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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 18, ISSUE 31 JAN. 27 – FEB. 2, 2010

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TAK EE E ON E! FEATURE 11

STORIES FROM AFAR One woman tries to spread peace by sharing lives PICKS 16

GET OUT Deets on the week’s hippest happenings NOISE 21

DIRTY ROCK Getting intimate with The Missionary Position FOOD 28

WATERY EYES Sweet and spicy hold hands at Sweetwater’s

“Don’t kill Big Bird.”

CITYDESK 9


2 | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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BW STAFF PUBLISHER: Sally Freeman Sally@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com EDITORIAL Editor: Rachael Daigle Rachael@boiseweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Atkins Amy@boiseweekly.com Features Editor: Deanna Darr Deanna@boiseweekly.com News Editor: Nathaniel Hoffman Nathaniel@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Tara Morgan Tara@boiseweekly.com Listings: Juliana McLenna calendar@boiseweekly.com Proofreaders: Jay Vail, Annabel Armstrong Interns: Andrew Crisp, Joe Firmage, Jennifer Spencer Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Travis Estvold, Jennifer Hernandez, Dan Hudak, David Kirkpatrick, Ted Rall, Lora Volkert ADVERTISING Advertising Director: Lisa Ware Lisa@boiseweekly.com Account Executives: Meshel Miller, Meshel@boiseweekly.com Chelsea Snow, Chelsea@boiseweekly.com Jessi Strong, Jessi@boiseweekly.com Jill Weigel, Jill@boiseweekly.com CLASSIFIED SALES Classifieds@boiseweekly.com CREATIVE Art Director: Leila Ramella-Rader Leila@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Adam Rosenlund, Adam@boiseweekly.com, Lindsey Loch, Lindsey@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Derf, Mike Flinn, Glenn Landberg, Jeremy Lanningham, Laurie Pearman, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Tom Tomorrow CIRCULATION Shea Sutton Shea@boiseweekly.com Apply to Shea Sutton to be a BW driver. Man About Town: Stan Jackson Stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Mike Baker, Andrew Cambell, Tim Green, Jennifer Hawkins, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Michael Kilburn, Lars Lamb, Brian Murry, Amanda Noe, Northstar Cycle Couriers, Steve Pallsen, Patty Wade, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 30,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 750 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. No person may, without permission of the publisher, take more than one copy of each issue. SUBSCRIPTIONS: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. TO CONTACT US: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street, Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com Address editorial, business and production correspondence to: Boise Weekly, P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701 The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2009 by Bar Bar, Inc. EDITORIAL DEADLINE: Thursday at noon before publication date. SALES DEADLINE: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher.

NOTE ALL PRESS IS GOOD PRESS Last week’s food reviews of Big Bird’s Burgers racked up dozens of comments a boiseweekly.com, most of them chiding writer Nathaniel Hoffman for dissing the restaurant’s Christian theme. “Amazing that your bigotry allowed any space to mention the food at all.”; “Criticize the food, not the personal beliefs of the restaurant owners.”; “This article is a perfect example of why we don’t read the Boise Weekly ...” Food reviews in BW are not something we approach cavalierly. I’ve had more than one restaurateur tell me a BW review put them out of business, and whether I believe that, we do put a great deal of thought and effort into each review. Striking a balance between supporting the local business community and communicating to the public honestly about a business is no easy task. We approach food reviews from a man-on-the-street perspective, that is, the perspective from which we assume our readers dine in any restaurant. Those upset with Hoffman’s assessment of Big Bird’s fell into roughly two categories: those who took issue with Hoffman mentioning atmosphere and those who took issue with what he said about the atmosphere. Regarding the former, we believe that dining out is an entire experience, which encompasses the food itself, how it’s presented, the service, cleanliness and decor. And each of those things is fair game in a BW food review. Regarding the latter, Hoffman represents “a medium-sized segment of the population” who will not feel welcomed at Big Bird’s. In places like Idaho, where Christianity is the dominant religion, a majority of people will not understand that assertion. However, that doesn’t make it untrue. The overarching goal of a BW food review is to tell readers what they’re getting into. A reviewer does that by employing his or her own paradigm. When I say a Thai restaurant is lackluster, I’m drawing on several months experience in Thailand. Therefore, a reader who prefers authentic Thai food may choose not to patronize that restaurant. We’ve often insulted restaurants by describing the decor as kitschy, gaudy and immature, yet none of those adjectives have elicited much response. Was Hoffman brash? Yes. Did he draw on his own non-Christian past in sizing up Big Bird’s? Yes. But neither of those things are uncharacteristic of what we do at BW. Those readers who fall into that “medium-sized segment of the population” will steer clear of Big Bird’s regardless of how good the food is. Those who don’t are helping Big Bird’s to have what, I presume, is a record week in profits. —Rachael Daigle

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Boise Weekly pays $150 as well as a $25 gift certificate to Boise Blue Art Supply for published covers. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. Proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. Square formats are preferred and all mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 3


WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE MAIL / MONDO GAGA BILL COPE TED RALL NEWS Idaho’s non-functioning violent sex-offender registry

PARDON ME, BUT PLEASE STOP A&E Editor Amy Atkins has a new blog hobby: posting ridiculous music videos she finds on Youtube. Log on to Cobweb to check out Maxine the singing stewardess ... er, flight attendant ... and “Pardon Me.”

CRUSADING FOR THE HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION Although the Idaho Human Rights Commission has yet to really protect all of the state’s citizens (like when it voted not to back LGBT protections last year), a group of prominent Idahoans is peeved about its potential demise. A long list of notable names—including former Gov. Cecil Andrus—is published at citydesk in defense of the commission.

CRUSADING FOR SENIORS’ RIGHTS Keeping with responses to proposed budget cuts, citydesk also talked to Health and Welfare, which was in front of the Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee, and seniors rallying in support of the Commission on Aging.

WE WERE DUPED AND WE STILL DUG IT Last week, we directed you to Ben Love’s new show “Sum Moment—A Collection of Wings.” If you missed the opening, visit Cobweb for photos of opening night, including the life-sized “effigy of Michael Jackson” cake.

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TIGER grants still on the loose ROTUNDA FEATURE Stories of Peace BW PICKS FIND 8 DAYS OUT SUDOKU NOISE The Missionary Position does is standing up MUSIC GUIDE ARTS Idaho gains ground in the regional arts scene SCREEN Ford and Fraser in Extraordinary Measures MOVIE TIMES VIDIOT FOOD Two reviewers feel the Caribbean heat of Sweetwater’s Tropic Zone BEER GUZZLER CLASSIFIEDS HOME SWEET HOME NYT CROSSWORD FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

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MAIL HAITI: A DISASTER AND A METAPHOR Haiti is a metaphor for an America weakened by conservatives. Haiti has no effective government to help its citizens. This is what conservatives want for America. Remember how ineffectually conservatives responded to Hurricane Katrina? Conservative leader Grover Norquist has said he wants the U.S. government so small he could strangle it in a bathtub. Conservatives overlook that such a small conservative government would be too weak to provide effective military defense or to respond to national emergencies. (The next time a dam breaks in Idaho, call Norquist.) Conservatives support the same religious views against birth control that have led to unsustainable overpopulation and

unemployment in Haiti. Conservatives support a free-for-all approach to the environment which would lead to the kind of deforestation seen in Haiti. Conservatives support the same hands-off attitude to the financial sector that led years ago to the looting of the Haitian economy by foreign banks. Conservative economic policies are leading to the same levels of unemployment now seen in Haiti. Enthralled of authoritarian personalities, conservatives want forceful leaders like Francois “Papa Doc” Duvalier, who give them simpleminded slogans while looting the country. So take a serious look at the misery and strife of Haiti because that’s what America will look like after conservatives finish with it. —Gary L. Bennett, Emmett

S U B M I T Letters must include writer’s full name, city of residence and contact information and must be 300 or fewer words. OPINION: Lengthier, in-depth opinions on local, national and international topics. E-mail editor@boiseweekly.com for guidelines. Submit letters to the editor via mail (523 Broad St., Boise, Idaho 83702) or e-mail (editor@boiseweekly.com). Letters and opinions may be edited for length or clarity. NOTICE: Ever y item of correspondence, whether mailed, e-mailed, commented on our Web site or Facebook page or left on our phone system’s voice-mail is fair game for MAIL unless specifically noted in the message.

