Issuu on Google+

LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 18, ISSUE 50 JUNE 9–15, 2010

FR

TAK EE E ON E! CITIZEN 10

ADICHIE’S NIGERIA Author explains that Africa has more than one story FEATURE 11

FAMILY PORTRAITS A look at who’s behind the issues facing the LGBT community NOISE 23

JERSEY FINGER Matt Hopper talks about life on the road SCREEN 26

WHAT THE DICKENS? Ghosts at the Seattle Film Festival

“I am willing to give Chubby Dick a shot at redeeming himself.”

COPE 6

2 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Business Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Annabel Armstrong Videographer: Blair Davison Interns: Stephen Foster, Rachel Krause, Jacob Lyman Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Jennifer Hernandez, David Kirkpatrick, George Prentice, Ted Rall, Anne-Marije Rook ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Adam Rosenlund Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Steve Klamm, Noah Kroese, Glenn Landberg, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street, Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE IDAHO’S STANCE ON HUMAN RIGHTS IS PATHETIC. State leaders have made it clear they’re not interested in extending anti-discrimination protections to the gay and lesbian community. At the start of 2009, I watched members of the Senate State Affairs Committee barely give Sen. Nicole LeFavour the courtesy of their attention before quickly voting against printing her bill to amend the Idaho Human Rights Act to include LGBT protections in the workplace, education and housing. A week before LeFavour was shot down by her fellow senators, the Idaho Human Rights Commission—an organization tasked specifically with “ensuring that all people within the state are treated with dignity and respect”—voted against supporting LeFavour’s proposed legislation. While the current situation is disheartening and frustrating, what’s most shocking about it is that most people don’t even know LGBT protections aren’t in place. Turn to page 11. The lines under the “Anonymous” photo in this week’s main feature read: “Under Idaho state law, there are no legal protections for either jobs or housing because of sexuality. There are protections in cases of gender, race, religion, national origin and age.” As the editorial department sat around the conference room table readying the piece for print, several staffers gasped at that line. One asked if it was actually true. Later, I conducted an informal poll around BWHQ, asking my colleagues if they were aware of the fact that it’s legal to fire someone simply for their gender identification or sexual orientation. Resoundingly, the answer from my straight colleagues was “no.” This is my third Pride issue as editor of Boise Weekly, and I’m weary of writing every June that Idaho’s treatment of its gay and lesbian citizens is inexcusably bigoted. Every person photographed in this week’s feature knows the risks associated with being public about their sexuality, but not all of Boise Weekly’s readers do. How many of you straight readers out there know that anti-discrimination laws are not extended to the LGBT community? Now how many of you are willing to do something about it? It’s not enough for those enduring discrimination to fight for their own rights. Those of us who enjoy discrimination protection whether we’re women, disabled, Jewish or Muslim, black or Asian, old or young, have to join that fight. But first, people have to know that discrimination is still acceptable under Idaho law. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Angela Katona-Batchelor TITLE: Cat Loaf

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

MEDIUM: Linocut ARTIST STATEMENT: Bad cat! Oh, I can’t stay mad at you … I’d like to give a shout out to all my family and friends in Idaho. I miss you and think of you often. Marvin says “hi” too!

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Square formats are preferred and all mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 3

WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

VIDEO KILLED THE NEWSPAPER STAR How boring would Boise Weekly be if it were still only a newspaper? Nope, these days we’re a full-fledged multimedia company. And we just took a giant leap into the “multi” part of that claim. Last week, at boiseweekly.com, we launched a new video platform. Since the new boiseweekly.com went live last summer, video has been a frequent element, but with our new setup, video is an official resident. Go to the homepage, head to the far left on the nav bar and click on video. There, you’ll find video taken by BW reporters, as well as video aggregated from all over the Web. Even cooler? You can post your own videos. Yes, you. Have something you want to share? Scroll down to the “Tools” box and click on “upload a video.”

HEADS OR TAILS TAKES OFFICE Think your vote doesn’t count? The race for precinct committeeman and voter’s delegate for Precinct 14 was determined by coin toss after two candidates tied in the May 25 primary. Yep, a coin toss. Heads—aka Hank Harris—won.

FILE UNDER SO GROSS BUT OH SO GOOD What’s poo-shaped and poo-colored and found in a toilet? Ice cream. Well, perhaps more often the answer is poo, but not in “What Will They Think of Next: Modern Toilet,” a June 2 Cobweb post from Amy Atkins. The photos are worth the trip to cyberspace.

4 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

EDITOR’S NOTE

3

MAIL / MONDO GAGA

5

BILL COPE

6

TED RALL

8

NEWS & BIZ Keeping flexible when it comes to work

9

CITIZEN

10

FEATURE Faces of Pride

11

BW PICKS

16

FIND

17

8 DAYS OUT

18

SUDOKU

22

NOISE Matt Hopper takes aim with his Jersey Finger

23

MUSIC GUIDE

24

SCREEN A trip to Seattle for Ondine and Exit Through the Gift Shop 26 MOVIE TIMES

28

FOOD Two reviewers discover the menu at The Modern Hotel and Bar

30

BEER GUZZLER

32

CLASSIFIEDS

34

HOME SWEET HOME

34

NYT CROSSWORD

36

FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

38

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

MAIL

“

MI L ES D A I S HE R HA S B I GGE R BA LLS THA N CH U C K N O R R I S ! � —I know Miles D (BW, Rec, “Flying Down,� June 2, 2010)

THE GREAT BOISE HOLE MESS The construction pit at Eighth and Main has stood out to me since it was created. As time has passed, the situation with the Boise Hole has caused me more and more frustration. Walking by the hole on my way to Alive After Five or during the Saturday Market, it’s a shame that such a prime piece of real estate is sitting unused. A group on Facebook was recently formed to address this issue. The stance of the group, called Turn the Boise Hole into an Urban Park! (http://bit.ly/ a1rWi6), is that it is unfair to the people who live in and love Boise to leave this hole in the heart of our

city unďŹ lled. The Facebook group has grown to more than 2,000 members in just two weeks, a testament to how big an issue this truly is. One of the ďŹ rst actions of the group was to write e-mails to the mayor’s ofďŹ ce, asking for the issue of the hole to be addressed. There has been no reply or acknowledgement of the hundreds of e-mails that were sent. The time has come for our city leaders to take whatever steps are necessary to take back the Boise Hole and turn it into a space that can be used, possibly an urban park. Imagine having a patch of grass, a few trees and some benches in that spot. Suddenly the Saturday Market patrons will have some

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted.

space to spread out into, the weekday lunch crowd will have another spot to enjoy their sandwiches on nice days, and all Boiseans will be able to enjoy a gathering place that was once a hole in the heart of our city. We want to be proud of our city, and the Boise Hole makes us ashamed. —Catherine Amend, Boise; Aubrey, Balfour, Boise; Maddie Breen, Middleton; Barb Cochrane, Boise; Dan de Varona, Boise; Lisa Hall, Emmett; Cody Pratt, Boise

NO BM ON THE BW Just a small note. You can quit printing eight to 10 Boise Weeklys each week now. My chickens have grown and they said they don’t have to take a “BM� on the “BW� any more. Bad thing about it is they want to grow up as Democrates [sic] so, Nov. 2, I’ll cut their ugly heads off. —Bob Kiah, Boise

Expertise. Dedication. Pride. Hayden Homes Official Tools of the Trade !'2'(&,0,(.'&(+-!'2+, (0! &(+"'&"'-!'#.,-"' '(-!+!(&."%+(&&"-- (.+,%/,-(."%"' !" !*.%"-2!(&,-'.')+%%%/%. (20('-"'."'-!--+"-"('2.,"' -!5',-&-+"%, -.+,'51-.+,/"%%(.)%0"-!%(%+-,&',!") %%$2(.++( -.+'-!-4,!(00."%(.+ !(&, '(.++).--"(' Visit our model homes throughout Treasure Valley:

Brownstone

(--"/"%$3%+(& 

Carlton Bay

(-----+-%(+,,!( '02+(& 

Napoli

(-- % &"-2+(& 

Idaho RCE #29144

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 5

OPINION/BILL COPE

PLUG UGLY I ain’t no engineer, but ... You will be happy to know I have come up with a good use for Dick Cheney. But before I tell you what that use is, I must acknowledge one of my most faithful complainers as the inspiration for this column. He calls himself “dlb” within the anonymity of BW’s online comments and hardly a week goes by when he doesn’t find plenty in what I’ve written to bitch about. On rare occasions, he even manages to be semi-coherent in his commentary, although I suspect that on those occasions, he has borrowed his insults from other Internet worms. (Don’t take me wrong. I don’t use “worms” as a derogatory term ... necessarily. You see, when I write an opinion, I think of it as tilling another row in my opinion garden, turning the soil and softening it up so that, hopefully, something good grows from it. And every gardener knows that when you till rich soil, worms come to the surface. Which is what I consider “dlb”—one of the worms that crawls out when someone else does the work. Only, unlike Internet worms, real worms actually serve a useful purpose.) Anyway, “dlb” has lately been greatly incensed that I have not lambasted President Barack Obama for his response to the disaster in the Gulf of Mexico in the same way I ripped President George W. Bush for his handling of the Katrina aftermath. The reality that there is virtually nothing Obama can do about a crisis taking place under a mile of water, contrasted with the reality that there were any number of things Bush could have done about thousands of people left helpless in sea-level New Orleans is a distinction I don’t expect “dlb” or any other right-wing boob to appreciate. Yet he is correct about one thing: I have let almost two months slip by without saying anything about what is shaping up to be not only the worst environmental calamity imaginable but what could be one of the worst economic calamities as well. And all the other Obama bashers are correct about one thing, too: We must find someone to blame. This is simply too dreadful for heads not to roll. But rather than try to wrap it around Obama, the man incidentally in office when years of malpractice, recklessness and appalling greed came to their inevitable fruition, let us identify that one man responsible above all the rest for the corruption spewing out of the ocean floor. Let us find the man who almost a decade ago gathered a cartel of oil magnates away from the prying eyes of the free press and nature lovers alike, and bequeathed unto them the gift of doing whatever the goddamn hell they wanted, promising them virtually no oversight from the only entity big enough to oversee an international cartel of oil magnates: the U.S. government. Let us name the man to whom we most owe this spectacle of death and ruination unfold-

6 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

ing off the coast, and let us cast the blame on he who has earned it. Dick Cheney, there’s who to blame. Dick Cheney, the only vice president in recent memory so malevolently creepy you wouldn’t want your children sitting on his lap. Dick Cheney, the man who let loose the dogs of oil. U For those of you afflicted with the same historical amnesia that debilitates “dlb’s” rationality, let me catch you up. In the spring of 2001, starting just 10 days after taking office, Cheney assembled a task force of corporate energy Goliaths, and gave them the privilege of formulating the Bush energy policy, un-checked. Exxon-Mobile, Conoco and Dutch Shell were all in on it, as well as British Petroleum, Enron and Halliburton. To this day, Cheney resists the release of records from those policy sessions, but it is widely agreed that Big Oil was allowed— nay, encouraged—to write their own ticket. There are even indications that Ken Lay—the crooked sonofabitch who manipulated the energy markets in California and then drove Enron into the biggest bankruptcy ditch in American history—was given the task of picking those who would regulate the oil industry. This was far beyond normal “foxin-henhouse” stuff. This was more like “gang-of-foxes-design-henhouse, haveits-construction-subsidized-by-taxpayers, sell-henhouse-to-hens-for-enormous-profit, then-eat-the-hens” stuff. I suspect that if Americans knew what they had really paid over the last decade for Cheney’s energy chicanery, there wouldn’t be an “undisclosed location” left in North America in which the bastard could safely hide. But we are a nation of second chances, are we not? And I am willing to give Chubby Dick a shot at redeeming himself. As I write this, Cheney’s old BP buds are trying another procedure—“cut and cap,” I believe they’re calling it—but it’s not my impression there is a surplus of optimism the strategy will work. So as a standby, here’s my plan. It is my understanding that the pipe from which the oil is pouring is 19 inches in diameter. And it is my observation that Dick Cheney is at least 19 inches in diameter. It wouldn’t hurt if he were actually 20 or 21 inches in diameter. That would make for one tight cork, yes? Obviously, the biggest problem with this procedure is the delivery system. Like, how does Mr. Cheney get down there where he could actually do some good for once in his rotten life? I’ve figured that out, too. I have, somewhere around here, a pumice block and a length of dog chain that I will happily donate to the cause. There you go, “dlb,” that column on the oil spill you wanted. You happy now? WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 7

OPINION/TED RALL

ON THE HIGH SEAS Activists finally fight back—and win

NEW YORK—They call themselves activists. But leftist activists rarely do anything. They march. They chant. They whine. Since the ’70s, passive resistance has become a religion of sorts among American “activists.” The exceptions, such as 1999’s Battle of Seattle between Seattle riot cops and anti-WTO protesters, have been notable—not least because they mark the few times the left has won. So when Israel dispatched armed commandos to seize a flotilla of Turkish ships attempting to break its blockade of the Gaza Strip, they had every reason to expect the usual pacifist response: playing dead. “We prepared for an operation involving light resistance,” an Israeli Navy officer told The Jerusalem Post about the clash on the Mavi Marmara, the biggest ship. “We anticipated that the soldiers would get spat at and maybe slapped. We did not expect that the soldiers would be met by a mob armed with bats, knives and metal pipes. “We thought there would be verbal and passive violence, but not to the level we encountered,” the Naval officer continued. “Everyone who came toward us wanted to kill us.” The Turkish activists (no quotes, as they’re worthy of the name) claim the Israelis opened fire first. IDF forces shot and killed nine passengers in the melee. Up to 60 passengers and 10 IDF soldiers were injured. Whether the activists defended themselves or attacked first, no one knows. Nevertheless, their willingness to use violence is notable, which naturally came as a shock. Officials responded to the Mavi Mar-

8 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

mara incident like any bully who finally gets the bloody nose he deserves. Israeli Deputy Foreign Minister Danny Ayalon accused the convoy of a “premeditated and outrageous provocation” and described the flotilla as an “armada of hate.” Lt. Col. Avital Leibovich, a spokesperson for the IDF, said: “They chose to use violence. They had stocks [of] different kinds of sticks, of knives, of metal objects. They took two pistols from our Navy SEALs. They used the entire magazines on these pistols. They wounded our soldiers.” In the official narrative, heavily armed commandos who take over a ship on international waters are not “choosing to use violence.” Only individuals forced to resort to sticks and knives have “chosen” violence. The friends and families of the nine who died will never get over what happened. But they can take some comfort in the fact that they died for a noble cause: ending the joint Israeli-Egyptian blockade of Gaza, home to 1.5 million stateless Palestinians whose lives have been devastated by the resulting economic collapse. Nine lives have been lost; thousands will be saved when the blockade ends. A United Nations fact-finding mission recently concluded that Israel’s blockade of Gaza should be prosecuted as a war crime at the International Criminal Court if it continues through September. Was violence justified against the Israelis, even in self defense? Maybe yes, maybe no. The point is: it worked. Because of those pipes and axes and knives the embargo is doomed. Israel finally went too far. The activists finally went far enough.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NEWS/CITYDESK BUSINESS/NEWS NOAH K R OES E

FLEX IT

On June 3, the American Civil Liberties Union announced it had amended its suit against Idaho’s largest prison, removing the Idaho Department of Correction Director Brent Reinke and the Commission on Pardons and Paroles from the suit’s list of defendants. The ACLU complaint filed in March alleged that prison officials at Idaho Correctional Center not only accepted the culture of violence at the prison but encouraged it. On June 2, Boise Weekly reported that since the suit was filed, violence had increased. A May 26 letter by Idaho prison chief Brent Reinke said: “During the month of April, six incidents were reported. Since the beginning of May, there have been 11 reported incidents.” In a release on the amended complaint, ACLU of Idaho Director Monica Hopkins said, “We felt Corrections Corporation of America is the real culprit. However, when the state government chooses to contract out management of its facilities, they do not contract out their responsibility to adhere to constitutional standards.” In April, Hopkins told BW that although a bill carried through the Legislature this year designed to help quell prison violence was a step in the right direction, it would not affect the lawsuit.

