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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 18, ISSUE 38 MARCH 17–23, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 8

OTTER RUNS And seven or eight chase him

FEATURE 11

BATTLEFRONT The quiet war south of the border

SCREEN 22

ART & COPY Documentary asks if it is magic or manipulation?

FOOD 25

DA BOMB-AY Inhaling Indian food at the Idanha

“There are many prisons that aren’t nearly as violent as this one.”

NEWS 8


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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com Business Editor: Zach Hagadone Zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: Nathaniel Hoffman Nathaniel@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Annabel Armstrong Interns: Andrew Crisp, Joe Firmage, Jennifer Spencer Contributing Writers: Sarah Barber, Bill Cope, Jennifer Hernandez, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall, Jeramiah Robert Wierenga ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Justin Vipperman, Justin@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designer: Adam Rosenlund Adam@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Steve Klamm, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street, Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

NOTE INVERTED CROSSES, BONERS AND A HEARTY WELCOME First, thank you to those Idaho Arts Quarterly supporters who, since last week’s announcement, have conveyed their disappointment over the journal’s demise. It’s good to know so many people thought we were doing something valuable with IAQ. Unfortunately, not everyone thought we were doing something valuable or putting forward our best artssupporting foot with last week’s Sarah Palin cover. We’ve fielded complaints and compliments on everything from the religious symbolism to the artistic quality. Perhaps coincidentally—perhaps not—last week a few red BW boxes also sustained serious injuries requiring a patch up by the BW distribution trauma team. Whether those blows were dealt on behalf of Palin’s image or simply because we’re part of that damn liberal media so despised by brutes who like to prove their point with a swift kick to an inanimate object’s plexiglass ... who knows. But as for cover artist Peter Barnes’ Mother Palin, I’d urge you to remember back to a cover in November 2008 featuring “Barack OBoner.” Yes, some of you just physically winced at that memory, didn’t you? Well, if nothing else, Art Director Leila Rader, who chooses each week’s covers, achieves a decent rate of balance in selecting covers that please and offend. Last, have a look at this week’s staff box. We’ve added a new name to the editorial lineup and those of you who pay attention to the names writing your news each week may recognize the addition. With this issue, we welcome Zach Hagadone to Boise Weekly. Hagadone, who jokes that he’s worked for almost every print outlet in town, most recently worked at Idaho Business Review. He’ll be lending us a hand with news coverage and the occasional A&E story, but the bulk of his time will be spent as Boise Weekly’s business editor. Now that I’ve perked a few ears with that title, I’ll let it stew for a couple of weeks until we’re ready to officially break the news. —Rachael Daigle

COVER ARTIST ARTIST: Cale Cathey TITLE: Ampersand as Art

The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2010 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

MEDIUM: Ink, paper ARTIST STATEMENT: Where does creativity come from? I believe it comes from our brains. But I also think that our brains are filled with other things, like delicious black ink.

Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it too. BOISE WEEKLY IS AN INDEPENDENTLY OWNED AND OPERATED NEWSPAPER.

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SUBMIT

Boise Weekly pays $150 for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Square formats are preferred and all mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | 3


WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE

THE MODE EXPLODES OK, Tour Mode has exploded all over Boise Weekly’s blog world. Finn Riggins is still en route to SXSW with gigs all along the way. RevoltRevolt has joined the lineup and is photo happy—mostly eaten waffle, anyone? Equaleyes blogs about getting un-86’d from a venue in Salt Lake City and Thomas Paul chimes in from a little coffee shop in Pocatello.

ONCE UPON AN EMERALD ISLE Boise State professor Angeline Kearns Blain talks about her new book, I Used to Be Irish, a memoir about her povertystricken, abusive and repressive childhood in Ireland. Kearns Blain will sign copies at Trip Taylor Wednesday, March 17.

RADIOACTIVE GAVIN AT SXSW You might know Gavin Dahl from his time on Boise Community Radio or be familiar with his occasional byline in BW. But now, you should get to know the intrepid reporter from his Cobweb blog posts from deep in the heart of Texas. Dahl is on assignment for BW at SXSW and has been sending lengthy, funny, informative missives from the Film and Interactive portion of the renowned fest. He met director Jason Reitman, walked out of auteur Korine Harmony’s latest and trashiest release, and watched the masters of mockery, Master Pancake Theater, jab at Bond. James Bond.

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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MONDO GAGA

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BILL COPE

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TED RALL

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NEWS ACLU sues after reports of prison violence

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ROTUNDA

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FEATURE The War Next Door

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BW PICKS

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FIND

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8 DAYS OUT

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SUDOKU

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NOISE Otep Shamaya on bringing fans along for the ride 19 MUSIC GUIDE

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SCREEN Art & Copy

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MOVIE TIMES

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FOOD Two reviewers gorge on Indian food at Bombay Grill

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CLASSIFIEDS

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HOME SWEET HOME

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NYT CROSSWORD

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FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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BILL COPE/OPINION

OLD DEMS DON’T DIE

They get into discussions and wish they were dead “How in hell can a man your age still be a Democrat?” That extraordinarily stupid question was put to me a couple of weeks ago by someone I didn’t know. He was butting in on a political discussion I was engaged in with my considerably conservative pal, Steve. We were in a bar, which is never a good place to engage in political discussion unless all interested parties are in about a trillion percent agreement with one another. I had stopped for a quick “how’s it hangin’?” with Steve before calling it a night. It’s a weekly ritual. I’m there for one reason, Steve’s there for another. When I’m done, I never leave until I shoot some you-know-what with him for a bit. We like one another, Steve and I. Don’t ask me why. We enjoy one another’s company, that’s all I know. In matters political, he thinks I’m misguided and I’m totally convinced he is, but evidently, neither of us is so disturbed by our mutual misguidedness that we aren’t able to be friends. He thinks it’s because we respect one another enough to not treat the other like he’s stupid. Maybe. But not calling the other stupid doesn’t necessarily translate into friendship. I think we’re friends because either one of us, at any time, can say, “brother, I’m in no mood to talk about that tonight,” and we don’t. Steve was lobbing darts. The buttinski is on his dart team. I can’t remember the exact matter Steve and I were discussing, but I was in a good enough mood, so I imagine it had to do with something Steve and I are nowheresnear agreeing on, let alone a trillion percent agreeing on. He and I don’t agree on much of anything except that something is totally, totally, totally screwed up. Something. We both know it, neither of us like it, but we have entirely different opinions on how it got that way. That may well be what we were discussing—how things got so screwed up— when Mr. Buttinski butted in. “How in hell can a man your age still be a Democrat?” Even as stupid as it is, it’s an old question. I’ve heard it, or variations on it, all my life. There is this certitude among conservatives that being liberal is a phase children go through. Something like bed-wetting or being a Goth or going to college. They have convinced themselves that the process of maturing is supposed to take the liberalness out of a man, if he’s any kind of man. They think as a man gets older, liberalness should go the way of baby teeth and love of cute animals. There used to be a bumper sticker– “A Liberal Is Just Someone Who Hasn’t Been Mugged Yet”—that reflected the same certitude. The idea is, life bangs you around so much that it knocks all the commitment and passion and openness out of you, if you have any sense at all. If you have any sense, you’re supposed to grow increasingly less concerned about anyone beyond your own

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experience and increasingly more concerned about your own experience. Your own safety. Your own comfort. Your own money. Your own certitude. As you grow older, you’re supposed to forget all that liberal crud about how different kinds of people have more in common than not in common, and you’re supposed to just remember they are different. Instead of becoming more enlightened as you learn, conservatives believe you should learn to forget all that phony enlightenment silliness and “it takes a village” bull and “we are the world” nonsense, and if you don’t have something conservative to say, you should just shut the hell up. “How in hell can a man your age still be a Democrat?” “Same reason all the smart people my age are Democrats,” I answered. I admit it wasn’t a great comeback. What I should have said was, “And as a self-admitted Republican, why are they letting you play with sharp objects?” And I would have pointed to his darts. That would have got him good, I bet. But that didn’t occur to me until later, as I thought of all the great comebacks I should have thought of. At the time, I was frankly stunned that a person I didn’t know and who didn’t know me would demonstrate such a complete lack of class as to butt into someone else’s discussion. I shouldn’t have been so stunned. I know better. I learned years ago not to expect a whole lot of class from conservatives. I guess they think such qualities as behaving with some class and being polite and keeping your nose out of other peoples’ discussions are liberal qualities and should be cast aside like old bell-bottom jeans and tolerance and curiosity. Anyway, the discussion between Steve and I was over, and the discussion between myself and Mr. Rude Buttinski was on. It didn’t amount to much, that discussion. It became immediately apparent he didn’t know what he was talking about, and he seemed to think the same thing about me. I was stuttering mad and he was too, and all either of us was really able to say was what a complete and utter waste of time it would be to try to make any sense to the other one, because according to him, I’m a moron, and according to me, he’s a moron, and the iron-clad fact that I had proof of his moronness didn’t impact the discussion at all because, according to him, nothing I was certain of—including his stupidity—could possibly be anything but stupid. The next morning, I called Steve to apologize for flying off the handle like that. He said, “Hey I was just about to call you.” I said, “What for?” And he said, “To apologize for my friend (rude Mr. Buttinski) flying off the handle like that.” Considerably classy, that’s Steve. And funny thing: At my age, I have more respect for that than all the stupid opinions in the world. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


OPINION/TED RALL

TRIUMPH OF THE SWILL

The Hurt Locker supports the troops—and the lies NEW YORK—The Motion Picture Academy’s choice of The Hurt Locker as best film of 2009 is a sad commentary on America’s unwillingness to face the ugly truth about itself nearly a decade after 9/11. The Hurt Locker is about a U.S. Army Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit operating in U.S.-occupied Iraq in 2004, one year after the invasion. They get called in to disarm improvised explosive devices of all shapes and sizes. The EOD unit in The Hurt Locker also comes under fire from Iraqi resistance fighters. The setting is inherently political, yet director Kathryn Bigelow studiously insists that her movie isn’t. The trouble with The Hurt Locker is that it, like too many other American war films, whitewashes history. In this film, neither the EOD unit or soldiers ever make a mistake that kills or injures an Iraqi civilian. Like the camera that put the audience behind the killer’s mask in Halloween, Bigelow has created a claustrophobic, soldier’s-eye view ominous with paranoia. This supposedly apolitical film turns into pro-U.S. propaganda. As film critic Andrew Breitbart wrote, The Hurt Locker stripped its Iraqi characters of their humanity “and turned [them] into story-props: villains, victims, foulmouthed hustlers, or strange alien beings who keep an awkward distance and mourn the dead by yelling savagely at the sky.” Creative liberties have limits. One is historical truth. Unless you’re making a live-action cartoon like Inglorious Basterds, you can’t make things up. But The Hurt Locker creates an alternate universe, in which U.S. troops took as much care not to hurt civilians as AIG took with our tax dollars.

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In the real world of U.S.-occupied Iraq in 2004, American soldiers were blowing away anyone who failed to slow down at checkpoints. They were raping, robbing and murdering. Countless soldiers recounted randomly shooting at houses and people. According to Iraq Body Count’s conservative estimate, between 8,000 and 10,000 Iraqis were killed by April 2004. The truth was probably fiftyfold. In September 2004, Knight-Ridder News Service reported that more Iraqi civilians had been killed by U.S. forces at checkpoints than by insurgents. “At the Baghdad morgue, Dr. Quasis Hassan Salem said he saw a family of eight brought in: three women, three men and two children. They were sleeping on their roof last month because it was hot inside. A military helicopter shot at them and killed them: ‘I don’t know why,’” said the wire service. The reason for the bloodshed was simple: U.S. troops had been trained to shoot first They didn’t care about civilians. We don’t see any of this in The Hurt Locker, only good, confused American boys trying to muddle through a scary situation as best they can. It is sad that a film so devoid of texture can earn critical plaudits. Not only is the history it seeks to revise ridiculously recent, one can only shudder at the thought of what Iraqis and other Middle Easterners will think when pirated copies start showing up. We need to stop wallowing in self-indulgent, sentimental pap about how bad war is for the U.S. military forces. After all, the United States has started every war it has fought since 1945. What we should be considering is what our forces do to others in the course of invading and destroying their countries.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | 7


CITYDESK/NEWS GARY W ILL/ IDFG

NEWS

ACLU BATTLES PRISON ASSAULTS Private lockup accused of unbridled violence NATHANIEL HOFFMAN Hammer Flat is a winter wonderland for unglates.

GETTING LANDS, SCHOOLED The Boise City Council agreed last week to use $4.1 million in Foothills Levy funds— nearly the balance of the $10 million levy—to purchase the 701-acre Hammer Flat parcel on critical wildlife habitat on the outskirts of Boise. Since 2007, the parcel, which is in Ada County, has been slated for a 1,350-unit planned community called The Cliffs. Boise’s purchase of the property protects it from development. “Of all the incredible land acquisitions made through the Foothills serial levy, this is the most significant. By putting this land into public hands, we will protect it and the wildlife it supports for generations to come,” said Mayor Dave Bieter. Hammer Flat lies just south of the 35,000-acre Boise River Wildlife Management Area, which is managed as critical winter grounds by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game. The temperate plateau is home to herds of deer, elk and antelope. “Even out of the disaster of the recession, some good has come,” said Mike Reineck, a Harris Ranch resident and member of Save the Plateau, which formed to fight The Cliffs development. According to Tucker Johnson, whose family obtained development rights for The Cliffs from Ada County, there were discussions with the city several years ago. “Those dialogue doors have always been open,” Johnson said, after the City Council approved the acquisition. But in early December 2009, it was note-holder Sterling Savings Bank that contacted the city to sit down in earnest and discuss the sale, according to Boise Parks and Rec Director Jim Hall, who negotiated the deal for the city. At the City Council meeting, several council members and members of the public mentioned their desire for another Foothills preservation levy. While Boise continues to spend money, the State of Idaho continues to siphon it off. And—finally—a small group of constituents noticed. About three dozen Idaho State University students made the three-hour trek from Pocatello last week to rally against cuts to higher education on the steps of the State Capitol. Though they hoped for participation from other Idaho campuses, only one student each from Boise State and College of Western Idaho joined the protest. “All of this financial decision-making is occurring at the worst time for students,” said Tom Briggs, an ISU grad student in secondary education. It’s midterm season. Briggs said the ISU student government had reached out to Boise State’s student leaders, to no avail. —Nathaniel Hoffman

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The American Civil Liberties Union has sued Idaho’s largest prison—the privately run Idaho Correctional Center—alleging a culture of violence that is accepted and even encouraged by guards, forcing inmates to live in fear. “Prison isn’t supposed to be a violent place,” said lead ACLU attorney Stephen Pevar. “There are many prisons that aren’t nearly as violent as this one … If ICC cannot very quickly improve things, those prisoners have to be taken out of there.” The lawsuit details 23 assaults at ICC since November 2006. The ACLU claims that all of them were preventable, but that guards, through deliberate indifference, failed to protect the inmates. But ICC, which is run by Corrections Corporation of America, the largest private prison contractor in the country, has been known as Idaho’s most violent prison for more than two years. A 2008 Associated Press investigation revealed that the assault rate there was three times higher than at other state prisons. At the time, legislators voiced concern for the levels of violence at ICC, but a follow-up report a year later by AP reporter Rebecca Boone revealed that, despite several investigations, the number of assaults at ICC had decreased only slightly to almost nine per month.

