same—to the corporate zeitgeist. I suspect it has to do with a religious tradition that … shall we say … is not renowned for encouraging women to excel. Outside the delivery room, that is. And as it happens, Rep. Simpson is a member in good standing of that particular religious tradition. No need to mention the name of this sect, but should you not be sure of the one I mean, I’ll give you a hint: assemble a list of the most accomplished women to come out of Utah in the last 150 years. Not to imply that Mr. Simpson’s religious brand is the only backward-ass voodoo to be represented in the U.S. Congress. The entire GOP seems to be infected with a level of spirituality that’s not a full hop, skip and jump beyond kissing rattlesnakes and burning witches. As to the matter of Simpson suggesting that Minnick might aid and abet in the deposing of Nancy Pelosi as House Speaker, all I can say is, when a politician has made it a tactic to grovel before the lowest common denominator of his constituency, nothing should surprise us. In closing, Toots, I was sorry to hear about the loss of your husband. Was it recent? And I trust you had nothing to do with it, yes? WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

TED RALL/OPINION

LEARNED HELPLESSNESS In dire straits, Americans whimper instead

PORTLAND, ORE.—In 1967 animal researchers conducted an experiment with two sets of dogs strapped into harnesses and subjected to a series of shocks. The dogs were placed in the same room. The first set of dogs was allowed to perform a task—pushing a panel with their snouts—in order to avoid the shocks. As soon as one dog mastered the shock-avoidance technique, his comrades followed suit. The second group, on the other hand, was placed out of reach from the panel. They couldn’t stop the pain. But they watched the actions of the first set. Then both groups of dogs were subjected to a second experiment. If they jumped over a barrier the shocks would stop. The dogs in the first set all did it. But the second set was too scarred to help themselves. “When shocked, many of them ran around in great distress but then lay on the floor and whimpered,� wrote Russell A. Powell, Diane G. Symbaluk and P. Lynne Honey in Introduction to Learning and Behavior. “They made no effort to escape the shock.� The decrease in learning ability caused by punishment leads to learned helplessness. Battered and bruised, with no apparent way out, the American electorate has plunged into a political state of learned helplessness. They’ve voted Democratic to punish rapacious Republicans. They’ve voted Republican to get rid of do-nothing Democrats. They’ve tried staying home on Election Day. Nothing helps. Most Americans work longer hours for less pay. Until, inevitably, they get “laid off.� Even in 2009, when Americans were losing their homes to the same banks their taxes were paying to bail out, the world’s richest people—

those with disposable wealth more than $30 million—saw their assets soar by 21.5 percent. The public is now in full-fledged flailing mode. Just two years ago, President Barack Obama and the Democrats swept into power on a platform of hope and change: hope that things might improve by changing from the Bushian Republicanism of previous years. Now, depending who you listen to, people have either turned against the hope and the change or against the failure of ObamaCo to deliver it. “The voters, I think, are just looking for change, and that means bad news for incumbents and in particular for the Democrats,� says Peter Hart, a Democratic pollster. Change from change we can’t believe in. According to the latest NBC News/Washington Post poll, this is the same electorate that “shows grave and growing concerns about the Gulf oil spill, with overwhelming majorities of adults favoring stronger regulation of the oil industry and believing that the spill will affect the nation’s economy and environment.� Because you know the Republicans are all about more regulation of Big Oil. And care so much about the environment. There is some good news: Three major polls find that most Americans don’t believe Obama has a plan to fix the economy. Like the poor Set B dogs in that 1967 experiment, Americans are running around aimlessly, veering between two parties that differ only in their degree of harm. Republicans are evil; Democrats enable it. The way out is obvious. If a two-party corpocracy beholden to gangster capitalism is ruining your life, get rid of it. Don’t whimper. Bite.

Join us this summer for Boise’s premier riverfront patio experience. Enjoy wild salmon, local game, sustainable fresh fish, prime beef and local organic produce.

Reserve your table today. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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CITYDESK/NEWS IDAHO DELEGATION ON FINANCIAL REFORM AND JOBLESS BENEFITS

—George Prentice

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MEDICAL CHOICES

New law puts personal medical freedoms in legal limbo GEORGE PRENTICE While Idahoans celebrate their independence on the Fourth of July, some say a new law, which goes into effect on Thursday, July 1, is undermining those very freedoms. SB-1353, the Freedom of Conscience for Health Care Professionals, allows pharmacists the right to refuse to fill prescriptions based on their own moral objections. The change could have a dramatic impact on some extremely varied demographic groups and has many worried about what it will mean for Idahoans. “[The bill is] not respective of the rights of Idahoans,” said David Irwin, spokesman for AARP of Idaho. Under the new law, patients could find health-care providers unwilling to carry out their end-of-life wishes. The Gem State chapter of AARP has nearly 180,000 members, about half of Idaho’s 50 and older population. The law also has a direct impact on women with prescriptions for RU486—a drug that ends pregnancy—and it’s this conflict that has created the most controversy. “It’s a ridiculous law,” said Rebecca Poedy, vice president of Idaho Operations for Planned Parenthood. But those who wrote the legislation see things in a very different light. David Ripley, executive director of Idaho Chooses Life—and one of the authors of the original legislation—calls the new law “heroic” and added that the real victory “belongs to the Lord.” Still, Freedom of Conscience is just one item on a laundry list of new laws that reach into every corner of Idaho. From now on, voters will need to show photo ID at the polling place or sign an affidavit swearing to their identity. Certain Idaho Department of Fish and Game records will be made confidential to curb intimidation and threats. If you’re a new state employee, you’ll have to wait 90 days to be eligible for health insurance, up from 30 days. Convicted criminals will have to pay higher court fees to help fund the judicial branch. None of these matches the angst hovering over Freedom of Conscience, which was approved by the 2010 legislature by a vote of 21-13 in the Senate and 51-18 in the House. The bill’s history goes back to 1973, when the Idaho Legislature enacted limited conscience protection for hospitals and doctors. But that changed dramatically in 2005, when much of the nation was gripped by debate over the case of Terri Schiavo, a Florida woman whose feeding tube was removed after a highprofile right-to-die legal battle. Days later, the Legislature passed the Medical Consent and Natural Death Act, granting

individuals the right to dictate which medical procedures should or should not be used to prolong their lives. It also allowed patients to name those who can make those decisions for them in the event they can’t. Opponents waited to find a legal maneuver to dilute the measure. They got their wish ear-

caring for them will honor their wishes. But those wishes can be taken out of their hands effective this week,” Irwin said. “At a critical time in your life—and an emotional time for your family—a doctor or nurse can walk away from you. Is that a time when you want to start interviewing health-care professionals to find out who will honor your advance directives or end-of-life wishes?” The bill has become a political hot potato. It will be a key element of a soon-to-be-published voter guide sent to the 180,000 AARP members. The association is asking each state legislative candidate where he or she stands on the issue, and if he or she supports repealing the new law. But proponents have made the issue political as well. In his blog published on May 29, Ripley cheered the recent GOP primary defeat of Twin Falls Republican Sen. Chuck Coiner, one of a handful of Republicans who voted against the bill. Ripley called Coiner’s defeat a “very exciting development.” “Sen. Coiner had, without possible dispute, one of the most liberal voting records in the Idaho Senate. We are very hopeful that [Lee] Heider will provide the kind of family friendly leadership Idaho deserves,” Ripley wrote. “We have anti-choice candidates who like nothing more than to make these issues political,” Poedy said. Her opposition to the new law focuses on the clause that will allow pharmacists to deny certain prescriptions, such as RU-486. Poedy said 95 percent of women in the United States use contraception at some point in their lifetime. “Denying patients the right to medical care prescribed by their own physician should not be tolerated. A pharmacist who does this interferes with a doctor-patient relationship, in an effort to forward their own personal agenda ... and if that happens, they should not be pharmacists,” Poedy said. So what will happen when an Idaho pharmacist refuses to fill a prescription? “We’re not sure,” Poedy said. “We’re thoroughly investigating all possible legal options.” In the meantime, opponents have sent more than 700 communications to the Governor’s Office, and Planned Parenthood is finishing a newly commissioned statewide poll on the issue. There is no legal precedence in Idaho according to Irwin. “This forces the debate. It will result in a very real and unfortunate study on this issue.” In the meantime young Idaho women and seniors are unlikely shipmates in uncharted legal waters. BE N WI LSO N

Early on June 25, a 20-hour marathon by members of the U.S. House and Senate hammered out a reconciliation bill that could transform financial regulation. The proposal would make lending agreements easier to understand, protect small borrowers from hidden penalties and fees, and restrict trading by banks for their own benefit. The approval clears the way for both houses of Congress to vote on the full financial regulatory bill next week. Citydesk got Idaho First District Rep. Walt Minnick on the horn to ask about the new bill. Minnick said that in spite of aspects of the bill that “may result in unnecessary cost and government interference, there is more good than bad,” in the legislative package. “Based on my initial understanding of the legislation, I’m inclined to support the bill,” he said. Minnick said the next step will be new legislation, which he is crafting to oversee commercial real estate. Minnick cited a White House blue-ribbon panel that reported a 43 percent decline in commercial real estate assets in the last two years. “And it’s larger now,” Minnick told Citydesk. “More individuals are credit-worthy for loans to sustain or build their businesses, but small lending institutions are stressed by collateral assets [commercial real estate] that are declining in value,” he said. “They simply can’t make the loans, even to eligible lenders.” Minnick told Citydesk he expects his commercial real estate reform legislation to surface before Labor Day. In keeping with federal legislation news ... Last week Citydesk also reported that the U.S. Senate failed to pass legislation that would have extended unemployment benefits for more than 1 million of the nation’s jobless. On Capitol Hill, Republicans got enough votes to prevent a measure extending benefits from ever going to the floor of the Senate for a vote. According to the National Employment Law Project, without Congressional action, 1.2 million Americans will exhaust their jobless benefits by the end of June. The Idaho Department of Labor estimates as many as 22,000 Idahoans could exhaust their jobless benefits in the next three months. The agency says more than 4,000 lost jobless benefits earlier this month.

NEWS

lier this year, when the Freedom of Conscience legislation was crafted by State Republican Sens. Chuck Winder, from Boise, and Russ Fulcher, from Meridian, with some help from Ripley. The first draft of the bill aimed to shield nurses and pharmacists opposed to providing medications that stop pregnancies, cause abortions or deal with stem cell therapy. Soon after, the end-of-life clause was added. Irwin said much of his organization’s membership is outraged over the new law. Second only to the state’s budget challenges, a recent AARP poll indicates that repealing the Freedom of Conscience Law is one of Idaho seniors’ highest priorities. “They want to make sure that whoever is

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CITIZEN

DUANE QUINTANA

Boise Coffee Party eschews Tea Party philosophy BY ANDREW CRISP

What’s the relationship to the Tea Party? It’s been kind of a natural Tea Party response. It wasn’t necessarily our initial

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Is Idaho more of a tea partier state? I think the Tea Party has a pretty strong following here, and you here a lot about it. And they get a lot of people out to things. I think it’s been a tough ball to get rolling here [with the Coffee Party]. I’m not sure we’ve all been on the same page with the national movement ... we’re doing a survey right now of our group … we’ll have something like a Tea Party response committee,

Why have these groups—Tea and Coffee alike—sprung up? I think there’s just a number of different problems that people are feeling more. People who aren’t normally involved in politics are getting hurt by politicians. There’s a lot of emotions, and a lot of anger, and a lot of fear in the economy, in health care and in education. Especially in our state. The education budget cuts and what that means. I think a lot of it is the economy, the jobs, the lack thereof. Many people are over-qualified so they’re not able to get the work. They’re sick and they don’t have health care. They’re able to work, but they don’t have jobs. They want their kids to have a good education. People cannot help but notice, and stand up and do something about it. I think that’s what Coffee Party and Tea Party do well. It’s not Democratic, and it’s not Republican. Most people aren’t even that any more. Everybody is so in between. It’s all about normal people getting involved and getting heard.

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3701 Overland

What is the Coffee Party concerned with? It was all about trying to encourage having frank and honest conversations about the issues. “Playing nice in politics,” I really liked that idea. I’ve done work in the community for a while. Politics seemed kinda to be the next level to positively impact the work that I do and the life that I try to have.

Is the Tea Party seen as anti-civil rights? There’s definitely that perception of them. That they’re anti-social programs, anti-a lot of things. I don’t think that we’re necessarily saying we’re for or against these things. We, as a group, are trying to encourage the conversation. Some people believe in screaming that voice, and some people want to have a discussion and get heard. We’re trying to understand where everyone’s coming from, trying to find a compromise or a middle ground, a government that functions better for all people—not the majority, not the loud, not the ones willing enough to go to a rally—but for all people, especially for those that don’t have a voice.

politicians or events with the Coffee Party promotion, “this was done with civility,” that sort of thing. Kind of push the socializing civil engagement. A poetry slam type thing, it’d be called Soap Box. They could have a few minutes to get up on the soap box. Make it fun. Make it something people would want to go to.

*please call for appt.

How did you get involved in politics? I received a Facebook invitation to the first Coffee Party meeting. When I was a teen I worked in the House of Representatives in Boise. I’m from Wendell. Rep. [Wendy] Jaquet sponsored me when I was a page ... I went to D.C., where I represented the state of Idaho. I was a poor kid—she helped me get suits and stuff. Then I got away from politics as I got into school.

intention, but it’s kind of a way to get out there. We do a response to a Tea Party rally, practice civility while we’re there. I think the big thing with the Tea Party is that it seems … they’re working on trying not to be so out there, so extreme in their views. [Depicting] Obama into Hitler, different things like that are taking things a little further. They come off a little more angry or wild at first. I think they’re doing a good job of getting people involved, people that normally haven’t been. That’s what the Coffee Party is trying to do. Helping the average person understand their place in politics.

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

Duane Quintana has long been a driving force in Boise. In 2006, Boise Weekly interviewed Quintana about his work with ALPHA, an organization he founded after being diagnosed with HIV. Four years later, BW chatted with Quintana once again, this time about organizing the Boise arm of the national Coffee Party, alongside co-founder Cindy Gross. The national Coffee Party movement sprang up not long after the Tea Party patriots took the national stage after President Barack Obama’s inauguration. While the Tea Party is a proponent of smaller government, fewer taxes and fewer regulations from a conservative angle, the Coffee Party addresses those issues from what they see as a more civil stance.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 11

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Manifest destiny.

It’s still blue skies when J.J. Grey comes out to play.

SATURDAY JULY 3

bikes BARS AND STRIPES ALLEYCAT

jams WIDESPREAD PANIC Wax your dreads, don your tie-dye, grab some patchouli and a bottle of your favorite whiskey, and gently toss your three-legged dog in the back of the truck. It’s time to head on down to Idaho Botanical Garden: Widespread Panic is coming to Boise. The Athens, Ga., jam band has basically been on the road for the last 25 years straight, some years playing close to 250 shows. They’ve headlined almost every major U.S. festival including multiple appearances at Bonnaroo, a stop at Austin City Limits, Vegoose, High Sierra, Wakarusa, All Good and more. Not to mention, they just dropped their latest studio album, Dirty Side Down, on May 24. Last time they played near Boise was back in 2006 at the Brundage Mountain Resort, and this time around, they’re bringing guitarist Jimmy Herring, former member of Aquarium Rescue Unit and The Dead, who replaced guitarist George McConnell shortly after the Brundage show. Herring adds a whole new element to the band. His incredible fretwork, blistering speed and soulful solos bring new flair and depth to the long improv sessions Panic is known for. Opening the show will be funk septet JJ Grey & Mofro. Loaded up with a slide guitarist, a killer Hammond organ player, and a trumpet/tenor sax brass duo, JJ Grey throws down long, two-hour sets full of Southern fried, booty shakin’ blues. The concert is part of the 2010 Idaho Botanical Garden Outlaw Field Concert Series. 3:30 p.m. gates, 5 p.m. show, $35, Idaho Botanical Garden, 2335 N. Penitentiary Rd., 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden.org.

MONDAY JULY 5 punk GBH While many Americans have gone to the streets and joined Facebook campaigns in protest of the recent

SATURDAY JULY 3

Arizona immigration law, New York City-based group Outernational has taken their frustrations to the recording studio. The group recently worked with Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello to produce a cover of the Woody Guthrie classic “Deportees” in disapproval of the law. Outernational, which

12 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

infuses that same level of rage toward their repertoire of protest punk, is opening for British punk legends GBH (which stands for Grievous Bodily Harm) at the Venue on Monday, July 5. Formed in 1978, GBH is known as one of the pioneers of the British street punk scene called UK82. Self-described as “proper

Though some of our truck nuts-sporting readers might think the liberal commies here at Boise Weekly don’t know jack about red-blooded patriotism—to quote our friends the French— au contraire. Every year, BW hosts one of the most flag-waving, hotdog-scarfing, lighting shit on fire, ra-ra America Fourth of July parties this side of the Mason-Dixon line. And while that might be stretching the truth a little, one thing is absolutely true: We do host an annual Independence Day event—the Bars and Stripes Alleycat—but it probably has more in common with a May Day parade than a traditional Fourth of July barbeque. Every year, on the Saturday of the Fourth of July holiday, hundreds of tattooed bicyclists gather outside BWHQ, crack a PBR and wait patiently to receive their manifests. This year, at the strike of 4 p.m., alleycats will tear into their packets, start planning their routes across the city and race to hit up a number of bars and complete wacky tasks. Many beers, lots of sweat and a few spills later, these Bars and Stripes racers will meet up at a TBD location for a special celebratory after party. The BW Third of July Bars and Stripes Alleycat: it’s as American as tofu dogs and glutenfree apple pie. 3 p.m. sign-up, 4 p.m. race start (entrants capped at 125), $13, Boise Weekly Office, 523 Broad St., 208-344-2055, boiseweekly.com.

hardcore brummy punk rock,” GBH released its latest studio album, Perfume and Piss, in April of this year. Although most of the original spiked Mohawk and combat boot-wearing UK82 bands have since left the stage, with more than 30 years of experience under their studded belts and an enduring passion for performance, GBH continues to produce, tour and influence the sphere of hardcore punk. 7 p.m., $12, The Venue, 521 Broad St., 208-9190011, boisevenue.com.

TUESDAY JULY 6 Hitchcock THE 39 STEPS Remember age 15? Mallrats, atrocious stainless steel braces, trans fat-laden food and lots of “talk to the hand” and “bite me” references come to mind. Hailey-based theater group Company of Fools just turned the big one-five, and as a reflection of its defiant

and dramatic attitude, will open its 2010-2011 season with the comedy The 39 Steps. Just like the exaggerated arguments with parents about how totally unfair cur few was, the Tony Award-nominated play The 39 Steps is an over-the-top Monty Python-infused spy thriller. The play, adapted by English actor Patrick Barlow from the John Buchan novel and 1935 Hitchcock film of the same name, follows the stor y of a man’s unintended involvement with a WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FIND LAU R IE PEAR M AN

CAMPOS MARKET: CARNE ASADA RANCHERA PREPARADA

Bang up job, fireworks.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY JULY 3-4 fireworks TREASURE VALLEY FOURTH OF JULY EVENTS With the sun bottoming out after 10 p.m. on summer evenings, Fourth of July fireworks displays in the Treasure Valley are not for the early birds. Luckily, there are a number of ways to get a daytime dose of red, white and blue before the late-night “oohs” and “ahs” fill the balmy air. This year, the Boise Fourth of July Liberty Day Parade will be held on Saturday, July 3, at 10 a.m. The route begins at the corner of 10th and Bannock streets and then swings east from Bannock to Fourth Street, then south on Fourth Street to Idaho Street, west on Idaho to 12th Street and north on 12th Street back to Bannock Street. Parade organizers recommend you arrive early to snag a good spot. libertydayparade.com. On the actual Fourth of July, make sure to stop by the annual Kiwanis Pancake Breakfast from 7-11 a.m. in Julia Davis Park next to the Band Shell on the west side. A meal ticket runs $5 for grownups and $4 for the lil’uns, with plenty of free clowning, music and face painting to keep all patriots entertained. The 2010 Fourth of July fireworks show in Ann Morrison Park starts this year at approximately 10:15 p.m. Note that Ann Morrison Park will be closed to vehicle traffic all day, but the Boise State Towers parking lot and a number of downtown parking garages—Eastman Garage, Capitol Terrace Garage, City Centre Garage, Grove Street Garage, Boulevard Garage, Myrtle Street Garage, Avenue A West, Avenue A East—will provide free public parking all day. cityofboise.org. For those outside of Boise, Meridian will host a full day of Fourth of July activities, including an obstacle course and concessions beginning at 1 p.m. on Sunday, July 4. Local bands Apple Thief, Craving Dawn and Big Wow start at 3 p.m. meridiancity.org/parks_rec. Caldwell’s Fourth of July Celebration kicks off at 10 a.m. on Saturday, July 3, with a parade that begins in Caldwell Memorial Park and winds through downtown Caldwell. The city also hosts a fireworks display on Sunday, July 4, at Simplot Stadium at dusk. Entr y costs $1. cityofcaldwell.com.

Liber ty Theatre in Hailey. Opening night is Pay What You Feel Night, meaning you literally pay whatever you feel like paying for tickets that go on sale an hour before the per formance. The company

secret organization after assassins murder a female spy—with a bread knife. With plenty of Hitchcockian references sprinkled throughout, this tongue-injowl installment will run for a total of four weeks at the

S U B M I T

Zane Lamprey lives the hard life.

WEDNESDAY JULY 7 alco-medy DRINKING MADE EASY WITH ZANE LAMPREY At first glance, a comedy show called “Drinking Made Easy” sounds a lot like “breathing made easy,” “changing a light bulb made easy” or “eating cupcakes made easy.” Certain things just don’t require a primer. But some take the task of chugging hooch quite seriously, including Zane Lamprey, host of the Travel Channel’s international drinking series Three Sheets. Lamprey has sipped, swigged and swallowed a range of alcoholic beverages in more than 50 countries, making him one of the world’s top moonshine masters. As part of his 53-city comedy tour, “Drinking Made Easy,” Lamprey makes a stop at Knitting Factory on Wednesday, July 7. “Drinking Made Easy” is described as “one part education, one part comedy and two parts kick-ass.” The Andrew Zimmerman of cocktails, Lamprey has indulged in the finest French spirits, as well as downed shots of rum filled with dead scorpions. Lamprey has done more than 100 interviews and has been featured in more than 50 publications, such as The New York Times and Vanity Fair, and has appeared on The Tonight Show and Last Call with Carson Daly. His book Three Sheets: 6 Continents, 15 Countries, 150 Drinks and 1 Mean Hangover hit bookstores in March. Comedian Marc Ryan and Lamprey’s college friend Steve McKenna will join Lamprey at Knitting Factory for what is sure to be an intoxicating evening. 7 p.m. doors, 8 p.m. show, $25-$50, Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

is also hosting Girls Night Out per formances Wednesday, July 7, and Saturday, July 17, involving reduced ticket prices, a red carpet, $4 beer and wine, and postshow champagne, chocolate and discussion with the director and actors. The show is suppor ted in par t by an award from the National Endowment for the

Barbecue season is upon us—although you may have to move the grill under the carport or an awning if this rain keeps up. It’s a safe bet that you will be standing in front of a meat counter at some point this summer, tr ying to decide how best to feed a CAMPOS MARKET hungr y horde. 413 N. Orchard St. Instead of chicken legs, 208-658-0644 hotdogs or costly cuts of steak, stop into Campos Market on Orchard Avenue and make the short trip to the meat counter near the back of the store. If you’re a little unsure of what to tr y first, order a few pounds of Campos’ house-prepared carne asada ranchera preparada for the grill. Thin-sliced steak is marinated in a simple but rich combination of tomato sauce, garlic and onions. At $4.89 per pound, it’s not the cheapest cut of cow out there, but it slices up nicely. Toss a few chunks in the bottom of a warm tortilla, doused with a glug of your favorite hot-sauce—which you can also find, you guessed it, at Campos—and your friends may dub you the Barbecue Queen/King. If you can’t wait until dinner to sink your teeth into some marinated beef, head over to Campos at lunch time for a few authentic taqueria tacos. You can pick up the carne asada ranchera preparada para llevar on the way out. —Amy Atkins

Ar ts, the Paul G. Allen Foundation and patrons Judith and Richard Smooke. Tuesday, July 6-Saturday, July 31, times var y, $10-$28, Liber ty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, companyoffools.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 13

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JUNE 30 Food & Drink BOISE URBAN GARDEN SCHOOL FARM STAND—Fresh organic produce produced and raised by BUGS students. Proceeds benefit BUGS programs. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 4-6 p.m. FREE. BUGS Garden, 4821 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208424-6665, www.boiseurbangardenschool.org.