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TO PAY FORWARD OR NOT TO PAY FORWARD There is a man and woman who have managed to get a wheelchair and cane somehow. I see them run without either one. The point of them using (sometimes) this wheelchair and cane is that they get to hold a sign saying disabled to try to get your money. I witnessed them before they had the cane. Even since I have witnessed both walk without the cane. I asked them why they are lying and they replied they do what they have to do, which is to scam you out of your money. Now that they have gotten this cane, they use it to further their image but I am telling you as an honest citizen of Boise that I saw them without the cane and wheelchair! They are tricking you and it is appalling. Please keep your cash because I promise you there are more frauds with signs than you know. — Sarah DiLulo, Boise

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 5


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When last we visited with Red, he was deep into enunciation therapy, a prerequisite to completing a comeback as my sidekick. For several weeks, he was making great strides, I thought. He had mastered that crucial ďŹ rst step of pronouncing one-syllable words so they might be recognizable to average readers—i.e., “bearsâ€? instead of “bawrs,â€? and “weâ€? instead of “weezeâ€?—when Sarah Palin began her highly publicized book tour, and I’ll be damned if he didn’t slip right back to square one. Or, as it came from Red’s mouth, “skwor whun.â€? “Red,â€? I cautioned. “You have to get your nose out of that woman’s coverage. Her inuence is reverting you back to incomprehensible hillbillyese.â€? “Aww, Cope, yawr juzz jay-luss yewse Dem’crats ain’t god nuttin’ whad look so good in ďŹ shnet stockins as Sarah.â€? “You want to be my sidekick or not?â€? I said, sternly. “Besides, Sarah’s ďŹ shnet stockings are just your wishful thinking ... probably.â€? So he reluctantly turned his attentions back to speaking clearly and not drooling so much in the process. But I have noticed another disturbing development. It ďŹ rst appeared as we were rehearsing a scene from the upcoming 2010 campaign season. “Cope, It shore ... er, sure ... looks like it will be a cuh ... a cuh ... a ca-lam-it-ous year for Dem-oh-crats.â€? “Don’t count on it, pal. We lost that one in Massachusetts mostly because the independent voters don’t have enough long-term memory to think back more than a few days at a stretch. But things are starting to turn around now, so the attention deďŹ cit will work for us instead of against us. We just need to get serious about evoking Bush more.â€? “Ee-voking who?â€? “Bush. George Bush.â€? “Well now, Cope, I can’t say as I ever heard of no George Bush before.â€? “Yeah, right. Like, the guy who botched things up so badly, it would take Jesus Himself several years to mop up his slop?â€? “George Bush, you say? Nope. Don’t ring no bell.â€? “For Christ’s sake, Red, you were his biggest fan! Started the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, then let bin Laden get away! Oversaw the worst economic collapse in 80 years! Made more enemies for the United States than Red Bull makes jitters! Ignored the warnings before 9/11, then handed the national treasury over to Halliburton afterwards! Put our country into a dive we may never recover from! He was around for eight years, Red! He was president of the United States! Just 12 months ago! Don’t you dare tell me you don’t remember him!â€? “Nuh-uh. Far as presidents go, I remember Ronny Reagan, what made America the best

country ever. And I remember Bill Clinton, what made America hate Democrats like they oughta. But this fella ... uh, what’d you say his name was again? ... why, he sounds like something you saw in one of them scary movies you’re always watching.� “Red, I know what you’re doing, and you aren’t going to get away with it.� “Get away with what, Cope? “Your side doesn’t have a damn thing to show for itself but Bush, so you’re trying to pretend these troubles started with Barack Obama. But to do that, you have to make people either forget or ignore the record of abject failure the Bushies ran up. Well it won’t work, chump. The only Americans dumb enough to fall for your little ruse are, not coincidentally, the same 30 percent who never stopped supporting Bush.� “Cope, I think I see what’s going on here. You’re looking for one of them scrapgoats to pin all the blame on, seeing as how this Bo ... Bob-am ... er, O-bam-a is the worst president in the history of the world.� “Dammit, I don’t need a scrap ... er, scapegoat to pin the blame on! The blame is the Bush administration’s and that’s the history the sane people will remember!� “Tell me something, Cope. Let’s say there really was such a thing as this Bush feller your yakking about, and let’s say he really did do all those screwy things what you claim he did. So ’zactly when does the blame for everything switch over to Obama?� “Never. Obama makes his own mistakes, no argument. But the responsibility for Bush’s disasters will never, ever fall on him. And here’s why ... if you spill red wine on a white carpet, you never get to blame the janitor because he’s not cleaning up the mess you made quickly enough. It’ll always be your mess, no matter how many mistakes he makes in trying to get rid of it. Get it?� “I ain’t got no janitor and I ain’t got no white carpet, Cope. And I don’t drink no wine. So it couldn’t o’ been me what done that mess.� “I’m not saying you did. I’m saying Bush did it.� “Then according to you, this Bush feller did ever thing bad what’s ever been done, including spilling that wine on my carpet?� “Then you have a carpet, after all?� “Yeah, but it ain’t white, and it ain’t wine. It’s Ragu what made that splatch, and Bush didn’t do it. He never once came by my house like I wrote him to.� “Ah, so you do remember Bush?� “Who?� Be prepared for more of the same, folks. It’ll be the Republican songbook for 2010, you can bet on it: “We couldn’t possibly have caused this, but we need to get back to whatever the hell was going on when it started so’s we can get it to stop!� WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


TED RALL/OPINION

DAVID DINKINS REDUX Obama will drag down Democrats in November NEW YORK—Normally I stay out of the political prognostication racket. It’s as thankless as writing for Arianna Huffington. Politically, 2010 could end up a big year. First, the economy will continue to sour. There may be small up-ticks, but the overall picture will keep trending downward. Credit markets won’t loosen, there will be more bankruptcies and more foreclosures. I’m a pessimist because none of the structural problems have been addressed. No one has done anything to put more money into the pockets of consumers or businesses. More bailouts and stimulus packages might help, but Congress won’t approve them after bankers used the loot to buy new yachts. President Barack Obama’s job-approval rating is tied to the unfolding fiscal apocalypse. Unless there’s another 9/11, his numbers will plunge toward the Dick Cheney zone. Obama could have done a lot to ease the economic pain: direct federal assistance to homeowners, nationalize insolvent banks, giant New Deal-style federal employment projects funded by immediate withdrawal from Afghanistan and Iraq. Instead, he kept the Bush administration’s policies and personnel. There’s also a racist component to Obama’s problems with the electorate. Obama is much like David Dinkins, elected in 1989 as New York City’s first black mayor. Dinkins made the mistake of thinking that African Americans were his political base. They weren’t. Dinkins made a lot of boneheaded moves, such as ordering white teachers be laid off first. “Never again,” I heard countless white liberals say. “They [blacks] had their chance.”

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White anger at Dinkins was out of proportion to his performance; if he was the same mayor, but white, he wouldn’t have been as reviled. We’re seeing that now. Obama is just another Bill Clinton, unwilling to seize the opportunities afforded by the economic meltdown. White voter remorse, however, is a bitch. Americans hate Obama more than they would hate Clinton because he’s black. Conventional wisdom says the Democrats will lose seats in November. But no one is predicting a 1994 bloodbath. The GOP is too fractured. Writes Nancy Cohen in the Los Angeles Times: “what was most important about 1994 politically won’t make or break the 2010 elections. Congress changed hands in 1994 because the Christian right recruited new voters and white Southerners shifted to the GOP.” That won’t happen in 2010, she says. “Neither evangelicals nor white Southerners can swing this year’s election, because they are the Republican Party.” Generally, I agree with Cohen. But I think Democratic losses will be more severe than the experts expect. Voters are being forced to flop back and forth between two parties they hate, but their contempt for the Democrats will be particularly toxic. Obama’s Democrats, on the other hand, ran as agents of hope and change. It wouldn’t be as bad for them if their party’s standard bearer hadn’t failed so spectacularly, managing to live down to Sen. John McCain’s denigrating portrayal of him as an empty suit. Nothing pisses people off more than being promised the big and then failing to receive even the small.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 7


CITYDESK/NEWS PAGING STEVE ROGERS As always happens this time of year—in the news biz at least—the Legislature seems all-consuming. We’re trying to keep an ear out for other goings on, but the drama in the natural light-filled halls of government is too good to pass up. Even the AARP is up in arms, and it’s not even February. The AARP of Idaho (the group formerly known as the American Association of Retired Persons) is calling on the governor and the Idaho Legislature to avoid making stark cuts to ser vices, par ticularly at the Depar tment of Health and Welfare and the Commission on Aging. “AARP is warning legislators and the governor of the dire effects of the proposed cuts and is sending them a simple message: Don’t balance the budget on the backs of the state’s most vulnerable residents,” the group’s press release said. The group has set up a budget hot line to connect older Idahoans to their legislators: 1-800-232-0581. You can enter your zip code and they’ll connect you to your delegation. (It’s not exact—some zip codes span legislative districts.) AARP has 180,000 members in Idaho, according to spokesman Dave Irwin. That’s more than half of the over 50-population of the state, a cohor t that is nearly all registered to vote and 75 percent of whom vote in ever y election, Ir win said. Surely, Gov. C. L. “Butch” Otter and legislators—most of whom fit the same demographic—are aware of that voting bloc. In fact, the Commission on the Aging is one of the few agencies spared Otter’s budget euthanasia plan—seven other small agencies are being completely phased out under Otter’s plan. Still, AARP is not pleased with Otter’s 8 percent cuts to Aging. Not that they have any suggestions for funding those services: “I’m not a legislator. They’ve been elected to office to figure out just that. It’s our job as an advocacy organization to understand just what the ramifications of those cuts are going to be,” Ir win said. The group is also irritated by the Legislature’s attempts to oppose national health-reform effor ts before those effor ts have even produced anything concrete in Washington, D.C. Ir win points out that both the U.S. House and U.S. Senate versions of the health-care bill provide more funds for Medicaid, which, lawmakers agree is in great need of more funds. “We’re saying no when our most vulnerable population needs us to say yes,” Ir win told citydesk. Idaho Public Television is one of the agencies slated to be weaned off the general fund teat. Station Manager Peter Morrill feels that if this money that subsidizes statewide broadcasting doesn’t come from the state, it’s likely that it won’t be available from other sources. “First of all, we are a state organization. We receive approximately $1.6 million from the state of Idaho, which makes up roughly 25 percent 9 of our budget. The state funds that