In the last year, ICC reported 231 offenderon-offender assaults, compared to 89 at the next largest prison, the Idaho State Correctional Institution, according to Idaho Department of Corrections spokesman Jeff Ray. Ray declined comment on the ACLU lawsuit, as did Steve Owen, director of marketing for CCA, who wrote in an e-mail that the prison is safe and monitored by IDOC. Starting in January 2008, IDOC officials cited concerns that CCA was not fully investigating reports of inmate violence, was not reporting crimes committed in the facility and was not holding perpetrators of violence accountable, the AP reported a year ago. IDOC officials also indicated the number of assaults may be triple what CCA was reporting. Meanwhile, CCA faces numerous lawsuits at prisons across the country and is at the center of a spate of in-custody deaths at privatelyrun immigration detention centers. There were nine deaths at one Arizona detention facility, The New York Times reported in January. CCA general council Gus Puryear told an attorneys’ trade magazine in 2005 that at any given time, there are 700 to 1,100 claims pending against the company. Pevar said he is aware that CCA faces lawsuits in other states, but that he is seek-

ing class-action relief only for the prisoners in Idaho. According to the lawsuit, ICC is widely known as “gladiator school” for the number of violent prisoners who are given latitude to commit assaults. The term “gladiator school” has been applied to violent prisons for years, including the Deuel Vocational Institution in Tracy, Calif., in the ’70s and early ’80s. But an inmate at a CCA-run prison in Nashville, Tenn., recently bragged to a judge that he acted as a “gladiator” there, beating up other inmates at the behest of CCA guards, according to chattanoogan.com. Relatives of inmates have also been concerned about violence at ICC for about two years; it was the impetus for the creation of a new blog in January, Idaho Prison Watch. “I’ve been hearing about the ‘beat down’ of inmates by other inmates for over two years now. We also know how apathetic and/or vicious some of the [correctional officers] have been. We assumed that nothing was being done as far as investigations,” said Connie Molen, who runs the blog. “There are more than a few of us that are breathing a sigh of relief. Now we hope the ACLU will continue to carry the ball all the way to the end.”

OTTER FILES FOR SECOND TERM Eight file for governor, Seven desire the post NATHANIEL HOFFMAN court in a different county seat across the state Gov. C. L. “Butch” Otter filed to run for a second term after months of evasiveness about once a month, and on the GOP Lincoln Day circuit. his plans. “It’s more important Otter told an Idaho than ever that people who Press Club breakfast a few want to be elected listen to weeks ago that he did not the people,” Field said. want to start campaignOtter also announced ing before the Legislature a new finance director, Kensettled on a direction with dra Waitley of Boise, and his proposals. With state new Eastern Idaho regional budgets now set, Otter coordinator, Sheila Olsen of announced March 12 that Idaho Falls. Debbie Field will take a Olsen replaces Otter’s leave of absence from her 2006 East Idaho chair, Shapost as Idaho drug czar to ron Parry, an Idaho Falls manage his campaign. Field city councilor and longtime ran Otter’s 2006 campaign. Republican who signed on Otter joins a crowded with Democratic challenger field for the Tuesday, May Kieth Allred recently. Parry 25, GOP Primary. told the Post-Register that OtField said that Otter takes Candidate filing closes ter has not been able to connect the primary seriously and has Friday, March 19 at 5 p.m. with Idaho citizens during his been connecting with voters For updates, check first term. through his Capitol for a Day citydesk.boiseweekly.com Allred filed to run earlier last program, in which he holds

week, saying that Otter is out of ideas for turning the economy around. “The fact that Otter has drawn primary opposition of this scale shows that other people in Idaho are dissatisfied with his leadership,” Allred spokesman Shea Andersen said. Otter faces at least four opponents in the May primary. Walter Bayes, an anti-abortion activist from Wilder; Rex Rammell, a large-animal veterinarian from Idaho Falls; and Republican comedian and retired state worker Ron “Pete” Peterson, who is squatting on the domain name beatbutch.com until at least after the primary had all filed at press time. Ada County Commissioner Sharon Ullman told BW she is running against Otter as well, though at press time, she had not filed. Ullman signs have cropped up across Boise, and Ullman said she has recently made campaign stops in Coeur d’Alene, Twin Falls and Idaho Falls. Also running are independent candidate Jana Kemp, Libertarian Ted Dunlap and Lee R. Chaney Sr., who is challenging Allred in the Democratic primary. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


DAILY

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | 9


UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

RENEWING RENEWAL Lawmakers and redevelopers plot future of blight ANDREW CRISP When asking folks about urban renewal there are a few constants in the responses: “ahs,” “ums” and “well that’s complicateds …” Even lawmakers have a hard time describing the complex topic. So Unda’ was recently left asking, “Just what the hell is urban renewal?” The Idaho Legislature is reviewing multiple bills on the issue, including one from Boise’s urban renewal agency. The process, popularized in 1950s California to redevelop blighted urban areas, hasn’t been revised here since the ’80s. Some legislators oppose urban renewal as a shady use of taxpayer dollars. Others recognize its benefits as a strong tool for cities. Blackfoot Rep. Dennis Lake, chairman of the House Revenue and Taxation Committee, cited a specific concern in his district. “One of ’em started out as 61 acres. It’s composed of Walmart and a little shopping area down there. This has been in existence for 20 some odd years. There’s not been one dime that’s gone to city services yet, it’s all gone to urban renewal. Once they got the infrastructure paid off, they just expanded the district.” Some of these entities, like one Lake cited in Coeur d’Alene, have used the state’s definition of “blight” to abuse—by some accounts—property-swiping powers granted to urban renewal districts, even nabbing lakefront property. An urban renewal agency effectively acts as a dairyman at a creamery: skimming off the frothing fat from a vat of milk. But they skim off extra property tax value instead, whether it is a small increment from inflation, or a larger value, and apply it directly to the blighted area. Thus, any property value money goes to improvements, often through private developers, which in turn bump up

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the property value further. Rep. Phil Hart of not-so-blighted Athol brought a number of bills to the Rev and Tax’s urban renewal subcommittee, which was tasked with examining the vast issue. His bills all focused on making urban renewal agencies more publicly powered, through directly electing commissioners, extended public comment and allowing taxing districts to opt out. “They’re the only boards that spend taxpayer dollars that isn’t publicly elected,” said Hart. “It allows the city council to commandeer—I say commandeer—the tax revenue of other taxing districts. I think what’s happened is urban renewal has grown into beautifying the city or promoting private industry.” Boise’s urban renewal agency also sought changes to the state’s law, including an effort to separate classic blight redevelopment from efforts to use redevelopment for economic development or beautification. “The idea was if there were any good ideas in the other bills, we could do that in the subcommittee,” said Rep. James Ruchti of Pocatello. The bill that survived the subcommittee is similar to the one proposed by Boise’s redevelopment agency, Capital City Development Corp. It provides a shorter lifetime for urban renewal agencies (down to 20 years from 24), ensures a proportional ratio of board members from the area and allows the mayor an easier way to eject board members. Shoestringing, or picking up small chunks of property for an existing district, would also be banned. But the public election of commissioners or votes on district formation were left out, perhaps after pressure from multiple cities’ urban renewal boards. CCDC’s idea for separating economic development functions from urban renewal also fell by the wayside.

Phil Kushlan, executive director of CCDC, is a kind of redevelopment wunderkind in Idaho. “In order to make one of these happen, the impetus comes from one of three sources: our board can say, ‘we see an area that needs attention, so we think it ought to happen.’ The city can say, ‘this area needs attention, make it happen.’ Or the property owners of the area can express an interest and make it happen,” said Kushlan. From there, the board must demonstrate blight, form a redevelopment district and the tax increment financing (TIF) begins to roll in. “The property value is certified by the county assessor, and that’s called the base value. All the taxing agencies continue to levy their tax rate. Over time, people are gonna come build stuff there, you’re gonna have growth and investment—and just inflation, too,” said Kushlan. “That increment comes to the urban renewal board to fund these upgrades.” Boise’s BODO area is a direct result of TIF, as are the big sidewalks and trees on Eighth Street. What was once an “economic liability” is now a strip of restaurants and a popular hangout. Future CCDC plans include a link from BODO to the Greenbelt. Some legislators—those more tea party friendly than Eighth Street loiterers—told Unda’ the Rotunda they weren’t thrilled with the outcome of the subcommittee. House Assistant Majority Leader Scott Bedke did agree, however, that the bill is a good start. And Kushlan said the subcommittee’s efforts are a win for urban renewal in Idaho, though he has a few concerns about some parts of the new bill, including the section that makes redevelopment board members serve at the will of the mayor and city council. A hearing is expected this week.

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boiseweekly | march 17–23, 2010 | 11


JU LIAN C AR DONA

A military patrol on the southern edge of Ciudad Juarez.

tegration of our national security. They decry migrants (illegal invaders), violence spilling over the border and, in certain zany moments, see Islamic terrorists crossing the desert and leaving a litter of prayer rugs. The migration of the Mexican poor is the largest human movement across a border on the planet. It was triggered by the destruction of peasant agriculture at the hands of the North American Free Trade Agreement, by the corruption of the Mexican state, by the growing violence in Mexico, and exacerbated by the millions of Mexicans working illegally in the United States who send money home to finance their families’ trips north. It should be seen as a natural shift of a species. We need ecologists on the border; the politicians have become pointless. The drug industry is the second-largest source of foreign currency in Mexico, just behind oil. It earns somewhere between $30 billion and $50 billion a year—no one really knows, including the people in the industry. It also creates enormous numbers of jobs in the United States: We spend billions a year on narcs, maintain the world’s largest prison industry—which is absolutely dependent on the intake of drug felons—and we have about 20,000 agents on the border who feed off drug importation. The rehab industry is also a source of a large number of jobs, since many well-heeled defendants pick mandatory treatment over prison. Many county and local police departments now get fat off RICO suits based on drug offenses. The official line of the U.S. government, one most recently voiced by Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, is that drug consumers in the United States are responsible for drug murders in Mexico. Only someone who is drugged could believe this claim. The sole source of the enormous amount of money in the drug business, and its accompanying violence, is the U.S. prohibition of drug use by its citizens. Since President Richard Nixon proclaimed the War on Drugs 40 years ago, there have been two notable accomplishments: Drugs are cheaper than ever, and they are of much higher quality. But then, NAFTA was promoted by presidents George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton as something that would buoy the Mexican economy and reduce or end illegal immigration—two claims that are now clearly refuted by facts.

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The left seeks open borders or No More Deaths, the latter a protest of the 500 or so migrant deaths per year—a rather low fatality rate, considering that at least a half-million Mexicans move illegally across the border each year. But the left seldom if ever mentions the slaughter in Mexico during the last three years that has left 17,000 citizens dead, a killing of Mexicans by Mexicans. The right constantly speaks of fortifying the border, as if this could stop a human tide lashed northward by misery. And, of course, the right promotes draconian drug laws even though the failure of such laws is increasingly apparent. On the border, Adam Smith meets magical realism. Here, the market tenets of supply and demand, the basic engine of both the migration and the drug industry, are supposed to be overturned magically by a police state. Consider one simple number: The border is 1,900 miles long. If two people slipped through each mile in a 24-hour period, that would amount to 3,800 people a day. That adds up to 1,387,000 people a year. Or consider this: One bridge from Juarez to El Paso handles 600,000 semi-trucks a year. One semi with a freight load of 24 tons could probably tote enough heroin to satisfy the U.S. market for a year. Add to the mix the inevitable corruption of the police agencies: A few months ago, a Border Patrol agent in southern Arizona was busted for running dope in his official car for $500 a load. Few discussions about the border come from facts. Most discussions of the border come from fear. We seem to prefer slogans and fantasies: free trade, “just say no,” gigantic walls. Almost certainly, the drug industry and illegal migration are the two most successful anti-poverty initiatives in the history of the world. The drug industry has poured tens of billions of dollars annually into the hands of ill-educated and largely poor people. Illegal migration has taken people who were lucky to earn $5 a day and instantly given them jobs that pay 10 or 20 times that much. It has also financed the remittances, more than $20 billion shipped from immigrants in the United States back into the homes of Mexico’s poor each year. No government can match these achievements. And tens of thousands of people in the U.S. agencies are earning far better salaries fighting drugs and the Mexican poor WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


rushing in, and we can hardly alter that fact if we continue to believe fantasies. Open borders: a fantasy. The War on Drugs: a fantasy. Walling out migrants: a fantasy. Being protected by a police state: a fantasy. The man sitting on the couch watching the Mexican killer speak is beyond such fantasies. He is here illegally (as is the killer for that matter), and he is surviving. His old life has ended, and he knows it. But then the killer’s old life has ended, too; there is a contract on his head for $250,000 because he offended his superior in the drug industry. It is early January as I write. This weekend, more than 40 people were murdered in Juarez, a city once hailed as the poster child of free trade, the city with the lowest unemployment rate in Mexico. The killings—three of them women—had little touches. A double amputee was shot in the head and then left on a dirt road wrapped in a blanket. Another man was found with his severed head on his chest—the tongue, eyes and nose had been removed. A narco-message was left on yellow cardboard and weighted down with two severed arms. Such slaughter usually goes unnoticed in the U.S. press. Should it actually come to the attention of our newspapers, it simply will be written off as part of a cartel war. This is a ďŹ ction. Almost all the dead are poor people, not drug-enriched grandees. And though we give Mexico half a billion dollars a year to encourage its army to ďŹ ght drug merchants, this alleged war has a curious feature: Almost no soldiers ever die. For example, in Juarez, over 4,200 citizens have been slain in two years. In the same period, with 7,000 to 10,000 soldiers in town, the military has suffered three dead.