Workshops & Classes MOUNTAIN BIKING BOISE AND MCCALL—Local author Steve Stuebner will talk about great trails highlighted in his books, Mountain Biking in Boise and Mountain Biking in McCall. 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald, Boise, 208-322-1141, www. rei.com. VEGETARIAN CUISINE WITH CHEF RANDY KING—Menu includes jicama and citrus salad, grilled caesar salad, tofu stir-fry with snap peas and more with BW’s contributing writer, chef Randy King. 6:30 p.m. $50. Pottery Gourmet, 811 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-368-0649.

Talks & Lectures ADVENTURE PHOTOGRAPHY WITH A PRO—Local photographer and educator Chad Case will present a program on exploration and adventure photography. 7 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, www.boisepubliclibrary.org.

Sports & Fitness TRICYCLE RACES—The disclaimer at the beginning of Jackass was about exactly this sort of thing, which is why it’s awesome. 10 p.m. FREE. The Lobby, 760 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-2183, www.thelobbyboise.com.

Kids & Teens MAKE AND TAKE WEDNESDAYS—A science and art program for children ages 6 and older held in the Secret Garden. Learn while having fun. 4 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2940, www.gardencity. lili.org. WASTEWATER: WE TREAT IT RIGHT—Learn about the flow of water treatment through activities like viewing wastewater treatments, TP tube bowling and making TP tube puppets. Kids can also try their hand at cleaning up a simulated wastewater sample. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Boise Watershed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-4891284, www.cityofboise.org/Bee/ WaterShed.

Odds & Ends POKER—7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811.

14 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

SPLASH BASH—Poolside party with live music, food and drink specials and weekly drawings for prizes. 6-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www. owyheeplaza.com.

THURSDAY JULY 1 On Stage BAT BOY THE MUSICAL—Musical based on the perennial cover-boy for the Weekly World News. A feral half-bat/half-boy is discovered living in a cave and attempts to gain acceptance from the community of a small southern town. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org. DONNIE MAC’S GOT TALENT— Open talent show for cash and prizes. Sign up any time. 7 p.m.

$10. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008, www.donniemacgrub.com.

Workshops & Classes LOCAVORE GROUP POTLUCK— Monthly discussion of trends, trade resources, information on where to get, grow or harvest food. First Thursday of every month. North End Organic Nursery, 2350 Hill Road, Boise, 208-389-4769, northendnursery. com. MAD SCIENTIST: WATER SCIENCE—Hands-on experiments with water and other liquids. 2 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, www. adalib.org. PRACTICE AQUI—Designed for ages 13 and older. Attendees should have an understanding of English and Spanish. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2940, www.gardencity.lili.org.

NOISE/CD REVIEW AVI BUFFALO: AVI BUFFALO Possibly the sunniest record of the summer, Avi Buffalo’s self-titled debut (Sub Pop) is a pleasant, dreamy collection of California-inspired pop tunes. Avi Buffalo is a four-piece band from Long Beach, lead by 18-year-old singer-guitarist Avigdor ZahnerIsenberg. Despite his youth, the clean-cut, average-looking Zahner-Isenberg is a crafty songwriter and outstanding guitar player. Wielding a Fender Jazz Master, he adds licks and fills worthy of Nels Cline or John Scofield. The band’s heavily referenced influences range from the Shins, Wilco, even MGMT to Neil Young and the Beach Boys. With song names like “Five Little Sluts,” “Summer Cum,” and “Where’s Your Dirty Mind,” it’s clear where these kids’ minds are. Lyrically, the album is full of sexual angst and dirty innuendo, but also with some occasional depth: “I can’t express these thoughts without mistakes / no one can make you lose your faith / except for someone who you love. “ “What’s In It For” is a clean, beach-soaked tune bound for endless summer playlists. “Jessica” is a mellow, reverb-heavy ballad about a teenage crush with an incredibly soulful guitar solo during the bridge. “One Last” has keyboardist Rebecca Coleman trading lines with an extra-pubescent sounding Zahner-Isenberg, making for one of the better tracks on the album. “Remember Last Time” is an eight-minute composition with flattering lyrics, soaring melodies, a staggering guitar solo and a power ful, bursting crescendo. Not bad for a group of teenagers. —Stephen Foster WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT Art

E. Blue Heron Lane, Meridian, 208-724-6311.

FIRST THURSDAY IN DOWNTOWN BOISE—On the first Thursday of each month, downtown visitors can stroll through downtown Boise’s art galleries and enjoy unique entertainment and special events. See Page 19. First Thursday of the month, 5-9 p.m. FREE, For more information, visit www.downtownboise. org.

POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811.

Odds & Ends GOLDFISH RACING—Goldfish are placed in a raingutter, and it’s your job to urge them on toward the other end by blowing through a straw. Winner gets a big bar tab and their fish. 10 p.m. FREE. Mack and Charlie’s, 507 W. Main St., Boise, 208830-9977, mackandcharlies. com. ICE CREAM ZOOFARI—Enjoy the zoo after hours with special feedings, stories and events. Price of admission includes ice cream. Proceeds benefit Zoo Boise’s educational programs. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $4.50-$5.75. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-384-4125, www. zooboise.org. THE MERIDIAN SINGERS—A group for enthusiastic women who like to sing a cappella in barbershop style. The ability to read music is not necessary. 7:30-9 p.m. The Music Den, 245

TEAM TRIVIA NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Bad Irish, 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, www. badirish.com.

FOUR SHILLINGS SHORT— Outdoor world-and-Celtic-music concert with two musicians playing more than 20 different instruments. Bring low-back chairs or blankets. 7-9 p.m. $10. Boise Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 6200 N. Garrett, Garden City, 208-658-1710, www.boiseuu.org.

Workshops & Classes VINTAGE SWING DANCE—Instructions on classic Lindy Hop moves. All ages. No partner required. 7 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, www. heirloomdancestudio.com.

FRIDAY JULY 2 On Stage BAT BOY THE MUSICAL—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org.

Concerts AMERICAN FESTIVAL CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA—More than 270 singers including special guest, Grammy-winning songwriter Peter Cetera, will kick off Sun Valley’s Fourth of July weekend. 7 p.m. $39-$150. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, www.sunvalleycenter.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

Art ARTISTS’ RECEPTION—Reception for Cary Henrie, Kent Lovelace and Craig Kosak, the artists featured in “Tradition in Transition.” 5 p.m. FREE. Kneeland Gallery, 271 First Ave. N., Sun Valley, 208-726-5512, www. kneelandgallery.com. FIRST FRIDAY ART IN EAGLE— Take a stroll through downtown Eagle and visit local merchants and galleries along the way. First Friday invites the public to stop in to shops, and enjoy a drink, art and music. Held in downtown Eagle. First Friday of every month, 4-9 p.m. Downtown Eagle, 310 E. State St., Eagle. FIRST FRIDAY ARTIST GALLERY—Woodriver Cellars highlights a different local artist every month and hosts the featured artist to present and discuss their art. On the first Friday of the month, guests enjoy the scenery of the winery, art, live music, food and awardwinning wines. First Friday of every month, 6-10 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars, 3705 N. Hwy. 16, Eagle, 208-286-9463, www. woodrivercellars.com. GALLERY WALK—Starts at Kneeland Gallery goes through downtown. 5-8 p.m. FREE. Kneeland Gallery, 271 First Ave. N., Sun Valley, 208-726-5512, www. kneelandgallery.com.

Talks & Lectures

| EASY

| MEDIUM |

HARD | PROFESSIONAL

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Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

METRO CONVERSATIONS— Wake up with an informative networking event. Various Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce and Downtown Boise Association businesses host this early morning event designed to offer the public a chance to meet one another while discussing things happening within our community. First and third Friday of every month, 8-9 a.m. FREE, Moon’s Kitchen Cafe, 712 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-385-0472. www. boisechamber.org.

Odds & Ends BOISE CAFE LATIN NIGHTS— Get a basic Latin dance lesson included in the cover at 9 p.m. and then practice dancing to music by DJ Tomas or DJ Saya. Loosen up with a beer or glass of wine. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. Boise Cafe, 219 N. 10th St., 208-3433397.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 15

8 DAYS OUT NOCHES LATINAS—Every Friday night, a DJ spins the hottest salsa, durangese, merengue, cumbia, bachata and salsa dancing. For all ages. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. FREE. Chilango’s Mexican Restaurant, 8915 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-0304. WORLD’S LARGEST BEACH BALL—Kick off the first H2Overload Friday night, by playing with the world’s largest beach ball in the Whitewater Bay Wave Pool. 7-11 p.m. Price varies. Roaring Springs Water Park, 400 W. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-8848842, www.roaringsprings.com.

SATURDAY JULY 3 Festivals & Events BARS AND STRIPES— BW’s annual alley-cat race. First-come; first-served. Limited to 125 participants. See Picks Page 12. 3 p.m. $13. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, www.boiseweekly.com. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—Open-air market with all manner of local food and products, from fresh vegetables to fresh doughnuts, all served from the freshest of vendors. Live music acts, plus local arts and crafts. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Downtown at Eighth and Idaho streets, Boise.

On Stage A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—Shakespeare’s chickflick, orchestrated with a ‘60s mod-twist. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org.

Sports & Fitness BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB NIGHT—Members of the Boys and Girls Club receive free admission to the speedway to see racing. 6:30 p.m. Meridian Speedway, 335 E. Main St., Meridian, 208-888-2813, www. meridianspeedway.com.

Kids & Teens LIMELIGHT NIGHT HIP-HOP DANCE—Hip-hop dancing for teenagers and all ages every Saturday night at the Limelight. No smoking in the building and no alcohol in the dance center. 10 p.m. $8. Limelight, 3575 E. Copper Point Way, Meridian, 208898-9425, www.limelightboise. com.

Odds & Ends BOISE CAFE LATIN NIGHTS— See Friday. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. Boise Cafe/Cafe Bellisima, 219 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-3433397. GOT NEWF?—Newf is short for Newfoundland, a giant dog breed. If you have one, meet with other dogs and owners to play. For more information, e-mail tandb26@yahoo.com. 5 p.m. FREE. Morris Hill Park, NE corner of N. Roosevelt and Alpine streets, Boise. NOCHES LATINAS—Get free salsa dance lessons from 8-9 p.m. or 9-10 p.m., and then dance the night away from 10 p.m.-2 a.m. DJs spin the hottest salsa, duranguense, merengue, cumbia and bachata. 10 p.m.1 a.m. $5 cover. Chilango’s Mexican Restaurant, 8915 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3760304.

SUNDAY JULY 4 Festivals & Events FOURTH OF JULY BASH—Watch the fireworks with grub, as well as tunes by High Street. Reservations required. 6 p.m. Music of the Vine, 2805 Blaine St., Ste. 130, Caldwell, 208-454-1228, www.musicofthevine.com. FOURTH OF JULY CRITERIUM— Four-corner course in downtown Hailey immediately after the Fourth of July parade. Register at www.bcrd.org. 1 p.m. $35. IDAHO CITY OLD FASHIONED FOURTH OF JULY—Parade, games, food, races, the Idaho City Triathlon (pie eating, nail driving, hay bale toss) and a reading of the Declaration of Independence. Fireworks at dusk. More info at www.myidahocity. com. Noon-midnight. FREE. MIDDLETON FOURTH OF JULY—A full weekend of festivities. Saturday, there will be a fireman’s breakfast from 6:30-11 a.m., a car show at 10 a.m. and a parade at noon, followed by a festival with vendors. Sunday there will be fireworks at dusk. FREE. www.middleton.id.gov SKYDIVE IDAHO INDEPENDENCE WEEKEND—$20 off all pre-registered tandem jumps Fourth of July weekend. $165. www.skydive-idaho.com TREASURE VALLEY FOURTH OF JULY—Parades in Boise and Meridian, live music and fireworks. See Picks, Page 12. FREE. FOURTH OF JULY PANCAKE BREAKFAST—Put on by the Gem State Kiwanis. See Picks, Page 12. 8-11 a.m. $5. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise.

SUMMER ICE SHOWS—Performances by Olympic and worldclass figure skaters: two-time U.S. silver medalist Rachael Flatt and U.S. gold medalist Nathan Chen. Show begins at dusk. $32$98. Sun Valley, Idaho.

Workshops & Classes USA BALLROOM DANCE— Monthly dances with introductory and intermediate lessons included with admission. The activities are family-friendly and smoke- and alcohol-free. 7 p.m. $10 for non-members, $5 for members and students with ID, 208-249-1715, www.usadanceboise.org. Boise Valley Square and Round Dance Center, 6534 Diamond St., Boise.

Art DOUGLAS DAWSON—Dawson will discuss his collection of African ceramics that will be on display at the Severn Gallery for the month of July. FREE. Gail Severn Gallery, 400 First Ave. N., Ketchum, 208-726-5076, www. gailseverngallery.com. Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

16 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT On Stage

Boise, 208-344-7272, www. papajoesboise.com.

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM—See Saturday. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208-336-9221, www. idahoshakespeare.org.

Citizen NETWORKING JOB CLUB—Networking Job Club meets to offer leads, tips, insights and ideas with focus on career assessment, finding the hidden job market, networking, internet success, developing a successful resume and interview coaching. Facilitator and guest speakers. 10:30-11:30 a.m. FREE. Foothills Christian Church, 9655 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-0011.

Odds & Ends SALSA SUNDAYS—Latin dance night. 6 p.m.-2 a.m. Cowgirls, 353 Ave. E, Kuna, 208-9229522, www.cowgirlsaloon.com.

Odds & Ends

MONDAY JULY 5

BEER PONG—8 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s Saloon, 5467 Glenwood, Garden City, 208-3226699.

On Stage

PABST BINGO NIGHT—Play bingo for PBR, swag and other random stuff found at second hand stores. $1 PBR, Oly, or Rainier cans, or get a “ghetto bucket” (two of each) for $4. 7 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008, www. donniemacgrub.com.

INSERT FOOT THEATRE—Local improv comedy. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, www. heirloomdancestudio.com. PLAYS FROM THE ALLEY—Alley Repertory Theatre’s second annual new works reading series will feature Phil Atlakson’s The Primordial State of Every Single Thing, in which a happily married couple is distressed to learn that their only son has taken a 2D lover—a video-game anime character, embodied in the form of a body pillow. $10. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, www. visualartscollective.com.

PAWS ON THE PATIO—Leashed, well-behaved dogs are invited to hang on the patio to help raise money for Spay Neuter Idaho Pets, by chowing down on some of Zamzow’s finest vittles. 3 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008, www. donniemacgrub.com. PIONEER TOASTMASTERS— Participants are invited to work on their public speaking with the Pioneer Toastmasters speaking club. Guests and new members are always welcome. Not so sure you want to speak? No problem, show up and sit in. For more information, e-mail personalityonpaper@yahoo.com. 6-7:30 p.m. FREE, 208-559-4434. Perkins Family Restaurant, 300 Broadway Ave., Boise.

Talks & Lectures PRAXIS LODGE PUBLIC DIALOGUES SERIES—A monthly meet to engage in discussions pertaining to science, ethics, culture, philosophy, humanism and Freemasonry, hosted by Praxis Lodge. Each session features a presentation followed by open dialogue. Everyone is invited to attend. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Papa Joe’s, 1301 S. Capitol Blvd.,

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

TUESDAY JULY 6 Festivals & Events PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP, POETRY SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE— The Idaho LoudWriters Program includes a performance poetry workshop with Tara Brenner at 6 p.m., followed by an all-ages poetry slam. The Slam of Steel is a chance for poets to perform their own spoken-word poetry, a combination of literature and performance, in front of a crowd. Sign up is at 6:30 p.m. and the show is at 7 p.m. For more information, e-mail cheryl_maddalena@yahoo.com. 6 p.m. FREE for workshop; $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, www. boisepoetry.com. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632. PLAYING IN THE PLAZA—Food and craft vendors, along with live music by Barbara Laing and Bernie Reilly. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Generations Plaza, corner of Main Street and Idaho Avenue, Meridian, www.meridiancity.org.

On Stage BAT BOY THE MUSICAL—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org. COMPANY OF FOOLS PRESENTS: THE 39 STEPS—Monty-Pythonesque adaptation of the Hitchcock film by the same name, in which a man goes on the run from the law in order to clear his name of a murder he did not commit and expose an international conspiracy in the process. See Picks, Page 12. 7 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www.companyoffools.org.

Literature POETRY READING—Poetry host Scott Berge invites poets to share their own work or favorite poems during a fun night of poetry readings. Sign up at 6:30 p.m. and start waxing poetic at 7 p.m. For more information, e-mail ScottBerge@live.com. Tuesdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Alia’s Coffeehouse, 908 W. Main St., Boise, 208-338-1299.

Kids & Teens SHOOTING STARS BASKETBALL—Basketball league for kindergartners and first-graders with one practice and one game a week. Participants must register by Tuesday, July 6. Team placement Wednesday, July 7. 7 p.m. $24-$32. Nampa Recreation Center, 131 Constitution Way, Nampa, 208-468-5858, www. nampaparksandrecreation.org.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 17

8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends

Food & Drink

Kids & Teens

BALLISTIC BEER PONG—Compete for $300 in prizes. 10 p.m. FREE. Bad Irish, 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, www. badirish.com.

BOISE URBAN GARDEN SCHOOL FARM STAND—Fresh organic produce produced and raised by BUGS students. Proceeds benefit BUGS programs. Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 4-6 p.m. FREE. BUGS Garden, 4821 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-424-6665, www. boiseurbangardenschool.org.

MAKE AND TAKE WEDNESDAYS—A science and art program for children ages 6 and older held in the Secret Garden. Learn while having fun. 4 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2940, www.gardencity. lili.org.

BOISE ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY—The club meets the first Tuesday and second Friday of the month. FREE, Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895. www. boiseastro.org. KILROY COFFEE KLATCH—Join other people of the WWII-generation for a morning of conversation and friendship. All veterans are welcome and there are often guest speakers. For more information, e-mail suepaul@ warhawkairmuseum.org. 1011:30 a.m. FREE. Warhawk Air Museum, Nampa Airport, 201 Municipal Dr., Nampa, 208-4656446, www.warhawkairmuseum. org. POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811. ROTARY CLUB MEETINGS— Meet up with other professional adults to collaborate on topics of community service and wellbeing. 5:15 p.m. Perkins Family Restaurant, 300 Broadway Ave., Boise, 208-395-1531. SOCRATES CAFE—Interested in life’s greater questions? Join a group of active and engaged listeners who meet every week to discuss burning questions like “what is the standard of beauty,” or “are happiness and pleasure the same thing.” The group votes on a question and the discussion begins. For more information, e-mail scott@ scottharris.cc. 7-8:45 p.m. FREE. Papa Joe’s, 1301 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-344-7272, www.papajoesboise.com.

WEDNESDAY JULY 7 Festivals & Events LIQUID FORUM—Liquid Lounge and United Vision for Idaho host a discussion forum showcasing a different local nonprofit each month, along with a silent auction and music. This month, Idaho Community Action Network’s Leo Morales will lead a discussion on immigration, followed by music from Ben Burdick and mingling. 5-7:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, www. liquidboise.com.

On Stage BAT BOY THE MUSICAL—See Thursday. 8 p.m. $12-$375. Idaho Shakespeare Festival, 5657 Warm Springs Ave., Boise, 208-429-9908, box office 208336-9221, www.idahoshakespeare.org.

Workshops & Classes BACKPACKING BASICS FOR WOMEN—Danii McLin will give an overview of backpacking basics, including how to chose the right gear. 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald, Boise, 208322-1141, www.rei.com/stores/ boise. THE ALTERED T-SHIRT—Fee includes a kit, snack and instruction on how to effectively create custom T-shirts through surgery. 1-4 p.m. $45. The Idaho School of Art and Craft (Mend Inc.), 701 E. 44th St. #11, Garden City, 208-830-3644, theidahoschoolartandcraft.wordpress. com.

Literature BOISE NONFICTION WRITERS, SPEAKER SERIES—Join a group of nonfiction writers who meet to learn from guest speakers and from each other. Arrive at 6 p.m. to browse bookshelves and chat it up with other aspiring writers. For more information, e-mail hshaklee@uidaho. edu. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE, www. sageecosci.com/Writers.html. Rediscovered Bookshop, 7079 Overland Road, Boise, 208-3764229.

Talks & Lectures DRINKING MADE EASY WITH ZANE LAMPREY—The host of the Travel Channel’s Three Sheets with special guests Marc Ryan and Steve McKenna. 8 p.m. $25-$50. Knitting Factory Concert House, 416 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-367-1212, www. knittingfactory.com. GIRLS IN TECH—Featuring local Boise Radio host Stephanie Wick. Join Wick for an evening of humor as she discusses what it’s like to host her local program “That’s Woman’s Work.” 5:45-7 p.m. FREE. Boise Water Cooler, 1401 W. Idaho, Boise.

Sports & Fitness TRICYCLE RACES—The disclaimer at the beginning of Jackass was about exactly this sort of thing, which is why it’s awesome. 10 p.m. FREE. The Lobby, 760 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-2183, www.thelobbyboise.com.

Odds & Ends POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811. SPLASH BASH—Poolside party with live music, food and drink specials and weekly drawings for prizes. 6-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www. owyheeplaza.com. WATERSHED WEDNESDAY— Free drop-in activities and movies, as well as watershed exhibits. 10 a.m.-noon. FREE. Boise WaterShed, 11818 W. Joplin Road, Boise, 208-4891284, www.cityofboise.org/Bee/ WaterShed.

Calls to Artists BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS—Drop your artwork by the BW office. Square format works preferred, but slightly rectangular works accepted. Final reproduction size is approx. 10” x 10” but original artwork may be any size. We request that all published original covers be donated to a charity cover auction in the fall benefiting youth outreach programs in the arts. BW will pay $150 for ever y published cover. Direct questions to leila@boiseweekly. com. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, www. boiseweekly.com. EMERGING ARTISTS EXHIBIT-CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—For info, visit www. boiseweekly.com and click on Emerging Artists Exhibition link at the top of the page. IDAHO SCREENWRITER’S ASSOCIATION SHORT SCREENPLAY CONTEST—Screenwriters can submit a 5-20 page screenplay of any genre for the chance to win $50 cash and a production of their script by local filmmakers. Submit three copies of your script with a title page that includes contact information, genre and a log-line, along with an entr y form and $20 check or money order payable to Idaho Screenwriter’s Association by July 1, to ISA, c/o Louise Luster, P.O. Box 663, Eagle, ID 83616. Contact ctpfilms@gmail. com, or call 208-859-5123 for more info.

COMPANY OF FOOLS PRESENTS: THE 39 STEPS—See Tuesday. 7 p.m. $10-$28. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, www. companyoffools.org.

18 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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1ST THURSDAY

FIRST THURSDAY, TWO WAYS BOTH END AT THE POOL

hether you’re a marathon runner or a mall-walker, First Thursday has enough art, wine and free snacks to give you a good culture workout. And while we have full faith that our readers are pros at sniffing out free booze and good times, we decided to do things a little differently this month and whip you up a First Thursday itinerary. Here are two ways to maximize your July First Thursday—one for the go-getters and one for the lazy hooch hounds.

W

TARA MORGAN

5 P.M.

BITTERCREEK ALEHOUSE & RED FEATHER LOUNGE 246 N. Eighth St. 208-345-1813

6 P.M.

DEAD BIRD GALLERY

280 N. Eighth St. Idaho Building lower level 208-880-9989

6:15 P.M.

ALEXA ROSE GALLERY

280 N. Eighth St. Idaho Building basement courtyard

6:45 P.M.

THOMAS HAMMER COFFEE COMPANY 298 N. Eighth St. 208-368-0649

7:30 P.M.

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE 500 W. Idaho St. 208-345-4320

8THSTREETMARKETPLACE.COM

Fuel up for your First Thursday journey with some locally grown grub from Bittercreek Ale House and a special meet and greet with documentary filmmaker Seth Warren. A longtime professional kayaker, Warren is famous for his 2007 film Oil + Water, which follows his and pal Tyler Bradt’s travels cross-country in a petroleum-free retrofitted Japanese fire truck named Baby, which will be parked in front of Bittercreek for First Thursday. Warren’s latest documentary, Nature Propelled, follows Baby’s journey to 30 cities while Warren explains the connection between natural elements, renewable energy and adventure sports. If you’re still in the hood, Nature Propelled will screen at Red Feather at 7 p.m., along with a three-course local dinner presented by the Idaho Energy Collaborative. Once you’ve gotten your fill of suds, head downstairs in the Idaho Building for a nip of “Macro Lemonade.” This new exhibit at Dead Bird Gallery features macro photography by local artist Wayne T. Crans, who examines exotic arthropods and miniatures. For more animal oddities, head a few doors down to check out the group-show “Versus,” at the Alexa Rose Gallery. In addition to Alyson McCrink’s “feminine animal morphing” illustrations (the whole animal-head-withhuman-gams trend that has become crazy common), the show will also feature work by graphic artist Brian Anglin, conceptual sculpture artist Marie Mortensen and mixed-media artist Jakob Nyberg. Local duo Evils will flood the subterranean space with their ambient, atmospheric space jams. Don’t forget to keep your buzz going with a glass of wine from Parma Ridge Vineyards.

