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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 18, ISSUE 47 MAY 19–25, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 9

RX REFORM Health-care reform a primary concern in the election FEATURE 12

POWER TO THE PEOPLE You asked, the candidates answered in BW’s Electionland guide to the primaries NOISE 24

ALL STARS Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars stop in Boise SCREEN 28

ROBIN HOOD Ridley Scott’s version not as bad as some critics say

“To allow capitalism to fully work its course, you have to allow for failure.”

CITIZEN 10


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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Business Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: Nathaniel Hoffman Nathaniel@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Annabel Armstrong Videographer: Blair Davison Interns: Jennifer Spencer Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Jennifer Hernandez, David Kirkpatrick, George Prentice, Ted Rall ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Adam Rosenlund Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Steve Klamm, Noah Kroese, Glenn Landberg, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street, Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

NOTE COMING TO A BAR NEAR YOU This is the time of the year when BW staffers regularly find themselves “coming to” more often than waking up. We drag our sorry butts into the office, rumpled, with sunglasses on, and flop into our chairs just hoping the pounding will go away with enough sugar, grease and caffeine. At first, the month-long Martini Mix-Off was to blame. We’d head out bar hopping en masse every Thursday night with then-editorin-chief Bingo Barnes pulling double duty as the leader of the BW pack as well as a judge for the Mix-Off. Then someone had the bright idea to start testing for our annual Coldest Beer contest over the course of a month. I’ll admit, between the two, my liver has taken pretty severe beatings the last few years during the month of May. Last week, I completed all of my Coldest Beer assignments in one long, beer-soaked night. To keep from embarrassing myself, I won’t admit here how many bars or beers or shots my team logged. What’s important is that I’m ahead of deadline, and I’m finished. Despite a decent hangover. But not all BW testers have finished their beer temp testing. The smart testers don’t drink the beer, but instead hand it off to the nearest bellied up elbow bender. You’d think I would’ve learned my lesson by now. I can tell you for certain that the bar with the coldest beer in town was not on my list of stops, although I have one serious contender for the warmest beer. Guess we’ll just have to wait until Wednesday, June 30, when the Coldest Beer issue hits stands to find out. Until then, we offer up this week’s issue. Quick: pop quiz, hotshot: When are the primary elections? If you answered November, you’d be so wrong. The correct answer is Tuesday, May 25. And I’d like to think BW readers are such an engaged and well-informed bunch that not only did you all ace the quiz, but you’ve already completely rearranged your schedule to go vote. Need some help determining who to vote for? We have you covered. Turn to Page 12, where you’ll find BW’s election guide as generated, in part, by you, the readers at our online election forum called Electionland, where you ask the questions and the candidates answer. Read it. Study it. Vote with it. And get your questions ready for Tuesday’s winners because we’re relaunching Electionland before November’s final showdown. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Reilly Clark TITLE: Foreign Entanglement MEDIUM: acrylic on canvas ARTIST STATEMENT: Who has Who (whom?). This image is representative of our recent foreign entanglement and how we’re in several no-win scenarios. Or it could just be a strange picture of a snake and a bird ...

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Square formats are preferred and all mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 3


WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

WET YOUR WHISTLE The writer with BW’s most developed palate posted the equivalent of a booze strip tease on Cobweb this week with his ode to Saisons, which, unfortunately, you can’t get in the potato state. Work up a thirst and sudden desire to head to Seattle at Cobweb.

WHO? WHAT? WHERE? Starfucker drops Pyramiddd and re-adopts Starfucker. Except for their Facebook page. Get the dirt at Cobweb.

DEFINE “PORN” Citydesk poked a little fun at Wikipedia’s decision, spurred by Fox, to pull porn from its online encyclopedia. For a good laugh, read what one reader had to say about the stor y in the “quote of the week” on Page 6, and to read Citydesk’s take, log on to boiseweekly.com.

BEER WEEK AND BIKE WEEK Boise Bike Week runs until Saturday, May 22, and beer week goes through Sunday, May 23. For a list of activities, visit boiseweekly.com. For our two-wheeled commentary, including a pic of the ultimate contraption (part bike, part keg), visit Cobweb.

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INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

3

MAIL / MONDO GAGA

6

BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS Diagnosing the health-care impact on election season 9 CITIZEN

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FEATURE Electionland: Your guide to the primaries

12

BW PICKS

18

FIND

19

8 DAYS OUT

20

SUDOKU

22

NOISE Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars on hope, music and home 24 MUSIC GUIDE

26

SCREEN Robin Hood

28

MOVIE TIMES

29

FOOD Two reviewers head to the 2C to check out Le Baron’s Honker Cafe

30

WINE SIPPER

33

CLASSIFIEDS

34

HOME SWEET HOME

34

NYT CROSSWORD

36

FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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May

Music

David Andrews Band

21st

26th

Macklemore & Ryan Lewis

Paul Peterson also feat. The Project 28th

208 287 9200

www.reefboise.com

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MAIL I F A WI KI P E DIA PAGE ON B UK K AK E SHOWS A BROAD WITH GOO ALL OVER HE R, GU E SS WHAT—THAT’S ENC YC LOPEDIC CONTE NT. ”

—BK (boiseweekly.com, Citydesk, “FOX News Officially Steps into Activism,” May 11, 2010)

KUDOS Seems Bill Cope and a lot of Dems are PO’d at Walt Minnick because he would not “tow the party line” with ObamaCare (BW, Opinion, “Our Man in Nevada,” May 12, 2010). For the record, I live in Mike Simpson’s district. Twice, I heard Walt on Nate Shelman’s radio talk show on KBOI where he explained why he was voting against the bill and both times he made the point that he was voting as he was because he was elected to represent the citizens of Idaho who had made their feelings quite clear on the legislation. It

was refreshing to witness a member of Congress looking out for the folks back home instead of bowing to pressure from on high, that being the Speaker. We need more people “inside the beltway” that remember who put them there and whom they serve. —Mark D. Zimmerman, Boise

NO KUDOS The two major Republican candidates who want to go to the U.S. Congress from the 1st District of Idaho filled out a Tea Party questionnaire and stated they would like to remove the 17th Amendment allow-

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted other wise.

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ing direct election of U.S. senators. Mr. Vaughn Ward and Mr. Raul Labrador want to return to the days of back rooms filled with cigar smoke where the good old boys at the state legislature picked one of their best buds to go to Washington, D.C. I am amazed that these “patriotic” citizens want to take away a cherished right, a right fought and paid for with the blood of countless thousands of American military men and women. Mr. Ward fought in Iraq so that the Iraqis could vote, yet he is willing to strip Americans of that same right? Mr. Labrador is no better. Anyone espousing such radical notions should not be given the time of day, much less be elected to high office. How sad for our country. —Mark Klinger, Boise

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BILL COPE/OPINION

REKERS WRECKED The Right way to be gay

Here is what we know: George A. Rekers is 61 years old. He is a professor of neuropsychiatry and behavioral science at the University of South Carolina. He is a Southern Baptist and has a theological degree to go with his Ph.D. In 1972, when he would have been 24, Rekers developed a method of spotting what he called “gender disturbances” in children. Along with the arch-conservative James Dobson, he helped found the Family Research Council in 1983, and is considered within certain circles to be an expert on homosexual behavior. Until resigning this week, he was on the board of directors of the National Association for Research Therapy of Homosexuality, an organization that insists the use of something called “conversion therapy” can turn homosexuals away from homosexuality, especially if it begins at an early age. By his own admission, Professor Rekers has spent a great deal of time with children and adolescents who have exhibited “gender disturbances” in his efforts to demonstrate that budding gays can be turned to heterosexuality. In 1989, Rekers co-authored a paper in which women working outside the home was called “bondage,” that despite a few bruises and welts, Biblically prescribed spanking was not child abuse, and that morally, there could be only one definition of “family.” In spite of the fact his teachings have met with objections from sources as diverse as the American Psychiatric Association, the Log Cabin Republicans and the ACLU, Rekers has been hired repeatedly to testify in legal cases as an authority on why homosexuals must be denied certain rights and privileges. A significant share of his income has come from fees charged to anti-gay adoption forces to show up in court on their behalf. This month, a Miami newspaper photographed him returning from a 10-day trip to Europe in the company of a young man (age 20) he had hired off a website called rentboy.com. On that site, attractive men advertise themselves by posing with most of their clothes off. Some of them go so far as to show potential boy renters what their penises look like. At first, Professor Rekers claimed he had rented “Lucien” (real name: Jo-Vanni Roman) to carry the luggage. Later, he added that he had spent much of their stay together in Italy filling the lad in on the glories of a life lived in the loving embrace of Jesus Christ—an embrace young Lucien could not possibly experience if he were to continue with his gay ways. Professor Rekers has spent decades warning people that homosexuality means an eternal separation from the Lord, so we must assume he explained to Lucien that he would not be going to Heaven if he didn’t stop renting himself and his penis out over the Internet. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

For his part, Lucien told reporters that he had given Rekers daily nude massages, and that judging from what he saw, he had no doubts Rekers is a homosexual. U Now, here is what we don’t know: Might there be something about making a living as a Bible-spouting, right-wing, high-profile homophobe that encourages a certain variety of homosexual to take up that profession? Or could holding the job of Bible-spouting, right-wing, high-profile homophobe somehow be compelling people already in that profession to turn gay? And could either of those propositions suggest that the career choice of Bible-spouting, right-wing, high-profile homophobe is populated to some unknown degree by gays who refuse to admit their homosexuality even when they are caught red-handed? Could it even be that the entire field is so dominated by homosexuals, that it’s hard to find a non-gay Bible-spouting, right-wing, high-profile homophobe in the ranks? Certainly, many in the broader homophobe community will find it offensive that we are even asking these questions. But considering how many of their own number have been exposed as homosexuals, there is sufficient reason to examine the possibility that the Religious Right itself—what with all their Deuteronomy this and Leviticus that—is actually causing homosexuality among those paragons of self-righteousness who most fervently believe what they are preaching. As we know, most gays honest enough to admit they are gay would insist that they were born homosexual, that they are as natural a part of God’s Good Creation as flowers and florists. But what does Professor Rekers think, now that he’s been caught in the biggest lie of his life? Or the Reverend Ted Haggard—the last associate of James Dobson to be exposed in the embrace of a male prostitute. When did it start with him? Closer to home, Larry Craig? When and if the time ever comes that Larry turns to honesty, will he acknowledge that Nature made him what he is? Or might he credit all those years of being around—and taking an active part in—the jokes, the ridicule, the hatred, the recrimination, the legislation … the damnation … for flipping his gay switch to “on”? Do we become that which we loath the most? Or do we loath the most what we’ve known about ourselves all along? And either way, how can any healthy mind spend a lifetime condemning itself? And ultimately, how many more children will be twisted by the likes of George A. Rekers before we can allow them to be what they are? As the professor would agree, this particular “gender disturbance” may be a learning opportunity we can’t afford to ignore.

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OPINION/TED RALL

HOLIDAY IN THE SUN Travel planning for Afghanistan

NEW YORK—How are things going in Afghanistan? The best way to find out is to go see for yourself. I’m doing that in August. You can tell a lot even before you go. “Whatever you do,” a friend e-mailed me from Kabul, “don’t fly into the Kabul airport.” He wasn’t worried that my flight would get shot down by one of President Ronald Reagan’s leftover Stinger missiles. His concern is corrupt cops. “[Afghan President Hamid] Karzai’s policemen are crazy,” my buddy, who works for an NGO, elaborated. “They’ll hold you up at gunpoint right in the airport.” One option is to hitch a flight on a military transport to the former Soviet airbase at Bagram, but war reporters shouldn’t tag along with soldiers. So I’m not flying into Kabul. Which works out, since getting to Taloqan, in Takhar province near the Tajik border would have required traveling toward Mazar-e-Sharif from Kabul. Among the highlights of the road are landslides and a trek through the warscarred Soviet-era Salong Tunnel. It also offers an assortment of thugs both political (Taliban) and apolitical (bandits). Instead, I’ll fly into Dushanbe, the capital of Tajikistan. It takes a full day to drive from Dushanbe to the Afghan border. I’ll be in Dushanbe for two or three days waiting for government permits. You can’t travel to the “security zone” along the border with Afghanistan without a permission from the Tajik Ministry of Foreign Affairs. No journalist in a war zone is safe without a fixer to make things happen: government permits, cars and drivers, places to stay. I’ve accumulated a set of fixers throughout Central and South Asia over the years, but it’s hard

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to arrange a fixer in advance in Afghanistan. There’s hardly any mail, phone service or electricity outside Kabul, much less e-mail. Nevertheless, I contacted another Kabulbased friend about lining up fixers in Takhar, Kunduz, then northern Afghanistan en route to and around Herat (near the Turkmen and Iranian borders) and finally Nimruz province. There’s heavy fighting in Kunduz. The Taliban recently beheaded four guards working for U.S. forces near Herat. In Zaranj, the provincial capital of Nimruz, suicide bombers just took out the governor’s compound. “No one wants to go where you’re going,” my friend informed me. The average salary in Afghanistan is $30 per month. “I pay $150 a day,” I replied. “I know a guy. But he’s a whiner. He’ll complain about it the whole time. And you’ll have to promise a death bonus to his wife if something happens.” I can rent a satellite phone and use dial-up. It won’t be fast; at 9,600 bps it takes an hour to send one a simple cartoon. The search for power will be endless. Of course, the biggest inconvenience is danger. Everyone worries about me. “Keep your head down.” “Come back alive.” “Don’t get killed.” They’re sweet and loving sentiments. But they’re also kind of funny. Most of my friends still think of Afghanistan as the Good War, the one that had something to do with 9/11. They think we’re there to help the Afghans. They think the carnage is in Iraq; actually, it’s more dangerous for U.S. troops in Afghanistan. If the Afghanistan War is going so well, why is everyone so worried?

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NEWS/CITYDESK B ETS Y Z . R U S S ELL/ EYE ON B OIS E

NEWS

RX FOR MIDTERM ELEX Will health-care reform help or hinder candidates in November? NATHANIEL HOFFMAN Medicare donut hole. “As components of this roll out leading up to full implementation in 2014, people are going to be seeing a lot of the benefits of this,” said David Irwin, a spokesman for the AARP of Idaho. Across the nation, the AARP is beginning to educate its members about the reforms that

NOAH KROESE

When Idaho Gov. C. L. “Butch” Otter signed on to a multi-state lawsuit to overturn the Obama administration’s brand new healthcare reform law, he made an electoral bet. Sen. Mike Crapo, who voted against the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act in December 2009, made the same wager when he co-sponsored an effort to repeal the bill. But a virtually unknown Democrat from Teton Valley is making the opposite bet, running for Senate on a pro-healthcare reform platform. “This is not health-care reform, this is health insurance reform ... the government is refereeing health care,” said Tom Sullivan, a small-business owner and first-time candidate from Tetonia. “This is an opportunity for us to make the American people more productive.” Sullivan has an opponent in the May 25 primary— Brooklyn, N.Y., attorney and single-payer advocate William Bryk—but he hopes to challenge Crapo in November, in part on Crapo’s opposition to the Democrats’ health reforms. “It’s not about whether it’s a right or a privilege,” Sullivan said during a recent Boise visit. “It’s about the overall net effect of having a healthy population.” Recent polls indicate that either wager is risky. A late-April poll from the Quinnipiac University Polling Institute found that voters disapproved 55-40 of the way President Barack Obama handled health-care reform. The Kaiser Family Foundation asked, also in late-April, how Americans felt about the law itself. They found the reforms favorable by a margin of 4640, but respondents were confused about what the law actually does. More recent Gallup and Rasmussen polls were equally contradictory, showing respectively, support for the bill and support for repeal of the bill. Part of Sullivan’s bet is that by fall, more Americans will understand what the law does for them and therefore accept it. By September, insurance companies won’t be allowed to deny coverage to children with pre-existing conditions, must end lifetime limits on coverage and rescissions (when people are dropped after they get sick) and must provide no-cost preventive care visits. Seniors will get a $250 rebate for prescription drugs if they’ve been denied drug coverage under the so-called WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

are coming down the pike, even before election season swings into full gear. But as reform backers prepare their campaigns, Crapo and many other conservative candidates are insisting on repeal, echoing the Republican message in the lead up to passage of the bill. Crapo favored health-care co-ops and Medicare/Medicaid reform during the Congressional debate and last week he cited a recent Congressional Budget Office report that estimates that discretionary spending on health-care reforms will cost $115 billion— taking the potential cost of reform over the $1 trillion mark. “We were making these arguments when we were debating the bill, but the proof of it was not out,” he said. Jonathan Parker, executive director of the

Idaho Republican Party, said health care probably won’t be the main issue in November, but that it will be a strong issue for Republican candidates in Idaho. “I just think overall a majority of Idahoans oppose the actual health-care bill that went through Congress,” Parker said. Idaho Republicans will continue to call for opening insurance policy sales across state lines and bringing costs under control. So might Idaho’s Democratic Rep. Walt Minnick, though he’s not arguing for repeal. Minnick was one of a handful of Democrats who voted against the bill. “Walt thought through this very carefully,” said Idaho Democratic Party Executive Director Jim Hansen. “He doesn’t support repealing it, and he doesn’t support this crazy lawsuit.” The National Republican Congressional Committee funded a pre-primary television spot criticizing Minnick’s votes against abortion-related amendments to the health-care reform bill, and Parker cited Minnick’s original support for Nancy Pelosi to become speaker of the House—the same Pelosi who also supported health-care reform—as reason to oppose Minnick. The subtle arguments in favor of health-care reform might be hard to make in Idaho as well. “From a policy perspective, I think most people would approve of it,” said College of Idaho political economist Jasper LiCalzi. “But it’s the big picture stuff that people don’t like.” Boise doctor Ted Epperly, chairman of the board of the American Academy of Family Physicians, agreed that people are starting to settle into the idea of the massive reforms. “It will be interesting to see what the voters have to say, however I think the politicians will absolutely make it an issue,” said Epperly, who supported Obama’s reforms and was at the White House this month discussing ways to increase the number of primary care doctors using incentives that were written into the bill. Sullivan and Crapo have about five months to read the bill—Sullivan says it’s really only 230 pages if you take out all the triple spacing—and hone their arguments, as the powerful forces of public opinion are shaped by the early roll-out of health-care reform. “Whether it’s enough time or not, what really matters is principles,” Sullivan said. “I’m not going to straddle the fence.”