The supply and quality of drugs in the United States has not declined, nor has the price gone up. As for the migration of the poor, neither the border wall nor immigration raids of meatpacking plants and other businesses in the United States have stanched the ow. Instead, the greatest force temporarily reducing the torrent of people has been the collapse of the U.S. economy. But since the Mexican economy is sinking even faster, the migration will almost certainly resume and grow. The border should not be an issue in American life, but rather our window on the world. All our foolish beliefs are refuted here. Free trade is creating the largest human migration on earth. Our belief that drugs can be successfully outlawed has created the second-most proďŹ table industry in Mexico and a gulag of new U.S. prisons. Our effort to fortify the border has created a wall and a standing army of agents (now larger than the U.S. army was when we launched our war against Mexico in 1846), and it has failed to stop people or kilos from moving to our towns. Our refusal to even seriously consider the notion of overpopulation (we prefer lethal drones to birth control or legalized abortion) will eventually destroy large portions of the earth’s ecosystems. And we are equally reluctant to face one nagging fact about Mexico: Forty percent of its federal budget comes from oil sales, and the president of Mexico has said publicly that the oil ďŹ elds will be exhausted in nine years. What then? Someday a history of our border policies will be written. It will require a Marxist. —Groucho, not Karl

Living on the border can cripple a person’s emotional range. I grow more numb with each passing day. I ďŹ nd myself staring dazed at photographs, like a recent set from Juarez of two men burned alive. But whatever is happening to me is minor compared to what is happening to the Mexican people as their world collapses around them. One night I get a call from a friend in Juarez. He says a man just put a gun to his head and threatened to kill him. He wants me to call his wife if he turns up dead and explain what happened. I hang up and go back to reading a book. That is what the numbness feels like. There is a painting on the wall in the house. In the painting, a nude woman reclines. The artist lives in a small town near the border, a place plagued by murder and unrest. He painted it in one night, as his mother was dying of cancer. The painting haunts me. At ďŹ rst, I see nothing but brown forms. Then the naked woman. Then I see that the sky above her is ďŹ lled with faces. So is her nude body. I see, at the same instant, a naked woman and a writhing mass of demons. That is my border. The one in plain view that my government says it cannot see. Update: As this story went to press, news broke that three people, including two Americans, were shot and killed in Ciudad Juarez. Charles Bowden lives in the Southwest. His new book is Murder City: Ciudad Juarez and the Global Economy’s New Killing Fields. This article ďŹ rst appeared in the March 1 edition of High Country News.



than they could ever make in the private sector. After, say, ďŹ ve years, the average Border Patrol agent is knocking down 75 grand a year, plus generous beneďŹ ts and serious job security. DEA is infested with agents earning six ďŹ gures. And these industries are literally failure-proof—the more Mexicans who migrate, the more drugs that arrive, the more agents that are hired. The real problem is not these success stories, but the fact that the good times are going to end. Obviously, the terrain of the United States can only sustain a ďŹ nite number of people. So eventually migration—both legal and illegal—will be curtailed by draconian national ID laws. As for the drug industry, the money depends on two variables: that drugs remain illegal and that domestic suppliers, meaning the licit pharmaceutical industry, refrain from launching competing products. This second reality is already vanishing. The explosion of over-the-counter mood-altering drugs cuts into the illegal market, and bit by bit will cut into the drug trafďŹ ckers’ proďŹ ts. Without the earnings of the drug industry, the Mexican economy would collapse. But several things will persist. The environment in the United States will continue to be wrecked as more and more people ee the failure of the global economy. Violence will ourish as human numbers increase and incomes sink. And the police state in the United States will metastasize as my fellow citizens seek magical solutions to concrete problems. Already, we have created a nation that would be unimaginable to our ancestors, one where a person often cannot work unless he or she ďŹ rst urinates for a laboratory. But here is the bottom line: The world is



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BOISEweekly | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | 13


BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

The Mad Hatter prefers to run a relay on his un-birthday.

Pucker up for good luck.

SATURDAY MARCH 20 wacky hats

WEDNESDAY MARCH 17

MAD HATTER RELAY AND RABBIT HOLE RUN

green beer ST. PATRICK’S DAY BASHES Long before mini marshmallow maniacs started snatching Lucky the Leprechaun’s Lucky Charms, St. Patrick had snagged a charm of his own. According to legend, St. Patrick used the three-leafed shamrock to demonstrate the holy trinity to non-Catholics. The shamrock is now officially a registered trademark of the government of Ireland and, unofficially, an international symbol of the holy trinity of St. Patrick’s Day—Guinness, Jameson and Bailey’s. On Wednesday, March 17, revelers worldwide will don their greenest Gallic garb and indulge in the phenomenon of pounding green beers and perpetuating tacky Irish stereotypes. If you want to get a good green buzz on in Boise, here are a few pots o’ gold you should seek out this year. At Humpin’ O’Hannah’s from 3 p.m.-close, you’ll find everything from a greenest person competition to music by the Giant Leprechauns to a Spot the Pot O’ Gold scavenger hunt. Also, be sure to partake in a few $1 green beers from 3-8 p.m. Bad Irish will feature the Boise Highlanders bagpipers at 5:15 p.m., 9 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. and the Irish Tiernan dancers at 8 p.m. Patrons can partake in $2 green beers and $3 Celtic knot shots all night long. At Mulligans, there’s no live music but you can still get schlocked with $1.50 green PBR, $3 Guinness, $4.50 Irish car bombs and $6 corned beef and cabbage. Ha’Penny opens at 9 a.m. and features the McCleary Band from noon-3 p.m., a KBOI live broadcast with prizes from 4-7:30 p.m. and Armed and Hammered from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. There will also be an array of drink specials all night.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 17 rock opera MINI BROADWAY Watch out Danny Zuko and Sandy Olsson, hotshots

from Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s drama camp and Boise Rock School are about to take your big-haired, lipsynched performance to the next level. On Wednesday, March 17, the kids will seize the stage at Boise Contemporary Theater to collaborate on a handful of musical rock

14 | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | BOISEweekly

songs, including “You’re the One That I Want,” from the oft-covered 1978 moviemusical Grease. “The kids initially were like, ‘Oh, we don’t want to do Grease; that’s not rock,’” explained Boise Rock School co-founder Ryan Peck. “Then we started doing it and it’s

Get on your Shriner-style fez or your Indy Jones fedora. It’s time for the annual Mad Hatter Relay and Rabbit Hole Run—the only running event in town where a head-covering of your choosing is actually required. To ensure that you don’t take your Race to Robie Creek training too seriously, sponsor Mike Shuman of Shu’s Running Store stresses, “It’s just fun. It’s absolutely fun.” Race director Jeff Ulmer agrees, adding, “This is a one-of-a-kind event in which anything goes.” The unique race format involves teams of two people, and each teammate runs a two-mile leg twice through Julia Davis Park, for a total of four miles each. When the baton is passed after the first leg, non-running teammates can compare hats while waiting their turn to run again. Official judges will also be comparing hats, so if speed ain’t your thang, you might still win a prize for sporting a fancy lid. Feel free to enhance your turban or sombrero with the corresponding full-body attire, as costumes are encouraged, too. For the second year in a row, the Mad Hatter Relay will include a one-mile Rabbit Hole Run so that the single-digit age group can join the fun. Instead of the traditional T-shirt associated with fun runs, all participants will receive beanies to keep their domes warm for the remainder of spring. 9 a.m., $38 per team, $20 kids run, Julia Davis Park (access road by rose garden), 700 S. Capitol Blvd. Register online at bluecirclesports.com. More information at cityoftreesmarathon.com.

their favorite now.” For the per formance, Boise Rock School musicians will jam out recognizable rock numbers live on stage as ISF drama camp actors per form accompanying skits. Some other gems audiences can expect are White Snake’s “Here I Go Again” from the musical Rock of Ages and a selection from The Who’s rock opera Tommy. “We’re going to try to do these shows every couple of months and just do different

selections,” said Peck. In addition, BRS students will be linking up with the Treasure Valley Institute for Children’s Arts as the backing band for Leap Troupe. “We are trying to make sure that we have really unique, fun offerings that encompass more than just the Rock School,” said Peck. “If you want to dance, you can dance. If you want to act, you can act. All things are available.” 7 p.m., $5 donation, Boise Contemporary Theater,

854 Fulton St., 208-3319224, boiserockschool.com.

THURSDAY MARCH 18 documentary PREMIERE OF IDAHO’S FORGOTTEN WAR In September 1974, former Kootenai tribal chairwoman Amy Trice declared

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FRIDAYSATURDAY MARCH 19-20 hail mary NUNSENSE OPENING WEEKEND While it might seem like nuns ascended their kitsch pedestal around the time Whoopi Goldberg donned the black and white for Sister Act or when people started sliding their hands up the robes of boxing nun puppets, the sister craze actually started way before that. In December of 1985, Dan Goggin premiered Nunsense, a cabaret-style off Broadway

S U B M I T

COURTESY AP PHOTOS

war on the United States government. More than a centur y earlier, in 1855, the Idaho Kootenai tribe got short-changed by the Treaty of Hellgate. Though they weren’t represented at the signing, the treaty nonetheless ceded some of their territories to the United States in exchange for a few allotments. Unfortunately, there was no reser vation established for the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho. It was only after a member of Trice’s tribe froze to death in his heatless, dilapidated home in Bonners Ferr y in 1974 that she decided to end the cycle of poverty that had plagued the dwindling Kootenai population. In filmmaker Sonya Rosario’s long-anticipated documentar y of this struggle, Idaho’s Forgotten War, she examines how Trice and 67 of her Kootenai tribal members banded together to gain legitimacy for their tribe and pull themselves out of poverty. A special free premiere screening of Idaho’s Forgotten War will take place at the Boise State Student Union Building on Thursday, March 18, from 6:30-9 p.m. Rosario will be joined by Native American drummers and special guests Amy Trice, Valerie Fast Horse, Nancy Egan, Randy Teton, Velma Bahe, Julia Davis Wheeler and Cherie Buckner Webb. 7 p.m., FREE, Boise State Student Union, Simplot D, 1910 University Drive, 208-426-4636, idahosforgottenwar.com.

FIND

DROPBOX: TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE CLOUD

Daniel Ellsberg at the Los Angeles courthouse, 1973; Anthony Russo and Patricia Ellsberg at right.

SUNDAY MARCH 21 whistle blower THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN AMERICA Move over, Charles Manson. Step aside, underwear bomber. The most dangerous man in America might not be who you think. The opportunity to discover his identity arrives on Sunday, March 21, when Treasure Valley Community Television and The Flicks will join forces to bring an exclusive showing of 2010 Oscar-nominated documentary The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and The Pentagon Papers. While the title might be cumbersome, the plot is a compelling piece of history that has essentially gone the way of the dinosaur. Though not serial-killer dangerous, Daniel Ellsberg is the guy who decided that the government shouldn’t be able to get away with lying to the public. With the help of his teenage kids, Ellsberg copied and then leaked a 7,000-page secret report, which detailed the United States government’s conduct in the Vietnam War and its attempt to conceal said involvement. Following the one-night-only movie viewing, a panel of local experts, including Todd Shallat from the Center for Idaho History and Politics at Boise State and the Idaho Statesman’s Dan Popkey, will lead a discussion of the circumstances surrounding Ellsberg’s decision that ended his government career and led to a life of activism. Carole Skinner from The Flicks speaks to the timeless relevance of the film, advising, “You always have to keep an eye on your government. You can’t just blindly trust.” Certainly makes one wonder where the modern-day Iraq War whistle-blowers are. Perhaps this documentary will inspire the next most dangerous man in America. 7:30 p.m., $11, The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

play, at Cherry Lane Theater in New York City. Nunsense follows the Little Sisters of Hoboken after they return from their bingo night to discover that the cook, Sister Julia, Child of God, had accidentally poisoned 52 of the sisters with her botulismlaced vichyssoise. To raise money for the sisters’ burials, Reverend Mother Regina, Sister Mary Hubert, Sister Robert Anne, Sister Mary Leo and Sister Mary Amnesia stage a talent show in a local school gym,

complete with tap dancing, ballet and singing. Nunsense’s wild popularity spawned a number of unholy offshoots, including: Nunsense II, The Second Coming; Nunsense Jamboree; Nuncrackers; Meshuggah-Nuns; Nunsensations!; Nunsense A-Men! and Nunset Boulevard. Check out the original Nunsense, featuring a nonpoisoned vichyssoise dinner, at Knock ’Em Dead dinner theater’s new location off Parkcenter Boulevard. The

My work day doesn’t end when I go home. Dressed in sweatpants and a T-shirt, I’m often bellied up to my home PC, writing feverishly, a cup of coffee and a bag of Swedish fish within reach. But unlike a writer who can e-mail a Word document to a publisher, everything I write goes into a program designed for newspaper layout. From home, I either e-mail articles to myself or copy them onto a thumb drive. It’s a fine system—until I forget to attach a document to an e-mail, forget to hit “send” on my way out the door, or leave my drive dangling from my PC’s USB port. Dropbox seems custommade for me. dropbox.com I downloaded the program on my computers—my desktop, my laptop and my netbook—and then a login and password allows me access to any docs I “drop” into the “box” either from the downloaded application or on dropbox.com. It’s free for up to 2GB of storage and that 2GB can be anything: music, documents, video, pictures, whatever. The program syncs any changes I make to a document, which means if I edit an article at home, all of those changes are on the version of the document in the dropbox on my work computer as well. The same goes for visiting dropbox.com on the Web; I can see all of the documents in my dropbox folder, including any changes to the documents that I’ve made. Dropbox also allows for file sharing and collaborating, making telecommuting that much easier. I may never have to change out of my sweatpants. —Amy Atkins

show opens Friday, March 19, and runs every Thursday, Friday and Saturday through Saturday, April 17. Friday, March 19-Saturday, April 17; 6:40 p.m. no dinner offered Thursdays, $16.50 adult, $13.50 students, seniors and military; 6:15 p.m. for dinner Friday and Saturday, $37.50; 7:40 p.m. no dinner Friday and Saturday, $18.50; Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theater, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208-3850021, kedproductions.org.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | 15


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY MARCH 17 St. Patty’s Day Parties

BOISE CITY DEPT OF ARTS &HISTORY opportunities public art

ST. PATRICK’S DAY BAG PIPERS—The Pipes and Drums of the Boise Highlanders will be making the rounds on St. Patty’s Day. Here’s where to ďŹ nd them: noon at The Crescent, 5:15 p.m. at Bad Irish, 5:30 p.m. at Kopper Kitchen, 5:45 p.m. at The Crescent and the Tavern at Bown Crossing, 6 p.m. at Lindy’s and Quinn’s, 6:15 p.m. at Harr y’s in Meridian, 6:30 p.m. at Rudy’s, Bardenay, Busted Shovel and Jumpin’ Janet’s, 7 p.m. at Bittercreek, 127 Club and Buster’s on Broadway, 7:15 p.m. at Hyde Park Pub, 7:30 p.m. at The Refuge and Rick’s Press Room, 7:45 p.m at Bill and Lynn’s and The Ram in Boise, 8 p.m. at Murphy’s, 8:15 p.m. at Angell’s, 8:30 p.m. at Hannah’s, Ha’Penny and The Ram in Meridian, 9 p.m. at The Crescent, Lindy’s and Bad Irish, 9:15 p.m. at Crickets, 9:30 p.m. at Gil’s K-9, 9:45 p.m. at Bittercreek, 10:15 p.m. at Bad Irish, and 10:30 p.m. at Quinn’s. www.boisehighlanders. com. ST. PATTY’S DAY AT SIXTH AND MAIN—Get in to China Blue, Dir ty Little Roddy’s and Main Street Bistro with an allaccess $10 pass. 8 p.m. $10. Main Street Bistro, 609 Main St., Boise, 208-345-9515.