Mosey up the back stairs of the Superb Sushi courtyard and take a quick left into Thomas Hammer for the opening of graphic designer Nicolet Laursen’s new series of chalk drawings, “I See You.” You might recognize Laursen’s colorful, whimsical portraits of people and animals from her art opening last month at Happy Fish Sushi and Martini Bar. Head back down Bannock to check out perennial Boise fav Ben Wilson’s new exhibit at Flying M Coffeehouse. Wilson will show a collection of 15 to 20 pieces, featuring “a combination of new work and old work,” according to gallery co-curator John Warfel. “Also, he’s going to have some 3D elements that he’s created, painted faces on boxes with wings hanging from the ceiling in front of the wall.” Be sure to ask for a plastic bag to carry your Wilson concert poster print, things are about to get splashy.

8 P.M.

OWYHEE PLAZA HOTEL 1109 W. Main St. 208-343-4611

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Ease into your First Thursday with some Fourth of July-themed tapas at the Basque Market. Red wine, white sangria and blue potato tortilla pintxos promise to light the fuse for a firecracker First Thursday evening.

After celebrating American independence with the Basques, link arms with your patriotic crew and skip over to BODO to bask in some independent art. The 8th Street Artists in Residence program currently features multimedia painter Shari Olivieri; mixed media artist Ben Browne, who’s work “explores the relationship between a bright green shop stool, the latest products from Apple Computers and the colors purple and green”; and Romanian-born Mihai Baluta, who is working on his “Graphite and Gold” series.

5 P.M.

THE BASQUE MARKET

608 W. Grove St. 208-433-1208

5:30 P.M.

8TH STREET MARKETPLACE 404 S. Eighth St.

Still hungry? Pop over to Casa del Sol for $2 tacos, $2 Tecate drafts and live jams from Raquel Lopez. That’s just $4 for a beer belly-full of awesome. Though we’re not sure if this is a clever fish taco pun or a typo, Casa del Sol promises to “feed your appetite and warm your sole.” Mmm. Warm sole.

CASA DEL SOL

Cruise across Front Street to browse work from the local roaming artist collaborative Gypsy Gallery by the Grove Plaza fountain. Comprised of gypsies Cherry Woodbury, Jenifer Gilliland, Kristy Albrecht, Marianne Konvalinka, Michael Falvey, Pam McKnight, Miriam Woito, Kevin Flynn and Zella Bardsley, the collaborative also includes a number of special guest artists at each showing. After collecting some artist trading cards from the gypsies, get your flips flopping toward the Art Source Gallery. It’s time to cram in one last morsel of culture before you wet your ankles and refresh your buzz.

GYPSY GALLERY

The 10th Annual “Art Source Gallery Juried Exhibition” features 55 works selected from artists across the country working in mediums like photography, watercolor, oil, acrylic and ceramics. This year’s juror John Taye will announce award recipients at 6:30 p.m., while attendees slug down wine from Indian Creek Winery and beer from Brewforia from 5-9 p.m.

Congrats on all the hard work boozing and cruising through downtown. You must be exhausted. How about a refreshing cocktail and a dunk in a sparkling pool? Lucky for you, from 6-10 p.m. Owyhee Plaza flings open their pool gates to the bikini-clad masses for a special First Thursday pool party with live entertainment from the Ben Burdick Trio and Amy Weber. Throw back specialty beer flights, appetizers and other drink specials while watching your fellow art nerds flash some flesh. Sexy.

6:15 P.M. 409 S. Eighth St. 208-287-3660

7 P.M. The Grove Plaza

7:30 P.M.

ART SOURCE GALLERY

1015 W. Main St. 208-331-3374

8 P.M.

OWYHEE PLAZA HOTEL 1109 W. Main St. 208-343-4611

BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 19

1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS FIRST THURSDAY East THE ADELMANN EVENT 1 CENTER—Part of the Artist in Residence program, which gives local

artists free workspace in three-month stints. Art by Dee Dee Miller, Rose Elkovish, Ann Winslow, Christine Howard and Naomi Elton, with wine tasting from Woodriver Cellars. 622 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-287-3296.

BASQUE MARKET—Special Fourth of July red, white and blue tapas, along with housemade sangria. Try the new sangria slushy. 608 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-433-1208, www. thebasquemarket.com. BASQUE MUSEUM & CULTURAL 2 CENTER—Free admission to the museum and tours of the Cyrus

Jacobs/Uberuaga house starting at 6:30 p.m. Jam session with local musicians. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. 611 Grove St., Boise, 208-343-2671, www.basquemuseum.com.

CHRONIC TACOS—Open until 10 p.m. with five specials for less than $5. 106 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-3453711. DRAGONFLY—All handbags, wallets and tote bags will be 20 percent off. 414 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3389234, www.gama-go.com. FLATBREAD COMMUNITY 3 OVEN—Photography of Boise landmarks by Amber Grubb. Happy

hour until 6 p.m. Kids eat free and all bottles of wine for $20. 615 W. Main St., Boise, 208-343-4177, www. flatbreadpizza.com.

FLYING M COFFEEHOUSE— 4 Check out mixed-media works by graphic designer Ben Wilson,

including magic flutes and mechanical men. Then order an iced coffee to get you on your way just a little bit cooler. 500 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-3454320. FRONT DOOR NORTHWEST PIZZA AND TAP HOUSE—Beers from Boise Co-Op paired with chocolates from The Chocolat Bar. 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9201, www.thefrontdoorboise.com.

Ben Wilson’s magical world at Flying M Coffeehouse. Moving, mixed media on panel, 2’ x 2.5’ IDAHO INDIE WORKS—Make-and-take craft 5 table along with wine tasting from Sawtooth Winery. 106 N. Sixth St., 208-342-0804, Boise, idahoindieworks.blogspot.com.

LEKU ONA—Display of Basque art “Lauburu 6 Art” by Marianne Schaffeld and family, which includes ceramic ornaments and candle holders,

etched glasses, wooden canes and walking sticks as well as photographs of the Basque country. Music by Amuma Says No! 117 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-345-6665, www.lekuonaid.com.

MELTING POT—Parma-focused evening, with 7 a book signing of Leaving Parma by Angie Sarich, photography by Jessica Torres and wines

from Snake River Winery. 200 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-383-0900, www.meltingpot.com. PENGILLY’S—Frim Fram Four is on stage all night long. 8:45 p.m. FREE. 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344.

South 8TH STREET MARKETPLACE AT BODO—Art8 ist in Residence Program. Multimedia painter Shari Olivieri will open her studio for viewing.

Mixed-media artist Ben Browne will show a body of work exploring the relationship between a shop stool, the latest products from Apple Computers and the colors purple and green. Mihai Baluta will work on his graphite and gold series, “Origins,” inspired by neolithic figurines. 404 S. Eighth St., Mercantile Building, Boise, 208-338-5212, www.8thstreetmarketplace.com.

ATOMIC TREASURES—Celebrating re-use with an eclectic mix of vintage retro and found 9 objects. Special guest watercolor artist Brian Floyd with originals, prints and Rock-Art T-shirts. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-0811, atomictreasures.com.

BOISE ART GLASS—Make your own paperweight. Thirty-minute slots fill up fast 10 so reservations are encouraged. Enjoy cheese, crackers and cider while watching free demonstrations. $30. 530 W. Myrtle, Boise, 208-3451825, www.boiseartglass.com.

BOISE ART MUSEUM—Studio Art Explora11 tion: Practice drawing from observation after viewing the work in John James Audubon: American Artist and Naturalist. Art Talk: Storyteller and author Brian “Fox” Ellis, in the persona of Audubon, brings history, ecology, art and literature to life in the performance. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, www.boiseartmuseum.org. CASA DEL SOL—Celebrate First Thursday with live music, $2 tacos and $2 pounders of Tecate. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208287-3660. 37

20 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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COLDEST BEER YO U R G U I D E TO T H E G LO RY O F B E E R TESTERS: Amy Atkins, Sarah Barber, Andrew Crisp, Rachael Daigle, Deanna Darr, Todd Dvorak, Stephen Foster, Josh Gross, Jennifer Hernandez, Nathaniel Hof fman, Zach Hagadone, Dave Kirkpatrick, Jacob Lyman, Tara Morgan, Patti Murphy, Chris Oats, Jennifer Spencer, Lora Volker t PHOTOGRAPHS BY: LAURIE PEARMAN

t’s hard to think of beer as work, but when you’re testing 172 bars across Ada County in search of the coldest taps around, ordering a pint is serious business. For the last nine years, Boise Weekly has sent out an army of testers, armed with little more than a kitchen thermometer and a few sheets of paper to record the results. Why would we do such a completely unscientific and seemingly pointless undertaking? We do it for you, dear beer-loving BW readers. We know that ever yone has an opinion on the per fect temperature of beer, some highfalutin beer lovers even break it down to temperature by variety of brew. But in the end, we have to face the simple truth that in the dog days of summer, when you’re quite convinced that your flip flops will melt to the sidewalk, what you want is a frosty, cold beer, not the thermostatic justification of your beer knowledge. Once you’ve slaked your thirst, bone up on your beer knowledge with the stor y on impor tant points in

the histor y of beer or check out the biggest movers in our Hall of Fame. As with most things Boise Weekly, we have limited our testing to only locally owned establishments. And when a joint is big enough to have a couple of locations, we test only one. Still, it’s such a big job that we recruit a small battalion of testers to help the BW staff collect results—and limit our hangovers. And, as always, we prostrate ourselves at the feet of our testers, who demonstrate a remarkable amount of self sacrifice by moseying up to bar after bar to order pint after pint of cheap beer. Testers, you have our eternal gratitude. Now, go forth, meander through the results. Stand amazed at the teeth-numbing temperatures of the top 10 coldest beers, then mar vel at the warmest beers around, the whole time appreciating the wonder that fermentation has given us. —Deanna Darr

30.2°

>>> LONGHORN LOUNGE

Where else in the heart of downtown Kuna can you see who has the longest drive, toss back some finger steaks and dance the night away? The service is attentive and quick with a healthy dose of witty banter. 458 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-9224163.

FOOD DRINK SMOKE WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 21

33°

32.8°

THE FLICKS

Just because you’re seeing a movie doesn’t mean you can’t have a beer, does it? Well at least not at this Boise art-house institution that has a sweet little patio. 646 Fulton St., 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

33.3°

BOULEVARD BAR

In first place: the 2009-2010 Boise Masters bowling league, sponsored by Boulevard Bar at 20th Century Lanes. Now you know why they’re celebrating inside the clean, cozy bar and on the enclosed, covered patio. 4079 Chinden Blvd., Garden City.

33.3°

LINDY’S STEAK HOUSE

Lindy’s wears the crown for the best damn finger steaks in town. You can play shuffleboard and smoke cigarettes in the lounge, but then chow-down, smoke-free, in the dining room. 12249 Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3751310.

31°

THE BEER HOUSE

There’s a sense of foul-mouthed camaraderie at the Beer House. They don’t serve food, but they have a backyard grill for you to barbecue your own, plus volleyball pits and horseshoes. 9751 Cory Lane, 208-322-9958.

31°

DRY CREEK MERCANTILE

This idyllic, neo-turn-of-the-century mercantile contains a long oak bar, dining tables, grocer’s shelves and a patio where Hidden Springs parents socialize while watching their kids play tag on the expansive green out front. 5892 W. Hidden Springs Dr., 208-229-2001, drycreekmerc.com.

31.1°

RANCH CLUB

Smoke and fun permeate the walls of this dark paneled speakeasy, where billiard balls crack loudly and the beer pong table awaits. 3544 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3437447.

31.4°

CHARACTERS

Bright and open hotel bar inside one of Boise’s most established hotels. Lots of TVs, perfect to catch the game and a snack when you’re far from home. 1800 Fairview Ave., 208-3447691.

22 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

31.6°

OUTPOST CAFE AT THE BOISE AIRPORT

Head out to your local airport and grab a cold one. This one, ladies and gents, is cold. The Outpost not only serves icy booze but has a full menu. Boise Airport, 208-383-3110.

32.1°

RIVER ROCK ALEHOUSE

Inside it’s casual friendliness. Outside, there’s a patio for chilling. With two dozen beers on tap, mostly imports and microbrews, and the usual pub food from the grill, it’s a good spot to wait out the after-work Eagle traffic. 228 E. Plaza St., Ste. Q, Eagle, 208-938-4788.

32.1° SOLID

With arguably the largest patio-to-interior floorspace ratio, Solid is a welcome addition to the BODO bar scene, not only as a place you want to hang out, but as a place offering late-night food. Can you say chicken and waffles? 405 S. Eighth St., 208-345-6620.

32.2° 4-E’S BAR

Rack ’em on one of the pool tables and check out the wall of memories. Chow down a Totino’s grozen pizza while you admire the giant tennis ball dangling from the ceiling, just don’t touch. 379 E. Main St., Kuna.

33.3°

32.3° LIQUID

It’s dark and well suited to its live-music-andliquid-lovin’ crowd. Liquid also has serious patio bragging rights and just recently added food. 405 S. Eighth St., 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

32.8°

STAGECOACH INN

Gigantic breaded prawns are the appetizer of choice at this classic half-century-old Western lounge and steakhouse, where loyal guests have returned for decades. 3132 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-342-4161, stagecoachboise.com.

33.4°

CREEKSIDE LOUNGE

The only place we know where “teriyaki stix” is a menu item. Hooligan’s is the spot for pool and Saturday night karaoke. 10704 Overland Road, 208-376-9800.

The lounge is one-stop entertainment in the Treasure Valley’s biggest little city. Go for the cold beers, house-made finger steaks and onion rings, stay for the dancing, karaoke, beer selection, hospitable service and giant patio. 751 W. Fourth St., Kuna, 208-922-4421, creeksidekuna.com.

32.9°

33.4°

HOOLIGAN’S PUB

BOISE FRY COMPANY

Not only is the beer served cold at this fry-n-burger joint, but it’s also served in glasses made from recycled wine bottles. Scantily clad in salt and peanut oil, the taters that make the name crave a local lager to wash them down. 111 Broadway Ave., 208-4953858, boisefrycompany.com.

32.9°

HARRY’S BAR AND GRILL

A big, three-sided bar is the center of this family friendly grill. Exposed ducts overhead lend an industrial feel, while plate glass windows provide views of the Treasure Valley’s ever-changing weather. 2032 E. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-888-9868.

GINO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Gino’s isn’t known for beer. Gino’s is known for killer minestrone soup and tender osso bucco in a spacious new location where hungry patrons from Star, Nampa, Eagle, Meridian and downtown Boise flock. 3015 W. McMillan Road, Meridian, 208-887-7710.

33.5°

CASA MEXICO

A friendly staff keeps the setting cheerful, while alternating splashes of bright red and yellow brighten an otherwise understated decor. Heavy, chilled mugs keep the beer cold throughout your meal. 3083 S. Bown Way, 208-345-8464, casamexicoidaho.com. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

33.6°

PLAYER’S PUB AND GRILL

Homemade soups and pot roast Wednesdays make the pub inside Westy’s Garden Lanes more than a bowling alley bar. Regulars go to this Garden City hideout for the $4 burgerfries-and-chilled-draft lunch. 5504 Alworth, Garden City, 208-376-6563, playerspubandgrill.com.

34°

VES’S BROADWAY BAR

Ves’s offers a restaurant, pool tables, big screens and enthusiastic patrons. You never know who will be there. It’s where the AARP meets Animal House. 1712 Broadway Ave., 208-342-9951.

34.1°

35°

JUMPIN’ JANET’S

Now that the cool kids are moving up to the Bench, they need a watering hole. We suggest they pull up a stool at Janet’s, order a sandwich and a pint and hang out for a bit. They’ll be drawn into a pickup game of pool or electronic darts before they know it. 574 Vista Ave., 208-342-7620.

34.3°

BUSTERS SPORTS BAR

At this family-friendly sports bar Dad and Mom can watch the game while their ankle-biting offspring chomp on hamburgers served by waitresses in short skirts and tight tank tops. Smokers can puff away on the big, sunny patio out front. 1396 E. State St., Eagle, 208-9381800, busterssportsbar.com.

34.3°

FLATBREAD COMMUNITY OVEN

A feast of Neapolitan sensibilities is warmed by the big wood-fired pizza oven, huge garlic smell, decent music and sprawling bar. 615 Main St., 208-287-4757, flatbreadpizza.com.

34.4°

THE VILLAGE PUB

Just follow the arrows to the neighborhood hangout. Notable for its fireplace smack dab in the center of the bar, the Village Pub also sells wine by the half liter. 9936 Fairview Ave.

34.5°

CHARLIE BROWN’S

A regular told us that when she moved to Boise, she looked all over town for a neighborhood bar. After just a few minutes, she knew she’d found her home away from home. Bartender Andra always offers a cheery smile with a pint of PBR. 5783 Overland Road, 208-375-6541.

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35°

CASANOVA PIZZERIA

34.5°

MONTEGO BAY

Got parrot? Tiki-themed bar and club with a great patio and floating docks on Lake Harbor. Dancing rules the roost on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights. 3000 N. Lakeharbor Lane, 208-853-5070, montegobayidaho.com.

34.5° REEF

African masks, copper diving helmets, surfboard paraphernalia and all manner of thatch-bedecked gimcrackery put the Reef in a “Cabo San Lucasian” class of Tiki bar. Diffuse neon reds, oranges and pinks give the interior a certain intimacy, but the rooftop patio is where it’s at. 105 S. Sixth St., 208-287-9200, reefboise.com.

34.8°

HUMPIN’ HANNAH’S

Hold court in a corner that looks like grandma’s living room, shake your ass on the dance floor, stake out a pool game, marvel at the kitsch just about everywhere or perch high above it all on the wrought-iron balcony. You’ll find ’em from 21 to 61 at this longtime Boise favorite. 621 W. Main St., 208-345-7557.

34.8°

THE POCKET

Get some pool buddies together and show off your bank shot at one of the Pocket’s many quarter or hourly tables. 1487 N. Curtis Road, 208-375-2474.

The Comet, Medusa and Juno. Nope, those aren’t a list of comic book superheroes. Those are a few of the pies that Casanova pulls out of its wood-fired brick oven on a regular basis. Don’t let the lack of curb appeal fool you; this quaint joint serves up some of the best pizza this side of Venice. We’ll give you five-to-one odds that your first bite of Jimmy The Greek (olive oil, feta, spinach, tomato, Kalamata olives) won’t be your last. 1204 S. Vista Ave., 208-331-3535, casanovapizzeria.com.

35°

GIL’S K-9 BAR

On first impression, Gil’s seems like the kind of place that inspires a loyal clientele. On second glance, that group of hard-core regulars seems like a pretty welcoming crew, especially when viewed from a barstool perch or the shuffleboard table. 2506 Main St., 208-345-4420.

35.1°

WILLI B’S SANDWICH SALOON

Willi B’s is from another era. Cattle-branded wooden booths crowd the small bar/sandwich joint and old post office boxes line the wall. But beyond all levels of awesomeness, beer is included in the lunch special. 225 N. Fifth St., 208-331-5666, willibs.com.

35.2°

BILL-N-LYNN’S PLACE

Peeling paint, worn-out upholstery and gizzards on the menu make this a truly fantastic dive bar. A big surprise: They serve cheap champagne by the bottle. 229 W. Franklin Road, Meridian, 208-888-4075.

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BEER THROUGH HISTORY Beer has earned a reputation as the working man’s drink, but that title is belying its proud history. In fact, some beer-lovers have even conjectured that fermenting grain for beer was one of the reasons early hunter/gatherers settled down. The earliest archeological evidence of brewing dates back roughly 6,000 years to ancient Sumeria—a culture that honored Ninkasi, the goddess of brewing. The Sumerians are also credited with creating the beer straw, used to drink unfiltered beer without ingesting all the sludge. The famous Gilgamesh epic mentions beer, giving it at least partial credit for being what set the civilized man apart from the primitive man. Ancient Egyptians were big on beer as well, with numerous recipes for the drink and a long list of medicinal uses for the brew. Even Christian tradition mentions beer, considering it was on Noah’s supply list for the ark. By roughly 500 C.E., monasteries had started brewing beer for their own use and are credited with being the first to use hops. By the 1300s, they were the leading producers of beer. By the 1500s, beer was so popular among every social strata that Queen Elizabeth favored drinking an ale with breakfast. The first colonists in Virginia tried brewing their own beer but soon sent to England for better beer. Brewing became an art form in Germany, where brewers created the first guild. In 1526, they created the first purity laws for beer. Beer in the New World did get better, and many notable Americans owned breweries, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Samuel Adams. Thanks to German immigrants in the 1850s, Anheuser-Busch, Miller, Coors, Stroh, Schlitz and Pabst were founded in the United States. By the 1880s, there were more than 2,000 breweries in the country. Pressurized kegs showed up around 1900, but Prohibition (1919-1933) forced the party underground. Just two years after the end of Prohibition, the first beer in a can (Krueger’s Finest Ale) was introduced to the mass market. Since then, it has been all-steamahead for beer, leading to such milestone inventions as the beer bong and the keg stand.

35.2°

35.4°

TOM GRAINEY’S

Beers, bros and Black Sabbath. Tom Grainey’s is securely smashed in the middle of the wild rumpus that is Sixth and Main streets. Most nights, live music cuts through the smoky fog and drunk dudes do what drunk dudes do. 109 S. Sixth St., 208-345-2505.

35.3°

THE GARAGE / LUCKY 13

Industrial garage doors open the interior to the patio giving Lucky 13 a nice airy feel. The diverse clientele, plastic cups and paper plates make it feel something like a pizza picnic at a family reunion. 3662 S. Eckert Road, 208-344-6967, lucky13pizza.com.

35.4°

ANGELL’S BAR AND GRILL

After nearly 30 years, this nearly subterranean eatery owns almost an entire block in the heart of downtown. The sub-Saharan decor and Tommy Bahama vibe ensure this oasis is no mirage—the eyes of wall-mounted ibex heads follow your every move. 999 Main St., 208-342-4900, angellsbarandgrill.com.

35.4°

THE BUFFALO CLUB

Live bands, raucous crowds and a big dance floor make this a wild country bar. 10206 Fairview Ave., 208-321-1811.

35.4°

PARRILLA GRILL

This cantina-style Hyde Park haunt courts the college crowd with $1 taco Thursdays and nightly drink specials. The partially enclosed patio is comfy year round, if you can snag a seat. 1512 N. 13th St., 208-323-4688.

35.4°

THE QUARTER BARREL

This former NASCAR-themed bar has been cleaned out and turned into a small, nonsmoking concert venue. Karaoke on Thursdays and an enclosed patio for cig puffers. 4902 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-3430.

35.5°

OVERLAND BAR

This dark watering hole provides pool tables, a jukebox and enough neon beer signs to line Bronco Stadium. 3907 W. Overland Road, 208-336-4707.

35.6°

BELLA AQUILA

Stylish furnishings and a fire-engine red quartzite bar define the lounge inside this contemporary Italian restaurant. The micro of the month is selected to complement the upscale Italian fare served in the dining room and on the cottonwood-shaded patio. 775 S. Rivershore Drive, Eagle, 208-938-1900, bellaaquilarestaurant.com.

35.6°

BULL’S HEAD STATION

An airy, open bar with hardwood floors, burgundy leather seats downstairs and a cozy, English pub-style joint upstairs with a full menu of British and American classics. Check out the rotating entertainment including poker tournaments and dance nights in the room next to the upstairs pub. 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-855-5858.

—Deanna Darr

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35.6°

CHEERLEADERS SPORTS BAR AND GRILL

Flat screen tellies are everywhere you look, as are waitresses wearing tight tops and knee socks at this colorful, cavernous sports bar. 3541 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-939-9209, cheerleaderssbg.com.