On June 2, Boise Mayor Dave Bieter gave his annual State of the City address to a packed house at the Boise Centre. While topics included last year’s successes and the city’s economic development, the highlight of the morning was the unveiling of a new large-scale solar-power project west of the airport. The city has entered into negotiations with Sunergy World to build a large-scale solar energy production facility on the former city dump site. The plant would cost $45 million, generate 10 megawatts of electricity (enough to power 1,200 homes every year) and create several dozen jobs. Sunergy is also interested in installing solar panels in awnings at the airport parking lot. The project is a first step into boosting the city’s green reputation, a factor that led to the loss of a German solar panel manufacturer to Colorado last year. But solar power is just part of Bieter’s overall plan for the city. He credited careful planning and budgeting for preserving vital city services, but said that to prosper, the city needs to move forward, not stand still. “If we do everything, we win,” Bieter offered as his economic development philosophy. He explained that it was not a call to try to be everything to everyone, but to use every tool available. “This is what I mean by every tool. Our job is to provide the context for you to succeed,” Bieter said. He once again stressed the need for a local option tax. “If we’re going to prosper, we need more tools. We can’t do it by cutting alone,” Bieter said. According to the mayor’s statistics, a oneeighth-cent sales tax would generate $7 million annually to fund research at Boise State. A half-cent tax would generate $22 million annually he believes could fully fund a topnotch public transportation system, including both buses and a proposed light rail. Bieter said he believes a local option sales tax is the most effective means of funding because it spreads the cost to visitors. “We vote in state legislators who don’t trust the voters,” Bieter said. “All I’m asking the governor and the Legislature is, give us this tool and let us have those conversations locally so we can take it from there.” Idaho is one of only three states without a local tax or state funding for public transportation, along with Alaska and Mississippi. “All due respect to those states, I’d rather be in the majority,” Bieter said. The mayor acknowledged that these were likely the toughest times seen since the Great Depression and said that he agreed with President Franklin Roosevelt that we rise or fall together. “We will have success if we don’t look back at what we’ve lost, but look forward to what we stand to gain,” Bieter said.

—Rachael Daigle

—Josh Gross

Making work work ZACH HAGADONE “Work is not where you are, it’s what you do,” said Patricia Kempthorne, former first lady of Idaho and founder and executive director of the Twiga Foundation, a Boise-based nonprofit that promotes workplace flexibility. “[Workplace flexibility is] so important because of the way we work now in the 21st century,” she said. “We are such a 24/7 global economy, plus, there’s a real awareness of family.” According to Kempthorne, a confluence of forces—political, demographic and technological—is driving a trend toward a world of wireless work. It’s been happening for a long time, aided by the ubiquity of cell phones and wireless Internet, but a rising generation of tech-savvy workers, the need for elder care and more families with two working adults means workers are demanding more flexibility. “More and more employers are discovering that loosening the traditionally rigid work schedule pays off,” said Sandy Colling, director of sales and support with Boise-based Business Psychology Associates. “Studies show retention increases and study after study shows productivity also shoots up. More than half of companies now say they offer flextime, and one-third allow telecommuting at least part-time.” The change in workplace culture is also gaining political support—including from the president of the United States. President Barack Obama hosted a White House forum on workplace flexibility in late March, when he brought together business leaders to focus on policies that help employees maintain a healthy work/life balance— from flexible hours and in-office child care, to sabbaticals and job sharing. Kempthorne’s group, Twiga—Swahili for “giraffe,” a gentle family devoted animal—is geared toward improving the work/life balance of working moms, but as Obama said at the forum, “Workplace flexibility isn’t just a women’s issue … It’s an issue that affects the well-being of our families and the success of our businesses.” Kempthorne agrees. “As we’ve seen in the recent research, women make up half of the work force, but what that has really shown us is that both men and women are looking for flexibility because there’s a much greater sharing of responsibility, both as the provider and the caregiver,” she said. And it turns out Boise is a community in the lead on workforce flexibility. Eight local businesses and organizations were awarded 2009 Alfred P. Sloan Awards for Business Excellence in Workplace Flexibility, and the national awards presentation was hosted by the Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce. Given out by the Families and Work Institute, which Twiga partners with, the awards are about best practices that help enhance WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

recruitment, retention, health and productivity. Among Boise’s Sloan award winners is the law firm Givens-Pursley. Human Resources Director Robin Scruton said the company’s policies include flextime, child care and a host of health and wellness programs. “It’s made us happier and healthier—more productive and efficient,” she said. Scruton added that while flexible work programs have always been a priority for GivensPursley, there’s definitely been an increase over the last five years. “This is a whole different generation coming up right now, and we try to recognize that. We also have a lot of working mothers,” she said. “We have a culture of being very family minded, and we take what we do very, very seriously. It’s a very stressful job practicing law, and we want to help people have a good, happy life doing it.” Audit, tax and financial advisory firm KPMG is another Sloan award winner. Mike Alva, associate director of KPMG’s West Internal and External Communications, said 81 percent of employees who said they have flexibility at work also said KPMG was “a great place to work.” “It’s about establishing a culture where people feel they have control over when, where and how they work,” Alva said. But even with benefits measured in higher retention, better health, improved productivity and happier workers, workplace flexibility can be challenging to institute. “I would say trust is a barrier—employers have to trust their employees that when they’re working from home, they’re actually working,” Kempthorne said. “Then there’s the ‘we’ve done it this way for years’ factor, and businesses often think flexibility is going to cost them somehow. It won’t. It’s really just the perception of cost.” “We’ve kind of done away with that whole stereotype that to get ahead in your life you’ve got to go full-out, nose-to-the-grindstone,” Scruton said. “What’s more important is what can we do to help our employees be whole people?”

MAYOR BIETER STRESSES LOCAL OPTION TAX AND SOLAR POWER

EXTRA/NEWS

The Idaho Correctional Center is the center of an ACLU complaint for a climate of inmate violence.

ACLU DROPS IDOC FROM SUIT

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 9

CITIZEN

CHIMAMANDA NGOZI ADICHIE Nigerian author reads at the Egyptian Theatre Award-winning Nigerian novelist Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is fed up with the “patronizing, well-meaning pity” that characterizes many people’s perceptions of Africa. In her novels Purple Hibiscus (2003) and Half of a Yellow Sun (2006), Adichie describe the highs and lows, the love and loss, of post-colonial, middle-class Nigerian society. We spoke with Adichie via e-mail before her reading at the Egyptian Theatre on Wednesday, June 9, at 7:30 p.m. Can you describe your background growing up in Nigeria and how it has shaped the stories that you are drawn to? First, as a reader, I am drawn to all kinds of stories. I grew up on the campus of the University of Nigeria, in the town of Nsukka. My parents worked at the university. By far, the largest coverage of Africa as a continent is that of a single story of catastrophe. Stories like mine are hardly heard—of middle-class Africa, of children who had happy childhoods. Too many people have been told how Africa is dying and too few have been told how Africa lives. The dying stories are important, of course, but one will never truly understand the African space if one does not also hear other kinds of stories. There are many people for whom the word “Africa” immediately brings to mind poverty, death, war, starvation. And this becomes what they see as “authentic” Africa. I was once told, for example, by an American professor that my book was not “authentically African” because I wrote about middle-class Africans who drove cars. For him, an “authentic” African writer should write about people who were starving and poor. The Africa I know is a middle-class

10 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Africa and the stories of middle-class Africa are just as important as the stories of poor Africa. Did all Americans live like John Steinbeck’s characters when he wrote? No. Neither did all Americans live like Edith Wharton’s when she wrote. Nobody questions the authenticity of these American stories. You have said, “The problem with stereotypes is not that they are untrue, but that they are incomplete.” What role do you think novelists play in helping to fill in the gaps created by stereotypes? Both novelists and historians can fill out the skeletal stereotypes, but novelists even more so because I like to think of fiction as the soul of history. History tells you what happened, but good fiction tells you how it felt and reminds you that it happened to people with whom you share a common humanity. You did an immense amount of research into the history of the Nigeria-Biafra war during the four-year period you were writing Half of a Yellow Sun. How did you keep the novel from becoming too burdened by history? By constantly reminding myself that the characters had to be at the center of the narrative. By pushing aside the desire to show off how much time I had spent in dark libraries. What have been some public perceptions of Half of a Yellow Sun in Nigeria? The book has been very well received by—and this particularly makes me happy— Nigerians, cutting across gender and ethnicity. It has made it possible for Nigerians of my generation to start asking questions about that period of our history. I have often heard how

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

TARA MORGAN

the novel has served as a starting point for important and sometimes difficult conversations among families and friends about what happened in 1967. You describe yourself as a “very happy feminist.” What do you mean by that? I was once told by an acquaintance in Nigeria that feminists were unhappy women who could not find husbands. So I thought I had better qualify mine with happiness. For me, to be feminist is simply to recognize and acknowledge that there are still many gender inequalities in the world and to work to address and change them. I write mostly about women. My work is feminist in the sense that I write about what I care about but I don’t write ideological fiction. I have no interest at all in simplistic propaganda. In my view, individual women can be just as horrible as individual men, but what is important is that the power structure benefits men as a group. Now that you split your time between America and Nigeria, what are some specific things you miss from each place? Even though my husband and I eat mostly Nigerian food here in the U.S., it never tastes like the real thing. So I miss that. And I miss my friends. And I miss the sense of being where I never question my place. In Nigeria, my Internet connection is always too slow. So I miss my American broadband. And I miss plums. And I miss online shopping.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FACES OF PRIDE Putting a face on the issues

DEANNA DA RR | PH OTO G RA PH S BY L AU R I E P E A R M A N

E

ach year around this time, Boise Weekly takes a closer look at gay rights and issues facing the LGBT community in Idaho. We’ve discussed controversies over same-sex marriage, discrimination and job protection with experts and activists across the board. The community is filled with families and committed couples who might not match the stereotype of mainstream society, but they are families all the same. But what sometimes gets lost in all the politics are the actual people whose lives are in the cross hairs of the debate.

Sarah Seidl and Kim Beswick, with their children Nick, 6, and Kate, 4 Sarah Seidl, who co-owns a construction company with her brother, knows what love at first sight is like. She knows the joys of motherhood and the rush of marrying the one you love. But in her case, her partner happens to be another woman. Sarah and Kim have been together for a decade, after meeting at a party. They were married in California surrounded by their family and later decided to take the next step and have children. It’s that kind of commitment to each other that makes comments that they aren’t a “real family” all the more cutting. “Family is about love, and that’s what this family is,” Sarah said. Sarah and Kim have slowly become more active in the gay community after proposals for a constitutional amendment to the state constitution banning same-sex marriage first appeared. In November 2006, voters approved an amendment to the Idaho Constitution defining marriage as between one man and one woman. “It was a tough decision,” Sarah said of being more visible, but in the end, they felt it was actually better for their children. “There are great people out there, and part of this is education, and we have to step forward. Once you have kids, it really hits home.” For Sarah, education comes through living the life of an everyday family and members of the community. “We’re doing everything else other parents are doing. At the end of the day, the kids are the most important part.” Sarah and Kim have started talking to their children about the fact that they may someday hear negative comments about their family. Sarah said they are just trying to raise strong, confident children. Her daughter has her own take on their situation, telling Sarah she considers herself lucky to have two moms.

Jody and Maria May-Chang with their son Cody May, 21 Jody and Maria have been together for 14 years and moved to Boise from Santa Barbara, Calif., to find a more family friendly community. Since landing in Boise in 1999, Jody has been at the forefront of gay-rights advocacy, publishing the Pride Depot blog and As I See It at may-chang.com. While she sees some progress in actions like the inclusion of sexuality in the hate-crimes law, she believes the there’s still a lot to be done, especially when it comes to legalizing same-sex marriage and civil unions, as well as creating job and housing protection. According to Idaho law, it’s legal for an employer to fire someone based simply on their sexual orientation. “People, right now, can be fired for just being gay,” she said. “They can’t always come out if they’re afraid to lose their jobs. This really is a civil-rights issue.”

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 11

James and Jezzabelle Monroe One couple with two personas and two engagements. In public, and on stage, they are James and Jezzabelle, active members of the Imperial Sovereign Gem Court of Idaho, performing in charity drag shows whenever they get the chance. At home, they are Jeremy (James) and Robert (Jezzabelle), a couple who met more than a year ago and have pledged their lives to each other. It was Robert who did the proposing in their personal life, but the equation was flipped last month when James surprised Jezzabelle with a public proposal as she relinquished her crown as Miss Gay Boise Pride 2009. It seemed only fitting that their alter egos should be as committed as they were at home. It also put the focus on their goal of creating more family oriented drag shows, where all-ages crowds can join in the fun and experience their performance art. While the two would love to have their commitment (either as a marriage or as a civil union) legally recognized by the state, that’s not the most important thing for them. “No. 1 is that it’s recognized by God in the church,” James said. The couple are members of the Treasure Valley Metropolitan Community Church, a group founded to create a place where everyone can worship in an open and accepting environment. The pastor at the church has said she will perform a ceremony. Still, James would like to be on equal footing someday. “Yes, we should have the right, as the fact that we are in the land of the free, we should be free to marry as a gay couple,” he said.

12 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 13

Amber Howard and Rachel Dovel, with their son Logan Henderson, 5 Amber and Rachel first came to public attention in the summer of 2009, when the Nampa Recreation Center denied them a family membership. “They basically laughed at us and told us we weren’t a real family,” Amber said. Sadly, it wasn’t the first time the couple of more than three years had run into discrimination. When they tried to find daycare for their son, daycare operators refused to take him, specifically citing the fact that his parents were gay. “They said because of our ‘home situation,’ it would not be appropriate to take a child like him,” Amber said. Because Idaho law does not include protection from discrimination due to sexual orientation, there’s nothing the family can do about it. They’ve even had past neighbors who refused to let their children play with Logan. It’s this kind of attitude toward their son that has led the couple to enroll him in the Idaho Virtual Academy, rather than have him attend public school. To supplement his education, Amber said she plans to sign him up for as many YMCA programs as possible since the YMCA extended them a family membership, no questions asked. Still, the denial of them as a family continues to sting. “We’re just as much a family as any other family unit,” Amber said. “There’s families out there that could be a grandmother and grandfather and their grandchildren live with them. They’re a family unit. What difference does it make if there’s two mommies?”

Anonymous Boise Weekly asked numerous gay couples and families to pose for a picture but many couples turned us down for one resounding reason: They were afraid public exposure could cost one or both partners their jobs. Under Idaho state law, there are no legal job or housing protections based on sexual orientation. There are protections in cases of gender, race, religion, national origin and age. Repeated attempts to include protections based on sexuality have been stonewalled. Boise Democrat Sen. Nicole LeFavour has continually championed legislation to make the change at the state level, but the Senate State Affairs Committee voted not to even print the bill in February 2009. That same month, the Idaho Human Rights Commission voted to not support an amendment to the Idaho Human Rights Act, which would have extended discrimination protection to the LGBT community.

14 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 15

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events JOS HU A GR IFFLER

I’m sorry, this is the Eagle what feed?

SATURDAY JUNE 12 Grown up Guarini lookin’ all ... grown up.

