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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 18, ISSUE 39 MARCH 24–30, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

SUCKING AIR Ada County’s little red vans face demise FEATURE 11

SAYS WHO? In the world of the blog, just what qualifies a food critic?

PICKS 14

OVID ALL WET Boise State stages Metamorphoses

INSIDE

RESTAURANT GUIDE BW’s first-ever glossy guide to gettin’ grub

“... we’re forced to pass these resolutions that may be unconstitutional.”

ROTUNDA 10

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Business Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: Nathaniel Hoffman Nathaniel@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Calendar Guru: Josh Gross Josh@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Annabel Armstrong Interns: Andrew Crisp, Joe Firmage, Jennifer Spencer Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Jennifer Hernandez, Ted Rall, Jeramiah Robert Wierenga ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Adam Rosenlund Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Glenn Landberg, Steve Klamm, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street, Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

NOTE MY HONEY-DO LIST AIN’T FROM MY HONEY Some weeks, the 400 words that fill this space practically write themselves. Some weeks, I stare down the pool of white space, and while I always win, it’s not always pretty. And in weeks like this last one, it seems as though everyone has something they’d like me to say in Note. I have a laundry list of messages that I, as the official messenger of BW, have been asked to deliver. Scrawled in the margins of my day planner and on neon-orange Stickies on my desk are barely legible reminders that read “Tom,” “sections,” “guru,” “food/restaurant.” These are all things I’ve been asked to address in the now 300 words that follow. Please do forgive the “listiness” of what’s to come: Uʺ/œ“»\Ê/œ“Ê/œ“œÀÀœÜʈÃʘœÌÊ`i>`°ÊÃÊiۈ`i˜Vi`ʜ˜Ê Page 4, This Modern World is alive and kicking and is once again in BW. Regarding its recent absence, our only excuse is that with a smaller page count, we had to choose between Tomorrow and Mike Flinn’s Mondo Gaga, and faced with the choice, we went local. Don’t worry, if we nix a cartoon or a section permanently, you’ll read about it here. Uʺ-iV̈œ˜Ã»\Ê œˆÃi]ÊÀÌÃÊ>˜`Ê,iV]Ê̜œ]Ê>ÀiÊ>ˆÛiÊ>˜`ÊʎˆVŽing. Don’t worry, if we nix a cartoon or a section permanently, you’ll read about it here. UʺÕÀÕ»\Ê/…>˜ŽÃÊ̜Ê̅iÊVÀœÜ`ʜvÊޜÕÊ܅œÊ̅ÀiÜÊޜÕÀÊ name and resume into consideration to be BW’s calendar guru. We have found a fearless master of all things eventrelated and he hails from the fair city of Portland, Ore., most recently. Josh Gross is editorial’s new guy, and since he’s just getting the lay of the city, I’d suggest you drop him a line if you have events that regularly need attention. You can reach Gross at josh@boiseweekly.com. Uʺœœ`É,iÃÌ>ÕÀ>˜Ì»\ʘ`Êw˜>ÞÊ°°°Ê>œÜʓiÊ̜ʈ˜ÌÀœ`ÕViÊ the shiny new object, which has hopefully already distracted you, in this week’s edition. It’s called—appropriately—the Restaurant Guide, and we’ve launched this inaugural issue in tandem with our annual Food Issue. In this week’s main feature, longtime food writer Jennifer Hernandez explores the crowded waters of food blogging, and in the Restaurant Guide, Hernandez takes a look at chef/producer collaborations happening throughout southern Idaho. Take my advice, sit down with this week’s issue over a plate of food because if you’re not hungry now, you will be by the time this issue gets through with you. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Marne Elmore TITLE: “Produce, Noun; Produce, Verb” MEDIUM: Woodblock print ARTIST STATEMENT: A topic that interests me and appears in my work is agriculture. I am interested in the dilemmas that can arise in the processes of food production. It is fascinating to look at the relationships between local, national and global agricultural concerns.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Square formats are preferred and all mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

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WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world. FINN R IGGINS

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE

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MAIL / MONDA GAGA

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS What’s to become of the little red vans in Ada County’s emissiontesting battle ROTUNDA

BW BLEEDS SXSW COVERAGE If you’re not at SXSW, log onto to boiseweekly. com and let BW bludgeon you with festival coverage. Boise bands Finn Riggins and RevoltRevolt blogged their way over the mountains and through the desert to get to Austin, Texas, and then blogged for their lives while in the midst of all the action. After you get your behind-the-scenes dose at Tour Mode, skip over to Cobweb, where BW freelancer Gavin Dahl has been immortalizing the festivities by blogging, vlogging and snapping photos like a mad man.

CAST OF CHARACTERS MAKE THEIR WAY TO THE STARTING LINE It was a flurry of filing last week as candidates threw their names in the proverbial hat. Two familiar Ada County Commission faces resurfaced in a bid for their former seats. Vern Bisterfeldt and Roger Simmons will run on the same platform against incumbents Rick Yzaguirre and Fred Tilman. And on the national front, a gum-smacking Bill Sali came out of hiding to throw his weight behind Raul Labrador, who is running for his old seat in District 1. Get more at citydesk.

Forget Saving The World. How About Helping One Kid One Time With One Donation?

Smile Train provides free cleft surgery which takes as little as 45 minutes and costs as little as $250. It gives desperate children not just a new smile—but a new life.

THERE’S NO EXCUSE FOR BOREDOM Twiddling your thumbs? Visit Cobweb for daily updates on the events you shouldn’t miss under any circumstances.

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FEATURE The Next Byte

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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MUSIC GUIDE

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ARTS The Basement Gallery’s new owners share a pond-skipping approach to art

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SCREEN Bounty Hunter

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MOVIE TIMES

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FOOD Boise fine-dining mainstay, Cottonwood Grille, throws down its best for two reviewers

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CLASSIFIEDS

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HOME SWEET HOME

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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“...one of the most productive charities—dollar for deed—in the world.” — The New York Times

Donate online: www.smiletrain.org or call: 1-800-932-9541

According to the U.S. Government, women should be sure to take sufficient levels of folic acid (400 micrograms/day) during pregnancy to help prevent neural tube defects and reduce the risk for cleft lip and palate. For more information, visit www.SmileTrain.org. The Smile Train is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit recognized by the IRS, and all donations to The Smile Train are tax-deductible in accordance with IRS regulations. © 2010 The Smile Train.

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MAIL LIBERAL MEDIA BIAS I really tried. It’s been months since I read through BW. I got tired of the hardcore liberal bias I read. You can write however you want for whomever you want, I am not promoting censorship. However, consider carefully who you are writing for. Who is your target audience? I picked up a recent paper and read in the opening paragraphs on immigration that “some people are patriots, and some care about reform.” What? That phrase twisted people concerned about national sovereignty into haters. That is not true! I am 100-plus percent in favor of legal immigration. Illegal immigrants are in a precarious position where they are exploited, and their presence lowers everyone’s wages. I tried again. Bill Cope’s article on health insurance started out good, but then he threw in the obligatory insult, “there it is, explained so even a teabagger can

understand it.” So now people concerned with an ever-expanding government and taxes are stupid? As I said before, who are you writing to? Liberals already read this paper. Extreme conservatives won’t read it. If you want independents and libertarians such as myself to read, perhaps you shouldn’t have such a condescending attitude toward people that aren’t as liberal as yourself. —Anthony R. Benson, Boise

SUCKERED Reading Tom Edgar’s letter (BW, Mail, Feb. 24, 2010), apparently he is one of millions suckered in by the so called Congressional Reform Act of 2010. CRA2010 is a petition circulated via e-mail. It contains a list of law changes purporting to restore Congress to the citizen legislature envisioned by the nation’s founders. Either through ignorance or deliberately, the petition’s

S U B M I T Letters must include full name, city and contact information and be 300 or fewer words. Submit letters via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: All correspondence is fair game.

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author implies conditions that don’t actually exist: Congress doesn’t pay Social Security tax—yes, they do. Congress doesn’t pay for their health insurance—they do. Congress doesn’t pay for their pension plan—they do. Congress votes themselves annual pay raises—they don’t. Laws passed by Congress don’t apply to them—they do. And so on and so forth, bogus. I urge folks to Google “Congressional Reform Act of 2010.” Notice how it has spread to countless Web sites perpetuating these myths to millions willing to believe any negative thing about their government. I am not defending Congress’ behavior. Lord knows they deserve most of the criticism they receive. But, as a U.S. citizen retired from a 20-year military career, I take offense at the circulation of a government reform petition based on falsehoods. I defended freedom of speech and press, but I didn’t imagine that included freedom to perpetuate lies about the people’s branch of government. —John Ireland, Nampa

BOISEweekly | FEBRUARY 3–9, 2010 | 5

OPINION/BILL COPE

RED’S GOOD IDEA Part one “Whudchuh gerna rut ’boud negs?” “Hey hey hey, Red. Seriously? I think you can do better than that, don’t you? C’mon, try it again.” “Geez, Cope. You’re worse’n an old maid English teacher. Can’t a feller relax now an’ then? “Not in my column, bud. You want to talk like that, take it to your teabag friends. But as long as you’re in here, you have to at least try to sound like you didn’t just fall off a boxcar from Mississippi. Now, what is it you want to know?” “I’m just asking what you’re gonna write about next.” “Golly, pal, I haven’t really decided. Got a lot of topics tumbling around in my head, but nothing’s come up a winner yet.” “I think you oughta write about how that good ol’ Texas school board is gonna change America.” “And how’s that, Red?” “’Cause from now on, the textbooks’ll be telling the true, conservative side of how things happened instead of the lyin’ liberal side. You know, Cope, that’s gonna change everything. You liberals ain’t got a chance now.” “Frankly, Red, I’m not really worried about those Texas feebs changing much with their horseshit version of history.” “Huh? Why not? You oughta be!” “Nah. Think about it. The smart kids will learn better as soon as they grow up enough to have their own minds, and the stupid kids are going to grow up to be conservatives, anyway, no matter what the books say. Besides, I see the history of civilized countries as the inevitable and natural evolution of humanity out of the savage darkness of conservatism to the sublime enlightenment of liberalism. Certainly, there are setbacks along the way … and sure as hell, Texas contributes way more than its fair share of the setbacks … but since the Golden Age of Greece right on up to the election of Barack Obama, the march to an increasingly liberal society has been one steady, unstoppable, irrepressible progression. Those dumbass Texas school boarders are just swatting at the wind, that’s all.” “What!?” “I don’t want to write about the Texans’ textbooks, how’s that.” “Well then, what are you gonna write about?” “What’s it matter to you, Red?” “I just wanna know. It’s the only dang perk I get outta this sidekick job, knowing afore anyone else what your next opinion is.” “OK, fine. What I’m thinking of writing about is how Rep. Walt Minnick and Israel are so much alike. But I’m worried I don’t have enough room left to make the case.” “Huh? Walt Minnick is like Israel? Or

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is it that Israel is like Walt Minnick? And how d’you figure, anyhow?” “Well, see, they both have a habit of pissing on our foot and calling it friendship.” “Whoooooooa, Cope. Your problem isn’t not having enough room. Your problem is not having enough guts.” “Um, yeah. I’m afraid you might be right about that, Red.” “That’s why you’re beatin’ around the bush here, ain’t it? That’s why you’re piddlin’ around with me when you should be writing up a storm, ain’t it? You don’t know how to say something bad about your ol’ Democrat buddy Walt, so’s you’re wasting what space you got left dreaming up some conflationary hoop-de-doo mixing Israel into the batch, so’s if you ever get around to saying what you want to say about Minnick, maybe people will notice the Israel part and not so much the Minnick part. That’s what you’re doing, ain’t it, Cope?” “Eeeoooow, conflationary? Mighty big word for a guy from Melba.” “Well! Ain’t it?” “Sorta. Maybe. Yeah. But that’s not to say Israel hasn’t been pissing on our foot and calling it friendship. And it isn’t so easy criticizing Israel, either. I might say something certain Israelis don’t like, and I could end up in a Dubai hotel suite with a pillow over my face. That’s something I don’t have to worry about with Walt Minnick.” “Cope, let’s take this one at a time. First, I’ll pretend I’m Israel, and you tell me what your beef is with me. Then we’ll do the same with Minnick. It’ll be like back-to-back interventions, sort o’ like what we had to do with my brothers Blacky and Whitey.” “Red, that’s a pretty good idea. But gee, I only have about 150 words left. I don’t think I could even get the Israel part said in 150 words, let alone the Minnick part.” “There any law says you can’t stretch this out to a two-parter? Huh? You done two-parters on some purdy dumb stuff. So’s why can’t you do it here? “That’s not a bad idea, either. See? What’d I tell you way back when I got you into enunciation therapy? Once you stop talking like a drunken monkey, you stop thinking like one, too. I swear, we’ll turn you liberal yet, Red.” “You’re wasting words, Cope. C’mon, let’s get this going here. Remember, I’m Israel. What ya’ have to say to me?” “OK. Um, Israel. Pal. Here’s the deal, see. Um … how’d you like to go it alone from here on out?” Next week, Cope intervenes with Israel and Walt Minnick, sort of like what Red had to do with his brothers Blacky and Whitey. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

TED RALL/OPINION

OBAMACARE! Bill a bailout for insurers, disastrous for Americans NEW YORK—The details of President Barack Obama’s health-care plan are finally starting to come out. They are ugly. I want to socialize medicine, but America desperately needs smart, strong opposition to Obamacare. The worst part is the “mandate,” requiring the uninsured to buy insurance at hyper-inflated prices. We can’t count on so-called liberals to fight. We need a passel of old-fashioned conservatives to come to our rescue. What we’ve got instead are fools like David Rivkin. Rivkin, a right-wing lawyer who worked in the Reagan-Bush Justice Department, recently fired the first salvo against Obama’s healthcare mandate in The Wall Street Journal. Requiring Americans to buy health insurance from a for-profit monopoly is stupid and immoral. But Rivkin and other federal society types rely on a different approach: suing. They say the Obamacare mandate is unconstitutional. “If you say the government can mandate your behavior as far as this insurance goes,” he wrote, “there will be nothing the government can’t do. They can control every single way in which you dispose of your income.” As Mark Hall, a law professor specializing in public health at Wake Forest University, points out Congress enjoys “ample power and precedent through the Constitution’s ‘commerce clause’ to regulate just about any aspect of the national economy.” Congress can make us buy health insurance. So the court challenges will be fun for lawyers. Meanwhile, we will be stuck. Obama’s proposed solution will pour billions into the pockets of those who caused the problem. Insurance companies routinely deny claims.

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Their lobbyists protect monopolies. They jack up rates, underpay doctors and kill tens of thousands of people a year while paying their CEOs tens of millions—with our premiums. But Obamacare won’t rein in the insurers. Under the Obama/Senate plan, the poor— earning less than $14,500—would be required to go on Medicaid. Unless they don’t qualify, in which case they would have to pay at least 2 percent of their income to private insurers or get dinged $750 a year. The working poor, meanwhile, would get charged a percent of their income on a sliding scale. According to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, federal subsidies for poor workers would be too low. People who earn between $14,500 and $43,000 a year would pay between 4 and 12 percent of their annual income to private insurers. And let’s not forget about deductibles. Like the subsidies, the “actuarial value of coverage” would slide on a scale. Under the Senate bill a family of three earning less than $27,000 would be fairly well covered. Obamacare would cover 97 percent of their bills. But a family of three earning between $45,000 and $73,000 would only have 70 percent coverage. There would also be co-pays: $20 per doctor’s visit, $250 if you had to go to the hospital, and lab tests and X-rays would come completely out of your wallet. Faced with a disaster like this, America needs opponents on the right ready to fight back. What we’ve got instead—incoherent Tea Partiers, idiotic lawyers like Rivkin, and Rush Limbaugh, who claims that the existing system is perfect as it is—might as well be working for Rahm Emanuel.