NEWS

SEX OFFENSES IN FLUX Idaho Violent Sexual Predators escape extra scrutiny NATHANIEL HOFFMAN Since Feb. 10, 2009, the state’s Sexual Offender Classification Board has been sidelined by an Idaho Supreme Court decision that declared Idaho’s process for violent sexual predator designations unconstitutional. In that time, at least eight sex offenders who had been referred to the board for VSP hearings have instead been released from prison without review. A committee of the Idaho Criminal Justice Commission—headed up by a representative of the State Appellate Public Defender’s Office, which helped overturn the VSP provisions in the Smith v. State of Idaho case

W E WA NT TO M AKE SU RE THAT A S W E TA KE THE SE S T E P S, WE ’ RE TAK I NG THE E NTI RE S E X O FFE NDE R T R E AT ME NT U NI V E RSE I N T O A CCOU NT. ” —BRENT REINKE, DIRECTOR OF THE IDAHO DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS

last year—has been studying the statute. But it will not recommend changes to the Legislature this year. It will be 2011 at the soonest before Idaho attempts to bring the VSP designation into compliance, reactivating the program. VSP designations are applied to sex offenders who are highly likely to re-offend, not necessarily those whose crimes are perceived as more violent. They are held to more stringent registration and oversight rules than other sex offenders. “There were eight people who were not reviewed, who potentially could have slipped through the crack,” said Kathy Baird, administrator of the SOCB. “I do believe that there is concern about nothing being done, but the legislation just hasn’t been ready for this session.” Idaho’s VSP law passed in 1998 to comply with the federal Jacob Wetterling Act and Megan’s Law. Since that time, the SOCB has reviewed 93 VSP cases. It declined to designate 13 as VSPs, tabled two for future review, and one designation was overturned, according to Baird. Six VSP hearings have been vacated due to Smith, in addition to approximately eight that were never initiated. Even counselors who treat sex offenders agree there is some use in identifying those who are high risk for re-offending, though

8 | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | BOISEweekly

the designation must come with more than just a label. “If we’ve got a guy who is a very high risk offender, I think it would be well for us to identify that person and have that person under scrutiny,” said David Ferguson, a counselor who also serves on the Judicial Council’s VSP subcommittee. But Ferguson also wants to see more treatment and says that recidivism rates for sex offenders are lower than most people think and lower than any other crime except murder. “It doesn’t define who they are,” Ferguson said. “It defines what they did, and they can get on the other side of that.” Even before the Smith decision, which said that sex offenders have a right to meaningfully defend themselves before the SOCB, Idaho was working on revising its sex-crime laws. That’s because a decade after Wetterling and Megan’s Law, which established predator designations and public sex offender registries, Congress passed a new sex-crime law, the Adam Walsh Act, which establishes national standards and a three-tiered designation for sex offenders. Idaho, along with the majority of states, has gotten an extension in implementing the Walsh Act and may ask for another extension. “We want to make sure that as we take these steps, we’re taking the entire sex offender treatment universe into account,” said Brent Reinke, director of the Idaho Department of Corrections. The department has contracted with the Center for Sex Offender Management, a national clearinghouse for sex offender research and policy, to help rewrite its sex-offender laws. CSOM has already completed a review of Idaho’s regulations and will be in the state next month to interview people who work with sex offenders before making recommendations later this year. Reinke said he’s also concerned that Idaho’s VSP program is not functioning, but that he’s worked with the Idaho Sheriffs’ Association to make sure that sex offenders—including potential VSPs, who often top out, meaning they are held for the full length of their sentence and are not eligible for parole—register properly when released from prison. They will present this stepped-up registration process to the Justice Commission soon. Idaho Sen. Denton Darrington, chairman of the Senate Judiciary and Rules Committee, and Rep. Jim Clark, chairman of the House Judiciary and Rules Committee, are both involved in the Criminal Justice Commission process, along with the Attorney General’s Office, Corrections, prosecutors and medical professionals. Heading up the VSP committee is Molly Huskey, an attorney with the Appellate Public Defender’s Office in Boise. The Smith

decision requires changes to some two dozen Idaho statutes and rules, and the committee wants to be sure to “provide sufficient due process such that if they are designated as a violent sexual predator, that the due process protection will legitimize the designation,” Huskey said. That includes providing full documentation to offenders, writing clear and objective criteria for VSP designations, allowing offenders proper counsel and access to witnesses and experts, and other changes. Huskey said that even if offenders are not being put on the VSP list at this time, they still must register as sex offenders. “The purpose behind a VSP designation is to make sure that the community can access information to keep themselves and their community safe,” Huskey said. Steve Bywater, the deputy attorney general working on both the VSP and Adam Walsh

NON-VS P OFFENDER S MAY PETITION A COURT FOR R ELIEF FR OM THE DUTY TO R EGIS TER AFTER A PER IOD OF 10 YEAR S . ON THE OTHER HAND, A VS P HAS NO R IGHT TO S UC H R ELIEF. THUS , FOR AN OFFENDER DES IGNATED AS A VS P, THE S C AR LET LETTER S AR E INDELIB LE. —IDAHO SUPREME COURT SMITH DECISION, FEB. 2009

legislation, said there is a growing consensus among all the parties, including prosecutors and defense counsel, on fixing the statutes. But there is one additional issue that could still foil the entire process: The cost. To read the Smith v. State of Idaho decision go to boiseweekly.com. For more about the Idaho Criminal Justice Commission activities, see Page 9. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS

DEFENDING THE POOR Idaho public defenders lack state support, standards NATHANIEL HOFFMAN Idaho’s patchwork system of county public defenders increasingly jeopardizes the Sixth Amendment right to counsel for the state’s poor and puts the state on the hook for violating the right to a fair trial, a new report from the National Legal Aid and Defender Association finds. “While there are admirable qualities of some of the county indigent defense services, NLADA finds that none of the public defense systems in the sample counties are constitutionally adequate,” the report states. The NLADA looked at seven counties, including Ada and Canyon, and found that in every one of them public defenders were working more cases than national standards recommend, allowing them inadequate time with their clients. “When you’re simply processing cases and not getting it right, people could be going to jail for crimes they did not commit, and that leaves the true perpetrator on the street,” said David Carroll, research director for NLADA. Ada County public defender Alan Trimming said his office’s caseload is large but that the report’s statistics are overly broad. “Do our delivery of services meet Constitutional standards? My answer to that is yes. Would we like to have additional staff? My answer to that is also yes,”said Trimming. According to the report, Ada County public defenders saw an average of 952 felony clients per lawyer, allowing them 2.18 hours on each felony case. The American Bar Association

recommends defenders carry about 150 felony cases per year, Carroll said. Idaho, through its Criminal Justice Commission, has been aware of growing caseloads in the public defender system since at least 2007. An earlier NLADA study found that excessive workloads in the State Appellate Public Defenders Office could be offset by better representation in the lower courts. A Justice Commission study group is already reviewing the report and will make recommendations by the fall, according to Patricia Tobias, administrative director at the Idaho Supreme Court. While the NLADA declines to make specific recommendations, acknowledging that a local solution is better, Carroll points to neighboring states, including Oregon and Montana, where the state has taken over funding and management of indigent defense from the problematic county-based system. “That’s a common theme with failing systems,” Carroll said. “It’s our position that the Gideon case requires states, not counties to do this.” The 1963 Gideon v. Wainwright case established that lawyers are “necessities, not luxuries” in the courtroom and that the state must provide counsel to those who can’t afford it. Thirty states now fully fund indigent defense systems, relieving counties of the burden and three more states fund most of their system. Idaho does not fund public defense at the state level, nor are there any statewide institutions that monitor or aid pubic defenders.

STALKING TIGER Fed transit priorities shifting to quality of life NATHANIEL HOFFMAN The City of Boise will have to wait until February to hear the results of a federal stimulus grant application that could pay to build the bulk of the downtown streetcar system. But since applying for the TIGER grant from the Federal Transit Administration, U.S. Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood has announced that projects similar to Boise’s proposed circulator will get more attention from his agency. “We’ll finally be able to make the case for investing in popular streetcar projects and other transit systems that people want—and that our old ways of doing business didn’t value enough,” LaHood told the nonprofit Transportation Research Board earlier this month. Boise applied for $40 million in TIGER funds late last year, a competitive grant that WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

was part of the stimulus package. LaHood had said the awards would be announced in January, but Cece Gassner, the city’s streetcar spokesperson, said she’s heard the announcement will come next month. LaHood also indicated recently that he likes many of the TIGER applications and wants the ability to fund more of them than the $1.5 billion cap allows. “For example, we’re sitting on high-quality applications worth billions of dollars submitted through our TIGER grant program that could be announced right away—if we had the funds,” LaHood said. He continued: “As we evaluate major transit projects going forward, we’ll consider all the factors that help communities reduce their carbon footprint, spur economic activity, and relieve congestion.”