EAGLE’S CROWN JEWELS

FRIDAY-SATURDAY JUNE 11-12 music SUN VALLEY ACOUSTIC WEEKEND Ah, the season of summer music festivals. For those tired of putting up with wookies nagging for schwills off your beer, the folks at Sun Valley Resort are putting on a posh, weekend get-together featuring some rad acts. Acoustic Weekend at Sun Valley Pavilion runs Friday, June 11, and Saturday, June 12. On Friday, Peruvian duo Alejandro Rivas and Maria Laura Bustamante will per form, followed by folk/pop siren Molly Venter and American Idol second-placer Justin Guarini. Saturday features short sets from Molly Venter and Justin Guarini, with Juno Award-winners and Grammynominated roots-rockers The Duhks headlining. Borneo born singer-songwriter Zee Avi will open for The Duhks. The event will take place in the sultry Sun Valley Pavilion. The sunvalley.com website offers this steamy, romance novel-worthy blurb about the venue: “The sky and mountain are captured by the free flowing sensual roof, comprising of a seasonal luminous tensile membrane covering nearly 1,500 seats … The surrounding landscape is sculpted into an undulating park gently elevated like a natural amphitheatre.” Sounds sexy, doesn’t it? Buy your tickets and watch video of the performers at sunvalley.com. Friday, June 11, 6 p.m.; Saturday, June 12, 5 p.m.; $25-$60, The Sun Valley Pavilion, 400 First Ave., Sun Valley, 888-622-2108.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 9 plants EDIBLE AND USEFUL PLANTS American author Jack London wrote stories framing man vs. nature, his most cited being the famous short story “To Build a Fire,” in which the protagonist’s efforts to survive a nasty

Nordic winter are constantly barred by natural occurrences. For instance, when the protagonist musters up the strength to build a fire, a snow pile drifts off a tree, quelling the flame and ending his chance of survival. This view of man vs. nature has pervaded human thought throughout our existence. Boisean Ray Vizgirdas wants to change that. Through his field research and naturalist tendencies, Vizgirdas has come to be-

16 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

marbles

lieve that nature’s hostility is often overplayed. “It should be an unplanned vacation out here. It should be an enjoyable time outdoors. Don’t look at it as being full of monsters,” said Vizgirdas in a Boise Weekly interview last summer. Ray Vizgirdas is a biologist by training and naturalist by heart. He teaches wilderness survival courses at Boise State and has a knack for identifying useful and edible plants in the wild.

Nothing says Eagle like a piping-hot plate of deep fried gonads. Since the 1950s, Eagle has hosted one of the world’s largest Rocky Mountain oyster feeds. And even though Eagle has thrown on a pair of fancy underpants since the event’s humble beginnings, the town still knows how to go nuts. More than 1,000 people are expected to go balls to the wall in Merrill Park for the event, which is also referred to as the Eagle Nut Feed. This year’s event will host a six-on-six coed volleyball tournament, offering a minimum payout of $600. Hamburgers and garden salads will also be available for those who don’t want to testes their gag reflexes. Proceeds benefit the Eagle Volunteer Firefighter Association, which works to provide a pool of individuals to assist the Eagle Fire Department. The feed is being held in conjunction with the annual Eagle Fun Days, which includes a golf tournament, carnival, rodeo, car show, fun run, family bike night and the Wet and Wild Parade. Catch a variety of musical performances, such as Crosby Stills and Nash at the Eagle River Park Pavilion and Moody Jews and Nate Fowler at the Heritage Park gazebo. 5-10 p.m., $10-$22, Merrill Park Eagle, 637 E. Shore Drive, 208-939-6463, eaglefire.org.

On Wednesday, June 9, he’ll teach a free workshop at the Foothills Learning Center, sharing his knowledge and passion for edible and useful plants of the Foothills. 7-8:30 p.m., FREE, Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, 208-493-2530.

SATURDAY JUNE 12 cthulhu GREAT ESCAPE IV Amongst science fiction and fantasy fans, Cthulhu is much more than a grotesque, tentacle-headed monster. Created by horror author H.P. Lovecraft in the

1920s, Cthulhu appears in numerous role-playing games, such as Dungeons and Dragons and World of Warcraft. It also happens to be the mascot of Idaho fan entertainment group Fandemonium. Fandemonium—which hosts an annual video game, anime and science fiction convention in August— presents the fourth annual all-ages Great Escape party at the Cole Village Shopping Center featuring live DJs, dancing, games and prizes. Bottomless cups of high-energy Cthulhu juice are just $3. The night’s theme is “tiki and beach” meaning hula skirt-clad beachcombers will be busting a move to the beats of DJ HouseHard, DJ Nerdgasm and DJ Quateri-

ous. With a Hula Hoop contest and comedy improv also scheduled, Great Escape IV is sure to bring out the competitive spirit in all fanboys and girls. 7 p.m.-midnight, $6, Cole Village Shopping Center, 3395 N. Cole Road, fandemonium.org.

SUNDAY JUNE 13 foodies SAVOR IDAHO We imagine there would be far fewer weepy “bankrupt” faces—and far more hiccup-y Vanna White stumbles—had Wheel of Fortune taken a cue from Savor Idaho and changed its WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

FIND OF GODS AND MEN

May the force of jazz hands be with you.

SATURDAY JUNE 12 film DARTH WAITER Community members working together to make a little boy’s dream come true have produced a film worthy of a few accolades. This is the story of 12-year-old Mitch Kohler and his dream to be in a Star Wars movie. Sponsored by the Idaho chapter of the Make-A-Wish Foundation, Mitch and a large group of volunteers spent eight months writing, producing and filming a Star Wars spoof called Star Waiters. The final 35-minute film stars Mitch as Luke PieWalker, who alongside Pretzel Leia, avenges the loss of his family’s temporary tattoo parlor by taking on the evil Darth Waiter. Academy Award-winning producer Ben Shedd (The Flight of the Gossamer Condor), students from Riverstone International School and Rolling Hills Charter School, and community members all pitched in to make Mitch’s dream a reality. More than 700 people showed up to the red carpet premiere at the Egyptian Theatre to watch the film in May 2009. Those who missed the film the first time have a second opportunity to see it at the Ada Community Library on Saturday, June 12. Shedd and actors in the film will be present. Last October, Mitch’s wish won the Infinite Wish Award from the Make-A-Wish Foundation of America, which recognizes one wish fulfilled by a chapter that fostered high levels of community involvement. 1:30-3 p.m., FREE, Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, 208-362-0181, adalib.org.

name to the Wheel of Wine. Pat, can I buy a viognier? The Wheel of Wine allows Savor Idaho attendees to take a spin and win prizes from local businesses in exchange for a donation to the Idaho Wine Commission’s Idaho Wine Scholarship Fund. This year, the Wheel of Wine hopes to draw in $2,500 to support the IWSF, a scholarship that helps local students learn the process of winemaking. In addition to spinning the Wheel of Wine, Savor Idaho also offers oenophiles enough wine tasting opportunities to get their heads spinning. Tasting begins promptly at 2 p.m. and runs

S U B M I T

though 6 p.m. Idaho wineries scheduled to appear include: 3 Horse Ranch Vineyards, Cinder, Fraser Vineyard, Hell’s Canyon Winery, Koenig Vineyards, Sawtooth Winery, Syringa Winery and Woodriver Cellars, among many others. To mop up all those mini pours, Savor Idaho also features morsels from local restaurants, including ahi sashimi salad from Bardenay, soup shots from Berryhill, cheesy habanero and merlot bites from D’arcys Catering, kahlua pig with coconut rice from Kanack Attack Catering and carrot cake cupcakes from Pamela’s Bakery, Cafe and

The divine Faythe Levine.

TUESDAY JUNE 15 crafts HANDMADE NATION It would’ve been hard to predict, even five years ago, that the DIY craft community would blow up as it has. Etsy. com, the handmade eBay, is now a household name. “Not your grandma’s [fill in the blank with anything from quilting to lube]” has become such a common utterance that we’ve had to throw it on the BW editorial blacklist. The Treasure Valley even has its own burgeoning craft community: Idaho Indie Works, Bricolage, Puffy Mondaes, Church of Craft. To document the meteoric rise of this punk rock, DIY craft revolution, director and author Faythe Levine traveled 19,000 miles across the country to speak with indie craft pioneers like Jenny Hart of Sublime Stitching, calendar maker Nikki McClure and Callie Janoff of Church of Craft. Levine pieced together a book and a feature-length film called Handmade Nation: The Rise of DIY Art, Craft and Design. The film explores how “ethics can overlap with creativity and art with community” as the indie craft movement weaves together ideals like feminism, anti-consumerism and environmentalism. On Tuesday, June 15, local “humanmade” craft shop Bricolage will host a special screening of Handmade Nation at Flicks. Doors open at 5:30 p.m. and all ticket holders are automatically entered to win door prizes like a vintage bike donated by Boise Bicycle Project. The film starts at 7 p.m. and food and drinks will be available. 5:30 p.m. doors, 7 p.m. film, $8, The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., 208-342-4222, bricoshoppe.com.

Espresso, to name a few. Tickets for Savor Idaho are $40 a pop and can be picked up through Selecta-Seat, the Idaho Wine Commission office, A New Vintage Wine Shop, Cinder

Trekkies—and I don’t mean you J.J. Abrams, you interloper—your day has come. Finally, there’s a worthwhile fan-flick. Shot and edited over the course of two years Star Trek: Of Gods and Men is a three-part independent and unofficial mini-series starring original cast members from all five series and some of the movies, including Walter Koenig, Nichelle Nichols, Garrett Wang, J.G. Hertzler, Tim Russ, Ethan Phillips, Alan Ruck and more. The story focuses on an aging crew about to dedicate a full-size replica of the Enterprise as a museum. When they’re forced to use it to answer a distress call on the planet of The Guardian of Forever, it sends them on an adventure through an alternate reality sans Cpt. James Kirk. Of Gods and Men is arguably more true to the franchise than last summer’s big screen reboot. And despite being startrekofgodsandmen.com funded by only one super-fan and forbidden by copyright to make so much as one galactic credit, its production value is at least equal to the original series. Several scenes were even shot at the iconic Vasquez Rocks, a site instantly recognizable to any Trekkie. And the sets, painstakingly recreated by a hobbyist, are indistinguishable from the originals. The whole of the film—themes, production and stor y— all manage to strike a per fect balance between homage and a fresh take. It can be seen for free at startrekofgodsandmen.com. —Josh Gross

Winer y and Idaho Botanical Garden. 2-6 p.m., $40, Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Old Penitentiary Road, 208-3438649, savoridaho.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 17

8 DAYS OUT 8 DAYS OUT/PRIDE WEEK LAU R IE PEAR M AN

WEDNESDAY JUNE 9 Festivals & Events BOISE’S BEST BAD DANCER—Bust out your worst windmilling, Roger-Rabbiting, running-manning, high-kicking moves for the chance to be officially crowned, Boise’s worst dancer. Cash and prizes to the “winners.” See Picks, Page 16. 8 p.m. $5. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., 208287-5379, www.liquidboise.com.

Workshops & Classes

Minerva Jayne’s BINGO is no drag.

SATURDAY JUNE 12

THURSDAY JUNE 17

PRIDE WEEK KICK-OFF PARTY—A general bar night party with a countdown to Pride Week starting at midnight. 9 p.m. FREE. Sin, 1124 W. Front St., 208-3423375, www.sinboise.com.

BOISE QUEER IDOL—Karaoke contest with local celebrity judges Amy Atkins, Matt Bragg and Keith Brown. Plus live performances by Rebecca Scott, Minerva Jayne, The Firefly Girlz and The Common Ground Community Chorus. Five contestants move on to finals at Boise Pride Festival. $200 prize. 8 p.m. $5 door. $10 to compete. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557.

BACHELOR / BACHELORETTE AUCTION—Local gay and lesbian singles will be auctioned off to raise money for Pride. 10 p.m. FREE. Sin, 1124 W. Front St., Boise, 208-342-3375, www. sinboise.com.

SUNDAY JUNE 13 THE THIRD ANNUAL SINGING BEE—A karaoke event. Know the words, win the prizes. 9 p.m. $3-$5. The Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., second floor, Capitol Terrace, Boise, 208-336-1313, www.thebalconyclub.com.

LES BOIS AWARDS—An award ceremony for local community members, organizations and businesses that have been supportive of the LGBT community. 6 p.m. FREE. VAC, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, www. visualartscollective.com.

TUESDAY JUNE 15

LEATHER NIGHT—Winners chosen for best leather attire have a chance to compete for the state title. 9 p.m. Lucky Dog, 2223 Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-3330074, www.luckydogtavern.com.

MINERVA JAYNE HOSTS PRIDE BINGO—Tuesday night bingo at the Balcony, but with bigger and better prizes for Pride Week. 7:30 p.m. $5 donation. The Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., second floor, Capitol Terrace, Boise, 208336-1313, www.thebalconyclub. com.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 16 PRIDE MOVIE NIGHT—An hour of socialization followed by a screening of Priscilla: Queen of the Desert. 6:30 p.m. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-3424222. AFTER-MOVIE SHOW—Stage show with surprise performers. 9 p.m. FREE. Sin, 1124 W. Front St., Boise, 208-342-3375, www. sinboise.com.

18 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

FRIDAY JUNE 18

SATURDAY JUNE 19 PRIDE RALLY—The official kickoff to Pride Day with a political rally at the Capitol Building. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Idaho Capitol, 700 W. Jefferson, Boise. PRIDE FESTIVAL—A day-long festival centered on community and entertainment with vendors and food galore. 11 a.m. FREE. Ann Morrison Park, Americana Blvd. PRIDE PARADE—Flashy floats and colorful participants trek from the Capitol to Ann Morrison Park in the annual Pride Parade. 11:30 a.m. FREE. Idaho Capitol, 700 W. Jefferson, Boise. PRIDE FINALE PARTY—Party at the bar to celebrate the end of Pride Week. 9 p.m. FREE. Sin, 1124 W. Front St., Boise, 208-342-3375, www.sinboise. com.

EDIBLE AND USEFUL PLANTS—Ray Vizgirdas shares his passion for the edible and useful plants of the Foothills. See Picks, Page 16. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208-5143755, www.cityofboise.org/ parks/foothills.

Literature DROP-IN WRITING WORKSHOP—Twice a month, authors and teachers Malia Collins and Adrian Kien offer writers of all levels a chance to create and share work in a friendly, informal atmosphere. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, www. thecabinidaho.org. LITERATURE AND FOOD—Dr. Cheryl Hindrichs, an assistant professor of English at Boise State, will present and discuss Mark Kurlansky’s Choice Cuts, an anthology of food-writing. 7 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900, www. boisepubliclibrary.com. THE WRITE TO TELL THE TALE—Non-fiction writers meet to receive and share critiques and ideas in a supportive and helpful atmosphere. 7-9 p.m. FREE, www.sageecosci.com/ Writers.html. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise.

Sports & Fitness TRICYCLE RACES—The disclaimer at the beginning of Jackass was about exactly this sort of thing, which is why it’s awesome. 10 p.m. FREE. The Lobby, 760 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-2183, www.thelobbyboise.com/.

Citizen SUMMER KICK-OFF FOR THE BOISE COFFEE PARTY—Prefer your political parties without the tea? The Boise Coffee Party may be just the thing. Discussion of issues and actions surrounding education and the election in November. See www.coffeepartyboise.com, or contact duane@ boisecoffeeparty.com for more info. 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. The Fixx, 224 10th St., Boise, 208-331-4011.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT Kids & Teens FAMILY FUN NIGHTS—Sports, games and craft activities for children with autism and other disabilities. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Meridian Boys and Girls Club, 911 N. Meridian Road, Meridian, 208-888-5392, www.bgclubidaho.org.

Odds & Ends BOISE UKULELE GROUP— Instruction and a chance to jam. All levels welcome with no age limit and no fees. All that’s needed is a willingness to learn and play ukulele music. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Meadow Lakes Village Senior Center, 650 Arbor Circle, Meridian. SPLASH BASH—Poolside party with live music, food and drink specials and weekly drawings for prizes. 6-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www. owyheeplaza.com.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THURSDAY JUNE 10 Festivals & Events EAGLE FUN DAYS—Events include a carnival, the ninth annual Eagle Fun Days Rodeo, a street dance, family bike night, along with vendors, food and more. See www.eaglechamber.com for full schedule. Times and prices vary. Downtown Eagle, 310 E. State St., Eagle. FOURTH ANNUAL EVENING IN THE GARDEN—Live music, food, wine tasting, silent and live auctions in a beautiful garden setting. All proceeds to benefit Boise Valley Habitat for Humanity. 6 p.m. $25-$30. Far West Landscape and Garden, 5728 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-4000.