35.6°

DONNIE MAC’S TRAILER PARK CUISINE

The most exciting bar stools in town for sure—bounce up and down on the leather, saddle-style seating as you enjoy roadkill cuisine and beer and wine in this ironically themed trailer park restaurant. 1515 W. Grove St., 208-384-9008, donniemacgrub.com.

35.6°

36.3°

JAKERS BAR AND GRILL

A long sweeping bar separates the two dining sections of this popular eater y that offers nightly specials and a great happy hour. 3268 E. Pine St., Meridian, 208-288-0898, jakers. com.

35.6°

PITCHERS AND PINTS

This funky, intimate and friendly space is decorated with personalized $1 bills and features a covered patio and pool table out back. One of the best neighborhood pubs around, despite not being in a neighborhood. 1108 Front St., 208-287-0357. mypitchersandpints.com.

35.6° SIN

A decadent multi-level makeout palace, Sin is complete with red lounge lighting and an enormous multimedia setup, including an on-stage stripper pole. 1124 W. Front St. 208-342-3375, sinboise.com.

35.8°

NUT HOUSE SPORTS BAR AND GRILL

TURNER’S SPORTS BAR

36.1°

GELATO CAFE

Sushi? Check. Gelato martinis? Check. Draught beer? Checkety-check. Live music on the patio on Wednesday afternoons? Yep, that too. 2053 E. Fairview Ave., Meridian, 208-8468410, gelatocafeofidaho.net.

36.3°

CHANDLERS STEAKHOUSE

The azure lighting above the bar in no way indicates a blue light special—prices match quality in this high-end arena. The extravagant establishment’s wrap-around patio offers prime viewing for the annual Twilight Criterium—book early or forget it. 981 W. Grove St., 208-383-4300, chandlersboise.com.

36.3°

O’MICHAEL’S PUB AND GRILL

Twelve tap handles, a menu of nuts to nosh on and house-made pickled eggs make it easy to spend time watching sports on the joint’s 14 TVs. 12505 W. Chinden Blvd., Boise, 208-3788273, nuthouseboise.com.

If you’re going to do some incognito day-drinking, O’Michael’s is the place. A scant few rays of sunshine peek through the covered windows and mounted animal heads smile from the walls. Friendly staff, fried stuff and stiff drinks. 2433 N. Bogus Basin Road, 208-342-8948, omichaelspub.com.

35.9°

36.3°

SAM’S SALOON

Just looking at the walls will remind you of all the beers that your dad used to tell you about when you were too young to pound ’em yourself. After you tire of the beer nostalgia you can always play some darts or pool. 751 W. Fourth St., Kuna, 208-922-4421. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

36.3°

RICK’S PRESS ROOM

From the nice selection of micros to the salmon wrapped in potato to the hometown service, Rick’s Press Room represents everything that is good about classic Americana. 130 E. Idaho Ave., Meridian, 208-2880558, rickspressroom.net.

Just the basics at this neighborhood joint: Dark, smoky atmosphere, pool tables and liberal pours. But what gives with the Tiki vibe? 4022 State St., 208-342-9090.

36.4°

MCCLEARY’S PUB

Located next to an Indian market, McCleary’s brings Irish flavor to Boise. Play air hockey while gazing at trinkets from the land of Michael Collins adorning the pub’s olive-colored walls. 604 N. Orchard Ave., 208-3423007.

36.5°

BEN’S CROW INN

Inside, soft light and lots of wood paneling. Outside, one of the best patios in town with a great view. An East Boise institution for more than a quarter of a century and still going strong. 6781 Warm Springs Ave., 208-3429669.

36.5°

BREWS BROTHERS

This sporty, pubsy spot has 23 beers on tap and plenty of bottle choices. Feeling clubby? Then join the joint’s mug club. At $40, membership buys you a catered dinner and your name etched in your very own glass tankard. 6928 W. State St., 208-853-0526, brewsbrothersonline.com.

36.5°

RED ROOM TAVERN

The Red Room’s aesthetic mixes hipster-punkbasement and Goth-chick-bedroom. But while its dive bar roots lend it just enough grunge to feel laid back, the joint has enough chic to cut through the sleaze. 601 W. Main St., 208-3437034.

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36.5°

36.5°

STRIKERS BAR IN MERIDIAN LANES

Professional dart games with professional dart players ser ved with a side of weekend karaoke, attentive ser vice and cold beer—if that isn’t enough for you, there is always bowling. 324 S. Meridian Road, Meridian, 208-888-2048, meridianbowlinglanes.com.

36.5°

VISUAL ARTS COLLECTIVE

Art shows, concerts and theater performances are on the docket and three locally crafted Sockeye Brewery offerings are on tap. The venue is huge but the attitudes aren’t big. 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, visualartscollective.com.

36.5°

WHITE WATER SALOON

Ya got darts, ya got locals imbibing and ya got conversing in the early weekend afternoon about the follies of the previous week. Toss in friendly service and you can’t ask for much more in this pre-revitalization area of Meridian. 1646 N. Meridian Road, Meridian, 208-8883063.

36.7°

BAR AT THE GROVE HOTEL

Clientele at the granite-top bar wear T-shirts and ball caps, but collars and pearls rule the tables. Live piano entertains swanky weekend crowds who know that the citrus juice in any mixer is visibly fresh-squeezed. 245 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-333-8000, grovehotelboise.com.

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36.7°

SUN RAY CAFE

Where Spandex-clad bikers and their offspring go to replenish depleted calories the Sun Ray Cafe patio in Hyde Park is always packed with pitchers and pizzas, due in no small part to the expansive streetside patio. 1602 N. 13th St., 208-343-2887.

36.8°

THE CRESCENT

The Crescent is known for its “No Lawyers” cuisine: Lawyer Fries (aka Rocky Mountain Oysters), the Jailhouse Burger and the Court Reporter Club. Don’t think they’re serious about their lawyer ban? Just try them, we dare you. 5500 W. Franklin Road, 208-322-9856, no-lawyers.com.

36.9°

36TH ST. BISTRO

A fancy affair attached to an enormous garden center. Plants cover every surface, offering a lush and upper-crust place to get a beer. 3769 Woody Drive, 208-433-5108, 36streetgardencenter.com.

36.9°

DUTCH GOOSE

Start with the homemade spicy deviled eggs. Move to the steamed clams or hand-cut tenderloin finger steaks drenched in beer batter. Then try burning it all off with a game of horseshoes in the pit out back. There’s a reason there’s no such thing as a quick drink at the Dutch Goose. 3515 W. State St., 208-342-8887, dutchgoose.com.

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37.4°

37.4°

THE BOUQUET

36.9°

GOODWOOD BARBECUE CO.

This family friendly barbecue joint has brisket, ribs, steak and waiters in crisp white shirts who grind fresh pepper on your salad. It also has a comfy bar where you can wait for your table with a cold one in hand. 7849 W. Spectrum, 208-658-7173, goodwoodbbq. com.

37°

10TH ST. STATION

One door and no windows mean only welladjusted eyes can distinguish patrons’ identities in this intimately smoky scene. Clandestine meetings over stiff drinks and generous pours surely draw in the likes of Jimmy Hoffa—or maybe a local judge. 104 N. 10th St., 208-344-2677.

37.3°

LITTLE DUTCH GARDEN

After nearly a century of service, the “Bucket” commits as much to local bands and indie music as it does to its 16 taps. The sultry and historic back bar caters to the three wise men—Jack, Jim and Jose. 1010 W. Main St., 208-345-6605, thebouquet.net.

37.4°

CLUB SAVVY’S

From countr y to rock and hip-hop, if you request it, they’ll play it inside this spacious cinder block dance and pool hall. Bar scrip is the prize at Wednesday poker tourneys. 3933 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-429-9339.

37.4°

LEKU ONA

Although Leku Ona serves up authentic Basque food, one need look no further than the bar for a good time. Classed-up drinking with tapas, picon punches and a healthy pour of vino seven days a week. 117 S. Sixth St., 208-345-6665, lekuonaid.com.

37.4°

MAIN STREET BISTRO

A literal neighborhood bar, this home-converted-into-a-tavern joint sits in between brick homes and sketchy apartments. One can play pool or foosball with the regular clientele. 910 S. Owyhee St., 208-342-9034.

MSB’s famous confiscated fake ID trophy board is gone these days, but the Bistro is still party central for the young, single, skin-to-win crowd. 609 W. Main St., 208-345-9515.

37.3°

37.4°

SMOKY MOUNTAIN PIZZA AND PASTA

Sure, you can get one heck of a tasty slice, but there’s also a surprisingly nice wine selection and a happy hour from 2-6 p.m., just the combination to keep everyone happy for hours on end. 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208-429-0011, smokymountainpizza.com. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

STUBS SPORTS BAR

A wide selection of appetizers, pizza, salad, sandwiches and tacos with budget-friendly specials ever y day. Eclectic sports memorabilia decor, TVs along all the walls—hey, it’s a sports bar. 3662 Findley Ave., 208-3367882.

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38°

38.4°

JIM’S ALIBI

Need a beer at 7 a.m.? This dark, jukebox-heavy, Torch-owned establishment can provide it. Pinball is the pastime of choice for the clientele. 2710 Broadway Ave., 208-342-9220.

38.1°

MACK AND CHARLIE’S

A perpetual line snakes outside the door of this college hangout on the weekends but weeknights are mellow enough to actually snag some quality time with the shuffleboard table and a BFC served in a special BFC koozie. What’s that you say? What’s a BFC? Guess you better check it out. 507 Main St., 208-3435159, mackandcharlies.com.

38.1°

PIPER PUB AND GRILL

With a scenic second floor balcony, an entire wall of adult beverages and stellar food offerings, Piper is a classy place to rub elbows with the after-work crowd. 150 N. Eighth St., 208-343-2444, thepiperpub.com.

37.5°

GRAINEY’S BASEMENT

Sure, it’s subterranean, but with access to the upstairs bar, a party atmosphere and live music, it’s anything but dark. 109 S. Sixth St., 208-345-2505.

37.6°

CAPITOL CLUB

With free limo service and 12 hours per day that are “happy,” this Western-feeling bar is a lesson in economics. Unfortunately, it’s also temporarily closed. 622 W. Idaho St., 208-336258.

37.6°

CAZBA/OPA

Mediterranean in all respects, Cazba now houses the bar, Opa, in its cloud-muraled walls. Chase your hummus with a cold beer, either perched on a cloth-upholstered stool at the bar or from a prime people-watching spot on the patio. 211 N. Eighth St., 208-381-0222.

37.6°

CHEF ROLAND’S

Masks, gators and crustaceans on the wall; crawfish, catfish and collards on the menu; the ebullient Chef Roland in the kitchen—slow down and enjoy. 1221 W. Boise Ave., 208-3444387.

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37.7°

GAMEKEEPER LOUNGE

An elegant, old-school hotel martini bar where an evening can be both anonymous and familiar and time can stand still. 1109 Main St., 208-343-4611, owyheeplaza.com.

37.7°

GRAPE ESCAPE

OK, so it’s a wine bar, but that one tap of high-end beer makes it a solid option for the non-wine lovers in the group to sip a brew while enjoying a lingering, elegant lunch. 800 W. Idaho St., 208-368-0200.

37.7°

LEGENDS SPORTS PUB AND GRILL

ESPN surrounds you at Legends in the Edwards Cinema complex. Munch on pub grub while you wait for your movie. 7609 Overland Road, 208-377-1819, legendspubandgrill.com.

37.7°

SOCKEYE GRILL AND BREWERY

It’s no wonder 100 other bars in the Treasure Valley have Sockeye’s flavorful beers on tap. These people know how beer is done. The knowledgeable waitresses offer entertaining lectures on the science of beer. 3019 N. Cole Road, 208-658-1533, sockeyebrew.com.

37.8°

MULLIGANS BAR AND EATERY

With 20 beers on tap and TVs spanning the interest spectrum, Mulligans is a lively place with friendly staff and plenty of activities to keep you occupied while you nurse your cold beer(s). 601 S. Main St., Meridian, 208-884-3737.

37.9°

BURGER ’N BREW

A relaxed atmosphere with plenty of TVs and big tables for groups and softball teams. Free popcorn and 24 rotating micro taps. 6928 W. State St., 208-853-0526.

37.9°

LOCK, STOCK AND BARREL

Fancy pants drinking with a regular line up of live music on stage. Otis shakes ’em up behind the bar and steaks are as thick as your forearm in the restaurant. 1100 W. Jefferson St., 208-336-4266, lsbboise.com.

37.9°

RUDY’S PUB AND GRILL

Sassy bartenders pouring from 14 taps and serving delectable Kobe sliders keep neighbors going back to this family friendly Northwest pub. The Majestic movie theater and a Harley dealership nearby helps, too. 2310 E. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-884-4453, rudyspubngrill. com.

38.1°

TWISTED TIMBER PUB AND GRILL

These guys celebrated their first anniversary in June. Cool stained concrete floors, modern art, a coffee bar, a nice selection on tap and Wiis ensure they’ll be celebrating many more. 4563 S. Cloverdale Road, 208-362-7157, ilovethetimber.com.

38.3°

CACTUS BAR

One member of the rough-but-harmless crowd in this smoky dive accused us of being undercover cops. The bartenders don’t take plastic—even the po-po have to pay with cash. 517 W. Main St., 208-342-9732.

38.3°

RED EYE BAR AND GRILL

Dance to live music, toss some darts, pick solids or stripes on the pool table, tee-up on the Golden Tee, or know when to hold ’em or know when to fold ’em on the multiple poker tables. Perhaps just settle down with a cold pint and talk politics with the locals. 414 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-922-9797, redeyebarandgrill.com.

38.4°

CRICKET’S BAR AND GRILL

This is one of the few places in Boise where you can stuff your face while you sing. Cricket’s features karaoke and Taco Tuesday, an all you can eat Mexican paradise. 1228 Oakland Ave., 208-344-6235. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

38.4°

END ZONE

It’s all about consistency at this tiny sports bar across from Bronco Nation. You can be sure to catch any sport you want on one of the six boob tubes. 1010 Broadway Ave., 208-3840613.

38.4°

THE REFUGE

A 21st century take on the neighborhood bar with an eclectic mix of six TV screens, WiFi, a billiards table, Internet jukebox and a patio with an appropriately urban view of Parkcenter. 404 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208-424-8211.

38.5°

BUDDIES PUB AND DELI

The name’s half right: You’ll make buddies, but you’ll have to order food from the Lucky Palace a few doors down. The patrons are as chatty and friendly as can be. 8654 W. Overland Road, 208-658-0906.

38.5°

COBBY’S SANDWICH SHOP

Serving killer sandwiches since 1978, Cobby’s has its act down pat. There are four tap handles, picnic table seating and a rustic, cabin-like interior at the local institution’s second branch. Don’t get us started on the serve-yourself potato chip dispenser. 4348 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-322-7401, cobbys.com.

38.5°

TAVERN AT BOWN

An innovative and well appointed take on the tavern theme with steaks, upscale bar food and brews on one side—sushi, Japanese beers and sake on the other. Nice patio in a quiet setting. 3111 S. Bown Way, 208-3452277, tavernatbown.com.

38.7°

LOUIE’S PIZZA AND ITALIAN RESTAURANT

Louie’s is a Treasure Valley Italian dining institution and perhaps the only place where you’ll find Peroni on tap, perfect to go with an order of bruschetta. 2500 E. Fairview Ave., Meridian, 208-884-5200, louiespizza.com.

38.8°

20TH CENTURY LANES

Who doesn’t want beer with bowling? The real question is: Who wouldn’t want $6 pitchers with Cosmic Bowling on Monday nights after 10 p.m.? 4712 W. State St., 208-342-8695, 20thcenturylanes.com.

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38.8°

39.4°

COWGIRLS SALOON AND TEQUILARIA

You can get your weekly fill of hip-hop or country music frills in this expansive space just outside of downtown Kuna. After you’ve completed your dance on the bar—specially designed to support all sorts of rump-shaking—and chit-chatted with the outstanding staffers, make sure you head over to the gift shop to buy a Cowgirls thong for your lil’ sweet thang. 353 Ave. E, Kuna, 208-922-9522, cowgirlsaloon.com.

38.8° MAI THAI

Tom kah gai. Martini. Repeat. If you must, throw in a beer. Happy hour at this upscale Thai joint is surprisingly affordable, making it the perfect place to start off an evening of downtown merrymaking. 750 W. Idaho St., 208-344-8424, maithaigroup.com.

39.2° AHI SUSHI

Sage green walls and a three-sided sushi bar with a smooth black dining counter set the stage for Ahi’s friendly sushi chefs. Kirin on tap helps to put out the tongue-fire lit by the Damn SOB roll. 1193 Winding Creek, Ste. 104, Eagle, 208-938-3474, ahisushibar.com.

39.3°

THE TORCH 2

You’ll need a torch to see inside but this gentlemen’s club offers the regular bar fare with a sprinkling of scantily clad seductresses writhing on poles. At this Boise institution, it’s not so much about being seen, as it is about staying in the shadows. Bottoms up. 610 S. Vista Ave., 208-336-4747, thetorchlounge. com.

39.4° DAVINCI’S

It’s a New York-style Italian restaurant and full bar in an historic building in Eagle serving a good selection of imported beer and microbrews, wine and liquor. Live music and wine tasting every Thursday. The ambiance is relaxed and welcoming for 20-somethings as well as octogenarians. 190 E. State St., Eagle, 208-939-2500, davincis2.com.

39.4°

PIZZALCHIK

Can’t remember how to pronounce it? Think “swizzlestick.” Tasty pizzas, salads and roasted chicken, good tap beer selection and comfy outdoor patio with wide-screen view of the Foothills. 7330 W. State St., 208-8537757, pizzalchik.com.

39.4°

THE PLANK

As the name suggests, the Plank is stuffed to the gills with pirate flair including flags and a skeleton wench. Adorned with big screen TVs and a patio, this bar welcomes all mateys aboard. 650 S. Vista Ave., 208-336-1790, theplankboise.com.

39.4°

THE SYMPOSION

The Sympo has that special brand of dingy useful for those days when you feel so downspirited that you don’t want to get out of your sweats. Populated by friendly customers and their dogs, for whom downtown Boise is a little too “freaky-deaky.” 2801 Fletcher St., 208-342-9420.

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COLDEST BEER HALL OF FAME We test a lot of beer at a lot of bars, but each year there are a few stand outs that catch our attention. This year’s winner, The Longhorn, wasn’t even bumping the top 10 last year, but an impressive 5.4-degree drop in temperature vaulted it past the 2009 winner, 4-E’s Bar, which dropped to No. 9 with a 2.4-degree increase. On the opposite end of the spectrum, the owner of last year’s warmest beer, Grainey’s Basement, must have supercharged its cooling system in the last 12 months. The bar turned in a massive 12.1-degree improvement, launching it from the bottom of the heap to a perch firmly in the middle. Several bars earned a frosty star this year for making a return trip to the top 10. Joining the Longhorn and 4-E’s on the illustrious list are the Ranch Club (jumping in rank to No. 4 from No. 8) and Characters (moving up to No. 5 from No. 6). We also must give a nod to River Rock Alehouse, making its first appearance at the top of the list, registering an impressive 12-degree decline in temperature to land at No. 7. On the warm side of the list, Gusto gained a whopping 10 degrees to end up with the title of warmest beer, turning in a temperature of 56.3 degrees. This end of the list also has its returning alumni, to which we award the melted star. This year’s warm-beer hall of fame honorees are: The Lift, Bar Gernika and New Frontier. Remember, no matter what end of the scale you fall on, you’re all winners—well, kind of. —Deanna Darr

30 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

39.4°

39.8°

WHITEWATER PIZZA AND PASTA

Family friendly, rustic and wide open, Whitewater Pizza and Pasta is where you can reminisce about those river memories of yesteryear over a cold pint and a slice of delicious pizza. 1510 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-888-6611, whitewaterpizza.net.

39.5°

SAM’S PLACE

This tiny hole-in-the-wall hosts an annual golf tourney and is a gathering place for Nascar fans. 3395 N. Five Mile Road, 208-376-0074.

39.6°

BERRYHILL AND CO.

Boldly departing from the usual peanuts and pretzels bar snacks, the free hors d’oeuvres on the semi-circular bar often involve smoked salmon and chevre. Subtle and sassy, the black-clad staff keep the microbrews endlessly flowing from their taps. 121 N. Ninth St., 208-387-3553, berryhillandco.com.

39.6°

FIRESIDE INN

There is a fireplace that once functioned. But patrons bent on tossing shot glasses into the fire doused that flame. Classic-rock juke, pinball, darts and shuffleboard add some warmth. 1610 N. 31st St., 208-342-9075.

39.7°

BOISE CAFE

This far north of the border, free salsa dance lessons draw everyone from hip shakers to hippies. Only a cold beer could cool the steamy tango. 219 N. 10th St., 208-3433397.

39.7°

EASTSIDE TAVERN

With a spacious, green-hued atmosphere and a fine wood-carved mural of the Boise skyline, the recently re-opened and spiffed-up Eastside Tavern plays host to a slew of video games, a wide open pool area, shuffleboard, electronic dartboards and an above-par selection of liquor and beer. 610 E. Boise Ave., 208-3453878.

39.7°

MUGGSY’S

Huge patio, pool tables and an unlimited selection of music on the Internet jukebox. With its rustic sports bar vibe, Muggsy’s is the place to go in Meridian when you need to quench your thirst or watch the Broncos on game day. 501 S. Main St., Meridian, 208-898-9470, muggsyssportsbar.com.

39.7°

SHORTY’S SALOON

This authentic country saloon feels like a slice of the old Wild West featuring a long, hardwood bar worn smooth by the forearms of countless working men cradling Budweisers and Marlboros. 5467 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-322-6699, shortyssaloon.com.

39.8°

EMERALD LANES

Yes, there are the requisite bowling lanes, arcade games, pool, pinball and air hockey, but it’s made all so much more interesting with the addition of a few pints. 4860 Emerald St., 208-344-2695. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

39.8°

HIGHLANDS HOLLOW BREWHOUSE

The Bogus Basin beer stop-off brews its own ales and hosts lots of drafts. The venue feels like a ski shack, with beer-robilia on the walls—makes ya wanna get snowed in. 2455 Harrison Hollow Lane, 208-343-6820, highlandshollow.com.

39.8°

Q’S BILLIARDS AND EATERY

The lamps over the pool tables glow green like an exotic beetle. Play pool, drink beer, grab a bite to eat. Play pool, drink beer ... you get the idea. 6570 Fairview Ave., 208-322-9122.

40.2°

KRUEGER’S

Beer pong and Bronco swag are the prominent features of this hidden gem on Broadway. Ask for a rum and coke, one of the few liquor concoctions available. 550 Broadway Ave., 208-761-3076.

40.2°

PENGILLY’S SALOON

This speakeasy style saloon features wooden booths, an antique cash register, vintage lighting and old style chairs. But it abdicates the typical smoky atmosphere for drinks and music. 513 Main St., 208-345-6344.

40.3°

KAY AND TRACY’S 127 CLUB

The expansive space includes something for everyone: pool, darts, live music, hunks of prime-rib—some of the best in the Treasure Valley—and even bags of salt and vinegar chicharrones hanging behind the bar. 127 E. Idaho Ave., Meridian, 208-884-0122.

40.4°

BUSTER’S SPORTS BAR

Scantily clad waitresses serve families and the college crowd as a dozen big screens blare every sports game imaginable in this Boise State crazed bar and restaurant. 1326 Broadway Ave., 208-345-5688, busterssportsbar.com.

40.5°

HYDE PARK PUB

With a healthy stock of regulars—even at noon—patio seating and a Hyde Park location, the bar affords patrons a laid-back style of imbibing. 1501 N. 13th St., 208-336-9260.

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40.5°

RED FEATHER LOUNGE

Mellow and moody but with an approachable quotient of cool, Red Feather Lounge hits all the right notes: fine dining, drinks on the patio or a swanky night on the town. With relatively tight quarters, you can sit in one of the half-dozen or so plush booths or kick it upstairs. 246 N. Eighth St., 208-429-6340. justeatlocal.com.

40.5° VISTA BAR

Not many bars have a fireplace. This hidden gem complements the white bricked standout with a jukebox, pool table, arcade games and a scattering of televisions. 813 S. Vista Ave.

40.7°

PAPA JOE’S

Fresco, ivy covered walls and wood paneled booths give an Italian flair to a Boise State favorite. Make sure your beer comes with their one-of-a-kind fabric coasters. 1301 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-344-7272, papajoesboise.com.

40.8°

SUDS TAVERN

Located directly across from Bronco Stadium, it’s no surprise Suds caters to the college crowd. It features six televisions, a few pool tables, blue and orange walls and healthy mix of eye candy. 1024 Broadway Ave., 208-3459656, sudstavern.com.