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CITYDESK/NEWS JOCKEYING FOR PRIMARY SEASON

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NEWS

ADA EYES CANYON EMISSIONS TESTS Red van operators fear airshed-wide contract ZACH HAGADONE With Kuna and Canyon County set to start state-mandated emissions testing on June 1, some officials are feeling a little trampled upon. “It’s one of the most frustrating things as a local government official I’ve ever had to deal with … It is Big Brother cracking down on Canyon County in the most abusive manner I’ve ever seen,” Canyon County Commissioner Steve Rule said.

about 65,000 tests per year in Canyon County, $3 of that would go to DEQ for public outreach and the remainder would go to the company. More than 20 existing mechanics or lube shops will perform the tests as a sideline business, and a portion of the test fee—somewhere between $2 and $4—would go to the tester. In comparison, Ada County’s little red vans, which do about 130,000 tests per year, are LAU RIE PEARMAN

Though still in session, legislating took a back seat to campaigning last week as final candidate filings rolled in across Idaho. First on the federal scene, The Mikes (Sen. Crapo and Sen. Simpson) drew multiple GOP primar y challengers while The Walt (Rep. Minnick) managed to stave off any Democratic challengers, despite his recent vote against mediocre, near-universal health care for most Americans. There are plenty of Republicans gunning for Minnick’s seat, however, led by Vaughn Ward and Raul Labrador representing the particularly conser vative and the especially conser vative wings of the Idaho GOP. At the state level, Uncle Butch drew significant challenges from the left, right and screwy. Along with single-issue candidates and comedians, Otter will face Ada County Commissioner Sharon Ullman, angr y former elk farmer Rex Rammell and a lady from Post Falls who filed at the last minute and whom citydesk has yet to burden with any type of label. Whoever emerges from that fat primar y will almost definitely face Democrat Keith Allred, who has a minor primar y challenger to contend with as well. Eldon Wallace, an education expert who has advised Democratic legislators, is challenging Lt. Gov. Brad Little in November, should Little stave off his two primar y challengers. Democrats also fielded candidates for secretar y of state, controller and superintendent of public instruction this year. In local legislative races, there is much interest in the western Ada County (District 14) seat being abandoned by Labrador. Four Republicans, including Mayor Nate Mitchell from Star and Reed DeMordaunt, want in, and Democrat Steve Berch also filed. District 14’s Mike Moyle also drew Democratic opposition this year from William J. Young. Two veteran Democrats are abandoning their posts, opening up seats in districts 18 and 19. Sen. Kate Kelly and Rep. Anne Pasley-Stuart are retiring. Republicans, including Dean Sorensen, who ran against Kelly previously, are all over the District 18 races. Democrats, on the other hand, are jockeying for the open District 19 seat, with four filed for the May 25 primar y. The Ada County Commission race got interesting last week with a pair of veteran county commissioners filing against two incumbents with the hopes of dissolving the County Commission as we know it. Roger Simmons and Vern Bisterfeldt, who ser ved together on the commission a decade ago, want back in, and they want to get rid of the three full-time commissioners in favor of a part-time, five-person board. Simmons is challenging Commissioner Rick Yzaguirre and Bister feldt is running against Chairman Fred Tilman. Read citydesk online for more election news. —Nathaniel Hoffman

Wilke Meyers tests emissions from a van down by the Overland Park Shopping Center. He worries that if Ada County switches emissions test vendors, he and other independent testers would be shut down.

The Idaho Department of Environmental Quality says it’s just doing its job, enforcing a 2008 state law requiring emissions control in Environmental Protection Agency-designated airsheds. Further, Canyon County had its chance to front its own mitigation plan but was rejected because it didn’t meet the necessary level of pollution offsets. “We’re all in the same airshed, and we follow federal guidelines,” said Pete Wagner, regional administrator for the Department of Environmental Quality in Boise. While Canyon County may feel abused, cities in Ada County think the DEQ-imposed program might be a better option than their current emissions-testing system, which is carried out by an army of independently owned testing businesses collectively referred to as “little red vans” (even though not all are red and many are housed in portable buildings). The bottom line: Canyon County’s testing regime will be carried out over five years by Utah-based SysTech International at a price of no more than $11 a test. According to SysTech, which estimates

allowed to charge up to $20—$3.50 of which goes to the Ada County Air Quality Board. DEQ recently asked the board if it wanted to join Canyon in switching to SysTech. It’s a move strongly supported by board member, Ada County Commissioner and Republican gubernatorial candidate Sharon Ullman. “We need to be looking at a comparison of $20 with $11. Why should we overcharge people?” she said. Ullman has put several motions before the air board in support of bringing SysTech to Ada County, though none have passed. At the March 18 meeting, board members voted to wait at least six months before making a decision and use Canyon County as a test case. “We have a good system. We are satisfying DEQ and being proactive about what satisfies the EPA,” said board chairman David Zaremba, who’s also vice president of the Meridian City Council. “We do need to consider what is going to happen in Canyon County.” Emissions testers were relieved that they’ll have a “six month reprieve,” but many believe that’s not enough time to assess SysTech. If

Ada officials come down in favor of the company, testers have good reason to fear that the little red vans will be thrown under the bus. The last thing the county wants is a patchwork of testers with their own systems and policies. SysTech President and CEO Lothar Geilen said there’s a middle way. If the company runs emissions testing in Ada County, he said the red van owners could subcontract. “We’re trying to include as many red van operators as we can,” he said. “We understand that it’s socially responsible to include them.” Wilke Meyers, who operates Ace Emissions in the lot of the Overland Park Shopping Center, says that’s nice to hear, but few if any of the current 49 testing operations could afford to stay in business if they were only making between $2 and $4 per car. “If you put the numbers to it, there isn’t any way that anybody just doing [tests] for a living can make a living,” he said. Even though Ada County testers are allowed to charge up to $20, many don’t. Some offer promotions, discounts and coupons, others set their price as low as around $8. Meyers charges an average $17 per test and takes home $13.50 per car after the air board takes its cut. With $1,000 a month in overhead, and a Jan. 1 switch from annual to biennial testing that halved his business, he’s just making it with eight to 10 cars a day. “It’s not like anybody’s sitting here getting rich doing this job,” he said. Geilen recognizes that, too. “We have an $11 inspection fee, and the red van operators charge $20. The $9 difference that the motorist is paying today and may be saving tomorrow—that comes out of the red van operators’ pockets,” he said. Joe Villareal and Bob Gallivan have owned Aires LLC and its two testing stations for the past five years. They fear that SysTech could cause 50 small businesses to go under. “They want to go to Big Brother,” said Gallivan. “I have a problem with that from the get-go.” Ullman thinks that’s a misrepresentation. “‘Big Brother’ is big government telling us we have to get our vehicles’ emissions tested in the first place,” she said. “But if we can get this government-mandated service for cheaper, and meet that need, I feel like it’s worth it.” She also doesn’t have much sympathy for the red vans. “That we somehow owe them something, to keep them in business by overcharging Ada County residents—I just don’t buy that,” Ullman said. “Our obligation is to ensure the best possible service at the lowest possible cost.” For Villareal and other station owners, the issue comes down to competition. “We’re all about competition,” he said. “If we need to go down to $10, we’ll go down to $10. It’s the American way.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

DAILY

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | 9

UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

LINES IN THE SAND Legislature tilts at health care windmills ANDREW CRISP Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter stood before members of the press last week in his ceremonial office to sign the (so-called) Idaho Health Freedom Act. House Bill 391 moved through the Legislature this month on strictly party-line votes. With Otter’s signature, the bill creates an Idaho statute in symbolic opposition to the federal overhaul of health insurance, which passed on March 21 after a yearlong battle. The Idaho bill promises Idaho citizens the freedom to buy health services as they like, and rejects any possible federal penalty for not purchasing health insurance. Additionally, it tasks Attorney General Lawrence Wasden with fighting the federal government in court, and provides $100,000 to do so if necessary. “We’re not gonna be in this alone,” said Otter. “There’s gonna be many other states … in this with us. I think to protect the people of Idaho, which is one of our first obligations as a government, it’s the right thing to do.” Otter was backed by a number of legislators—literally standing behind him at the podium—all of them Republican. With his first public bill signing of the 2010 session, Otter became the first governor in the country to sign such anti-health-care reform legislation. “How can somebody mandate us, because we’re breathing, to buy health insurance?” said retiring Rep. Jim Clark, a Republican from Hayden Lake. Idaho was propelled onto the national stage the day after the signing, pushing Otter into the spotlight. (U.S. Rep. Mike Simpson got major play as well, hanging off a U.S. Capitol balcony with a “KILL” sign as Congress prepared to vote. Republicans brandishing “THE” and “BILL” signs accompanied Simpson.) But Otter made Anderson Cooper on CNN, as well as Neil Cavuto on Fox News, telling

10 | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | BOISEweekly

both that enough states could stand up to the feds to make a Constitutional challenge. “I tell you what, if you get 36 states, that’s a critical mass, that’s a Constitutional mass.” No record could be found of the phrase “constitutional mass” in the founding documents, but Otter may be referring to the majority of states needed to amend. Outspoken advocates for health-care overhaul, like David Irwin with the Idaho branch of the AARP, opposed Otter’s move. “This is a classic example of politics coming before patients,” said Irwin. “It stands little chance, if any, of standing up in court. $100,000 is not going to go very far when you’re fighting a case in the Supreme Court. We don’t know how this legislation is going to act with existing federal laws, or how it’s going to interact with the health-reform bill, we don’t know how it’s going to interact with current state laws.” While New Plymouth Republican Sen. Monty Pearce assures Unda’ the Rotunda that the Health Freedom Act was homegrown, drafted by Clark and Boise Republican Rep. Lynn Luker, the American Legislative Exchange Council states that the bill is based on model legislation they provide to their members. The D.C. group seeks to “advance the Jeffersonian principles of free markets, limited government, federalism, and individual liberty …” “It basically says that people can’t be forced into a health-care system,” said Christie Herrera, the director of ALEC’s health policy arm. “The language is loosely based on a bill that we have, that would prohibit citizens from being fined or jailed for not having health insurance … The issue is, should I be forced into buying something from a company I don’t like,

or an industry I don’t support?” Retiring Boise Democratic Sen. Kate Kelly raised concern about the ramifications of the Legislature’s decision. During the Senate deliberations on the bill, Kelly distributed an opinion from Deputy Attorney General Karin D. Jones regarding the status of J-1 visa holders under the Idaho Health Freedom Act. Under the J-1 visa program, foreign visitors working in Idaho are required to carry health insurance. Kelly asked whether attempts to deport those without insurance would require defense by Idaho’s attorney general. Otter referred to state sovereignty during the ceremony, echoing the concerns of his fellow GOP lawmakers. Lawmakers urged the federal government to amend the 10th Amendment, strengthening states’ rights, asserted the primacy of English and God in public places and would create a silver medallion, which could be used to pay taxes. “They’re doing this for political reasons. So many of these bills have constitutional flaws, and they pass anyway,” said Kelly. “Day after day we’re forced to pass these resolutions that may be unconstitutional. The defense is always, ‘it’s an election year … the people want this to pass …’ Well, that’s not the way we should be legislating.” As for health freedom, the bill does not go into effect until July 1, and it requires that the feds force some unnamed Idaho official to force some unwitting Idaho citizen to buy health insurance before the state sues. But just one day after the bill passed, Otter was in Park City, Utah, meeting with other Republican governors and discussing a challenge. And Wasden’s office was in discussions with other states to decide on litigation, according to spokesman Bob Cooper.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | 11

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L nt n t e r l s i s a s t t t u t I u a se fo ish d at io y de a d od di of o pp in ed to an an ent mu “I rna con ted lf od in th e n es d lifi ah N in a r ro g f h b d d ial ni o a : t l d t o t f di ’s lis te o ha es s a cr g c e M ast o Id dep adi ach or is li oth Blo blo s m cat St ew dn no t o ur in t a i r t h re tic ed en ye e ab “W aho en o b ed a v fe a co g W gge ay ion th pe ate s ju ’t r t th r a bec g th sta s. ib u ar is a d b s e s r y r s st ea a fo a e s , ili (b H u ou out he , tu en roa by riet s a des ith rs a e n in e a on ur t I o us Be l e s d t t a f l o r n l y e B e f y e a a y o i I re to te em f t d e nt an hin nd am to A run ood I fi ned rad cast loc of od f et nte ke bul ois ur ee hin w I d hin no B= o f o i c a e h d d g n r . a d o r t c j R o i l r i n d in s n I l e o i r n ou e i o e iti et the nd g sto bec p lik k I ite dn th FF fa ece nta r fo ut?’ Id t pi to pro t w NP ws urn cs. ity. W s, e n 1 c, hi m B ry au ret e I ’m r,” ’t w e M p e t a 9 a r n R ” a t c A bu A> b hi 9 W m t in ur s i en ois ho che m duc s t r ap alis s do tel se ent ha a b he an e 5 s t s c e =J u t h a n e a t e ite al . da b , b op h ye , t d on tio e d rs t w . as ,” ler it i io d ad ex t t nu f f e n m a i h s o s i o t i g i @ u o u t n r h a c i r n h e a o fl o l u t t y y t bi he an s, a s. he w pla o p thi s , s n i l y du m e ch o ur o d ke id d =J te id y N wh hat pro d ile as sa d ft So q ri in a ng a c j e l e f r n e s o a s l n l s e u t t e to La tri n ll ry t y br er ke a P ic he du at ivi F9 ur the lin ot ed c id. hat r a I w ali er, ed. s m , I l o e h R w h t e n a d c i o n an in un l o he ri In ’s ll, e fic it’ F< ith d I cla e is f p ad ys ike al As s a br , w sta er ona g i m c f N s d t c n d c l o i s s r a o r elf d u h e, P oa he rte to l n S st so re c o s s fil fo iqu tea ea the t [ tio ju =R p c R pr nte agr de ed od con aho es ue- dca ast a ‘ a d n ed o e d lly F w n st t d o H a c h l ur ub ou nd iat va ff  icu th in ch su ’s fo dr st in s o o w re it s, th o d n a o e n t o b i e d l i h t te n ce f f w o st bl on lab re arn on ica her in A uce co ltu e ne Sep ain me Bou r co iven s an g, E ll B n th co ha nch ] ra and at I u c m o t gg of le t t rs n ns s d di it th nd rs nt ra w te . an t do alle turn ing e o tion n C “B hei ehin ric e re ndu I w ter con it er, se ty cie ho wr bl y in d E ed th f h s. al in . H e B wh loc ribu l iss No mb e lo r st d bu sta cti an m e t i s w e i n g a H g f e h o u i k a t t t r I i s o a d f t n t g t r o t s l i n i i e a t o t i d a u o a e o ist ge ri he in r g ted r ng t iou in en a rie m ibl o h ns pi an rn ab ctiv ny d st se a bo ed i ns s in hw 200 s,” rs es M es an un t s c on e I is an ece d ia to con s c clu ar ho ou ely fo an rea th n t co Id est 9 t d n an th da ho d o s w sa are ,” B en ses ts a - o n , a i r br e r e cl ee lo Bo t to rec m ds on Ha he me ah Fo th or id n o u, pr nd ea cts niv an es d yo ly ho me ut by li n N fr o, od e E ca s o s k o o r “ T e t s k i h f u u rad . s jo ed he t j s w sta s th loc ore ma Han d a ba reas l ch ’ bl elp its pa the ne, d an orth om Wa Ne dib do io ur a m ou aid e te s l y a e t s e s W s o k n w u o d l w p ir l f an w e be sh e r fs g fi p m jo h d t h Va ali a b an rna . lin ar d elf gen eb fo ow fo rod rs, e V , re fea nan ons ent urn ey h Bo est. her ingt s si Ida lle st us wh lm s t a s re a k b r e uc ra al st tu cia or o a av s w on e, ho en y b in S ine o w ers fea re o erat ite rit , O w W a usin xpo ed s nch ley’ aura res lly s fr r gi listi e v sha ith , te ef ili ss e h e n t s “ c r f o e d u e r e r s e r p r p e sit co s su e rs fo te o u m t f st ry e t s a eg re b pu ing ore con th an re loc . e r nt ses re cia a od ur dc pp th or an d he nd on th sit e ch ab al bl th rib h Bo lty nd ie s a as or e w da iff ir u e co er o e i b “ a c n e i e ep s re s t h n t b f o e n A n p r r r un s a ut o n u o de d cu o la he ju l in ti r s a foo ur ea d o int his us at d o en pin n tr nd a o i o tio o M l h t p g s v e a n s in d t t . n” fil sk ds ey m th rv W e e f n a io y’s e e fie n nd on is xp es s s . I o th er ie eb sse w o pp ns ou tro s in pop of ld s t o r r t t o e a w n a o r m s t a a n i s s n o n a t o t an rs du a pi tim m b n ke m e ex o in o s w ite he es cc a t r a fo de o ep a o ch f lo cl ver it . in d elv cin pl ng es ad , a od d w , B ep che ut g, sa es g ac o it ke f t an ca ud s h o r t s f io nd t i o h ’ s yu i e, te s t he g ll e n o e o r ll s e y d