Boise artist Amy Westover at Derix Glass Studio

          !  Upcoming Opportunities:   ""     A Presentation By Tricia Watts of ecoartspace.org March 18, 5:30pm at Boise Watercooler, 14th & Idaho Streets

 !  "   March 26, 4-8pm, & 27, 10-3pm, FREE, Must Register. Learn how to transform your idea into a proposal.    "   Proposal Deadline April 23 - All proposals will be exhibited at the Idaho Green Expo, May 8 & 9, Six projects to be funded at $5,000 each.   A public selection panel chose Jason Keeble and John Yarnell to design the Kristin Armstrong Bikeway signs. For the Linen District Public Art Project Kate Masterson, Matt Bodett, and Reham A. Aarti were selected. Thanks to all those who applied.

for more information visit our website:

www.BoiseArtsAndHistory.org or call us at 208.433.5670 16 | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | BOISEweekly

ST. PATRICK’S DAY BASH— Rocci Johnson is throwing a huge St. Patty’s Day bash with prizes and music. The greenest person in the bar wins a $100 bar tab. Visit myspace. com/humpinhannahs. 3 p.m.-3 a.m., $5 after 9 p.m. Humpin’ Hannah’s, 621 Main St., Boise, 208-345-7557.

Lit

On Stage

BOOK SIGNING—Angeline Kearns Blain, the author of I Used to be Irish, will read from and sign copies of her new book. 7 p.m. FREE. Trip Taylor Bookseller, 210 N. 10th St., 208-344-3311.

FICTION—Faced with death, two married authors decide to share their diaries with each other. They learn that not every relationship should be an open book. Contains adult content. Viewer discretion advised. Rated R. 7:30 p.m., $12. Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-342-2000, www.stagecoachtheatre.com.

Workshops & Classes PRODUCING PRODUCE—Get a lesson on what fruits and vegetables grow well in the valley’s climate, as well as a few tips and tricks to make your garden all it can be this summer. 7 p.m. $10 member/$15 nonmember. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208343-8649, www.idahobotanicalgarden.org. WHOLE FOODS NUTRITION 101—Dr. Emily Penney’s 90-minute class offers tips on weight loss, healthy cooking and maintaining optimal energy levels. 6:30 p.m. Library at Collister, 4724 W. State St., Boise, www. boisepubliclibrary.org.

THURSDAY MARCH 18 Festivals & Events ELEGANCE ON THIRD THURSDAY—An elegant evening of dancing and romancing. Guests are encouraged to dress to the nines. With music by Beverly and Rex. Ages 21 and older. 7 p.m.-3 a.m. FREE. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-3434611, www.owyheeplaza.com.

THE ODD COUPLE—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $4. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208-9392189, ehsmeridianschools.org.

Workshops & Classes IDAHO NATIVE PLANT SOCIETY MEETING—Join botanist Ann Debolt for a look at the how-to’s of native plant landscaping. 6:30 p.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-334-2225, ďŹ shandgame.idaho.gov. RIDGE TO RIVERS—Learn about Boise’s Foothills trail system run by Ridge to Rivers with Rich Gardunia. 7 p.m. FREE. Library at Hillcrest, 5246 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-562-4996.

FRIDAY MARCH 19 On Stage NUNSENSE—A high-energy musical with ďŹ ve nuns, plenty of plot twists and a whole lot of laughs. Dinner at 6:30 p.m. Show at 8 p.m. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-385-0021, kedproductions.org. FICTION—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m., $15, Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise,

ST. PATTY’S DAY PARTY—The Lobby opens its doors at 11 a.m. with free corned beef and cabbage while supplies last. 11-3 a.m. FREE. The Lobby, 760 W. Main St., Boise, 208991-2183. ST. ROWDY DAY PARTY WITH RADILLAC—Green beer specials and 25 cents hot wings. Who says pirates can’t get down with the Irish? 8 p.m. FREE. The Plank, 650 S. Vista, Boise, 208-336-1790.

On Stage BOISE KIDS MAKE LIKE BROADWAY— Boise Rock School and Idaho Shakespeare Festival’s Drama School share the stage in a Broadway-style per formance with songs from Rock of Ages, Tommy and Grease. 7 p.m. $5 donation, boiserockschool.com. Boise Contemporar y Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232. THE ODD COUPLE—The female version of Neil Simon’s play brought to you by Eagle High School’s Fourth Wall Players. 7 p.m. $4. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Lane, Eagle, 208939-2189, ehsmeridianschools. org.

Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT 208-342-2000, www.stagecoachtheatre.com.

house, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, www.pdplayhouse.com.

THE ODD COUPLE—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $4. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Ln., Eagle, 208-9392189, ehsmeridianschools.org.

Concerts

POPEYED—Join the funny folks at Boise’s local family theater as Popeye, Olyve, Wympy and Sweetie do their best to protect their sweet and sleepy town from the likes of evil Bruno and his gang. 7:15 p.m. $7-$13, 208-336-7383. Prairie Dog Play-

A SALUTE TO SHAKESPEARE— Boise Philharmonic’s March Classical Concert features Hamlet with music from Franz Liszt, Romeo and Juliet composed by David Diamond, and Symphony No. 5 in c minor by the one, the only Ludwig van Beethoven. 8 p.m. $17-$65. Northwest Nazarene University Brandt

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Center, 623 Holly St., Nampa, 208467-8011, www.nnu.edu.

SATURDAY MARCH 20 Festivals & Events CONTRA DANCE—Live music by Robert and Judi with calling by Denise and Gary. Orientation

7:30 p.m., dance 8-11 p.m. Couples, singles and children 10 years and older welcome. Partners are not necessary. 7:30-11 p.m. $8 adults, $3 youth, Broadway Dance Center, 893 E. Boise Ave., Boise, 208-794-6843.

On Stage FICTION—See Thursday. 8:15 p.m., $15, Stage Coach Theatre, 5296 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-3422000, www.stagecoachtheatre.com.

NUNSENSE—See Friday. Dinner at 6:30 p.m. Show at 8 p.m. kedproductions.org. Knock ’Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208385-0021.

POPEYED—See Friday. 7:15 p.m. $7-$13, 208-336-7383. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, www.pdplayhouse.com.

THE ODD COUPLE—See Wednesday. 7 p.m. $4. Eagle High School, 574 N. Park Ln., Eagle, 208-939-2189, ehsmeridianschools.org.

Concerts A SALUTE TO SHAKESPEARE— See Friday. 8 p.m. $17-$65. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate.edu.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | 17


8 DAYS OUT Odds & Ends

Talks & Lectures

SWING DANCE WORKSHOP— The High Desert Swing Dance Club presents Patty Vo, who will share her knowledge of West Coast Swing, Night Club Two Step and Country Two Step. Registration at 11:30 a.m., classes at noon. More info at idahoswingdance.org or by calling 208-830-7622. Boise Valley Square and Round Dance Center, 6534 Diamond St., Boise, 208-377-5788.

BOISE CULTURE CAFE—Students are invited for an evening of conversation and collaboration about the issues and concerns facing young artists. Refreshments provided. 5:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3850111, www.thelinenbuilding.com.

SUNDAY MARCH 21

Odds & Ends

Festivals & Events SUNDAY MARKET—The main floor of the Linen Building becomes an indoor market where shoppers can find locally produced food and goods, including arts and crafts, jewelry, clothing, food and drink, live music and children’s activities. A portion of March’s sales will benefit Treasure Valley Family YMCA’s Strong Kids Campaign. There will also be live music by Greg Bridges. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-385-0111, www.thelinenbuilding.com.

SUDOKU |

PINK WOMAN ALL ALONE— Performance art by Barbara Martin-Sparrow in the historic Boise Train Depot. Wander the halls before or after the family friendly performance. 1:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Train Depot, 2603 Eastover Terrace, Boise.

SQUARE DANCE WORKSHOP— See Saturday. Boise Valley Square and Round Dance Center, 6534 Diamond St., Boise, 208-377-5788, www.idahoswingdance.org.

MONDAY MARCH 22 On Stage LADY—This Craig Wright piece is part of BCT’s annual 5x5 Reading Series. From the writer

THE MEPHAM GROUP

of The Pavilion comes this dark comedy about three friends on a hunting trip who realize they may no longer have much in common. 7 p.m. $40-$50 for the entire series, individual tickets $10-$12. Boise Contemporar y Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-4423232, www.bctheater.org.

TUESDAY MARCH 23 Talks & Lectures BOISE RIVER COMMUNITY LECTURE—Idaho Rivers United presents a lecture on climate change and flood risk, by Gregg Teasdale from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, as part of the continuing lecture series. 6 p.m. FREE, 208-343-7481, www.idahorivers.org. Garden City Library, 6015 Glenwood St., Garden City. IN THE GARDEN WITH GARNETTE EDWARDS—Join Garnette Edwards of Edwards Greenhouse in a talk for life-long learners about what’s on the horizon in the exciting world of gardening. 10:30 a.m. Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-570-6900, www.boisepubliclibrary.com.

WEDNESDAY MARCH 24 Festivals & Events CONRAD STRAYS FUNDRAISER—Fuddrucker’s will donate 20 percent of food sales from 4-8 p.m. to Conrad Strays, a nonprofit feline rescue group. Customers must ask for the donation when they place their order. 4-8 p.m. Fuddrucker’s, 3421 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-887-2194, www.fuddruckers.com.

Literature BOOK SIGNING—Brandon Mull signs the final volume of his bestselling series Fablehaven: Keys to the Demon Prison. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Deseret Industries, 10740 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-375-4681.

Calls to Artists

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers. © 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

18 | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | BOISEweekly

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

BOSCO ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS—Boise Open Studios Collective Organization is accepting new member applications from Ada, Boise and Canyon county artists for the 2010 year. Artists will have the opportunity to open their studios in June and/or October. All applicants are juried by a panel of existing members and often at least one outside juror. To be juried in time for the June Open Studios, applicants must postmark materials no later than April 1. Applicants only interested in the October Open Studios weekend may postmark materials as late as June 1. Visit www.boiseopenstudios.com for information.

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS/NOISE NOISE

GETTING CLOSE TO SHAMAYA OTEP’s frontwoman is a fan of her fans JEREMY HENDERSON A few months ago, Otep Shamaya woke up, logged into her Facebook account and sent a message to a fan’s sister—a stranger—wishing her a happy birthday. Otep Shamaya: “Shhh ... don’t tell anybody, but the secret to being a successful musician “They couldn’t believe it, and I’m just is showing your fans as much love as they show you.” honored that they feel like it’s a big deal,” says Shamaya, singer of the Los AngelesThe results have been downright demobased metal band that bears her name: OTEP. nated metal scene for the sake of self-respect. Shamaya will probably never be seen spilling cratic. “I try to use everything that I have to “We did that for three or four nights,” across the cover of Revolver Magazine’s show my appreciation to the people, to take she says. “Over 300 people were watching us “Hottest Chicks of Metal” issue. a little bit of time out of my day to answer perform.” “I don’t want to be judged by my gender,” an e-mail or reply to somebody on Facebook Since 2008, fans have collectively watched she says. “I don’t want people to like our band ... I was brought up to value your self-worth thousands of hours of live and archived because I’m a girl. I want them to like our by how hard you work, no matter if you’re footage of Shamaya chugging energy drinks, music for what it is and what it stands for.” the president or you clean streets. Now that reciting lines from Alice in Wonderland and Shamaya says she’s not out to win male I write songs for a living, I apply the same ranting against America’s preference for fans, she’s not out to win female fans, she’s philosophy to that.” out for their lives. She wants to change them. celebrity over substance. And like the winning presidential candiBut the experience, she says, transcends “When I first started the band, I wanted date she supported with a performance at the mere voyeurism; during practice she gets up to really learn the community of people that 2008 Democratic National Convention (with in the camera and tells viewers “to raise their constant blogging and with her raucously anti- were following us, who they were,” says hands, to stand up and jump around with us.” Shamaya, who formed OTEP in 2000. “I Republican repertoire), the overtly but poetiThe replies flash across the screen: spent a lot of time on message boards and focally political singer has worked hard, both “I just woke up my mom!” through her lyrics and rising celebrity, to make rums. That was really the only way to jump “My girlfriend is screaming at me to in and be a part of that then.” “power to the people” into an art form. shut up.” These days OTEP is taking its head-bang“Hopefully, what we’re seeing now [postShamaya loves it. ing populism to places barely conceivable a Bush] is people informed and involved and “Social-networking sites have just exploddecade ago. The band regularly broadcasts taking advantage of what’s available to us, ed and made [artist-fan interaction] so much live video of its rehearsals via ustream.com, information-wise. And hopefully, we’ll stay easier,” she says. “It has brought us closer.” a social networking involved and we’ll Matt, a 24-year-old fan from Tucson, site that is quickly own it,” says Shamaya Ariz., who visits the band’s online chatroom doing for Web cams who, somewhat ironiTuesday, March 23, with Bury Your Dead, Through The Eyes Of The Dead and what YouTube did for “at least once a day,” has seen OTEP four cally, is named for an Destrophy, doors at 7 p.m., show at 8 p.m., times in concert but never had the opportucamcorders. ancient Egyptian phi$15-$35. nity or courage to talk to her—at least in per“We started doing losopher who supposKNITTING FACTORY son. However, during the recording of Smash the Web cam broadedly extolled the virtue 416 S. Ninth St., The Control Machine, he talked to her about cast when we started of avoiding conflicts. 208-367-1212 the new album in ustream’s chat room. recording the record, “There was so much bo.knittingfactory.com “I don’t remember [what I asked her] but broadcasting in the that happened in this it was awesome seeing her on a Web cam and studio all day long,” country that people talking to her,” he says. “OTEP has changed Shamaya says. “People were waiting in the just allowed to happen: Guantanamo, the chat rooms before we even started and they’d my view of chick metal singers—she is so Patriot Act, our civil liberties diminished.” poetic and artistic.” stick around all day, just watching.” In fact, her feelings toward the previous On the last night of recording Smash the At first, to keep the songs from their administration are so strong, she says she Control Machine, Shamaya logged into the would gladly surrender the success, fame and appropriately titled new album, Smash the band’s Ustream account. Control Machine (their first on renowned personal satisfaction of the 2004 anti-war “We have a lot of work to do, it’s the last hardcore label Victory Records) under wraps, hit “Warhead,” if it would undo the “failed night, but it’s been an amazing experience and they muted the audio. tyranny” she hoped the song might prevent. I want to thank you guys for sharing it with That didn’t last long. “I’d exchange writing ‘Warhead,’ for Bush us,” she said. “You guys could help us spread “When we started to get ready to go on never being in office any day of the week and tour, we said, why don’t we give people a pri- the word … so hit up your Facebook, hit up twice on Sundays.” your MySpace, your Twitter and let the world vate show,” Shamaya says. “Not everybody She’s also happy to trade the easy atis going to be able to see us play, or we might know ... I’ll see you guys soon.” tention her gorgeous face and her svelte, not be playing in their area.” tattooed body could claim in the male-domiWWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

One Eskimo: Up close and personal.