What’s the metaphor, Rex?

LAST-MINUTE ELECTIONEERING In the last week before an election— even a mere primary election—the money starts flowing to candidates, giving some indication of who will survive. In this case, Gov. C. L. “Butch” Otter saw a late influx of thousands of dollars from political action committees, according to the Idaho Secretary of State’s online database. Otter got his $2,500 from Altria, nee Phillip Morris, on the same day he received a $2,000 personal contribution from Altria lobbyist Skip Smyser. He got his $1,500 from the Regence Group insurance interests and $9,000 from the loggers, contractors and the Idaho (Power) PAC. Pre-primary reports were due as BW went to press, but the early filings are an indication of high dollar contributions. Based on the 48-hour notices filed, Otter’s primary opponents barely managed to scrape together gas money. Otter’s presumptive Democratic opponent, Keith Allred, who has already drawn fire from an oppositional website funded by Idaho industrialists—allredink.com— reported $6,000 in large contributions prior to his full filing. The Allred camp was also touting poll results in the last week, citing a Rasmussen Reports poll that had Otter up 54-32, but Allred closing the gap by 10 points since the last query. Otter Republican primary opponent Rex Rammell was also touting his optimistic reading of poll numbers recently, releasing a Greg Smith and Associates poll that showed him with 24 points to Otter’s 48, with 28 percent uncommitted in the race. And though it’s not likely to affect the primary, the Idaho Education Association released a poll showing wide opposition to budget cuts in public schools, to the tune of 81 percent. Eight in 10 likely voters said they opposed the $130 million cuts to education that the Legislature approved and Otter signed last session, and a majority of respondents favored adding a penny sales tax or funding more tax auditors to collect money for schools. Warning: All of these polls have margins of error, i.e., could be wrong. In the First Congressional District race, Vaughn Ward—who replaced much of his campaign staff in recent weeks after a series of missteps—led Raul Labrador in the money race, with nearly $600,000 to Labrador’s $200,000. But Labrador sealed the Tea Party Boise endorsement, the group’s first-ever political endorsement (see Citizen, Page 10). Still, Democrat Rep. Walt Minnick—who has no primary this month— spent more than the two of them combined and still has $1 million in the bank. —Nathaniel Hoffman

BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 9


CITIZEN

BRENDAN SMYTHE The resurgence of pre-Enlightenment thought NATHANIEL HOFFMAN

OLD IDAHO PENITENTIARY SATURDAY, JUNE 19TH at the

plus 11 other bands on 2 stages, art demonstations and prison exhibits

WWW.GEMSTATEJAM.COM

10 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

had interest in those companies, for them to stay afloat or survive, would all pull together and fix what needed to be fixed. If all their investors bailed on them and said, nah, you need to go down, obviously they’ve upset their investors or any other Americans enough that they need to disappear. To become prophet and say that this will trickle down to all of us ... we believe that that was just fear tactics. Obviously, it started under Bush and we were all just watching this happen.

How did you start Tea Party Boise? It all started with the bailouts that got us angry enough. Watching that happen—it drove us to do something that we’ve never done before, and that’s stand on a street corner with a sign. There were just three of us: my brotherin-law, myself and my wife. I drug Michelle out there and she was embarrassed the whole way, but we felt passionate enough to say something to people that we disapproved of what was going on in Washington. A year later, we’re up to 2,600 members that feel the same way.

Was your first protest during the Bush administration? It was just around the kitchen tables at that time. As a conservative, this is a conservative movement. But one thing it absolutely is not is a Republican movement. They have done just as much damage to this economy and to the destruction of our founding principles as the Democratic Party. This started at the kitchen table, and when it came to watching where Obama was taking it, it really drove us to the streets.

What made you mad about the bailouts? We’re capitalists, we’re business owners and to allow capitalism to fully work its course, you have to allow for failure, and for the government to take our tax money, lots of our tax money ... whatever method they choose to take our money and give it to companies that really should have failed really made us angry.

What did Obama do that moved it to the streets? First off, he was continuing what was going on with the bailouts. But secondly, the tone changed from simply the bailouts to wanting to control and save all these other American problems. And we felt we didn’t want any more touching of the system. If you remember, it started going over to GM, we started working into other industries, and if there wasn’t any public pressure at the time, who knows how far it would have gone.

What was your preferred alternative? To try and guess as to what would happen requires prophecy. When people are held accountable to their actions, they do everything they can to try and stop the worst-case scenario from happening. People work together, we pull together as Americans and do it in an appropriate way, which is that anyone who

How far do you think it could go? Tyranny, no doubt, and we have lots and lots of history that shows that. Tyranny is when you have one person or a group of

JER EM Y LANNINGHAM

LIVE Inside the Walls of the

The Tea Party movement arose as a conservative reaction to Barack Obama’s election to the presidency. It has become a force in Idaho and national politics. Brendan Smythe, founder and president of Tea Party Boise, is a draftsman, father of four from Northern California and amateur scholar of government systems. In our hour-and-a-half-long interview, Smythe set out to convert us to his liberty-loving ways, but we agreed to disagree, perhaps to continue the debate over a beer.

persons that take control of a society, and so, if you look back in history, even with some wellfounded republics, when those republics think that they are a democracy—100 percent vote of the people—what happens is elitists will soon find themselves in power and they can’t control themselves with that much power, it’s a very addictive force, and so you quickly find yourself with a tyrannical government. What about the tyranny of corporations? They try to be, but there’s another force that’s working against them, and that’s the consumer. And so you have this beautiful match as to who has the money and who decides where that money is going to go, and so corporations have these handcuffs on them. They have to convince us and make us happy enough and make us want to give our money to them, but ultimately, at the end of the day, we have the choice and the power to give them that money or turn on that TV station or listen to that radio program or buy a Boise Weekly, or pick it up, it’s ultimately our choice. Now some people might say, “Well, they’re playing mind games with you.” Oh definitely, they’re trying to do mind games all the time but they never for once have the power to just say, you know what? I’m not going to try and convince you anymore, I’m just going to take your money. Smythe on socialism, health-care reform, YouTube and spirituality at boiseweekly.com.

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BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 11


ELECTIONLAND A VOTER GUIDE CREATED BY THE PEOPLE

GOVERNOR GOP How will you raise money to fund public education in Idaho?

WALT BAYES WALT BAYES

REX RAMMELL REX RAMMEL

Age: 72 Occupation: Retired itinerant farm worker Years in Idaho: No response Blog I read this week: None Best government service used this month: No response Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: No Response Teabags: 4

Age: 49 Occupation: Veterinarian Years in Idaho: 49, lived in Japan and Kansas Blog I read this week: Not really, Adam’s Blog, Eye on Boise Best government service used this month: I’m not happy with any of them. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: ITD taking down campaign signs. Teabags: 5

BUTCH OTTER BUTCH OTTER

Age: 68 Occupation: Governor Years in Idaho: 68 Blog I read this week: No response Best government service used this month: No response Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: No response Teabags: 3

PETE PETERSON PETE PETERSON

Age: 59 Occupation: Retired systems analyst and comedian Years in Idaho: 59 Blog I read this week: None Best government service used this month: The IRS, surprisingly. Every time I call, I always get a polite message about my tax refund not being ready yet. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Anything dealing with Mike Gwartney. Teabags: 1

12 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

SHARON ULLMAN SHARON ULLMAN Age: 46 Occupation: Full-time Ada County Commissioner Years in Idaho: 20 Blog I read this week: None regularly, Boise Guardian, Adam’s Blog, Richert, Citydesk, Eye on Boise, Huckleberries Best government service used this month: Idaho State Tax Commission in providing tax forms for a prior year. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Idaho Racing Commission and their attitude. Teabags: 3

TAMARA WELLS

TAMARA WELLS

Age: 29 on the left and 29 on the right Occupation: Medical tricologist Years in Idaho: 15, from California Blog I read this week: None Best government service used this month: None Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: None Teabags: 4

Otter: There is no doubt that public education is the single most important and proper role of government under the Idaho Constitution, and it will be the first priority for “backfilling” with available tax dollars as our economy fully recovers. However, “more money” is not the only or even the best answer to improving public schools and higher education in Idaho. More efficiency, better governance, less administrative overhead, more local flexibility, more parental involvement, more community support, more awareness of the crucial role that education plays in our economy ... Peterson: Education has been cut to the bone. Now we are starting to amputate. Both Butch’s office and Tom Luna’s are top-heavy with highly paid administrators (as is the Boise School District). Get rid of them. We need more grunts and fewer generals. I have heard that Idaho has more school districts than Montana, Wyoming and Utah combined. If true, we need to consolidate districts. We also need to study school districts (like the Meridian School District) and see how they do a better job for less money. Rammell: By cutting taxes! When our tax burden is too high, the economy will be suppressed and tax revenue will be low. By decreasing the tax burden, businesses will generate more taxable money. An economic paradox, cutting taxes when taxes are suppressive will actually bring in more tax revenue at the lower rate than the higher rate. This was done by Coolidge in the ’20s, JFK in the ’60s, Reagan in the ’80s, and Bush after 911. It will also work for Idaho. The problem is it is not instantaneous. It will take 2 to 3 years. Therefore, we have to do some creative financing along with some spending cuts. I propose eliminating most of the State Department of Education and giving complete control to the parents and teachers ... Ullman: As far as education spending, there are ways in which to make less money go further. For example, we need to raise the standards for students to gain entry into our state’s four-year university program. There is no place for remedial classes there, either. Higher standards will lead to smaller incoming classes and a significantly lower drop-out rate. For those students who need to hone their skills for a year or two before attending a four-year college, there is now a healthy community-college system accessible in most of the state ... Wells: I think a lot has to change. What are the schools going to do to raise money? Why are they always looking to the taxpayer to raise money? People are really involved in their children and they feel like they are not asked enough. We’ve got too many chiefs and not enough indians in the administration end. That’s the main problem in education: the administration we have. I would revamp the Board of Education. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


E

lectionland started as an experiment in democracy. And like democracy, it’s been like herding cats. Using a highly interactive web portal developed by the guys at yousaidit.com, we offered BW readers the opportunity to pose questions directly to political candidates—no stuffy debate moderators, no lame “what’s the last book you read?” questions. Just voters and candidates, mano a mano. But the voters had precious few questions. Maybe that’s why they still pay us the big bucks to come up with probing questions. Maybe Boise Weekly readers don’t really care about the primary elections, during which party insiders sort out their dirty laundry prior to the real election in November. Maybe news consumers don’t really want to be part of the

GOVERNOR DEMOCRAT

news-gathering process, despite conventional wisdom in the biz. In the end, you posed 48 questions to 28 candidates. With much goading, 22 of the candidates responded, with variable success rates browsing to a specified website, logging in and filling in fields obviously demarcated for their personal response. In return for their cooperation, BW has designated each of the federal, statewide and county candidates with a specified number of teabags, the now classic symbol of our political era. Here’s the patented BW teabag rating scheme:

US SENATE GOP

KEITH ALLRED KEITH ALLRED

MIKE CRAPO MIKE CRAPO

Age: 45 Occupation: Mediator and president of The Common Interest Years in Idaho: 45 Blog I read this week: Eye on Boise Best government service used this month: Public schools Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Special interest influence in state government. Teabags: 1

Age: 59 Occupation: Attorney Years in Idaho: 59 Blog I read this week: Blog clipping service Best government service used this month: Found out that Bonneville DMV allows early renewal of licenses. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Behavior of the U.S. Congress. Teabags: 3

Candidates received one teabag for each of the following: 1. Not answering Electionland questions, thus spurning both voters and the liberal media. 2. Talking about the Founding Fathers, the Constitution or God too much. 3. Attending “official” Tea Party events. 4. Complaining that government services are socialist. 5. Getting an actual Tea Party endorsement. 6. Winning BW’s teabagger bonus option. And remember: Idaho’s primary election is Tuesday, May 25. You can vote in either the Democratic or the Republican primary, but not both. For information, to request an absentee ballot or to find your polling place, visit idahovotes.gov.

US SENATE DEMOCRAT

WILLIAM BRYK Age: 55 Occupation: Lawyer Years in Idaho: 0 Blog I read this week: Made a brief post this week Best government service used this month: Public transportation Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Dealing with private health insurer for prescriptions. Teabags: 0

CLAUDE DAVIS IIIIII CLAUDE “SKIP” DAVIS LEE CHANEY Age: 57 Occupation: Recycler Years in Idaho: About 20 years, from Oregon Blog I read this week: None Best government service used this month: Social Security Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Complaints about his signs from cities. Teabags: 3

Do you think Idaho colleges and universities could compete with other states’ colleges and universities? Why or why not.

Age: 64 Occupation: Realtor Years in Idaho: 33 years, from Pennsylvania Blog I read this week: None Best government service used this month: Wieser Post Office is phenomenal. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: None Teabags: 1

Do you share the belief that crude oil speculation is partly responsible for volatile retail gasoline prices? Do you deem it necessary to rein in irresponsible speculation to prevent further damage to our already weakened economy? If so, what measures would you propose?

TOM SULLIVAN Age: 42 Occupation: Small business owner: merchant processing company, industrial park and small newspaper in Driggs Years in Idaho: Off and on since 1980 Blog I read this week: None Best government service used this month: Helped sign Mom up for Social Security. Did the whole application online, and it was “painfully easy.” Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Dealing with Citibank Mortgage over a billing mistake. Teabags: 1 Neither of you has run for office before. Why now?

Allred: The only responsible answer is yes. But we’ve got to recognize the important role that higher education—including our universities, community colleges and technical training facilities—provides in Idaho. Idaho’s founders understood that a thorough, effective education for our people is absolutely essential. As Idaho’s Constitution explains, “the stability of a republican form of government” depends “mainly upon the intelligence of the people.” Only an educated workforce will attract the businesses that can grow Idaho’s economy and sustain it through economic downturns. And only a robust higher education system will create that workforce. Only then will we truly be in a position to compete with other states, whether it’s on the ball field, the classroom, or in the strength and vibrancy of our economy. Chaney: Competing athletically. Yes, this builds moral and competitive spirit. Scholastically, it helps the college to keep up with changes.

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Davis: Due to the nature of the beast, speculation is a product of our capitalistic society. As long as commodities are needed, speculators will always be there to get their share of the pie, or perhaps lose it. I know of no real way to try to regulate speculation, irresponsible or not, but as a consumer, we all have the ability to do our own thing to help reduce the impact of sky-high gas prices. In the summer of 2008, gas prices were above $4 per gallon. I made a personal pact to NOT drive my vehicle one day each week, and I stuck to it. Being a Realtor, I depend on my vehicle to conduct a large portion of my business. As an independent businessman, I am able to time manage my business to accommodate this type of change. It caused no problem with my client base, and I was able to continue that practice until gas dropped below $3.50 per gallon. Collectively, can you imagine the impact on the oil industry and gas prices in particular if we all practiced this form of conservation? … Crapo: No Response

Bryk: I have run for office before. It’s always appropriate for citizens to offer themselves at the polls to serve the community and offer their opinions on public questions. Campaigns aren’t mere horse races: They’re the public forum through which we thrash out, however messily, the issues of the day ... I chose to contest this seat in 2010 in large part because the Idaho Democratic party organization failed to enter a candidate at the last election in 2004 ... At least this time, there will be a contest in November. Sullivan: I am running for United States Senate because I have two children: a daughter aged 13 and a son aged 10. As an American, I have been fortunate to grow up in a country that provides endless opportunity to anyone who is willing to educate themselves and work hard. I would like to guarantee that same opportunity to my children. I am running now because it has never been more important for able candidates to challenge incumbents and the status quo.

BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 13


US CONGRESS DISTRICT 1 GOP

KATHERINE BURTON

HARLEY BROWN HARLEY BROWN Age: 55 Occupation: Retired U.S. Navy officer Years in Idaho: 20 Blog I read this week: Not that computer literate Best government service used this month: We haven’t been attacked militarily across the border from Mexico or any other foreign power. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: I paid my taxes the other day. Teabags: 4

RAUL LABRADOR Age: 42 Occupation: Lawyer Years in Idaho: 14 years Blog I read this week: Idaho Conservative Blogger, Adam’s Blog, Eye on Boise, Treasured Valley Best government service used this month: I think we have great roads. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: I don’t deal with the government much. Teabags: 3

VAUGHN WARD Age: 41 Occupation: Lt. Col. (select) in U.S. Marine Corps, active reserves Years in Idaho: No response Blog I read this week: None Best government service used this month: No response Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: No response Teabags: 3

What is the difference between your Republican values and Rep. Walt Minnick’s? Minnick, a Democrat, has voted with Republicans on many of the key Democratic reforms in the last year. What would distinguish your tenure, partywise? Brown: WALT MINNICK VOTED FOR THAT DOMESTIC ENEMY TO THE CONSTITUTION OF THE UNITED STATES AND DOMESTIC ENEMY TO THE COUNTRY WE’RE SWORN TO DEFEND: NANCY [ COMMIE } PELOSI AS SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE. I AM NOT LIKE THIS UNPATRIOTIC PERSON NAMED WALT MINNICK. TO MINNICK : I HOPE YOU READ THIS, “COMRADE”! Labrador: The people of Idaho are conservative by nature. Walt Minnick claims that he shares many of our conservative values. However, his 2009 American Conservative Union score is 44 percent. In addition, Rep.

US CONGRESS DISTRICT 2 GOP

Minnick supported the interests of NARAL Pro-Choice America 100 percent in 2009. He also voted to increase the estate tax and other taxes ... Ward: Minnick voted with Republicans only when Pelosi didn’t need him. On critical votes, like bringing back the estate tax, also known as the death tax, Minnick voted with Pelosi and it passed by one vote. Minnick also voted for Nancy Pelosi as speaker and for taxpayer-funded abortion. While he did vote no on the health-care bill, he refused to work with the Republicans on their health-care plan ...

Age: 52 Occupation: Works at veterinary office Years in Idaho: 11 Blog I read this week: My own Best government service used this month: Got answers from the IRS. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Nothing recent Teabags: 1

CHICK HEILESON Age: 64 Occupation: Retired builder/developer/ HVAC contractor Years in Idaho: 64 years Blog I read this week: No. Not this week. Adventures of Charlie and Jane. Best government service used this month: I’m not into government service. Idaho’s got some of the best roads in the country. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: I try to stay away from ’em. Teabags: 5

RUSS MATHEWS Age: No response Occupation: No response Years in Idaho: No response Blog I read this week: No response Best government service used this month: No response Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: No response Teabags: 4

MIKE SIMPSON Age: 59 Occupation: Dentist Years in Idaho: 59 Blog I read this week: No response Best government service used this month: No response Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: No response Teabags: 3

What is your plan for the 13 million jobs that have been lost since December 2007? The White House and Congress seem completely oblivious to the job crisis our country is facing. Burton: The jobs loss has been tragic and devastating but it also presents an opportunity for doing things differently in the American economy. A recent study shows that we have reached peak oil and an oil ‘crunch’ is inevitable within the near future. Considering the amount of products used on a daily basis that contain petroleum, we would be wise to move a portion of our economy to new technologies, energies and materials. America’s economic recovery needs to include research, eduction and training in order to create and sustain a robust and diverse economy. To this end, I would support legislation that creates jobs that look toward a strong American economy ... Simpson: I don’t believe the answer to creating jobs is to continue spending money we don’t have. Instead, I would prefer to see tax cuts targeted at the small businesses, which create most of the new jobs in our economy.

By giving small businesses a tax break, they will be better positioned to expand their operations, bring on new employees, generate more income and ultimately create more revenue for the federal treasury, which helps balance the budget. Big government stimulus packages like that passed by the Democrats in Congress certainly create jobs in the near term, but that level of excessive spending hinders our economy over the long term ... Heileson: We need to put a stop to debt and currency-supply expansion by the Federal Reserve, relieve the vast number of federal regulations placed upon the market, rescind international trade agreements that give an unfair advantage to our foreign competitors (which results in American businesses moving out of the country or hiring foreign workers), and allow for competing currencies (e.g. gold and silver) rather than requiring the use of Federal Reserve notes ...

ADA COUNTY COMMISSION 2 ROGER SIMMONS

RICK YZAGUIRRE

Age: 65 Occupation: Semi-retired media consultant and lobbyist Years in Idaho: 34 years Blog I read this week: None Best government service used this month: Ada County Elections Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Can’t think of one. Teabags: 0

Age: 60 Occupation: County commissioner, grocer Years in Idaho: 60 years, a few in Alaska Blog I read this week: None, Statesman once in a while, BW or Guardian Best government service used this month: Renewed dog license with City of Eagle. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Getting driver’s license renewed. Teabags: 1

14 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

What is the ideal relationship between county government and the local governments it surrounds? Simmons: In short, it should be a symbiotic relationship where all entities work together to enhance services for all taxpayers living inside the county borders ... Unfortunately, based on the discussions I have had recently with some other elected officials, those relationships have deteriorated over the past six or seven years.

Yzaguirre: We have a good working relationship with other government entities and work toward mutual solutions for the greater good. We each have a role in coming together to address tough issues and there is regional cooperation. I believe we must build consensus ...

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KEYNOTE SPEAKER

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Memorial Day Weekend

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SUNDAY, MAY 30

Workshops on everything from golf to herbal remedies to belly dancing Exhibit Hall and Hands-On-Hall FREE and Open to the Public Over 50 Vendors selling fabulous products and offering massages and other treatments

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208-726-2777

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BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 15


LT. GOVERNOR GOP JOSHUA BLESSINGER

BRAD LITTLE

Age: 31 Occupation: Student, video production and editing, honorable discharge from Marines Years in Idaho: 31 Blog I read this week: Not usually, they are very left-leaning. Best government service used this month: Education, on a field trip with daughter’s class. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Nothing recent Teabags: 1

Age: 56 Occupation: Rancher Years in Idaho: No response Blog I read this week: No response Best government service used this month: No response Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: No response Teabags: 2

STEVE PANKEY Age: 58 Occupation: Real estate investor, owns properties Years in Idaho: 24 years Blog I read this week: None Best government service used this month: Going to the Post Office in Shoshone. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: None Teabags: 2

BLESSINGER PANKEY

LITTLE

Would the lieutenant governor have the responsibility of appointing a much needed oversight committee for Idaho’s appellate public defenders office? Blessinger: To my knowledge and research, the responsibility to appoint such a committee would fall on the Governor’s Office or the state attorney general. The governor may delegate this authority to the lieutenant governor, at which time I would appoint a committee that would ensure that the rights of the accused and the rights of any applicable victims are upheld. I do agree with you that the office does need oversight, directly or indirectly. I was formerly a correctional officer at the Idaho Correctional Center and saw many inmate files that, under a competently overseen appellate public defender, should have been overturned. I also saw a great number of honest and good men who just made a big mistake, but still deserved the time they were serving given the nature of their crime. To put it short, If it is made my responsibility, I will do my best to put the right individuals in place to make the Appellate Public Defenders Office run as efficiently and correctly as possible.

Pankey: The lieutenant governor would most likely play a major role in creating the oversight committee, appointing qualified people, agenda and goals. An effective oversight committee is needed. The Idaho Judicial Counsel is an old-boy club that rubber-stamps arbitrary judicial decisions leading to taxpayer supported appeals. The Idaho State Bar rarely takes action against incompetent and/ or corrupt attorneys—also leading to taxpayer supported appeals. Idaho’s state courts are divided into two areas: civil and criminal. Idaho’s major routine civil litigant is Action Collection. Action Collection has undue influence in civil Magistrate Courts, District Courts, Idaho Court of Appeals, and the Idaho Supreme Court. Voters have the right to not retain biased magistrates, district judges, and Supreme Court judges. Your vote not to retain biased judges is the only current check and balance on the appellate process. If Idaho director of finance Gavin M. Gee had the guts to regulate Action Collection according to law, there would be more taxpayer resources to deal with problems in the Idaho appellate public defenders office. In short, appellate problems are multifaceted ...

ADA COUNTY COMMISSION 3

16 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

VERN BISTERFELDT

FRED TILMAN

Age: 71 Occupation: Retired Boise police captain Years in Idaho: 51 Blog I read this week: Boise Guardian, for the first time Best government service used this month: Boise City Council buying Hammer Flat. Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: Mixed feelings on F-35 and Boise streetcar. Teabags: 0

Age: 64 Occupation: Retired U.S. West management, Ada County commissioner Years in Idaho: 64 Blog I read this week: None Best government service used this month: Opening of the Detox Center Worst bureaucratic bungle this month: None Teabags: 1 WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 17


AM Y GR ANGER

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

The strong, silent type.

THURSDAY MAY 20 abc’s TYPOGRAPHY CLASS

Boise bands bring the house down.

WEDNESDAY MAY 19 film BANDS OF 208 Anyone who’s been packed into a dank basement, jostled by the sway of sweaty bodies and sloshed with cheap beer while listening to the deafening clamor of live music pumped through sputtering amps knows how rad a house show can be. Local filmmaker Clarke Howell felt the pull of the house show scene. Between February and August of 2009, Howell filmed local bands at three house venues—Baby Sale, Grandma’s House and 208 House—and compiled the footage into a documentary called Bands of 208. “The documentary is split up into three parts,” explained Howell. “Each part is documenting these three houses and some of the bands and people surrounding each thing.” The documentary features local bands Vagerfly, Gorilla Thunder, For Fuck’s Sake, Mere Cat, Angels of the Dust and Scarf, and explores the fan communities that have sprung up around them. “I had already gone to shows at these three houses, and I saw something happening. They weren’t just venues … they had a good community building around it, and I saw some sort of culture forming that was separate from other culture elsewhere …” Howell said. “It was distinct and unique, and some of the music reflected that.” Bands of 208 premieres Wednesday, May 19, at Neurolux and includes live music from Jonn E Combat and the Jungle Fucks. DVDs containing a number of special features and a music compilation will be available for purchase. 8 p.m., $3, Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., neurolux.com. To view the trailer, search “Bands of 208” on facebook.com.

FRIDAY MAY 21 bikes BBP’S BLOCK PARTY It’s alive! The Boise Bicycle Project’s second annual Block Party on

Friday, May 21, will feature a contest for the most creative two-wheeled monster rides: the Frankenbikes. “The Frankenbike contest is a BBP brainchild. We’ve always had pretty limited resources at the shop, and as a result, we’ve had to get pretty creative in some of the bikes we’ve built.

18 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Frankenbike takes this creativeness to the next level by seeing who can build the wildest, craziest, most ‘Franken’ frankenbike,” said Jimmy Hallyburton, executive director and co-founder of BBP. In 2007, the Boise Bicycle Project, a 501(c)3 nonprofit bicycle coopera-

Typeophile.com messageboard user “oldnick” has something to say to all those graphic designers out there who don’t pay for their fancy fonts: “Your lame attempt to excuse your behavior with the bromide ‘everybody does it’ doesn’t hold water; everybody did it on Wall Street, and it cost the American taxpayers the better part of a trillion dollars to clean up the mess.” Sound a little harsh comparing pirated fonts to the excesses of Wall Street? According to local designer Amy Granger, like pirated music and software, font theft has become a real problem in the typography industry. “The world of type foundries and typography and type designers are struggling with those same choices that record labels do … it’s all sort of Pandora’s Box in terms of trying to keep control of it,” said Granger. If you want to learn more about contentious issues in type design—or brush up on type history and terminology—Granger is offering a four-part course on typography at the Muse Building. Beginning on Thursday, May 20, and running through Thursday, June 10, you can learn the ancient art form of typography and how to form and construct an alphabet of your own in “a fresh and creative way.” So, put a stop to your type-thieving ways and take Granger’s fontastic typography course. Remember: pirating design is infontile. Thursdays, May 20-June 10, 6:30-8:30 p.m., $200 for four classes, The Muse Building, 1317 W. Jefferson St. For more information, contact amydianegranger@gmail.com.

tive, began with a mission to recycle old bicycles and turn them into “functional pieces of art.” “BBP does a lot of great things for the community, from education, to affordable bikes, to bike donations. We’ve become well known for the charitable works we’ve done in the community, but our real goal is to strengthen the entire cycling community,” said Hallyburton. Last year, the Block Party began as part of Boise Bike Week, which is run by the Treasure Valley Cycling Alliance. On Friday, cycling enthusiasts can expect prize giveaways, live music, a beer garden and music by famed locals and friends of BBP, Finn Riggins.

Hallyburton hopes to appeal to the cycling community and the non-bicycle-riding population, as well. “We really wanted to create an event that the entire cycling community could come together to celebrate, and an event that would make other people jump on the proverbial ‘bicycle bandwagon,’” he said. “We have dreams of Boise one day being the cycling capital of the United States, and we’re doing everything we can to rally the community around that same dream.” 4-10 p.m., FREE, Eighth St. between Bannock and Main streets, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org.

SATURDAY MAY 22 junk RUMMAGE SALE There’s only one place in Boise this weekend where you can hear African drumming while munching on pancakes and perusing for that perfect pair of salt and pepper shakers. Foothills School of Arts and Sciences is hosting its Family Fair and Downtown Rummage Sale on Saturday, May 22. Since its inception in 1992, the Treasure Valley’s oldest independent school has served children from preschool through ninth grade. “This event is an important fund-raising opportunity WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


K EVIN B U TLER

FIND JAMES BURTON

Tear it up.

You don’t even want to know what happens in Chapter Three.

SATURDAY MAY 22 shredder

FRIDAY-SATURDAY MAY 21-22 stage NEIL SIMON’S CHAPTER TWO “Generally I like a comedy about life,” said Patrick Ryan, director of the upcoming Boise Little Theater production of Neil Simon’s Chapter Two. The 1977 semi-autobiographical work focuses on four characters who struggle with finding love in new relationships. Simon, famous for The Odd Couple and Lost in Yonkers, also composed the screenplay for the 1979 theatrical version starring James Caan and Marsha Mason. Ryan, director of last year’s Plaza Suite and former BLT business manager, began acting at the theater in December 1972. He enjoys producing Neil Simon plays, he said, because they are easy for audiences to relate to. “We really enjoy things more when they speak to our lives,” he said. Ryan hopes everyone can take away something personal from the performance. “Chapter Two says a lot about our search for love, relationships and happiness,” he said. 8 p.m., $12.50 adults, $9 seniors and students, Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., 208-342-5104. For additional dates and times, visit boiselittletheater.org.

for the school,” said Shawn Ann Shepherd, head of the school. The rummage sale features a pancake breakfast and barbecue lunch from Tapia Family Catering and entertainment from Boise Rock School and the Balance Dance Company. Kids can also participate in a number of games. “The games are a return to all of those great experiences of old-fashioned fairs and festivals,” said Shepherd. Adults have the chance to relax with a chair massage station and a beer garden after sifting through wares from 150 past and present Foothills school families. “We know that times are tight for everyone right now. And being able to have a giant rummage sale is a great way for all of us to reduce, re-

S U B M I T

use and recycle while bringing some important support to our school,” Shepherd said. 9 a.m.-3 p.m., FREE, Foothills School, 618 Eighth St., 208-331-9260, foothillsschool.org.