have come to us have been used to maintain the statewide broadcast 8 system,” Morrill tells citydesk. “Our initial projections are if we were to lose the funds, we would really have to pull back those statewide systems. Vir tually all of the repeater programs in the rural areas would not really be suppor table without some form of subsidization.” A group has already sprung up, aided in par t by the Friends of IdahoPTV and its public affairs firm, Gallatin Public Affairs, that’s attempting to voice its dissatisfaction with the state cuts to public television. Save Idaho Public Television prompts fans of the station’s programs to contact legislators and say “Don’t kill Big Bird.” And to join their 2,700-strong and growing Facebook group as well. In the ultimate play, IdahoPTV is telling lawmakers they will be cut from the day’s programming if they cut funding to the station; Morrill says the Legislature Live ser vice that beams video of committee and House and Senate proceedings throughout the Capitol building and over the Web, will not be in the new business plan. “That would be one of the ser vices, that if we lost state suppor t, I’m not seeing where the resources would come to continue that ser vice,” said Morrill. In the People-Who-Were-Denied-SesameStreet-as-Children camp, the latest issue of the classic comic book Captain America, entitled “Two Americas,” star ts out with a police raid on a Boise Foothills home, where an impostor Captain America is gathering up an underground army of Tea Par ty-like anti-government forces. The character William Burnside—who in 1950s Boise became obsessed with the New Deal era, Nazi-fighting American Hero, to the point of impersonating him—returns home to find vacant strip malls and rampant crime. “And now he was finally home ... but not to a hero’s welcome,” the strip reads. “No, this country had turned its back on him long ago.” Burnside, posing as the Captain, gathers groups of angr y white truckers and returned soldiers in his compound. “Honest, hardworking Americans ... ready and able to rise up and fight back,” as the strip describes. They march on downtown Boise, tea bagging signs (that’s what the signs in the book say) and all. They throw an African-American secret agent posing as an IRS auditor out of a bar, calling him “Obama” (with some degree of agent provocateur meddling from an undercover REAL Captain America). They even have the real undercover Captain posing as a compatriot refuse free beer (no handouts, no charity, man) after throwing the faux tax collector out of the bar: The strip acknowledges that Idaho ain’t D.C., but implies that the hinterlands are fraught with anti-government forces bent on insurrection. The cliffhanger ending leaves open the possibility that the real American patriot, Captain America himself, may swoop in and hand these impostor patriots a large can of whoop ass. It’s enough to make a guy want to read the comics again. —Nathaniel Hoffman

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UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

PHASING THEM OUT State may sunset agencies that serve minority populations ANDREW CRISP Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter came out swinging at the beginning of this year’s legislative season, suggesting the move of entire state agencies off the general fund dole. But in just three weeks, two of the agencies slated for full submersion have managed to keep their heads above water. Otter and Nancy Merrill, director of the Department of Parks and Recreation, announced last week that rather than “cut” the Idaho Department of Parks and Rec and move parklands to the Department of Lands, the state could cut $4.5 million, lay off 25 employees and raise fees. But while the Parks Department may be saved, there are still more than half a dozen agencies slated for a four-year phase-out from state funds: The list includes Idaho Public Television, the Idaho Human Rights Commission, the Independent Living Council, the Developmental Disabilities Council, the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Commission, the Hispanic Commission, and the Digital Learning Academy. The combined savings for taking these agencies out of the system? It’s a paltry $2.4 million by the fourth year. But at least one of them appears to have found a way out from under the guillotine so far. Marc Johnson, a lobbyist and once chief of staff to former Gov. Cecil Andrus, orchestrated an open letter signed by dozens of bipartisan religious and human rights leaders decrying the demise of the Human Rights Commission. The document outlined the significant gains the commission has made in a state that has historically dealt with racism, particularly in North Idaho, where the Aryan Nations once thrived. “When the governor made his proposal, I had a number of people ask me, or express

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concern to me, that this seemed like a really tough position to put the Human Rights Commission in. I said, ‘Let’s see if we can’t reach out to some of them, and bring back to the Legislature how important we think this is,’” Johnson said. There’s some hope on the horizon for the HRC, with a plan to move the agency to the Department of Labor, but there are details to finalize before that can happen. These agency reductions are all a part of Otter’s “efficiencies” mantra, through which he’s cutting services for marginalized Idahoans. Pablo Yzquierdo, a former commissioner on the Idaho Commission on Hispanic Affairs, also spoke out against the governor’s strategy. The staff at Hispanic Affairs is down to three—all of whom now face furlough days. While Yzquierdo couldn’t speak for the commission, he did say: “I think that cutting this commission has little to do with the budget. I realize that the state has a shortfall on taxes, but all these commissions add up to less than 1 percent. The Hispanic Commission only gets $100,000 a year from the state. I think it has more to do with this Libertarian ideology. I don’t think anybody wants big government. I certainly don’t, but I think that chopping down certain things like the Human Rights Commission, which has 40 years of work in the state ... I think the governor is out of step. I think it’s wrong.” Last week, the directors of some agencies slated for elimination filed into the Legislature’s Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee to plead their cases. When BW called Steven Snow, executive director of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Council, Unda’ the Rotunda was routed through a human interpreter service that allows the deaf to use a type of video telephone. What seemed

a bit strange at first ultimately highlighted the need for these agencies in Idaho. According to Snow, the agency’s very existence is at risk. “The federal money in relation to deaf and hard of hearing is very minuscule. We don’t have the qualifications to get the different type of money. Most of the money requires a state match … so basically there’s no money by the second year. And we can’t function on 50 percent of our budget. And that means we’re probably going to have to close down,” Snow said, through the interpreter. Perhaps the most precarious organization is that of the State Independent Living Council and the statewide network it supports. Kelly Buckland, director of the National Independent Living Council and former director of Idaho’s agency, is skeptical of Otter’s plan. “I think it’s very shortsighted. Some of the policy recommendations that have come out of [the council] have actually saved the state millions of dollars. Cutting something that will only save a few thousand dollars is shortsighted because in the long run, it’s going to cost the state money.” The state has three Independent Living Centers: in Boise, Pocatello and Moscow. While these organizations don’t directly rely on the SILC, they can’t exist without it, per federal regulations. If SILC fails, these centers and 10 offices around the state are gone, contributing to more unemployment and leaving Idaho’s disabled at risk. “The SILC, without state funding, the federal funding will not allow for any resource funding development. We can’t get more federal funding with federal dollars. In effect, if the SILC went away, I’m not sure where our money would come from,” said Dean Nielson, of Life Inc. in Pocatello.

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ADAM R OS ENLU ND

STORIES OF PEACE

ONE WOMAN’S MISSION TO BRING THE WORLD TOGETHER THROUGH PERSONAL TALES BY LORA VOLKERT eirut, Lebanon, 2006. The fighting between Hezbollah and Israel in southern Lebanon has spread to the country’s capital. Anti-aircraft missiles are fired at Israeli planes. The Israelis, in turn, bomb the Lebanese airport. Aid workers are forced to flee the country. But somewhere in the city, a woman is teaching art to children of Palestinian refugees. Somewhere in the city, a girl is remembering her best friend, whose father forbade them to hang out because of religious differences. Somewhere in the city, a young woman is swimming to take her mind off the evening news. All over the city, people are hoping for peace. It’s these stories that 33-year-old Katy Gilbert tells on storiesofourcity. com. Stories of Our City is a project affiliated with LEAP Charities in Boise that records and podcasts the stories of everyday Lebanese people. Gilbert hopes the stories give people in Lebanon a voice. “People in the country didn’t have a voice. They were at the mercy of the warlords or at the mercy of the politicians,” she said. She also hopes the project will help Americans understand the lives of people in the Middle East and empathize with them. She was in Boise on Jan. 6 to tell Boiseans about the project. “We’re hoping that the West will be able to engage more in the Middle East, that they will realize there’s people there and take action,” she said. Gilbert hopes to inspire people to write to members of Congress and take an interest in foreign policy in the Middle East. “It’s really a movement of love,” said Bart Cochran, the founder of LEAP, short for Love, Entrepreneurship, Accountability and Peace. “It’s the softer side of the peace process ... [Gilbert] values people. Her whole vision is, if people can hear the stories of other people, they can look at them as people and not as animals or adversaries.”

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Katy Gilbert, left, has spent much of the last few years in Lebanon, posing here with friends Laila and Fatima, while working on her project, storiesofourcity.com.

The project has been really well received in Lebanon and the United States, according to Gilbert. In November, Stories of Our City celebrated its 2,000th download. Gilbert was inspired to start the project based on her own experiences in Beirut. She was in Lebanon working with a handful of nongovernmental organizations, or NGOs, when war broke out between Israel and Hezbollah. She realized it was no longer safe in Beirut, so she decided to leave the country. “I wanted to stay and try to help, but it was a good decision,” she said. “You could see that the war had come to Beirut. It wasn’t just going to stay in the south.” She was standing by the airport bar with some friends when, through the airport’s large glass windows, they saw anti-aircraft missiles going up. Gilbert’s airplane left at 3 p.m. The Israelis bombed the airport just four hours later. Gilbert’s trip to Beirut in the summer of 2006 was part of getting her master’s degree in peace studies from Dallas Seminary. It was a fact-finding trip to look at what various NGOs were doing in Lebanon and what efforts seemed to be having the most effect. She decided to focus on peace studies after reading a book called Country of My Skull about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa. Reading people’s stories about what happened during apartheid and how they rebuilt their lives led Gilbert to one conclusion. “Peace does work, and it can happen,” she said. Gilbert is a big fan of podcasts like This American Life. “I just really like stories,” she said. “I thought, ‘we should just use something like this.’” After her trip to Beirut, Gilbert went to Amman, Jordan, to study Arabic, which she uses to conduct some of the interviews. She was already interested in starting a podcast project, but needed help. On a trip to Boise to visit her brother, she met Cochran, one of her brother’s friends. She found out LEAP had been doing some water projects in Afghanistan and was looking for a new project. Cochran recalls meeting Gilbert and hearing her stories about the people in Lebanon, the rich culture there, and her plans to start the podcast. “It really appealed to our hearts,” he said. “We thought what she was