40.9°

LOCAVORE

This new eatery has a slick but comfy bistro feel and is a nice addition to the Bown Crossing scene. It highlights local ingredients, with offerings like paninis, homebaked pastries and hearty salads. Don’t miss the patio. 3110 S. Bown Way, 208-338-8887.

40.9°

NAVAJO ROOM

Native American murals and movie star cowboy portraits greet patrons at this strip mall hidden treasure. Complete with a fireplace, pool tables and seating galore, everyone seems like they’re fixtures in the bar. 4900 Emerald St., 208-343-5817.

41°

THE BUSTED SHOVEL

The “Harley only” parking sign out front and leather-clad clientele mark this as a biker bar. Don’t miss the chili—the chef won the Meridian Fireman Association’s cook-off. 704 Main St., Meridian, 208-288-2217, bustedshovel.com.

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42.1°

41.5°

KIT KAT KLUB

Sitting on the border between Nampa and Meridian, the Kit Kat Klub is a tried-and-true bikini bar that has entertained valley residents for years. Watching scantily clad women dance isn’t your thing? No problem. With their plethora of pool tables you’re always sure to find an open one. 4842 W. Franklin Road, Meridian, 208-888-7731.

42.1°

TABLEROCK BREWPUB AND GRILL

Boise’s original brewpub is a big, airy beer hall with sand-colored wood highlights and colorful posters advertising its bevy of homegrown brews. Standard fare like mushroom burgers and cobb salads fill out the lunch menu. Located just a short jaunt from the Boise River, it’s a good spot to end a day on the Greenbelt. 706 Fulton St., 208-342-0944. tablerockbrewpub.com.

42.1°

WILLOWCREEK GRILL

41.1°

LUCKY DOG TAVERN

Dark, stylish gay friendly bar with pool, patio and dancing. Combines the look of a downtown club with comforting vibe of a neighborhood dive. 2223 Fairview Ave., 208-333-0074, luckydogtavern.com.

41.2°

KAHOOTZ STEAK AND ALE HOUSE

Boasting 44 taps, Kahootz isn’t your average suburban steakhouse, they take beer as seriously as their beef. Make sure you order up their famous sizzling bread pudding. 1603 N. Main St., Meridian, 208-895-9861, gotokahootz.com.

41.2°

SULLY’S PUB AND GRILL

Right on Star’s main drag is an Irish pub and grill that serves Shepherd’s Meatball Pie with a side of Smithwick’s. Add a lively staff and a family friendly environment and you have a rockin’ night out in Star. 11123 State St., Star, 208-286-7743, sullys-idaho.com.

41.3°

FALCON TAVERN

With intimate, group and patio seating, Falcon Tavern inspires patrons to linger over burgers and suds, discussing the ideal amount of foam. 705 W. Bannock St., 208-947-3111, falcontavern.com.

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41.5°

ALTERKNIT LOUNGE AT KFCH

The bonus of only being open on Knitting Factory concert nights is that there’s always live music. Less thronged than the main floor bar, expect to rub shoulders with a VIP en route to the private lounge. 416 Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

41.5° PIE HOLE

The last stop on a night of bar hopping has more than just pizza. The place also hosts a respectable collection of beers. Sometimes it’s crowded, but it’s worth it. 205 N. Eighth St., 208-344-7783, pieholeusa.com.

41.5°

CAFE OLE

Esta cantina es la mejor que la ciudad de Boise. Totopos y salsa son gratis durante la “happy hour,” y los azulejos y estuco construccion son exactamente igual con Mexico. 404 S. Eighth St., 208-344-3222, cafeole.com.

41.9°

CASA DEL SOL

A cozy brick-walled interior draws extra warmth from sun-themed artistic pieces hanging at eyelevel around the room. $2 tacos all day long are the bargain of the century. 409 S. Eighth St., 208-287-3660.

41.9°

JO’S SUNSHINE LOUNGE

In the shadow of St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center sits a motel lounge that oozes old-school. Live music, free WiFi and karaoke nights offer entertainment; vinyl booths, a knotty pine bar, free popcorn and a bartender who might call you “Hun,” offer a retro vibe—although there’s no sunshine to be found. 1115 N. Curtis Road, 208-376-2700, jossunshinelounge.com.

42°

THE LOBBY

There’s precious little more important to know about the Lobby except that you can win a hefty bar tab during Wednesday night’s indoor tricycle races. Only the boring don’t dig a bar with that kind of spunk. 760 Main St., 208-343-3388, thelobbyboise.com.

42.1° DINO’S

“Down at Dino’s Bar and Grill / The boys are back in town / The boys are back in town / Friday night they’ll be dressed to kill.” Though Dino’s definitely has been updated, the wide-open floor plan and big stage (and regularly scheduled live music) gave us some sweet little pangs of nostalgia. That, and the fact that they are once again serving Derailers, a dangerous concoction served in a bucket. A bucket! 4802 Emerald St.

Be prepared to plop down the cash for a cold one in this casually elegant eatery. With an extravagant fireplace, antler studded beams and roomy patio, Willowcreek impresses the masses. Especially when you can kick back with some sweet potato twigs and a few pals. 2273 S. Vista Ave., 208-343-5544, willowcreekgrill.com.

42.4°

BARDENAY

With a patio facing Boise’s historic Basque Block, the nation’s first restaurant distillery offers hand-crafted cocktails that showcase house-made spirits guaranteed to lift your spirits higher than Bardenay’s exposed beams. If you’re not in the mood for the hard stuff, the eatery and bar offer an impressive array of food, wine and beer, keeping everyone in the party happy and, well, partying. 610 Grove St., 208-426-0538, bardenay.com.

42.4°

LULU’S PIZZA

Adult libations are poured and paired with gourmet pizza, leading to some interesting combinations. Grab some barstool seating for happy hour with a glass of beer or wine. 2594 Bogus Basin Road, 208-387-4992, ilovelulus.com.

42.4°

THE OFFICE BAR AND GRILL

The Office has pool tables, a small dance floor, horseshoe pits, good burgers and a skeleton sitting at a desk. Of course, it also offers the best excuse for where you’ve been all day when you show up late for dinner. 6125 W. Fairview Ave., 208-377-2800. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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42.8°

BREWFORIA

You’re won’t find the coldest beer in town at Brewforia but you’ll find taps that rotate out on a bi-weekly basis and more than 500 different bottled beers to choose from. Buy a growler and fill it up with whatever happens to be on tap at the time. 3030 E. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-888-7668, brewforia.com.

42.8° ROCKIES

43.2° 42.5°

NEUROLUX

This Boise bar is a watering hole for the hip. If you can find bike parking, the dark atmosphere will keep you there until the wee hours. 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

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Flashback to the 1950s with roller skating waitresses and Elvis-era decor at this famous Boise diner. Sit at the malt shop-like counter or snuggle into a comfortable booth with the family. 3900 W. Overland Road, 208-3362878.

42.6°

TERRY’S STATE STREET SALOON

This neighborhood spot is all karaoke all the time. For those with stage fright, there’s pool and plenty of courage waiting in the $2 well drinks from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Just don’t hesitate with your drink order—this crew doesn’t mess around. 3301 Collister, 208-331-8225.

43°

SHIGE STEAKHOUSE

It’s a bar with sexy curves and high-backed black leather stools with armrests. Never mind that the island reggae music seems a little out-of-place amid white tablecloths, red roses and the finest sake in town. 150 N. Eighth St., 208-331-8208, shigejapanesecuisine.com.

43.1°

THE FRONT DOOR NORTHWEST PIZZA AND TAP HOUSE

Escape from the mob scene on Sixth Street with sophisticated beers, classy pizzas and sandwiches and a slightly rebellious clientele. These folks are beer lovers in the finest tradition. You won’t find the coldest beer here, and they’re OK with that. 105 S. Sixth St., 208287-9201, thefrontdoorboise.com.

43.2°

BASQUE CENTER

Low-ceilinged and windowless, this crazy-cheap bar’s audio component is Basque music (and sometimes dancing) from the adjoining room, along with Euskara-speaking natives who share a round before adjourning to the “members only” cardroom upstairs. 601 W. Grove St., 208-331-5097, basquecenter.com.

43.2°

TERRAPIN STATION

Terrapin Station is like your stoner brother’s college apartment—the requisite Bob Marley poster, a lingering musty smell and a bunch of grizzly dudes sitting around slugging beers. 1519 W. Main St., 208-342-1776.

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43.4°

HA’ PENNY BRIDGE PUB

When you’re in need of an Irish pub in Boise, hit up Ha’ Penny. Lots of dark wood, a long bar, plenty of taps and a casual atmosphere create a Northwestern Old-World hybrid. Check out the live music and full menu. 855 Broad St., 208-343-5568, hapennybridgepub.com.

43.7°

BALCONY CLUB

Where beer is the gold at the end of the gay-friendly rainbow. The Balcony Club’s liberal crew guarantees locomotion on the dance floor. A shared patio overlooking Eighth Street is perfect for seeing without being seen. 150 N. Eighth St., Ste. 226, 208-336-1313, thebalconyclub.com.

43.7°

BITTERCREEK ALE HOUSE

The first clue that ordering a domestic light lager might be frowned upon are the 28 tap handles, plus whatever neighboring Red Feather Lounge offers. Locavores will appreciate the beer list organized by milestraveled-to-get-to-your-table, as well as the local-centric menu offerings. 246 N. Eighth St., 208-345-1813, justeatlocal.com/bittercreek.

43.7°

QUINN’S RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE

To smoke or not to smoke? Quinn’s answers that question. The non-smoking dining area, complete with green tables, patio and old movie posters, provides respite from the adjoining lung-clogging lounge. 1005 S. Vista Ave., 208-342-9568.

43.9° BAD IRISH

“Erin go bragh,” screams the blarney banner above the pool tables. Clearly, the meat in this market is corned beef. With beer pong on Tuesdays and nickel beers on Wednesdays, quenching your thirst is fun and cheap. 199 N. Eighth St., 208-338-8939, badirish.com.

44°

IDAHO PIZZA COMPANY

A stocked salad bar, a kick-ass signature pizza and some of the nicest folks who ever piled toppings on a slab of dough make Idaho Pizza Co. an obvious stop for bite and a brew. Add in the game room, TVs and an interior that hasn’t been updated since a peanut farmer was president, and you have an easy answer to the question, “Where should we meet everyone for dinner tonight?” 4218 W. Overland Road, 208343-5455, idahopizzacompany.com.

44.6°

46.4°

With a granite bar top, hardwood accents and a sandstone arch over the liquor shelves, an earthy elegance pervades this upscale scene. The well-dressed crowd nestled in velveteen booths didn’t seem to judge our flannel-anddenim attire. And the Greenbelt-adjacent patio is one of the best places around to relax on a warm summer night. 913 W. River St., 208-333-9800, cottonwoodgrille.com.

The Lift is a popular post-game hangout for softball and rugby teams. It features more than two dozen taps and fish tacos with pineapple salsa. How about Sunday brunch with $1 mimosas on the back patio? 4091 W. State St., 208-342-3250, theliftboise.com.

COTTONWOOD GRILLE

46.3°

46.6°

BAR GERNIKA

TK’S BAR

You’ll be greeted with antlered walls, 1970s televisions and a mix of rowdy women and quiet old men at TKs, a bar honoring the finest tradition of the dive. Careful the bartender doesn’t blow smoke in your face. 3231 Federal Way.

46.4°

FLYING PIE

THE LIFT

One item at this Basque Boise institution distinguishes it from all others: croquettas. The sidewalk patio and proximity to Alive After Five keep the regulars coming back all summer long. 202 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-344-2175, bargernika.com.

51.3°

NEW FRONTIER

A giant sign behind the pizza kitchen states: “Pizza without beer is like PB without the J.” That sums up the philosophy here. One other thing: The micro lineup is best at warmer temps. 4320 W. State St., 208-384-0000, flyingpie.com.

Classic Americana in the heart of downtown Meridian—beneath the smoky haze you’ll find pool tables, a full-size shuffleboard, live music and friendly service. 116 E. Broadway Ave., Meridian, 208-888-9034.

56.3°

>>> GUSTO

Gusto is dark more than it’s open but when it is open, you’re likely to find a rocking party with a half-pipe inside or a death metal band on stage. The pressed tin ceiling lends the bar a dated elegant feel, but this is a plastic cup and warm beer kind of bar. 509 Main St.

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36 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 200 | BOISEweekly

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1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS 20

EDWARDS BOISE DOWNTOWN STADIUM 9—Free screenings of summer season film trailers. 7-8 p.m. FREE. 760 Broad St., Boise, 208-338-3821.

GALLERY ALEXA ROSE—Local artists 12 Brian Anglin, Keenen, Alyson McCrink, Marie Mortenson, Jakob Nyberg and Adrain Prazen. 6 p.m. 280 N. Eighth St., Boise.

HAIRLINES—Stop in and make an appointment for a new spring do by Lulu. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-383-9009. HELLY HANSEN—Try on a pair of shoes and receive 10 percent off any regularly priced item. If you buy the shoes, you get 20 percent off. 860 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-342-2888. IDAHO STATE HISTORI13 CAL MUSEUM—Idaho’s Historic Gems. Listen to live flute

6-8 p.m. in conjunction with the summer exhibit “Rock Art Perspectives: Pictographs and Petroglyphs,” on display through Aug 22. Admission by donation from 5-9 p.m. 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-334-2120, www.idahohistory.net/museum. html. QUE PASA—Hand-carved saints and virgins, black pottery, silver jewelry, suns and moons, fairies and dragons in steel. Mirrors, stoneware and more. Special guest Jammin’ Gena’s Designer Jams and Jellies will have samples. 409 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9018. THE STYLISH STORK—Artists Laura Davey and Adriane Headley from D.H. Studios will showcase their work and give away a $150 gift certificate good toward a custom mural. Also, all maternity clothing will be 20-75 percent off. 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-336-5655.

Central Downtown 8TH STREET MICRO 14 MALL—Five different stores each featuring a different

artist. Bricolage: “At the Seaside,” nautical adventure with original drawings, watercolor and ceramics by Kyler Martz. Sibb Custom Rides: “Sigh,” artwork and custom board designs by Sarah Marshall Creamer. Dead Bird Gallery: “Macro Lemonade,” macro photography of exotic arthropods and miniatures by local artist Wayne T. Crans. The Eclectic Art Store: photography by Joe Lopez and music by Cody Robbins. 280 N. Eighth St., Boise. AMERICAN CLOTHING GALLERY—Mention this listing in Boise Weekly and receive 20 percent off anything red, white or blue in the store (except for jewelry). 100 N. Eighth St., Ste. 121A, Boise, 208-433-0872.

BASEMENT GALLERY— 15 Installment: “Where the Sky Meets the Earth,” featuring

music by Summit Lake Paiute Tribe member Ronald Sam from

ART WALK

Locations featuring artists

work by John Taye, Cynthia Guild Stoetzer, Tricia May, Pat Kilby and Valerie Stuart. It is the first in a series of annual exhibitions that will attempt to communicate the experience of the physical world of our natural environment. 928 W. Main St., Boise, 208333-0309, www.basementgalleryboise.com. BERRYHILL & CO. RESTAURANT—Wine tasting by Coeur d’Alene Cellars. Music by Ken Harris and Rico Weisman. 6:30 p.m. 121 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-387-3553, www.berryhillandco.com. BITTERCREEK ALE HOUSE— The Idaho Energy Collaborative presents: Nature Propelled, a film by Seth Warren, shown in the cellar with a three-course meal. Also see Baby, the sustainably powered fire truck. Tickets for the film are $25 in advance and are available at Bittercreek. 246 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208345-1813, www.bittercreekalehouse.com. BRICK OVEN BISTRO—Live music by the Decade Blues Band and Rebecca Wright. 801 N. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3456, www.brickovenbistro.com. CHOCOLAT BAR—Bitner Vineyard will be pairing wine with chocolates. 805 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-338-7771, www. thechocolatbar.com.

GYPSY GALLERY—This 16 renegade art market has not permanent home. Artists

gather informally with their work. This month features an area for artist trading cards. The Grove Plaza, Boise, www.gypsygalleryart.com.

1. Adelmann Event Center

8. 8th St. Marketplace in BODO

15. Basement Galler y

2. Basque Museum and Cultural Center

9. Atomic Treasures

16. Grove Plaza

10. Boise Ar t Glass

17. Lisk Galler y

3. Flatbread Community Oven

11. Boise Ar t Museum

18. Piazza di Vino

4. Flying M Coffeehouse

12. Galler y Alexa Rose

5. Idaho Indie Works

13. Idaho State Historical Museum

6. Leku Ona 7. Melting Pot

14. 8th Street Micro Mall

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19. Thomas Hammer 20. Ward Hooper Galler y 21. Ar t Source Galler y 22. Galler y 601

IDAHO ADVANTAGE CREDIT UNION—Open house. Enjoy refreshments and check out auto loan rates. 6-8 p.m. 249 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-342-5660. LISK GALLERY—Painter 17 Jerri Lisk releases “50 series #9,” another series of 50

small paintings on aluminum. Also featuring large prints, cards and books by photographer Mark Lisk, as well as large oil paintings by Carl Rowe. As always, Dream Chocolate will be giving out samples. 850 W. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3773, www. liskgallery.com.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 37

1ST THURSDAY/LISTINGS 1ST THURSDAY/NEWS B AS EM ENT GALLERY

MAI THAI—Buy two entrees and get a free appetizer up to $6.95. Also enjoy happy hour specials 2-for-1 all drinks from 5-6:30 p.m. and then again from 9-10 p.m. 750 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-344-8424, www.maithaigroup.com. OLD CHICAGO—Kids eat free. Karaoke from 10 p.m.-close in the bar. 730 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-363-0037, www.oldchicago. com. PIAZZA DI VINO—Art by 18 Mika Belle. 212 N. Ninth St., Boise, 208-336-9577. PIE HOLE—Sleepy Seeds show on the patio. $1 PBRs. 205 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-3447783, www.pieholeusa.com. POTTERY GOURMET—20 percent off selected items, plus wine and hors d’oeuvres. 811 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-3680649. SLEEP WITH GRACE—Drawing for Ironman T-3.2 Celsion latex mattress set at 7:30 p.m. Entries available at any Treasure Valley Sleep With Grace location. 110 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208345-9300. THOMAS HAMMER— 19 Chalk drawing by Nicolet Laursen. 298 N. Eighth St.,

Boise, 208-433-8004, www.hammercoffee.com.

WARD HOOPER GAL20 LERY—Art featuring bikes and dogs. Wine tasting.

50 percent off framing of prints, and 25 percent off of gallery wrapped canvases and canvas orders. 745 W. Idaho St., Boise, www.wardhooper.com.

Westside

WHERE THE SKY MEETS THE EARTH

21

It’s almost impossible to walk into any local art gallery without seeing a landscape rendition of the Boise foothills. Why anyone would want an expensive interpretation of something you can look out your window everyday and see is beyond us. But keeping that in mind, we still think you should check out Basement Gallery’s new show, “Where the Sky Meets the Earth.” The exhibit explores “contemporary approaches to a traditional subject”—the landscape—utilizing a variety of fresh perspectives. The show features everything from Tricia May’s colorful tree groves to Valerie Stuart’s Earth-toned abstracts. Other artists in “Where the Sky Meets the Earth” include John Taye, Cynthia Guild Stoetzer and Pat Kilby. Basement Gallery, 928 Main St., 208-333-0309, basementgalleryboise.com. Speaking of the sky meeting the Earth, Boise’s newest beanpole high-rise condos, The Aspen Lofts, have taken a cue from their BODO neighbors, the 8th Street Marketplace, and are now integrating art with real estate. In collaboration with Urban Agent Team and Steve Zabel, Aspen Lofts developer Scott Kimball is introducing The House of Art, an opportunity for local artists to display and sell their work for one night only—First Thursday, August 5. A panel of judges will select nine different artists from all types of media to set up shop on the seventh floor of the Aspen Lofts. Artists will sign a two-phased contract and be able to sell their work the night of the event only. Obviously, all work should be displayed to the public in a way that doesn’t cause nicks or scratches to the fancypants condo. The deadline for submissions is Friday, July 16, and artists must reside in the Treasure Valley and include a current resume with five digital images of their work (72 dpi). Those who aren’t chosen for the August First Thursday event will be considered for a September location. Applications should be submitted to Steven Zabel at Szabel78@gmail.com, Lindsay Dofelmier at Lindsay@urbanagentteam.com and Jen Iacoboni, jen@urbanagentteam.com. —Tara Morgan

ART SOURCE GALLERY—Reception of the ninth annual Art Source Gallery Juried Exhibition. John Taye, professor emeritus at Boise State and this year’s juror will announce the 55 works selected from 216 entries. Music by Spudman, wine tasting from Indian Creek Winery. 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, www.artsourcegallery.com.

GALLERY 601—Unveil22 ing of the official Jaialdi 2010 original image, created by

San Francisco Artist Will Bullas. The previous exhibit, “Art For the Animals” will be closing at 8 p.m., followed by the drawing for the “Paws for a Cause” originals and “Cold Nose, Warm Heart” by John Weiss. FREE. 211 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-336-5899, www. gallery601.com. MODERN HOTEL AND BAR— Music by Ned Evett and Bill Coffey. 1314 W. Grove St., 208-4248244, www.themodernhotel.com. OWYHEE PLAZA HOTEL—Live music from the Ben Burdick trio with Amy Weber. 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www. owyheeplaza.com. THE RECORD EXCHANGE—$2 off any used CD or DVD $5.99 and above. In the coffee shop, all 12 oz. espresso drinks are only $2 and get $2 off any sale gift item over $5.99. 1105 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-3448010, www.therecordexchange. com.

38 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Where the Sky Meets the Earth, you’ll find ... a cow. Craig Spankie, There Ain’t no Way (detail), enamel, tar, paper and acrylic on board, 28” x 24”

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NOISE GLENN LANDB ER G

RUBIK’S CUBE

Colorcube tackles the puzzle of opening an all- ages venue TARA MORGAN Music is the adolescent signifier; it shapes friendships, style and worldview. Over the tiniest trinkets—a Dead Kennedy’s patch stitched onto a Jansport or a Grateful Dead bumper sticker slapped on the back of a beat up Volvo—social scenes fracture and converge. But in Boise, where kids younger than 21 aren’t admitted to venues that serve alcohol without food, the opportunity for teens to catch their musical idols in the flesh has been greatly curtailed. “Generally, in Idaho’s music scene, there hunk of the hardcore/punk scene, the indiearen’t very many all-ages music venues,” pop/folk community in Boise is lacking. said Clint Vickery, member of local band “We’re just trying to do something differSpondee. “House shows are a lot of fun, but ent than the Venue, namely stylistically, in they’re not seen well. They’re not taken well genres of music we’re booking,” said Vickery. by the community. And eventually they get “It’ll be electronic, pop, indie. Those are all shut down.” really vague terms, but it’s that style that isn’t With such a limited array of smaller-capacity all-ages outlets available to teens—the seen very much at the Venue.” And while it might seem like Colorcube’s Venue, Knitting Factory (which serves food), low-top Chucks will be stepping on the Flying M Coffeegarage, Brawl Studio—it’s Venue’s Vans, Venue promoter Jaclyn Brandt difficult to nurture a lasting appreciation for live music. That’s something, Vickery argues, sees it differently. “We get offered a lot of shows that we that has also stunted the 21-and-older music could probably make money on, but if it’s scene in Boise. something that doesn’t really fit the Venue “If kids don’t start developing a love to go … wherever the fans are going to be hapsee live music when they’re young, they don’t piest, that’s definitely where it should go,” have that when they’re older,” said Vickery. explained Brandt. “We all do have our little “So, the only reason they’re going to go and see it is because it’s at a bar. They’re not going personalities and it works well for all of us.” But while venues might work together to for the music, they’re going for the alcohol.” hash out which shows are the best fit for their Fortunately for local underagers, there space and audience, all-ages clubs are still, by are a couple of new alcohol-free live music their boozeless nature, at a disadvantage. options in town. Brawl Studio, an all-ages “Obviously, we do have laws here where hardcore/metal venue, recently opened in you can’t just have an all-ages venue with Garden City, and in September, Vickery and alcohol … For us, we some pals plan to have to sell tickets open Colorcube, an and that’s it. Other all-ages music and arts people can survive off space in a yet-to-beQuestions about street team volunteering, alcohol, but we can’t,” secured building near classes or art consignment at Colorcube can said Brandt. “So, Boise State. be sent to colorcubeboise@gmail.com. then our ticket prices “We’re providbecome $10, where ing opportunities to maybe somebody else youth, but we don’t could do the show for $5.” want it to be a teen center,” said Vickery. Another set-back for all-ages venues ac“But it is definitely … catering toward the cording to Eric Muniz, one of the founders youth culture. Basically, when we don’t have of Brawl Studio, is the fact that out-of-town shows, we’re going to be having art classes, acts often tour through Boise on weeknights, music classes, dance classes.” which can be a hard sell for parents. When Vickery, 23, his wife Melissa, 23, “The one thing about our particular town and their friends James and Lindsey Lloyd is there’s a lot of music that comes through (age 26 and 25 respectively) surveyed Boise’s here, but it’s not widely perceived as a music all-ages venue options, they noticed a gaping town,” said Muniz. “It’s a C-market so you hole. While the Venue caters to pop-punk/ end up having a lot of Mondays and Tuesemo acts and Brawl Studio has snagged a WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Vickery, dickery, dock. Clint wants kids to rock.

days for touring bands because they don’t want to play here on a Friday or Saturday because they can make their money in Seattle or Portland, [Ore.]” Though both Brawl Studio and Colorcube are functioning as nonprofits, Colorcube plans to integrate a retail arts and crafts arm as an alternate revenue source to help keep doors open. Budding local artists and makers will be able to consign their goods to Colorcube—with a price ceiling of $300—and 60 percent of the profits on goods sold will go to the artist and the rest will go to Colorcube. “I’ve always thought [art and music] go hand in hand … album art, T-shirts; it’s a big part of the music as well,” said James Lloyd, Colorcube’s art director. “And I think people who are into music are also usually into visual art—just looking for deeper things and images. It’s the same crowd.” In addition to selling artwork, Colorcube will also cultivate a street team of local high school and college kids to promote events and, eventually, curate their own shows in the space. The venue plans to host a maximum of three concerts a week—Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights—and all shows will end by 11 p.m. to keep ma and pa off their backs. “We really want to make sure, too, that it’s a place where parents feel comfortable sending their teenage kids,” said Melissa Vickery. Though the viability of these two new venues—both Brawl and Colorcube—in the Boise market is yet to be seen, their mere existence is being heralded by some as the dawn of a new era in the Boise music scene. “Three to four years down the road, the 21-and-over music scene is going to see the benefits of it,” said Vickery. “They’re going to make more money—those bars are—in alcohol, admission, everything. If [live music appreciation] is not cultivated when they’re in high school so they develop that desire, then it’s just not going to happen.”

BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 39

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE BEN WILKERTON TOUSLEY

GUIDE WEDNESDAY JUNE 30 ALIVE AFTER FIVE—WIth Rubblebucket and RevoltRevolt. 5 p.m. FREE. Grove Plaza BADMOUTH—With Burn Idols, Yukon the Archer, Fury of the Cyclops, Adamant Allies and Gernika. 6 p.m. $5. Brawl Studio BARBARA LAING—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

DM STITH, JUNE 30, NEUROLUX DM Stith’s bio reads like the background of an Agatha Christie character: His grandfather is professor emeritus in music at Cornell University; he was in a grade-school performance of Phantom of the Opera that nearly scarred him for life; and he was originally headed down a career path toward writing and illustration, but a fork in the road led him to music. Even in a hoodie and stocking feet, Stith’s shock of blond hair, serious heavy-lidded eyes and a furrowed look of concentration as he performs, give him the visage of a man in a time out of time. Strummed Latin-tinged guitar, hand claps and snaps, airy background choruses, a melancholy Simon-and-Garfunkelesque storytelling acumen and Stith’s floaty falsetto lend his recent release, Heavy Ghost Appendices (May 2010, Asthmatic Kitty Records), an ethereal tone. Check out Stith’s tour blog and gorgeous photos at dmstith.com. —Amy Atkins With Inlets and Silje Nes, 9 p.m., $5. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., neurolux.com.

BEN BURDICK TRIO PLUS— 9:30 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

KEVIN KIRK, STEVE EATON AND PHIL GAROZNIK—7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MOONDANCE—7 p.m. FREE. Smoky Mountain Pizza-Eagle

LOVEHATEHERO—With Divide the Day and The Venetia Fair. 7:30 p.m. $10. The Venue

PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—6 p.m. FREE. Smoky Mountain PizzaParkcenter RUBY HILL—9 p.m. FREE. Reef SOUL HONEY—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub & Grill

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY WEBER—6 p.m. FREE. Gamekeeper Lounge

THURSDAY JULY 1

BLACK TUSK—With Zoraster, Dark Castle, PussyGutt and Uzala. 9 p.m. Red Room Tavern

BILL COFFEY AND FRIENDS—7:30 p.m. FREE. Modern Hotel and Bar

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—Drums and amps provided. Just show up and make some noise. 8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

BUD RAYBERRY—6 p.m. FREE. Mai Thai-Eagle

CAMDEN HUGHES, JON HYNEMAN AND PHIL GARONZIK—7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

COME TOGETHER—5:30 p.m. FREE. Downtown Nampa Nights

DM STITH—With Inlets and Silje Nes. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux GIZZARD STONE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid JEREMIAH JAMES GANG—8:45 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

CHUCK SMITH—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

DAN COSTELLO AND LETA NEUSTAEDTER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock and Barrel FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s HOOCHIE COOCHIE MEN—6:30 p.m. $6-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

NAKED EYES—9 p.m. $5. Bouquet THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club THE SLEEPY SEEDS—With Housefire, James Orr and In The Pause. 8 p.m. $5. VAC THE THROWDOWN—The Elite, The Fav and Stenotic. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

FRIDAY JULY 2 8BALL BREAK—With RevoltRevolt, Trigger Itch. 8 p.m. $5. VAC

BRANDON PRITCHETT—6 p.m. FREE. Mai Thai-Eagle THE JACKS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill and Brewery JOHN CAZAN—5 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel JOHN HANSEN—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KEN HARRIS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill KEVIN KIRK, JOHN JONES, JON HYNEMAN, MIKE SEIFRIT— With Camden Hughes. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club SWAGGER—9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement TENNIS SHOE COWBOYS—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel VOICE OF REASON—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

ALPENFLOW—9 p.m. $5. Terrapin Station AUDIO MOONSHINE—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—6:30 p.m. FREE. Twig’s Cellar BLACK CARL—9 p.m. $5. Bouquet BLAZE AND KELLY—9 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub & Grill Audio Moonshine

40 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE C ONOR C U LVER

GUIDE SATURDAY JULY 3 THE 45S—7 p.m. FREE. Sun Ray Cafe 80S PARTY—9 p.m. FREE. The Plank ACTUAL DEPICTION—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—1 p.m. FREE. Solid DAN COSTELLO TRIO—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub EQUALEYES—9 p.m. $5. Terrapin Station ERIC GRAE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

I AM GHOST—With This Romantic Tragedy, We Are Defiance, A Tale Through Audio, Ashlynn, Stop Drop and Party, Silence the Reign, After the Impact and The Paris Funds. See Listen Here, this page. 5 p.m. $10. Brawl Studio KEVIN KIRK AND SALLY TIBBS WITH PATRICK KURDY—7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers MY NEW VICE—9 p.m. $3. Red Room Tavern NEW WEST GUITAR GROUP— 7 p.m. FREE. Modern Hotel PAUL PETERSON BLUES CLUB—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

SUNDAY JULY 4

TUESDAY JULY 6

BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Noon. FREE. Grape Escape

AUDRA CONOLLY—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill and Brewery

CORDON BLUES—4 p.m. FREE. Sun Ray Cafe

PRIMA DONNA—9 p.m. $3. Red Room Tavern

MOONSHINE AND MAYHEM—7 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

RUBY TUESDAYS WITH NEW TRANSIT FEATURING DAVE MANION—9 p.m. FREE. Bouquet

THE SIDEMEN—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SMOOTH—7 p.m. FREE. Liquid

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

MONDAY JULY 5

WEDNESDAY JULY 7

SWAGGER—9 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

THE AWFUL TRUTH TOUR—9 p.m. $5. Neurolux

TRAVIS MCDANIELS—6 p.m. FREE. Mai Thai-Eagle

GBH—With Outernational. See Picks, Page 12. 7:30 p.m. $12. The Venue

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—With Slim Cessna’s Auto Club and Poke. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza

WIDESPREAD PANIC—With JJ Grey and MoFro. See Picks, Page 12. 5 p.m. $35. Idaho Botanical Garden

MONDAYS WITH ROB PAPER—8 p.m. FREE. Reef PUNK MONDAY—Ohadi CD Release, Matt Smith and The Quickies. FREE. Liquid RHYTHM RANGERS—9 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Pub

CAPSIZE—With Shadows, Bare Witness, Armada, Gernika and For My Own. 7 p.m. $5. Brawl Studio DYING FAMOUS—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE HONEYCUTTERS—8 p.m. FREE. Reef For a complete list of live music, visit boiseweekly.com.

HOLIDAY BASH, JULY 3, BRAWL STUDIO With the Fourth of July holiday falling on a Sunday, Saturday night’s sky will undoubtedly be heavy with bright streaks of fireworks, the smell of barbecued meats (and sulfur) and, if you’re at Brawl Studio, the refrains of some seriously hardcore music. The non-profit, all-ages venue offers its stage to a number of both local and touring bands including during the Holiday Weekend Bash that kicks off at 5 p.m. and promises to run late with a loaded lineup: I Am Ghost (Epitaph), This Romantic Tragedy, We Are Defiance, A Tale Through Audio, Ashlynn, Stop Drop & Party, Silence the Reign, After The Impact and The Paris Funds. Handing over a Hamilton gets you in the door. Some parents may see that kind of ear-splitting, head-banging music as a bad influence on their progeny, but Brawl’s zero tolerance attitude toward drugs and alcohol may have them singing a different tune. —Amy Atkins

Hillfolk Noir

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Kevin Kirk

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

5 p.m., $10. Brawl Studio, 118 E. 37th St., No. 12, Garden City, myspace.com/brawlmetalcore.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 41

ARTS/VISUAL S U S AN VALIQU ETTE

ON CLEO’S TRAIL Outsider art in and outside environ AMY PENCE-BROWN About 15 miles south of Nampa, just off Highway 45 at historic Walter’s Ferry, sits Dan’s Ferry Service Gas Station. Below the station is an obscure little road that leads to Cleo’s Nature Trail and Museum. No roadside signage announces the place. Only the very observant might notice the large plastic rainbow and a collection of rusty kids’ tricycles signifying the way. But the extremely curious might be cautious to venture down this path uninvited—it feels much like entering someone’s private world. And, in many ways, it is. “We don’t advertise, so we rely mainly on people coming back again and again and bringing their friends. They really are inspired by what this remarkable woman has created,” says Steve Washburn, the on-site caretaker. Visionary environments like Cleo’s have been misunderstood and largely ignored in the These small statues are only a fraction of the Cleo’s Nature Trail and Museum welcoming committee. fine art world until recent academic interest in the area of folk art garnered them fame. Part sculpture, architecture and landscape, these collections—a clock museum, a doll museum, also had a clear sense of fun and whimsy. visionary environments are a kind of fantasy An enchanted forest is hidden at the back of world. The people who craft them are typical- a medical museum and a chapel. the trail’s loop, covered with low slung tree It wasn’t until after her husband died ly untrained artists, often referred to as “folk” branches and bracketed by a stream. Fairies, that Cleo truly began her journey as an or “outsider” artists, with a deep, almost gnomes, mushrooms and shiny whirligigs obsessive desire to create. Because of their lack artist. While she threw herself into creating enhance the childlike environment. artworks indoors, such as carving small, of formal training and frequent use of found Throughout the 1980s, Cleo personally materials or “junk,” American outsider artists meticulous environments within eggshells, greeted all visitors who wandered through her Cleo’s vision was focused on an outside and their created worlds have been traditiongate, including numerous local fourth grade environment. With a little help, she cleared a ally seen as strange and unimportant—often classes who visited this piece of Idaho history. one-mile looped path on her property, later eventually neglected or destroyed. Luckily, “Although we were there to learn about dubbed “the nature trail.” She began collectwith many large museum exhibitions devoted Walter’s Ferry and its place in Idaho history, I ing yard art to adorn the trail, often created to the work of folk artists, the importance of remember more about the kitschy collectibles locally, like hundreds of birdhouses built by these landscapes to our national history/artisLetta Hogland of Melba and five large totems and taxidermy that filled the museums,” says tic heritage is being recognized. Katie Hammon of Meridian, who first visited carved by a woodDr. Samuel Swayne Cleo’s Nature Trail and Museum in 1984 as a worker in Cascade. purchased the pictur10-year-old student at Caldwell’s Washington Life-sized sculptures esque property on the CLEO’S NATURE TRAIL AND MUSEUM Elementary School. began making their Snake River in 1927. 2048 Highway 45 S., Melba “I also remember Cleo’s bright red hair, way one by one onto He married his second 208-495-2312 eccentric dress, and that she was very kind the trail, including wife, Cleo, in 1946 cleos-nature-trail.blogspot.com to all of us kids.” Cleo curated, collected and an entire zoo of large and together with their cared for the museums and the trail until her painted African anichildren lived in an death in 2008 at age 94. Currently a board mals. Along the way adobe house that acted consisting of family members oversees the as the original ferry station in the late 1800s. Cleo became a fan of Utah sculptor Gary As a well-known caregiver to the community, Lee Price, whose bronzes of children on rope place, along with Washburn. The museum Doc Swayne, as he was called, and Cleo were swings and an entire marching band are wait- buildings are closed while the collections are undergoing documentation and conservation, active both civically and socially. They hosted ing to greet visitors. but the nature trail remains free and open to A woman of great faith, Cleo was dedilocal square dance nights at their home in the public daily. Cleo’s recently gained some cated to creating a spiritual environment for the 1950s. The eclectic couple also shared a passion for collecting—from antique medical visitors. Biblical quotes printed on metal signs national attention and a bit of fame, being featured on a 2006 episode of Kansas City tacked to wooden fence posts line the trail, as equipment to clocks, license plates to reliPublic Television show “Rare Visions and do saintly statues and a garden of angels. She gious artifacts. Until his death in 1976, Doc Roadside Revelations” and several offbeat even created private alcoves for personal reSwayne took an interest in architecture and flection—one can visit a replica of Jesus’ tomb tourist guides. There’s a sign on the trail, with built a small compound of buildings on the one of Cleo’s sayings: “This Place was built as property, utilizing a collection of stone, rocks or head up the hill to the prayer closet. a Vibrant Faith Adventure. You are my special Though there are many serious and and glass. He built his wife a grand home spiritual elements along her nature trail, Cleo friend. Please keep it free from harm.” and several mini museums to display their

42 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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SCREEN

MATERNAL INSTINCTS Mother and Child examines life’s messy realities GEORGE PRENTICE Mother’s Day came late this year. Sure there was the second week in May when we sent flowers and waited an hour for a table to have Sunday brunch. But the real gift this year is Mother and Child, a wonderful film playing at Flicks. Mother and Child isn’t just another movie to join a tidy list of good independent dramas. It’s a beautifully woven The Mother and Child reunion is only a motion (picture) away. tapestry examining the fundamental need for connection. The film visits the complex them fall into a net of melodrama. He never The third cycle of the film introduces us lives of three women. forces the story, yet he unleashes the power to Lucy (Kerry Washington) whose focus Annette Bening plays Karen, who at 14 of a script that reveals the best and worst gave up a child for adoption. That, coupled begins and ends with her heartbreaking attempt to become a mother. She and her hus- of the human experience. Garcia’s efforts with her being the sole caregiver for her band enter into an adoption agreement with are equaled by those of executive producer dying mother, manifests her brittle public Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu, the master of a young pregnant woman (Shareeka Epps) persona. Pity her co-worker (Jimmy Smits) the cinematic art form that weaves separate who holds the upper hand in an uneasy when he makes a valiant attempt to reach tales into one solid story. Think 21 Grams relationship. Washington continues to fill her emotionally. To his credit, and our and Babel. her resume with fine enjoyment, he tries This is no simple chick-flick. Mother and performances (Ray, again, and again, Last King of Scotland), Child is indeed for men who take great care and again. Smits MOTHER AND CHILD (R) in their relationships with women. But most and this may be her turns a small role Directed by Rodrigo Garcia importantly, it is a film for women, all kinds best. into a real gem. Starring Samuel L. Jackson, Annette Bening, of women—mothers, daughters, sisters and Mother and Child’s A second story in Jimmy Smits supporting cast fills the wives ... those in need and those who give. the movie involves Now playing at Flicks It handles the issues of pregnancy, surroscreen with actors at Naomi Watts as gacy, courtship, love and sex in a mannered, the top of their game: Elizabeth. She plays adult fashion. Samuel L. Jackson, a barracuda of an Yes, there are flaws in the film, but Cherry Jones, S. Epatha Merkerson, Amy attorney, and heaven help the man—or they lean more toward reality than drama. Brenneman, David Morse, Elizabeth Pena. woman—who gets in her way. Love and Above all, the movie is about the grace of Mother and Child was written and diwar are interchangeable and her sexuality rected by Rodrigo Garcia and is a first-class, motherhood. When you do get around to is a mere weapon in her arsenal. Her selfseeing Mother and Child (and I hope that loathing and her taste for vengeance mask a Oscar-caliber effort. Garcia clearly trusts you do), you’ll enjoy your second Mother’s lifetime of secrets and lies. If you’re a fan of the skills of his cast to walk a very high Day this year. emotional tightrope without ever letting Watts, this is some of her best work.

SCREEN/LISTINGS opening THE LAST AIRBENDER— Based on the popular Nickelodeon television series, the future of mankind falls in the hands of a young boy named Aang, who learns he is the last Avatar with the power to manipulate all four elements. (NR) Edwards 22, Edwards 9 TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE—Seattle may be ravaged by violence and turmoil, but Bella Swan is up to her usual airheaded ways as she continues on in the critical struggle of deciding who to love: the coiffed and diamond-skinned Edward or Jacob, the ever-shirtless teen

heartthrob. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22, Edwards IMAX JOAN RIVERS: A PIECE OF WORK—Audiences are sucked into the world of one of America’s most irreverent female comedians in this emotionally surprising documentary on Joan’s 76th year of life. (R) Flicks

continuing THE A-TEAM—A group of Iraq War veterans looks to clear their names with the U.S. military, which suspects the four men of committing a crime for which they were

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framed. Based on the iconic ’80s TV show of the same name. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 DATE NIGHT—After a bored married couple (Steve Carell and Tiny Fey) lie about their identity to get a table at a crowded restaurant, they are mistaken for the pair of thieves whose reservation they stole and must spend their date night running from the mob. (PG-13) Edwards 22 EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP—A French thrift shop owner in L.A. acquired a video camera and became famous for going out at night and filming graffiti artists at work. (R) Flicks

GET HIM TO THE GREEK—A music company assistant (Jonah Hill) is sent to London to retrieve an outrageous rockstar (Russell Brand) for a concert at L.A.’s Greek Theatre. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 GROWN UPS—The death of their childhood basketball coach leads some old friends (Adam Sandler, Kevin James, Chris Rock) to gather at the site of a championship celebration from years ago. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 IRON MAN 2—Robert Downey Jr. returns as Tony Stark, billionaire arms manufacturer and playboy with a

heart of cold fusion and a superpowered exoskeleton he uses to fight for freedom. But one of those enemies, Ivan Venko (Mickey Rourke), isn’t so pleased with the fact that Stark made his fortune with secrets stolen from Venko’s father and decides to seek super-powered revenge. (PG13) Edwards 22 JONAH HEX—Josh Brolin (No Country for Old Men, Planet Terror, Thrashin’) plays an old-Western bounty hunter whose encounter with death bestows him with a connection to the supernatural as he tracks down a terrorist to clear his name. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 43

SCREEN/LISTINGS THE KARATE KID—Twelve-yearold Dre Parker (Jaden Smith) moves with his mother to China, where he arouses the ire of a schoolyard bully and learns kung fu (not karate) from his apartment’s maintenance man, Mr. Han (Jackie Chan) in order to defend himself and grows up in the process. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 KILLERS—After a romance while on vacation, Jen (Katherine Heigl) discovers her new husband Spencer (Ashton Kutcher) is a spy being hunted by assassins. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 KNIGHT AND DAY—Tom Cruise and Cameron Diaz star in this action-comedy centered on a fugitive couple on an adventure where nothing and no one is what it seems. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 LETTERS TO JULIET—Dear John’s Amanda Seyfried stars in this romantic comedy about an American’s journey to Verona, Italy, the home of Shakespeare’s Juliet Capulet. When she begins to answer letters written to Romeo’s obsession, she gets entangled in the lifelong search for a long-lost love. (PG) Edwards 22 MOTHER AND CHILD—With a star-studded cast including Naomi Watts, Samuel L. Jackson and Annette Bening, Mother and Child follows the lives of three women fighting to control their lives. See review, Page 43. (R) Flicks PLEASE GIVE—Two young women care for their elderly grandmother while their neighbors, who have already purchased her apartment, wait for grandma to pass away so they can expand their living space. (R) Flicks PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME—Jake Gyllenhaal plays a rogue prince who must race against dark forces to prevent them from using an ancient dagger from the gods to reverse time and rule the world. (PG-13) Edwards 22

“THE BEST ‘TWILIGHT’ MOVIE SO FAR!” –– ENTERTAINMENT ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY WEEKLY

“★★★★★.” –– Shawn Shawn Edwards, Edwards, FOX-TV FOX-TV

ROBIN HOOD—Russell Crowe stars as Robin Hood. In 12th century England, Sir Robin Longstride (Crowe) must rescue his village from the nasty Sheriff of Nottingham (Matthew Macfadyen) while wooing the widowed Lady Marian (Cate Blanchett). (PG-13) Edwards 22 THE SECRETS IN THEIR EYES—Ricardo Darin plays a retired lawyer who is haunted by a case that ended in a false conviction for rape and murder. In Spanish with English subtitles. (R) Flicks SEX AND THE CITY TWO—Four NYC glamour-gals decide to go on vacation to the Middle East. Crude and heartfelt hilarity ensues. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

www.eclipsethemovie.com

IN THEATERS AND MOBILE USERS: For Showtimes, Text Message ECLIPSE and Your ZIP CODE to 43KIX (43549)

NOW PLAYING

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATERS AND SHOWTIMES SPECIAL ENGAGEMENTS NO PASSES OR DISCOUNT COUPONS ACCEPTED

44 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

SHREK FOREVER AFTER— Bored, Shrek makes a deal with Rumpelstiltskin to feel like an ogre again but is tricked and sent to an alternate version of Far Far Away where everything is wrong. (PG) Edwards 22 TOY STORY 3—The good old toys are back but Andy is all grown up and off to college. The toys are donated and must survive the constant craziness of a daycare center. (G) Edwards 9, Edwards 22, Edwards IMAX 3D

SCREEN/MOVIE TIMES WEDNESDAY, JUNE 30-TUESDAY, JULY 6 THE A-TEAM— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:25, 4:25, 7:25 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 11:20 a.m., 1:40, 2, 4:25, 7:10, 9:55 DATE NIGHT—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 2:25, 9:50

EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP—

Flicks: W-Th: 5:20, 7:20, 9:20; F-Sa: 1:20, 3:20, 5:20, 7:20, 9:20; Su: 1:20, 3:20, 5:20; M-Tu: 5:20, 7:20, 9:20

GET HIM TO THE GREEK—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:40, 4:40, 7:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:25, 2:55, 5:30, 8

GROWN UPS— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4:20, 7:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:45 a.m., 12:30, 1:20, 2:20, 3, 3:50, 4:45, 5:35, 6:20, 7:20, 8:05, 9, 9:45, 10:30 IRON MAN 2—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:15, 4:05, 7:05

JOAN RIVERS: A PIECE OF WORK— Flicks: F-Sa: 1:05, 3:05, 5:05, 7:05, 9:05; Su: 1:05, 3:05, 5:05; M-Tu: 5:05, 7:05, 9:05 JONAH HEX—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:45, 4:50, 7:45 Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:55 a.m., 1, 3:05, 5:10, 7:15

THE KARATE KID— Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1:05, 4:05, 7:05 Edwards 22: F-Tu: 11:50 a.m., 1:10, 3:20, 4:35, 6:40, 7:35, 9:40, 10:35 KILLERS—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:50, 4:45, 7:10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:35 a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 6:50, 9:15