THURSDAY MAY 20 music JOHANN HELTON “The first real spark was that fateful night in 1964 when the Beatles played Ed Sullivan Show,” said Johann Helton, classical guitarist and former member of the world-famous folk group, The Highwaymen (not to be confused with the outlaw countr y supergroup of

RENT A GOAT

COMMUNITY SHRED IT DAY If you only associate James Avery with the frowny-faced patriarch he played on Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, boy have we got some mind-blowing early ’90s trivia for you. From 19871993, Avery was the voice of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’ spiky arch nemesis, Shredder on the TV cartoon series. As in, master of Bebop and Rocksteady and total bitch to Krang, Shredder. But what exactly do James Avery and Shredder have to do with Community Shred It Day? Sadly, nothing. Except that both of them would probably agree that identity theft is a pretty lame crime. On Saturday, May 22, the City of Boise wants you to cart all of your old checks, bank statements, tax papers, magazine labels, prescription bottle labels, video tapes, credit card applications, old credit cards, financial documents down to the Ada County Sheriff’s Office parking lot. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. you can shred up to five bags or boxes of your personal info and give the proverbial finger to all the creeps who might be digging through your trashcan in search of paydirt. Cowabunga, dudes. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., donations accepted, Ada County Sheriff’s Office parking lot, 7200 Barrister Dr. For more information, e-mail jvanhouten@cityofboise.org.

the same name featuring Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson and Kris Kristofferson). Helton will perform tracks from his new two-disc solo acoustic album, Counting the Stars, Thursday, May 20, for free at the Ada Community Library. Before Helton linked up with The Highwaymen in 1991, they had previously soared to the top of the Billboard charts with the 1961 song “Michael.” Helton’s performance takes place as part of the Ada Community Library concert series, which began two years ago. “As Boise’s grown, there’s more concert opportunities. When we started, there wasn’t,” said librarian Susana Ossandon. Helton, who was classically trained in Italy and Salzburg, taught at College of Idaho and

A quick look out my back door reveals a sea of green, courtesy of spring. Not the green of a well-tended lawn or rows of fresh veggies sprouting from the cold ground, but the lushness of a healthy crop of weeds. Unfortunately, weed-control options generally require chemical-laden herbicides, an aching back or a IDAHORSE FARMS downtown high-rise condo. But Greenleaf one alternative remains for those 208-249-9292 who are too eco-conscious, lazy zephy31@yahoo.com or poor, like me, to rid their yard of weeds: renting a goat. Twenty bucks will get you a goat from Idahorse Farms in Greenleaf for a month. Goats are enthusiastic lawn-chompers who can munch their way through any patch of weeds, including the nasty, prickly thistles and (somewhat ironically) goatheads. All that you need to provide— besides the greenery—is a bowl of water, shelter from rain and the occasional chin scratch. Goats aren’t picky eaters and even consider a banana peel a special treat. Of course, the downside of this healthy appetite means that flower beds are fair game. So, make sure it’s the weeds and not the flowers that are within reach. Also, many goats seem to enjoy human companionship, so set up your lawn chair near your goat and kick back while someone else does the work. —Annabel Armstrong

Boise State. He performed with Luciano Pavarotti when he gave a concert with Boise Philharmonic. “I’m kind of the go-to guitar player for the Boise Philharmonic,” he said. “One of the things I noticed [about Pavarotti] was he was a very large man, not only in pounds but in stature.” Helton promises no opera during his library concert but said he will perform a number for a recently deceased Highwayman, David Fisher. Helton is only member of the Highwaymen to continue with a music career. “I’ve been one of the lucky ones because I haven’t had to put my toys away yet,” he laughed. 7 p.m., FREE, Ada Community Library, 10664 W. Victory Road, 208-3620181, adalib.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY MAY 19

THURSDAY MAY 20

wine tasting and artist demonstrations. 4-8 p.m. Galerie Belle Ame, 179 S. Eagle Road, Eagle, 208-938-1342, www.galeriebelleame.com.

Workshops & Classes

Festivals & Events

BUSINESS BUILDER DAY— Organized by the Idaho Business League, Business Builder Day hosts displays and seminar topics relevant to all owners, managers and key decision-makers in Idaho industries. BBD is FREE to attend and designed to ignite the business community by getting industry leaders motivated, educated, talking and networking. Topics include Social Media Marketing, Employee Motivation, Sales Lead Generation, Fraud in Business, Branding and much more. 7:30 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www. owyheeplaza.com.

ELEGANCE ON THIRD THURSDAY—An elegant evening of dancing and romancing. Guests are encouraged to dress to the nines for this fun, “big city” event with a tagline that reads “Dress up and party down ... There’s nothing like this party in town!” That means kicking the jeans and T-shirts for a night of glitz and glamour. With music by Beverly and Rex. Sponsored by Vrba Interior Design and Finishes. Ages 21 and older. 7 p.m.-3 a.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www.owyheeplaza.com.

ESPECIALLY FOR SENIORS— Senior guests (age 62 and older) receive free admission all day plus a docent-led talk regarding the current exhibit. This month: Garth Claassen’s exhibition “Bloated Floaters, Snouted Sappers and the Defense of Empire.” 2 p.m. FREE. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, www. boiseartmuseum.org.

Art EYE FOR DESIGN: A.J. WILEY, ENGINEER TO THE WEST’S PROJECTS—Part of Archeology Month. Noon-1:30 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Capitol Building, 700 W. Jefferson St., Boise, 208433-9705.

Talks & Lectures CULTURAL EXCHANGE IN JORDAN WITH STATE REP. BRIAN CRONIN—Cronin will share stories and insights gained from his trip to Jordan with a group organized by the Idaho Human Rights Education Center under the leadership of local educator Dan Prinzing, including seeing Project Citizen in action at a United Nations Relief and Works Agency school for Palestinian girls in Amman. 7 p.m. FREE. Shangri-La Tea Room, 1800 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-4240273, www.shangri-la-tea.com.

On Stage CHICKS’N’GIGGLES—Improv comedy. 7 p.m. $5. The Adelmann Event Center, 622 W. Idaho, Boise, 208-287-3296.

Workshops & Classes TYPOGRAPHY CLASS—Class will take a quick refresher of the history and terminology of type and then focus on the form and construction of letters in a fresh and creative way. See Picks, Page 18. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $200. Muse Building, 1317 W. Jefferson, Boise, 208-342-3316, www.musebuilding.com.

Art ARTE SOIREE—Gathering community together in an evening of art appreciation and awareness. The evening features music,

YES, MAYBE, NO—Featured artists: Ben Browne, Benjamin Love, Veiko Valencia and Matt Bodett. FREE. The Gallery at The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, www. thelinenbuilding.com.

Talks & Lectures MAYOR BIETER UNPLUGGED— Hosted by Boise Young Professionals, the “Unplugged” Forum is designed to encourage a discussion between young professionals and elected officials. Boise Mayor Dave Bieter will discuss how Boise is positioned to emerge from the recession and how the city can help businesses push toward recovery. 5:30-7 p.m. FREE to BYP Members. $15 non-members. Basque Center, 601 W. Grove St., Boise, 208331-5097 or 208-342-9983, www.basquecenter.com. THE MESSAGE AND THE MEDIUM: SOCIAL MEDIA FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION— Workshop designed to be both a romp through the world of communications strategies (including social media) and an exercise in developing a compelling case for your cause. It will also serve as a reality check that asks the question: “If you are not being heard by your local politician or in a funder’s board room, what

IDAHO HEALTH CARE FOR ALL—Andrew P. Wilper, MD, MPH, former public health fellow of Harvard Medical School and Cambridge Health Alliance, will present a talk called, “Dismayed in America: Health Insurance and Mortality in the U.S.” to be followed by a discussion. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Idaho Education Association, 620 N. Sixth St., Boise, 208-344-1341, www. idahoea.org.

Sports & Fitness MOUNTAIN BIKING INTRO— Intro class and skills ride. Part of Boise Bike Week. 6 p.m. FREE. Camel’s Back Park, 1200 W. Heron St., Boise. RECUMBENT RALLY—Part of Boise Bike Week. 6 p.m. FREE. Julia Davis Park, 700 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise. TRICYCLE RACES— The disclaimer at the beginning of Jackass was about exactly this sort of thing, which is why it’s awesome. 10 p.m. FREE. The Lobby, 760 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-2183. WOMEN’S ROAD RIDE—Part of Boise Bike Week. 6 p.m. FREE. Idaho Velodrome and Cycling Park, Old Horseshoe Bend Road, Eagle, www.idahovelopark.org.

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Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT makes you think 500 copies of your newsletter or a thousand hits on your website will make a difference?” 2-5 p.m. FREE. Idaho State Historical Museum, 610 N. Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-3342120, www.idahohistory.net.

STAR WARPS: MAY THE FARCE BE WITH YOU— Watch Luke Warmwater and Ham Rolo as they defend the galaxy against the malevolent Dark Vapors and his army of Storm Droopers. 7:15 p.m. $7-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208336-7383, www.pdplayhouse.com.

Sports & Fitness

THE DIARY OF ANN FRANK—The Heritage Middle School Drama Department presents a one-time-only production of The Diary of Anne Frank, to be performed on the Rocky Mountain High School stage. 6 p.m. $3. Rocky Mountain High School, 5450 N. Linder Road, Meridian, 208-350-4340, rmhs.meridianschools.org.

PEDAL POWER PICNIC AT THE PARK—Ride from Sierra Club to Municipal Park for a picnic. Part of Boise Bike Week. 6 p.m. FREE. Sierra Club, 503 W. Franklin St., Boise, 208-384-1023, idaho.sierraclub. org.

Literature BOOK SIGNING—With Gayle Redfern, author of Ancient Wisdoms. 6 p.m. FREE. Spirit at Work Books & Beyond, 710 N. Orchard, Boise, 208-388-3884, www.spiritatworkbooks.com.

Talks & Lectures METRO CONVERSATIONS—Wake up with an informative networking event. Various Boise Metro Chamber of Commerce and Downtown Boise Association businesses host this early morning event designed to offer the public a chance to meet one

another while discussing things happening within our community. 8-9 a.m. FREE, www.boisechamber. org. Moon’s Kitchen Cafe, 712 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-385-0472. SALON WITH FILMMAKER DAVID ULANSEY—Join Idaho Friends of Jung for a salon with filmmaker David Ulansey, executive producer of Call of Life: Facing the Mass Extinction. Wine and refreshments served. 7-9 p.m. $10 donation. Center for Spiritual Living, 600 N. Curtis Road, Boise, 208-375-0751, www.spiritual-living.org.

Citizen WALK A MILE IN MY WHEELS—Benefit for Disability Rights Idaho. With Rob Paper and a film screening of Shooting Beauty, a documentary about an aspiring fashion photographer whose life is changed forever when she discovers true beauty hidden inside a facility for people living with extreme disabilities. 8 p.m. $25 advance $30 door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208424-8297, www.visualartscollective.com.

Kids & Teens MYSTERIES BY THE RIVER—A mystery and adventure book club for boys with bestselling author Kristiana Gregory. 4 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-472-2940, www.gardencity.lili.org.

Odds & Ends CHANT MASTER PETER TANORIKIHO—Come experience chanting. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Facets of Healing Wellness Emporium, 717 Vista Ave., Boise, 208-429-9999, www.facetsofhealing.com. GOLDFISH RACING—Goldfish are placed in a raingutter, and it’s your job to urge them on toward the other end by blowing through a straw. Winner gets a big effin’ bar tab and their fish. 10 p.m. FREE. Mack and Charlie’s, 507 W. Main St., Boise, 208-830-9977, mackandcharlies. com. TEAM TRIVIA NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Bad Irish, 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, www.badirish. com.

FRIDAY MAY 21 Festivals & Events BICYCLE BLOCK PARTY—Raffles, frankenbike competition, valet parking, alley-cat race and music by Boise Rock School, Garden City Limits and Finn Riggins. Part of Boise Bike Week. 4 p.m. FREE. Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208-345-9287, www.boisebikeweek.com. EAGLE ISLAND EXPERIENCE FESTIVAL—26 hours of eclectic music along with food, vendors, artists and a bouncy castle for the kids. Music by BoDo Brothers, Voice of Reason, Eddie Shaw and the Wolf Gang (Howlin’ Wolf’s band) from Chicago, Lori B!, Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats, Poke, Dick Polley, Soul Serene, Gizzard Stone and Rosalie Sorrels. $20. Eagle Island State Park, 2691 Mace Road, Eagle.

On Stage CHAPTER TWO—Recent widower, writer George Schneider, is encouraged by his younger brother Leo to start dating again, which sends George deeper into depression after a series of bad matches. Then Leo comes up with Jennie Malone and she’s a keeper. Still, it is a bumpy trip on the road to Dreamland for these not-so-young lovers. George and Jennie stumble on, overcoming both their hesitation on the rebound and emotional neediness. 8 p.m. $11 adult, $9 senior and student. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, www.boiselittletheater.org.

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BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 21


8 DAYS OUT Sports & Fitness MAY IN MOTION—National Bike to Work Day. Part of Boise Bike Week. 7:30-10:30 a.m. FREE. Eighth Street between Main and Bannock streets, Boise, 208345-9287, www.boisebikeweek. com.

STREET FAIR AND DOWNTOWN RUMMAGE SALE—150-family rummage sale with live music, games, a pancake breakfast, an afternoon barbecue and beer garden. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Foothills School of Arts and Sciences, 618 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-331-9260.

On Stage

SATURDAY MAY 22

CHAPTER TWO—See Friday. 8 p.m. $11 adult, $9 senior and student. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, www. boiselittletheater.org.

Festivals & Events BLOCK PARTY FOR BOOKS—Basque dinner of seafood, paella, salad and bread, with music by the Young Curmudgeons and A Seasonal Disguise. Proceeds to benefit Boise school district libraries, which face a 100 percent budget cut for the next year. 6 p.m. $20. Basque Block, 601 Grove St., Boise. CAPITAL CITY PUBLIC MARKET—Open-air market. Live music acts, plus local arts and crafts. 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. FREE. Downtown at Eighth and Idaho streets, Boise. EAGLE ISLAND EXPERIENCE FESTIVAL—See Friday. $20. Eagle Island State Park, 2691 Mace Road, Eagle.

GABE DUNN’S COMEDY SHOW—Followed by AlpenFlow, performing for Equaleyes CD Release afterparty. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, www.liquidboise. com. STAR WARPS: MAY THE FARCE BE WITH YOU—See Friday. 7:15 p.m. $7-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, www. pdplayhouse.com.

Citizen PRIMARY RALLY—All statewide candidates will be given the opportunity to speak for five minutes to get voters excited about the primary. Contact 208853-0932 or peteandfriends55@ hotmail.com for more info or to

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3701 Overland

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be put on the speaking roster. 3 p.m. FREE. Idaho Capitol, 700 W. Jefferson, Boise.

Food & Drink SHARE OUR STRENGTH BAKE SALE—Amanda Wester, Miss Teen Boise International, is hosting a bake sale to benefit Share Our Strength in partnership with Life’s Kitchen and Bitz-N-Piecez. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Bitz-NPiecez, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise.

Workshops & Classes POND AND WATER PLANT CARE—Randy Tuckness of the Koi Society will offer tips on how to care for a pond and its inhabitants. 10 a.m. FREE. Far West Landscape and Garden, 5728 W. State St., Boise, 208-853-4000. SAFE BOATING SEMINARS— Seminars will include: weather, to boat or not, life jackets and flotation devices, requirements for a day of safe boating, first aid, flares and flags. The first 48 customers in the door on Saturday will have the chance to win a free Fish-n-Ski First aid kit. There will also be a registration box inside for Cabela’s Safe Boating Sweepstakes. Throughout the day. FREE. Cabela’s, 8109 W. Franklin, Boise. WORKSHOP WITH FILMMAKER DAVID ULANSEY—See Friday. 1-4 p.m. $20 donation. Center for Spiritual Living, 600 N. Curtis Road, Boise, 208-375-0751, www.spiritual-living.org.

THE MEPHAM GROUP

Talks & Lectures

$25 GO 0

ANCIENT WISDOMS—Author Gayle Redfern will discuss topics covered in her book, Ancient Wisdoms. Noon. FREE. Spirit at Work Books & Beyond, 710 N. Orchard, Boise, 208-388-3884, www.spiritatworkbooks.com.

2088664598

WALKING TOUR: GEOTHERMAL HEATING IN DOWNTOWN BOISE HISTORICAL DISTRICT— Presented by Neil Luther, Boise City Arts and History Department. 6 p.m. FREE. Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson, Boise.

Sports & Fitness PEDAL POWER PARADE—The culmination of Boise Bike Week. Ride through downtown, then return to the park for pizza, drinks and a raffle. Costumes welcome. 4:30 p.m. FREE. Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson, Boise. SECOND ANNUAL HORSESHOE TOURNAMENT—11 a.m. FREE. The Plank, 650 S. Vista, Boise, 208-336-1790.