SMOKE ’EM IF YOU GOT ’EM, BUT GO OUTSIDE; FOUR BRITS= ONE ESKIMO; CAZBOPA Terrapin Station is one of the most laidback music venues in town. The live music ranges from crunchy jams to Americana to indie to electronica to ear-splitting metal. Everybody there seems to be in a perpetual good mood, so it’s a comfortable place to hang out. And it just got more comfy ... last week, Terrapin became a non-smoking joint. The hazy cloud that hung over musicians, servers and fans will slowly fade away, leaving a clear view of the well-stocked beer cooler and the cozy couches. Patrons can now take in some tunes and know that they won’t wake up the next morning with a smoking hangover. Terrapin has some other good reasons to visit coming up: locals 3Machine, Oilslave and Zen Zero on Saturday, March 20; Slain in Silence, End of all Flesh and Nibiru on Thursday, March 25, and Le Fleur, Malachi and Harvey Krishna on Friday, March 26. Check boiseweekly. com for times and prices. Speaking of good times, on March 12, radio personality Tim Johnstone hosted a handful of fans and British quartet One Eskimo for an in-studio performance (actually, they hold these performances in a conference room). The 94.9 FM The River “studio” stop was the band’s only one in Boise and came about because River listeners had been telling Johnstone how much they loved the band. Johnstone did a little research, found out One Eskimo would be passing through Boise, made a few phone calls, pulled a few strings and got the band to stop for an hour and play a few tracks off of their self-titled debut release. Keep an ear on 94.9 for the opportunity to attend the invitation-only in-studio concerts. Some serious shifting is about to go down on Eighth Street. Opa/Cazba/Opium owner Max Mohammadi recently announced that he will be consolidating all three by moving Opa Lounge into the adjacent Cazba/Opium space. Because no move is complete without a debaucherous goodbye party, Opa invites local electronic heartthrob James Orr to serenade patrons as they say goodbye to their old haunt on Saturday, March 20. Then on Sunday, March 21—which is appropriately the start of the Persian New Year—Opa’s bar will be torn down and reassembled next door. Opa! —Amy Atkins and Tara Morgan

BOISEweekly | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | 19


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY MARCH 17 BATTLE OF THE BANDS—9

FRIDAY MARCH 19 BEN BURDICK—7:30 p.m., solo

p.m., $2, Terrapin Station BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY WEBER—7 p.m., FREE, Lock, Stock & Barrel BENEFEST—6:30 p.m., with Stoney Holiday, Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats, Dude Bro Man and Actual Deception. Donation admission. Knitting Factory

TWIZTID, MARCH 24, KNITTING FACTORY Hip-hop is the most protean of music genres, allowing for anything and everything to be part of its sound—even raps about fans. Take the hip-hop horrorcore of Twiztid. The geisha-white-faced Detroit duo of Jamie Madrox and Monoxide followed in the giant footsteps of mentors Insane Clown Posse. ICP followers—called Juggalos—are Twiztid’s fan base as well, and their songs often include call-outs to their fans. In an interview with RaveTV.com, Monoxide described their 2009 release W.I.C.K.E.D. as “the epitome of an album for a fan base... dedicated to the people who buy our records.” Twiztid is not for the faint of heart, it is not safe for work and should come with a parental advisory. But for the people who love Twiztid, that love is reciprocal: “It’s about Juggalos and runnin’ with lunatics / As long as y’all rock this we won’t quit / We do it all for y’all, I mean that shit.” —Amy Atkins Wednesday, March 24, 7 p.m. with Potluck, Kung Fu Vampire, Knothead. $17-$26. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

jazz guitar. FREE, Twig’s Cellar

OPA/CAZBA FINALE PARTY—10 p.m., Music from James Orr. Opa/Cazba

BLIND ARROW SET SAIL—9 p.m., $1, Liquid

STEVE EATON—8 p.m., FREE, The Gamekeeper Lounge

PILOT ERROR—9:30 p.m., $5, Reef

CARTER FREEMAN—10 p.m., FREE, Bittercreek Ale House

WILL BELL—6:30 p.m., FREE, Seasons Bistro

REBECCA SCOTT BAND—9 p.m. FREE, O’Michael’s

CODY ROBBINS, SAVE THE ARCADE, NATE POLLARD—8 p.m., $3, Flying M Coffeegarage DANNY SHAFFER—8 p.m., FREE, Sockeye Grill and Brewery

CELTIC RESIN—6 p.m., FREE, Piper Pub & Grill

THE FAV, APPLE CHARM, SLOTH FALCON—9 p.m., $3, Terrapin Station

SPINDLEBOMB—9 p.m., FREE, Liquid

THURSDAY MARCH 18 BRENT JOEL OF LUCID AISLE—9 p.m., FREE, Terrapin NASHVILLE UNPLUGGED—6 p.m., Shorty’s Saloon NASHVILLE UNPLUGGED AFTERPARTY—9 p.m., FREE, The Bouquet THREE BAND THROWDOWN—9 p.m., The Black Locusts, Krystos and Thor. $1 to vote, Liquid

MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m., $3, The Whiskey River

SOUL HONEY—9 p.m., FREE, Bad Irish

BOISE BLUES BROTHERS—8:30 p.m., $5, Reef

SOUL PURPOSE—10 p.m., $5, Tom Grainey’s

SLAIN IN SILENCE WITH ABOVE THE DEAD, BLACK LOCUST, LGE—7 p.m., $8, The Venue

THE FIRST LADIES, SPONDEE, LE FLEUR—9 p.m., $4, The Bouquet

SATURDAY MARCH 20 3MACHINE, OILSLAVE, ZEN ZERO—9 p.m., $4, Terrapin Station ACTUAL DEPICTION—9 p.m., FREE, Bad Irish

JOHNNY SHOES—8 p.m., FREE, Willi B’s

THE BLACK HOUNDS, THE NIGHT BIRDS, BLANK—9 p.m., $1, Liquid

MOTTO KITTY—9 p.m., $3, The Whiskey River

DAN COSTELLO—11 a.m., Red Feather Lounge

PILOT ERROR—9:30 p.m., $5, Reef

JIMMY BIVENS—8:45 p.m., FREE, Pengilly’s

PRIMAL SCREAM—7:30 p.m., Paying tribute to Motley Crue. $10, Knitting Factory

KRISPEN HARTUNG, AARON DAVIS, BRIAN MCFADIN—8 p.m., Experimental jazz improv. FREE, Flying M Coffeegarage

REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL, DEBBIE SAGER—8:45 p.m., FREE, Pengilly’s

THE LYRES—8 p.m., FREE, Willi B’s

SHON SANDERS—8:30 p.m., FREE, Piper Pub

MICROPHONE CHECK TOUR—8 p.m., With Mack 10, Lala, Fingazz, Mr. Knightowl, Snapper, Nino Brown and Slow Pain. $25$50, Knitting Factory

SHOWCASE SHOWDOWN—4 p.m., Silverstein, Versailles, The Maldroids, Silence the Reign, Bless the Martyr, The Dude Abides, The Nameless, For My Own, No Need for Scarlet, Obscure Beauty and saveyoursorrows. $6, The Venue SOUL HONEY—8:30 p.m., FREE, Piper Pub ST. ELIAS, ALAN ALDA—9 p.m., $5, The Bouquet STEVE EATON—8 p.m., FREE, The Gamekeeper Lounge YER MAMA—8:30 p.m., FREE, Ha’ Penny Irish Pub and Grill

SUNDAY MARCH 21 MOONDANCE—5 p.m., FREE, Tablerock Brewpub and Grill MY LIFE IN BLACK AND WHITE, JAR, THE MEATBALLS—9 p.m., $3, The Red Room Tavern

LISTEN LOCALLY. THINK GLOBALLY. 20 | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | BOISEweekly

WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


GUIDE/LISTEN HERE S AR AH S ITK IN

GUIDE MONDAY MARCH 22 THE ASYLUM, WAKE UP

MEL WADE—6 p.m., FREE, Dry Creek Merchantile

DEAD—9 p.m., $5, The Bouquet

TWIZTID—7 p.m., See Listen Here, Page 20. With Blaze, Kung Fu Vampire and Knothead. $17 door/$19 advance, Knitting Factory

TUESDAY MARCH 23 BEN BURKICK AND AMY WEBER—7:30 p.m., FREE, Reef JIMMY BIVENS—8 p.m., FREE, Sockeye Grill and Brewery

MOONDANCE—6:30 p.m., FREE, Sa-Wad-Dee

WEEKLY GIGS BEN BURDICK, BILL LILES— Sundays, noon. FREE. Grape Escape

GET DIRTY THURSDAYS—9 p.m., Sax infused whiskey rock FREE, The Bouquet HIGH DESERT BAND— Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater Pizza JAZZ NIGHTS—Mondays-Saturdays: 6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill. Thursdays: 7 p.m. FREE. Rembrandt’s. Tuesdays-Saturdays: Kevin Kirk, 7 p.m. Chandlers and Sundays: The Sidemen, 7 p.m., FREE, Chandlers JEANNIE MARIE—Fridays, 7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

LARRY CONKLIN—Tuesdays, 11 a.m. FREE. Moon’s Kitchen OPEN MIC NIGHTS—Sundays: 7 p.m., The Bouquet. Mondays: 7 p.m., Library Coffeehouse; 9 p.m., Terrapin Station; 8:45 p.m. Pengilly’s. Mondays and Tuesdays: 9 p.m., Tom Grainey’s. Wednesdays: 7 p.m., Donnie Mac’s. Thursdays: 7 p.m., O’Michael’s. PAUL PETERSON BLUES CLUB—Wednesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. The Bouquet PUNK MONDAY—Mondays, 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

JOHNNY SHOES—7 p.m., FREE, O’Michael’s Pub & Grill

BILLY BRAUN—Mondays, 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JEREMIAH JAMES AND NED EVETT—Tuesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

OTEP—7 p.m., See Noise, Page 19. With Bury Your Dead, Through the Eyes of the Dead and Destrophy. $15, Knitting Factory

BILLY ZERA, AWA AND SONY DISC—Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Mai Thai-Eagle.

JEREMIAH JAMES GANG— Wednesdays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND— Wednesdays and Fridays. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—Mondays, 8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

JIM FISHWILD—Wednesdays, 6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

THE SALOONATICS—Thursdays and Saturdays. 9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club

WEDNESDAY MARCH 24 BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY WEBER—7 p.m., FREE, Lock, Stock & Barrel CAPTAIN AHAB—8 p.m., See Listen Here, this page. With Tik///Tik, For Fuck’s Sake, Tenohone. $5, VAC CROWN POINT—8:30 p.m., FREE, Reef JOEY FARR—9 p.m., FREE, Terrapin Station

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THE BUCKSHOT BAND—Saturdays, 9 p.m. FREE for anyone in a cowboy hat. Shorty’s DAVID MARR—Fridays, 7 p.m. FREE. The Cole/Marr Gallery FABULOUS FLOYD STANTON— Wednesdays, 6 p.m. FREE. Cafe Ole-downtown

JIM LEWIS—Sundays, 11 a.m. FREE. Focaccia’s. JOHN CAZAN—Fridays, 5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel JOHNNY SHOES—Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Lock Stock & Barrel JUSTIN GAUSE—Saturdays, 7 p.m. Rembrandt’s

REBECCA SCOTT—Wednesdays, 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

SMOOTH—Tuesdays, 7 p.m. FREE. Liquid SOUL SERENE—Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’Penny THOMAS PAUL—Sundays, 10 a.m. and Mondays, 7 p.m. FREE. Red Feather

FRIM FRAM 4—Thursdays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s FUEGOGO!—Tuesdays, 9:30 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

CAPTAIN AHAB, MARCH 24, VAC Los Angeles-based electropop duo Captain Ahab once created a song for a movie so bad that it was good. In 2006, social networking site TagWorld joined New Line Cinema and announced a song contest for Snakes On A Plane. Captain Ahab (Jonathan Snipes and Jim Merson) won for “Snakes on the Brain,” which was included in the film’s soundtrack. The duo is still as clever as ever, expressing a sense of humor (visit grlsngwld.ytmnd.com) as well as a darker artistic side (watch the video for “U Want Me” on YouTube). Captain Ahab’s new release, The End of Irony (Deathbomb Arc), is due out next month, and the track “Acting Hard” is available for download. It’s a weird amalgamation of sparse beats, rap, Gregorian-like chants, fuzzy screams and church bells that grow from a repeated mantra to a Nine Inch Nails-style cataclysm. It’s cool like Samuel L. Jackson. —Amy Atkins Wednesday, March 24, with Tik///Tik, For Fuck’s Sake and Tenohone, 8 p.m., $5. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., visualartscollective.com.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | 21