On Stage THE BOB AND AL SHOW—A play following what happens when characters talk back to the playwright as they are being written. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3422000, www.stagecoachtheatre. com.

Workshops & Classes

Literature

KIDS WRITING WORKSHOPS— Workshops for ages 11-15 with author Kate Riley. Topics include writing, flash fiction and creative versus non-fiction. 1:30 p.m. FREE. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900, www.boisepubliclibrary.com.

FANTASTIC WORLDS BOOK GROUP—Discussion of the first book of fantasy series, Furies of Calderon, by Jim Butcher. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 7079 Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-4229, www. rediscoveredbookshop.com.

MANAGING MENOPAUSE NATURALLY—Lecture presented by Dr. Sarah Rodgers, one of the Treasure Valley’s leading authorities on menopause and perimenopause. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, www.boisepubliclibrary.org.

Kids & Teens

Art ARTIST DIALOGUE—The four artists whose work make up the gallery’s current show, “Yes, Maybe, No,” will be on hand to discuss their inspiration and craft. 5:30 p.m. FREE. The Gallery at The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3850111, www.thelinenbuilding.com. THE HEART OF EDUCATION— Year-end art exhibit for local high school students working in all mediums. Open to the public. 5-9 p.m. FREE. Gallery Alexa Rose, 280 N. Eighth St., Boise.

HELLO JELL-O GIVE IT A GIGGLE TOUR—Kids can put their giggle on tape using Jello’s mobile recording studio. Comedian and Jello spokesman Bill Cosby will then select one of the recordings to be used in a national TV spot. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Zoo Boise, 355 Julia Davis Drive, 208-384-4125, www. zooboise.org. TEEN WATER SPORTS—Water fights and games. 4 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-3620181, www.adalib.org.

Odds & Ends BIRDS OF PREY MEETING— Help plan the 2009 Birds of Prey Birding Festival. For info, contact Dave Lyon at 208-861-9131 or e-mail DJALyon@aol.com. 10 a.m.-12 p.m. FREE. Kuna Senior Center, 299 Avenue B, Kuna.

GOLDFISH RACING— Goldfish are placed in a raingutter, and it’s your job to urge them on toward the other end by blowing through a straw. Winner gets a big effin’ bar tab and their fish. 10 p.m. FREE. Mack and Charlie’s, 507 W. Main St., Boise, 208-8309977, mackandcharlies.com. POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811. PURLS AND PAGES BOOK GROUP—Spend the night knitting, crocheting or embroidering and chatting about your favorite book. 7 p.m. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900, www. boisepubliclibrary.com.

On Stage THE BOB AND AL SHOW—See Thursday. 7:30 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3422000, www.stagecoachtheatre. com. SYLVIA—The story of Greg, a man who gets a dog when his life has stalled but finds himself more enamored with the dog than his wife. Possibly because the dog flirts and sings Cole Porter better than she does. 8 p.m. $10. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., 208-336-7383, www.pdplayhouse.com.

Concerts GRAND OL’ TIME—Monthly acoustic music and squaredance series. Music by Black Jack Moonshiners, The Jacks and Hokum High-Flyers. 6 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, www.thelinenbuilding.com.

FRIDAY JUNE 11 Festivals & Events EAGLE FUN DAYS—See Thursday. Times and prices vary. Downtown Eagle, 310 E. State St., Eagle.

Workshops & Classes IDAHO PREFERRED COOKING CLASS SERIES—Chef Dean Fuller teaches a class on how to use local produce. See Food News. Page 30. 6:30 p.m. $50. Pottery Gourmet, 811 W. Bannock St., 208-368-0649.

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 19

8 DAYS OUT INTERCAMBIO: SPANISH-ENGLISH—English speakers have the opportunity to practice their spanish with hispanohablentes, native spanish-speakers. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Puentes Language Programs, 4720 W. Franklin Road, Boise, 208-344-4270, www.puentes.biz. VINTAGE SWING DANCE— Instructions on classic Lindy Hop moves. All ages. No partner required. 7 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, www. heirloomdancestudio.com.

Talks & Lectures CIVILITY IN A FRACTURED SOCIETY—The Andrus Center for Public Policy and the Idaho Humanities Council present Jim Leach, chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, who will speak on changing the nature of discourse to be more respectful and effective. Lunch will be served. Register online at www.andruscenter.org. 11:45 a.m. $12. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3338000.

Sports & Fitness 2010 WORLD CUP KICKOFF PARTY—Catch Mexico play against South Africa in the first game of the World Cup with food and drinks. Proceeds benefit the Boise Family Strengthening Center. 7:30 a.m. $10. El Gallo Giro, 5285 Glenwood St., Boise, 208-321-0355, www.elgallogiroidaho.com. SPECIAL OLYMPICS SUMMER GAMES—Special Olympians will be competing in basketball, powerlifting, aquatics, cycling and track and field events. There will also be an athlete parade at the opening ceremonies. 5-8:45 p.m. FREE. Meridian Speedway, 335 E. Main St., Meridian, 208888-2813, www.meridianspeedway.com.

SATURDAY JUNE 12 Festivals & Events BLOCK PARTY—Inflatable bounce houses, obstacle courses, water slides and pony rides, along with all manner of carnival games and good. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Grace Bible Church, 1415 W. Lone Star Rd., Nampa, 208-466-1751. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—Open-air market with of local food and products ranging from fresh vegetables to fresh doughnuts, all served from the freshest of vendors. Live music, plus local arts and crafts. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Downtown at Eighth Street, between Main and Bannock, Boise. DANCE TILL YOU DROP CONTEST—Classic endurance dance contest open to all skill levels and to viewing. Winning couple receives their choice of dance shoes. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, www. heirloomdancestudio.com. EAGLE FUN DAYS—See Thursday. Times and prices vary. Downtown Eagle, 310 E. State St., Eagle. TWISTED TIMBER ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY—Prize giveaways, two kegs of $1 beer, barbecue and live music from Actual Depiction and Solar Roller. 5 p.m. Twisted Timber Pub and Grill, 4563 S. Cloverdale Road, Boise, 208-362-7157. WET AND WILD PARADE—Firetrucks cruise the strip, hosing down onlookers. Part of Eagle Fun Days. Noon-2 p.m. FREE. Downtown Eagle, 310 E. State St., Eagle.

On Stage THE BOB AND AL SHOW—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m. $12-$15. Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3422000, www.stagecoachtheatre. com. SYLVIA—See Friday. 8 p.m. $10. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208336-7383, www.pdplayhouse. com.

Food & Drink SECOND ANNUAL CHILI COOK OFF—Submit your chili for a chance to win prizes and glory. Free entry to event and to submit chili. $5 to sample all entries. 6 p.m. FREE. Skydive Idaho, 24005 N. Can-Ada Road, Star, 1-800-SKYDIVE, www. skydive-idaho.com. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OYSTER FEED—Support the Eagle Volunteer Firefighters Association by eating food generally reserved for contestants on Fear Factor. Mmm-hmm, they’re testiclicious! Part of Eagle Fun Days. See Picks, Page 16. 5-10 p.m. $18-$22. Merrill Park, 637 E. Shore Drive. (in the Eagle River Development), Eagle.

Screen STAR WAITERS—Free screening and discussion of a spoof of Star Wars made with assistance from the Make a Wish Foundation for the benefit of 12-year-old Mitch Kohler, who was born with the spinal muscular atrophy and always wanted to be in a Star Wars movie. See Picks, Page 16. 1:30 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, www. adalib.org.

Kids & Teens SHIVER ME TIMBERS PUPPET SHOW—Puppet show following the adventures of Captain Long John Noisy in his pursuit of buried treasure. 10:30 a.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4200, www.boisepubliclibrary.org. TEEN AFTER-HOURS LUAU PARTY—A Luau. For teens. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, Boise, 208-362-0181, www.adalib.org.

Odds & Ends BOISE ASTRONOMICAL SOCIETY—The club meets the first Tuesday and second Friday of the month. See website for more info. FREE. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-343-9895. www. boiseastro.org. BOISE CAFE LATIN NIGHTS— Get a basic Latin dance lesson included in the cover at 9 p.m. and then practice dancing to music by DJ Tomas or DJ Saya. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. Boise Cafe, 219 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-3433397.

20 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

8 DAYS OUT Workshops & Classes

first in a series of novels about Nathaniel Cade, a vampire pardoned by President Johnson and now sworn to defend the nation against all supernatural threats, foreign and domestic. 2 p.m. FREE. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 1315 N. Milwaukee, Boise, 208-375-4454, www.barnesandnoble.com.

DISCOVER YOUR ARTIST WITHIN—Make art using reclaimed textiles, paint and draw with pastels in the native plant garden, create an outdoor sculpture. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208514-3755, www.cityofboise.org/ parks/foothills.

Sports & Fitness

Art

SPECIAL OLYMPICS SUMMER GAMES—See Friday. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Meridian Speedway, 335 E. Main St., Meridian, 208888-2813, www.meridianspeedway.com.

ANIME-INSPIRED ART GROUP—Meet to discuss different techniques and styles of creating anime art. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Bookshop, 7079 Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-4229, www.rediscoveredbookshop.com.

Citizen ALL VETERANS WELCOME HOME EVENT—All veterans and active-duty troops and their families are invited to a free barbecue with raffles, music, massages and information on jobs and schools. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Veterans Administration Medical Center, 500 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-422-1000, www. va.gov.

Literature BOOK SIGNING—Boise author Carol Heimbuch will sign copies of her children’s book Condor Caper, an adventure story about condors and a wildfire. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. $5-$7. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-3628687, www.peregrinefund.org.

Kids & Teens

CHRISTOPHER FARNSWORTH BOOK SIGNING—Journalist, screenwriter, novelist and native Idahoan Christopher Farnsworth will be signing copies of his latest novel, Blood Oath, the

SCIENCE SATURDAYS—Every Saturday, the Discovery Center features different topics with morning and afternoon sessions for different ages. Call for more

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

information, or visit the Web site. Discovery Center of Idaho, 131 Myrtle St., Boise, 208-3439895, www.scidaho.org. SHIVER ME TIMBERS PUPPET SHOW—See Friday. 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3844200, www.boisepubliclibrary. org. STAR WARS MEET AND GREET—Kids can get their photos taken with characters from the Star Wars concert at the Idaho Center. 2-3:30 p.m. Wahooz Fun Zone, 1385 S. Blue Marlin Lane, Meridian, 208-8980900, www.wahoozfunzone.com.

SUNDAY JUNE 13 Festivals & Events EAGLE FUN DAYS—See Thursday. See www.eaglechamber. com for full schedule. Times and prices vary. Downtown Eagle, 310 E. State St., Eagle.

Food & Drink SAVOR IDAHO—Sample offerings from 30 wineries and 25 restaurants, representing some of Idaho’s best, showing off their unique favorites. See Picks, Page 16. 2-6 p.m. $40. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, www.idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Green 2010 ANNUAL GARDEN TOUR—Seven private gardens will be open for viewing. Programs, maps and tickets available online or at any of the gardens on the day of the tour. Proceeds to benefit Idaho Botanical Garden. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. $15. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208343-8649, www.idahobotanicalgarden.org.

Citizen

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

ALMOST SUMMER BLACK DOG WALK—Group walk to raise awareness of “Black Dog Syndrome,” the phenomenon discovered by shelter workers that dogs with black coats are adopted at far lower rates, making them more frequent victims of euthanasia. Shelters and rescue groups will be on-hand with dogs and puppies available for adoption. Non-black dogs are requested to wear something black in solidarity. There will be a post-walk barbecue. 1 p.m. FREE. The Ram, 709 E. Park Blvd., Boise, 208-345-2929, www.theram.com.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 21

8 DAYS OUT MONDAY JUNE 14

TUESDAY JUNE 15

Workshops & Classes

Festivals & Events

WRITING WORKSHOP WITH STEVE ALMOND—Almond is the author of the story collections My Life in Heavy Metal and The Evil B. B. Chow and the nonfiction books Candyfreak and (Not That You Asked). His latest book, Rock and Roll Will Save Your Life, chronicles his devotion to rock ‘n’ roll and will be released by Random House in April. The workshop will focus on character development. Contact budesen@ sunvalleycenter.org to register. June 14-18, 9 a.m.-noon. $350. Sun Valley Center for Arts, 314 Second Ave. S., Hailey. 208-7269491, www.sunvalleycenter.org.

PLAYING IN THE PLAZA—Food and craft vendors along with live music by Moondance. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Generations Plaza, corner of Main St. and Idaho Ave., Meridian, www.meridiancity. org.

Citizen NETWORKING JOB CLUB— Networking Job Club meets to offer leads, tips, insights and ideas with focus on career assessment, finding the hidden job market, networking, Internet success, developing a successful resume and interview coaching. Facilitator and guest speakers. 10:30-11:30 a.m. FREE. Foothills Christian Church, 9655 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-0011.

Odds & Ends PABST BINGO NIGHT—Play bingo for PBR, swag and other random stuff found at secondhand stores. $1 PBR, Oly, or Rainier cans, or get a “ghetto bucket” (two of each) for $4. 7 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine, 1515 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-384-9008, www. donniemacgrub.com.

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

THE SCREENWRITERS GROUP—Learn and practice pitching your screenplay or project at the Idaho Screenwriters Group meeting. For more information, e-mail sherry.ae@ hotmail.com. 6:30 p.m. Idaho Pizza Company, 3840 Glenwood, Boise, 208-853-1224.

Screen HANDMADE NATION— Documentary about the new wave of craft and design. See Picks, Page 16. 7 p.m. $8. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, www. theflicks.boise.com.

Literature POETRY READING—Poetry host Scott Berge invites poets to share their own work or favorite poems. Sign up at 6:30 p.m. and start waxing poetic at 7 p.m. For more information, e-mail ScottBerge@live.com. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Alia’s Coffeehouse, 908 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3381299.

Citizen MONTHLY MEETING OF VETERANS FOR PEACE—This meeting is open to all who are interested. 7-9 p.m. FREE. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 2201 Woodlawn Ave., Boise, 208-344-5731, www. boisefirstucc.org.

Odds & Ends BALLISTIC BEER PONG—Compete for $300 in prizes. 10 p.m. FREE. Bad Irish, 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, www. badirish.com. FUEL MEETING—Fuel Boise is a group of young professionals, committed to education, community service and relationships. For this meeting, participants will learn how Woodriver Cellars got started in the wine business while sampling the fermented fruits of their labors. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars, 3705 N. Hwy. 16, Eagle, 208-2869463, www.woodrivercellars. com.

WEDNESDAY JUNE 16. Food & Drink DRINKING LIBERALLY—A group of left-leaning individuals gather to talk politics, share ideas and inspire change. 7 p.m. Solid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208345-6620. www.drinkingliberally. org SPLASH BASH—Poolside party with live music, food and drink specials and weekly drawings for prizes. 6-10 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www. owyheeplaza.com.

Calls to Artists BOISE WEEKLY COVER ART SUBMISSIONS—Every week Boise Weekly chooses one submitted original work for the cover. BW will pay $150 for every published cover plus a $25 gift certificate to Boise Blue Art Supply. We request that all published original covers be donated to a charity cover auction in the fall benefiting youth outreach programs in the arts. Works must be original, in any medium including digital and photography. Square format works preferred, but slightly rectangular works accepted. Drop your artwork by the BW office. Direct questions to leila@boiseweekly.com. Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, 208-344-2055, www.boiseweekly.com. IDAHO SCREENWRITER’S ASSOCIATION SHORT SCREENPLAY CONTEST—Screenwriters can submit a five- to 20-page screenplay of any genre for the chance to win $50 cash and a production of their script by local filmmakers. Submit three copies of your script with a title page that includes contact information, genre and a log-line, along with an entry form and $20 check or money order payable to Idaho Screenwriter’s Association by July 1 to ISA, c/o Louise Luster, P.O. Box 663, Eagle ID 83616. Contact ctpfilms@gmail. com, or call 208-859-5123 for more info.