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HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

Green IRIS FLOWER SHOW—Featuring mainly miniature dwarf and standard dwarf bearded iris. Exhibitors welcome. Flower arrangements featuring iris are also welcome and can be judged. Noon-6 p.m. FREE. Zamzows, 505 E. Chinden Blvd., Meridian, 208-846-7830, www. zamzows.com.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

22 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends

On Stage

Talks & Lectures

COMMUNITY SHRED IT DAY—Prevent ID theft by bringing your old checks, bank statements, tax papers, CDs/DVDs, magazine labels, prescription bottle labels, video tapes, credit card applications, old credit cards, financial documents—anything with your personal information—for the shredder. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE. Ada County Sheriff’s Office, 7200 Barrister Drive, Boise, 208-577-3000, www.adasheriff. org.

STAR WARPS: MAY THE FARCE BE WITH YOU—Watch Luke Warmwater and Ham Rolo as they defend the galaxy against the malevolent Dark Vapors and his army of Storm Droopers. 2 p.m. $7-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, www. pdplayhouse.com.

WALKING TOUR: GEOTHERMAL HEATING IN DOWNTOWN BOISE HISTORICAL DISTRICT— Presented by Neil Luther, Boise City Arts and History Department. 1 p.m. FREE. Capitol Park, 601 W. Jefferson, Boise.

Concerts

BOISE WIDE OPEN— Nine-hole mini-golf tournament with one hole at each of nine bars. Registration from noon-3 p.m. at Mack and Charlie’s, finish up at Mulligans by 7 p.m. Sack lunches and T-shirts for early registrants. Fabulous prizes awarded. Noon-7 p.m. $10. Mack and Charlie’s, 507 W. Main St., Boise, 208-830-9977, mackandcharlies.com.

MR. AND MRS. PRIDE—Part of the lead-up to Boise Pride. Contestant information and application are online@boisepride.org. Hosted by last year’s winners. 9 p.m. FREE. The Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., second floor, Capitol Terrace, Boise, 208-3361313, www.thebalconyclub.com.

DARKWOOD CONSORT AND VICKI BOECKMAN—Flute, viola and clarinet performances of works by Guillaume de Machaut, Truid Aagesen, Ole Buck, plus medieval dances. 2 p.m. $8$12. Esther Simplot Center for the Performing Arts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116.

Sports & Fitness

Art

SUNDAY MAY 23 Festivals & Events EAGLE ISLAND EXPERIENCE FESTIVAL—See Friday. $20. Eagle Island State Park, 2691 Mace Road, Eagle.

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INTERNATIONAL MUSEUM DAY—All of Boise’s museums in one place on one day. Tour the Old Pen, make a stomp rocket, view live birds, create a tree from roots to leaves, be a wastewater or stormwater droplet and make your way through a maze and more. For info visit www.boisemuseums.org. Noon-5 p.m. FREE. Old Idaho State Penitentiary, 2445 Old Penitentiary Road, 208-368-6080, www. idahohistory.net.

MONDAY MAY 24 On Stage INSERT FOOT THEATRE—Local improv comedy. 8 p.m. $5. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, www. heirloomdancestudio.com.

STORY STORY—A joint project of Alley Repertory Theater, the Boise State Story Initiative and the Cabin, Story Story is inspired by the NYC-based and NPR-broadcast Moth storytelling series, in which community members can come together and tell live onstage unscripted stories based on a theme. 7 p.m. $5. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, www.thelinenbuilding.com.

TRICYCLE RACES—The disclaimer at the beginning of Jackass was about exactly this sort of thing, which is why it’s awesome. 10 p.m. FREE. The Lobby, 760 W. Main St., Boise, 208-991-2183.

WEDNESDAY MAY 26 Concerts FOOTHILLS OR HIGHLANDS— Bagpipe music. 7-8:30 p.m. FREE. Foothills Learning Center, 3188 Sunset Peak Road, Boise, 208514-3755, www.cityofboise.org.

Literature

TUESDAY MAY 25 Citizen CITY COUNCIL MEETINGS— Boise City Council meetings are held every Tuesday. Noon. Boise City Hall, 150 N. Capitol Blvd.

Odds & Ends BALLISTIC BEER PONG—Compete for $300 in prizes. 10 p.m. FREE. Bad Irish, 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, www. badirish.com. TEAM TRIVIA NIGHT—8 p.m. FREE. Bad Irish, 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-338-8939, www. badirish.com.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT BOOK CLUB—Adult readers meet monthly to discuss the featured selection. For more information and to register, call 208-5624996. 7 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996.

Sports & Fitness HIKING DESTINATIONS IN THE SAWTOOTH AND BOULDER WHITE CLOUD MOUNTAINS— Ed Cannady, recreation specialist with the Sawtooth National Recreation Area, will present a slide show on trail destinations in the Sawtooth and Boulder White Cloud mountains focused on trail hikes leading to views of mountain peaks and alpine lakes. 7 p.m. FREE. REI, 8300 W. Emerald, Boise, 208-322-1141, www. rei.com/stores/boise.

Odds & Ends POKER—Play for fun and prizes. 7 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club, 10206 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-321-1811. VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO— The Vinyl Preservation Society of Idaho aims to preserve vinyl music heritage. Monthly meetings include guest speakers and DJs, opportunities to buy, sell and trade vinyl and, of course, a chance to share the group’s favorite albums. Keep it spinning. 7-10 p.m. FREE, www. vpsidaho.org. Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244. For more event listings, visit boiseweekly.com.

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NOISE Z AC H S M ITH

THE GRASS FIGHTS BACK Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars’ message of hope AMY ATKINS “When two elephants are fighting / the grass it will suffer ... / Them a big fool us / Have no mercy for the old ones ... / Have no mercy for the children ... / Have no mercy for the woman ... / Them a big fool us / ... Oh we a go suffer / Oh we a go suffer.” —Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars, “Weapon Conflict”

When elephants fight, the grass suffers. When the Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars perform, everyone wins.

ing: music heals and creates community.” From Los Angeles, Koroma—his speaking Hope. It’s a weighty word for people who may voice lower and quieter but as lilting as the bright, expressive peal in which he sings— see no reason to have any, like the citizens explained that the message is as important as of the West African coastal country of Sierra Leone, for whom an 11-year civil war resulted the music. Even the title of the new album is a message. in the deaths of more than 50,000 people. “On this second album, we focused on givHope. It was not a word that fell easily ing hopes to our people and then to everybody from the lips of Sierra Leoneans living in refuwho seems to have lost hope, you know,” gee camps in Guinea. But Reuben M. Koroma a man who fled to Guinea from his hometown Koroma said. “That’s why the title, Rise and of Freetown, Sierra Leone, had an unwavering Shine. We totally hope that our country, which has been devastated by war, can rise and shine belief that regardless of all they’d lost, hope again. And also the songs we wrote will give was one thing that no rebel fighter could take the people hope.” away from his people. That, in part, led him Koroma feels that Sierra Leone is improvto form the musical group that would become ing, albeit gradually. Most of the members of the eight-member Sierra Leone’s Refugee All Stars, which performs in Boise on Friday, May SLRAS have returned to their hometown of Freetown. But maybe more importantly, the 21, at the Bouquet. Hope was also the notion world’s perception of Sierra Leone is changing, behind the group’s second album, the spirited Afropop-infused Rise and Shine (Cumbancha), too. He believes that SLRAS has played an integral part in the latter. released in April. “We are [talking about] our country evSLRAS garnered international acclaim when erywhere we go,” Koroma said proudly. “We American filmmakers Zach Niles and Banker want people really to know that it’s not only White produced the gripping 2005 documentary The Refugee All Stars. Koroma—who had the war that is happening in our country.” It is because of the war that people know been living in refugee camps since 1997—and of our country, but there are also good things some fellow musicians at the Sembakounya happening in our country like the beautiful Refugee Camp sought to use music not only as a spiritual, emotional and creative outlet for culture. I think when we travel to places ... we are raising awareness of our country everythemselves, but as a source of solidarity and a where we go.” the all-too-lacking hope SLRAS’ rising star for those with whom has also garnered they shared a war-torn Friday, May 21, 8 p.m., $15 advance, major attention. They history. $18 day of show were featured on CBS People across the THE BOUQUET Sunday Morning, they world have been en1010 W. Main St. 208-345-6605 performed on Oprah, thralled by SLRAS’ rich thebouquet.net and they have a song synthesis of traditional on the soundtrack African instruments like for the film Blood the samba (djembe), Diamond. They also opened for Aerosmith, gyile (a wooden balafon) and shekere (shaker) participated in the U2 tribute album In the and more typically Western instruments like Name of Love: Africa Celebrates U2 and perelectric guitars and keyboards. The New York formed at the Lincoln Center, where they met Times wrote about the group: “As harrowing as these personal tales may be, the music buoy- former President Bill Clinton. With that recognition came the resources ing them is uplifting. The cliche bears repeat-

24 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

to better their lives—they travel in a tour bus and were able to afford modern conveniences so many take for granted, like refrigerators— but they haven’t forgotten the people at home. When they aren’t touring and are at home in Freetown, they perform weekly gigs. Koroma sincerely asserts that fame and fortune was never the ultimate goal for SLRAS. “In reality, when we started the band, it was to [get people’s minds] out of the war,” Koroma said. “Making their lives better was the only objective. We never really thought we would become the way we are,” he said, chuckling softly. “It’s really like a miracle.” That Koroma and his bandmates believe in miracles rings out in the songs on Rise and Shine. Some of that is informed by where they recorded it: New Orleans. “In New Orleans, we see a heavy presence of live music. When you go to the bars, the clubs, even on the street, you see live musicians,” Koroma said. “We are live musicians and we record live, and we just thought it would be an ideal place.” Rise and Shine’s 13 tracks are as diverse but as connected as the people who are touched by SLRAS’ music. “Gbrr Mani” (“Trouble”), which features the guttural rapping of the group’s youngest member Alhaji Jeffrey “Black Nature” Kamara; the horn-heavy “Jah Come Down,” featuring New Orleans brass band Bonerama; the Latin-tinged “Tamagbondorsu” (“The Rich Mock The Poor”). The combination of singing and sing-song chants in English and Krio (the national language of Sierra Leone) and the sound that arose from the collaboration of SLRAS with New Orleans musicians all comes together as a reminder never to forget lest history repeat itself and, always, to carry a sense of optimism. “When two elephants fight, it is the grass that suffers” is from an old African proverb that means when two sides go to war, it is the civilians who are trampled in the wake. But with a little hope, sometimes those blades of grass can find a way to once again stand tall. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 25


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE STARFUCKER, MAY 21, NEUROLUX Pyramiddd is dddone. On Thursday, May 13, Portland’s Pyramiddd announced on their Myspace page that they were changing their name back to the deliciously profane Starfucker. “So, yes, it was a long winter. We’re back out and Pyramiddd is dead and buried (except for our Facebook profile, which we’re working on), and a West Coast tour is ahead of us.” In an interview with the Portland Mercury in September 2009, the bouncy indie synthtronica group explained why they decided to take submissions from fans for a new name. “The name has been a problem for us in a lot of ways. We’ve missed out on opening slots with bands we really like, and we hope to tour Europe soon where there is already a Starfucker.” Name-change brouhaha aside, the more exciting news from these dudes is they’ve got two new side projects—Fake Drugs and Skeletron—and they’re embarking on a West Coast tour. On Friday, May 21, the dance popsters will swing back into Boise for a show at Neurolux with locals Vagerfly. Fuck, yeah. —Tara Morgan 8 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door, Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-3430886, neurolux.com.

GUIDE WEDNESDAY MAY 19

THURSDAY MAY 20

THREE BAND THROWDOWN— The ColdWar Veterans, Lullaby Polar and New Transit. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BATTLE OF THE BANDS—Sponsored by Harley Davison High Desert. 8 p.m. FREE. Shorty’s Saloon

ARMED & HAMMERED—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

FRIDAY MAY 21

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY WEBER—9:30 p.m. FREE. The Bouquet FINK AND POE—8 p.m. FREE. Reef GO ENGINE NOW—With Surrealized and Le Fleur. 8 p.m. $5. VAC HARVEY KRISHNA—With Oilslave. 9 p.m. $2. Terrapin Station JEREMIAH JAMES GANG—8:45 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s MOVEMENT MUSIC PRESENTS—With Leezy Soprano, Pleasantville Killers, J Boi and Public Intox. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

BLAZE AND KELLY WITH ROXX—7 p.m. FREE. Dino’s CONDUCTING FROM THE GRAVE—With I Catch Fire, The Dude Abides, Dead Last, Dangergrip and Above the Dead. 6 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios FEAR FACTORY—With Prong. 8 p.m. $20-$40. Knitting Factory HUMMINGBIRD OF DEATH— With Pretty Little Flowers, End of All Flesh and Gride. 8 p.m. $5. Red Room LAST BAND STANDING—With Abrupt Edge, Malachi, Calderra and Under Wicked Sky. 9 p.m. FREE. Grainey’s Basement PLANTS AND ANIMALS—With Lost in the Trees. 8 p.m. $12. Neurolux

BARENAKED LADIES—With Serena Ryder. 7 p.m. $35. Idaho Botanical Garden BEN BURDICK AND AMY WEBER—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill BLAZE AND KELLY—8 p.m. FREE. Bittercreek Ale House

CAP GUN SUICIDE—With 57 Heavy and Mudd Belly. 9 p.m. $3. Terrapin Station CELTIC WOMAN: SONGS FROM THE HEART—8 p.m. $38.50$62.50. Morrison Center DAVID ANDREWS BAND—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef

EAGLE ISLAND EXPERIENCE FESTIVAL—With Bodo Brothers, Voice of Reason and Eddie Shaw and the Wolf Gang. 5-10 p.m. $8. Eagle Island State Park

SPUD MOORE—6 p.m. FREE. Gelato Cafe

Factory HILLFOLK NOIR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s KRYSTOS—With Fury of the Cyclops, Black Locust and Tears of the Wizard. 6 p.m. $5. Brawl Studios SIERRA LEONE’S REFUGEE ALL-STARS—See Noise, Page 24. 8 p.m. $15-$18. The Bouquet STARFUCKER—With Vagerfly. See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $10. Neurolux

THE BUCK SHOT BAND—9 p.m. $3. Shorty’s Saloon

THE DECADE BLUES BAND—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

MR. TURKEY AND THE LAZY CIRCUS FRIENDS—8 p.m. $2. Flying M Coffeegarage

HELL’S BELLES—All-girl AC/DC tribute band. 8:30 p.m. $13. Knitting

THE FIRST LADIES—With Slow Trucks and The Sleepy Seeds. 8 p.m. $5. VAC

SATURDAY MAY 22 APPLE HORSE—With We Won the Science Fair, Bank, Your Friend Peter Giles and Vagabond. 6:30 p.m. $10. The Venue EAGLE ISLAND EXPERIENCE FESTIVAL—With Mojo Rounders, Cairo Fusion, School of Rock, Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats, Poke, Lori B!, Mazana, David Andrews and Fire Kittens. 11:30 a.m.-10:30 p.m. $8. Eagle Island State Park EDDIE SHAW—6-7 p.m. FREE. Record Exchange

Blaze and Kelly

26 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE EQUALEYES CD RELEASE PARTY—With The Shook Twins. 8 p.m. $8. Knitting Factory

MONDAY MAY 24

WEDNESDAY MAY 26 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY WEBER—9:30 p.m. FREE. The Bouquet

NUDE OIL—9 p.m. FREE. Quarter Barrel

BOISE MODERN JAZZ ORCHESTRA—20-piece big band jazz with local players. 7:30 p.m. FREE. The Bouquet

PAUL PETERSON BLUES CLUB—8 p.m. $5. The Bouquet

MONDAYS WITH ROB PAPER—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

POKE—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

PUNK MONDAY—Featuring Warner Drive. See Listen Here, this page. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

MOJO ROUNDERS—9 p.m. FREE. Hyde Park Pub NEO TUNDRA COWBOY—9 p.m. FREE. The Plank

SATURDAY NIGHT SANITARIUM—Dark-dance night. 10:30 p.m. $3. Terrapin Station SCHOOL OF ROCK—S.O.R. performs Pink Floyd’s, The Wall. 7 p.m. FREE. Donnie Mac’s. THE QUARTERTONS—10 p.m. $5. Reef

SUNDAY MAY 23 CARTER FREEMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Sun Ray Cafe EAGLE ISLAND EXPERIENCE FESTIVAL—With Dick Polley, Soul Serene, Gizzard Stone and Rosalie Sorrels. 11:15 a.m.-6 p.m. $8. Eagle Island State Park

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

FUEGOGO!—9:30 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station

JEREMIAH JAMES GANG—8:45 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

OPEN MICS—Wed: Donnie Mac’s, The Plank. Thu: O’Michael’s. Fri: Rembrandt’s. Sun: Bouquet. Mon: Terrapin Station, Pengilly’s, Library Coffeehouse.