SCREEN

THE ART OF MANIPULATION Art & Copy unveils the directors of ad culture JEREMIAH ROBERT WIERENGA Braniff Airline’s rainbow-colored fleet in the ’60s, came to advertising from the theater. “People flew with us because they were having a theatrical experience,” Wells says in the film. “People loved fun ideas.” Starting with a dynamic shift in the ’60s, which changed how ads were produced—the art department and the ad copy staff working collaboratively rather than in sequence—Pray traces many of the acmes of advertising history. Several of the top ad men, apart from selling specific brands of shoes or make-up, were involved with political campaigns, rebranding entire foodstuffs—the “Got Milk?” movement endorsed all milk companies—and selling an idea of what America should be. Nike’s “Just Do It” motto, which told nothing about the company’s product, has become one of the slogans of an empowered generation. Despite the stigma attached to our advertising-inundated era—Art & Copy asserts that the average American child views 20,000 commercials a year—the film makes a compelling case for viewing ad creators as artists. Like their starving compatriots, a salesman views society either critically or concordantly; his product either celebrates the culture or seeks to change it. As with any revolutionary artist, this can occur with either flamboyance or subtlety. And the egos in this film certainly can Ad-man George Lois being interviewed for Art & Copy in his New York home. rival those of an artiste. “It is an art form,” said Pray. “It’s just different because it’s supposed to make you do something.” the Wizard of Oz and have coffee with him.” really well done, it’s completely transformaArt & Copy mostly omits mention of Art & Copy, Pray’s documentary unveiling tive, it’s powerful and exciting. That’s really advertising’s failures—offensive campaigns the men and women behind the advertising good communication, human communicaor propaganda—but the successes, carecurtain, uncovers a fascinating bunch—enortion at the very top level.” fully examined and given more study than a mously creative thinkers pressured by profit Pray is best known for exploring social channel surfer’s attention concerns, and each with a subcultures. His debut feature Hype! (1996) span allows, are incisive, Thursday, March 18, 7 p.m. different idea of what adwas a peek into the explosion of the Seattle Tickets at egyptiantheatre.net. brilliant and thrilling to vertising should be. Take grunge scene, which he followed with 2001’s Sponsored by Boise Weekly and review. Any creative type, George Lois, the idea Scratch, a study of turntablism and the DJ hosted by Drake Cooper, the event is whether loathing or lovman behind such winning lifestyle. So why the switch from subversive a benefit for Treasure Valley Institute ing the consumer culture campaigns as “I Want My for Children’s Arts. filmmaking to the most commercial topic posthat has given rise to MTV” and Robert Kensible: a documentary about top ad execs and EGYPTIAN THEATRE the importance of smart nedy’s successful run for a their most profitable campaigns? 700 W. Main St. 208-345-0454 advertising, should see senate seat. “I compare it to a film I made about grafthis film. It’s a fascinating, “Advertising is like fiti,” said Pray, referring to his film Infamy sometimes aggravating look into the headpoison gas,” Lois says in the film. “It should (2005). “Most people just hate graffiti in spaces of these priests of products, the men tear you up, should choke you and maybe you almost the same way that most people say and women who herald and, in some ways, should pass out when you watch it.” they hate advertising. You can hate advertisshepherd our culture’s direction. Mary Wells, who soared after designing ing, but you should at least know these guys ... “I hate most advertising, just like anyone else. I find it just appalling what passes for culture,” documentarian Doug Pray told BW. “But when it’s really good, when it’s

For those guys to have successfully operated in that world, the only way they got there was by being rebels. In their own mind, they are revolutionaries. It’s like the opportunity to meet

C HR IS GLANCY

SCREEN/LISTINGS special screenings IDAHO’S FORGOTTEN WAR—The world premiere film screening of Sonya Rosario’s documentary film about the Kootenai Tribe of Idaho and Amy Trice, who on

22 | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | BOISEweekly

September 20, 1974, declared the last official American Indian war on the U.S. Government, and was the only woman to do so in the country’s history. See Picks, Page 14 for more information, including speakers and events to

follow. Thursday, March 18, 7 p.m. FREE. Boise State Student Union Building, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-INFO, union. boisestate.edu. THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN AMERICA: DANIEL

ELLSBERG AND THE PENTAGON PAPERS— Treasure Valley Community Television and The Flicks join forces to bring an exclusive showing of this 2010 Oscar-nominated documentary. Daniel Ellsberg is the guy who decided that the

government shouldn’t be able to get away with lying to the public. With the help of his teenage kids, Ellsberg copied and then leaked a 7,000-page secret report, which detailed the United States government’s conduct in the Vietnam War and its

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SCREEN/LISTINGS attempt to conceal said involvement. Following the film, local experts, including Todd Shallat from the Center for Idaho History and Politics at Boise State and the Idaho Statesman’s Dan Popkey, will lead a discussion of the circumstances surrounding Ellsberg’s decision that ended his government career and led to a life of activism. Sunday, March 21, 7:30 p.m., $11, The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., 208-342-4222, theflicksboise.com.

opening 2009 OSCAR NOMINATED SHORTS: ANIMATED AND LIVE—Check out this year’s Oscar-winning short films, Logorama by Nicolas Schmerkin (animated) and The New Tenants by Joachim Back and Tivi Magnusson (live). The five live action shorts are lumped together, running 94 minutes. The five animated shorts run together at 88 minutes. (NR) Flicks THE BOUNTY HUNTER—Not many criminals look like Jennifer Aniston. In this comedy by Hitch director Andy Tennant, Aniston stars as Nicole, a bail jumping ex-wife of rugged bounty hunter Milo Boyd (Gerard Butler). Car chases, handcuffs and taser guns pepper Nicole’s attempt to escape Milo’s clutches. A dash of sexual innuendo and police conspiracy makes this film a unique romantic romp. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID— Middle school is hell. Such is the experience of Greg (Zachary Gordon) and his band of nerdish pals as they trudge their way through seventh grade. Based on the book by Jeff Kinney, Greg tells his story through his journal and drawings. Battling his older brother, the cool kids, his embarrassing mother and the horror of gym class are only a few of the obstacles Greg must face. Rachael Harris and Steve Zahn also star. (PG) Edwards 9 REPO MEN—In the future, your heart can become repossessed. Jude Law stars as Lemy, a repo man for the artificial organ producing company, the Union. When an accident causes Lemy to receive a new heart, he struggles to make payments on his artificial ticker. Union executive Frank (Liev Schreiber) sends Lemy’s best friend and partner Jake (Forest Whitaker) to do the dirty deed of repossession. Lemy and his wife (Carice Van Houten) go on the run, fighting the Union and fighting for the right to survive. (R) Edwards 9 SOUNDTRACK FOR A REVOLUTION—In the 1960s, the American civil rights movement changed the course of history. However, it was the music that inspired the call for equality. Film clips and interviews mesh with music by Richie Havens, Harry Belafonte, John Legend, The Blind Boys of Alabama, The Roots and others. Directed by two-time Oscar winner Bill Guttentag and Dan Sturman, this documentary won awards at both the Vancouver and Chicago Film Festivals. (NR) Flicks VISIT BOISEWEEKLY.COM FOR FULL LISTINGS AND THE MOST UP-TO-DATE MOVIE TIME INFORMATION.

24 | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | BOISEweekly

SCREEN/MOVIE TIMES WEDNESDAY, MARCH 17- TUESDAY, MARCH 23 ALICE IN WONDERLAND—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 4:05, 9:50; F-Tu: 1, 1:45, 4:05, 4:35, 7, 7:30, 10:25 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12, 1, 2:40, 3:45, 5:15, 6:30, 8, 9:10, 10:30

ALICE IN WONDERLAND, IMAX 3D— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:40 ALICE IN WONDERLAND, DIGITAL 3D— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:35, 7:25, 10 ANIMATED OSCAR SHORTS— AVATAR—

Flicks: F-Sa: 1, 9; Su: 1; M-Tu: 9 Edwards 9: W-Th only: 12:55, 4:20, 7:50

AVATAR, DIGITAL 3D— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:15 a.m., 3:05, 6:35, 10:05 THE BLIND SIDE—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:50, 3:55, 6:40, 9:25

THE BOOK OF ELI— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:40 a.m., 2:20, 4:55, 7:35, 10:25 BOUNTY HUNTER—

Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1:20, 4:25, 7:25, 10:05

BROOKLYN’S FINEST—

COP OUT—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:15, 4:10, 7:05, 10:15; F-Tu: 9:45 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:25, 3:35, 6:55, 9:50 Edwards 9: W-Th only: 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8:05, 10:35

THE CRAZIES—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:35, 4:25, 7:20, 9:55

CRAZY HEART— Flicks: W-Th: 5, 7:20, 9:35; F-Su: 12:30, 2:45, 5, 7:20, 9:35; M: 5, 7:20, 9:35; Tu: 5:05, 7:25, 9:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:25 a.m., 1:55, 4:45, 7:10, 9:50 DEAR JOHN—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:20 a.m., 2:05, 5, 7:40, 10:15

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID—

Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1:30, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55

THE GHOST WRITER— Flicks: W-Th: 4:40, 7:15, 9:40; F-Su: 1:40, 4:30, 7:05, 9:25; M-Tu: 4:30, 7:05, 9:25 GREEN ZONE—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:25, 4:30, 7:25, 10; F-Tu: 1:10, 4:50, 7:45, 10:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 1:45, 2:35, 4:30, 5:10, 7:15, 7:45, 10, 10:20

THE LAST STATION—

Flicks: W-Th: 4:20, 7, 9:20; F-Su: 12:25, 2:40, 5:05, 7:25, 9:30; M-Tu: 4:20, 9:30

LIVE OSCAR SHORTS—

Flicks: F-Tu: 5

THE MOST DANGEROUS MAN IN AMERICA— OUR FAMILY WEDDING—

Flicks: Su: 7:30

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:40, 3:20, 5:35, 7:50, 10:10

PERCY JACKSON & THE OLYMPIANS: THE LIGHTNING THIEF— Edwards 9: W-Th only: 1:45, 4:50 7:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:45, 3:40, 6:20, 9:05 REMEMBER ME—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4:25, 7:20, 10:10; F-Tu: 1:25, 4:30, 7:40, 10:15 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10

REPO MAN— SHERLOCK HOLMES—

Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1:40, 4:15, 7:05, 9:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:05, 3:50, 6:50, 9:40

SHE’S OUT OF MY LEAGUE— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:35, 4:45, 7:45, 10:20; F-Tu: 1:50, 4:55, 7:50, 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:10 a.m., 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:30 SHUTTER ISLAND—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:05, 4, 7, 9:55; F-Tu: 1:05, 4:10, 7:10, 10:10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:10, 3:15, 6:15, 9:15

SOUNDTRACK FOR A REVOLUTION— VALENTINE’S DAY— THE WHITE RIBBON—

Flicks: F-Sa: 3, 7; Su: 3, 9:30; M-Tu: 7

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:10, 4, 6:45, 9:35 Flicks: W-Th only: 4:30, 7:30

THE WOLFMAN— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:40, 7:10, 9:45

T H E A T E R S Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Towne Square Reel, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208-377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


REVIEWS/FOOD On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

BOMBAY GRILL

LAU RIE PEARMAN

Though 10th Street Station regularly lures me in with its romantically Dining at Bombay Grill in the Idanha is much like I imagine lunching at seedy vibe—old concert tickets and dusty sports photos curling at the a New York tea room to be like. Frosted glass sconces with blue, yellow edges from the ever-present cloud of smoke—that same decaying charm and reddish-pink bulbs offer low lighting. Heavy burgundy vinyl table has never made me long for Indian food. Boy, have I been missing out. coverings, carnation pink linen napkins and framed intricate traditionalLurching open the Idanha’s heavy doors on a recent weekday evelooking needlepoint pieces all work to complete the old-world feeling of ning, I made a sharp left into the eerily empty Bombay Grill. Though the open, high-ceilinged dining area. the open, three-tiered space has a dated feel—worn teal carpets, light Bombay Grill’s inexpensive, well-stocked lunch buffet ($8.95, availpink walls and smudgy brass railings—it manages to ooze a comfortable seven days a week) is de rigeur for first-timers and destination able charm. Offered a table by the fireplace, which wasn’t on, my date dining for those in the know. Buffet items change slightly from day and I caught our reflections in the adjacent wall-sized mirror. to day, but the owners’ son, who serves at Bombay, said the biggest Our server approached with a sly smile and guided us through the change is on the weekends. “We have mainly vegetarian dishes then; menu’s various items, it’s more Indian,” he interjecting a few said, smiling. wisecracks along On a weekday, the way: “The saag I filled a plate with paneer is like your basmati rice, a rich, mom, it takes over savory saag paneer everything around it.” (homemade cheese Breaking off shards of and spinach), orange freshly fried papadum alu matar (curand dunking them ried potatoes and in ramekins of sweet peas), a sweetish tamarind and mint yellow navrathan sauce, we decided to korma (veggies, share the tandoori almonds and raisins shrimp ($16.95) and in cream), chana a vegetarian sampler masala (chickpeas in platter ($15.95). The an herb-filled brown tandoori, our server sauce) and a host of cautioned, would take other saucy, aromatic a while because the dishes, including a shrimp needed time to huge shallow round properly marinate. chafing dish of mango What sizzled out chicken. The dishes of the kitchen 20 or were cool both in so minutes later was temperature and in a fragrant pile of Indian fajitas. A heap of caramelized spice. The food would have been better served if the chafBOMBAY GRILL onion slivers concealed a family of beastly pink shrimp ing dish temps had been turned up, but my timid tongue 928 W. Main St. dusted with an array of spices I couldn’t come close to hardly (and thankfully) tingled—except at the surprising208-345-7888 bombaygrillboise.net identifying. The vegetarian thali came with a holy-shitly spicy saag—as I mopped up sauces with buttered but Open seven days spicy bowl of saag paneer (creamed spinach and cheese slightly charred naan. I finished off with sweet, squishy 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; 5-10 p.m. cubes), a shruggable side of chana masala (spiced whole gulabjaman (fried pastry of dry milk and honey in syrup) chickpeas), a helping of super-rich dal makhani (creamy and a small cup of chai tea. brown lentils), a bowl of bright yellow navrathan korma On a Sunday night, I was dipping crispy pieces of (mixed veggie curry), a cucumber yogurt raita, crunchy/chewy naan papadum in a spicy mint chutney and tamarind sauce and sipping from and a side of white rice. Though the individual servings in the sampler a cup of hot chai tea when my non-vegetarian thali ($19.95), which I platter seemed small at first glance, we ended up carting home far more ordered mild, arrived. A large round metal tray was filled with smaller than we could eat. metal ramekins of chicken tikka masala (tandoor-broiled chicken in When I returned to Bombay Grill to check out the lunch buffet later a tomato, onion and cream sauce), chicken curry, chana masala, raita in the week, the vibe had completely changed. A warm natural light (cool, tangy yogurt and cucumber sauce), onion and tomato salad, and filtered through the street-facing windows as a number of office-types a side of basmati rice. Though it was listed on the menu, the thali was loaded their plates with heaping scoops of starched-shirt staining curminus saag paneer, but plus a spicy tender lamb dish not listed as well as ries. With Indian pop music softly streaming from the speakers, I dove a leg of tandoori chicken, which sat in the center of the tray. As a rule, into a mound of all-you-care-to-eat radness ($8.95). A couple of old I do not like meat on-the-bone, especially chicken—especially chicken friends from the sampler platter turned up—saag paneer, navrathan legs. But I was intrigued by a crust of spices and the enticing smell and korma, dal makhani—alongside an array of newness like the alu tikki tentatively tasted the bird. Unbelievable. The tandoor cooking sealed (crispy, oniony fried potato chunks) and the bayngan bhartha (tandoor- in the meat’s juices and the exotic spices infused it with a smell as tanroasted eggplant with a pronounced tomato tang). talizing as its taste. After a bite or two of each dish, I was full and the Sipping on a cup of complimentary chai tea, I finished off my meal chicken leg was the only thing that didn’t make it into my to-go box. with a few bites of a fried, donut-hole-like desert, swirled in a pool of Due to the consistency of both quality and solicitous service, I’ve milky rice pudding. Though the weekday lunch buffet at Bombay Grill added Bombay Grill to my list of favorite and affordable restaurants is a far better deal than dinner—more variety, cheaper prices—it suffers and Indian to my list of favorite ethnic foods. A friend who is an Indian from one unfortunate pitfall. You can’t trudge down the joint’s wellfood aficionado confirmed its ranking. “Bombay Grill’s food is good worn back stairs for a nightcap at 10th Street Station. and cheap, like Indian food should be.” —Tara Morgan gets all dal-ed up for a night on the town. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