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‘Hey, do you mind if we take a picture? We can send it out to our followers, tell a little bit about you.’ And then at some point we’ll circle back and say, ‘Hey, if you believe in what we’re doing can we count on you for some kind of support?’” Of the 189 “favorite pages” listed on Behind the Menu’s Facebook page, “Less than a dozen are sponsors at this time,” Boss said. “But we’re expecting that will grow. “We have a tremendous mix of culinary businesses in our area that are not just restaurants,” Boss said. “Talk a walk down Bannock Street in downtown Boise: you have City Peanut Company, the Chocolat Bar and Pottery Gourmet Kitchen,” he said, describing a mere sliver of Boise’s interesting and diverse culinary culture. “People in Boise are tremendous boosters of our local food

12 | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | BOISEweekly

scene—like Chamber of Commerce ambassadors. The advent of social media and the blogosphere allow people to do what used to be done by word of mouth.” The idea of accepting payment for blog content is still being debated, but, according to the Federal Trade Commission, it’s fine, as long as the arrangement is fully disclosed. Last December, the government issued its Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising. While bloggers aren’t the only group targeted, they are included in a clear set of guidelines about disclosure: “When there is a connection between the endorser and the seller of an advertised product that might materially affect the weight or credibility of an endorsement (i.e. the connection is not reasonably expected by the audience) such connection must be

fully disclosed.” Like Boss, Jess Flynn is also in the PR biz. The owner of Red Sky Public Relations got into food blogging because, “I talked a lot about food on Twitter and some blogger in California who has a travel blog site said, ‘You seem to really know your stuff about food in Boise. Would you write a blog post for me?’ That’s why I started. I wrote that blog post about my favorite breakfast stops in Boise.” Flynn started her IdahoFoodies blog (idahofoodies.posterous.com) to “share info about the places that I love, the people I love and the types of food that I like.” “If you read the blog, you’ll see that half the time I don’t know what I’m doing. Cooking—I’ll include that in there. I don’t have an ego about admitting what I don’t understand.”

Flynn makes a point of not profiling her PR clients on her blog, but said if she were to ever mention a client, she would make a disclosure of the business relationship. “I believe in transparency in who you are and all that. If somebody sent me something or I got it free from a client, I would disclose that,” said the former television producer. Regardless of the finer points of how they do it, the proliferation of food-oriented blogs in the Treasure Valley says a lot about how much residents care about the topic. “The stories we tell are about people who have a passion that’s rooted in who they are, where they’re from, their family relationships. And they are trying to get that out there and share it. And I wanted to tell these stories,” Boss said. “To me, social media was the perfect platform for doing that.”

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t’s a fact: Everybody has to eat in order to stay alive. But does this basic necessity qualify anybody to critique the meals they eat at restaurants? We asked three local chefs and restaurant owners what they think of the recent rise in the everyman food critic via the Web and how it has affected their businesses. John Berryhill of the upscale downtown eatery Berryhill & Co. has 15 years experience as a chef, restaurant owner and caterer in Boise. Weighing in with 15 years in the no-can-opener Mexican fast food biz is Senor Fresh founder Paul Provost. And Pizzalchik chef/owner Brad Breakell has been baking gourmet pies and roasting chickens for six years.

Bg`f:]jjq`add$:]jjq`add;g& How do you think food bloggers and people who post comments after professional restaurant reviews have changed the restaurant business? We use Open Table, which is a guest management/reservation software program. After they dine, [the customer] gets a review e-mail that asks, “How was your experience?” I’m pleasantly surprised at how many more people are posting good reviews. A lot of professionals and travelers use Open Table, and it falls under the “good” category. They control it more than on other places. A lot of the other stuff I find is just trash written by people who can publish with no accountability. There is a fan page that is just the opposite about me on Facebook, a John Berryhill hate page. It’s authored by the girlfriend of a p.o.’d former employee ...

They can say whatever extreme things they want and they’re not accountable for it. What do you think qualifies a person to be a restaurant critic? Well, I don’t think you need to go to restaurant critic school. I think you need a general knowledge of food. A professional reviewer is paid to critique the profession that keeps him in business. You can’t just slam away. I think you need to be grounded in the industry. Why do you think there are so many food bloggers and food commentators out there today? It’s so easy and accessible to comment now that technology has developed these platforms where a voice can be heard without accountability.

:jY\:j]Yc]dd$HarrYd[`ac How do you think food bloggers and people who post comments after professional restaurant reviews have changed the restaurant business? It’s good news/bad news. Human nature is to talk about the bad experience. I don’t look at any of the sites, but only know what my customers tell me. The good news is some people do post good comments. But if someone waits too long for their food, they’ll post it was a bad experience. But I’m also hearing that other people will respond, “You���re full of crap. The food is worth the wait.”

What do you think qualifies a person to be a restaurant critic? This is the only business where everyone thinks they’re an expert. Everyone eats food. But they complain about prices and think they know what it takes to run a business. But they don’t. I don’t pretend to know how to be a mechanic. So what gives people the idea that they know better than I do about how to run a restaurant? Why do you think there are so many food bloggers and food commentators out there today? Food is the essence of life. People are passionate about it.

HYmdHjgngkl$K]fgj>j]k` How do you think food bloggers and people who post comments after professional restaurant reviews have changed the restaurant business? To be honest, I don’t know enough about it. Whatever people feel about our food, we’ve been here 15 years. I feel good about our food, and we have a lot of loyal customers. I see people who’ve come in once a week for 10 years. What do you think qualifies a person to be a restaurant critic? A really open mind, to have travelled some and to not just go by appearances. A lot of times, people look at the high-end restaurant reviews. But the majority of the population is middle class, and they’re not going to Spago to spend $120 on a meal. It may be a great meal, but few can afford it. A good critic is going to know the

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niches and be grounded in the middle where there’s a wider range of food. Why do you think there are so many food bloggers and food commentators out there today? Everybody has an opinion. It’s easy to get on a blog and say “this food sucks.” It can be anonymous and belligerent. As a restaurant owner, if I have to rely externally on one critic to tell me my food is good, then I’m relying on one entity instead of the general population. As a restaurant owner, you can’t worry about one good or bad review. You have to know internally that you’re doing a good job, stick to what you do and know it’s good. Somebody can come in, they’re having a bad day, they don’t like the burrito and they take it out on their blog. But then 10 more people come in right after him, eat the same burrito and say it’s the greatest thing.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | 13

C AR R IE QU INNEY

BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

Nicole Orabona needs a hand out of Boise State’s 2,700-gallon pool.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY MARCH 25-28 Xiu Xiu challenge you to a back-alley brawl.

METAMORPHOSES OPENING WEEKEND

THURSDAY MARCH 25 music XIU XIU, TUNE YARDS AND SCOUT NIBLETT If you pride yourself on being the weirdest person at the bar, you might want to sit this show out. With Xiu Xiu’s Jamie Stewart, Tune Yards’ Merrill Garbus and Scout Niblett all crammed into Neurolux, noisy, art-rocky sonic surprises are all but guaranteed. Stewart formed the experimental art-rock act Xiu Xiu (pronounced shoe shoe) in 2000 with a few San Diego pals. After the release of Knife Play in 2002, the band has continued to evolve, cycling through a handful of members but always retaining Stewart at the core. Xiu Xiu’s most recent album, Dear God, I Hate Myself features, Angela Seo and percussionist Ches Smith and was recorded mostly on a Nintendo DS. To get a good taste of the band’s synthy darkness, check out the video for “Grey Death,” in which Stewart and Seo trade off strangling each other while Stewart quivers lyrics like “You were beautiful and I lost you / Like a whip covered in pins and glue.” Though Garbus, the sole member of Tune Yards, cloaks her artsy darkness in ukulele strums, trash-can percussion loops and field recordings of laughing children, her lo-fi music is nonetheless both brutal and uplifting. In the achingly pretty “Fiya,” she sings: “What if my own skin makes my skin crawl / What if my own flesh is suburban sprawl / What happened between us makes sense if I’m nothing / and you’re all / if I am nothing at all.” Niblett, who swung through town in September 2009 and is only joining Xiu Xiu and Tune Yards for one night, tops off this eccentric pizza with her own Cat Power-y brand of distorted indie rock. Niblett is touring on her new album, The Calcination of Scout Niblett, and is known for her collaborations with Will Oldham and her performance-artsy stage antics. 8 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door, Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., 208-343-0886, neurolux.com.

FRIDAYSUNDAY MARCH 26-28 flowers GARDEN SHOW

giant pool

If you’re a home-gardening green thumb, you’ve likely spent the last sunny week staring longingly at the barren mound of soil in your back yard, imagining the ripe veggies that will litter the ground come summer. This weekend, instead of singing lullabies to your soon-to-

14 | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | BOISEweekly

be-transplanted seedlings, throw on your floppy sun hat and bike to the Boise Centre for the 14th annual Boise Flower and Garden Show. In addition to checking out garden art, lawn furniture, plants, decks and greenhouses, you can also participate in a number

The Boise State theater department’s upcoming production of Metamorphoses is almost as ambitious as Ovid’s 15-book mythological poem. Scenic designer Michael Baltzell and technical director Fran Maxwell created a 650-square-foot, 2,700-gallon pool, complete with surrounding deck, which was assembled in the Danny Peterson Theatre at the Morrison Center. “The play is a contemporary adaptation of Ovid, and it is set very specifically in water … water is a symbol of life, of transformation,” explained Richard Klautsch, department chair of theater arts at Boise State. Written by Mar y Zimmerman, Metamorphoses originally premiered in 1996 under the name Six Myths at Northwestern University before going on to open on Broadway at the Circle in the Square Theatre in 2002. The play features nine different stories taken from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, including the stor y of King Midas and his golden touch; Orpheus and his under world quest for Eur ydice; and Baucis and Philemon, who unknowingly host a feast for Zeus and Hermes. “The pool is used differently as we go through the progression of the nine stories,” said Metamorphoses director Ann Price. “Sometimes it’s used quite realistically and we stage a shipwreck, and other times it’s used symbolically, as characters transform. The water is part of that process of evolution and change.” This production—which used more lumber in a single show than the department usually goes through in a year—premieres on Thursday, March 25, at 7:30 p.m. “We don’t want people to think that they’re going to come in and see a bunch of old dusty myths, stories of the gods,” said Klautsch. “It’s a very, very contemporary play, and all of the stories have to do with the power of love and the power of transformation.” Thursday, March 25-Saturday, March 27, 7:30 p.m.; Sunday, March 28, 2 p.m. $15 general, $12 seniors, military, non-Boise State students and Boise State alumni, Danny Peterson Theatre at the Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1494 or idahotickets.com. For info on additional performance dates in April, visit theatre.boisestate.edu.

of educational seminars, including a talk by featured speaker Melinda Myers, author of 20 gardening books and host of the nationally syndicated TV program Melinda’s Garden Moments. Jim Zamzow, from the local gardening chain of the same name, will also give three presentations of Don’t Treat

Your Soil Like Dirt on Saturday, March 27, at 11 a.m. and 3 p.m., and on Sunday, March 28, at 1:15 p.m. Also, be sure to stop by the special orchid and bonsai displays along with the specialty food pavilion, which features locally made prepared-food items. After a full day perusing garden

porn, zen out with a wine tasting beginning at 4 p.m. and the sounds of the Sandon Mayhew Quartet. Friday, March 26-Saturday, March 27, 10 a.m.-9 p.m., Sunday, March 28, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $7 adults, $2 kids 7-12, Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., 208-336-8900, gardenshowboise.com.

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FIND CONTIGO COFFEE MUG

Antsy purple pantsy.

Talk Paul-itics with Dr. Ron.

FRIDAY MARCH 26

SATURDAY MARCH 27

trailer park

politics

ROCK WITH THE FLOCK

AN EVENING WITH RON PAUL

Join your trucker hat-wearing, Miller High Life-swilling bros for an evening celebrating all the greasy glory of trailer park culture. On Friday, March 26, grab a fancy meal of SpaghettiO’s from the can at Donnie Mac’s Trailer Park Cuisine and spend the evening rocking out to songs by Antsy McClain and the Trailer Park Troubadours. McClain, whose fans call themselves flamingo-heads after the ubiquitous pink lawn adornment, belts out ditties about life in the doublewide lane, while decked out in a pompadour and 1950s Buddy Holly garb. McClain’s songs feature tales of the characters he met while growing up in a series of trailer parks in Kentucky. His lyrics, like in the song “I Married Up,” are peppered with vivid descriptions of the trailer park lifestyle. “She’s got her brown fuzzy slippers and her mustard yellow terry cloth robe / Got her mail-order Richard Petty earrings dangling from each lobe / Got her hair up in rollers and the rollers are Mountain Dew cans / She’s a picture of grace with that grilled Spam and cheese in her hands.” And while this poking fun of trailer park culture might get a few folks’ rat-tails in a knot, McClain explained his choice of subject matter on All Things Considered in the following way: “I’m singing about my own life and my own family and friends, people that are very dear to me. I think at first glance someone might think that this is strictly a parody or has ill intent or could be dark comedy. But it really is a tribute. I don’t like the word ‘trash,’ and ‘trailer trash’ has been one of those terms thrown about that I think is very derogatory and mean-spirited, and it’s not in any way the direction that I have ever wanted to take with this.” Catch Antsy McClain and his Trailer Park Troubadours at the Record Exchange for a free in-store performance on Thursday, March 25, at 5:30 p.m., and again at the Egyptian Theatre on Friday, March 26, for a special show that benefits the Boise affiliate of the National Alliance on Mental Illness. Also, don’t forget to stop by Donnie Mac’s for a special afterparty with food and drink specials. 6:30 p.m. doors, 7:30 p.m. show, $20, Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net. For more info on McClain, visit unhitched.com or antsy.net.