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s LIKE TRAINS AND TAXIS—With Arctic Turtles and Mousy Brown. 9 p.m. $3. Terrapin Station LOCAL NATIVES—With Sucker. 8 p.m. $5. Neurolux MACKLEMORE—With Ryan Lewis. 10 p.m. $5. Reef TECH N9NE—8 p.m. $22. Knitting Factory

JEREMIAH JAMES AND NED EVETT— 8 p.m. FREE. Lock, Stock & Barrel MAXWELL STREET BLUE BAND—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye Grill RUBY TUESDAYS WITH MATT HOPPER AND THE ROMAN CANDLES—9 p.m. FREE. The Bouquet

DJS—Wed: Bad Irish, Balcony. Thu: Balcony. Fri: Bad Irish, Balcony. Sat: Balcony, Dirty Little Roddy’s, Neurolux, Terrapin Station. Mon: Bad Irish, Balcony. Tue: Balcony.

I BRA A KE

YER MAMA—8:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’ Penny

TUESDAY MAY 25

SONG & DANCE

KARAOKE—Wed: 44 Club, Dirty Little Roddy’s, Ha’Penny, Overland, Savvy’s, Sin, Terry’s. Thu: 44 Club, Hannah’s, Overland, The Plank, Quarter Barrel, Savvy’s, Shorty’s, Terry’s. Fri: 44 Club, Nuthouse, Overland, Savvy’s, Sunshine Lounge, Terry’s. Sat: 44 Club, Crickets, Hooligans, Savvy’s, Terry’s. Sun: 44 Club, Bad Irish, Balcony, Liquid, Overland, Ranch Club, Savvy’s, Terry’s. Mon: 44 Club. Tue: 44 Club, Crickets, Lucky Dog, Overland, Savvy’s, Shorty’s, Terry’s. For the week’s complete schedule of music listings, visit boiseweekly.com.

Like Trains and Taxis

WARNER DRIVE, MAY 24, LIQUID Monday has a bad rap—and deservedly so. But it doesn’t have to be that way. On Monday, May 24, Los Angeles fivesome Warner Drive returns to Punk Monday, bringing its rock-with-alittle-punk-in-its-pockets sound. Part of what makes Warner Drive so easy to get into (besides the fact that one of their guitar players is female) is that they have that quintessential L.A. rock feel: layers of guitar, catchy hooks and crashing cymbals with hints of the ’80s rock that played out on Santa Monica and Sunset boulevards. Warner Drive’s edge is sharpened by a sense of humor and a pinch of the obscenity that punk is known for, as well as racing rhythms that make it impossible to sit still. Head to Liquid, rock out to Warner Drive and take a little of the sting out of Monday. But be careful. If you have too much fun, Tuesday is really going to piss you off. —Amy Atkins

SMOOTH—7 p.m. FREE. Liquid TWENTY-ONE-12—Benefit for Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation. 8 p.m. $5. VAC

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

With Lullaby Polar and New Agenda, 9 p.m., $3. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., 208-287-5379, liquidboise.com.

BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 27


SCREEN

ROBIN HOOD HITS A BULL’S-EYE Director Ridley Scott is the true marksman here GEORGE PRENTICE Someone once adeptly coined the phrase, “the devil’s candy,” while dramatizing Hollywood’s addiction to all things big. From Cleopatra, to Heaven’s Gate, to Bonfire of the Vanities, it has become a parlor game to handicap the fate of a movie based on the size of its budget. Director James Cameron inflates budgets of his movies because ... “Robin, do you feel you’ve been overplayed?” “Not at all my dear Marian. I’m just getting started.” well, because he’s James Cameron. He torches the landscape with abandon and mances. Say what you will about Crowe’s banks and Errol Flynn in the ’20s and ’30s; leaves viewers breathless, but rarely do his off-screen antics, but when he commits to a films (Avatar, Titanic) advance the art form. we saw Disney make him a fox; we even role, he’s in 110 percent. And Robin can only sat through Kevin Costner, complete with In contrast, director Ridley Scott invests as be as good as his enemy is bad. Mark Strong a mullet and a very American accent. Mel much in character as in effects. His Robin (Sherlock Holmes, Young Victoria) inhabits Brooks visited the man in the hood twice: Hood walks a very thin line between bigthe villainous Godfrey with menace. The in the 1970s sitcom, When Things Were budget entertainment and a culturally satisrole offers very little nuance here, and the Rotten and the film Men in Tights. Frank fying experience. The end result is thrilling. scar-faced bad-ass is a perfect foil. And Cate Sinatra sang and danced as “Robo” in Scott is not exactly the darling of critics, Blanchett’s Marian warms the screen first Robin and the 7 Hoods, John Cleese stole and Robin Hood is no exception; the early with the slightest of sparks and then with a reviews have been pretty tough. But time and Time Bandits with his version of the title hearth ablaze. role, and Sean time again, Scott’s movies But this is Scott’s Robin Hood. His cinConnery played (Alien, Blade Runner, ematic palette of pewter grays and blood reds Robin as a bald, Thelma & Louise, GladiROBIN HOOD (PG-13) paunchy, middle- splash across the screen with great effect. His ator, Black Hawk Down) Directed by Ridley Scott sweeping panoramas of Nottingham and the aged conundrum are worth every penny Starring Russell Crowe, Cate Blanchett, cliffs of Dover are never self-indulgent and in Robin and of admission. He’s not Mark Strong always move the story forward. The score by Marian. afraid of big themes, but Now playing at Edwards 9 and Edwards 22 little-known Marc Streitenfeld is lush. Yet the 2010 he also fills the screen It’s hard to understand why this Robin incarnation is with stories that resonate Hood is taking such a critical drubbing. true to the Robin with viewers. He does Don’t hate it because it’s big. Instead, emHood that many of us long for. He remains more than entertain. His movies matter. brace its largesse. Sometimes a movie is big a defender of liberty, a champion of fairness, There was every reason in the world for because its ideals are big: righteous battles, this Robin Hood to fail. More than 40 films but is always a bit of a scalawag. Russell untethered freedom, pure love. And Robin feature Robin, the earliest from more than a Crowe as Robin Longstride adds one more Hood emerges victorious. iconic character to his quiver of perforcentury ago. We watched Douglas Fair-

SCREEN/LISTINGS Special Screenings A SNAPSHOT OF THE PAST: HAGERMAN FOSSIL BEDS—Written and hosted by geologist Bob Lorkowski, of the Hagerman National Monument, the film covers the history of the ancient Snake River, Lake Idaho and the Hagerman Horse. Wednesday, May 19, 7:30 p.m. $8. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com. BANDS OF 208—See Picks, Page18. Wednesday, May 19, 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-3430886, www.neurolux.com.

28 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

CALL OF LIFE: FACING MASS EXTINCTION— Thursday, May 20, 7 p.m. $10. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., 208-342-4222, www. theflicksboise.com. SHOOTING BEAUTY— Documenting an aspiring fashion photographer whose life is changed forever when she discovers true beauty hidden inside a facility for people living with extreme disabilities. Thursday, May 20, 8 p.m. $25 Advance $30 Door. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, www. visualartscollective.com.

opening THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN AMERICA: DANIEL ELLLSBERG AND THE PENTAGON PAPERS— Documentary following the story of the Rand Corporation researcher who leaked thousands of pages of secret documents to the NY Times in 1971. (NR) Flicks SHREK FOREVER AFTER— Shrek is back. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SWEETGRASS—Documentary following sheep farmers and their flocks on their last drive over the Beartooth Mountains. (NR) Flicks

VINCERE—The tragic story of Ida Dalser (Giovanna Mezzogiorno) who bore Mussolini (Filippo Timi) a son and financed his newspaper long before his rise to power. (NR) Flicks

continuing ALICE IN WONDERLAND— (PG) Edwards 22 BABIES—Documentary following the first year in the life of four different babies being raised in different parts in the world in very different ways. (PG) Flicks

THE BACK-UP PLAN— Jennifer Lopez is back as the single and baby-hungry Zoe, who is artificially inseminated with a friend’s sperm. Dating complications arise when a pregnant Zoe meets Stan (Alex O’Loughlin). (PG13) Edwards 22 THE BOUNTY HUNTER— (PG-13) Edwards 22 CITY ISLAND—Corrections officer Vince (Andy Garcia) secretly takes an acting class, but his wife, Joyce (Julianna Margulies) thinks he is having an affair. The introduction of Vince’s ex-con son throws the family into more chaos. (PG-13) Flicks

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


LISTINGS/SCREEN CLASH OF THE TITANS—(R) Edwards 22

MOVIE TIMES/SCREEN WEDNESDAY, MAY 19-TUESDAY, MAY 25 A SNAPSHOT OF THE PAST—

Flicks: W: 7:30

ALICE IN WONDERLAND—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:55, 3:45, 6:35, 9

BABIES— Flicks: W-Th: 5:15, 7:15, 9; F-Su: 1:15, 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 8:55; M-Tu: 5:15, 7:15, 9:15 THE BACK UP PLAN—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:10 a.m., 1:45, 4:25, 6:55, 9:30

BANDS OF 208—

Neurolux: W: 8

BOUNTY HUNTER—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:15, 2:55, 5:35

CALL OF LIFE—

Flicks: Th: 7

CITY ISLAND—

Flicks: W-Th only: 4:55, 9:15

THE CLASH OF THE TITANS—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:10, 2:40, 5:25, 7:55, 10:25

THE CLASH OF THE TITANS 3D— DATE NIGHT—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 9:45,

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:05, 4:05, 7:50, 9:55 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:05, 2:15, 4:45, 7, 9:15

DEATH AT A FUNEREAL—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 8:10, 10:25

FURRY VENGEANCE— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:50 a.m., 2:05, 4:15, 6:50 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO— HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON—

Flicks: W-Th: 7 Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:50, 4:50, 7:05, 9:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 9:05

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:35 a.m., 1:55, 4:40, 7:20

DATE NIGHT—(PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 DEATH AT A FUNEREAL—American remake of the 2007 British comedy, in which everything that can go wrong at a funereal, does. (R) Edwards 22 FURRY VENGEANCE—Animals attack when a real estate developer (Brendan Fraser) attempts to build a housing development in a forest. (G) Edwards 22 THE GIRL WITH THE DRAGON TATTOO—Swedish film revolving around the disappearance of the young Harriet Vanger, whose uncle is convinced she was murdered by someone in his wealthy and eccentric family. He hires a dishonored journalist and inked computer hacker to discover the horrifying truth. (R) Flicks HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON—To prove his manhood, the son of a Viking chief must capture a dragon. In the process, he discovers that dragons may be man’s new best friend. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 IRON MAN 2—Robert Downey Jr. returns as Tony Stark, billionaire arms manufacturer with a superpowered exoskeleton he uses to fight the enemies of freedom. But one of those enemies, Ivan Venko (Mickey Rourke), is seeking super-powered revenge. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 KICK ASS—(R) Edwards 22

IRON MAN 2—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:10, 1:40, 2, 4:10, 4:40, 5, 7:10, 7:40, 8, 10:10, 10:40 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 1:30, 2, 2:30, 3:30, 4:30, 5, 5:30, 6:30, 7:30, 8, 8:30, 9:30, 10:30, 11

IRON MAN 2 IMAX— KICK ASS—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1, 4, 7, 10

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:25 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:35, 10:15

THE LAST SONG— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:05 a.m., 1:40, 4:20, 7:05, 9:40 LETTERS TO JULIET— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 10:20 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12, 1:25, 2:35, 4, 5:05, 6:40, 7:35, 9:10, 10:10 THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN ERICA: DANIEL ELLSBERG AND THE PENTAGON PAPERS— Flicks: F-Su: 1:05, 3:05, 5:05, 7:05, 9:05; M-Tu: 5:05, 7:05, 9:05 NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:55, 4:55, 7:55, 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:15, 3:35, 6, 8:15, 10:35

OCEANS— ROBIN HOOD—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:35, 2:50, 4:55, 7:10, 9:20 Edwards 9: W-Th: 1, 1:30, 4, 4:30, 7, 7:30, 10, 10:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:20, 1, 1:40, 3:20, 3:55, 4:40, 6:20, 7, 7:40, 9:20, 10, 10:40

SHREK FOREVER AFTER— Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1:20, 4:20, 7:20, 9:55 Edwards 22: F-Tu: 9:45 a.m., 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45, 10:15 SHREK FOREVER AFTER 3D—

Edwards 22: F-Tu: 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50

SHREK FOREVER AFTER IMAX 3D— SWEETGRASS—

Flicks: F-Su: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:10, 9:20; M-Tu: 5, 7:10, 9:20

TERRIBLY HAPPY— VINCERE—

Edwards 22: F-Tu: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30, 12

Flicks: W-Th only: 5:10, 9:40 Flicks: F-Su: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; M-Tu: 4:30, 7, 9:30

YELLOW HANDKERCHIEF—

Flicks: W-Th only: 5, 7:10, 9:20

T H E A T E R S Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THE LAST SONG—A classical piano prodigy, Ronnie (Miley Cyrus) refuses to follow in her father’s footsteps and attend Juilliard. Can father and daughter reconnect over their love of music? (PG) Edwards 22 LETTERS TO JULIET—Dear John’s Amanda Seyfried stars in this romantic comedy about an American’s journey to Verona, the home of Shakespeare’s Juliet Capulet. When she begins to answers letters written to Romeo’s obsession, she gets entangled in the lifelong search for a long lost love. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 NIGHTMARE ON ELM STREET— (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 OCEANS—Pierce Brosnan narrates this Disneynature film that explores the planet’s oceans and the negative impact humans can have on the sea’s inhabitants. (G) Edwards 22 ROBIN HOOD—See Review, Page 28. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 TERRIBLY HAPPY—After a nervous breakdown, a city cop is reassigned to a rural border town for lighter duty, but quickly finds his hands full with local roustabouts who prefer vigilante justice. A thriller with a touch of black comedy that critics have compared to films by the Coen Brothers. In Danish with English subtitles. (NR) Flicks YELLOW HANDKERCHIEF— Kristen Stewart stars alongside a bristled William Hurt whose exconvict character Brett Hanson attempts to reunite with lost love, May (Maria Bello). Along the way he encounters fellow outcasts Stewart and the geeky Gordy (Eddie Redmayne). (PG-13) Flicks

BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 29


FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

LE BARON’S HONKER CAFE

GLENN LANDBERG

Sometimes, a restaurant can serve as a time machine, propelling a diner As we stepped out of Le Baron’s Honker Cafe into the high-noon through time and space into a memory. sun, a woman with a few kids in tow trying to decide where to Such is the case with Le Baron’s Honker Cafe in downtown Nampa. eat intercepted us. “Did you like their food?” she asked. Standing From all outward appearances, it doesn’t seem like something that has the within feet of the restaurant’s front door with the onset of food power to bend the laws of physics, but if you make it past the contempocoma setting in, my answer came out without much thought. I rary assortment of simple wooden tables and booths lining warm goldenshrugged. “It’s diner food. It’s like eating at your grandma’s house.” beige walls, the historic soda fountain from the Dewey Palace Hotel and Then I popped open the shiny, black styrofoam to-go box in my the warm smiles from the staff, and open the menu, you’ll feel like you’re hand. “But,” I said, “check out the size of this turnover ($3.99).” in a different era. With the length and girth of a football, the cellophane-wrapped It’s in the expansive menu that the true nature of Le Baron’s is found. pastry barely fit into the box. They marveled for a second—though The homey cafe has been a family enterprise since 1974, and it manages clearly not as impressed as I had been—thanked us and kept on to bridge the gap bewalking. tween the farm town A few minutes and the growing earlier, we’d surveyed metropolitan area. the damage at our The menu is filled table, which looked with comfort food like a battlefield. that gives a hearty Splotches of errant, nod to the past: pale country gravy meatloaf, liver and dotted one side of onions, finger steaks, the table, bright red roast beef, roasted tomato basil soup turkey and dressdripped from a spoon ing, all served with onto a white saucer, homemade mashed a faint trail of coffee potatoes, a vegetable led from one cup and a roll. Breakfast to the personal pot is served all day and nearby. Abandoned includes an entire dishes held puddles page of egg options. of turkey gravy or the It’s old-fashioned crumbly remnants farm food, in generof a biscuit. Two tall ous portions, that is glasses stood empty unpretentious but except for the film of made with simple, orange juice clinging quality ingredients. to the inside. Best of all, the prices My dining LE BARON’S HONKER CAFE are just as unassuming, to the point I kept doublecompanion had concluded that his chicken-fried steak 1210 Second St. S., Nampa checking to make sure I had read it right. ($6.69), though run-of-the-mill, had hit the spot, that his 208-466-1551 My favorite dining companion—herself a farm hashbrowns had been appropriately brown (thus sparing Mon.-Sat., 6:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Closed Sunday girl—smiled as she reminisced but decided to go with me the lecture on how to properly cook hashbrowns, the special, a Sicilian lasagne ($8.99). The massive which, without fail, accompanies a poorly cooked rectangle was stuffed with spicy Italian sausage and batch), and that his scrambled eggs were functional but piles of ricotta cheese, although it could have used a little more marinara not memorable. Two out of three wasn’t bad, but his biscuits and sauce. Thick slices of garlic bread topped with parmesan and a sprinkle of gravy came out with a measly 50-50 score. The good side: soft yet oregano and garlic lined the plate were enough to induce a food coma. sturdy biscuits. The drawback: country gravy that was pasty and flat I started with a cup of the tomato basil soup (99 cents), which was rather than rich and creamy. both thicker and spicier than I expected and piqued my interest in the pot I’d opted for lunch and fared about the same in the success roast ($6.79). The farmhand-sized portion was daunting, but I dug into a department. A starter of homemade tomato basil soup ($1.89) was pot roast so tender there was no need for the accompanying steak knife. a little too reminiscent of its canned base with a dose of pepper that The thick brown gravy was decidedly homestyle, as were the satisfyingly was just a bit too healthy. Of the four ingredients in my open-faced chunky mashed potatoes. turkey sandwich ($6.29)—whipped potatoes, thinly sliced turkey, A small cup held green beans with a slight metal tang that betrayed sliced white bread and golden, carrot-speckled turkey gravy—none their canned origins. Usually, I would balk at canned vegetables, but were outstanding and together put on a mediocre show. The whipped somehow, here, it seemed only right. The monstrous, buttery roll billowed potatoes were buttery but the turkey was dry and the starched, unsteam as it was broken open, and its light, fluffy layers were something to toasted white bread was a complete distraction. get lost in. As we surveyed the damage we’d inflicted, we decided Honker’s We did the responsible thing and packaged up half of our meals and was the kind of comfort-food stop we could put up with on the then ordered dessert. The house specialty apple turnover ($3.99) filled a regular if we lived in Nampa—not because it was outstanding in any platter-sized plate, but we didn’t let that hinder us. In a horrifyingly short way but because it was strangely familiar. It was the kind of no-frills time, the warm, gooey, cinnamon-saturated baked apples, flaky crust and meat-and-potatoes food my grandma would have put on the table, scoop of vanilla ice cream were just a smear on the plate. along with a few mayo and chopped olive sandwiches. Unfortunately We may have waddled out, complaining about not needing to eat for a for Honker’s, no one in my family ever drove to grandma’s just for week, but I know I wasn’t alone in wondering about the breakfast menu. the food. —Deanna Darr wishes she could plant pastries.