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doing was really important.” With funding from LEAP, Gilbert went back to Beirut to collect stories. She has done 40 to 50 interviews with people she meets through her friends in Beirut or random people on the street. “I approach people and tell them that I am working to help Americans understand the people of the Middle East and almost immediately they start telling me things from their life,” she said. Life in Beirut has calmed down a lot in the past three years, Gilbert said. “We do have crazy things, like there is a tank on my street, but it doesn’t really affect me,” she said. “You give directions based on the tanks. ‘Take a left at the second tank,’” she said, laughing. A far greater challenge is having the infrastructure to post the podcast. There are at least three hours a day when there’s no electricity, Gilbert said. And there are caps on Internet usage. You can only upload or download 4 gigabytes per month. She once decided to go over the cap and pay the extra amount, and received a bill for $300. Now she hops from one coffee shop to the next when she reaches her cap. “As far as war-torn countries go, we should be happy we have Internet,” Gilbert said. “It could be a lot worse.” Despite the Internet restrictions, she has produced 23 podcasts. She plans to expand the podcast to include other Middle Eastern countries and expects to spend half of 2010 in Lebanon and half in Egypt, Syria and Jordan. Gilbert hopes to add an element to her Web site that will allow people to record their own stories from anywhere, and she wants to get members of other NGOs to record people in Iraq, Afghanistan and Darfur. And she hopes to expand her content to books, radio and other Web sites. Gilbert often gets people in Lebanon to tell the sorts of stories anyone can relate to—funny stories about their grandmothers, or sad tales of the death of a parent—to show Americans that people in Beirut are no different than they are. She loves stories that break down stereotypes Westerners have about the Middle East. “I met a man who was a Sunni Muslim, and he’s also gay, so he calls himself ‘The Gay Sunni,’” Gilbert said. “He realized he WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


was gay because he was falling in love with Rhett Butler on Gone With the Wind.” He has a partner and is out to some people but not to his family, who go to the mosque every week. Most people don’t realize that Lebanon has a gay community, Gilbert said, but anti-homosexual laws are enforced less in that country than in other primarily Islamic countries. They even had a gay-rights rally there when the police tried to clamp down on a gay bar. But she especially likes to find stories that show the indomitable Lebanese spirit. “I really enjoy listening to the stories of hope there in Lebanon, to listen to them and see how they’re trying to make a better life in Lebanon,” she said. One of her favorites is about a woman named Yara who spent three

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days camped out in a doorway in order to secure funding for a project to help get Palestinian children involved in art and use art to tell their experiences. Gilbert hopes her stories bring people together. “There’s a lot of division there, but there’s a lot of similarities. Every side has people who want peace.”

EXCERPTS FROM STORIES OF OUR CITY NADA, JULY 26, 2009: “A few times we had bombs like close, above the bridge ... I wasn’t working then, I was working actually for a lifestyle magazine and I wasn’t doing political stuff so I didn’t have to work. It’s very weird. You go rent a

bunch of movies, you go buy lots of books. I didn’t want to watch the news. I didn’t want to ... Everything was closed. We didn’t have gas. We were worried. I didn’t want to hear about the war, but everyone was worried ... I would hear horrible things happening. My friend that I called ... two of her cousins died because 14-year-old guys bombed their house. No, horrible things were happening. Every now and then I would like go to one of the place where they would welcome refugees and go help out ... I would come swim every morning ... It’s terrible to say that I was swimming and sunbathing when people were dying, no it’s a horrible thing to say, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t care. I didn’t want to live hooked on the TV. But every day I would like, I volunteered at a place, every day to say

I was doing my part but ... what are you going to do? ... And you feel angry because your whole life is put on hold, like it’s very selfish because people are actually dying and you’re safe, and your biggest problem is that your favorite brand of whatever is not available anymore. This is a very selfish thing to say but you also get angry because, OK, now my life is on hold because of what?”

YARA, NOV. 8, 2009: “I was so crazy, so I think I want to quit my job and to be involved more with the children, and I have no money. Yeah, I am telling you that I have no money. I have nothing. I have no funding, I have nothing at all. I have only my proposal and I spent, I tell you the truth, I spent one week going from one place

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to another and telling the people that this is my proposal and you have to come through, to give me money. And one of the most funniest thing I have done, there is someone … I was staying at his apartment, at the door of his apartment, three, three days, three consecutive days, because he promised me that he will give me money and then he refused, so I’m going to keep on punishing you by seeing you every day from 6 a.m. ’til 12. And then he gave me money ... This is a project for kids, mainly for kids between 8 and 12 years old, and it’s an artistic place for them to create anything they want from writing plays, writing stories, from music if they love music, photography. We want them to learn what they are passionate for, so we take their passion and we enlighten it. This is my own project so it’s a big difference. When you see someone who has no hope in life and you see he has desire to do something, that’s what I want to do is to make small, small, little bit difference.”

OLIVER AND NADA, OCT. 18, 2009: “You have things like auto theft. In the States, they’ll pull you out of the car, shoot you in the face and then take your car. Here it’s much more organized.” “Here you get to buy it.” “Here they pull this whole scheme where they act like they’re cops, and they’ll pull you over and they’ll take your car.” “It’s usually the very nice cars, and you get to pay to buy it back.” “Yeah, they give you the chance to buy it back from them. So they’ll steal your car ... and they say, we have your car. How much are you willing to pay for it? ... Exactly. They kidnap the car.”

JOSEPHINE, AUG. 9, 2009: “I work all around the house ... I know the cooking of the Lebanese food, only by looking I learn, so I can cook by my own ... Lots of Filipina working here stay long time because we are the breadwinner, even though we are highly educated within a secondary (school) or by university, there is no choice at all because if you stay in the Philippines and you have a big family and your children are in the university, it costs a lot of money. I came here because I had four children and then my husband doesn’t have a good work. So when I stay in the Philippines I am a secretary … so the money I received is not enough for my family because we are staying with mother and father, in one house … So I was forced to work overseas because I could earn a lot of money and then I can help my brother, I can help my mother, I can help my sisters and at the same time my children will be the ones who will benefit.” “How often do you see your children?” “Every two years ... (It isn’t easy) because the children, what they are every time telling me, ‘We doesn’t need your money. We want your love. We want (you) to be with us, because we grown up only with the grandparents and my sisters,’ but they want of course the caress. But what can I do? There is no choice at all. So I need to stay far from them.”

JADE, OCT. 25, 2009: “I remember when we were standing in the hospital and the doctor came out of what was supposed to be a very quick and easy operation on my father, and he told us that he had severe brain cancer and it was a stage

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four brain cancer ... something really crazy and really rare. To explain how someone feels at that moment, at a moment where it seems like everything is crashing down and, you know, you’re especially watching your family just breaking to bits, is probably impossible. But the emotion, the feeling is still there ... I remember seeing my mom just break down and my sister cry, and my brother and I just look at each other like, did this just happen? Did the worst thing that always happens to other people and is always in a different house and was always oh, that sad story that you hear from a friend’s friend’s friend, did that just happen to us? Did we just became that friend’s friend’s friend? It’s really amazing how the roles in life change sometimes, just flip so quickly. After the operation my father went into a nine-month coma, the first of which was a full coma where he was in the ICU the whole time and the rest of the eight months he was in a semi-coma, which meant that he was kind of awake but still not there. His eyes were open, he would look at you, but he didn’t know who you were. He didn’t know you. During that nine months it was a very interesting time for me—and I choose the word interesting because I can’t explain it in any other way—it was an interesting time for me because I hadn’t had a very strong relationship with my father, and because of the lack of relationship, because I now was in a way forced to spend so much time with him but spending time with him in a very weird way. Spending time with him while he’s just lying in a bed, immobile. I’m just sitting there, thinking and speaking out loud, and no one listening ... Finally he passed away and at that moment, I knew that, I don’t know how, that same feeling that I felt that is extremely inexplicable and I can’t explain what it is and I can’t describe it, is changed at that moment ... I felt sad of course and I felt upset, but there was this moment of peace at the same time ... I knew one thing. I knew that God was just. I knew that God loves me and I knew God loved my father much more than I could love anyone.”

MAUREEN, NOV. 1, 2009: “I wasn’t even aware there was a war until I was much, much older. Like, it was this filter. No one spoke about it at home. No one told me what to think. No one told me what to believe. And you know like schools don’t tell you anything about the war. They don’t teach you and they ban talking about politics and about the recent history of Lebanon, so everything after ’75 is not included in a single history book that’s taught in school ... The first time I was really, really hit by it, kind of, was when the father of a friend of mine, really, really good friend of mine, I think we were 13 and he asked her, he asked his daughter not to invite me anymore because I was Christian and he didn’t want his Sunni daughter hanging out with Christians ... She just like totally blocked me and it was so painful. She was my best friend and we were 12, 13 ... She never told me and she just fabricated this whole story about, yeah, well, he thinks you’re distracting me from school and I just need to focus on my studies ... I found out through another friend who slipped, she thought I knew and she’s like, well, this is exactly why.” WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events

You’d be remiss to diss the Nexus.