VPS DANCE PARTY

FRIDAY MARCH 26

You know how much it sucks when you’ve got a good late-night dance par ty going, then all of the

vinyl S U B M I T

Put down your laptop and throw on your Magic the Gathering T-shirt, Libertarian folk hero Ron Paul is bringing the discussion out of the Internet chatrooms and into real life at the Morrison Center on Saturday, March 27. Paul, a Republican Congressman from Texas, is known for his grassroots presidential campaigns in 1988 and again in 2008. Frequently the lone “no” vote in the House, Paul advocates for the dissolution of the Federal Reserve and a drastically reduced Federal government, among other things. These policies have earned Paul a very dedicated and vocal following—often called Paulites—and in February, these supporters led Paul to win the Conservative Political Action Conference’s presidential straw poll with a full one-third of the vote. (Take that, former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin, with your measly 7 percent.) So, whether you see eye to eye with Ron Paul or find his policies a-paul-ing, be sure to catch the former physician prescribe his own brand of tough medicine for this ailing government at the Campaign for Liberty forum at the Boise State Special Events Center at 2:30 p.m., or again at the Morrison Center at 7 p.m. 2:30 p.m., Boise State SEC, 1800 University Drive, sub. boisestate.edu. 7 p.m., $5-$15, Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1110, idahotickets.com.

sudden someone busts out the caterpillar on your living room floor and knocks the record player needle off its groove? Well, the Vinyl Preser vation Society of Idaho understands your plight. Though dance par ties and vinyl go together like cocaine and Marc Bolan, sometimes they need help. On Friday, March 26, VPS will host an all-vinyl dance par ty, complete with DJs Pedro and Tony B to make sure the records never skip and the elec-

Remember those carefree days when your beverages came in a colorful, topple-free sippy cup? When there was no need to cry over spilled milk or lie about mysterious carpet stains? Well, stainless steel coffee mug manufacturer Contigo knows exactly what the accident-prone grown-up needs: an adult sippy cup. Now, this is no run-of-the-mill mug— there’s no sliding of leaky hatches or unscrewing of coffee-flecked lids to get a sip of the good stuff. The geniuses at Contigo came up with a magical Autoseal lid that makes their mugs 100 percent leak proof. It works like this: You fill the BPA-free mug with a hot or cold liquid of your choice, then screw on the lid and press the side button each time you want to take a gulp. When you release the button, the mug returns to being completely sealed—like throw-itin-your-giant-purse-withthe-only-copy-of-yourgrandpa’s-will sealed. gocontigo.com The mug holds up to 16 ounces and keeps your beverages hot for four hours and cold for 12 hours. And while they do come in an array of sleek colors— silver, blue violet, purple—they sadly don’t make any with little plastic fish and swirling glitter. Well, not yet. —Tara Morgan

tronica, house, nu-jazz, world lounge, funk, soul and old-school hip-hop jams flow all night long. If you’re not a VPS member, snag a buddy who is and glide on over to the Linen Building star ting at 8 p.m. Though the dance par ty is open to the public, admission is cheaper for VPS members and their crew at $2 a pop. Nonmembers shell out 3 bones. 8 p.m., $2-$3, Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., 208-385-0111, vpsidaho.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | 15

8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY MARCH 24 Festivals & Events CONRAD STRAYS FUNDRAISER—Fuddrucker’s will donate 20 percent of food sales from 4-8 p.m. to Conrad Strays, a nonprofit feline rescue group. Ask for the donation when you place your order. 4-8 p.m. Fuddrucker’s, 3421 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-887-2194, www. fuddruckers.com.

Literature BOOK SIGNING—Brandon Mull signs the final volume of his bestselling series Fablehaven: Keys to the Demon Prison. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Deseret Industries, 10740 W. Fair view Ave., Boise, 208-375-4681.

THURSDAY MARCH 25 On Stage METAMORPHOSES— The Boise State theatre arts department is going mythic as they present Mar y Zimmerman’s “Metamorphoses.” The play is presented as a series of vignettes, each one showcasing a different ancient presence. Based on classic Ovid tales, expect to see characters such as Midas, Alcyone, Eros and more. 7:30 p.m. $9-$15. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 415 E. Park Center Blvd, Boise, 208-426-3980, theatre. boisestate.edu. NUNSENSE—A rip-roaring, highenergy musical with five nuns, plenty of plot twists and a whole lot of laughing. 7 p.m., Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 333 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-3850021, www.kedproductions.org.

PRACTICE AQUI—Spice up your bilingual aptitude during this weekly gathering. Designed for ages 13 and older. Attendees should have an understanding of English and Spanish. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208472-2940, www.gardencity.lili.org. RHYTHMS OF GHANA— Experienced Ghanaian drummer Harrison Tei teaches students of all levels the rhythms and techniques of Ghana using traditional Kpanlogo drums. Beginners are welcome. E-mail boisedrumcentral@yahoo.com for more information. 7-8:30 p.m. $10. Drum Central, 717 N. 11th., Boise, 208-424-9519, www.boisedrumcentral.com. SQUARE DANCE LESSONS— It has been said that square dancing is friendship set to music. Anyone age 9-90, singles, couples and families are invited to learn how to square dance. The first lesson is free. For more information, call Cinder at 208-830-9459. 7-9 p.m. $4 per lesson; family rates available. Boise Valley Square and Round Dance Center, 6534 Diamond St., Boise, 208-362-9911, www. idahoswingdance.org. TOE-UP SOCK KNITTING CLASS—Learn to keep your own tootsies warm by learning the “magic loop” method of sock knitting taught by Amy Olenick. Price includes yarn, Addi circular needles. 3-5 p.m. $55. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-407-3359, www. puffymondaes.com.

Literature BOOK CLUB—Each month features a new book. Grab the list of titles from the library. Mar. 25: The Poisonwood Bible, by Barbara Kingsolver. 7 p.m. FREE. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, 208-562-4995 www.boisepubliclibrary.org.

Sports & Fitness DROP-IN HIP-HOP CLASSES— Anyone age 16 and older can drop by the Trey McIntyre Project studio for an open level hip-hop dance class. No experience or membership is necessary, just a willingness to have fun and get a great workout. These classes are ongoing and taught by Janelle Wilson. 7-8 p.m. $10 per class, 208-724-6537. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, www.heirloomdancestudio.com.

Religious/Spiritual IDAHO KABBALAH STUDY GROUP MEETING—Meet with the group to see how Kabbalah can transform lives and the world by offering true fulfillment. Open to all. 7:30 p.m. 208-8706580, www.kabbalah.com. Hotel 43, 981 Grove St., Boise.

Odds & Ends ENGLISH/SPANISH KARAOKE—Sing along to your favorite songs in English or Spanish with tons of song choices for all ages. 9 p.m.-1 a.m. FREE. Chilango’s Mexican Restaurant, 8915 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3760304. THE MERIDIAN SINGERS—A group for enthusiastic women who like to sing a cappella in the barbershop style. The ability to read music is not necessary. 7:30-9 p.m. The Music Den, 245 E. Blue Heron Ln., Meridian, 208-724-6311. THE YARN CLUB—Finally, a place for all the knitters and crocheters to get together and chat. 1 p.m. FREE. Fuzz, 605 Americana Blvd., 208-343-3899, www.fuzzspin.com.

Workshops & Classes BEGINNING BELLY DANCE— Learn fun and exciting ways to dance and move during beginning belly dance classes. No previous experience is required. For more information, visit the Web site or e-mail hennadancer@msn.com. 7:30-8:30 p.m. drop-in rate, $15 per class; one class per week, $50 per month; two classes per week, $75 per month. Mearah’s Treasures and The Desert Dreams Dance Studio, 4419 Mar vin St., Boise, 208-794-1929, www.mearah. com. KNITTING CLASS—Learn how to make a cashmere “Hannah” hat with cashmere yarn created by local Pepperberr y knits. Fee includes yarn, pattern and all three sessions. 10:30 a.m.noon. $60, puffymondaes.com. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-407-3359.

LISTEN LOCALLY. THINK GLOBALLY. 16 | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT DANCE LESSON AND OPEN DANCE—Go early for a lesson or show up around 8 p.m. for an open floor. Offering a mixture of ballroom, swing and latin music and lessons. Open to all ages. 7-8 p.m. dance lesson, 8 p.m.midnight, open dance. $3 with student ID, $5 general. Heirloom Dance Studio, 765 Idaho St., Boise, 208-871-6352, www. heirloomdancestudio.com.

FRIDAY MARCH 26 On Stage KEN’S FEATHER EXTRAVAGANZA—Grand feather show, with the proceeds going to scholarship funds for GLBT students attending Idaho higher education. 8 p.m. $10 at door. The Balcony Club, 150 N. Eighth St., second floor, Capitol Terrace, Boise, 208-336-1313, www.thebalconyclub.com.

FRIDAY NIGHT DRUM JAM— Drummers are surrounded by the rhythm of the community while drumming, dancing and listening to the beats. These facilitated circles are open to all levels. 8-10 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Drum Central, 2709 W. State St., Boise, 208-424-9519, www.boisedrumcentral.com.

NUNSENSE—See Thursday. Dinner is at 6:30 p.m., show time at 8 p.m. Dinner must be ordered one day in advance. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 333 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-385-0021, www.kedproductions.org.

NOCHES LATINAS—Every Friday night, a DJ spins the hottest salsa, durangese, merengue, cumbia and bachata with salsa dancing the rest of the night. For all ages. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. FREE. Chilango’s Mexican Restaurant, 8915 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-0304.

POPEYED—Join the funny folks at Boise’s local family theater as Popeye, Olyve, Wympy and Sweetie do their best to protect their sweet and sleepy town from the likes of evil Bruno and his gang. 7:15 p.m. $7-$13, 208-336-7383. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, www.pdplayhouse.com.

SATURDAY MARCH 27

Sports & Fitness

On Stage

IDAHO STEELHEADS VS. VICTORIA SALMON KINGS—7 p.m. idahosteelheads.com. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or Box office 208-331-8497.

NUNSENSE—See Thursday. Dinner is at 6:30 p.m., show time at 8 p.m. Dinner must be ordered one day in advance. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 333 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-385-0021, www.kedproductions.org.

Odds & Ends

POPEYED—See Friday. 7:15pm, $7-$13, 208-336-7383. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, www.pdplayhouse.com.

BOISE CAFE LATIN NIGHTS— Get a basic Latin dance lesson included in the cover at 9 p.m. and then practice dancing to music by DJ Tomas or DJ Saya. Loosen up with a beer or glass of wine. Empanadas from Tango’s are served Friday evenings. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. Boise Cafe/ Cafe Bellisima, 219 N. 10th St., Boise, 208-343-3397.

Auditions CHAPTER TWO AUDITIONS— A writer finds true love after the death of his first wife. Four actors needed. Men, 30-45. Women, 30-45. The play runs

May 21 through June 5. Call 208-342-5104 for information. 2 p.m. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, www.boiselittletheater.org.

Food & Drink FLIRT—A singles alternative to the downtown nightclub scene, featuring music from DJ Pedro, and art by Bill Blahd. 8 p.m. $15. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, www.thelinenbuilding.com.

Literature STORY TIME—Enjoy Saturday market, then gather the family for story time. 2 p.m. FREE. A Novel Adventure, 906 W. Main St., Boise, 208-344-8088. www. anoveladventure.com THERAPY DOGS—Dogs at the library? Indeed. Bring down the family for a reading session with varying therapy dogs. 2 p.m. Boise Public Library, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, www.boisepubliclibrary.org.

Talks & Lectures OPERA IDAHO/COFFEE AND CONVERSATION—Opera Idaho executive director Mark Junkert and Idaho Shakespeare Festival actor Tom Willmorth will discuss the Met’s production of Hamlet over coffee and muffins. 10 a.m. FREE with Met Opera Simulcast Ticket. Edwards Spectrum 22, 7701 W. Overland Road, 208377-1700, www.uatc.com.

Sports & Fitness IDAHO STEELHEADS VS. VICTORIA SALMON KINGS—7 p.m. idahosteelheads.com. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or Box office 208-331-8497.

Odds & Ends

EYESPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

SEED SWAP—Meet other local gardeners and swap planting seeds with them, or make donations to new gardeners looking to get their start. 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. FREE. Edwards Greenhouse, 4106 Sand Creek St., Boise, 208-342-7548, www. edwardsgreenhouse.com.

SUNDAY MARCH 28 Auditions CHAPTER TWO AUDITIONS— See Saturday. 2 p.m. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, www.boiselittletheater.org.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | 17

8 DAYS OUT Festivals & Events 14TH ANNUAL FLOWER AND GARDEN SHOWâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;This show marks the beginning of spring. With a wealth of information and a ton of booths, the Flower and Garden Show welcomes your sunny self for a day of mingling and gardening goods. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $7 adults, $2 kids ages 7-12, FREE kids 6 and younger. Boise Centre on the Grove, 850 W. Front St., 208-336-8900, www.gardenshowboise.com.

On Stage

Odds & Ends THE YARN CLUBâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Finally, a place for all the knitters and crocheters to get together and chat. 1 p.m. FREE. Fuzz, 605 Americana Blvd., 208-343-3899, www.fuzzspin.com.

TUESDAY MARCH 30

METAMORPHOSESâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; See Friday. 2 p.m. $9-$15. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-3980, theatre. boisestate.edu.

Odds & Ends

POPEYEDâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;See Friday. 2 p.m. $7-$13, 208-336-7383. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, www.pdplayhouse.com.

BOOZE CLUESâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Trivia and prizes with the one and only E.J. Pettinger. 8 p.m. FREE. Pengillyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 513 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-6344.

Odds & Ends

OJOLBTJCSFXJOHDPNtGBDFCPPLDPNOJOLBTJCSFXJOH

MONDAY MARCH 29

SOCIAL COUNTRY DANCINGâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Swing dance/Social Dance. 7-10 p.m. FREE, www.lessonsindance. com. The Bullâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Head Pub, 1441 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208855-5858.

BALLISTIC BEER PONGâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Sign up starts at 10 p.m. Bad Irish, 199 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208338-8939, www.badirish.com.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 31 Festivals & Events OVER 40S DANCEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Weekly dances are held for the older-

SUDOKU |

THE MEPHAM GROUP

than-40 crowd with a different country music band every week. 7:30 p.m. $5 members, $6 nonmembers. Eagles Lodge Boise, 7025 Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-0115.

On Stage MINERVA JAYNEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SAINTS AND SINNERSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Minerva, Selena, Godiva and special guest Victoria woo and wow the crowd with glitzy lip-syncing performances. 8-10 p.m. $2. Sin, 1124 W. Front St., 208-342-3375, www. sinboise.com.