30 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

—Rachael Daigle knows just how hashbrowns should be cooked. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEweekly | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 31


FOOD/DINING North Boise

13th St., 208-367-0020, www. SU. goodysgoodies.com. $

20TH CENTURY LANES—The list of respectable establishments in which you can find a chili dog is no foot long. Indeed you can get one at 20th Century Lanes, but you can also get a family feeding of sliders and fries, Idaho’s ubiquitous food (fingersteaks), and—believe it or not—breakfast. 4712 W. State St., 208-342-8695, www.20thcenturylanes.net. $ SU OM .

HAWKINS PAC-OUT—Whether Classic burger drive-in in a classic location. Tots, twist cones and daily specials from Hawkins’ Facebook page. 2315 N. Bogus Basin Road, 208-338-9627. $ SU.

36TH STREET BISTRO—Enjoy breakfast, lunch and dinner in the sprawling 36th Street Garden Center. Set in the windowed west wing of the store, the cafe serves espresso and pastries for breakfast, sandwiches and salads for lunch and the dinner menu is ever-changing depending on what’s fresh and in season. The rotating menu features locally grown and raised foods. 3823 N. Garden Center Way, 208-433-5100, www.36streetgardencenter.com. SU OM . $-$$ BOISE CO-OP DELI—You just can’t leave the Co-op without at least one deli delight in your bag. Each day brings a new selection of delicious foods made with the freshest ingredients. 888 W. Fort St., 208-472-4500, www. SU boisecoop.com. $-$$ OM. CAFE VICINO—Chefs Richard Langston and Steve Rhodes serve up fresh and innovative foods, offering a casual lunch menu with choices like daily quiche, salads and portobello mushroom sandwiches. Dinner choices lean toward finer dining, offering carpaccio, a variety of pastas and entrees that run the gamut from braised lamb shanks to a New York steak to cioppino. 808 W. Fort St., 208-472-1463, www.cafevicino.com. $-$$$ RES OM. CASA MEXICO—Shakes With restaurants all over the Treasure Valley, Casa Mexico is family owned, with an extensive menu and an attentive staff. 1605 N. 13th St., 208-333-8330, www. casamexicoidaho.com. $-$$ SU OM. FANCI FREEZE—Shakes, malts, spins, sundaes and the Boston shake (one part sundae, one part shake) are what have made Fanci Freeze a Boise favorite for years. But because we can’t live on ice cream alone, Fanci Freeze also serves a whole mess of burgers, some of the crispiest tots in town and even a grilled cheese for the non-meat-eater. 1402 W. State St., 208-344SU OM. 8661. $ GOODY’S SODA FOUNTAIN— From the moment you walk in, the smells of fresh caramel corn, homemade ice cream, hand-dipped chocolate and every kind of sugary delight hit you like a ton of gummy bricks. 1502 N.

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ —Less than $8 $ $ —$8 to $14 $ $ $ —$14 to $20 $ $ $ $ —Over $20

HIGHLANDS HOLLOW BREWHOUSE—Whether it’s the appetizers (Monty’s Hummus, Hollow Hot Wings), the entrees (Pan Fried Oysters, Mess-OChops) or the burgers and sandwiches (Black Bean Chili Burger, Reuben), stopping in at Highlands Hollow after winter skiing or hiking up Camel’s Back hill in the summer is always a great idea. 2455 Harrison Hollow, 208-343-6820, www. highlandshollow.com. $-$$ SU OM. HYDE PARK PUB—If there’s one little joint that’s always packed no matter the day or the time of the day, it’s Hyde Park Pub. A pub in every sense of the word, HPP has a menu of food you eat with your hands, TVs in every corner, a varied selection of tap brews and that neighborhood restaurant feel, which so many of its neighbors envy. 1501 N. 13th St., 208-336-9260. $ SU. LULU’S FINE PIZZA/SUPERB SUSHI—Big Apple-style gourmet pie for pizza lovers of everywhere kind. Get a wheel or go by the slice. Check out the usual

toppings or get adventurous with some tasty things you’re not used to seeing on a pizza menu. Superb Sushi is set up inside Lulu’s, too. Order up a roll to go with your pie. 2594 Bogus Basin Road, 208-387-4992, www. ilovelulus.com. $-$$ SU OM. MAZZAH—Visit the Med over lunch or drop on by for dinner. Gyros, hummus, falafel and baklava on the quick. Try the fatoosh salad—you won’t be disappointed. 1772 W. State St., 208-333-2566, www.mazzahboise.com. $-$$ SU OM . O’MICHAEL’S PUB & GRILL—It’s a North End institution with one waitress who’s been serving there for 40 years. The menu is full of traditional and specialty sandwiches, fish and chips, and the best giant fried prawns in town. 2433 N. Bogus Basin Road, 208-342-8948. $-$$ SU . THE PANTRY—Offering daily specials. Kitschy comfort joint serving up breakfast, brunch and lunch items. Killer weekend brunch deals and specials. Free coffee refills. Their menu tops out at $11.75 for prime rib and eggs and starts out around $3.95 for a basic eggs, hashbrowns and toast meal. They hook up phones to each table for old-school phone ordering during lunch hours

FOOD/RECENTLY REVIEWED RED ROOM TAVERN 601 W. Main St., 208-343-7034 “Not generally a fan of any drink preceded by the words ‘strawberry blonde,’ I was hesitant to follow my server’s suggestion. But, man, am I glad I did. The drink was strong, in a familiar way, and the house vodka was surprisingly not sweet and flecked with fresh basil.” —Tara Morgan

THE GREEN CHILE 5616 W. State St., 208-853-0103, thegreenchile.com “However, the best option is a ‘bowl of green,’ a deep, ceramic vat of bubbling green chili, which is a somewhat mysterious concoction of tender pork, onions, chiles, jalapenos and cilantro topped with a web of melted jack and a swoop of sour cream.” —Rachael Daigle

BAGUETTE DELI 5204 W. Franklin Road, 208-336-2989, baguettedeli.net “Shredded lettuce, cilantro, white noodles, paper-thin slices of pork and shrimp, wrapped with tight hospital corners in rubbery translucent rice paper accompanied by a cup of thick, sweet mahogany-brown peanut sauce.” —Amy Atkins

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RES —Reservations

needed/recommended —Patio SU —Open on Sunday OM —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

32 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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DINING/FOOD throughout week. 1545 Shoreline Dr., 208-344-5486. $-$$ SU . PARRILLA GRILL—Serving wraps and salads in a primo Hyde Park location. This concrete and metal eatery is a popular place to chill during summer, but Parrilla’s hot wraps and microbrews are a fine way to stay warm in the winter as well. The primary colored sign and terra cotta walls welcome regulars and passersby equally and the casual atmosphere and good eats keep them all coming back. 1512 N. 13th St., 208-323-4688. $ SU . SUN RAY CAFE—SunRay holds down the coveted corner patio at 13th and Eastman streets. The menu is familiar to that location, featuring salads, subs and pizzas named for geographical

features in Idaho. Bring your dog, all your friends and break pizza crust with a pitcher of beer. 1602 N. 13th St., 208-3432887. $-$$ SU.

State BURGER ’N BREW—An old-school Boise sports bar whose name says it all: burgers and beer. 4295 W. State St., 208-345-7700. $-$$ SU. BUZZ CAFE—Coffee, lunch and breakfast early in the day. Wine tastings and music aplenty at night. 2999 N. Lakeharbor Lane, SU 208-344-4321. $-$$

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family style Mexican restaurants. 4334 W. State St., 208-3389707. $-$$ . DUTCH GOOSE—Homemade finger steaks, fresh steamed clams, soup, sandwiches and great hot wings. They also serve up over 17 beers. 3515 W. State St., 208-342-8887. $-$$ SU OM. FLYING PIE PIZZERIA— Boise’s longest-lived and most inventive pizzeria. They have their own beer (the impeccable Triple Pi Belgian-style ale), and pies to please even the pickiest eaters. 4320 W. State St., 208-384-0000, www. flyingpie.com. $ SU OM.

CORONA VILLAGE—Gut-busting burritos, incredible chips and Dos Equis on tap make the Village stand out among Boise’s

THE GREEN CHILE—Southwestern cuisine in Boise with green and red chilis, chimichangas and chile rellenos. The menu also features burgers and salads right along side sopapaillas. 5616 W. State St., 208-853-0103. $-$$ OM .

WINE SIPPER/FOOD

THE LIFT BAR AND GRILL—This sweet State Street spot always tempts traffic jammers with its ridiculous drink specials. Tuesday night is Holy Oly night, with 50-cent Olympia cans from 4 p.m.-close. Gnaw on a plate of State Street nachos or one of the dive’s many vegetarianfriendly dishes like the Portobello and sun-dried tomato sandwich. Weekend breakfast is a hangover cure from the gods. 4091 W. State St., 208-342SU OM . 3250. $-$$ MADHUBAN—A daily lunch buffet and a huge menu including all the favorites. You’re gonna love the curry. Great for vegetarians. 6930 W. State St., 208-8538215, www.madhubanindiancuisine.com. $-$$ SU OM.

WASHINGTON RED BLENDS Both cabernet and merlot helped to put Washington on the wine map, and that state still makes some of the best you’ll find. Today, syrah is making a big splash there, as well. All are great on their own, but when you mix things up a bit, the whole can be greater than the sum of the parts. So continuing the blend trend from the last Wine Sipper, here are the panel’s top picks from a field of blended Washington reds: 2006 BERGEVIN LANE CALICO RED, $15.99 A coming together of five different grapes (merlot, cabernet sauvignon, syrah, zinfandel and cabernet franc), the Calico wins the “Most Varieties” award. It offers an intriguing combo of bright cherry and berry with secondary aromas of leather, grilled meat and fennel. On the succulent side, the creamy red fruit flavors are impeccably balanced by just the right hit of acidity. A definite best buy. 2007 OTIS KENYON MATCHLESS RED WINE, $23 Soft berry and sweet plum pudding aromas dominate this wine with a nice whiff of smoke adding an interesting touch. Definitely made in a crowd-pleasing style, the blend is twothirds merlot to one-third cabernet sauvignon. The palate is a spicy mix of dark berry and red currant with a velvety texture and a nicely persistent finish. 2006 ROSS ANDREW SYRAH-CABERNET SAUVIGNON, $25 With rich and ripe aromas of fresh blueberry and cherry liqueur colored by a nice hit of vanilla and toasty oak, this is an immediately appealing wine. The palate is lush and seamless and offers dark cherry and plum fruit flavors, again colored by silky oak. The tannins are soft with bright, cleansing acidity coming through on the finish. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

MERRITT’S COUNTRY CAFE—This 24-hour Boise mainstay is the place to land after a long night on the town. The “home of the scone” serves up grub that turns customers into regulars. 6630 W. State St., 208-853-9982, www.merrittscaSU OM . fe.com. $-$$ MONTEGO BAY—A little bit of the tropics in a land-locked state. Montego Bay’s claim to fame is its outstanding patio, or layers of patios to be accurate, with levels cascading their way from the restaurant down to lakeside in the Lake Harbor development. There are multiple bars inside and out, and hungry customers will find a newly revamped menu. 3000 N. Lakeharbor Lane, 208-853. 5070. $-$$ PIZZALCHIK—PIZZa sALad and CHIcKen. Get it? Perfect robust salads, plus delicious original pizzas and whole chickens roasted in a 6,000-pound stone-hearth oven. Many toppings made in house. 7330 W. State St., 208-853-7757. SU . $-$$ WESTSIDE DRIVE-IN—From the mind of “Boise’s Best Chef,” Chef Lou, come some of the most scrumptious foods for dine-in, take-out or frozen to use when cooking is the last thing you want to do. 1939 W. State St., 208-342-2957, www.cheflou. SU OM. com. $-$$ For more restaurant listings visit boiseweekly.com.

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BW HEALTH & FITNESS The balcony that wraps 1012 E. ALDAPE COVE ROAD, around the front of this twoBOISE $274,888 story home allows views 3 bed/2 bath that skim treetops before 1,976 square feet reaching the downtown Keller Williams Realty skyline. It also serves as a Jill Giese, 208-761-5031 kwboise.com prime storm-watching perch MLS #98436336 in the spring. The 51-year-old residence’s location at the base of Shaw Mountain Road is close enough to city center for the owner to bicycle home from the weekly outdoor cocktail party known as Alive After Five in just seven minutes without having to struggle very far up the notoriously hilly road. On the bottom floor is a handyman’s room, the master suite and a family room with a wet bar. A great room, two bedrooms, a full bathroom and the spacious balcony are situated upstairs. Original 1959 fixtures, like ash veneer closet doors and a cheerful yellow sink-bathtub-toilet combo, act as functional conversation pieces. Recent updates blend the home’s mid-century sensibilities with colorful contemporary panache. The retro kitchen centers on a vintage turquoise blue metal GE work island that has a 9-foot-long stainless steel countertop and an oversized sink. Stainless appliances and a glass cooktop have replaced the unit’s original machines. The turquoise wall behind the work center flows into the living room, where it frames a black tiled fireplace with a thick glass hearth and mantel.

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BARTER BW NEED $$ CASH PAID for diabetic test strips. 208-315-1398.

BW HAVE I am a writer seeking work. If you are interested in hiring me for an advertising job, or any job that involves writing, please contact me for a writing sample at ladylagithia@ymail.com. Pay is negotiable, and varies by project. Thank you for you time.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

TRANSPORTATION BW 4-WHEELS --IDNDI6MIG6867)L9E$J Good running and extremely reliable Toyota pickup truck. SR-5, power steering, LEER fiberglass shell, AM/FM/CD, tach. Fuel injected 22R motor, 5 sp. manual. $2300. OBO. Dave 208-850-7572.

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SARA LEE: Sweet and sociable little gal with hopes of a home.

RACHEL: Lovely brown tabby in search of the purrfect family.