—Amy Atkins’ paneer started to saag when she turned 40.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | 25


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REAL ESTATE BW SHARED HOUSING ALL AREAS - ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com

Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

GDDBB6I:L6CI:9 In SE Boise home. No pets. Wireless internet incl. Move in April 5. Call Patrick at 340-8350.

BW FOR RENT 2BD, 2BA. State St. & Kessinger. $575/mo. Pets welcome. 3716762.

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One of the coolest 936 E. WINDING CREEK, EAGLE things about this home $239,000 is that a five-minute walk 3 Bed/2.5 Bath can lead to muffuletta at 2,037 Square Feet Season’s Bistro or to the Market Pro Real Estate Services Jodi Archer, 208-870-9575 post office in downtown IntermountainMLS.com Eagle. Stroll another five MLS #98429628 minutes and you can snack on fudge-frosted brownies at Blue Moose Cafe or pick up groceries at Albertsons. This two-story residence is located in the Winding Creek subdivision, where there are community vegetable beds and large, grassy common areas. The $67 monthly homeowners’ association dues cover irrigation and maintenance of the tidy landscaping along the small neighborhood’s curved main street. The 5-year-old dwelling’s covered porch faces a big common lawn and neo-traditional homes clustered on the opposite side of it. The large, east-facing porch provides a sunny spot for sipping morning coffee and a shady place for after-work refreshments. From the foyer, French doors open to a front office with floorto-ceiling bookcases and lots of closet storage. At the rear of the home, you’ll find the living room and kitchen, which is outfitted with slab granite counters, stainless steel appliances and nutmeg-tinted maple cabinets. The kitchen flows forward into a casual dining space that connects to the foyer. Upstairs are two bedrooms, a full bathroom and the master suite.

ALL AREAS - HOUSES FOR RENT. Browse thousands of rental listings with photos and maps. Advertise your rental home for FREE! Visit: http://www.RealRentals.com For Rent. 4BD, 2BA family home in Meridian. Call Robert 884-4292.

BW FOR SALE 8DBB:G8>6AA6C9 605 Star Rd. Bank Owned Commercial Property. Also known by 11230 Hercules. Zoned C-1. This .40 acre lot is in a nice area with Commercial and Residential buildings all around. West side of lot is bordered by a nice partially landscaped pond with ducks and swans. Quick access to both HWY 20 and the freeway. No solicitors. $49,900 Call Katie Rosenberg/ AV West Real Estate, www.BoiseHomeExpert.com ;G::76C@G:EDA>HI Looking for a deal? Visit www.ChallengerBoiseHomes.com for your free list of area foreclosures! Or contact Heidi, Market Pro Realtor at 208-440-5997. HeidiJC@ cableone.net Unbelievable prices await! ;G::BDC:NID=DB:7JN:GH HURRY! Time is running out to take advantage of the FREE MONEY available from the government for purchasing a home! $8000 completely free to 1st time buyers and $6500 available to non 1st time buyers! In addition... we have grant money available up to $20k and Area Specific loans with up to $40k to buyer! What an opportunity!! No charge to see if you qualify for our programs and we still have no money down available! What have you got to lose? Call Heidi, Market Pro Realtor at 208-440-5997 E-mail: HeidiJC@ cableone.net Visit me on the web at www.ChallengerBoiseHomes. com for your complimentary list of area bank repo homes!

BW MASSAGE

6B6I:JG B6HH6<: 7N:G>8

Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577. Thomas. Prof. therapeutic massage only by trained & exp. masseur. New client spec. Rob 375-3082. ULM 340-8377.

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 8805772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Boise & Nampa studios.

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com Massage Boise Hotels 869-8128. B6HH6<:7N<>C6 Full Body Treatment/Relaxation, Pain Relief & Tension Release. Call 908-3383.

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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Wknds.Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Deep Therapeutic Massage by Muscular Guy. 869-2766.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW SPIRITUAL ;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

PROS: Upgraded family home located within walking distance of all downtown Eagle conveniences. CONS: Second-story master suite. —Jennifer Hernandez Open House: Sunday, March 21, 1-4 p.m.

26 | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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| MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | CAREERS | TRANSPORTATION | BARTER | FOR SALE | | PETS | SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

| REAL ESTATE

BW HEALING ARTS

CAREERS BW HELP WANTED 6HH:B7ANLDG@:GHC::9:9 Small Crafts, Sewing, Woodwork, Sent to your location. You finish. To $480+ Wk. Free Info. 24 Hr. 801-264-5558. Boise Co. releasing a new brand. Looking for bikini girls to become new face of product line. Inquire at admin@bloodyfine.com 7D>H:<GDJE=DB:H Make a difference assisting adults w/ developmental disabilities. Must be 21 w/ clean driving record. Stop by 30 S. Cole Road, 9am-4pm.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

8C6$C6 To care for adults with developmental disabilities. Must be 21 with clean driving record. Apply 30 S. Cole Road, 9am-4pm. Drivers needed day/night. Please call or text aft. 6pm. 208-3711234. ABC David. MYSTERY SHOPPERS. Earn Up To $150 Per Day. Undercover Shoppers Needed to Judge Retail and Dining Establishments. No Experience Req’d. Call 1-877-4637909. The ACLU of Idaho is seeking a fulltime Development Coordinator. Full description and application instructions at www.acluidaho. org. Applications may be sent to ACLU of Idaho, PO Box 1897, Boise, ID 83701. Application deadline is April 9, 2010. The ACLU is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer. Work exchange Buddhist center, Redwood Coast, CA. Room, board, stipend, classes, must like to work hard & have interest in spiritual development www.yeshede.org/volunteer.html books@ ratnaling.org 510- 809-2014.

TRANSPORTATION BW 4 WHEELS &.,(>CI:GC6I>DC6AH8DJI>> 1973 International Scout II 345 V8 4 speed manual transmission. $3000/OBO. Contact bradshill1@ gmail.com to make an appt. to see it, serious offers only.

KING SIZE PILLOW TOP MATTRESS SET. New - in bag, w/ warranty. MUST SELL $199. Call 921-6643. Leather Sofa plus Loveseat. Brand new in crate w/Lifetime warranty. Retail $2450. Sell $699! 888-1464. QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET. Brand new-still in plastic. Warranty. MUST SELL $139. Can deliver. 921-6643. K>CI6<:<DD9HH6A: Sponsored by ATOMIC TREASURES MARCH 19, 20 AND 21, 11AM to 6PM 6521 Ustick Rd, Boise East of Cole and West of Mountain View In the Old Treasure Garden Building 16 sellers, offering antique, vintage, retro, new, unusual and unique goods

HB6AA9D< Looking to acquire a small lap dog for companionship. Needs to be quiet and clean. I am blind and wheel chair bound so I need a small pet to keep me company. Dog needs to be house-trained. Please call Matt at 344-8335.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

BW HAVE

FOR SALE

BW WANT TO BUY

ADOPT-A-PET

BARTER

IG69:8DCHIGJ8I>DC;DG4444 I am a fully licensed, registered & insured framing, siding, and remodel contractor looking to trade labor for your unwanted items of value. E-mail a description of what you need done and what you have to trade. quickquality3@aol. com. Services available but not limited to: remodels, framing, siding, decks, fences, covered patios, tile, painting, roofing, gutter clean out, shops & shelves.

from the past present and future. Furniture, clothing, jewelry, collectibles and much more. I have a few spaces left. 10’x 10’ , $25 for all 3 days. Contact info: Cindy Allen atomictreasures@live.com Visit us on Facebook 208-344-0811.

MARLEY: 1-year-old mix-breed dog weighs 20 lbs. Likes being a lap dog and walks on his back legs. (Kennel 414 - #9837265)

SAMMY: 1-year-old female black, orange and white cat who is shy but sweet. Litterboxtrained. (Kennel 50 - #9840200)

RITA: 2-year-old female mix who weighs 39 lbs. Loves to be with people. Good indoor companion. (Kennel 402 - #9804852)

MAYCEE: 2-year-old female great Pyrenees. Sweet and affectionate. Confident and playful with other dogs. (Kennel 317 - #9810319)

BINX: 5-month-old male kitten who loves to be held and petted. Playful, friendly and litterbox-trained. (Kennel 76 - #9587367)

SUGAR: 8-month-old female border collie mix. Sweet, loving and inquisitive. Eager to learn more. (Kennel 310 - #9774193)

BW STUFF 9 Piece King Sleigh Bed Set Brand new. Dovetail drawers. List $2950. Sacrifice $799. 888-1464. Bed, Queen Tempurpedic Style Memory Foam Mattress. Brand new, w/warranty. Must sell $225. 921-6643. BEDROOM SET 7 pc. Cherry set. Brand new, still boxed. Retail $2250, Sacrifice $450. 888-1464. Couch & Loveseat - Microfiber. Stain Resistant. Lifetime Warranty. Brand new in boxes. List $1395. Must Sell $450! 888-1464. 9:AA>CI:AE:CI>JB8DBEJI:G 1G RAM, 80G HD, keyboard, mouse, monitor. $100. 344-5326. <G6HH;:9N6@B:6I Burger, Chuck Roast & Crossrib Roasts-$5.50/lb. Top Round Steak, Sirloin Steak & Sirloin Tip Roasts-$10/lb. New York & Ribeye Steaks-$12/lb. Tenderloin Steaks-$20/lb. This is premium meat from grass-fed animals raised in McCall. No growth hormones, steroids or any stuff you don’t want in your meat. Yak meat is 95 - 97% lean. It is a tender, red meat with a mild flavor that doesn’t dry out when cooked. It’s high in healthy Omega 3 fatty acid, CLA, and protein. USDA inspected and processed at Northwest Premium Meats and packaged in cryovac packages of approximately 2 servings per package. Contact us for payment and shipping options. yakranch@frontier.com

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

LILLIAN: Playful and petite little torti looking to find the purrfect home.

JOSIE: Sweet and cud- STELLA: Talkative and dly Siamese mix with a affectionate young lady big heart searching for with lots of love to give. that special someone.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MARCH 17–23, 2010 | 27


| REAL ESTATE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | CAREERS | TRANSPORTATION | BARTER | FOR SALE | | PETS | SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

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SERVICES BW HOME >CI:G>DG:MI:G>DGE6>CI>C< Very reasonable prices! Help with colors, inside & out, repairs, carpentry work, sealing texturing, kitchen cabinets repainting, staining, brush, roll and spray ďŹ nishing, attention to detail, 25 yrs. exp., dependable, references avail., licensed & insured! Call Joe-Bohemia Painting for a free written estimate. 345-8558 or 392-2094.

NOTICES BW NOTICES GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484.

CDI>8:D;=:6G>C<DCC6B:8=6C<:# 86H:CD#/8KC8&%%'&+*# A Petition to change the name of Debra Godfrey Ripley born 3/30/59, in Stockton, California residing at 843 E. River Park Lane, Boise, ID 83706, has been ďŹ led in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Debra Godfrey, because I am returning to my maiden name. The petitionerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father has died and the names and addresses of his closest blood relatives are: Karen Waldo, 2117 Funston Ave, Stockton, CA 95205. The petitionerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother has died and the names and addresses of her closest blood relatives are: Amos Williams, Menan, ID 83431. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock p.m. on April 15, 2010, at the County Courthouse. Objections may be ďŹ led by any person who can show the court good reason against the name change. Date: Feb. 09, 2010. By: D. Price, Deputy Clerk.

NYT CROSSWORD | 1 Quarter deck? 7 Cross sites, often 13 â&#x20AC;&#x153;And?â&#x20AC;? 20 1957 Wimbledon winner Gibson 21 Say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oh, all rightâ&#x20AC;? 22 Folded like a fan 23 Smack 1

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BW MUSICAL INSTRUCTION/OTHER ;>99A:6C9$DGK>DA>CA:HHDC Fiddlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Frog String Studios is now accepting new students of all ages/levels. Opportunity to play with a group once tunes are learned. We have rentals available, for more information call 208- 344-7297 or email Fiddlinfrog@gmail.com

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BW MUSICIANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S EXCHANGE Elvis impersonator for hire. Parties, special occassions. Located in Mtn. Home. John 587-5719. Keyboardist to play original material wanted. Ed 389-9619.

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COMMUNITY POSTINGS

86C9A:E6GI>:H Earn FREE product for hosting a candle party! Call 208-447-6317 to book your candle party! Check out our product line at www.foreveryhome.net/lynnette @>AGDN@D;;::@A6I8= Warhawk Air Museum is excited to announce the monthly â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kilroy was Hereâ&#x20AC;? coffee klatch. 1st Tuesday of every month. 10-11:30am. Warhawk Air Museum, 201 Municipal Dr, Nampa. K:C9DGHL6CI:9 Yellow Pine Harmonica Festival. August 6,7,8, 2010. Looking for unique food vendors who run on propane, not electricity (not hamb/hotdogs). Also need Arts & Crafts type vendors. Call 208633-3325.