WEDNESDAY-THURSDAY JAN. 27-28

Trains, complaints and funding ordeals.

tech BIZ EXPO If you’re a Treasure Valley techie looking for a chance to toy around with a Google Nexus One or learn the basics of Microsoft Windows 7, the 19th annual Business and Technology Expo, or Biz Expo, is right up your alley. On Wednesday, Jan. 27, from noon-5 p.m. and Thursday, Jan. 28, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m., more than 120 Boise-area businesses will gather at the Boise Centre to show off the latest and greatest in business and technology. The event is free to the public and offers more than 40 hours of business and tech-related seminars, including Your Web Site’s Broken and You Don’t Even Know It: Five Things to Do to Make Your Web Site More Relevant; Turning up the Heat Without Cooking the Books; Business Under Siege, Fraud in America: An Overview of Fraud Awareness Protection and Prevention; and Microsoft Windows 7: Are you ready? While Biz Expo will bring together a wide array of local companies, it’s not really aimed at job seekers. “I would say that over half of our attendees are business owners, presidents, CEOs,” said Kris Miller, director of business development at Idaho Business League. “If someone’s seeking a job, they can come down, but it’s more geared to business-to-business networking and business-tobusiness resources.” But not everything at Biz Expo is tech-focused. Local service-oriented companies that cater to the business community—like Baird’s Cleaners and The Modern Hotel—will also be on hand to showcase their offerings. And it wouldn’t be a legit expo without free stuff, so attendees can look forward to door prizes, drawings and even some grub from Papa Joe’s. “It’s really an event geared toward helping to profile and enhance and expand local Idaho businesses,” said Miller. “So, hopefully, it can help spark some life into the economy.” Wednesday, Jan. 27, noon-5 p.m., Thursday, Jan. 28, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., FREE, Boise Centre, 850 W. Front St., 208-336-8900, boisecentre.com. For more information, visit idahobizexpo.com.

WEDNESDAYSATURDAY JAN. 27FEB. 20 stage AT HOME AT THE ZOO Few, if any, life-altering experiences occur on a park bench. But that’s not the case for Peter, the upscale book editor protagonist

in Edward Albee’s threeact play, At Home at the Zoo. Boise Contemporar y Theater, which premieres the play on Wednesday, Jan. 27, had to seek personal approval from the 81-yearold, three-time Pulitzer Prize Award-winning playwright before going into production. In At Home at the Zoo’s first act, the prequel “Homelife” explores the shattered marriage of New Yorkers Peter and Ann. In the second act, “Zoo Story,” Peter cools

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down from a marital spat by reading a book in Central Park (as most men tend to do?), where he encounters Jerry, a belligerent transient with questionable motives. A bizarre and unnerving conversation leads to an event that transforms the lives of both men forever. At Home at the Zoo takes a voyeuristic look at the sudden transformation of ordinar y people. Albee, author of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?,

THURSDAY JAN. 28 lecture NEXT STOP: CITY CLUB The motto of the City Club of Boise—“Nothing happens until people start talking”—is not quite true in the case of Boise’s proposal for a streetcar. A lot has already happened, but the venerable old forum, which regularly fills its intellectually challenging luncheons well beyond capacity, is going to add to the conversation with a debate of sorts this week. Cece Gassner, Boise Mayor Dave Bieter’s point person on all things streetcar, will deliver the city’s vision for laying tracks downtown: economic development, public transportation, a small dose of nostalgia, and—as of a few weeks ago—proof that the feds are on the same page as the city in terms of funding quality-of-life transit projects. On the other page, George Iliff, managing principal at downtown real estate brokerage Colliers International and a member of the city’s Streetcar Task Force, will criticize the city’s predictions for economic development and ridership numbers and continue to play the role of trolley skeptic in a suit. We’d rather not fill out the little question cards, so we’re going to get this out of the way now: When you were both kids, did you think you’d be a lawyer and a real estate broker, or did you play with trains? 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m., $16 members, $23 nonmembers, $10 students for lunch, $5 listen only, The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd.

examines the brutal truth about the human condition. His conclusion comes to light in the final scene of At Home at the Zoo. Humanity, it seems, is sometimes not so human. Previews Wednesday, Jan. 27-Fri. Jan. 29. Opens Saturday, Jan. 30. Through Saturday, Feb. 20. Shows at 8 p.m. Feb. 6 and Feb 13 matinee 2 p.m. Postshow talk on Feb. 5 and Feb. 13. $12-$32, Boise Contemporar y Theater, 854 Fulton St., 208-331-9224, bctheater.org.

SATURDAY JANUARY 30 lit RANDOM READINGS Many of us have a book of some sort simmering in a crockpot in the back of our brains. Be it the next great American fiction masterpiece, a tawdry wind-swept romance or a historical overview of sedimentary rocks in Ada County, there’s latent literary greatness lurking all around.

The Idaho Writer’s Guild, an arm of The Cabin that offers “networking, employment and educational opportunities” for the Idaho writing community, has started a new program to help local writers turn that crockpot medley into a published pot roast. Random Readings is a quarterly series that kicks off on Saturday, Jan. 30, from 1-3 p.m. at The Cabin’s Jean Wilson Reading Room. The series will offer writers and readers the opportunity to congregate and explore the finicky world of publishing WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


LAU R IE PEAR M AN

FIND Go figure.

THURSDAY-SUNDAY JAN. 28-JAN. 31 dance FIGURATIVELY SPEAKING When Idaho Dance Theatre chose the title Figuratively Speaking for the second show of its 2009-2010 season, the company tried to pick an all-encompassing theme. “We create the programs as the season progresses, but we have to have the titles ready for season tickets,” explained IDT’s managing director Becky Breshears. “So, we come up with names, sometimes they end up relating and sometimes they don’t. With Figuratively Speaking, the only thing we’re thinking about is just the figure on stage.” Skimming over the show’s highly varied program, it’s a good thing they kept it loose. The evening will feature guest choreographers Lauren Edson—who performs with the Trey McIntyre Project—and IDT company member Gonzalo Valdez, whose piece is a new interpretation of West Side Story. IDT cofounder Marla Hansen will bring back the number “Why Wait,” which is set to music by Tom Waits and explores situations in which people are trapped in their everyday lives. And Carl Rowe, IDT co-artistic director, will also premiere a new piece with music by composer Craig Armstrong, which is based on having to make a difficult decision. “The piece that we saw in rehearsal last week had this hugely complicated partnering section, where every single dancer gets held up by another at some point,” said Breshears, describing Rowe’s new piece. “It was all about how you depend on others to help you through these situations.” If this fancy dance cocktail has you intrigued but you’re on a domestic beer budget, be sure to check out IDT’s no-frills preview night, which offers attendees a “pay what you can afford” admission price. Also, those who want to check out the show more than once will receive half-off admission on their second go-round when they present their ticket stub to the box office. Preview Thursday, Jan. 28, 7 p.m., pay what you can; Friday, Jan. 29-Saturday, Jan. 30, 8 p.m.; Sunday, Jan. 31, 2 p.m. $28 adults, $20 seniors, $14 students, Boise State Special Events Center, 1910 University Drive, 208-331-9592, idahodancetheatre.org. through the eyes of published Idaho authors. The first installment will feature Magic Valley authors Bonnie Dodge, Dixie Thomas Reale and Patricia Santos Marcantonio speaking about their collection of short stories, poems and essays titled Voices from the Snake River Plain. Boisean Valerie Robertson, president of the Coeur du Bois Chapter of Romance Writers of America, will also read from her novel, Blade’s Edge. And local sci-fi author Ken McConnell will speak about his novels Starstrikers and Null Pointer. 1-3 p.m., FREE, Jean Wilson Reading Room, garden level of The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-331-8000, idahowriters guild.com.

S U B M I T

SUNDAY JAN. 31 kosher PICKLE RABBI Ever wondered what makes a kosher pickle different from a run-of-the-mill preserved cuke? Well, Rabbi Shmuel Marcus—aka Pickle Rabbi—is heading to town to give Boiseans the lowdown on the kosher pickling process from vine to brine. Sound like a pickle-schtickle? It’s not. Marcus is the founder of the Kosher Pickle Factory in Cypress, Calif., and travels around the country giving lessons on the dill-icious

SHOW YOUR LOVE WITH LASAGNA

Who you callin’ chicken?

SATURDAY JAN. 30 bugs BACKYARD CHICKENS 101 Q: Why did the chicken cross the road? A: To get to the sustainable urban eco-coop where he kicks it with pals and scarfs down composting scraps in exchange for a fresh supply of eggs and fertilizer. If that wasn’t the punch line you were expecting, then you’re probably an urban chickenkeeping novice. If that’s the case, the Boise Urban Garden School wants to be your wing man. On Saturday, Jan. 30, BUGS is offering the intro class Food, Fertilizer and Pest Control: Your complete introduction to raising this amazing food source (and great pet), family style. Though city regulations put the nix on noisy roosters, each household is allowed three hens inside Boise city limits. Touted as a sustainable way to produce your own free eggs while fertilizing for your garden, backyard chicken-raising has seen immense popularity over the past few years. The BUGS class, taught at the home of instructor Susan Medlin, will cover when, where and what breed of chicks to buy, as well as proper coop construction and feeding practices. If you’re afraid your spouse/little tyke will run around like a chicken with its head cut off while you’re out of the house, fret not: You can bring them along free of charge. Other upcoming classes offered at BUGS include Square Foot Gardening on Feb. 26, Pest Management on March 20 and Preservation I and II on Sept. 18 and Oct. 2, respectively. 9:30 a.m.-noon, $40, 5323 Hill Road, 208-424-6665, boiseurbangardenschool.org.

art of vinegar preservation. On Sunday, Jan. 31, Pickle Rabbi will take over the Rose Room downtown, as-salting attendees with his vast knowledge of canning. For $15 in advance or $18 at the door, each participant