LYDIA: Relaxed lady seeking forever friend to share my life with.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MAY 19–25, 2010 | 35


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SERVICES

8DAA:<:"A:K:AA:8IJG:H:I “Understanding Literature and Life - Drama, Poetry and Narrative” taught by Arnold Weinstein, Ph.D., Harvard. Lecture #210 from The Teaching Company. 64 lectures, 30 minutes/lecture. On cassette tape for easy listening while you exercise! $40 ($200 value). Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. ;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

NYT CROSSWORD | ACROSS 1 New ___, N.Y. 6 W.W. II beachhead south of Rome 11 “Amen!” 15 Battle of Normandy site 19 Japanese porcelain 20 Washington zoo attraction 1

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B>C>;ADG6AI:6H:I Miniature tea set with lavender and green flower pattern. Ceramic. Teapot: 3 1/4” x 1 1/4” x 3” high. Set of 10. Haquegiftshop has an excellent selection of eye catching water collectibles at 30% discount on every item. Get more info here http://www.haquegiftshop.com

SERVICES BW HOME >CI:G>DGs:MI:G>DGE6>CI>C< Help with colors, inside & out, repairs, carpentry work, sealing texturing, kitchen cabinets repainting, staining, brush, roll and spray finishing, attention to detail, 25 yrs. exp., dependable, references avail., licensed & insured! Call Joe-Bohemia Painting for a free written estimate. 345-8558 or 392-2094.

<DC:<G::CA6LC86G: All Electric, No Emissions. Services incl. spring cleanup, mowing, trimming & pruning, organic fertilization & weed control. Mention this ad for 15% disc. Call 208861-3017. Longhair Lawncare Grass Trimmin’ and Baggin’. Most lawns $25. We bust our ass to mow your grass. 208-713-0325. ADD@>C<;DGLDG@ I am looking for work. Will to do most anything. Paint, clean, mow, yardwork, landscaping, haul stuff. I have a truck. No job too small. I work for a fair price. E-mail mgudgus@yahoo.com and let me know the job. Thanks.

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MUSIC

BW PROFESSIONAL

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8C68:GI>;>:9:A9:G86G: Accepting Medicaid and private pay clients in my Idaho certified family home for elderly. CNA with 20+ years experience. Rose 208384-0141.

EDL:G:9B>M:G NADY Powered Mixer 4130X. Great condition. $75 OBO. Please call 208-954-6211.

MS. CONCEPTIONS BY ELIZABETH C. GORSKI / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

22 Squares for breakfast 23 Programming tool created by Grace Hopper (1906-92) 26 In that capacity 27 Stimpy’s pal 28 ___ World

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64 Woodworking tool created by Tabitha Babbitt (1784-1853) 68 Block 70 2008 Wimbledon champ 71 Office item created by Bette Nesmith Graham (1924-80) 77 Practice game 83 Chaperons, typically 84 ___ king 86 Singer Kitt 87 Actress Téa 88 Driving convenience created by Mary Anderson (1866-1953) 94 Slightly faster than moderately slow 96 Ramblers and Hornets 97 Cape ___ 98 Like some companies’ day care facilities 101 Pike, e.g. 103 Music and dance, e.g. 104 Rock group whose name is an appropriate alternative title for this puzzle 111 Fly 112 Money machine co. 113 First family starting in 2009 117 Food formula created by Ruth Wakefield (1903-77) 124 Lunar effect 125 Entry-level carpentry jobs? 126 Proctor ___ (small appliance brand) 127 Shangri-la 128 Twists the truth 129 Act badly? 130 Journal jotting

DOWN 1 Common type 2 Old Testament prophet 3 Bell ___ 4 Whitlings, e.g. 5 Zippo 6 Before now

7 Pilfer, old-style 8 Microwave 9 Accustom 10 Frolickers by a stream 11 Yevtushenko’s “Babi ___” 12 Copy ctr. blowup 13 Lead role in “The Piano” 14 Telephone part 15 “Pardon me, Arturo …” 16 Banquo, e.g. 17 “La Grande Parade” artist Fernand 18 Yellow-and-white flower 21 Tubular pasta 24 Julie of “The Early Show” 25 Joe and Jane 30 “Golda’s Balcony” subject 31 Roundish 32 Agatha Christie title 33 Sombrero part 34 Eastern princess 35 Where Polynesian Airlines is based 36 ___ Speaker 37 F.D.A. guideline 38 Primitive percussion instrument 43 “Don Giovanni” aria “Dalla ___ pace” 45 Start of a spell 46 Home in the woods 47 Bride and groom exchange 48 Jorge’s house 49 Crock pot dinner 51 Donate, to Burns 52 LAX watchdog 53 Popping pills 54 Letters on a bucket 55 Celtic land 59 On the same side 61 Little rascal 62 Court grp. 63 Beer source 65 Dorm V.I.P.’s 66 Public health agcy. 67 Former Mideast inits. 69 Interpret

71 Refrain syllables 72 Esquire in “Henry VI, Part 2” 73 “Eris ___ sum” (“You will be what I am”) 74 Forearm part 75 “Put ___ writing!” 76 Literary inits. 78 Gaping mouth 79 Brief look inside? 80 Stock phrase 81 War of 1812 treaty site 82 Takes in 85 “Brilliant!” 88 First part of a record 89 Preceder of many words? 90 “There Is ___ …” (song by the Cure) 91 Hungarian patriot Nagy 92 Coll. major 93 Future atty.’s challenge 95 Removed with force 99 Add a hint of color to 100 Make secret 102 Midnight Poison maker 103 Relief pitcher? 104 Having a dull surface L A S T

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105 Egglike 106 What appears above a piñata? 107 Rock’s Van ___ 108 Land in East 58-Across: Abbr. 109 Drag race sound 110 Like many a sumo wrestler 114 Jazz vibraphonist Jackson 115 Impressionist 116 Like a hottie 118 Swiss canton 119 Have a good cry 120 Nav. rank 121 “Koochie-___!” 122 Subway line to Columbia U. 123 Needle point? Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

M U G A P N V I O L S I R A T E E D I A N E C T E W E R C N E T I N C A D E I O A P O L D E R S A S A L R T I S E U M S M I T A P N E T S G T

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U N C U T C U R S E A T I O N L S P O A C E R T I O N A R C T U S S L A P T I O S U E Y S P R S S H O R P E R A T A E T O A S T E S Q U O R U N N C I E H C O R O A U T N S S E A

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IL><HIL>HI

New summer crafting classes for Tweens/Teens. Mixed media group forming. Call for details 342-0600 or check our website. www.twigsandtwists.com, 605 Americana Blvd.

BW GARAGE SALES Flea Market held at corner of Maple Grove and Emerald St. on 5/215/22. 9-5 p.m. Variety of items.

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BW MUSICIANS EXCHANGE >C9JHIG>6ABJH>8>6CHC::9:9 Local industrial musician living in Meridian looking for people to collaborate with for album. Recording tracks at home. Looking for people that actually listen to industrial music. Wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t mind working with an open-minded black metal guitar player. Would like to make the darkest, most pro offering yet. E-mail ďŹ rst: chaozexperiment@mad.scientist.com

COMMUNITY POSTINGS BW ANNOUNCEMENTS GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-2898484. This is not a job offer. DE:C;DG7JH>C:HH Check out the fruit stand on W. State St. between Moxie Java & Burger & Brew! Nicest guys in town!

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BW ADULT ENTERTAINMENT BUYER BEWARE Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services. ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+. Hot Singles Waiting To Connect! Call 208-287-3333. Free w/code 5500. Call 800-210-1010. MEET LOCAL SINGLES. Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7584, 18+. SEEKING SEXY SINGLES? Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7583. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. Where Hot Men Hook Up! Call 208-489-2162 or 800-777-8000. Free w/code 2982.

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BW PEN PALS Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. WM looking for F correspondence. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;8â&#x20AC;?, 180 lbs., and in need of intelligent correspondence and a steady connection with the outside world. Will be released in March of 2013 and am interested in establishing a foundation for a new and long term friendship and more. Randy Snowball #28961 S.I.C.I. ND-D-4 PO Box 8509 Boise, ID 83707. I am looking for any F to write as pen pals. Robert Wright #77364 I.S.C.I. PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707.

SWM 28 yrs. Old, Irish/German, looking for a SF for a pen pal and possibly more. Ages 20-35 who is outgoing, good sense of humor and who will be down for me for the next six years Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m here for. Dusty Knight #76632 I.S.C.I. 9-A4-B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m currently looking for M/F pen pals to write. I have two and half years left and would like to meet new friends. I am a 31 yr. old SF Latina. I have long black hair and am beautiful. I am also looking for someone as a friend or possibly more. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m also Bi-lingual. Elizabeth Gayton #81754 S.B.W.C.C. 2-32A 1300 S. Pleasant Valley Rd. Kuna, ID 83634. I am Latina, beautiful, 25 yrs. Old and I have three daughters. I live in Twin Falls but, I am from TX. I love to go to clubs and listen to oldies, rap, reggae and I love to play soccer. I love to have fun and watch movies. I want somebody nice and honest. I would love wonderful pen pals. I have long black curly hair and honey brown eyes. Leslie Flores #73576 P.W.C.C. 1451 Fore Rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. Sexy 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;5â&#x20AC;?, long black hair, brown eyes, 135 lb., 30 yr old looking for M 25-40 yrs. Old to write. So if your down to ride shoot a few lines my way. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be a waste of time. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll tell you like it is. Elenor Cervantes #67121 P.W.C.C. 1451 Fore rd. Pocatello, ID 83204. SWM, 24, 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;9â&#x20AC;?, 150 lbs., brown hair and hazel eyes. Looking for friends to write and hopefully more. Completely healthy, ďŹ nancial goaldriven, enjoy sports, cooking, dancing and having fun. Honest, intelligent, charming, wild, mature, and will put a smile on your face with my words and boyish good looks. Will be attending college upon my release. All letters answered. I have pictures. Sam Higginbotham #76512 I.S.C.I. PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I am a 23 yr. old WM, 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;10â&#x20AC;?, 265 lbs., brown hair and eyes. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m good looking with a great personality. Michael Bravo #87675 I.S.C.I. PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Attractive man, lonely looking for a friend. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m 27, 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;2â&#x20AC;?, 200 lbs. and built. Brian Fletcher #94569 I.S.C.I. U-9 PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Looking for a good pen pal to write as a friend. I am 27 yrs. Old. I like to read and write poetry. Joseph Hornof #92253 I.S.C.I. 16B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I am looking of any F ages 18-35 years old to write. Gary White #67333 I.S.C.I. 16A-37B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. I am looking for any F between the ages of 18-35 years old to write. Clinton Levi Plumb #88990 I.S.C.I. 16-A-49B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. Looking for pen pals. 38 yrs. Old, WM, 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;4â&#x20AC;?, tattoos looking to meet new people. Maybe more. Will answer all letters. Big teddy bear with a huge heart. Very open minded. Only in on parole violation so not sure how long I will be here. Riley C. McCarroll #45414 I.S.C.I. A33B PO Box 14 Boise, ID 83707. 52 year old, healthy, open minded inmate. All of my people are gone. Receive virtually no mail. How about it? James L. Smith #21092 S.I.C.I.-C.W.C. PO Box 8509 Boise, ID 83707. 31 year old SWF looking for someone to help me pass my time. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m fun, outgoing, honest and loyal. I like music, arts and sports. If I sound like someone youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to write, drop me a line. Carrie Blacksford #47997 1451 Fore. Rd. Pocatello, ID 83205.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

38 | MAY 19–25, 2010 | BOISEweekly

ARIES (March 21-April 19): All of us have gaps in our education. You and I and everyone else alive have dank pockets of ignorance that diminish our humanity, and musty pits of naivete that prevent us from seeing truths that are obvious to others. We all lack certain skills that hold us back from being more fulfilled in our chosen fields. That’s the bad news. The good news is that the gaps in your education will be up for review in coming weeks—which means that it’ll be an excellent time to make plans to fill them. Here’s a way to get started: Be aggressive in identifying the things that you don’t even know you don’t know.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I won’t be surprised if people begin to compete for your attention. There may even be some pushing and shoving as they jostle to get closer to you. At the ver y least, you can expect a flurr y of requests for your time and energy. What’s this all about? Either your usefulness is flat-out increasing or else those who’ve underestimated you in the past are finally tuning in to what they’ve been missing. So here’s my question and concern: Will you get so seduced by what ever yone asks you to give them that you lose sight of what you really want to give them? I suspect there will be a difference.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You don’t have to answer to anybody this week. You don’t have to defend, explain or compromise yourself. I mean, you can do those things if you want to be super extra nice, but there won’t be any hell to pay if you don’t. It’s one of those rare times when you have more power than usual to shape the world in accordance with your vision of what the world should be. I’ll go so far as to say that the world needs you to be very assertive in imposing your will on the flow of events. Just one caveat: Mix a generous dose of compassion in with your authoritative actions.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I’m not saying that you should create a superhero identity for yourself and embark on a campaign to combat injustice. But if you’ve ever wondered whether the life of a costumed crusader is right for you, it’s an excellent time to experiment. Your courage will be expanding in the coming weeks. Your craving for adventure will be strong, too. Even more importantly, your hunger to do good deeds that reach beyond your own self-interest will be growing. Interested? Check out superherosupplies.com.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When Paul McCartney first got the inspiration to write the song “Yesterday,” he had the melody and rhythm but couldn’t get a feel for what the lyrics should be. For a while, as he was waiting for the missing words to pop into his brain, he used nonsense stand-in phrases. The dummy version of the first line was “Scrambled eggs, oh my dear, you have such lovely legs.” This approach could be useful for you in the coming weeks. As you create a fresh approach in your own life, you might want to show the patience McCartney did. Be willing to keep moving ahead even though you don’t have the full revelation quite yet.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): All 26 of Edgar Rice Burroughs’ stories about Tarzan are set in Africa, but he never once visited that continent. And Bram Stoker didn’t feel the need to travel to the Transylvania region of Romania in order to write about it in his novel Dracula. But I don’t recommend this approach to you in the coming weeks, Libra. If you want to cultivate something new in your life by drawing on an exotic influence, I think you should immerse yourself in that exotic influence, at least for a while. If you want to tap into the inspiration available through an unfamiliar source, you need to actually be in the presence of that unfamiliar source.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): I suspect you’re going to feel a bit constrained in the coming weeks—maybe even imprisoned. I suggest you make the best of it. Rather than feeling sorry for yourself and spiraling down into a dark night of the soul, try imagining that you’re a resourceful hermit who’s temporarily under house arrest in an elegant chalet with all the amenities. Regard this “incarceration” as a chance to start work on a masterpiece, upgrade your meditation practice or read a book you’ve needed an excuse to lose yourself in. Believe it or not, your “deprivation” could be one of the best things that has happened to you in a while.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Why would you choose this bright, sunny moment to descend into the dark places and explore the fermenting mysteries? What renegade impulse would move you to turn away from the predictable pleasures and easy solutions, and instead go off in quest of more complex joys and wilder answers? I think you long to be free of transitor y wishes and fleeting dreams for a while so that you can get back into alignment with your deeper purposes. You need to take a break from the simple obsessions of your grayish, poker-faced ego, and re-attune yourself to the call of your freaky, evergreen soul.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sufi holy man Ibn ’Ata Allah was speaking about prayer when he said the following: “If you make intense supplication and the timing of the answer is delayed, do not despair of it. His reply to you is guaranteed; but in the way He chooses, not the way you choose, and at the moment He desires, not the moment you desire.” While I don’t claim to be able to perfectly decipher the will of the divine, my astrological research suggests that you will soon get a definitive answer to a question you’ve been asking for a long time. It may come softly and quietly from a direction you don’t expect and with a nuance or two that’ll test your reflexes. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Is Fast Food Too Tempting?” read a headline in The Week magazine. The accompanying article discussed whether people have the right to blame and even sue McDonald’s and Burger King for their health problems. We might as well add other allegedly appealing poisons to the discussion. “Is heroin too tempting?” “Is cheating on your lover or spouse too tempting?” I hope you’re seeing where I’m going with this. The coming weeks will be a good time to take personal responsibility for any supposedly fun activity you’re doing that warps your character or saps your energy. It’s prime time to end your relationship with stuff that’s bad for you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “The mind loves order, the heart loves chaos and the gut loves action,” says my astrological colleague Antero Alli. The ideal situation is to honor each of these needs, keeping them in a dynamic balance. But now and then, it’s healthy to emphasize one over the other two. According to my astrological analysis, you’re entering one of those times when the heart’s longing for chaos should get top priority. But if you do choose to go this way, please promise me one thing: Do your best to tilt toward the fascinating, rejuvenating kind of chaos and tilt away from the disorienting, demoralizing kind. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): When people are truly dehydrated, the impulse that tells them they’re thirsty shuts down. That’s why they may not know they’re suffering from a lack of water. In a metaphorically similar way you have been deprived so long of a certain kind of emotional sustenance that you don’t realize what you’re missing. See if you can find out what it is, and then make measured (nondesperate) plans to get a big, strong influx of it. The cosmic rhythms will be on your side in this effort.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 18 Issue 47