Sports & Fitness IDAHO STAMPEDE VS. RIO GRANDEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;For tickets, call 208388-4667 or visit idahostampede.com. 7 p.m. Qwest Arena, 233 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-424-2200 or Box ofďŹ ce 208-331-8497, www.qwestarenaidaho.com.

Odds & Ends 9TH STREET TOASTMASTERSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; Noon. FREE, 208-388-6484, www.9thstreettm.org. BOISE UKULELE GROUPâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;All levels, beginning to advanced, welcome with no age limit and no membership fees. For more information, visit the Web site. 6:15 p.m. FREE, www.boiseukulelegroup.com. East Lakes Village Senior Center, 650 Arbor Circle, Meridian. 208-362-7702. SOCRATES CAFEâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Interested in lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s greater questions? Join a group of active and engaged listeners who meet every week at Papa Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Coffee Shop, 1301 S. Capitol Blvd. The agenda is to show up with a burning question; â&#x20AC;&#x153;What is the standard of beauty,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are happiness and pleasure the same thing?â&#x20AC;?, whatever is on ones mind; the group votes on a question and the discussion begins. For more information, e-mail scott@scottharris.cc. Tuesdays, 7-8:45 p.m. FREE.

Call to Artists ART SOURCE GALLERY NINTH ANNUAL JURIED SHOWâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Juried by artist and Boise State professor emeritus John Taye. Open to all ďŹ ne artists and media (no video or crafts). Work must be original and completed in the last three years. Artists may submit up to three works. Application fee is $25. Opening is July 1. For more information visit artsourcegallery.com.

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s puzzle. And donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. Š 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LAST WEEKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ANSWERS

BOSCO ACCEPTING APPLICATIONSâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Boise Open Studios Collective Organization is accepting new member applications from Ada, Boise and Canyon county artists for the 2010 year. Artists will have the opportunity to open their studios in June and/or October. All applicants are juried by a panel of existing members and often at least one outside juror. To be juried in time for the June Open Studios, applicants must postmark materials no later than April 1. Applicants interested in the October Open Studios weekend may postmark materials by June 1. Visit www.boiseopenstudios.com for information.

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE JONAH SHUE & FRIENDS—10 p.m., FREE. Bittercreek

JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—9 p.m., FREE. The Plank

WEDNESDAY MARCH 24

ten Here this page. With Aaron Mark Brown of The Invasion. 8 p.m., $5 adv., $7 door. Flying M Coffeegarage

CHRIS GUITIERREZ—8 p.m., FREE. Willi B’s

REBECCA SCOTT TRIO—8 p.m., FREE. Sin

CROWN POINT—Alt/pop rock from Portland. 8:30 p.m., FREE. Reef

WHITE MICE, UZALA, MICROBABIES, FOR FUCK’S SAKE—8 p.m., $5. VAC

RUSS54—10 p.m., $3. Grainey’s

JOEY FARR—9 p.m., FREE. Terrapin Station

XIU XIU, TUNE YARDS, SCOUT NIBLETT—8 p.m., $8. Neurolux

SHON SANDERS—7:30 p.m., FREE. Music of the Vine

PRAVDA—Local rock/fusion/ prog, 8:30 p.m., $3. Terrapin Station

SPINDLEBOMB—9 p.m., $1. Liquid

REBECCA SCOTT—8:30 p.m., FREE, Piper Pub

FRIDAY MARCH 26

TT MILLER—8 p.m., FREE, Willi B’s

REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m., FREE. Gamekeeper

ANTSY MCCLAIN AND THE TRAILER PARK TROUBADOURS—There’s a lot to be said about contentment/some folks never get enough/Let me ask you honey, which is better?/A mansion full of money, or a trailer full of love? See Picks, Page 15. 7:30 p.m., $20. Egyptian Theatre

SATURDAY MARCH 27

JON DAVIDSON—8:30 p.m., FREE. Reef KEN HARRIS—6:30-9:30 p.m., FREE. Berryhill MEL WADE—6 p.m., FREE. Dry Creek Mercantile MOONDANCE—6:30 p.m., FREE. Sa-Wad-Dee TWIZTID—With Blaze, Kung Fu Vampire and Knothead. 6 p.m., $17 door, $19 advance. Knitting Factory

THURSDAY MARCH 25 ANTSY MCCLAIN AND THE TRAILER PARK TROUBADOURS—5:30 p.m., FREE. Record Exchange THE MALDIVES—With Josh Harty and Pablo Trucker. 9 p.m., Bouquet THE MOONDOGGIES—See Lis-

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BLUE SKIES FOR BLACK HEARTS, LOW-FI, WITH CHILD—8 p.m., $5. VAC COLD—With Nonpoint. 8 p.m., $20. Knitting Factory EVERTIME I DIE, YEAR STRONG, POLAR BEAR CLUB, TRAPPED UNDER ICE—7 p.m., $16. The Venue JD KINDLE AND THE EASTERN OREGON PLAYBOYS—With Thomas Paul. 9 p.m., $3. Bouquet

QUASI, EXPLODE INTO COLORS—8 p.m., $12. Neurolux REX AND BEVERLY—8 p.m., FREE. The Gamekeeper Lounge

LAURA GIBSON, ETHAN ROSE, AARON MARK BROWN, FIELD GUIDE—8 p.m., $5. VAC LEE PENN SKY—8 p.m., FREE. Willi B’s

RUSS54—10 p.m., $3. Tom Grainey’s

ALPENFLOW—With Reason the Citizen. 9 p.m., $5. Bouquet

SPINDLEBOMB—9 p.m., $1. Liquid

BLUES ADDICTS—9 p.m., FREE. O’Michael’s

SUNDAY MARCH 28

FETISH 37—With One Second Till Forever and Krystos. 6 p.m., $10. The Venue

FRONTIER RUCKUS—With Bernie Reilly. 9 p.m., FREE. Bouquet

JD KINDLE AND THE EASTERN OREGON PLAYBOYS—With Thomas Paul. 9 p.m., FREE. Pengilly’s

JARED MEES AND THE GROWN CHILDREN, BOY EATS DRUM MACHINE, SLEEPY SEEDS—8 p.m., $5. VAC

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

THE MOONDOGGIES, MARCH 25, FLYING M COFFEEGARAGE When a storm of hand claps, piercing harmonica and rambling Rhodes organ floods the gates on The Moondoggies’ “Bogachiel Rain Blues,” there’s only one thought that comes to mind: “Man, this band sounds like The Band.” With a swaying refrain of “I’m goin’ down to die,” the four 20-something Seattleites channel all of the sun-glinted good times of Band hits “Rag Mama Rag” or “Time to Kill.” Luckily, the group evades easy comparisons on other tracks from their 2008 release Don’t Be a Stranger. The song “Changin’” is rock and roll, pure and simple, and other numbers, like the slower-paced “Old Hound,” showcase The Moondoggies’ softer side with their Fleet Foxes-y three-part harmonies taking center stage. —Tara Morgan Thursday, March 25, with locals Aaron Mark Brown and The Invasion, 8 p.m., $5 adv., $7 door. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533, brownpapertickets.com.

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LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE NANDA DEVI, DEATH OF SELF, TRANSIENT, COMMUNION, HUMMINGBIRD OF DEATH—9 p.m., $6. Redroom TYRONE WELLS, TONY LUCCA, ROY JAY—7 p.m., $13-$25. Knitting Factory

MONDAY MARCH 29 VOODOO GLOW SKULLS, MARCH 31, GUSTO When brothers Eddie, Frank and Jorge Casillas formed the Voodoo Glow Skulls in the late ’80s, their hardcore ska-punk resounded with the kids who hung out in the Riverside, Calif., back yards where VGS first played. Two decades later, those kids have grown up, but they can still be found spinning their favorite VGS albums and singing along to “Fat Randy”—and their own kids are listening, too. VGS has stayed true to their roots but their music has definitely evolved over the years. Drummer Chris Dalley, who permanently joined the band early this year, said it’s because VGS has kept the music fresh. “Every new album is a step in a new direction,” Dalley said. “We experiment and try new things. You can only make the same album for so long,” he said, laughing. He added that VGS will roll into Boise old-school—by bus. Look for a retrofitted white school bus parked near Main Street on show night. —Amy Atkins Wednesday, March 31, with The Useless, All Hands Go and Radillac, 9 p.m., $10. Gusto, 509 Main St.

20 | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | BOISEweekly

JERRY JOSEPH AND THEJACKMORMONS—8 p.m., $10. Neurolux PUNK MONDAY—N.N.F.U. tour kick-off, Upinatem, Roofied Resistance, 9 p.m., FREE. Liquid

TUESDAY MARCH 30 CARMEL CROCK AND KEN HARRIS—7 p.m., FREE. O’Michael’s

WEEDEATER, BLACK TUSK, STRUCK BY LIGHTNING, BONE DANCE, BLACK CLOUD—9 p.m., $8. Redroom

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—Mondays, 8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

WEDNESDAY MARCH 31

BUD GUDMUNDSON, MATT HARTZ—Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews

CASPIAN, ARMS AND SLEEPERS, RED HANDS BLACK FEET, JUMP JETS—9 p.m., $5. Redroom THE DIRTY HEADS—With Simpkin Project. 8 p.m., $12. Neurolux JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—9 p.m., FREE. Reef SOULFLY—With Prong, Incite, Rotting Corpse. 7 p.m., $20 adv., $22 door. Knitting Factory VOODOO GLOW SKULLS, THE USELESS, ALL HANDS GO, RADILLAC—See Listen Here, this page. 9 p.m., $10. Gusto

MATT HOPPER—With The Roman Candles. 9 p.m., FREE. Bouquet

WEEKLY GIGS

MAXWELL STREET BLUES BAND—8 p.m., FREE. Sockeye

BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES—Sundays, noon. FREE. Grape Escape

OWL CITY, LIGHTS AND PAPER ROUTE—6:30 p.m., $18 adv., $20 door. Knitting Factory

BILLY BRAUN—Mondays, 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SPOONDRAGON—8 p.m., FREE. Willi B’s

BILLY ZERA, AWA AND SONY DISC—Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Mai Thai-Eagle

THE BUCKSHOT BAND—Saturdays, 9 p.m. FREE for anyone in a cowboy hat. Shorty’s

DAVID MARR—Fridays, 7 p.m. FREE. The Cole/Marr Gallery FABULOUS FLOYD STANTON— Wednesdays, 6 p.m. FREE. Cafe Ole-downtown

JOHN CAZAN—Fridays, 5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel JUSTIN GAUSE—Saturdays, 7 p.m. Rembrandts OPEN MIC NIGHTS—Sundays, 7 p.m. FREE. The Bouquet; Wednesdays, 7 p.m. Donnie Mac’s; Mondays, 7 p.m. FREE. Library Coffeehouse; Thursdays, 7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s; Mondays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s; Mondays, 9 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station; Tuesdays, 9 p.m. FREE. Tom Grainey’s

FRIM FRAM 4—Thursdays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

PAUL PETERSON BLUES CLUB—Wednesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. The Bouquet

FUEGOGO!—Tuesdays, 9:30 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station

PUNK MONDAY—Mondays, 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

HIGH DESERT BAND— Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater Pizza

REBECCA SCOTT—Wednesdays, 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

JAZZ NIGHTS—MondaysSaturdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill; Thursdays, 7 p.m. FREE. Rembrandt’s; Featuring Kevin Kirk Tuesdays-Saturdays and The Sidemen on Sundays. 7 p.m., FREE, Chandlers JEREMIAH JAMES AND NED EVETT—Tuesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel JEREMIAH JAMES GANG— Wednesdays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s JIM FISHWILD—Wednesdays, 6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—With DJ Naomi Sioux. Wednesdays and Fridays. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s THE SALOONATICS—Thursdays and Saturdays. 9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club SMOOTH—Tuesdays, 7 p.m. FREE. Liquid SOUL SERENE—Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’Penny THOMAS PAUL—Sundays, 10 a.m. and Mondays, 7 p.m. FREE. Red Feather THE TIX—Wednesdays, 9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

NEWS/ARTS M IC HAEL C OR DELL

ARTS GLENN LANDB ER G

THE BRITISH CONNECTION Meet Basement Gallery’s new owners TARA MORGAN

Each month, it was the same dilemma. Jane Brumfield, then in her early 20s, would glance around her bare Hastings, England, apartment and ponder how to divvy up her remaining pounds. She could invest in necessities—a proper bed, a refrigerator, food—or she could follow her gut and splurge on art. Jane, a shop girl by day and volunteer gallerina and artist in her off time, was cultivating an art addiction that would soon become an all-consuming habit. Though her floors lacked Jane Brumfield measures her new gallery’s success one painting at a time. furniture, her walls never lacked original artwork. Eventually, after years working for muRoss-Thompson. seums and galleries, Jane’s art obsession led her work, which isn’t bad for a newbie on the “We still want to promote the new and and husband Mike Brumfield—an off-shore oil Hastings scene. The Weekend Gallery, with its collection of eclectic illustrators and printmak- up-and-coming artists to get involved and worker with bicep tats and a welcoming Louishow us their work,” said Mike. “But we’re ers, has an aesthetic that fits nicely with the siana drawl—to open the Weekend Gallery in also trying to intermix that work with more Hastings. A few years later, they cast their gaze pop-surrealist niche Allen carved out at Baseestablished artists.” ment Gallery over his 13-year reign. across the pond and narrowed their sights on This expanded focus pleases Love, a first“When I first heard, I thought, ‘Oh, boy, I Boise’s Basement Gallery. “It’s all Bill Carman’s fault that we bought don’t know if I’m going to keep selling here be- time Basement-ite who is showing a collection cause I don’t know what she’s going to be like, of large monoprint woodcuts based on old the gallery,” said Jane, laughing. “We had dictionary illustrations in the exhibit. After the so this is a trial thing for us,’” said Carman. decided that we absolutely weren’t going to closing of J Crist Gallery last year, Love says he “But the Hastings partnership has worked out do it for at least another year or two years. hopes to see Basement take up the contemporeally well so far.” And then I came into the Bill Carman show rary, cutting-edge gallery reins. But Jane also had another motive for keepand I just loved his work so much and ended “For me personally, the really illustrative ing the Weekend Gallery open. up buying a lot.” pop surrealism that is, or was, the Basement “I needed to keep a toe in England,” she Six months before Jane slipped in to the Gallery—it’s cool that it’s expanding beyond cavernous space beneath the Idanha Hotel and confessed. After the couple’s previous unsucthat,” said Love. “For this show, in parcessful move to the art-deprived community began snatching up Carman’s pop-surrealist ticular, they’re including people who work in pieces, the previous owner Perry Allen had qui- of Twin Falls—to be closer to Mike’s two traditional processes, but aren’t thinking about etly put the gallery up for sale, “just for kicks.” daughters from a previous marriage and four them in traditional ways.” grandchildren—Jane was hesitant to come When Allen later approached Jane, half-jokCarman, whose career is already well-estabingly, and asked, “Hey, why don’t you just buy back to the States. Luckily, both Boise and Basement Gallery ended up being a natural fit. lished both locally and internationally, plans to the gallery?” she took him up on his offer. continue showing work at the new Basement “The one thing that has appealed to us The Brumfields’ plan from the get-go has Gallery for the time being as a way to maintain about [Basement] Gallery, and where we felt been to maintain the space’s existing frame a foothold in the Boise art scene. there was a connection with our own tastes shop and also integrate work from artists “I can get more money for my work outside and the kind of things that we like, is the sort represented at both of their galleries. of contemporary-figurative-narrative nature of of Idaho, but the reason for showing here was “I already had artists and existing clientele never about the money, it was about the presthe work that is here. And the slight eccentricover [in England] and the idea of starting ence in the community,” said Carman. “I still completely from scratch again was really quite ity,” said Jane. “We like the eccentric.” want to have that, so I have a show coming up And the Brumfields don’t have any intendaunting,” said Jane. “During the time that I [at Basement] in September and October.” build up my clientele here and get to know the tion of throwing the eccentric baby out with As the Brumfields continue to meet new the bath water. The couple invited Basement artists and the arts scene here, we can always regulars like Ben Wilson artists and learn more about their new combring work over from and Erin Ruiz to partici- munity, one thing in particular has made Jane England. With the idea, BASEMENT GALLERY pate in January’s “Noise fondly recall her early days of art obsession. then, that we will also be 928 W. Main St. “The thing that I found really impressive, in the Basement” exhibitaking work from Ameri208-333-0309 and I know that this is something that Perry tion, and they also have ca over to England.” basementgalleryboise.com particularly nurtured, is the age group of an open door policy for This exchange process buyers. In England, I have to wait until they other artists who have is already chugging along, get over 40 before they even start thinking previously shown at Basement. Their latest though it has hit a few potholes. When Carexhibit “Contemporary Printmaking,” which about spending money on art. Here, a lot of man and British artist Len Shelley debuted a the buyers are in their early 20s, mid 20s, opened at the beginning of March, features joint show at the Weekend Gallery in January, and that’s fantastic because obviously they’re a number of Carman’s pieces got stuck in Eng- well-known locals Tarmo Watia and Kirsten going to carry on developing their collecFurlong alongside Boise State printmaking lish customs. And then a blizzard completely shut down the town on the day of the opening. students Benjamin Love and Matt Bodett and tions,” said Jane. “It just becomes compulsive, I know that personally.” British printmakers Alison Read and Sarah Nonetheless, Carman sold two thirds of his WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

Michael Cordell captures Gem Court pizazz.