22 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NOISE LAU R IE PEAR M AN

GIVE ’EM ALL THE JERSEY FINGER Matt Hopper releases his most grown up CD yet AMY ATKINS Labeling today’s touring musicians troubadours romanticizes their gritty, DIY existence. They log thousands of miles, going from smoky dive to smoky dive, playing for embarrassingly small crowds and hoping to make enough scratch to get to the next unfamiliar destination. But for 31-year-old Boise-based musician Matt Hopper, taking that kind of of adventure, but wanting to avoid starvation, hardscrabble path actually was romantic. It Hopper’s first stop was Los Angeles. He met a led him not only to a comfortable, laid-back lot of people and learned a lot about being a life here, but also brought him to an artistic musician while living in L.A. but it’s tough to destination—and a new CD, Jersey Finger be poor there. (Hatcher Pass), his fifth album and the one he It wasn’t long before Hopper was at a considers his best work yet. turning point. He would have to get a real Hopper grew up in Alaska. Wasilla to be job if he wanted to stay in L.A. or he could exact. He likes to say he’s from Hatcher Pass, do what troubadours do and hit the road. In Alaska, because it sounds more mysterious— 2003, Hopper booked himself a West Coast he says few people have heard of it—and to tour, which is when he first discovered Boise. A avoid answering questions about Sarah Palin. national stint soon followed and he was on the Though he’d played music through his road for an entire year. teens, it wasn’t until age “That’s when I first be21, while playing with his came ‘Troubadour Matt,’ band The Roman Candles a road warrior,” Hopper and living in Anchorage said, laughing. that he began to feel that What 10 years of being “musician” was the ana road warrior has resultswer he could give when ed in—besides a healthy anyone asked, “So, what fan base and a slew of stodo you do?” ries and song fodder—is a “That’s when I considnumber of relationships, ered I could do this for a many of which continue living. I could do this as to this day. a career,” Hopper said. Some of those relation“I could be one of those ships still come in handy guys that puts out records at Hopper’s day job: and tours. I was like, I booking shows for The want to do this.” Bouquet. Bouquet owner The Roman Candles (a MATT HOPPER CD RELEASE PARTIES Tyson Twilegar said Hopname he still records under June 11, 9 p.m., $5 adv., $8 door. per’s time on the road is a and plays with), put out The Bouquet, 1010 W. Main, big benefit to finding good two records, which helped thebouquet.net. acts to play the bar. Hopper find the confidence June 12, 9 p.m., $3. Neurolux. “He offers a lot of to give in to his wander111 N. 11th St., neurolux.com. things people who aren’t lust and hit the road. He June 13, 9 p.m., FREE. VAC, 3638 musicians couldn’t,” had also read Into The Osage St., visualartscollective.com. Twilegar said. “He has an Wild, Jon Krakauer’s story June 14, 9 p.m., FREE. Reef, eclectic group of friends based on the journals of 106 N. Sixth St., reefboise.com. and he knows people and Chris McCandless, a For more information, bands from everywhere.” college-educated young visit matthopper.com. Another of Hopper’s man who hitchhiked into important relationships the Alaskan wilderness to is one with producer/musician Richard Swift, live a life of solitude and who died of starvawho Hopper met while he was living in L.A. tion four months later. Inspired by that sense WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Home is a rare pit stop for Matt Hopper.

When it came time to record this album, Hopper knew he wanted Swift at the helm. Hopper dug into his back catalog of more than 300 demos, culled them down to 34 and started e-mailing them to the producer. Swift chose 12 and the two set a date to record. However, on the day Hopper arrived at Swift’s Oregon recording studio, Swift sustained a painful injury referred to as a Jersey Finger, in which the flexor tendon of the finger is damaged. Recording was on hold for a couple of weeks and once Swift recovered enough to play (he plays synthesizer, drums and bass on the record), the two set out at lightning speed to get the album done. Swift brought in some elements that Hopper wanted—like horns— but also kept certain things out of the recording that he knew wouldn’t work. For example, Hopper really wanted djembe in a song. Swift disagreed. There is no djembe on the record. The result of time spent in that Cottage Grove, Ore., recording studio is the 11 tracks (and one bonus track) that comprise Jersey Finger, an energetic, rock/pop/Americana album with handfuls of chugging guitar, brushed snares, surprising horn sections and Hopper’s controlled talk-sing vocals that shift from raspy reflections to goosebump-inducing falsettos in a snap. The CD opener, “In It For the Music,” sums up what Hopper discovered about himself during all of those years on the road: He’s a musician. This is what he does. “If home is where you wanna be all the time / I don’t think you could ever hang with my kind. / We’re in it for the music ... We’re in it for the music all the time.” “Being on the road changed me. I kind of grew up out there,” Hopper said. “I learned how to use common sense. I learned how to deal with loneliness. I was lonely for a long time, but eventually, you realize it’s just a state of mind and you can overcome that. But it’s like I told my parents, ‘I’m an artist and artists have to suffer.’”

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 23

LISTEN HERE/GUIDE C ANDIC E EVANS

GUIDE WEDNESDAY JUNE 9

THURSDAY JUNE 10

FRIDAY JUNE 11

SOUL HONEY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

5GEARS IN REVERSE!—6 p.m. FREE. Bardenay-Eagle

CROSBY STILLS AND NASH—7 p.m. $49.50-$99.50. Eagle River Pavilion

ALPENFLOW—9 p.m. $4. Terrapin

SUN VALLEY ACOUSTIC WEEKEND— See Picks, Page 16. 6 p.m. $25-$60. Sun Valley Pavilion

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Mountain Standard Time with David Robert King and the Lost River Boys. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza

MOO-GOT-2, JUNE 10, BOUQUET AND JUNE 12, TERRAPIN Google Mugatu and you’ll find Will Ferrell in a weird blonde wig. Google Moo-got-2 and you’ll find this California-based funk/jam band. Keyboardist Tomek Zajaczkowski (originally from Boise) said that although they are prone to some extended jams, Moogot-2 isn’t a hippie band. They’re a party band. “We’re mostly into just getting people dancing,” he said. “We’re about keeping a steady groove all night.” Two keyboards, saxophone, guitar, bass and drums provide for Moo-got-2’s sound, reminiscent of the jazz/funk fusions that served as musical montages in ’80s coming-of-age flicks. It’s all round edges and groovy jams. Google Moo-got-2 for a preview of their mellifluous tunes— just make sure you spell it right. —Amy Atkins June 10, 9 p.m., $5. The Bouquet, 1010 W. Main St., thebouquet.net; June 12, 9 p.m. with Equaleyes, $3. Terrapin 1419 W. Main St., 208-342-1776.

24 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

FABULOUS CHANCELLORS—6:30 p.m. $6-$10. Idaho Botanical Garden

BLAZE AND KELLY ON THE ROXX—11:30 a.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza

CHRIS GUTIERREZ—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BLUE HORNS—With La Knots and A Seasonal Disguise. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

FATAL—With Ripshaw and Fury of the Cyclops. 9 p.m. $3. Red Room

HIGH STREET—5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Downtown Nampa Nights

JIMMY BIVENS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE LION THE TAMER—With Red Hands Black Feet, In the Pause and Gernika. 6 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLYGOATS—With New Transit. 9 p.m. Liquid

HARVEY KRISHNA—With Bales of Hey. 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux JAMES ORR—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

LOOSE CHANGE—9 p.m. FREE. The New Frontier Club

JEREMIAH JAMES GANG—8:45 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

MOO-GOT-2—See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $5. The Bouquet

JIMMY BIVENS—7:30 p.m. FREE. Humpin’ Hannah’s

MOUNTAIN STANDARD TIME— 9 p.m. $5. Terrapin Station

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

OCEAN STORY SOCIAL—CD release show. 8 p.m. $5. VAC

MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES—Release party for Jersey Finger. With The Head and the Heart, Nick Jaina, Thomas Paul and Sean Hatton. See Noise, Page 33. 8 p.m. $5$8. The Bouquet

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club

PLANET ROCK—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

SHOOK TWINS—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

THE QUARTERTONS—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

TRAVIS WARD AND HILLFOLK NOIR—6 p.m. FREE. Modern

REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. The Gamekeeper

WE’RE NOT AFRAID—With Stormy California and Roofied Resistance. 9 p.m. $5. Red Room Tavern

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

REBECCA SCOTT—7:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub SUPERSTAR RUNNER—With J.D. Valerio. 9 p.m. $2. Terrapin

SIX CENTS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

SPINDLEBOMB—9 p.m. $2. Liquid

TOPAZ AND MUDPHONIC—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef WARSAW—With Useless. 9 p.m. $3. Red Room Tavern

SATURDAY JUNE 12 A TASTY JAMM—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s BATTLE OF THE BANDS—With Roofied Resistance, The Radicals, Capgun Suicide, Dying Famous, Solstice, Social Antidote and The Jerkwadz. 2-10 p.m. $2. Quarter Barrel BEN BURDICK AND BILL LILES—1 p.m. FREE. Solid CHELSEA GRIN—With Fire in the Skies, Brawl, Deception of a Ghost, A Past Unknown and For My Own. 6:30 p.m. $8. Brawl Studios IQEQ CD RELEASE PARTY— With Malachi, The Well Suited and Pale Green Pants. 7:30 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE LOOSE CHANGE—9 p.m. FREE. The New Frontier LUIA BEACH PARTY—With Nude Oil. 9 p.m. FREE. The Plank MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES—With Fauxbois and Jesi Dobrusky. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux

SUNDAY JUNE 13 MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES—9 p.m. FREE, Visual Arts Collective

NICK JAINA—With Hillfolk Noir. 8 p.m. $3. Flying M Coffeegarage

MEL WADE—With Blaze and Kelly and Rebecca Scott. 2 p.m. FREE. Seasons Bistro

THE QUARTERTONS—10 p.m. $3. Grainey’s Basement

WHEELS ON FIRE—With Beartrap and Mountain Man. 9 p.m. $5. Red Room Tavern

SOUL HONEY—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub SPINDLEBOMB—9 p.m. $2. Liquid

RUFIO—With The Higher, Goodnight CaulďŹ eld, Loomis and The Lust. 7:30 p.m. $10. The Venue SONGWRITER’S CLUB WITH BERNIE REILLY—7 p.m. FREE. The Bouquet

STILL TIME—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef SUN VALLEY ACOUSTIC WEEKEND— See Picks, Page 16. 5 p.m. $25-$60. Sun Valley Pavilion TAUGE AND FAULKNER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s YER MAMA—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

REBECCA SCOTT AND DEBBIE SAGER—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

PUNK MONDAY—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

THE SHOOK TWINS—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye

TUESDAY JUNE 15

WEDNESDAY JUNE 16

ANDREW ANDERSON—With Trevor Green and Mason Reed. 9 p.m. $4. Terrapin

THE AGGROLITES—9 p.m. $12. Reef

18 SWITCHBACKS—9 p.m. $4. Terrapin Station

MOO-GOT-2—Followed by Sanitarium. 9 p.m. $3. Terrapin

THE SALOONATICS—9 p.m. $5. The Buffalo Club

MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES—9 p.m. FREE, Reef

MONDAY JUNE 14 DELTA SPIRIT—With Ezra Furman and the Harpoons, and The Romany Rye. 8 p.m. $10. Neurolux FROM THE PAWN—With Number Five is Alive, Ashes, Pandemic and The Dude Abides. 6 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios

BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE—See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $16 adv., $18 door, $40 platinum skybox. Knitting Factory DYLAN SNEED—With All on Seven. 9 p.m. $5. The Bouquet

ALIVE AFTER FIVE—Dave Barnes with James Orr. 5 p.m. FREE. The Grove Plaza CONTINUANCE—With All Hands Go, Armada, Ohadi, Our City Skyline and Dead Last. 6 p.m. Brawl Studios

FUEGOGO!—9:30 p.m. FREE. Terrapin

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

JEREMIAH JAMES AND NED EVETT—8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel

LEXIE MOUNTAIN BOYS—8 p.m. $5. VAC

JET BLACK HORROR—With The Baby Lottery, Mary, a Liquid Embrace and End of All Flesh. 6 p.m. $8. Brawl Studios

PRIZZY PRIZZY PLEASE—With Ooh Barracuda, Microbabies, Vagery, Cherry Bombs Burlesque and Cabaret. 9 p.m. $5. Red Room Tavern

POKEY LAFARGE AND THE SOUTH CITY THREE—8 p.m. $5. Reef

SHANNON CURTIS—With Jones for Revival. 9 p.m. $4. Terrapin

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

BRIAN JONESTOWN MASSACRE, KFCH, JUNE 15 Anyone who’s seen the 2004 rockumentary Dig! has witnessed what a complete shitshow Brian Jonestown Massacre’s Anton Newcombe can be. Sober now after years of pounding back vodka, Newcombe remains controversial. In an interview with Impose Magazine, Newcombe spoke on his band’s legacy. “First of all my project has been around for more than 20 years. I’ve outlasted all my peers. Furthermore, if you start the clock back in 1962 when The Beatles started recording and shit. Guess what they were doing 20 years down the road if they weren’t dead. Judge by that standard. I think I’m in very good shape. Anybody you want to name from my peers. They’ve either eaten dust or are just bitter.� Known for their druggy psych sound, BJM recently released their 12th studio album, Who Killed Sgt. Pepper? The album takes a step in a dancier direction, weaving in loops, disco rhythms and even soccer chants. —Tara Morgan 8 p.m., $16-$40, Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

    



               

    

 

  

        

     

 

  

       !"     #  

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 25

SCREEN

A GHOST STORY With deepest apologies to Charles Dickens GEORGE PRENTICE I am a changed man. I was visited by a ghost last week. I’d been pretty grumpy, rather Scroogelike, harrumphing about how some of the latest crop of films are unwatchable (Iron Man 2, Prince of Persia), and how the movies I have enjoyed (No One Knows About Persian Cats, Vincere) couldn’t find an audience. So I was visited by a specter (just play along). I’ll call him the Ghost of the Future. Shrouded in secrecy, Banksy plots what kind of rat, monkey or biting of social commentary Not unlike his distant cousin, Jacob Marley, he’ll tag England’s buildings with next. he was bound by chains, but in this case, the links were made of movie reels. When I my sanity. “Goobers looked closer, they were a montage of perfor- is a great, great film. EXIT THROUGH THE GIFT SHOP (R) or Raisinettes?” he It hints of fantasy, but mances by Katherine Heigl. I was horrified. Directed by Banksy, narrated by Rhys Ifans whispered. I shot him with Neil Jordan at The Ghost beckoned, “Come with me to Stars Banksy, Thierry Guetta, Shepard Fairey a look of disgust. the helm, it boasts a Seattle.” The next two hours boatful of unexpected “How?” I asked, voice quivering. Opens June 25 at Flicks were thrilling. The “We’ll fly,” said the Ghost. So, I stepped to turns. Without quesdocumentary, Exit tion, this is Farrell’s my bedroom window and prepared to jump. Through the Gift finest performance to “Are you nuts?” the Ghost screamed. Shop, is one of the most entertaining movies “We’re taking a super-saver fare on Horizon!” date. And he’s supported by two luminous of the year so far. The film, which explores lasses, Alicja Bachleda as the mysterious OnHours later, we were standing in a queue dine, and the amazing the dangerous, hilarious, but always fascinatat the Seattle Internaing world of graffiti artists, goes on an unAlison Barry as Fartional Film Festicharted journey with at least three scenes that rell’s daughter Annie. val. I looked at the caused my jaw to drop. When the lights came When the Ghost rundown of films and up, the Ghost was gone. I made my way to returned from the quickly chose Ondine. restroom, I asked him the lobby thinking I had lost him. I jumped “Good pick,” the if I would see Ondine when he snuck up behind me. Ghost confirmed. “Thanks for waiting,” he said. “I have a again. “Indeed you “It’s directed by Neil pretty small bladder.” I noticed the woman shall. Ondine will be Jordan (who won behind the snack bar watching me. at Flicks in July.” an Oscar for The “Sorry,” I said. “OK, then, I’m Crying Game), and She laughed, “That’s OK. You remind ready to go home,” it stars Colin FarONDINE (PG-13) me of a guy who was here a long time ago. I I said. rell. It’s about an Irish Directed by Neil Jordan think he said his friend’s name was Harvey.” “Not yet,” the fisherman who catches When we returned home, I asked the Ghost moaned. A few a young beauty in his Stars Colin Farrell, Alicja Bachleda, Alison Barry Ghost, “Do you think the people in Boise will hours later, we were nets. It turns out, she’s embrace Exit Through the Gift Shop when it in the dark of another a ...” Opens July 16 at Flicks comes to Flicks later this month?” theater. “Don’t tell me!” I The Ghost smiled. “Only if you tell them “I’m heading to the shouted at a specter about it.” snack bar,” the Ghost said. only I could see. Several people in line stared The next morning, I woke rejuvenated. And “Ssshhh!” I spurted, causing a few more apprehensively at me. I sent a turkey to Katherine Heigl’s house. movie-goers to look at me as if questioning Two hours later, I was a new man. Ondine