KNIGHT AND DAY— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:30, 4:30, 7:40 Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:50 a.m., 12, 1:25, 2:35, 4:10, 5:25, 7, 8:10, 9:35, 10:40 THE LAST AIRBENDER— Edwards 9: Th-Tu: 1, 4, 7:10, 10 Edwards 22: Th: 1, 4, 7:10, 10; F-Tu: 11:30 a.m., 12:55, 2, 3:30, 4:40, 6:05, 7:10, 8:40, 9:45 THE LAST AIRBENDER 3D— LETTERS TO JULIET— MOTHER AND CHILD— PLEASE GIVE—

Edwards 22: W-Tu: 12:30, 3, 5:40, 8:15 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:55 a.m., 5:05, 7:30 Flicks: W-Th: 4:30, 7, 9:30; F-Tu: 4:40

Flicks: W-Th: 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; F-Sa: 12:45, 2:45, 7:10, 9:10; Su: 12:45, 2:45; M-Tu: 7:10, 9:10

PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME— Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:30, 3, 5:40, 8:15 ROBIN HOOD—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:20, 3:25, 6:45

THE SECRET IN THEIR EYES— Flicks: W-Th: 4:20, 6:55, 9:25; F-Sa: 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:25; Su: 1:40, 4:20; M-Tu: 4:20, 7, 9:25 SEX AND THE CITY TWO—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1

SHREK FOREVER AFTER—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:30 a.m., 1:55, 4:20, 6:35, 9:10

TOY STORY 3—

TOY STORY 3 3D—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:10, 4, 7 Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:45 a.m., 12:05, 1:30, 2:40, 4, 5:20, 6:30, 7:50, 9:05, 10:25 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:40 a.m., 12:55, 2:15, 3:30, 4:50, 6:05

TOY STORY 3 IMAX 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:25, 7

TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:10, 1:40, 2:05, 4:05, 4:30, 4:55, 7, 7:30, 7:50, 9:55, 10:20, 10:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 9 a.m., 10:45 a.m., 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 12:20, 12:40, 1:40, 2:10, 2:40, 3:05, 3:35, 4:35, 5:05, 5:45, 6, 6:30, 7:30, 8, 8:30, 8:55, 9:25, 10:25 TWILIGHT SAGA: ECLIPSE IMAX— Edwards 22: W-Th: 10:15 a.m., 1:10, 4:05, 7, 9:55

T H E A T E R S Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

REC

AN IONIAN SKI JOURNEY A former BW intern hits the slopes for some early summer skiing WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHS BY BEN WICKHAM of the Ionian Basin at a lake named for John Muir’s daughter, and I made a pilgrimage to the Muir Hut—a stone building shaped like an igloo perched on the saddle of 12,000-foot Muir Pass. I had planned to ascend the divide and catch a glimpse of the Ionian Basin but a dwindling amount of time and energy turned me away. This time, we enter the Ionian Basin the next day. Clouds sock in the basin, making everything bleak. I can’t see the mountains above us and the wind howls while hard snow pelts my face. Everything appears blank and we set up camp at what seems to be the first flat spot, but it’s so white, we can’t tell. The next day, we find that we’re camping on 3 feet of snow on top of the creek draining the lake. The storm hits and it turns into a long night of bracing the tent, holding the frame during the biggest wind gusts. I don’t sleep, and I don’t even think about going outside to relieve myself until nearly 2 a.m., when minute gaps of quiet begin to break up the wind. Mainly, I lay there miserable, wishing I wasn’t there. The Ionian Basin is beating me down, reminding me that I’m hungry because we couldn’t cook dinner in the storm, that I’m cold, that I’m uncomfortable, that I’m three days from the road and that if there’s one spurt of wind that takes the tent to its breaking point and it tears open, I’m screwed. I’m wishing I had heeded every warning—the lower back pains before the trip, the self doubts climbing passes with a heavy pack—and taken any of those opportunities to turn around while I could. I’m wishing I hadn’t journeyed out to the Ionian Basin. The sky turns blue by daybreak and I see the appeal of a skier’s journey to this basin. From camp alone, two high peaks with steep consequential terrain tower over us. And a nice, big face—much like a This ain’t the kind of camping you get to in your car. double black diamond run in a ski area—slopes off the east ridge of Mt. Goddard. Ionian is not your typical alpine bowl-like Odyssey and named the mountains with the basin. It’s filled with rounded mounds of epic poem in mind. Solomons then turned rock, some as tall as a 1,000 vertical feet, the high sierra route east, around and away all of them skiable with chutes, bowls or from the Ionian Basin. low angle slopes. There are no trees around I’d been lured out here before, sumus, just black metamorphic rock jutting out moned by what I’d seen on a map. I of the snow pack. It’s a simple landscape, camped in the Evolution Valley, just north Scylla. Charybdis. The Three Sirens. The Black Giant. The Enchanted Gorge. They’re mythical names. They’re also names of features on a map of King’s Canyon National Park high up and deep in the heart of the Sierra Nevada in eastern California. They’re jagged, black mountains and a deep, rugged gorge in or around the Ionian Basin, and they may be the most remote place in a massive mountain range. It’s May and four of us—me, Todd, Dave and Ryan—are seven days into a 12-day ski tour, a self support backpack trip traveling on telemark and Alpine touring skis and crossing 12,000-foot passes with 75-pound packs. We’re five hours north of Los Angeles and four hours down the road from Reno, Nev. We plan to enter the Ionian Basin the next day to set up a base camp and ski. Todd claims it’s a skier’s paradise. I ask him where the names came from and he tells me. We have time. As we sit on a house size block of granite alongside ice covered Martha Lake watching storm clouds roll in, Todd tells me how Theodore Solomons named most of the geographic features in the area while surveying in the 1890s. When Solomons climbed to the top of the Goddard Divide—the wall-like ridge separating the Evolution Valley from the Ionian Basin—he looked down on a landscape so harsh, so dark and foreboding, he thought of Homer’s

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Between a rock and a hard place is some primo skiing.

open terrain and snow, and it’s easy to decide what to do. We split up and ski. Todd and Ryan go explore the basin and catch a glimpse straight down the gut of the rugged Enchanted Gorge. Dave skies laps on Mt. Goddard then circles over behind Scylla for a few more runs. I choose a line above camp, a nice 1,000-foot straight shot that starts somewhat steep and mellows quickly. The snow is smooth and wind buffed. Our best skiing comes our second day when the four of us climb Mt. Goddard. The view from the summit is legendary. The peak sits west of the Sierra Crest and at more than 13,500 feet, it’s taller than anything around it. You can see everything in the Sierras—all the way up to Yosemite, Banner and Ritter near Mammoth, the Palisades, and south toward Whitney. The ski descent is big, open and quick—the most appropriate way to leave the top of a mountain. Later, I sit in camp listening to Todd and Dave tell tales of horror of summer trips

through this place, scrambling through the boulder fields that surround all the lakes. I glance up at Goddard, the giant pyramid we climbed a few hours earlier, and my eyes follow the rough and craggy divide that reaches off it. I glimpse at all the dark rock and at the broken summit of Scylla behind me and I realize the snow eases the raggedness of this place with no trees. And once the snow is gone, there are no meadows. Just black, black rock, heaps of it everywhere. In a way, it’s the wasteland of the Sierras. I imagine some higher being that created these mountains scraping away at the Evolution Valley, Martha Lake Basin and LeConte Canyon until the granite mountains and glacial valleys are polished and clean, beautiful and picturesque and then dumping out the unwanted tailings into the Ionian Basin for it to sit in piles for eternity. Thinking of it that way, I’m glad I didn’t catch a view of Ionian two summers ago. Like Theodore Solomons, I may have turned back and never returned.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 45

REC/LISTINGS Register

REC/PLAY AM Y GR EER

CITYSOLVE URBAN RACE— Race around Boise using clues to get you to your next destination. Billed as the “Amazing Race” that doesn’t require you to quit your day job. Race is Saturday, July 17, noon, $40-$60. Register at urbanadventure-race-boise-2010. eventbrite.com. FIT FOR LIFE HALF MARATHON—The eighth annual Fit For Life half marathon will be held Saturday, July 10. Course starts at the Hawks Memorial Stadium parking lot and finishes on home plate inside the stadium. There are three distance options available, 5K, 10K and the half marathon. Register at www.bluecirclesports.com. For more information go to www. cityoftreesmarathon.com.

Recurring BENCHMARK TRAINING—Members meet up Saturday mornings to run local trails, including Robie Creek, Les Bois, Barking Spider and more. Members also get discounts on various local races, tons of training information and access to coaches that can answer questions about everything from nutrition to clothing. Saturdays, 8:30 a.m. $70 one-time membership fee, Parkcenter Mall, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise. 208-8882122, www.benchmarktraining. homestead.com. BOISE WOMEN’S HIKING NETWORK—Women’s hiking group with about 800 members. Members post invitations for day hikes, camping trips, backpacking, snowshoeing and more. Schedule varies. For more information, contact Joyce Fabre at 208-384-8582. FREE, groups. yahoo.com/group/BoiseWHN/. TREASURE VALLEY FAMILY YMCA TRIATHLON CLUB—The Treasure Valley Family YMCA’s new Triathlon Club (Boise Y Tri) is open to all ages and abilities– beginner to advance. Get started in the sport with daily workouts and a variety of clinics. For more information, contact Harold Frobisher at 208-344-5502, ext. 262. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-5501, www. ymcaboise.org. WOMEN’S SHOP RIDES—Join a beginner/intermediate no-drop, road bike ride that takes off from George’s Front Street store at 6 p.m. every Thursday. 6 p.m. FREE. George’s Cycles, 251 E. Front St. Ste. 100, Boise, 208343-3782, www.georgescycles. com.

Events & Classes BEGINNER-FRIENDLY CLASSES—Learn the elements of yoga, tai chi, chi gong in a beginnerfriendly environment. Instructors guide students through yoga and movement mediation. The classes are free, however, all donations go to support the studio so that it can continue to offer affordable and diverse classes. First Thursday of every month, 4:15-5:15 p.m. FREE, donations accepted. Muse Yoga Studio, 1317 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208-345-2704, www.museyoga. com.

46 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Some teams stretch before a game. Not the Persian Cats.

SOC IT TO ME I used hate soccer. I loathed driving down Hill Road past Optimist park on Saturday mornings, dodging illegally parked cars and their soccer-crazed owners. The soccer ball stickers—the ones with kids’ names and numbers stuck to the back of minivan windows—make me want to huck a bowling ball at someone. The very idea of soccer moms is enough to make me forbid any offspring I may one day have from playing the sport. Even the name “soccer” makes me crazy. Why can’t Americans just call it by the same name the rest of the world calls it by? Because soccer is not futbol, that’s why. Futbol, on the other hand, I can dig. Watching the game is better than most of the crap on TV. Drama, scandal, triumph—it’s all there in a futbol game. But there’s something different in the soul of the futbol player’s game, something the American game seems to lack. As it turns out, I never hated soccer. I just hated the stereotypes of American soccer and the fact that beyond the World Cup, on a professional level, the United States has so little interest in the world’s most popular game. Six months ago, I couldn’t have told you the difference between soccer and futbol. Had the World Cup aired in January, I wouldn’t have paid it any mind, much less known off the top of my head that Landon Donovan scored the winning goal against Algeria in 90-plus minutes of last Wednesday’s game. But in January, I was persuaded by a coworker to join an indoor soccer team, never having played a game in my life. Two seasons later, I’ve been hit in the face a few times by the ball. I’ve been bruised, kicked and knocked over by other players. I’ve twisted a knee out of whack, faceplanted on the field and tripped over the ball. Somehow, I’ve even managed to self-mutilate my nether regions with my own foot while botching an assist. I recently scored my first goal, and as I jogged back to center I made the mistake of telling an opponent it was my first goal ever. He was not amused. My bumps and bruises haven’t led to any grandiose revelations. (And during the editing process of this piece a co-worker hipped me to the fact that Chuck Klosterman beat me to a version of this rant in Sex, Drugs and Cocoa Puffs.) But what I have discovered is the actual sport behind all the crap associated with American soccer is fun. It’s fun to play, it’s fun to watch. My teammates are heavily tattooed and none of them drive a minivan. And, for better or worse, we play the same game as all those kids at Optimist on Saturday morning. None of us, however, play the same game Pele played as a kid in a Sao Paolo slum. None of us will ever play the same game many of the kids in the FIFA player escort program play. I’ll be watching the World Cup finals come Sunday, July 11. And I’ll continue to volunteer to get knocked around the indoor field with my American soccer team. But I’ve learned a lesson about judging the world’s favorite sport by American standards. Sometimes, the rest of the world gets it right. —Rachael Daigle WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FOOD/NEWS GLENN LANDB ER G

REVIEWS/FOOD On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

COPPER CANYON

GLENN LANDBERG

Nampa is not known as the hub of fine dining in the Treasure Valley, Copper Canyon restaurant is an integral element of downtown Nampa’s therefore I approached Copper Canyon restaurant with a slight bit of ambiance: part old-school (the Yesteryear Shoppe), part new-school jaded apprehension. I rightfully had that chip knocked off my shoulder. cool (Flying M Coffeegarage). High booths, low tables, sunset-colored Granted, the decor of the popular Nampa eatery had me wonderdecor=old school. A tofu dish on the menu=new school. While that can ing. Small tables and booths, draped in linen tablecloths, were scattered provide for an interesting experience, it can also symbolize a little chaos. around the space, but the design elements felt like they came from a preThe mushroom torte appetizer (full size, $9.95) advertised mushfab decorating kit, rather than adding to the atmosphere. The chairs— rooms, Gruyere cheese and spinach topped with a tomato basil cream which were retro cool or just dated—matched the orange-red walls and and sided with tempura-battered mushrooms. Unfortunately, Gruyere ceiling, creating the effect of being in a red rock (or copper) canyon. didn’t raise its head, but it may have been lost in the tangy, aromatic While the surroundings weren’t exactly inspiring, the well executed puddle of cream sauce that we spooned up like soup. The torte tasted meals that graced the table forced a major change of opinion. unmistakably of cinnamon, nutmeg or maybe Chinese five spice, but Our meals started our server returned with salad (two from the kitchen to tossed and one caesay that salt, pepper, sar). The caesar was thyme and tarragon passable, but I was were the only spices. pleased with the ginA large bowl of gery bite of the house thick, yellowy salmon Asian vinaigrette and chowder brightened the dried cranberries, our tastebuds as we almond slivers and chewed big chunks pear in the tossed. of perfectly cooked I was disappointed potato and celery to fold back the and fleshy hunks of napkin in the bread fish. The few crispy basket to discover croutons that floated only a couple of at the surface added a slices of thin baguette pleasantly surprisrolling around the ing crunch not often bottom. But I got encountered in a over it with a glass of seafood soup. Sawtooth Winery’s The entrees arcabernet ($6.50). rived on a mixedAll my questionmatched service—a ing ended when the mix of china and entrees arrived. The pottery—and we, braised breast of again, discussed COPPER CANYON duck ($18.95) was what might be con113 13th Ave. S., Nampa not only wonderfully tender, but coated in a port wine sidered a lack of focus. Plentiful piles of broccoli and/ 208-461-0887 and sun-dried cherry sauce that made me glad I had or carrots decorated each dish. They added color, but coppercanyonnampa.com Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; chosen the garlic mashed potatoes as a side—all the a less-is-more approach might let other dishes on the Tues.-Sat., 5-9 p.m.; better to soak up the extra. I soaked each bite of duck in plate stand out better. A thick, flaky filet of hazelnutClosed Sun.-Mon. the sweet and slightly tart sauce, turning the white breast encrusted halibut ($16.95) and not-very-garlicky garlic meat pink before I could stuff it in my mouth. The thin mashed potatoes served as our hint of Copper Canlayer of duck fat lining one side of the breast is probably yon’s specialties, and then we challenged the meat-andpreferred by true foodies, but it threw me off just a bit. Thankfully, the potatoes norm with the chilled Pacific salad ($12.95), the portabella accompanying seasonal vegetables included both carrots and asparagus, polenta ($9.95) and the vegetarian tofu delight ($8.95). Crispy cubes and were crisp without being raw. of tofu topped a bed of wild rice covered in pea pods, walnuts, sliced Dinner conversation devolved into forks being passed between dinalmonds and a healthy dose of the broccoli and carrots with which ers as we sampled each other’s dishes. The Five Spice Pork Tenderloin we had become so familiar. The seeds from a hot pepper accompanied ($12.95 for a 5-ounce portion) was marinated in ginger honey, but the nearly every forkful as did a heat that would have registered high in rich, earthy sauce had touches of pepper and citrus that made it a big Scoville units. Long, meaty slices of portabella sunk into the pine nutfavorite. The chicken marsala ($12.95 for a 5-ounce portion) had a heavy polenta, and the coating of marinara over the whole evoked substantial, creamy wine sauce, and the breading on the chicken was notes of lasagna. We agreed that the next family barbecue should thin, yet remained just lightly crisp despite the sauce. include our version of this interesting, filling, savory dish. Slices of red The option to have the smaller 5-ounce portion was a nice inclubell pepper and rings of purple onion poked past fresh, leafy greens sion, not only for the cost-savings, but for those of us who don’t like in the Pacific salad and well complemented the giant sauteed-thenbeing intimidated by the size of our food. It also left room for the most chilled shrimp and scallops that lay across the top. important part of the meal: dessert. As we mulled over and then decided against dessert, Chef Brian The molten lava cake ($5.95) was completely decadent, piping hot Inaba approached our table and inquired to our satisfaction. That and had a healthy dollop of fresh whipped cream. It quickly disapadded bit of personal service helped us draw the conclusion that the peared beneath battling utensils. next time we are in Nampa to take advantage of some of the newAfter my experience at Copper Canyon, I’ll have to remember to school stuff unique to the city—Puffy Mondaes, Flying M Coffeegacheck my food ego at the county line. rage, White Pine—we would stop by Copper Canyon again for our taste of old-school. —Amy Atkins knows a little something about old (school). —Deanna Darr prefers duck, duck to goose. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Baguette Deli will soon get a sib.

THE DELI SO POPULAR IT’S MULTIPLYING On a Sunday afternoon, Tracy Pham stands behind the counter of her sandwich shop, Baguette Deli (at the corner of Orchard and Franklin), busily taking orders. For the first sunny Sunday this year, the place is surprisingly busy. Most of the tables are occupied and six or seven people wait in line. And in about two months, Pham is going to be even busier: As well as owning the bench Baguette and the Orient Market on Emerald, she’s opening another Baguette Deli in downtown Boise at the old Coldstone Creamery location. Pham, who moved to Boise from Vietnam about 20 years ago, says that she understands that economically it may not seem like a great time for expansion, but she had been planning to open another Baguette for awhile, and both the market— which she has owned for more than 10 years—and the Franklin deli are doing well. The downtown location will be similar to the Bench deli, though Pham may add a few noodle soup selections. You’re going to hate us for this, but you know it’s true: It will be August before you know it. In exchange for wishing away the bulk of your summer in that last sentence, we will give you some advance notice on one of the season’s most food-filled annual events: the Boise Soul Food Extravaganza. On Saturday, Aug., 7, from 11 a.m.-8 p.m., Julia Davis park will fill with the aroma of barbecued ribs, jambalaya and sweet-potato pie; the sounds of hip-hop, jazz, spiritual and blues music; and thousands of people stuffing their mouths and ears with both (hopefully, they don’t get confused). Visit boisesoulfoodfestival.com for recipes and more info on the event. And last, but so very not least, we have a welcome addition to the BW Card family: Brick Oven Bistro. From the days when it was housed in the humble little brick building that Addie’s now calls home, we’ve loved everything from crawfish etoufee to lamb shank to an open Yankee pot roast sandwich and more. We can now skip over to the Grove for lunch, knowing that when we slog back to the office, our bellies will be heavier, full of the Reuben made with hand-carved ham and a bowl of homemade soup with a scoop of mashed potatoes in the middle of it, but our wallets won’t be too much lighter. —Amy Atkins

BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 47

FOOD/DINING Kuna EL GALLO GIRO—Main courses are huge and span Tex-Mex to authentic. The Carne Borracha is a good example of the fare delivered in a caldron made of volcanic rock with carne asada, jalapenos, onions and tomatoes with a side of tortillas. Other selections include lengua en chile verde (beef tounge in a tomatillo green sauce), zope (handmade tortillas with beans, steak, salsa de tomatillo and cojita cheese) and menudo (tripe chile). 482 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-922-5169, www.elgallogirokuna.com. $-$$ SU . LONGHORN LOUNGE—Gather round the horseshoe-shaped bar for late-night bar grub because the kitchen is open late to serve the blurry and bright eyed. Select from hot wings, chicken strips, finger steaks, stuffed tots, deep fried green beans and anything they can throw in the fryer, including potstickers. 458 W. SU. Third St., Kuna. $ PEREGRINE STEAKS AND SPIRITS—The steakhouse with more to offer than New York Steak, petite sirloin and T-Bone steaks, the menu features stuffed pork chops, chicken fried steak, salmon fillets and Italian chicken breast as well. Enjoy a fine meal and then pop in next door to the Creekside Lounge inside the restaurant where every hour is an enjoyable experience. The lounge has big screen televisions, karaoke on Wednesdays and nightly drink specials. The Creekside patio offers a nice view of Indian Creek. 751 W. Fourth St., Kuna, 208-922-4421, www.creekSU. sidekuna.com. $-$$ RED EYE—This country bar has a nice, dark vibe and friendly staff. Rest a bit on the padded elbow pads at the bar and order burgers and barbecue. 414 W. Main St., Kuna, 208-922-9797. SU. $ TANNINS WINE BAR—Choose wines by the glass or buy the whole bottle. Tannins also features specialty beers and a food menu featuring cheese, fresh baked baguettes and and handmade truffles. The wine list includes a wide range of selections from Idaho, the United State and the world. Each week, six house wines are featured by the glass along with live music and tastings from area distributors. 347 Ave. E, Kuna, 208-922-1766, www. tanninswinebar.com. $$-$$$ OM.

4:30-6 p.m., features drink and sushi specials. 1193 E. Winding Creek, Ste. 104, Eagle, 208-938-3474, www.ahisushibar. OM. com. $-$$$ BARDENAY—Located in a new development along the Boise River, the little brother of the Boise bar still features the distillery’s own hooch, as well as an impressive array of beer, wine and assorted liquors. The drink menu is longer than the food menu and features unique concoctions from the bar’s award-winning bartenders. Munch on the anything-but-standard pub food while you try to pick your favorite. The riverside patio is the real highlight of the Eagle location, so be ready to fight for a table on warm summer evenings. 155 E. Riverside Dr., Eagle, 208-938-5093. $$-$$$ SU OM. BELLA AQUILA—The riverside restaurant boasts one of the best patios in the area. With an impeccable attention to every dining detail, the food, service and atmosphere make for a lovely experience. The restaurant serves a wide selection of Italian fare plus breads with every meal. Sweet options include sweetened ricotta and mascarpone-filled cannoli dipped in dark chocolate and pistachios or try a fancy drink like a blueberry cobbler martini with vanilla and blueberry vodkas and a graham cracker crust rim. 775 S. Rivershore Lane, Eagle, RES 208-938-1900. $$-$$$$ SU OM. THE BLUE MOOSE CAFE—With moose-inspired decor, an eatery where diners can get tasty bistro fare like soups and salads, sand-

wiches and wraps. Think about dining in their new sunroom or outside. 79 Aikens Road, Eagle, 208-939-3079. $ . BUSTER’S BAR AND GRILL— The neighborhood sports bar/ family restaurant is suburban sports getaway. Servers in tiny outfits deliver selections from a full menu of pub food and use the glow of big TVs to find their way to the tables. 1396 E. State St., Eagle, 208-938-1800. $-$$ SU. CAFE RUSSIAN BEAR—Owner Oleg Mironov and his wife make every single thing on the menu from scratch. Borscht, Russian crepes, beef stroganoff, potato pancakes—it’s all homemade. If you are as hungry as a bear, the cafe serves up borscht in up to 18 ounce servings, or try the “Old Russia” salad, a combination potato, ham, eggs, onion, peas, carrots, pickles and mayo. The pirogi is a unique pastry selection made fresh daily. No preservatives or pre-made ingredients, ever. 600 S. Rivershore Lane, Ste. 160, Eagle, 208-939-1911. $-$$. . COOL HAND LUKE’S STEAKHOUSE/SALOON—Think meat and potatoes dressed up with a cowboy hat and a whole lot of Western theme. Of course there’s chicken and seafood, but the star of the menu is beefsteaks in particular. Everything comes ranch-style with sourdough rolls, soup or salad, campfire beans and a bevy of side dishes. 291 E. Shore Dr., Eagle, 208-939-5860. $$ SU OM.