BW COVER AUCTION GRANT 2010 RECIPIENTS For this year’s annual Cover Auction Grant, BW awarded a total of $14,067. The proceeds from the 2009 auction totaled $12,067, and we added $2,000 that was returned by the South Jr. High School Mural Project after that project was cancelled. Since 2002, Boise Weekly has featured the work of local artists on the cover. In November of each year, we auction off all of the original works and the proceeds fund our private Cover Auction Grant. We have raised more than $90,000 for local arts. This year, we received a total of 19 applications, 12 of them for the general grant and seven applications from individual artists. In the past, the grant was only open to organizations. This year, however, we introduced the PJ Dean Artist Grant, a $1,000 award open to individual artists to honor longtime BW contributor PJ Dean who passed away in 2009. To help parse out the proceeds, we invited an esteemed panel of judges to choose organizations, artists and projects that they felt would enrich Boise’s art community. The panel was comprised of people who, themselves, have done much to promote Boise’s—and Idaho’s—arts: Michael Faison, Tara McElhose-Eiguren, Amy Pence-Brown, Russ Stoddard and Boise Weekly art director Leila Rader. In the general category, the panel awarded $2,000 to BOSCO, $2,500 to Go Listen Boise, $1,000 to Boise Art Walks, $2,000 to Trey McIntyre Project, $2,042 to TRICA, and $2,000 to the Has Bin Project. BOSCO will use funds to help advertise its popular annual Open Studios Weekend. Go Listen Boise is going to rev up a Grand Ol’ Time and Old Time Music Series to help acquaint Boiseans with Old Time Music at family friendly events. Boise Art Walks will use its grant to fund the Boise Basque Block Podcast Tour, the third in a series of podcast tours. Trey McIntyre Project will use its funds to present SpUrbans (Spontaneous + Urban) to Title 1 schools. TRICA plans to continue funding its New Model for Arts Education Initiative. And the Has Bin Project is a group of artists who plan to create a tree out of blue recycle bins. Though the judges were tasked with choosing one artist to receive the PJ Dean Artist Grant, they were so impressed with the entries, that they awarded Brooke Burton $525 to help with a 3D topographical map, Michael Cordell $1,000 to facilitate an exhibit of photos he took of members of the Idaho Gem Court from 1981 to 1988 and Kirsten Furlong $1,000 to help with work she’ll be doing based on a residency at Denali National Park later this year. —Amy Atkins

BOISEweekly | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | 21

SCREEN

SHORTS VS. FULL-LENGTH Oscar Short Showcase squares off with Bounty Hunter JEREMIAH ROBERT WIERENGA I saw 14 films this weekend. Thirteen of them were not a waste of time. Unfortunately, the intelligence-offending exception, The Bounty Hunter, is the only film most audiences will ever hear about. The remaining baker’s dozen, each part of the Oscar Nominated Short Films showcase, will likely be buried in DVD extras and YouTube clips, while The Bounty Hunter, one of this week’s Gerard Butler and Jennifer Aniston are on the run from this career killer. box-office leaders, should be buried in an unmarked grave. her sitcom-honed timing and charm carrying March 25, at The Flicks, demonstrates the The Bounty Hunter is the story of ex-cop brilliance of exploring a unique theme, then her part, but neither are given more than a Milo (Gerard Butler), a man who is in a bad quitting while you’re ahead. With two diffew chuckle-inducing lines, and we’re never way. Slovenly, sardonic and blind to his own ferent screenings, an animated exhibition of given enough history to quite discover what substantial failings, he revels in destructive seven films ranging from Granny O’Grimm’s first sparked their love. chases as a bail enforcement agent, aka a Sleeping Beauty (Ireland, six minutes)—a To be fair, Butler and Aniston fall victim bounty hunter. His former wife Nicole (Jennisweet-and-sour retelling of the classic fairy to a crippling cinema curse, the trifecta of fer Aniston) is a low-level reporter who may tale—to the Wallace and Gromit bakery terrible production. Saddle hit-and-miss have found her big story, but when she skips thriller A Matter of Loaf and Death (United director Andy Tennant (Fool’s Gold, 2008) a court date to pursue an important lead, Kingdom, 30 minutes), or the harder-hitting with a script by still-sophomore-slumping Milo is assigned to bring her to justice—a live-action showcase featuring a merrily screenwriter Sarah Thorp (Twisted, 2004), prospect that has him literally skipping in macabre moving day in The New Tenants lob in the culturally fatuous talents of promischievous glee. And thus begins one of the ducer Neil H. Moritz (Urban Legend, 1998), (United States, 20 minutes) and sobering least interesting “chase her ’til she catches and it’s no surprise that slavery short Kavi (India, 18 minutes), him” capers ever comthere’s more exuberance, genuine laughter a trite, interminable mitted to film. THE BOUNTY HUNTER (PG-13) and plain-speaking poignancy in each short vortex of vacuousness What begins as a Directed by Andy Tennant slice than in most feature ���lms’ padded runforms at the center of funny premise becomes Starring Gerard Butler, Jennifer Aniston ning time. this film. There’s no a tired string of cliched Now playing at Edwards 9 It’s an unfortunate truth that these films, convincing romance and subplots and anemic and Edwards 22 unlike their full-length counterparts, rarely little comedy to justify attempts to rekindle are seen after this brief post-Oscar timeThe Bounty Hunter’s the pair’s relationship. frame. Thirteen smart ideas delivered with inclusion in the “rom-com” genre. Without the charismatic disguise of his naWhereas a film such as The Bounty Hunt- swift, precise execution trump an amusing tive accent, Scotsman Butler proves a poor idea with big-name stars served with snailer takes a single interesting idea and flogs leading man, his childish and bullheaded like dispatch, so treat yourself to a meatier it for 106 minutes, the Oscar Nominated take on Milo convincingly communicating Shorts showcase, playing through Thursday, sampling while you still can. why Nicole left him. Aniston fares better,

SCREEN/LISTINGS special screenings PAPPY BOYINGTON FIELD—A special documentary screening of the efforts to honor a WWII pilot by renaming a Coeur d’Alene airfield. Community members struggled against the government to commemorate Coeur d’Alene native and Medal of Honor winner Pappy Boyington. The film includes archival footage of the F4U Corsair, insight from Pappy’s son, Greg Boyington Jr., and actor Robert Conrad, who portrayed Pappy in the television series Baa Baa Black Sheep. Director Kevin Gon-

22 | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | BOISEweekly

zalez will be present for a Q & A session after the film. Thursday, March 25, 7 p.m., $6.50-$8.50, Flicks, 646 Fulton St., 208-342-4222.

opening GREENBERG—Doing nothing is rarely a person’s life goal. However, it is for failed musician Roger Greenberg (Ben Stiller) who moves from New York to Los Angeles to housesit for his brother. While reveling in the life of laziness, he encounters his brother’s assistant, Florence (Greta Gerwig). The two

form a connection over their self-inflicted purposeless existence. Noah Bambauch (The Squid and the Whale) directs this comedy/drama, which also stars Rhys Ifans and Jennifer Jason Leigh. (R) Flicks HOT TUB TIME MACHINE— Eighties geek/heartthrob John Cusack returns in Steve Pink’s (Accepted) comedy about four friends who take a break from their humdrum lives to venture to a ski resort they frequented in their prime. After a night of booze-filled madness, Adam (Cusack), Lou (Rob Corddry), Nick (Craig Robinson from

The Office) and Jacob (Clark Duke) wake up back in 1986, courtesy of a magic hot tub. Rather than fight their fate, they decide instead to relive their glory days. (R)

that dragons may be man’s new best friend. (PG)

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON—According to Dreamworks Animation, dragons are as cuddly as teddy bears. Gerard Butler and America Ferrera lend their vocal talents to this adaptation of Cressida Cowell’s children’s book about dragon domestication. To prove his manhood, the son of a Viking chief must capture the firebreathing reptile. However, in the process he discovers

2009 OSCAR NOMINATED SHORTS—Check out this year’s Oscar-winning short films, Logorama by Nicolas Schmerkin (animated) and The New Tenants by Joachim Back and Tivi Magnusson (live). The five live-action shorts are lumped together, running 94 minutes, and the five animated shorts run together at 88 minutes. Live and animated will alternate show times. (NR) Flicks

continuing

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M

SCREEN/LISTINGS SCREEN/MOVIE TIMES WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24- TUESDAY, MARCH 30 ALICE IN WONDERLAND— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1, 1:45, 4:05, 4:35, 7, 7:30, 10:25 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1, 6:30 ALICE IN WONDERLAND, IMAX 3D— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:40

ALICE IN WONDERLAND— (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22, Edwards IMAX AVATAR—(PG-13) Edwards Digital 3-D, Edwards IMAX THE BOUNTY HUNTER—See review Page 22. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 BROOKLYN’S FINEST—(R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 COP OUT—Bruce Willis and Tracy Morgan play cops. (R) Edwards 22

ALICE IN WONDERLAND, DIGITAL 3D— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:35, 7:25, 10

THE CRAZIES—(R) Edwards 22

ANIMATED OSCAR SHORTS—

DEAR JOHN—Army man John meets Savannah during an annual leave. Their fairytale romance is torn apart by war when John is deployed overseas. (PG-13) Edwards 22

Flicks: W-Th only: 9

AVATAR, DIGITAL 3D— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:15 a.m., 3:05, 6:35, 10:05 BOUNTY HUNTER— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4:25, 7:25, 10:05 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:05 a.m., 12, 1:40, 2:45, 4:15, 5:20, 7, 7:55, 9:40, 10:30 BROOKLYN’S FINEST—

COP OUT—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 9:45 Edwards 22: W-Th: 9:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8:05, 10:35

THE CRAZIES— CRAZY HEART—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:50, 4:25, 7:20, 9:55 Flicks: W-Th: 5, 7:20, 9:35; F-Su: 12:30, 2:40, 5, 7:15, 9:25; M-Tu: 5, 7:15, 9:25 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:25 a.m., 1:55, 4:45, 7:15, 9:50

DEAR JOHN—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:25, 3:35, 6:55

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:30, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:20 a.m., 1:35, 3:55, 7:10, 9:25 THE GHOST WRITER— Flicks: W-Th: 4:30, 7:05, 9:25; F-Su: 1:40, 4:30, 7, 9:30; M-Tu: 4:30, 7, 9:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:35, 3:25, 6:25, 9:20 GREEN ZONE— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:25, 4:30, 7:40, 10:15 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:45, 2:35, 4:30, 5:10, 7:05, 7:45, 9:35, 10:20 GREENBERG—

Flicks: F-Su: 12:40, 2:45, 4:50, 7:05, 9:15; M-Tu: 4:50, 7:05, 9:15

THE LAST STATION—

Flicks: W-Th: 5:05, 7:25, 9:30; F-Su: 12:25, 2:35, 4:55, 7:10, 9:20; M-Tu: 4:55, 7:10, 9:20

LIVE OSCAR SHORTS— OUR FAMILY WEDDING—

Flicks: W only: 5 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:50, 3:30, 6:45, 9:10

PAPPY BOYINGTON FIELD—

Flicks: Th only: 7

PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF— Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:45, 3:40, 6:20, 9:05 REMEMBER ME— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:25, 4:30, 7:40, 10:15 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:35 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10 REPO MAN—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:40, 4:15, 7:05, 9:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:40 a.m., 2:25, 5:05, 7:40, 10:20

SHERLOCK HOLMES—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:05, 3:50, 6:50, 9:45

SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:50, 4:55, 7:50, 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:10 a.m., 1:30, 4:20, 7:35, 10:15 SHUTTER ISLAND—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:05, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:10, 3:15, 6:15, 9:15

SOUNDTRACK FOR A REVOLUTION—

Flicks: W: 7; Th only: 5

T H E A T E R S Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Towne Square Reel, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208-377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

CRAZY HEART—(R) Flicks, Edwards 22

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID— Middle school is hell. Such is the experience of Greg and his band of nerdish pals as they trudge their way through seventh grade. (PG) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 THE GHOST WRITER—Pierce Brosnan stars as former British Prime Minister Adam Lang, a man with a mysterious and war criminal past. When the Ghost signs on to finish Lang’s memoirs, he becomes embroiled in a CIA scandal. (PG-13) Flicks, Edwards 22 GREEN ZONE—In the opening moments of the Green Zone trailer, we think Bourne is back; alas, no. But Matt Damon and Bourne Ultimatum director Paul Greengrass promise to take audiences on a similar thrill ride. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 THE LAST STATION—The deteriorating Leo Tolstoy (Christopher Plummer) and his wife Sofya (Helen Mirren) are at odds over whether Leo’s considerable fortune from Anna Karenina and War and Peace will go to the Russian people or the couple’s many children. (R) Flicks PERCY JACKSON AND THE OLYMPIANS—The Empire State Building provides a portal to a new world when the demigod son of Greek god Poseidon teams up with the daughter of Athena to stop a festering war between the gods. (PG) Edwards 22 REMEMBER ME—Tyler is a rebel New Yorker who struggles to maintain the tense relationship with his successful father (Pierce Brosnan). After he is arrested by a surly police officer (Chris Cooper), he plots revenge by dating his daughter Ally. (PG13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 REPO MEN—In the future, your heart can be repossessed. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE— The newest beauty and the beast tale. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SHUTTER ISLAND—Two U.S. marshals probe the vanishing of a patient from a criminally insane infirmary on a secluded island in Massachusetts. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 SOUNDTRACK FOR A REVOLUTION—In the 1960s, the American Civil Rights movement changed the course of history. This film presents the soundtrack for that change. (NR) Flicks