Gifts of food and cer tificates may seem like easy outs when the receiver was expecting something a little more personalized. But make it a lovely stoneware baking pan filled with Cucina di Paolo’s savor y take-and-bake lasagna with a cer tificate for 50 percent off the next order, and the person on the receiving end will be happier than Garfield on National Lasagna Day (July 29, by they way). CUCINA DI PAOLO Proprietors Paul and Mar y 1504 Vista Ave. Jean Wegner came up with 208-345-7150 this novel way to give a great cucinadipaolo.com Open Tues.-Fri. gift that Mar y Jean said is not 11 a.m.-7 p.m.; only good marketing for Cucina Sat. Noon-6 p.m.; di Paolo—when the recipient closed Sun.-Mon. comes in to use the coupon for a half-price lasagna refill, they can take in (and maybe take home) some of the other gastronomical gems in the joint—but it’s good for the giftgiver as well. “It’s great karma for you,” Mar y Jean said. “Because any time your friend uses it, they’ll think of you.” This isn’t a cheap gift, either in presentation or in dollar outlay: it will run you $48. But keep in mind that dough nets you a pan-full of one of the Wegners’ famous sixpiece meat, chicken or vegetable lasagnas in 14 varieties, a refill for only $9.50 (regular price is $17), bragging rights as an incredible gift-giver and, if you’re lucky, an invitation to dinner. —Amy Atkins

can head home with his or her own jar of homemade kosher pickles. 1:30-2:30 p.m., $15 adv., $18 door, $50 per family, The Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St. To RSVP, visit jewishidaho.com.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 17


8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY JAN. 27 Festivals & Events THE RED LIGHT REVIEW—A peppery kind of evening featuring the likes of the ladies of burlesque paired with open mic and live music by Dan Costello, Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats and Oilslave. Also hosting poets from the Big Tree Poetry Slam. VAC is a 21-and-older venue. 8 p.m. $7. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, www. visualartscollective.com.

Food & Drink GIRLS NIGHT OUT—Gather the ladies together for an evening of chocolates, wines, pampering and decadent desser ts. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $40 members, $50 nonmembers. Boise Co-op, 888 W. For t St., Boise, 208472-4500, www.boisecoopwineshop.com.

Odds & Ends LISTEN LOCALLY. THINK GLOBALLY.

Peter Anastos, Artistic Director

VINYL PRESERVATION SOCIETY OF IDAHO— January’s theme: Wallow in the Post-Holiday Blues. Major Chess Records collector John Francis presents the Chess Records story on vinyl. 7-10 p.m. FREE, www.vpsidaho.org. Modern Hotel and Bar, 1314 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-424-8244.

THURSDAY JAN. 28 Concerts BOISE PHILHARMONIC YOUTH ORCHESTRA SPRING CONCERT—A full symphony orchestra comprised of talented, local high school musicians performing classics from the standard orchestral repertoire. 7 p.m. $7. Timberline High School, 701 E. Boise Ave., Boise, boisephilharmonic.org.

representative Tim O’Leary will share a variety of ways to make your home more energy efficient. 7-9 p.m. $15. Hillside Junior High school, 3536 Hill Rd., Boise, 208-854-5120. A STREETCAR FOR BOISE? TWO VIEWS— See Picks, Page 16. 11:45 a.m.-1:15 p.m. $16 members, $23 nonmembers, $10 students for lunch, $5 listen only. The Grove Hotel, 245 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-333-8000.

FRIDAY JAN. 29 Food & Drink CHILI FEED BENEFIT—Columbia High School Boosters host a chili feed to raise money for their scholarship fund. 5:30-8:30 p.m. $3.50. Columbia High School, 301 S. Happy Valley Road, Nampa, 208-498-0571. WENTE VINEYARDS WINE TASTING—Wente Vineyards wants to treat you to their private stash, including their allocation only Nth Degree Special Reserve merlot and syrah, as well as serving up four wines from their limited production. 6-8 p.m. $20, includes six tastings. Helina Marie’s Wine and Gift Shop, 11053 Hwy. 44, Star, 208-286-7960, www.helinamaries.com.

Sports & Fitness CHAIR DANCING WORKSHOP—Burlesque superstar, miss AbSINthia Verre, leads a lady’s chair dancing workshop. Email danceophidia@gmail.com to register. 7-8 p.m. $15. Ophidia Dance and Art Studio, 200 E. 37th St., No. 7, Garden City, 208-409-2403, www.myspace. com/danceophidia.

Kids & Teens FRIDAY FAMILY MOVIE NIGHT—Bring the family down for a special screening of Pilgrim’s Progress. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Red Letter Books and Cafe, 1 Auto Dr., Boise, 208-376-6917 or cafe 208-639-7118, www. redletterbooks.com.

SATURDAY JAN. 30 Festivals & Events 107TH ANNUAL ROBBIE BURNS NIGHT—Haggis for dinner and shor tbread for desser t, followed up by per formances by the Boise Highlanders and their Highland Dancers, as well as the City of Trees Pipe Band and the Celtic Sisters. 6 p.m. $27 adults, $12 children ages 4-11. Advanced ticket purchase is required. To purchase tickets, contact John McDade at 208331-5675. Doubletree Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, www.doubletree.com. DISCOVERING ENGINEERING—Folks at the College of Engineering at Boise State will be holding an all-ages activity session where par ticipants will be able to build robots, design bridges and construct just about anything. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. FREE. Boise State College of Engineering, 1375 University Drive, Boise, 208426-1153, coen.boisestate. edu/discoverengineering.

Concerts SOUNDS LIKE FUN— Boise Philharmonic presents a series of concer ts designed for the whole family with

19

Art

Cinderella

Saturday, February 6th at 2 & 8 pm

Tickets on sale now!

Group discounts and family packages available

www.balletidaho.org or call 426-1110 18 | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | BOISEweekly

A SENSE OF PLACE, THE DREAM HOUSES OF JAMES CASTLE— An opportunity for the public to enjoy a visual presentation by Jacqueline Crist featuring works by Idaho’s own James Castle. 67:30 p.m. FREE. J Crist Galler y, 223 S. 17th St. (at Fair view), Boise, 208-336-2671, www. jcrist.com. STEPHANIE BACON, ARTIST RECEPTION—Mixed-media artist Stephanie Bacon presents her exhibition Found Paper Polemics. 5-7 p.m. FREE. Brandt Center at NNU, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-467-8975, www. nnu.edu/brandt.

Talks & Lectures ADVANCED HOME ENERGY EFFICIENCY—Eco-Home Solutions representative Todd McGiverin and Idaho Office of Energy

Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT a host of upbeat and interactive musicians. Today’s per formance focuses on strings. 10:45 a.m. $8. Esther Simplot Center for the Per forming Ar ts, 516 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-345-9116.

Valley by John Rember. 10:30 a.m.-noon. FREE. Meridian Librar y, Silverstone Branch, 3531 E. Overland Road, Meridian, 208-884-2616, www.mld.org/ silverstone.htm.

18

RANDOM READINGS— See Picks, Page 16. 1-3 p.m. FREE. The Cabin, 801 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-331-8000, www.thecabinidaho.org.

Food & Drink CREATING A VALENTINE’S DAY BREAKFAST FOR YOUR PARENTS—Wouldn’t that be nice? Sweet chef Betti Newburn leads youth ages 8-17 in a comprehensive breakfast menu fit for a queen and king. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. $35. Potter y Gourmet, 811 W. Bannock St., Boise, 208-368-0649.

Green BACKYARD CHICKENS—See Picks, Page 16. 9:30 a.m.-noon. $40, FREE kids and spouses. BUGS Garden, 5323 Hill Road, Boise, 208-4246665, www.boiseurbangardenschool.org.

Workshops & Classes

SUNDAY JAN. 31

CHICKEN AND EGG WORKSHOP—It’s a potluck and poultr y bash. Bird man Arden Schmitt will share his knowledge of all things bird. Bring a dish to share. Space is limited. 11 a.m. $20. Held at Arden’s farm, 1421 S. 1800 E. in Gooding, Idaho, 208-5439987 or 208-720-0673.

Odds & Ends PICKLE RABBI—See Picks, Page 16. 1:302:30 p.m. $15. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise, 208-381-0483, www.parklaneco.com/roseroom.

Literature LIVING IN THE MODERN RURAL WEST—Gather to discuss today’s pick: Traplines: Coming Home to Sawtooth

MONDAY FEB. 1 Talks & Lectures PRAXIS LODGE PUBLIC DIALOGUES SERIES—A monthly meet to engage in discussions per taining to science, ethics, culture, philosophy, humanism and free masonr y, hosted by Praxis Lodge. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Papa Joe’s, 1301 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-3447272.

TUESDAY FEB. 2 Festivals & Events PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP AND POETRY SLAM OF STEEL AND HAIKU BATTLE—Poetr y workshop with Denise Jolly and Matt Blesse at 6 p.m. followed by an all-ages poetr y slam. Sign ups are at 6:30 p.m. and the show is at 7 p.m. FREE for workshop; $5 poetr y slam, $1 with student ID, www.boisepoetr y.com. Woman of Steel Galler y and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-331-5632.

On Stage

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

CINDERELLA, FAMILY SERIES—A behind-the-scenes preview to Ballet Idaho’s production of Cinderella with a 45-minute interactive talk. 6 p.m. $10, Esther Simplot Center for the Per forming Ar ts, Ballet Idaho Annex, 501 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-343-0556, www. balletidaho.org.

Food & Drink FRENCH WINES—Chef Brad Cowan will lead par ticipants’ palates through various regions of France. 6-7:30 p.m. $10. Brick Oven Bistro, 801 N. Main St., Boise, 208-342-3456, www. brickovenbistro.com.