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings BEST OF I48 SCREENING— Sunday, June 13, 7 p.m. $10. The Egyptian Theatre, 700 W Main St, Boise. www. egyptiantheatre.net. HANDMADE NATION—Documentary about the rise of

26 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

DIY arts, crafts and design. See Picks, Page 16. (NR) Tuesday, June 15, 7 p.m. $8. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St.. www.theflicksboise.com I48 SCREENINGS—Screening of entries for a contest in which a three- to seven-minute film must be written, shot and edited within 48 hours. The 59 films are broken into four

flights of screenings. (NR) Saturday, June 12, 12:30, 2:30, 4:30, 6:30 p.m. $5. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise. www.theflicksboise.com

Opening THE A-TEAM—A group of Iraq War veterans looks to

clear their names with the U.S. military, who suspect the four men of committing a crime for which they were framed. (PG-13)

he’s having an affair. The introduction of Vince’s ex-con son throws the family into even more comedic chaos. (PG-13) Flicks

CITY ISLAND—Back by popular demand. Corrections officer Vince (Andy Garcia) secretly takes an acting class, but his wife, Joyce (Julianna Margulies), thinks

HARRY BROWN—Michael Caine plays an elderly veteran on a mission to avenge his best friend’s murder with a special brand of geriatric justice. (R) Flicks

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 27

SCREEN/LISTINGS THE KARATE KID—Twelve-yearold Dre Parker (Jaden Smith) moves with his mother to China, where he arouses the ire of a schoolyard bully and learns kung-fu (not karate) from his apartment’s maintenance man, Mr. Han (Jackie Chan). (PG) Edwards 22 LOOKING FOR ERIC—The only thing keeping twice-divorced postal worker Eric from going postal is his love for Manchester United. Lucky for him, his favorite player Eric Cantona (now retired) decides to help get Eric’s life on track. (R) Flicks

continuing

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 9-TUESDAY, JUNE 15 AJAMI—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:30, 7, 9:30

BABIES—

Flicks: W-Th: 5:15, 7:15

CITY ISLAND— DATE NIGHT—

Flicks: F-Su: 12:30, 2:35, 4:40, 7, 9:15; M-Tu: 4:40, 7, 9:15 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:05, 2:20, 4:45, 7:15, 9:25

GET HIM TO THE GREEK— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:30, 4:30, 7:20, 10:10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 12:10, 1:40, 2:40, 4:30, 5:20, 7:10, 7:55, 9:50, 10:25

AJAMI—Set in the melting pot of Jewish, Muslim and Christian cultures in Tel Aviv, Israel. Five stories are intertwined and include the themes of romance outside the tribe, violence, misunderstanding and retaliation. Subtitled in English (R) The Flicks

THE GOOD HEART— Flicks: W-Th: 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; F: 9:05; Sa: 1:05, 3:05; Su: 1:05, 3:05; M: 5:10, 7:10, 9:10; Tu: 4:30, 9:35

BABIES—Documentary following the first year in the life of four babies. (PG) Flicks

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON—

DATE NIGHT—(PG-13) Edwards 22 GET HIM TO THE GREEK—A music company assistant (Jonah Hill) is sent to London to retrieve an outrageous rockstar (Russell Brand) for a concert at L.A.’s Greek Theatre. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 THE GOOD HEART—Paul Dano (Little Miss Sunshine) plays a homeless and suicidal youth, who is taken in by a gruff bar owner (Brian Cox) who tries to offer him a new life. (R) Flicks HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON—(PG) Edwards 22 IRON MAN 2—(PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 KILLERS—A woman (Katherine Heigl) discovers her new husband (Ashton Kutcher) is a spy being hunted by assassins. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 LETTERS TO JULIET— (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 MARMADUKE—(PG) Edwards 22

HANDMADE NATION—

Flicks: Tu: 7

HARRY BROWN—

Flicks: F-Su: 12:40, 2:50, 5, 7:10, 9:20; M-Tu: 5, 7:10, 9:20

I48 SHORT FILMS—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:45 a.m., 2:05, 4:15 Flicks: Sa: 12:30, 2:30, 4:30, 6:30

IRON MAN 2— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:45, 4:50, 7:50, 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:25, 1:15, 3:10, 4:05, 6:20, 7:20, 9:15, 10:30 THE KARATE KID—

Edwards 22: F-Tu: 12:45, 3:50, 7, 10:10

KILLERS— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4:05, 7:10, 9:55 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:30 a.m., 12:45, 1:55, 3, 4:30, 5:35, 7, 8, 9:30, 10:20 LETTERS TO JULIET—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45, 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: Noon, 2:35, 5, 7:35, 10:05

LOOKING FOR ERIC—

Flicks: F-Su: 12:25, 2:40, 4:55, 7:15, 9:30; M-Tu: 4:55, 7:15, 9:30

MARMADUKE—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:40 a.m., 12:30, 1:55, 2:55, 4:20, 5:10, 6:35, 7:25, 8:45, 9:35

THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN ERICA: DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THE PENTAGON PAPERS— Flicks: W-Th: 5:20, 9:20 NO ONE KNOWS ABOUT PERSIAN CATS—

Flicks: W-Th: 9:15

PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1, 4:40, 7:35, 10:25 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:10 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 12:50, 1:20, 2:10, 2:50, 3:35, 4:10, 4:50, 5:30, 6:15, 7:05, 7:40, 9, 9:55, 10:20,

ROBIN HOOD—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:20, 3:25, 6:30, 8:20, 9:45

THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN AMERICA: DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THE PENTAGON PAPERS—Academy Award-winning documentary. (NR) Flicks

SEX AND THE CITY TWO—

NO ONE KNOWS ABOUT PERSIAN CATS—Iranian youths try to form a rock band with the hopes of playing a festival in London. (NR) Flicks

SHREK FOREVER AFTER— Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:45, 4:10, 7:05, 9:45 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10

PRINCE OF PERSIA: THE SANDS OF TIME— (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 ROBIN HOOD—(PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SEX AND THE CITY TWO—(R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SHREK FOREVER AFTER—(PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SPLICE—Two experimental geneticists (Adrien Brody, Sarah Polley) splice human DNA with animal DNA and attempt to raise the creature as their own child. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SWEETGRASS—Documentary following sheep farmers. (NR) Flicks

28 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

SCREEN/MOVIE TIMES

Edwards 9: W-Th: 12:40, 1:10, 4:20, 7:30, 10:40 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:40, 1:50, 3:50, 6:30, 6:55, 7:30, 9:40, 10:10

SHREK FOREVER AFTER 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:50 a.m., 2, 4:25, 6:45, 9:10

SHREK FOREVER AFTER IMAX 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:30 a.m., 1:45, 4, 6:15, 8:30

SPLICE— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:40, 4:45, 7:45, 10:20 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:25 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 2:15, 4:40, 5:05, 7:10, 9:50, 10:35 SWEETGRASS—

Flicks: W-Th: 7:20

T H E A T E R S Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

“A Mile for Men’s Health”    

Friday

25

R

208.570.2662

A Family Running/Walking Event Funding Prostate Cancer Screenings and Awareness

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 29

NEWS/FOOD FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

THE MODERN HOTEL AND BAR Welcome to the BW Card, you dog.

EARTH, WIND, FIRE ... AND WATER

30 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

LAU RIE PEARMAN

First, the bad news. Sweetwater’s Tropic Zone closed recently, packing up all the tropical fun just as the weather is threatening to start acting like summer. So long, curried goat. I, for one, shall miss you. For BW Card holders, that’s particularly disappointing news, especially if champagne and the raw bar were just your thing. Following the loss of Sweetwater’s, however, a new restaurant is coming onto the BW Card program. The magical mystery dinner tour known as Mystique will be an operational member of the BW Card this week. The Pocatello-based restaurant serves dinner Monday through Saturday by reservation only at its Boise Spectrum location, and if one were to judge a restaurant simply by its slim menu pickins, it looks like a night at Mystique is about the dinner theater-style magic show perhaps a little more than it is about the food. Also new to the BW Card in the very near future is Eddie’s Wood Fired Dogs in southeast Boise. Run by the geniuses who brought us Boise Blue Cow (and believe me, anyone with a handful of kids in tow knows exactly how genius the helpyourself frozen yogurt method is), Eddie’s smells like a camp fire and offers a menu that reads like an encyclopedia of meats that fit into a hot dog bun. (Mystique: 1410 S. Entertainment Ave., 208-375-2141. Eddies: 2325 Apple St., 208-331-3647.) And in the DIY department of food, Idaho Preferred, the Department of Ag’s program to champion all things local, is starting a cooking class series at Pottery Gourmet this month. Get a lesson on what’s grown and raised locally, as well as a tutorial in how to cook it. This month’s class is Friday, June 11, with a lesson that includes croquettas, Idaho trout, huckleberries and—of course—potatoes. For the full menu, more information on the class or to register, call Pottery Gourmet at 208-368-0649. If you fancy yourself quite the chili cook, Skydive Idaho is hosting a chili cook-off Saturday, June 12, 6-7 p.m. Enter your pot of hot stuff for $5 or spectate for free. For information, contact Skydive Idaho at 208455-0000. —Rachael Daigle

Despite its scenester status, the Modern Hotel and Bar is still a someAmid minimalist decor, low booths, acrylic tables and Eames-style what unknown beast to many. Even for some sitting at the bar in the wooden chairs, the recent addition of food to the Modern Hotel and Linen District’s boutique hotel. On First Thursday, with the notes of lo- Bar fits in like an Eero Saarinen side table. It’s not prey to the whims cals Ned Evett and Bill Coffey wafting in from open glass doors, I stood of molecular gastronomy nor is it too much of a nod to vintage. It is at the bar to place a food order. Laying eyes on my menu, the guy next instead food in which the sum is equal to its fresh, lovely parts. to me said, “They have food here? And they do music? And the people The Modern’s menu is a short, two-page affair. Dishes are beautifully in the rooms just put up with it ... or wait, is this actually a hotel?” Yes, presented on angular plates that mirror the lines of the hotel’s layout yes, yes and yes. I put in a food order, as well as an order for another like the pavers in the secluded courtyard. The luxury in each menu Ashley in Exile—a potion of peach-kissed gin with elderflower liqueur item comes unassumingly through the austere portions, fine ingredients and Riesling—and slunk back to base camp in a corner of the bar. The and savory flavor profiles. Page one of the menu is all appetizers: an patio crowd was thick enough to relegate those of us who wanted a taarray of tartines—little French open faced sandwiches—smoked trout ble inside. However, canapes, a mussels as the night wore on, and chorizo dish, inside—where retro chicken quesadillas chic in pale yellow and plates of olives or and light blue chill nuts. Soups, paninis under a chorus line and salads make up of hanging, painted the entirety of the white antlers—was entree offerings. the place to be. The roast beef and While the Modern mozzarella panini has a reputation as a ($9) was a squished, destination, few mencrispy, surprisingly tion its food among complex sandwich, the reasons. For the complemented by devoted meat-andcrunchy homemade potatoes type, the potato chips liberModern’s menu has a ally sprinkled with few gaping holes. For paprika. The peppery those who overlook bitterness was grilled that, a few nice surout of the arugula prises wait. and Dijon mustard, The Asian salad grilled cheese and ($11) is among the salty lean beef were successes. A coiled easily teeth-torn. nest of purple cabFrom a distance, the THE MODERN HOTEL bage, julienned jalachicken quesadillas AND BAR penos and carrots, and whole cilantro, the salad does it ($8) looked like a smaller version of those offered at 1314 W. Grove St. like more salads should do: dispenses with the lettuce. almost any chain restaurant but the Modern’s attention 208-424-8244 A quartet of prawns marched in a straight line up and to detail is something those chains seldom abide. Melty, themodernhotel.com Kitchen open Sun.-Mon. over the ensemble and cashews tumbled out of the stretchy aged Gouda and tangy Monterey jack between 5 p.m.-10 p.m., Tue.-Sat. veggies. For summer, it’s an ideal dish. Better for winter soft tortillas was lush, and the inclusion of fleshy nuts 5 p.m.-11 p.m. was the roast beef, mozzarella and arugula panini ($9), and a side of creamy, not-too-spicy salsa took the ’dilla which was rich and filling. We awarded it extra bonus in a deluxe direction. points for the arugula. It is on its cocktail menu that Modern’s attitude turns toward Starters of guacamole ($9) and olives ($5) fell squarely in the land ostentation—tartines and canapes are inarguably pompous. But bragof potential. The mound of mashed avocado was just slightly off in gadocio can be forgiven if it’s warranted. Like James Bond, Modern’s consistency and rather than standing on its own for flavor, relied on a drink menu swaggers around with its tuxedo-adorned chest puffed out. few stripes of Sriracha and sour cream sauce to get the job done. The And like the secret agent, it has earned it. guac was good stuff, though, and ultimately it was only the flat, round, The Manhattan Mule ($7.50) is a syrupy bourbon, sweet vermouth, functional chips that needed improvement. Olives marinees arrived lemon juice and house-made ginger beer that sipped beautifully with the piled into a dish measuring 1-foot by 1-inch. We harpooned herbed and panini. The strange-named A Pair Of combined Grey Goose La Poire marinated large and baby green olives—some stuffed, some not—and (pear), grapefruit, lemon, Galliano L’Autentico and sage and gave off the occasional kalamata with wooden skewers. While they were ideal bright aromatics as it popped on the tongue. for all-night snacking for our group, I expected a more sophisticated A new summer cocktail menu will be available soon, but an advance olive choice—maybe EVOO-soaked, pit-in Spanish olives—than the glimpse revealed a selection of classic drinks and Modern seasonal supermarket olive bar standard. coolers like the Lackadaisy with Torrontes dry white wine, pisco, Sophisticated, however, showed up for dessert ($8). Two bars of lemon juice, orange flower water, simple syrup and orange peel; the melting absinthe ice cream, each bisected with a layer of fudgy chocohoney and ginger, cachaca and lime Honey-Ginger Caipirinha; and the late cookie crumbs, stole the whole show. Like the Ashley in Exile anticipated return of the Modern Cocktail, a gin or vodka on the rocks ($7.50), the flavors were a study in subtlety. Mint and licorice lurked with muddled cucumber, lemon, sugar and fizz. They’ve also added a but neither bragged about being there. I’d rank it as the most unique Bea Arthur—Highlands scotch, lemon, honey and orange peel. Maybe dessert in town and recommend not only finishing your night with it, there’s time before the menu gets back from the printer for one more but maybe starting there as well. homage: a sexy, flowery pink cocktail named the Rue McClanahan. —Rachael Daigle almost called in absinthe to work.