BW CLASSES & WORKSHOPS =DLID@C>I6ADK:HDC< Book signing at Fuzz March 25th, 2pm. Rachel Herron will sign & read from her new book. Call to reserve a spot. 343-3899.

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24 More homely 25 Escaped 26 Slogan encouraging binge drinking? 29 Business partner of Marcus 30 Wind up on the stage? 31 Steamship hand 33 Conquers

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60 Harryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s chum at Hogwarts 62 Number of states whose last two letters are its own postal abbreviation 63 Show fear 65 Butterfingers 67 Pickup line locale? 69 Alex Trebek? 73 Eco-friendly computers from Taiwan? 76 1998 De Niro film 77 Character in the Torah 79 Nuts 80 Abbr. on a pay stub 81 Brethren 84 You might bow your head when receiving one 85 Will who played Grandpa Walton 86 Appetizer abroad 90 Casual tops 92 Dictionnaire entry 94 Starchy stuff 96 Explosive mixture 98 Nashville neurosis? 101 Teakettleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sound? 104 Chinese craft 105 Mount ___ (highest point on Baffin Island) 106 Jaded sort 107 Outpouring 110 Head cases? 113 ___ support 115 They point the way 117 Clueless emcee? 123 Giant advantage, scorewise 125 Danielâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mother on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lostâ&#x20AC;? 126 Even 127 French king called â&#x20AC;&#x153;the Fatâ&#x20AC;? 128 Apple product since 2001 129 Series of notes 130 Put up 131 Comes together 132 Midway enticements

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3 Surmounting 4 Pâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, but not Qâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 5 Like some plates 6 Colonial word for â&#x20AC;&#x153;master,â&#x20AC;? in India 7 Swiss district known for its cheese 8 ___ Park (Queens neighborhood) 9 Casual reference 10 Conrad of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Casablancaâ&#x20AC;? 11 Month that includes Capricornio 12 Certain crew training 13 Big inits. in news 14 â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Good Earthâ&#x20AC;? heroine 15 Place to sample bouquets of rosĂŠs? 16 Portrayer of Cuthbert J. Twillie and Egbert SousĂŠ 17 Damages 18 Really rankled 19 New voters, often 27 Leopoldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s partner in crime 28 Add zing to 32 More mature 34 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lemme ___!â&#x20AC;? 35 13th moon of Jupiter 36 Contents of some cartridges 37 Food whose name means â&#x20AC;&#x153;lumpsâ&#x20AC;? 39 Game with racks 41 Franco of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Camelotâ&#x20AC;? 43 On display 44 See 85-Down 46 Skip the service, say 47 Not serious 48 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Waiting for Leftyâ&#x20AC;? playwright 51 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Too bad, so sad!â&#x20AC;? 56 Like some noodles 57 Franklin who sang â&#x20AC;&#x153;Piece of My Heartâ&#x20AC;? 59 Common Amer. paper size 61 Intl. Peace Garden state 64 Sow sound 65 Some midpoints 66 Bratkowski in the Packers Hall of Fame 68 Rhapsody

69 â&#x20AC;&#x153;___ Rememberâ&#x20AC;? 70 Egyptian for â&#x20AC;&#x153;be at peaceâ&#x20AC;? 71 Rear-___ 72 Wisk alternative 74 Inits. in the classifieds 75 Grammy winner Jones 78 Cotillardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;La Vie en Roseâ&#x20AC;? role 82 Mosqued man? 83 Sexist or ethnically stereotyping 85 With 44-Down, kindness 87 Abbr. at the top of a memo 88 ___ sci 89 Twin vampire in â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Twilight Sagaâ&#x20AC;? 91 Having a rhythmically recurrent contraction 93 Diamond holder 95 Bad winnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s response 97 Pulitzer winner for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tales of the South Pacificâ&#x20AC;? 99 Portrayer of Flower Belle Lee and Peaches Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Day 100 Angels are at home there 102 Court reporter? L A S T

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AD86A;>7:G6GI>HI Book signing by local ďŹ ber artist Sharon Baker at Twigs & Twists on March 25th from 12-2pm. 605 Americana Blvd. www.twigsandtwists.com IGJC@H=DL!7G>96AEGDB;6H=>DCH >CHIDG: March 25th, at Caledonia Fine Fabrics. Trunk Show by Brensan Studio Patterns, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wearable Art.â&#x20AC;? Stop by or call for details. 605 Americana Blvd. 338-0895. ;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classiďŹ eds at www.boiseweekly.com. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy! Just click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Post Your FREE Ad.â&#x20AC;? No phone calls please.

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<88H6CCJ6A6J8I>DC Garden City Community Schools Annual Auction. Friday, March 19th at the Visual Art Collective, 3638 Osage Ave. Garden City. 5:30 PM- 9:00 PM located behind the Women of Steel on Chinden. Auction will include both live and silent auctions. The auctions MC will be Channel 7 anchor Larry Gebert. We will be auctioning various items including professional art, classroom student art, themed baskets, and a white water rafting trip. $15 at the door. No one under 21 allowed.

ADHIA:6I=:G?68@:I I lost my brown, bomber-style womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leather jacket late night on a Friday. I am offering a reward if found. Call Celeste 891-2886.

The Best selection of SEXY local Singles! Call Lucky Talk now! 800-777-TALK.

Pen Pals complimentary ads for our incarcerated friends are run on a space-available basis and may be edited for content. Readers are encouraged to use caution and discretion when communicating with Pen Pals, whose

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backgrounds are not checked prior to publication. Boise Weekly accepts no responsibility for any relationships that may arise from contacting these inmates. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a Hispanic woman 5â&#x20AC;&#x2122;, 120 lbs. brown eyes and hair. 32 yrs. Old very loving friendly and open minded. Margarita Zepeda #59764 T.F.C.J. PO Box 306 Twin Falls, ID 83303.

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BW ADULT ENTERTAINMENT BUYER BEWARE Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services. ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+. Hot Singles Waiting To Connect! Call 208-287-3333. Free w/code 5500. Call 800-210-1010. MEET LOCAL SINGLES. Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7584, 18+. SEEKING SEXY SINGLES? Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7583. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. WHERE HOT GUYS MEET. Browse & Respond FREE! 208-472-2200, Code 5801 or MegaMatesaMen. com, 18+. Where Hot Men Hook Up! Call 208777-8000. Free w/code 2982.

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WOMEN SEEKING MEN CHERRY BOMB Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m 21 and I like going to bars and hanging out, listening to music, a good conversation and living life. I guess Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking for someone with the same interests thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s around my age. gabraella, 21, #101102. SWEET N NEWLY SINGLE... What can I say, I am truly an open minded, easy going girl. I love doing everything from outdoor activities and camping to reading and watching movies. I will try anything at least once! SweetGirl1981, 28, #101036.

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WHO ELSE IS READY? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m honestly delightful. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say my best character traits are friendliness, genuineness, soulfulness and all womanness. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ready for some fun. With someone who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take it all so seriously. Who else is ready? sweetinboise, 44, #101026.

MEN SEEKING WOMEN HOPING TO PIQUE YOUR INTEREST... I am a very spontaneous person and I like to surprise the one I am with. I enjoy the ďŹ ner things in life. Expect it when you least expect it. sboisean, 46, #101080.

CIRCLES Jack of all trades. What attracts me most is someone who is not afraid of life, who has talents herself (dancing, singing, playing an instrument, SOMETHING) and is of culture and worldiness. Brandon2lpol, 23, #101077. THE GOOD LIFE Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a 34 yr old PSRW that enjoys anything outdoors i.e.: camping, hiking, exploring. I am easy going and laid back and up for trying just about anything. benjamin, 34, #101049. WAIT A SECOND....Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;M COMING! SWM looking for a fun friend to hang with. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make you laugh if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll make me ______? Jahlicious, 52, #101055.

MEN SEEKING MEN BOISE CYCLING GUY Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking for others to hang out with, dinner and a movie, cycling, or just relaxing. I enjoy coffee shops, bookstores and cooking. cycleman83713, 37, #101090. FUN, ENERGETIC & SLIGHTLY CRAZY Social and always up for a good time. I do like to have nice quiet evenings at home. I can tend to be very sarcastic at times. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking for almost anything. Let me know what you think. SSutton, 24, #101014.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | MARCH 17â&#x20AC;&#x201C;23, 2010 | 29


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): From what I can tell, your excursion to Fake Paradise didn’t exact too serious a toll. The accidental detour may have seemed inopportune in the moment, but you know what? I think it slowed you down enough to keep you from doing something rash that you would have regretted later. And are you really sorry you were robbed of your cherished illusions? In the long run, I think it was for the best. As for the scratches on your nose from when you stuck it into business you weren’t “supposed” to: They’re a small price to pay for the piquant lesson you got in how not to live. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Some people are here on the planet to find success, while others are here to find themselves. In the big scheme of things, I’m not sure which category you fit into, Taurus. But I’m pretty sure that for the next few weeks, you’ll be best served by acting as if you’re the latter. Even if you think you’ve found yourself pretty completely in the past, it’s time to go searching again: There are new secrets to be discovered, in large part because you’re not who you used to be. So for now at least, I encourage you to give your worldly ambitions a bit of a rest as you intensify your self-explorations. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Being a paragon of moral behavior can be fun and rewarding. It’s amazing how many interesting people want to play with me just because they think I’m so #%&@ highminded. But I’ve got to confess that my commitment to discipline and righteousness is sometimes at odds with my rebellious itch to give you mischievous nudges and outrageous challenges. Like right now, the conscientious teacher in me might advise you to keep a lid on debauchery, voracity, excess, uproar, slapstick, wise-cracking, fireworks and limit-pushing. But the rabble-rousing agitator in me feels obligated to inform you that at no other time in 2010 will the karmic price be lower for engaging in such pursuits. CANCER (June 21-July 22): It’s time for you to stop specializing in furtive glimpses and start indulging in brazen gazes. You’re ready to phase out your role as a peripheral influence and see if you can be more of a high-intensity instigator and organizer. Yes, Cancerian, you’ve earned the right to claim more credibility and clout—to leave your tentative position outside the magic circle and head in the direction of the sweet hot spot. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Nature seems to exult in abounding radicality, extremism, anarchy,” wrote Annie Dillard in Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. “If we were

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to judge nature by its common sense or likelihood, we wouldn’t believe the world existed. In nature, improbabilities are the one stock in trade. The whole creation is one lunatic fringe ... No claims of any and all revelations could be so far-fetched as a single giraffe.” (Dillard’s entire passage is here: bit.ly/ TinkerCreek.) Reading this passage is a good way for you to prepare for the immediate future, Leo. You’ll soon be invited to commune with outlandish glory. You’ll be exposed to stories that burst from the heart of creation. You’ll be prodded to respond to marvelous blips with marvelous blips of your own. But here’s the catch: It may all remain invisible to you if you’re blinded by the false belief that you live a boring, ordinary life. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The storm is your friend right now, Virgo. So are the deep, dark night and the last place you’d ever think of visiting and the most important thing you’ve forgotten about. So be more willing than usual to marinate in the mysteries—not with logical ferocity but with cagey curiosity. The areas of life that are most crucial for you to deal with can’t be fully understood using the concepts your rational mind favors. The feelings that will be most useful for you to explore are unlike those you’re familiar with. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Here’s your mantra for the coming week: “I disappear my fear. I resurrect my audacity.” Say it and sing it and murmur it at least 100 times a day. Let it flow out of you after you’ve awoken each morning and are still lying in bed. Let it be the last sound on your lips as you drop off to sleep. Have fun with it. Dip into your imagination to come up with different ways to let it fly—say it as your favorite cartoon character might say it, like a person with a Swedish accent, like your inner teenager, like a parrot, like a grinning sage. “I disappear my fear. I resurrect my audacity. I disappear my fear. I resurrect my audacity.” SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Have you ever heard about how some all-night convenience stores blast loud classical music out into the parking lot in order to discourage drug dealers from loitering? In the coming days, use that principle whenever you need to drive home a point or make a strong impression. Your aggressive expressions will be more effective if you take the darkness and anger out of them, and instead fill them up with forceful grace and propulsive compassion. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The Hebrew word “chalom” means “dream.” In his book Healing Dreams, Marc

Ian Barasch notes that it’s derived from the verb “to be made healthy and strong.” Linguist Joseph Jastrow says that chalom is related to the Hebrew word “hachlama,” which means “recovery, recuperation.” Extrapolating from these poetic hints and riffing on your astrological omens, I’ve got a prescription for you to consider: To build your vitality in the coming weeks, feed your dreams. And I mean “dreams” in both the sense of the nocturnal adventures you have while you’re sleeping and the sweeping daytime visions of what you’d like to become. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I just found out the American shipping company UPS has legally trademarked the color brown. The grass-roots activist in me is incredulous and appalled. But the poet in me doesn’t really care; it’s fine if UPS owns drab, prosaic brown. I’ve still got mahogany at my command, as well as tawny, sepia, taupe, burnt umber, tan, cinnamon, walnut and henna. That’s especially important for this horoscope, Capricorn, because I’m advising you to be very down to earth, be willing to get your hands dirty, and even play in the muck if necessary in order to take good care of the basics. But don’t do any of that in a boring, humdrum “brown” way. Do it exotically and imaginatively, like mahogany, tawny, sepia, taupe, burnt umber, tan, cinnamon, walnut and henna. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You are hereby excused from having to know a single nuance about Angelina Jolie’s secret love tryst with Lady Gaga, or the addictions of conspiracy theorists who lose huge sums of money gambling on the end of the world. In fact, it’s a good time to empty your mind of extraneous, trivial and useless facts so that you can clear vast new spaces for more pressing data, like how you can upgrade your communication skills, why you should do some upkeep on your close alliances, and what you might do to streamline your social life. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In my astrological opinion, you don’t need anything that shrinks, deflates or tames you. Influences that pinch your imagination should be taboo, as should anything that squashes your hope or crimps your life force. To make proper use of the vibrations circulating in your vicinity, Pisces, you should gravitate toward situations that pump up your insouciance and energize your whimsy and incite you to express the most benevolent wickedness you can imagine. You’ve got a mandate to fatten up your soul so it can contain a vaster sense of wonder and a more daring brand of innocence.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 18 Issue 38