BOISEweekly | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | 23

NEWS/FOOD BOISE’S PIE HOLE MOVES BEYOND BOISE

24 | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | BOISEweekly

FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

COTTONWOOD GRILLE For years, Cottonwood Grille has been considered among the upper I’ve often biked by the Cottonwood Grille patio in the summertime, echelon of fine dining in Boise. However, the greatest achievement isn’t pausing to watch the well-dressed clink their wine glasses as tufts making it into this rarefied company, but staying there. of gauzy cottonwood coast down from the trees. The vibe, while Cottonwood has managed to escape flavor-of-the-week status, as elegant, has always seemed so country club-chic that I never gave the well as the gradual slide into mediocrity by simply offering creative, place a second thought. quality food, while reinventing its menu to keep diners interested. But that ritzy rep has been concealing one very important fact: The The restaurant has perfected the balancing act between style and place is strangely affordable—if you stick to the bar. comfort. The food is gourmet, but it’s also entirely approachable, A girlfriend and I walked into the airy Cottonwood lobby for comfortable Northwestern fare with a happy hour on a recent weekday concentration on regionally produced afternoon, passing a pair of haughty and raised offerings. Even the decor young hostesses before slipping into accomplishes the same task—oozing the wood-accented lounge. Both in elegance with the grand proportions our mid- to late-20s, we were by far of the dining room, massive chanthe youngest pair in the place. We deliers, a river-rock fireplace and snagged a raised bar booth amid linen-covered tables—yet it remains a smattering of lawyer types and comfortable with wood accents and elderly couples. Fortunately, the wine panoramic windows offering the list made us feel right at home. The quintessential view of the Greenbelt. menu features roughly 40 by-theOn a recent afternoon, the dining glass options, most of which cluster room was filled with diners clad in a around the Northwest region. The mixture of jeans and suits, epitomized choices are diverse and well-priced— by one gentleman sporting Keen wayou can snag a Brownstone pinot griter shoes and a tweed jacket. As early gio for $4 a glass or a locally made spring sunshine streamed through the Cinder chardonnay for $6.50. windows, my favorite dining companI got equally excited scanning the ion and I gazed longingly outside at bar menu, which offers items not the still-closed patio, wishing it was available on the regular menu and just 20 degrees warmer. We consoled can be ordered patio-side come sumourselves with glasses of wine— mer. We decided on the Dungeness Lagaria pinot grigio ($5) for her, crab and salmon cakes ($6 bar, $9.95 Portillo pinot noir ($5) for me. restaurant), and a half-dozen oysters Both of our lunches were prime ($10.95). While the two fried cakes examples of what Cottonwood does were filling and contained much best: putting thoughtful, Northwestmore flaky meat than breading, the ern twists on familiar dishes. real gems were the oysters—six huge, For me, it was the buffalo burger super fresh Pacific cold water oysters ($10.95). Cottonwood buys its meat served with a tangy mignonette. from area producers and hand cuts it When I returned to Cottonwood all. I’ve had a lot of buffalo burgers in with my mom and sister for the my time, but this was one of the few full dinner experience, I was struck times the rich flavor of the meat shone by the dining room’s similarity to past the condiments. The earthy the lodge in Dirty Dancing—a big flavor of the meat raised on an Idaho open room with stone accents, filled COTTONWOOD GRILLE farm was a welcome surprise, as were the seasoned and mostly with boisterous older men. We started things 913 W. River St. battered waffle-cut fries that accompanied the dish. off with the baked brie ($9.95), a round mound of soft 208-333-9800 My dining companion’s choice was a bit more daring. cheese encased in a crepe batter and doused in a jamwww.cottonwoodgrille.com Mon.-Sat.: lunch 11 a.m.-4 The Butter Schnitzel ($9.95) was an interesting take on my lingonberry chutney. The brie, though awkward to p.m., dinner 5-10 p.m. the traditional German wiener schnitzel. Instead of thin, cut, was nonetheless pleasing once smeared messily on Sun.: brunch 11 a.m.-4 breaded and fried veal cutlets, this version used freshly the accompanying bread. Our entrees—the medallions p.m., dinner 5-10 p.m. chopped Black Canyon elk mixed with onions and petit of Kobe tenderloin ($24.95), the grilled deep-sea Walu peas before being breaded and lightly roasted, then ($23.95) and the nightly special, wild-caught king served with a lemon caper beurre blanc and garlic mashed potatoes. salmon ($23.95)—were similarly pleasant, but not mind-blowing. My The texture was a bit of a surprise for someone versed in the finer meaty white fish Walu came topped with a fresh red oniony avopoints of wiener schnitzel, but the strong flavor of the elk, combined cado salsa and a heaping, oily square of herbed scalloped potatoes. with the bite of the lemon and caper sauce, quickly won a new fan. Though the spuds weren’t my thing, my mom was a big fan. My sis It was these same twists on traditional flavors that filled our table ordered her salmon “in a cage”—oven baked and half coated with on a recent dinner outing as well. From fillet of fresh Atlantic salmon crispy hashbrowns—which distracted from the fish’s lightness, but topped with a thick mound of horseradish that had been just slightly didn’t stop her from devouring the whole thing. crisped ($18.95) to the farm-raised, marinated and grilled pheasant While waiting for a chocolate mousse ($6.50) to go, I daydreamed served with a truffle sauce ($24.95) to the house-made salad dressings, of the serene, not-yet-open patio. If you ride your bike by Cottonthe flavors were a celebration of the best of what makes Northwestern wood this summer, come say “hi.” I’ll be the one with an array of cuisine unique, while pushing past the ordinary and expected. And, in apps scattered before me, picking cottonwood fluff out of my surpristrue Northwest style, Cottonwood does it without being pretentious. ingly affordable white wine. LAU RIE PEARMAN

It’s official: Pie Hole is taking over the pizza world. Brothers Jason and Russ Crawforth opened the first location of their late-night by-the-slice pie joint in downtown Boise almost five years ago, and despite some stiff competition (like three other by-the-slice joints in as many city blocks), Pie Hole has grown to what will be four locations by Friday, April 1. Russ Crawforth announced this week that Pie Hole’s third installment (the second opened on Broadway Avenue, catering to the Boise State crowd two years ago) will open in Meridian, and that his brother, Jason, along with another business partner, will open No. 4 in Pocatello. (It’s also possible that in the very near future a fifth Pie Hole will open for business in Salt Lake City.) You’ll recognize the menu at the Meridian location, but the vibe might be slightly different. Don’t worry, there’s no strip malls involved—the Crawforths have wedged the new location near three bars in downtown Meridian—but Russ told Boise Weekly he expects the Meridian Pie Hole to be more family friendly than, say, the edgy urban flagship location in downtown Boise. Got a gaggle of little leaguers? Meridian’s location is twice the size of the downtown Boise location, which means you can haul your team in after a game and shut their pie holes with a few slices of potato bacon pizza. Notable fact No. 1 about the Meridian location: the brushed aluminum sign lighting the way to Pie Hole’s entrance is solar powered. Notable fact No. 2 about the Meridian location: there will be an arcade featuring a handful of old-school games (Pac Man, anyone?). Meridian artists will, like Boiseans before them, have the opportunity to throw some art on the walls. A few walls inside and out are slated to become murals and rotating shows on non-muraled walls will provide a breath of fresh air periodically. Pie Hole, 726 Main St., Meridian, pieholeusa.com. Open Wed.-Sat. 11 a.m.-3 a.m. and Sun.-Tue. 11 a.m.-midnight. And if you’re checking in with Food News early this week, and have an opening on your agenda on Thursday, March 25, you might still snag a spot at Bella Aquila. Chef David Knickrehm and 3 Horse Ranch Vineyards have teamed up for a dinner that includes seared duck breast with an ’07 cab-sav or braised veal hips with an ’07 cab-merlot. Dinner starts at 6 p.m. and is $65 per person plus tax and gratuity. Reservations required. 775 S. Rivershore Lane, Eagle, 208-938-1900. —Rachael Daigle

—Deanna Darr thinks no one spins like a Northwesterner.

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ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com GDDBB6I:L6CI:9 In SE Boise home. No pets. Wireless internet incl. Move in April 5. Call Patrick at 340-8350.

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This two-story home 2369 S. RIDGEVIEW WAY, BOISE on Warm Springs Mesa is $396,200 oriented on its hillside lot 3 Bed/3 Bath 2,376 Square Feet to make the most of Boise House of Brokers Inc. River views across the tractRandall Gamblin, 208-713-8866 speckled basin below. houseofbrokers.net A wall of windows in MLS #98427961 both the main-level living room and the family room downstairs captures a sightline that skims above the dreary gray inversions that blanket the valley during winter. When the city below is trapped beneath a thick layer of low-hanging clouds, the occupants of this home enjoy days full of bright winter sunshine that streams in through the many windows placed on the home’s south side. The 35-year-old dwelling has been recently updated with slab-granite countertops in the kitchen and stylish vessel sinks in all three bathrooms. The large, shaded balcony outside of the kitchen beckons friends to share dinner and cocktails atop new Trex decking on warm evenings. On the main level, the master suite, one bedroom and a full bathroom are positioned at the front of the house. The living room, casual dining area and kitchen are located at the rear. In the walk-out basement, you’ll find a family room outfitted with a 103-inch projection screen, a separate wine tasting room, an office, one bedroom and a three-quarter bathroom. PROS: Updated home with a view on Warm Springs Mesa.

=NECD7>GI=>C<8=>A97>GI=:9 I invite you to picture yourself with an empowered pregnancy. How about picturing yourself with a calm, easy, and relaxed birth? You can! I provide private or group classes in your home or mine. Please call Marta for more questions at 208-406-8074.

BW CLASSES 8DB:96C8:L>I=JH Cairo Fusion Bellydance! Come join us for classes, every Monday from 6-7:30 pm. Contact Samira to register and for more information. 208-794-8393.

FAX (208) 342-4733

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1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 8805772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Boise & Nampa studios.

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still have no money down available! What have you got to lose? Call Heidi, Market Pro Realtor at 208-440-5997 E-mail: HeidiJC@ cableone.net Visit me on the web at www.ChallengerBoiseHomes. com for your complimentary list of area bank repo homes!

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1706 N. 7th. 2BD, 1BA. North End home. Hrdwd. flrs, W/D, no smoking, dog friendly. $800/mo. + dep. 336-5821. 2BD, 2BA. State St. & Kessinger. $575/mo. Pets welcome. 3716762. ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com Condo For Rent. 1st class livingmagnificent view. Outdoor pool. 24hr. security. 2BD, 1BA, carport/ storage. All util. incl. even cable. $750/mo. + dep. No pets. 9896246 or 467-4006. For Rent. 4BD, 2BA family home in Meridian. Call Robert 884-4292.

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BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com

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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Wknds.Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Mobile Massage by Emily. Certified Massage therapist specializing in Deep Tissue Acupressure Swedish Amma Therapy outcalls/incalls $60/hr. 208-283-6760. Massage Boise Hotels 869-8128. B6HH6<:7N<>C6 Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383. Prof. therapeutic massage only by trained & exp. masseur. New client spec. Rob 375-3082. ULM 340-8377.

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BW FOR SALE ;G::BDC:NID=DB:7JN:GH HURRY! Time is running out to take advantage of the FREE MONEY available from the government for purchasing a home! $8000 completely free to 1st time buyers and $6500 available to non 1st time buyers! In addition... we have grant money available up to $20k and Area Specific loans with up to $40k to buyer! What an opportunity!! No charge to see if you qualify for our programs and we

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT - ENERGY HEALING

CONS: Mature landscaping of sloped, .39-acre lot requires dutiful maintenance. —Jennifer Hernandez Open House: Saturday, March 27, 1-5 p.m.

26 | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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CAREERS BW HELP WANTED 6HH:B7ANLDG@:GHC::9:9 Small Crafts, Sewing, Woodwork, Sent to your location. You finish. To $480+ Wk. Free Info. 24 Hr. 801-264-5558. 7D>H:<GDJE=DB:H Make a difference assisting adults w/ developmental disabilities. Must be 21 w/ clean driving record. Stop by 30 S. Cole Road, 9am-4pm.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

8C6$C6 To care for adults with developmental disabilities. Must be 21 with clean driving record. Apply 30 S. Cole Road, 9am-4pm. Drivers needed day/night. Please call or text aft. 6pm. 208-3711234. ABC David. MYSTERY SHOPPERS. Earn Up To $150 Per Day. Undercover Shoppers Needed to Judge Retail and Dining Establishments. No Experience Req’d. Call 1-877-463-7909. The ACLU of Idaho is seeking a fulltime Development Coordinator. Full description and application instructions at www.acluidaho. org. Applications may be sent to ACLU of Idaho, PO Box 1897, Boise, ID 83701. Application deadline is April 9, 2010. The ACLU is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Work exchange Buddhist center, Redwood Coast, CA. Room, board, stipend, classes, must like to work hard & have interest in spiritual development www.yeshede.org/volunteer.html books@ ratnaling.org 510- 809-2014.

FOR SALE BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! No phone calls please.

Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please. KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

ROCCO: 2-year-old mix breed. Good with other dogs. Sweet temperament. Very strong but easy to work with. (Kennel 408 - #9829027)

RAMBO: 8-year-old male cat who was found as a stray. Nice tabby stripes and gorgeous green eyes. (Kennel 42 - #9606981)

OREO: 8-month-old female border collie mix. Bright and eager to please. Crate-trained. Lots of potential. (Kennel 401 - #10014104)

CHESTER: 1-yearold Lab/Australian cattle dog. Enjoys being cuddled. Loving and easy going. (Kennel 403 - #9800272)

SAM: 2-year-old male Manx cat. Enjoys being petted and handled. Litterbox-trained. Loves people. (Kennel 44 #10020051)

WINSTON: Male great Dane/Lab mix, 90 lbs. He is alert, strong and very responsive to positive training. (Kennel 308 - #9767510)

TRANSPORTATION BW 4 WHEELS &.,(>CI:GC6I>DC6AH8DJI>> 1973 International Scout II 345 V8 4 speed manual transmission. $3000/OBO. Contact bradshill1@ gmail.com to make an appt. to see it, serious offers only.

BARTER BW HAVE IG69:8DCHIGJ8I>DC;DG4444 I am a fully licensed, registered & insured framing, siding, and remodel contractor looking to trade labor for your unwanted items of value. E-mail a description of what you need done and what you have to trade. quickquality3@aol. com. Services available but not limited to: remodels, framing, siding, decks, fences, covered patios, tile, painting, roofing, gutter clean out, shops & shelves.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

GRAY GIRL AND MUFFIN: We’re a couple of laid-back older gals looking for a place to call our own.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

HILLARY: I’m quite the talker and love to show my affection out loud.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | 27

| REAL ESTATE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | CAREERS | TRANSPORTATION | BARTER | FOR SALE | | PETS | SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

SERVICES

BW WANT TO BUY HB6AA9D< Looking to acquire a small lap dog for companionship. Needs to be quiet and clean. I am blind and wheel chair bound so I need a small pet to keep me company. Dog needs to be house-trained. Please call Matt at 344-8335.