—Amy Atkins wants to be a Golden Girl. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 31

FOOD/DINING Eagle AHI SUSHI—Traditional Japanese sushi in swanky Eagle digs. 1193 E. Winding Creek, Ste. 104, Eagle, 208-938-3474. $-$$$ OM. BARDENAY—Located along the Boise River, the little brother of the Boise bar features the distillery’s own hooch, as well as an impressive array of beer, wine and assorted liquors. Munch on the anything-but-standard pub food while you try to pick your favorite. 155 E. Riverside Dr., Eagle, 208-938-5093. $$-$$$ SU OM.

and catering, one part wine tasting room. It’s a versatile little place to kick up your heels for a spell. 1117 E. Winding Creek Road, Eagle, 208-939-6680. OM. $-$$$ THE STUFFED OLIVE—Eagle has decided to tattle on its “best kept secret” and share this bistro’s fresh sandwiches, pastas,

roasted meats and fresh baked desserts with the rest of us. 404 S. Eagle Road, Suite A, Eagle, . 208-938-5185. $$ For more listings and reviews, visit boiseweekly.com and click on “Food.”

FOOD/BEER GUZZLER

BELLA AQUILA—With impeccable attention to every dining detail, the food, service and atmosphere make for a lovely experience. The restaurant serves a wide selection of Italian fare and sweet options include sweetened ricotta and mascarpone-filled cannoli dipped in dark chocolate and pistachios Try a blueberry cobbler martini with vanilla and blueberry vodkas and a graham cracker crust rim. 775 S. Rivershore Lane, Eagle, RES 208-938-1900. $$-$$$$ . SU OM CAFE RUSSIAN BEAR—Owner Oleg Mironov and his wife make every single thing on the menu from scratch, including borscht, Russian crepes, beef stroganoff and potato pancakes. The cafe serves up borscht in up to 18 ounce servings, or try the “Old Russia” salad, a combination potato, ham, eggs, onion, peas, carrots, pickles and mayo. No preservatives or pre-made ingredients, ever. 600 S. Rivershore Lane, Ste. 160, Eagle, 208-939-1911. $-$$. . DAVINCI’S—The “locals’ Italian restaurant” is housed in a historic bank building with a full-service bar area. A wide variety of Italian selections such as lasagna and chicken parmesan are accompanied by warm bread and all-you-can-eat salads. 190 E. State St., Eagle, 208-939-2500. $-$$$ SU. REMBRANDT’S COFFEE SHOP—Located in a restored church on Eagle’s main drag, Rembrandt’s is a neighborhood gathering point for more than just coffee. Rembrandt’s has hot and cold libations aplenty, a pastry case full of homemade muffins, sweets, breads and quiches, and a short lunch menu with largely portioned sandwiches, soups and salads. The cathedral—literally—ceilings and plush furniture lend the atmosphere a definitively welcoming and serene feeling. 93 S. Eagle Road, Eagle, SU OM 208-938-1564. $. . SEASONS BISTRO WINE BAR AND CATERING—The recipe for success here is one part upscale market, one part deli

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ —Less than $8 $ $ —$8 to $14 $ $ $ —$14 to $20 $ $ $ $ —Over $20

NEW BEER BOMBERS Sometimes more is more. While the 12-ounce format drives the majority of beer sales, most craft breweries offer a lineup of larger format bottlings. The 22-ounce bomber is typically reserved for special or seasonal releases, though some, like Ninkasi, release only in bombers. Here are three different new brews. If you love large quantities of beer, you won’t want to miss out on these. ABITA ABBEY ALE Brewed in the style of a Belgian dubbel, Abbey Ale definitely has some funk on the nose, where touches of clove mingle with sour apple, pear and yeasty bread dough. The clove comes through on the palate as well, along with an array of sweet fruit flavors including banana, fig and raisin. You’ll find light hops on the finish, but overall, sweet malt dominates. This is another nice effort from the Louisiana-based brewery. DESCHUTES HOP IN THE DARK CDA CDA stands for Cascadian dark ale and given its opaque ebony color the name is appropriate. With its deep-roasted malt and IPA-worthy blend of hops, this one could turn into a Jekyll vs. Hyde fiasco. Instead it is a wonderfully sublime ale with gorgeous hop and chocolate malt aromas that segue into beautifully persistent resiny hop, toasted malt and coffee flavors. The finish is smooth and creamy and offers pleasant, lingering touches of bittersweet chocolate. NINKASI RADIANT ALE Radiant pours a lovely amber with a billowy head that persists nicely with aromas laced with grain and soft fruit backed by citrusy hops. This well-balanced, very approachable brew leads off with lightly sweet malt that plays against bright citrus and a pleasantly bitter core of resiny hops. It is an eminently refreshing summer seasonal from this Eugene brewery. —David Kirkpatrick

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RES —Reservations

needed/recommended —Patio SU —Open on Sunday OM —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

32 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 33

PLACE AN AD

DEADLINES

|

D I S P L A Y A D S - T H U R S D A Y, 3 P. M .

| REAL ESTATE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT |

PLACE YOUR AD OFFICE HOURS Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Out to Lunch 1:30 - 2:30 p.m.

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

Tqfdjbmj{joh!jo!Ijtupsjd!Ipnft!'!Ofjhicpsippet"

BLUE ROOSTER REALTY

REAL ESTATE

HOME SWEET HOME

E-MAIL

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT Classified advertising must be paid in advance unless approved credit terms are established. You may pay with credit card, cash, check or money order.

This week’s home is 8097 W. COURIER, BOISE located in a nicely main$155,000 tained Northwest Boise 3 bed/2 bath 1,502 square feet neighborhood where pride Classique Realty of ownership is evident Jacqui Rogers, 208-283-2819 jacquirogers.point2agent.com around every corner. You’ll MLS #98437567 wind through quiet streets lined by modestly sized family homes surrounded by manicured lawns and tidy landscaping in order to reach this immaculate residence, which is set on a .15-acre parcel deep within the Landover Subdivision. Light gray-beige tints the 16-year-old home’s interior walls. The soft color is echoed in carpeting and sheet vinyl flooring throughout the house, as well as in the brick fireplace in the living room. The only exception to the neutral palette hides in the master suite, where a pumpkin-hued Southwest theme reigns. A sizable office with glass doors is at the entrance. A great room with an open kitchen is situated toward the rear of the home, where a sliding glass door in the dinette opens to a large covered deck and a tidy patch of lawn. Shade trees and colorful flowers scattered around the small yard’s perimeter seem to beckon the owner to stop and sip a little lemonade. The master bedroom also has a doorway that opens to the back deck. The kitchen features oak cabinets washed in a golden hue, black laminate counters, gleaming black appliances and a wraparound breakfast bar that seats four comfortably.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW MASSAGE Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577. Thomas. B6HH6<:7N<>C6 Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

6B6I:JG B6HH6<: 7N:G>8

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 8805772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Boise & Nampa studios.

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

BW FOR RENT

classified@boiseweekly.com

We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree.

L I N E A D S - M O N D A Y, 1 0 A . M .

ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com 8A:6CGDDB>:C::9:9 Meridian. 3BD, 2BA house. Rent our spare room out. I am a single father and have my kids half the time. I pay the utilities as long as you help keep them affordable. Call 401-6660.

(208) 342-4733

RATES

( 2 0 8 ) 3 4 4 -2 0 5 5

BW SHARED HOUSING

FAX

* Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

CL ASSIF IE D@BOISE WE E KLY.COM

2BD. 1st floor of Victorian era home. 962 sq. ft. with great-sized rooms and lots of windows. Heat and hot water are geo-thermal - super cozy in the winter. Rent is $664/ mo., plus a $26/mo. cost of basic cable is shared among tenants. Total cost is $690/mo. Cat would be considered. Credit references/ report required. 9 to 12 mo. lease. Property is at 323 East Bannock St. Call 867-7435. Vintage North End 1BD apt. with tile countertops, glass door knobs, picture molding, hardwood floor, lots of cupboard space in kitchen. Nice shared yard, 22nd & State. A/C, W/D. Non-smoking & no pets. $525/mo. 343-5541.

REAL ESTATE

(208) 344-2055

LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m.

|

WWW.BOISE WE E KLY.COM

CAREERS | BARTER | TRANSPORTATION | FOR SALE | PETS | SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

PHONE

DEADLINES*

VISIT | E-MAIL | CALL |

ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com C:L:G=DB: 3BD, 2.5BA. Fenced yard, 2 car grg., easy access to connector & BSU. Non smoking & no pets. rentme57@hotmail.com or 853-1169. HIJ9>D6EI# Clean, safe, quiet residential neighborhood off Roosevelt, close to BSU. No credit check or app fee, no lease. $345. Available now. Call 333-0066.

BW FOR SALE 2BD, 1BA MFH in desirable Ponderosa Mobile Home Park. Convenient to public transportation, shopping and public services. New gas stove, refrigerator, vinyl floor in bathroom, 2 outdoor sheds. Covered carport and porch. Offering $2000 towards a new roof and a carpet allowance is possible with a full-priced offer. Only one owner! Call 208-4840752. 2725 N. Five Mile Rd. Space # 36. Available for immediate occupancy! $11,900.

SERVICES

8DB: :ME:G>:C8: B6HH6<: 7NH6B

Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Wknds.Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Prof. therapeutic massage only by trained & exp. masseur. New client spec. Robert 484-6251. ULM 340-8377.

K>E;DDI B6HH6<:

Foot massage includes free shoulder & back massage. $29.99/hr. Gift certificates available. Buy a gift of health. 377-7711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

BW SPIRITUAL

PROS: Immaculate dwelling in well-kept neighborhood. CONS: Pumpkin paint in master suite. —Jennifer Hernandez

34 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

| MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | CAREERS | BARTER | TRANSPORTATION | FOR SALE | | PETS | SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

| REAL ESTATE

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - MASSAGE

CAREERS BW HELP WANTED 7D>H:<GDJE=DB:H Make a difference assisting adults w/ developmental disabilities. Must be 21 w/ clean driving record. Stop by 30 S. Cole Road, 9am-4pm. 7DD@>C<$B6C6<:B:CI Idaho Multimedia artist seeks collaboration with highly talented person to market/book multimedia presentation rich in history, art and song. The presentation plays beautifully in schools, parks, libraries, on concert stages, resorts, lodges, and great rooms everywhere! Many possibilities. This is commission-based work. Please send letters of inquiry and experience to artsidaho@gmail.com 8C6$C6 To care for adults with developmental disabilities. Must be 21 with clean driving record. Apply 30 S. Cole Road, 9am-4pm.

Reasonable rates: $20 for any document (max. 2 pages, 12 pitch, single space) or as negotiated. Don’t pay till you’re satisfied! Discount/pro bono for seniors, disabled or nonprofit orgs. 208-571-5288.

BARTER BW HAVE 9:6G?D=C!>C8# Cat got your tongue? With 22 years professional writing experience, I will write your: Love/breakup, job resignation letters or e-mail texts. Creative packaging and delivery options available. Complaints and appeals letters: extensive experience with government agency correspondence. Editorials, resume cover letters, speeches, job applications, online dating profiles, or whatever! Barter for goods/services welcome.

BW NEED Looking for enclosed 12-16 foot tandem axle trailer in good condition. Will trade for an early 1950’s- era Heywood-Wakefield “Wheat” Buffet and matching “Knee Desk”, or will pay cash, or a combination, whatever. Other antique furniture pieces potentially available 208-571-5288.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

G6EJCO:A H6ADC

Now has stations for lease. Great amenities, people and terms. Call 336-5008 for appointments.

Adults cats are DONATION ONLY until 6/15/10

MURDOCK: 4-year-old black male cocker spaniel. Likes being with people and being petted. Calm and easy to work with. (Kennel 400 - #10537063)

JAX: 2-year-old male shorthair cat. Sweet and friendly. Well cared for, neutered and ready for a new lap to lounge in. (Kennel 16 #10490536)

PARKER: 6 years old. Friendly and loving guy who loves to be petted and handled. Litterboxtrained and ready for a home. (Kennel 94 #10556649)

RALPHIE: 1.5-year-old male Rottweiler mix (64 lbs). Energetic with lots of “puppy.” Friendly, alert and eager to learn. (Kennel 305 #10514142)

LOBO: 7-month-old male German shepherd/border collie mix (47 lbs). Smart, attentive and eager to please. (Kennel 320 - #10580278)

PIP: 3-year-old male Chihuahua/terrier mix (11 lbs). Adorable, little lap sitter who walks nicely on a leash and likes being held. (Kennel 403 - #10480279)

BW CAREER INFO. $$$HELP WANTED$$$ Extra Income! Assembling CD cases from Home! No Experience Necessary! Call our Live Operators Now! 1-800-405-7619 EXT 2450 http:// www.easywork-greatpay.com

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES ALL CASH VENDING! Be the boss of your own local route with 25 new machines and candy for $9,995. Call today 1-800-920-9563. Multivend, LLC. BO#200003.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

BW CAREER EDUCATION

B6@:BDG:BDC:N

With a better job and a degree. Evening, day and online classes start next month. Financial aid is available for those who qualify. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645. www.stevenshenager.info

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

MOONLIGHT: Sleek JULIUS: Adventurous and sweet seeks caring cat ISO partner for catand forever companion. napping adventures.

LORETTA: Full-figured lady with a lot of love to give.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 35

| REAL ESTATE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | CAREERS | BARTER | TRANSPORTATION | FOR SALE | PETS | SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

SERVICES

FOR SALE

COMMUNITY

BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464.

Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464.

SERVICES

|

KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

SERVICES BW CHILD PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Talk with caring agency specializing in matching Birthmothers with Families nationwide. LIVING EXPENSES PAID. Call 24/7 Abby’s One True Gift Adoptions 866-413-6293 (Void in Illinois).

NYT CROSSWORD | ACROSS 1 City SE of New Delhi 5 “To your health!” 10 Cumberland Gap explorer 15 iPod control: Abbr. 18 Supermax resident 19 Chekhov’s “Uncle ___” 20 Instructional tool 1

2

3

21 W.W. II command 22 With 24-Across, two things that are stuffed 24 With 36-Across, two things on a farm 26 Getting up there in years 27 Tests for college credit, briefly 28 Domain

4

5

18

6

8

9

10

31

36

32

33

55

43 48

49

56

66 72

73

78

79

84

85

96

39

50

68 74

52

81

63 69

70

64 71

77

83

87

88 92 98

104

89

93

94

99

100 101 102

105

108 109 110

54

65

76

82

97

53

59

75

91

107

41

51

67

103

40

44

62

90

17

25

58

86

16

35

61

80

15 21

34

57

60

14

29

38

42 47

13

28

37

46

12

24 27

30

11

38 With 55-Across, two things that spin 42 Like some roofs and roads 44 Balloonists’ baskets 45 Que. neighbor 48 Fund-raising grp. 49 Scientist Pavlov 51 Some poetic feet

20

23

26

95

7

29 Laugh ___ 30 Word game component, sometimes 31Tijuana “that” 33 Seeing red 35 Guy 36 With 38-Across, two things associated with needles

19

22

45

FULL CIRCLE BY ERIC BERLIN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

106

111 112

113 114

115

116

117

119

120

121

122

123

124

125

126

36 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

118

55 With 82-Across, two things at an amusement park 58 Believers 59 “Hair” song with the lyric “Hello, carbon monoxide” 60 Many a Miley Cyrus fan 61 Speaker’s spot 63 Sicilian tourist attraction 66 Out of concern that 67 Little argument 68 Accusatory words 71 ___ Kalugin, former K.G.B. general with the 1994 book “Spymaster” 72 Vivacious person 74 Annual foursome 76 Opponent of Pericles 78 Santa ___ 79 ___ de malaise 82 With 95-Across, two things that are sticky 84 Admonishment 87 Egg cream component 88 Argentine aunt 89 Edinburgh-to-London dir. 90 Second track on “Beatles ’65” 92 “No Escape” star, 1994 95 With 99-Across, two things with brushes 99 With 115-Across, two things with ladders 103 Bargaining group 104 Church recess 105 Noted period 106 1922 Physics Nobelist 107 Physics units 108 Certain Apples 111 HDTV brand 113 Adjective for a bikini, in a 1960 song 115 With 117-Across, two things that are red 117 With 22-Across, two things associated with Thanksgiving 119 Wire service inits.