FOOD/RECENTLY REVIEWED TWIG’S CELLAR 816 Bannock St., 208-344-8944, twigscellar.com “The wine by the glass list currently offered has something to please just about every taste. There are some 30 reasonably priced choices, most for under $8 a glass.” —David Kirkpatrick

THE GYRO SHACK 6619 Ustick Road, 208-378-1325 “The deluxe gyro becomes super: super big, super meaty, super-duper spicy. Even big, throaty gulps of soda didn’t completely quell the burn or stop beads of forehead sweat.” —Amy Atkins

THE MODERN HOTEL AND BAR

Eagle AHI SUSHI—Traditional Japanese sushi in new swanky Eagle digs. Saturday from 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m., sushi is all you can eat and happy hour, which is Monday through Friday from

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ —Less than $8 $ $ —$8 to $14 $ $ $ —$14 to $20 $ $ $ $ —Over $20

1314 W. Grove St., 208-424-8244, themodernhotel.com “A coiled nest of purple cabbage, julienned jalapenos and carrots, and whole cilantro, the salad does it like more salads should do: dispenses with the lettuce.” —Rachael Daigle

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RES —Reservations

needed/recommended —Patio SU —Open on Sunday OM —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

48 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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DINING/FOOD DAVINCI’S—Casual Italian cuisine in quaint downtown Eagle, the “locals’ Italian restaurant” is housed in a historic bank building with a full-service bar area. A wide variety of Italian selections such as lasagna and chicken parmesan are accompanied by warm bread and all-you-can-eat salads. 190 E. State St., Eagle, 208-939-2500. $-$$$ SU.

REMBRANDT’S COFFEE SHOP—Located in a restored church on Eagle’s main drag, Rembrandt’s has become a neighborhood gathering point for more than just coffee. If it’s sustenance you seek, Rembrandt’s has hot and cold libations aplenty, a pastry case full of homemade muffins, sweets, breads and quiches, and a short lunch menu with largely portioned sandwiches, soups and salads. The cathedral—liter-

WINE SIPPER/FOOD

ally—ceilings and plush furniture lend the atmosphere a definitively welcoming and serene feeling. 93 S. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-938-1564. $. SU OM . SEASONS BISTRO WINE BAR AND CATERING—The recipe for success here is one part upscale market, one part deli and catering, one part wine tasting room. Add a couple of chef demos, a high-end wine store, a giant patio and viola ... it’s a versatile little place to kick up your heels for a spell. 1117 E. Winding Creek Road, Eagle, 208-939-6680. $-$$$ OM. THE STUFFED OLIVE—Eagle has decided to tattle on its “best kept secret” and share this bistro’s fresh sandwiches, pastas, roasted meats and fresh baked desserts with the rest of us. 404 S. Eagle Road, Suite A, Eagle, 208-938-5185. $$ . TULLY’S COFFEE—Small-batch roasted coffee from the Pacific Northwest. 150 E. Riverside Dr., Ste. 100, Eagle. $ SU. ZEN BENTO—Zen Bento does well by its simple little menu. This mostly take-out, affordable, lunch-only joint serves up healthy, fresh, tasty salads and bento boxes. 103 N. 10th St., . Eagle, 208-388-8808. $

Caldwell SPANISH WHITES When it comes to red wine, tempranillo and grenache are the mainstays in Spain, but when you’re talking white, it’s a much more varied field. Different regions champion different grapes, and in the line-up we assembled for this week’s tasting, no two wines were made from the same variety. It was tough to judge because all were well made, but here are the three favorites: 2008 SANTIAGO RUIZ, $20 This blend is dominated by albarino (70 percent) along with a few other varieties native to the Rias Baixas region. The aromatics are light and lively with rose petal and white flowers backed by touches of mineral, herb and clover. The palate is elegantly structured with bright fruit flavors (apple, pear, sweet grapefruit), nicely balanced by crisp acidity. It finishes round and ripe with a soft hit of lemon zest. 2007 TXOMIN ETXANIZ, $20 In the tiny region of Txakoli (chawk-oh-lee) just west of the coastal town of San Sebastian, hondarribi zuni is the primary grape. It produces a unique wine, this one showing floral aromas marked by green apple. Richer on the palate than most Txakoli, the ripe stone fruit and sweet custard flavors are matched by bracing acidity that comes through especially on the finish. A great summer white. 2009 TORRES VINA ESMERALDA, $11.99 This wine from Catalunya is a blend of two grapes: a moscato clone and gewurztraminer, a variety not typically associated with Spain. The latter definitely contributes an exotic spice component to the nose, where it mixes with honeysuckle, litchi, sweet melon and peach. It offers lots of stone fruit flavors in the mouth with a light hit of citrus on the creamy finish. An enticing wine at a great price. —David Kirkpatrick

THE COFFEE SHOP—Espresso, drip coffee, fresh baked goods, hot dogs, Polish sausages, cheeseburgers and snow cones. 1115 Albany, Caldwell, 208-454-7300. $-$$ . DUTCH GOOSE—Homemade finger steaks, fresh steamed clams, soup, sandwiches and great hot wings. They also serve up over 17 beers. 2502 Cleveland Blvd., 208-459-9363. $-$$ SU OM. IMELDA’S—Imelda’s is known for the light, fluffy and fresh homemade flour or corn tortillas and a make-your-own-taco option. Select from a wide variety of meats including chile Colorado, beef guisado, and barbacoa, ground beef, cubed pork, chicken, chorizo, shredded beef, bacon and sausage; then choose from a variety of toppings that include rice, onions, lettuce, beans, cilantro, and even potato. 2414 Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, 208-454-8757. $-$$ . MANCINO’S—Caldwell’s Mancino’s is home to hot, oven baked sandwiches with melted cheese piled high with deli meats. Appetizers include mozzarella sticks, jalapeno poppers and boneless chicken wings. The menu doesn’t leave out soups, salads and of course, pizza. 2412 Cleveland Blvd., Caldwell, . 208-459-7556. $ For more restaurant listings, as well as past reviews and more than you ever wanted to know about food with Boise Weekly’s annual Restaurant Guide, visit boiseweekly.com.

This week’s panel: Leil Cardoza, Red Feather; Dave Faulk, Porterhouse Meats; David Kirkpatrick, Boise Co-op Wine Shop; Cindy Limber, Bardenay; Karen McMillin, Hayden Beverage WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 49

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REAL ESTATE BW SHARED HOUSING ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com WANTED-REALLY ZEN ROOMMATE In a 4BD home near Greenbelt and BSU. $325/mo. $150 deposit. Call 340-8350.

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BW FOR RENT ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com AVAILABLE JULY 1ST Centrally located large 2BD, 1BA upstairs in small quiet apt. complex with AC, W/D, DW, lots of storage space. Please call Quail Glen Apartments 495-2484 or stop by & pick up an application. 4025 W. State St.

DOWNTOWN 2BD. $465/mo. Near Greenbelt/Library. 343-5476. EAST BOISE DUPLEX Spacious 1300 sq. ft. above ground basement apt. with huge windows, lots of light must see inside! Available immediately! Fresh paint throughout; new hall & living room flooring and new DW. Large rooms 3BD, 1.5BA, 16x12 living roomdecent size kitchen, W/D hook-up, small fenced back yard. No pets, no smoking. 2 available parking spots. $695/mo. plus deposit. W/S/T paid by owner. Call Tonya 407-7407 or Chuck 890-6898.

MODERN FLAIR DESIGNER OWNED 2100 sq. ft. Remodeled 3BD, 2BA + office. Walk to 36th Garden Center. Family & LR. New Kitchen. $219,900. 208-724-6968.

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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Wknds.Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759.

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Inside this modest ranch3740 PINEHURST DRIVE, BOISE style dwelling the owner has $219,900 created a very personal, 3 bed/2 bath 2,100 square feet stylish living space that is RE/Max Capital City far from the typical gut-andApril Florczyk-Medina, granite update you’d expect 208-724-6968 in a 30-year-old home. tourfactory.com/597293 A casual vibe flows from MLS #98433713 the cute white front porch into the updated great room, through a large addition that doubled the home’s square footage and out to a relaxed back yard. Just behind the house, a fence hides an outdoor shower and a sunny vegetable bed. The back lawn stretches from the bed toward a pair of shade trees that cool a small burbling pond. Black pea gravel crunches underfoot as you take a seat at the table in the shaded outdoor dining space. From the back yard, you can enter either the family room or the sizable master suite. Both spaces were created by the addition. The master suite has stamped concrete flooring, a separate office and a European shower in the bathroom. When it’s time to eat, meal prep occurs on black laminate countertops and in shiny black appliances. Sage green paint on two kitchen walls makes the room’s cherry-stained cabinets visually pop. Pergo flooring in the kitchen flows into an open living room, where there is a view of the front lawn. Although there is only a one-car garage out front, the .2-acre property has an RV parking pad.

8 MILES SOUTH OF TAMARACK! Gorgeous log home with beautiful covered porch & filtered view of the lake. Enjoy sheep migration by the home twice a year, summers at the lake, winters in the snow, hunting and fishing near by. This log cabin sleeps 4 in the loft bedroom and 2 additional with the living room hide-a-bed sofa. Water rights come with the home, septic is installed. Sale comes with cabin furniture including beautiful log master bed, 2 twin beds, kitchen dishes & utensils, dining room table & chairs, living room furniture. Scenic drive in Boise National Forest to God’s Acre Subdivision. Available immediately for purchase and enjoyment! Only $149,900. 1221 Fox Road, Cascade. Call Deborah w/Idaho Properties 208-484-0752. See virtual tour at www.tourfactory. com/535799. HOME FOR SALE ONLY $29,900! Light and airy MFH near Boise Foothills. Featuring 2BD, 2 full baths. Covered 2 car carport, wonderfully landscaped yard and beautiful stone patio. Access to shopping, public school and entertainment. Available for immediate purchase and occupancy. 8171 Casa Real Lane, Boise. Call Deborah w/Idaho Properties at 208-484-0752 for info or showing. For virtual tour go to www.tourfactory.com/535799

*AMATEUR MASSAGE BY ERIC*

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 8805772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Boise & Nampa studios.

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577. Thomas. MASSAGE BY GINA Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. Prof. therapeutic massage only by trained & exp. masseur. New client spec. Robert 484-6251. ULM 340-8377.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - BEAUTY

PROS: Stylishly updated home with no granite in sight. CONS: One-car garage.

50 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

—Jennifer Hernandez WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

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CAREERS CAREERS

BW HELP WANTED ESTIMATOR Ruby Dome, Inc. a construction company is seeking an estimator. Qualified candidates will possess five years experience as an estimator/project manager in general engineering construction including roads, earthwork, pipelines and utilities. This person must be able to prepare estimates, interface with customers and manage projects in excess of $100,000. Candidates should be experienced in AutoCAD. Please, fax, mail or e-mail resume with salary requirements to: Ruby Dome, Inc., 6525 East Idaho St, Elko, NV 89801. Fax: 775-738-8063. Email: rubydome@frontiernet.net GOVERNMENT JOBS: Earn $12 to $48/hr. Full Benefits, Paid Training, Health Care, Admin/Clerical, Construction, Law Enforcement, Finance, Public Relations, Park Service & More. Call 7 days. 1-800-858-0701 x2011.

RAPUNZEL SALON Now has stations for lease. Great amenities, people and terms. Call 336-5008 for appointments.

BW CAREER INFO.

RIGHT SCHOOL, RIGHT DEGREE, RIGHT NOW! Healthcare, Graphic Arts, Technology, Business & Accounting. Financial Aid is available for qualified students. Day, Evening and online classes start next month. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

$$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

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ALL CASH VENDING! Be the boss of your own local route with 25 new machines and candy for $9,995. Call today 1-800-920-9563. Multivend, LLC. BO#200003.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

DARLA: 5-year-old Lab. Gentle and calm girl who likes to play. Needs indoor home with moderately active family. (Kennel 319 #10761019)

SPIKE, DANTE, ALFALFA & DINAH: Adorable, playful and ready for an indoor home. Litterbox-trained. (Kennel 40 - #10833400, 430, 438 & 444)

FENSTER: 5-year-old Newfoundland/Lab (112 lbs). Sweet and loving dog. Gentle, low-key and with good manners. (Kennel 300 - #10749315)

STORMY: 2-year-old cat. Needs a quiet home where she can be treated like the princess she is. Likes being petted. (Kennel 43 - #10802393)

PARKER: 2-year-old German shepherd/ greyhound mix. Good with children and dogs. Playful and affectionate. Learns quickly. (Kennel 315 - #10770486)

VENUS: 3-month-old female kitten. Found as stray near Blaser and Orchard. Friendly and well cared for. Litterboxtrained. (Kennel 28 - #10813563)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

GYPSIE: Enjoys travel BONSAI: Shy little lady books and snuggling in in need of patient and the sun. ISO homebody. loving home.

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MOONLIGHT: In search of someone with a heart as big as mine.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 51

| REAL ESTATE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | CAREERS | BARTER | TRANSPORTATION | FOR SALE | PETS | SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

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AMERICORPS TUTOR TUTOR in greater BOISE and CANYON COUNTY areas: F/T and P/T 10 - 12 month AmeriCorps tutoring positions with Lewis-Clark Service Corps. Benefits include monthly living allowance, health coverage & education award. 208-854-6727.

FOR SALE

9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464.

ACROSS

1 Out of fashion 6 Trailer org.? 10 C.I.A. director Panetta 14 Immerse 19 Leave ___ (be permanently damaging) 20 “Ale” for the underaged

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SARA’S SECONDHAND

We buy your quality goods & furniture for CASH. Call 331-2366.

VILLAGE ANTIQUES

Multiple dealers, two floors of antiques & furniture. Mon.-Sat. 105:30. 2nd St. South in Downtown Nampa. 468-0900.

PUBLISHING TRADE BY TODD GROSS AND ASHISH VENGSARKAR / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

22 Apple messaging software 23 “Carson’s Successful Safari”? [Dalton Trumbo] 25 New Hampshire’s ___ State College 26 Spanish liqueur 27 Knoxville team, to fans

5

WANT TO BUY

BW COLLECTIBLES

BW STUFF

NYT CROSSWORD |

Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

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111 Brother of Malcolm on “Malcolm in the Middle” 112 White House nickname 113 Script 114 Three-piece parts 115 Hot 116 Former Swedish P.M. Palme 117 ___-Dale (1902 Kentucky Derby winner)

DOWN

1 ___ party 2 Tone deafness 3 Division 4 Grandchild of Japanese immigrants 5 Coastal flier 6 Candidate with the slogan “Come home, America” 7 Film director Pier ___ Pasolini 8 Some soldiers 9 Backrub response 10 Snares 11 Just beat 12 Christmas ball, e.g. 13 Sch. where Ross teaches on “Friends” 14 Two-piece part 15 Not worth ___ 16 “Renaissance College Girl”? [Dan Brown] 17 Yangtze tributary 18 Somme summer 21 Cockpit features 24 Batgirl player Craig 29 Puss 32 Spreadsheet feature: Abbr. 33 ___-10 (acne medication) 34 Key 35 The Big Easy, briefly 37 Rapper Fiasco 38 Company whose logo contains its name crossing itself 42 Charm 43 Since 45 Venal

46 Tom ___, Vito’s adopted son and consigliere in “The Godfather” 47 Appliance appellation 48 “Head Secretary”? [William Golding] 49 You might step out to get some 50 Lean, as meat 51 How much you might kick it up? 52 Like spoiled wine, say 55 Chemistry class charge 56 Camping supply 58 Carefree syllables 59 Oversell 60 Sagacity 62 Verdi aria 63 Pass again, in a race 71 Muffs 72 “Who’s ___?” 75 Holier-than-thou types 77 ESPN’s Hershiser 78 Start to freeze? 79 12-20 filler? 80 Laments the loss of 82 Low pitch indicator 83 Bring out 85 Not 85-Across L A S T

M E T A L R B I M A S B S M E S T I I N C I T S T A L E S A R M I N I E L E C T E E M A L T A A V E L O E B S I N K I N G O P Y E A S T O H M A G N O E X I S O N I A

S N E E Z E S R O S E D O C K E T

86 Corp. logos, e.g. 89 Start of many a rap moniker 90 Brought up 91 Ending with Rock 93 “Bam!” blurter 94 “Hey Jude” sounds 95 Dealers in metal goods 96 Minor-league category 98 To wit 99 Astrologer Dixon 100 Fictional hero in search of stolen treasure 104 Osso buco, basically 106 Record exec Gotti 107 Nearly failing 108 ___ tuna 109 GATT successor 110 Ending with Rock Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

E R A N L E O S S T I S U M C E R A R F N S S A P D F

A N S W E R S

R E N O W O M A N I C O B A I S G H E P C A L A M A T A R U R E L A N T S S C D O H I T A L Y N H L S E S A E B U I L R A N C E T R I K E D S O P D I G E R E N G D O R S E

A N Y M A I T N D O W H I A R N T S E S N E N E A I T

M A S C O T L E S S I N A T R A P

L A L A O B I L G A M A C E N Q U U S I E S T P S H A E L W A B L A T L O N G B O U K I S T I N C O D E R L S A I B O O K E R I A R E S T

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BW LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE Case No.:CV NC 1011073. A Petition to change the name of Jyotismita Ghosh, born 01/23/1994 in Kolkata, WB India residing at 2980 S. Zach Place, Boise, ID 83706, has been filed in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Johlea Gewhas, because the old name is not a balanced name, but the new name will be a balanced name, it will have a stronger intrinsic quality as mentioned in the balanced report. The child’s father is living. The child’s mother is living. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on August 10, 2010, at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: Jun. 07, 2010. By Debra J. Urizar, Deputy Clerk. June 30, July 7, 14 & 21, 2010. NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE Case No.:CV NC 1011071. A Petition to change the name of Bhaswati Guha, born 10/11/1958 in Kolkata, WB India residing at 2980 S. Zach Place, Boise, ID 83706, has been filed in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Bhasweti Gewhas, because the old name is not a balanced name, but the new name will be a balanced name, it will have a stronger intrinsic quality as mentioned in the balanced name report. The petitioner’s father has died and the names and addresses of his closest blood relatives are: No one is alive. The petitioner’s mother has died and the names and addresses of her closet blood relatives are: No one is alive. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m.

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on August 12, 2010, at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: Jun. 08, 2010. By D. Price, Deputy Clerk. June 30, July 7, 14 & 21, 2010. NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE CASE No.: CV NC 1011578. A Petition to change the name of Miguel Navarro, born February 4th, 1996 in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico residing at 5838 N. Applebrook Way, Boise, ID 83713, has been filed in Fourth County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Michael Miguel Navarro, because he has only a first name and wants to have a first and middle name. The child’s father is living. The child’s mother is living. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on August 17, 2010 at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name changes. Date: Jun. 15, 2010. By Debra J. Urizar. Deputy Clerk. June 30, July 7,14 & 21, 2010.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 53

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): How well are you capitalizing on this year’s unique opportunities, Aries? Since we’re halfway through 2010, let’s take an inventory. I’m hoping you’re well under way in the heroic task of conquering your past. It has been, and will continue to be, prime time for you to wean yourself from unresolvable energy drains. So exorcise irksome ghosts, please! You’re finally ready to graduate from lessons you’ve had to learn and re-learn. The coming months, will bring you even more opportunities to finish up old business that has demanded too much of your time and energy. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Now that we’re midway through 2010, it’s time to assess how well you’re taking advantage of this year’s good fortune. So let me ask you, Taurus: Have you been expanding your web of connections? Have you honed and deepened your networking skills? Have you taken bold steps to refine your influence over the way your team or crew or gang is evolving? The first half of the year has been full of encouragement in these areas and the coming months will be even more so. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): How well have you been attending to 2010’s major themes, Gemini? Since we’re midway through the year, let’s do a check-in. I hope that by now you are at least 15 percent sturdier, stronger and braver than you’ve ever been in your entire life and at least 20 percent better organized and disciplined. I hope that you have outgrown one of your amateur approaches and claimed a new professional privilege. Now write the following questions and leave them taped to your mirror for the next six months. “1. How can I get closer to making my job and my vocation be the same thing? 2. What am I doing to become an even more robust and confident version of myself?” CANCER (June 21-July 22): Let’s do a check-in on your progress so far in 2010. The year’s half over, and I’m wondering if you’ve been cashing in on the unique invitations that life has been sending your way. The way I understand it, you’ve been summoned to emerge from your hiding place and go wandering around in exotic and unfamiliar places. Events that may have turned you inward toward thoughts of safety in the past have, in recent months, nudged you out in the direction of the Great Unknown. Have you been honest enough with yourself to recognize the call to adventure? Have you been wild and free enough to answer the call? If not, I suggest you find it in yourself to do so. The next six months will be prime time to head out on a glorious quest.

54 | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | BOISEweekly

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Let’s take an inventory to see whether you’ve been taking advantage of the special opportunities life has been offering you. Consider these questions: Has the quality of your intimate alliances become especially intense, invigorating and catalytic in recent months? Have you created lots of small miracles with the people you care about most? If there has been anything missing from your efforts in these heroic tasks, get to work. Between now and January 2011, you’ll have a mandate to go even deeper than you have since January 2010.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Are you a dynamic bastion of stability yet, Sagittarius? Have you been growing deeper and deeper roots as you bloom in your power spot? Are you continuing to build your selfmastery as you draw abundant sustenance from the mother lode? You’re halfway through 2010, the year when these wonders should be unfolding with majestic drama. The best is yet to come, so I recommend that you declare your intention to make the next six months be a time when you come all the way home.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): So how is 2010 going for you so far, Virgo? Have you been taking advantage of life’s offers to help you move into a dynamic new phase of your relationship life? Have you been willing to set aside tired old strategies for seeking intimacy so that you can discover approaches you’ve never imagined before? Have you been brave about overcoming the past traumas and hurts that scared you into accepting less than the very best alliances you could seek? I hope you’ve been pursuing these improvements, because this is the best year in more than a decade to accomplish them.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): What are the toughest pairs of opposites in your life, Capricorn? What are the polarities whose different sides rarely resonate with each other and too often threaten to split you in half? One of the distinguishing characteristics of 2010 is the fact that you are getting unprecedented chances to bring them together in ringing harmony, or at least a more interesting tension. What have you learned so far about how to work that magic? And how can you apply it in even craftier ways during the next six months?

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Have you been doing a lot of sweating and grunting from sheer exertion in 2010? Have you thrown yourself conscientiously into the hardest, smartest labor you’ve ever enjoyed? I hope so, because that would suggest you’re in rapt alignment with this year’s cosmic rhythms. It would mean that you have been cashing in on the rather sublime opportunities you’re being offered to diligently prove how much you love your life. The next six months will provide you with even more and better prods, Libra, so please find even deeper reserves of determination. Intensify your commitment to mastering the work you came to this planet to do. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): How’s that project coming, Scorpio? You know, that assignment the universe gave you at the beginning of 2010 to loosen up, play more and periodically laugh like a tipsy Sagittarius. Have you been taking a sabbatical from the seething complications that in most other years are your rightful specialty? Did you throw some of your emotional baggage off a cliff? Are you dancing more frequently? I hope you’ve been attending to all of this crucial work, and I trust that you’re primed to do even more of it during the next six months. To take maximum advantage of your appointments with relief and release, you’ll have to be even sweeter and lighter.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You may still be gnawed by a longing for your life to be different from what it is. You might fantasize that you’re missing a crucial element that would, if acquired, usher you into a Golden Age. But I’ve been analyzing the big picture of your destiny, Aquarius, and here’s what I see: This year you’re being offered the chance to be pretty satisfied with the messy, ambiguous, fantastically rich set of circumstances that you’ve actually been blessed with. The first half of 2010 should have inspired you to flirt with this surprising truth. The second half will drive it home with the force of a pile of gifts left anonymously on your doorstep. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The journal Nature recently marked the 10th anniversary of a great scientific triumph: the complete mapping of the human genome. There was a cloud over the celebration, however, because few practical health benefits have yet to come out of this revolutionary accomplishment. It has proved unexpectedly hard to translate the deciphered code into cures for diseases. I offer this situation as a cautionary tale for you, Pisces. The first part of 2010 has brought you several important discoveries and breakthroughs. In the coming months, even as the novelties continue to flow, it’ll be your sacred duty to put them to use in ways that will permanently improve your day-to-day life. Unlike the case of the human genome, your work should meet with success.

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BOISEweekly | JUNE 30 – JULY 6, 2010 | 55

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Boise Weekly Vol. 19 Issue 01