PETS BW FREE PETS 8D8@6I>:AH One male and two females. The male is bonded with a female, they need to go together. The female of the pair is tame, the male is not. The other female is not bonded, nor is she tame. If interested, they can all go together with 4’ cage on wheels, 2 breeding boxes and bedding, food, treats, edible perches, etc. Call or text 208-4041892. neaston80@gmail.com

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BW LEGAL NOTICES

=6C9NB6CH:GK>C<7D>H: Yes, We Do That! - Paint, tile, repair a door, replace a window, fix the floor, carpenter, and so much more. Handyman, Home Repair, Property Maintenance - serving Boise and the surrounding area. Free Estimates, Reasonable Rates. Call 208-371-9486. jlhhandymanservices@gmail.com 9>N8DCHJAI6I>DCH 32 yrs. exp. in tile, marble, pavers. I will advise your DIY job. Call Curtis at 853-1595. Licensed & Insured.

CDI>8:D;=:6G>C<DCC6B:8=6C<:# 86H:CD#/8KC8&%%'&+*# A Petition to change the name of Debra Godfrey Ripley born 3/30/59, in Stockton, California residing at 843 E. River Park Lane, Boise, ID 83706, has been filed in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Debra Godfrey, because I am returning to my maiden name. The petitioner’s father has died and the names and addresses of his closest blood relatives are: Karen Waldo, 2117 Funston Ave, Stockton, CA 95205. The petitioner’s mother has died and the names and addresses of her closest blood relatives are: Amos Williams, Menan, ID 83431. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on April 15, 2010, at the County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court good reason against the name change. Date: Feb. 09, 2010. By: D. Price, Deputy Clerk.

BW PROFESSIONAL 8DIIDCLDD98G::@9:CI6A Dr. Michael Dolby offers the latest techniques & equipment to make going to dentist easier than ever. Call today! 323-8545.

NYT CROSSWORD | ACROSS 1 Window boxes, for short? 4 Prefix with business 8 F.B.I. scandal of the 1970s-’80s 14 Actress Fox of “CSI” 19 “Let’s Talk About Sex” hip-hop group 22 Tony who directed “Michael Clayton” 1

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38 Beachgoer’s item 39 Tennis star nicknamed “Ice Man” 41 Unabridged version of a Philip Roth novella? 47 Maneuver 48 Prepare for planting 49 “Don’t believe that!” 50 Warts and all 54 Bobby and others

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Attorney for Personal Representative IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA. Case No. CV IE 1004398. NOTICE TO CREDITORS. In the Matter of the Estate of HAROLD K. ROEDER, Deceased. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Iver J. Longeteig has been appointed personal representative of the estate of the above-named Decedent. All persons having claims against the Decedent or his estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice or said claims will be forever barred. Claims must either be presented to the undersigned at the address indicated, or filed with the Clerk of the Court. IVER J. LONGETEIG 5304 N. Turret Boise, Idaho 83702 Personal Representative March 17, 2010.

BW NOTICES GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484.

MUSIC

BW MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE

BW MUSICAL INSTRUCTION/OTHER

Elvis impersonator for hire. Parties, special occassions. Located in Mtn. Home. John 587-5719. Keyboardist to play original material wanted. Ed 389-9619. Top 40’s country band with house gig. Need new front man. Trace Adkins & Dierk Bentley style. Guitar +. Must be a showman. Gig is solid. Allen 344-2289.

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BOOK BINDING BY CALEB MADISON / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

23 Not just a little bow 24 Plot of a Willa Cather novel? 26 Cool-looking 27 Río contents 28 “Look what ___!” 29 Not so dry 31 Lb. parts 32 Desert bloomers 35 Ship to the New World

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69 Ed who provided the lead voice in “Up” 71 Eyes 72 Most likely 75 “The Closer” star Sedgwick 77 “Frost/Nixon” director’s copy of a Graham Greene novel? 85 No longer fresh 86 Takeoff 87 Bachelor’s end? 89 Weary 92 It’s molded 96 Ear part 97 Not casual 98 Convertible, maybe 99 Final copy of a Cervantes novel? 103 O.T. book read at Purim 104 It’s read to the rowdy 105 Suffix at a natural history museum 106 Literary collections 107 1948 Literature Nobelist 109 Red ___ 112 Form of many Tin Pan Alley tunes 114 Creased copy of a Jack Finney novel? 122 Tennis star Tommy 123 One-named supermodel 124 Sky: Fr. 125 C. S. Lewis land 127 Louvre article? 128 Mass producer, for short 130 Himalayan legend 133 Community hangout, informally 134 “Same here” 137 Illustrations in a Leo Tolstoy novel? 142 Sour 143 Brought up 144 1957 film dog 145 How a call may be picked up at the office 146 They get added to pounds 147 “A Serious Man” co-director, 2009 148 Head of state?

DOWN 1 Mineralogist’s job

28 | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

2 String once used for cellos 3 Not sit up 4 Whatever 5 Mailing HQ 6 Altered mortgage, briefly 7 Touch, for one 8 Past 9 Storage unit 10 Plethora 11 Unsettling 12 Blood lines 13 Seer 14 Start of the yr. 15 Suffix with Cray16 Fuzz buster? 17 Duke Ellington band instrument 18 Carter and Adams 20 Slightest residue 21 Mimicry 23 Lith., e.g., once 25 Boob 30 Kay Thompson title character 33 Savoy peak 34 Was helpless? 36 “There is ___ in ‘team’” 37 Stevenson of Illinois 39 Kind of line 40 Marlon Brando, by birth 42 Neighbor of Swed. 43 Spinner 44 Russian pancakes 45 Some blockers: Abbr. 46 Feel like 50 Too 51 Indian P.M. Manmohan ___ 52 Author Calvino 53 Throw around 55 Hit hard 57 Goal-oriented grp.? 58 Shooting site 59 Brought to mind 62 “Gil Blas” author 63 Still 64 Former Wall St. inits. 69 Toy sound? 70 Firefox alternative 72 Byrd’s rank: Abbr. 73 Film with the line “Oh, we have 12 vacancies. 12 cabins, 12 vacancies” 74 Beat 76 Celebratory cry

78 “Lovely!,” in dated slang 79 It’s undeniable 80 Stepped 81 Vagrants 82 Vega of “Spy Kids” 83 Fight announcement 84 Bob Marley, e.g. 88 Deli supplies 89 “Buffy the Vampire Slayer” creator 90 Roughly 91 Flower once cultivated for food 93 Rent 94 ___ mode 95 Marina sight 97 South African city of 2.5+ million 98 Biological bristle 99 Mr. and Mrs. 100 Giving nothing away, in a way 101 Bread with chicken tikka masala 102 College locale 104 Seoul soldier 108 Election winners 110 “I don’t need to hear that!,” informally 111 “Ciao!” 113 Ottoman honorific L A S T

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115 Locks up 116 Ottoman hospice 117 Sweet drink 118 Old Olds 119 Soviet co-op 120 Not just puff 121 “Uncle!” criers, perhaps 126 Australia’s ___ Rock 127 Stretch ___ 128 One of the Jonas brothers 129 Dance typically done to “Hava Nagila” 131 Rash preventer 132 Intro to Chinese? 135 Drag 136 Bolivian bear 138 Noted Palin impressionist 139 O.E.D. entries: Abbr. 140 Coloring 141 Where you might find a long sentence? Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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K E Y S

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COMMUNITY POSTINGS BW ANNOUNCEMENTS 86C9A:E6GI>:H Earn FREE product for hosting a candle party! Call 208-447-6317 to book your candle party! Check out our product line at www.foreveryhome.net/lynnette

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@>AGDN@D;;::@A6I8= Warhawk Air Museum is excited to announce the monthly “Kilroy was Here” coffee klatch. 1st Tuesday of every month. 10-11:30am. Warhawk Air Museum, 201 Municipal Dr, Nampa. K:C9DGHL6CI:9 Yellow Pine Harmonica Festival. August 6-8, 2010. Looking for unique food vendors who run on propane, not electricity (not hamb/hotdogs). Also need Arts & Crafts type vendors. Call 208633-3325. ;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

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BW KISSES =6EEN7>GI=96NA6GGN# You are the best. Thanks for your support and keep reading. Sally Ready to spice things up? Let’s meet for lunch. Go to McDonald’s® and ask for Angus Chipotle. <DD9I>B:H Big thanks to the Warlocks for putting on Liverdance. It was a great time out there on our bikes.

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BW FOUND Found on 3/17/10 book titled “Essentials of Abnormal Psychology” was found on Royal St. by Royal Body Works. Please stop by Boise Weekly to claim. Book will be recycled on 4/14/10. Call 3442055 with questions.

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BUYER BEWARE Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services. ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+. Hot Singles Waiting To Connect! Call 208-287-3333. Free w/code 5500. Call 800-210-1010.

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | 29

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): All but one of our planet’s mountain ranges have been mapped: the Gamburtsev Mountains, which are buried under 2.5 miles of ice in Antarctica. Recent efforts to get a read on this craggy landscape, aided by a network of seismic instruments, have revealed some initial details about it, including its role in forming the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. I recommend that you regard the Gamburtsevs as an iconic metaphor in the coming months, Aries. They’ll be an apt symbol for one of your life’s featured themes: the discovery and exploration of a massive unknown territory that has been hidden from view. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): It’s my opinion that everyone has a duty to periodically check in with themselves to make sure they still are who they say they are. Over time, there’s a tendency for all of us to fall into the habit of believing our own hype. We get entranced by the persona we project. We’re tempted to keep capitalizing on our past accomplishments in ways that lull us into complacency and give us unconscious permission to stop growing. You, Taurus, are in no worse danger of doing this than any of the rest of us. But the coming weeks will be an excellent time, astrologically speaking, for you to do an intensive check-in. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The odds are higher than usual that you’ll encounter a future soul brother or soul sister in the coming weeks. Potential allies are gravitating toward you. You’re also likely to brush up against a tribe or team you could benefit from knowing more about. That’s why I’m counseling you to be extra open to meeting people you don’t know. Talk to strangers. Ask your friends to introduce you to their friends. And consider the possibility of skipping over the customary social formalities so you can reveal some of the core truths about who you are right from the start. CANCER (June 21-July 22): Author Neil Gaiman sometimes invites his readers to get involved in his creative process. While working on the story “Metamorpho,” he Twittered, “Trying to decide if broccoli is funnier than kohlrabi in a list of vegetables.” When a number of fans suggested “rutabaga” instead, he took their suggestion. (Thanks to The New Yorker for that report.) I’d like to borrow Gaiman’s approach, as you’re entering a phase of your astrological cycle when you’ll have maximum power to shape your own destiny. So here’s my question: What accomplishment would you like your horoscope to say you will complete by May 15? E-mail me at truthrooster@gmail.com.

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LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): From the ninth to the 15th century, the Khmer empire thrived in what is now Cambodia. Its rulers were regarded as deities who had privileges that common folk didn’t have—as well as special responsibilities. Each god-king was expected to engage in sexual relations with a sacred nine-headed serpent every single night, whether he was in the mood or not. (An actual human being usually served as a proxy for the magic snake.) I suspect you may get an inkling of the god-king’s doubleedged situation in the coming week, Leo. On the one hand, you’re likely to be presented with the possibility of experiencing uncommonly interesting pleasure. On the other hand, there may be an obligatory quality to it—a slightly oppressive pressure that is fully blended with the bliss. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): According to the oracular priestess at the ancient Greek shrine of Delphi, whom I consulted in my dream last night, your code phrases for the week are “luminous shadow” and “hidden light.” That was the gist of her entire message; she didn’t provide any more practical clues. But here are some ways I might interpret her prophecy if I were you: What dark place in your life might soon shine forth with a new radiance? Or: What secret beauty is aching to be found? Or: What odd asset have you been concealing for no good reason? LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In my role as moral sentinel, I strongly urge you not to watch “Telephone,” the music video by Lady Gaga and Beyonce. It epitomizes everything that’s crazy-making about our culture: brilliantly executed, gorgeous to behold and perversely seductive, even though its subject matter is degrading, demoralizing and devoid of meaning. In my role as a kick-ass educator, however, I encourage you to watch the video at least once. I think you’d benefit from seeing such an explicit embodiment of the crazy-making pressures you’ll be wise to avoid exposing yourself to in the coming weeks. You can find it at tinyurl. com/ycx6p34. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Most of the time, life does not talk to you,” writes Robert T. Kiyosaki in his book Rich Dad, Poor Dad. “It just sort of pushes you around. Each push is life saying, ‘Wake up. There’s something I want you to learn.’” Different people respond in different ways, Kiyosaki says. “Some just let life push them around. Others get angry and push back. But they push back against their boss or their job or their husband or wife. They do not know it’s life that’s pushing.” I’m here to tell you, Scorpio, that what he says is

particularly apropos for you right now. And I hope that you will neither allow yourself to get pushed around nor blame the wrong source for the push. Instead, make yourself available to learn the lesson that life’s nudging you to pay attention to. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): NASA scientist Richard Gross believes that the recent 8.8 earthquake in Chile was so strong that it shifted the planet’s axis and shortened the length of the day. The amounts were relatively small—3 inches and 1.26 microseconds—but it was enough to make “the Earth ring like a bell.” I predict a somewhat comparable seismic shift for you in the coming weeks. The main difference is that yours will not be generated by a painful jolt but rather by a breakthrough that’s half smart and half lucky. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In a library in Warsaw, Poldand, there is a 1,000-plus-page memoir written by my great-greatgreat-great grandfather, Leon Dembowski, a close adviser to the last king of Poland. Someday I’ll make a pilgrimage over there, photocopy that family heirloom, bring it back to America, and have it translated into English. The task I envision for you in the coming weeks, Capricorn, has a certain resemblance to mine. I think you will have the chance to uncover a wealth of material about where you came from, but it’ll take a lot of footwork and reinterpretation. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): There’s no need for you to get a T-shirt that says, “Oh no, not another learning experience.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you are not about to have an embarrassing stumble that could in retrospect be euphemistically referred to as a “learning experience.” On the contrary, the educational events you’ll be communing with will be pretty pleasurable and will more closely resemble a hop, skip and a jump than a stumble. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I’m inclined to prophesy that in the days to come, you may be able to read the minds of people whose actions are critical to your success. I also suspect that you will know exactly what to do in order to banish a minor health problem. I’m even tempted to believe that when you gaze into the mirror, you will be more intrigued than you’ve been in a while. Have you ever heard a bird sing a song just for you? Did you ever find a small treasure you assumed was lost forever? Developments like those are in the works. There’s only one catch: To get the most out of this grace period, you will have to summon more faith in yourself than you usually do.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 24–30, 2010 | 31

14th annual

March 26-28, 2010

Downtown on the Grove

Shop exciting booths for your Yard, Garden and Patio! Melinda

Seminars

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MelindaMyers, nationally known gardening expert will entertain on Fri/Sat and JimZamzow, Boiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s local expert on Sat/Sun. Plus many other speakers and topics.

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Get inspired by beautiful display gardens! The main lobby garden is presented by TheNatureCompany and promises to be the perfect backyard vacation spot.

Show Hours

Admission Adults $7, Youth (7-12) $2 Children 6 & under Free

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Boise Weekly Vol. 18 Issue 39