120 Drug company behind Valium 121 “Pearls Before Swine,” e.g. 122 What some titles are written in, briefly 123 Standing need 124 Signed 125 “Zorba the Greek” setting 126 Smooth

DOWN 1 Region in ancient Asia Minor 2 With a smile 3 Most promising 4 Certain soldiers 5 “Law & Order” spinoff, for short 6 Draw of some bars 7 Being punished, militarystyle 8 “O.K., captain!” 9 Not ecclesiastical 10 Inspired by 11 Deep-sea predator 12 Spoken 13 Usual 14 Woolly one 15 In truth, in Shakespeare 16 Peter with four Golden Globes 17 Claim in a cigarette ad 18 Latte topper 23 Juilliard’s focus 25 Hockey goalie’s area 28 Scout’s job, briefly 32 Hasty signatures 34 Entertain 35 To-do 37 Use as a resource 39 Nutritional stds. 40 Word of warning 41 Ending with proto43 Like some metal toys 45 Many times, in verse 46 Studio that produced the Austin Powers movies 47 Source of some resins

93 “Honest!” 94 Neighbor of Montana 95 Very sorry 96 Green, say 97 18-wheeler 98 Real brat 100 Sea between Italy and Greece 101 Protect 102 Long lock 108 Monopoly token 109 Gooey dirt 110 Workout aftereffect 112 Arrived 114 She threw the apple of discord 116 Not quite quadri117 XXX x X 118 Letters in an old date

50 American sports car, for short 52 Shiny fabrics 53 Small-time tyrants 54 Mexican Mrs. 56 Others 57 In the know, in old slang 58 Counting everything 62 Put new turf on 64 Improvisatory piece of classical music 65 “Enchanted” girl of children’s lit 69 “Southland” airer 70 Shows near the front? 72 Target for certain athletes 73 Actor Burton 75 They’re nuts 77 Scientist with multiple Emmys 80 Rash soother 81 Rash soother 83 Fertilizer ingredient 85 Biochemical sugar 86 Sign 87 Gets through slowly 91 Kissed noisily L A S T

F R O T H

A E O L I A

G L A D L Y

R O S I E S T

O N T F E R R T W E E L E S P I S T A N A R E P R I R U B B U N I O E R G S F I R E U P I L E G

A N T T S H E T A A R P T I S N T O L E O V M A E R N I T R R O I N

Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

S K O A V A N Y U R K E A P S S O I C K R R E D A I V W H E E L E C T S P A T S E T A T A L S L O S E C E M E A P M A C S U C K C H E K E D

A N S W E R S

L A Y R E G A L E

R E C O N

R E A S C O O D R N T S E R C R C O C R

B A S E D O N

O R C A

O R A L

R D A I S N T T O N T T A L I M E C A A N M I E T

D O N T U S O T O U R B C E

N E V O W E R E C R M R I F E L P L A Y L A S A P E S S A M T E T O L E C L E N C A N I A S T T A R A L I A B O T E E N E R R I I T A S A N

O T O O L E

L O W T A R

T I N G O D S

S R A

S H I E L D

N Y E T R E S S

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

| REAL ESTATE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | CAREERS | BARTER | TRANSPORTATION | FOR SALE | PETS |

| SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

BW HOME <DC:<G::CA6LC86G: All Electric, No Emissions. Services incl. spring cleanup, mowing, trimming & pruning, organic fertilization & weed control. Mention this ad for 15% disc. Call 208-861-3017. 6<J67AJ:EDDAH:GK>8: For all your POOL & SPA needs call AGUA BLUE POOL SERVICE BU  0QFOJOHT t 8FFLMZ .BJOUFOBODF t /FX *O-

TUBMMBUJPOT t 3FQBJST t 'JMUFST t )FBUFSTt1VNQTt"DJE8BTIt 5JMF *OTUBMMBUJPOT t 5JMF $MFBOJOH and More! I am the Safety Pool Cover Specialists. I install, repair and provide professional sewing on all types of pool & spa covers. Agua Blue Pool Service is a family-owned and operated pool company that cares about you. We will give you the personal attention and quality service that you expect at a price you can afford. Call Efrain at 208-853-1475 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your Satisfaction is our Successâ&#x20AC;?. Fully License & Insured.

TRANSPORTATION

NOTICES

MUSIC

BW LEGAL NOTICES SUMMONS Case No. CV OC 1009090 IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA

BW MUSICAL INSTRUCTION/OTHER Keyboardist to play original material wanted. Ed 389-9619.

BW CLASSES

BOISE ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY, P.A., Plaintiff, vs.

;G::B6G>?J6C6 Presentation by NORML at Boise Public Library, 7pm, Tuesday, June 22.

CHANEE GRANT, Defendant. TO DEFENDANT GRANT:

HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMA! Graduate in just 4 weeks!! FREE Brochure. Call NOW! 1-800-532-6546 Ext. 97 http://www.continentalacademy.com C:L=DB:9:8DGHIDG: Bitz-N-Piecez is West Boiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newest home decor and more store. 8001 W. Fairview Ave. In front of Shopko Plaza.

HJBB:GH:L>C< 8A6HH:H

CHANEE

Beginner, intermediate & couture. Make a summer dress, Mom & Me Skirt classes, many to choose from. Check our calendar on the web for details or stop by Caledonia Fine Fabrics. 605 Americana Blvd. 338-0895.

You have been sued by Boise Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, P.A., the Plaintiff, in the District Court in and for Ada County, Idaho, Case No. CV OC 1009090. The nature of the claim against you is money due and owing. Any time after 20 days following the last publication of this Summons, the Court may enter a Judgment against you without further notice, unless prior to that time you have ďŹ led a written response in the proper form, including the Case No. CV OC 1009090, and paid any required ďŹ ling fee to the Clerk of the Court at 200 W. Front St., Boise, ID 83702, telephone 208-387-6900, and serve a copy of your response on the Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s attorney at Stephen W. Beane, Attorney at Law, P.O. Box 2694, Boise, ID 83701-2694, telephone 208-336-2690. A copy of the Summons and Complaint can be obtained by contacting either the Clerk of the Court or the attorney for Plaintiff. If you wish legal assistance, you should immediately retain an attorney to advise you in this matter.

CONNECTION SECTION

COMMUNITY POSTINGS

BW ADULT ENTERTAINMENT

BW ANNOUNCEMENTS GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484. This is not a job offer.

BUYER BEWARE Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services.

June 2, 9, 16 , 23, 2010. NOTICE OF SALE. I.C.§ 55-2306 PLEASE TAKE notice that on 6/19/10 at the hour of 3:00 p.m., storage unit #48, Verity Management shall sell the following described personal property in the manner described: Name: Laura Chin & Gary Reed, Address: 207 Murray, Garden City, ID 83714. Unit location: 3097 N. Five Mile Rd. Boise, ID 83713, Storage Unit #48. General Description: Queen sized bed set, bed frames, dresser drawer set, vacuum, and other misc. items. Said sale shall be conducted by live bid and all the contents of said unit shall be sold as single lot. All payments shall be in cash or certiďŹ ed funds. Said sale may be subject to cancellation in the event the owner thereof satisďŹ es all past due obligations related to the storage of such items. Publications must occur once a week for two consecutive weeks in a newspaper of general circulation.

Voice Personals and Live Chat

DATING SERVICE. Long-Term/ Short-Term Relationships, FREE2-TRY! 1-877-722-0087 Exchange/ Browse Personal Messages 1-866-362-1311. Live adult casual conversations 1-877-599-8753 Meet on chat-lines. Local Singles 1-888-869-0491 (18+) New!! Talk Live!! 1-866-362-1311. Hot Singles Waiting To Connect! Call 208-287-0343. FREE w/code 5500. Call 800-210-1010. ;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classiďŹ eds at www.boiseweekly.com. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy! Just click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Post Your FREE Ad.â&#x20AC;? No phone calls please.

Hard Cruising Ads and Live Chat

HOOK UP FAST!

SM

FREE to listen to ads. FREE to reply to ads.

Boise

(208) 343.8500

No online photos needed!

FRE COD E 1267E

Boise (208) 345.8855

FREE CODE 5235

For other local numbers call

1-888-MegaMates

TM

1-888-634-2628 www.MegaMates.com 24/7 Friendly Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ Š2010 PC LLC

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BW CHAT LINES

CONNECTION SECTION - ADULT

DATED This 21st day of May, 2010. J. DAVID NAVARRO CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT BY: RIC NELSON DEPUTY CLERK

ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d rather be dancingâ&#x20AC;? Shows, dance-a-grams and lessons. 208440-1117. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Back TRY ME! Discreet 1 on 1. Private massage. Call Angie!! 24/7, 208-515-5255. MEET LOCAL SINGLES. Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7584, 18+. PENIS ENLARGEMENT. FDA Medical Vacuum Pumps. Gain 1-3 inches permanently. Testosterone, Viagra, Cialis. FREE PILLS! 619-294-7777 code 1000 www. drjoelkaplan.com (discounts available). SEEKING SEXY SINGLES? Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7583. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. Where Hot Men Hook Up! Call 208-489-2162 or 800-777-8000. Free w/code 2982.

1-888-MegaMates 1-888-634-2628

TM

MegaMatesMen.com

24/7 Friendly Customer Care 1(888) 634.2628 18+ Š2010 PC LLC

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JUNE 9â&#x20AC;&#x201C;15, 2010 | 37

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): The secret is in plain sight. The hidden resource is freely available for anyone who intends to use it with integrity. The lost key is very close to where you left it when you last used it. The missing link is missing only in the sense that no one recognizes it for what it is. The unasked question is beaming toward you from three directions. The wounded talent will be healed the moment you stop thinking of it as wounded and start regarding it as merely unripe. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s time for some image medicine, Taurus. Wherever you are right now, I invite you to look down at your left palm and imagine that you see the following scene: an infinity sign whose shape is made not by a thin black line but by a series of small yellow rubber duckies. The duckies are flowing along slowly in continuous motion. They are all wearing gold crowns, each of which is studded with three tiny rubies. With resonant tones that belie their diminutive and comic appearance, the duckies are singing you your favorite song. It makes you feel safe, brave and at home in the world. What else can you see there? What happens next? GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you have long conversations with the image in the mirror this week, I won’t call you a megalomaniacal narcissist. Nor will I make fun of you if you paint 15 self portraits, or google yourself obsessively, or fill an entire notebook with answers to the question “Who am I, anyway?” In my astrological opinion, this is an excellent time for you to pursue nosy explorations into the mysteries of your core identity. You have cosmic permission to think about yourself with an intensity you might normally devote to a charismatic idol you’re infatuated with.

38 | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | BOISEweekly

This really is the climax. The time for your peak experience has arrived. If you postpone the harvest for another two weeks, your beauties may start to go to seed. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): What are you waiting for, my dear Virgo? Your future power spot has been exerting a strong pull on you. It has been calling for you to come and seize the clout you deserve. But you have not yet fully taken up the offer. As your designated nag and cheerleader, it is my sacred duty to wave a red flag in front of your gorgeous face and command you to pay attention. In my opinion, you need to drop what you’re doing, race over to the zone of engagement and pounce. You’re more than ready to stake a claim to the increased authority you’ll have a mandate to wield in the coming months. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): If you’ve read my horoscopes for a while, you know I’m the least superstitious astrologer on the planet. I champion the cause of reason and logic, praise the beauty of science and discourage you from constantly scanning the horizon for fearful omens. And yet I’m also a zealous advocate of the power of the liberated imagination. I believe that the playful and disciplined use of fantasy can be a potent agent for benevolent change in your life. That’s why I suggest that you spend some quality time in the coming week having imaginary conversations with the person, living or dead, who inspires you the most.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): The online Nietzsche Family Circus (losanjealous.com/nfc) features collaborations between the sappy family oriented comic strip “Family Circus” and the austerely portentous wisdom of German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. Judging from your current astrological omens, I’d say this is a perfect time for you to expose yourself to this stuff. You need to toughen up some of your weepy, sentimental urges and brighten up some of your somber, melancholic tendencies.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I want to be everywhere at once and do everything at the same time,” writes one of my Scorpio readers, J.T. He’s in luck because according to my analysis, your tribe is about to enjoy a phase much like what he describes. “No more of this linear, one-dayat-a-time stuff,” he continues. “I want a whole week packed into each 24-hour turn of the Earth, with heavy doses of leisure time interwoven with thrilling bouts of hard, creative labor. I want to live in a secret garden with 10 years of solitude and hang out at a street fair raging with conviviality. I want to sing with angels and romp with devils in between walking the dog, exercising at the gym and chatting to perfectly ordinary people. I want enough money to fill a swimming pool, and I want to live like there’s no such thing as money.”

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Gather your rewards, Leo. Soak up the blessings. Collect the favors you’re owed. It’s harvest time for you: your big chance to reap the fruits you’ve been sowing and cultivating these past 11 months. And no, don’t try to stretch out the process. Don’t procrastinate about plucking the ripe pickings.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): If you live on the Danish island of Mando, your only hope for driving to the mainland and back is when the tide is low. During those periods, the water often recedes far enough to expose a rough gravel road that’s laid down over a vast mudflat. Winter storms sometimes make even low-tide passag-

es impossible, though. According to my reading of the astrological omens, Sagittarius, there’s a comparable situation in your life. You can only get from where you are to where you want to go at certain selected times and under certain selected conditions. Make sure you’re thoroughly familiar with those times and conditions. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): One of the leading intellectuals of the 20th century, British author Aldous Huxley, wrote more than 20 books, including Brave New World. In his later years he made a surprising confession: “It is a bit embarrassing to have been concerned with the human problem all one’s life and find at the end that one has no more to offer by way of advice than ‘Try to be a little kinder.’” In accordance with your current astrological omens, Capricorn, I’d like you to take a cue from Huxley in the coming week. Proceed on the assumption that the smartest thing you can do—both in terms of bringing you practical benefits and increasing your intelligence— would be to deepen, expand and intensify your compassion. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Early in Marcel Proust’s novel In Search of Lost Time, the narrator stumbles upon a dizzying epiphany while having a snack. He dips a small cake into his cup of tea, and when he sips a spoonful, the taste of the sweet crumbs blended with the warm drink transport him into an altered state. Inexplicably, he’s filled with an “all-powerful joy” and “exquisite pleasure” that dissolve his feelings of being “mediocre, contingent and mortal.” The associations and thoughts triggered by this influx of paradise take him many pages to explore. I mention this, Aquarius, because I expect that you’re about to have your own version of this activation. A seemingly ordinary event will lead to a breakthrough that feeds you for a long time. Be alert for it. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Environmentalist Bill McKibben says that humans are transforming the planet so drastically that we shouldn’t refer to it as “Earth” any more. To acknowledge the fact that we’re well on our way to living on a very different world, he suggests we rename our home the “Eaarth.” By this logic, maybe we should rename your sign Piisces. The changes you’re in the process of making this year are potentially so dramatic that you will, in a sense, be inhabiting a new astrological sign by January 2011. In your case, however—unlike that of our planet— the majority of your alterations are likely to be invigorating and vitalizing. And you’re now entering a phase when you’ll have maximum opportunity to ensure that successful outcome.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

DAILY

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

BOISEweekly | JUNE 9–15, 2010 | 39


Boise Weekly Vol. 18 Issue 50