Workshops & Classes A BEGINNER’S GUIDE TO FACEBOOK AND TWITTER— Learn about the expanding ways you can use Twitter and Facebook to network. Class covers how to get star ted, and how to make sure your personal information is kept safe. 10:1511:45 a.m. FREE, reser vations required. Boise Public Librar y, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-384-4076, www.boisepubliclibrar y.org.

| EASY | MEDIUM | HARD

| PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

THE CHARACTER OF LEADERSHIP—Author, teacher and adviser Phil Eastman offers a two-hour interactive workshop examining the roots of leadership and character and how they are the true basis of our social and economic structures. 4-6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Librar y, Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, www. boisepubliclibrar y.org.

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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BOISEweekly | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 19


8 DAYS OUT Talks & Lectures DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PUBLIC HEARING—A public hearing will be held to discuss the “Draft Tank Closure and Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement for the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington.” Citizens interested in participating in the discussion may register at 6 p.m. with the ability to preview material and speak with DOE personnel and Washington Sate Department of Ecology staff. Brief presentations will follow open registration at 7 p.m., then followed by participant comments. 6-10 p.m. Owyhee Plaza Hotel, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www.owyheeplaza.com. STEPHANIE BACON—Mixedmedia artist Stephanie Bacon discusses the creation of her new exhibit, Found Paper Polemics. 11 a.m. FREE. Brandt Center at NNU, 707 Fern St., Nampa, 208-467-8790, www. nnu.edu/brandt.

WEDNESDAY FEB. 3

Jan. 27 – Feb. 20

Food & Drink FOUR FRENCH SOUPS FOR THE SOUL—Bringing back a previously sold-out class just in time for the coldest of seasons. Take an exploration in the cause of comfor t as you learn how to create four French soups. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $40 members, $50 nonmembers. Boise Co-op, 888 W. For t St., Boise, 208-472-4500, www. boisecoopwineshop.com.

Workshops & Classes WHAT’S NEW FOR 2010—Join instructor Kathy Ellensohn for some imaginative inspiration as she leads participants through a sneak peek at this year’s perennials. 6:30 p.m. $10 IBG member, $15 nonmember. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiar y Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, www.idahobotanicalgarden.org.

IDAHO REMODELING SOURCES DESIGN SHOW—With everything from seminars to room displays and curbing options, the Idaho Remodeling, Sources and Design Show provides everything you need to start up that project. Sat., Jan. 30, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sun., Jan. 31, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $2 general, FREE kids 12 and younger. Boise Centre on the Grove, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, www.boisecentre.com.

FIGURATIVELY SPEAKING—See Picks, Page 16. Preview night Thur., Jan. 28, 7 p.m. featuring a “pay what you can afford” admission price. Fri.-Sat. Jan. 29-30, 8 p.m. and Sun. Jan. 31, 2 p.m. $28 adults, $20 seniors ages 62 and older, $14 students. 208-331-9592, www.idahodancetheatre.org. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise.

MCCALL WINTER CARNIVAL— McCall is gearing up for the 45th Annual McCall Winter Carnival, an homage, of sor ts, to all things winter. Happening over the span of 10 days, the carnival incorporates ice sculptures, food, gaming, dancing, graffiti walls and so much more. Visit www.mccallwintercarnival. com for a breakdown of event times and pricing. Friday, Jan. 29-Wednesday, Feb. 3, McCall.

FOOLS—Leon Tolchinsky has landed a terrific teaching job in an idyllic Russian town, where upon arrival he finds a town that has been cursed with chronic stupidity for over 200 years and it’s his job to break the curse ... in only 24 hours. If he doesn’t succeed, he too becomes just as stupid. Thurs., Jan. 28, 7:30 p.m., Fri. Jan. 29, 8 p.m., and Sat. Jan. 30, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $11 adult, $9 senior and student. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-342-5104, www.boiselittletheater.org.

On Stage

MASTER CLASS—In this play by Terrence McNally, diva Maria Callas, a funny pedagogue of a voice master class, reflects on the triumphs and pitfalls of her life and career while celebrating and critiquing three of her eager Julliard students. Witty and comical, this play is intended for mature audiences. Thur.-Sat. Jan. 28-30, 8 p.m. and Sun. Jan. 31, 2 p.m. $15 general, $12 students, Boise State alumni, military and seniors. Danny Peterson Theatre, Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4263980, theatre.boisestate.edu.

THE ADVENTURES OF SHEERLUCK HOMES—Watch as Sheer Homes gets lucky, or not, in solving cases with his powers of happenstance. Fri.-Sat. Jan. 29-30, 7:15 p.m. and Sun. Jan. 31, 2 p.m. $7-$13. Prairie Dog Playhouse, 3820 Cassia St., Boise, 208-336-7383, www. pdplayhouse.com. AT HOME IN THE ZOO—See Picks, Page 16. Wed.-Fri., Jan. 2729, 8 p.m. and Sat. Jan. 30, 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. $12-$32. Boise Contemporar y Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-442-3232, www.bctheater.org.

THE MURDER ROOM—A witty comedy about a money-hungry wife and her numerous attempts to kill off her wealthy husband in order to claim it all. Fri.-Sat. Jan. 29-30. Dinner starts at 6:30 p.m. Show at 8 p.m. $39 dinner and show, $20 show only. Dinner must be purchased at least one day in advance. Knock ‘Em Dead Dinner Theatre, 333 S. Ninth St., Boise, 208-385-0021, www. kedproductions.org.

CLAUDE STUART—Gear up your gut for funny guy Claude Stuar t. Wed.-Thur., Jan. 27-28, 8 p.m. and Fri.-Sat., Jan. 29-30, 8 p.m. and 10:15 p.m. $10. Hijinx Comedy Club, 800 W. Idaho St., Ste. 200, Boise, 208-9477100, hijinxcomedyclub.com.

EYE SPY Real Dialogue from the naked city

Talks & Lectures RALLY AROUND MENTORING—Inviting all girls and Boise Tech members to take a tour of the Meridian Technical Charter school and gather more information on mentor opportunities. 5:45-7 p.m. FREE. Meridian Technical Charter High School, 3800 N. Locust Grove Road, Meridian, 208-288-2928, www. mtchs.org.

MULTIPLE-DAY EVENTS Festivals & Events BUSINESS AND TECHNOLOGY SHOW—See Picks, Page 16. Wed., Jan. 27, noon-5 p.m. and Thu., Jan. 28, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise Centre on the Grove, 850 W. Front St., Boise, 208-3368900, www.boisecentre.com.

20 | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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NEWS/NOISE NOISE

ASSUME THE POSITION The Missionary Position is a non- traditional take on a classic

John Doe: He still has the X factor.

LOCAL MUSIC IN THE LIMELIGHT

AMY ATKINS Choosing the right name can make all the difference in the world for a band—things may have turned out very differently for Black Sabbath if they’d stuck with their first appellation: The Polka Tulk Blues Band. But the more clever the name, the more likely a Google search will reveal that someone else Seattle’s The Missionary Position: Shouldn’t those guys be standing much closer together? has already thought of it. So sometimes the best thing a band can do is let serendipity do its thing: let the name, like inspiration, find He’s on the right track, with lyrics like them. That’s what Seattle-based The Mission- having much luck with music and was ready elements of a scrapbook made up of how to throw in the towel. ary Position did. he sees the world today. In the melancholy “In my mid-20s, I was ready to call it When Jeff Angell and Benjamin An“Here Comes the Machine,” Angell lagood,” he said. “I’d made some ground derson began playing a Thursday night ments, “It’s too late already / they won’t be [musically], but I was discouraged. And then residency at a club in Tacoma, Wash., happy ’til they own everything. / These days my ex-wife said, ‘Look at John Lee Hooker, they hadn’t yet settled on a name. Those there’s no telling who’s the prophet / and man. He never even recorded until he was Thursday lounge nights were billed as The who’s pulling the strings.” Missionary Position, and Angell said people 33. Look at Howlin’ Wolf. He never made a Justin Cantrell, the local promoter who single until he was 41. Leonard Cohen never thought that was the band’s name. booked the Boise appearance said he’s glad made it until he was like 34.’ Those guys are Angell originally wanted to go with The he did, even though he has a show at Gusto all cooler than anyone I ever grew up on.” Consequences, but found almost immedithat same night (see Listen Here, Page 22). But even with that in mind, as he and ately that it wasn’t his to take. “I saw they were touring so I sent them Anderson began to play together and record “A decade ago it would be forever a note and told them I liked their music. I before you found out someone else had that their debut release, Diamonds in a Dead Sky, they started to wonder if there was any told [Angell] he sounded like Dax Riggs’ name,” Angell said. “Now, some kid who (from Acid Death) solo stuff,” Cantrell said. point in trying. Maybe all the good music has never played a show before can have If the show goes well, Cantrell hopes to had already been made in the Mowtown that name locked up on his Myspace or a bring The Missionary Position back to Boise and Stax Records era. Was rock really Web site. You can’t compete with that. in March for a Skate Night at Gusto. There’s dead? No. Was it still worth making? Yes. Unless you have a good lawyer. And a no reason why it wouldn’t. In a genre full of dullards, they felt their big checkbook.” With Michael Alex on drums and Gregor songs were like little diamonds. Hard, So rather than fight it, Angell and AnLothian on sax, The Missionary Position’s derson embraced what the steadily growing strong little gems indeed. transition from a twosome to a foursome Diamonds is swampy, blues-based, soulnumber of Thursday night fans already seems to be working. had—they were now in The Missionary Po- ful guitar rock with enough electronic rip“There’s a certain kind of tribe mentalples to lend it a menacing air. It’s a modern sition. Done playing “cock-rock swagger” take on blues, with the occasional haunting ity of being in a band. You get this little music (he was formerly with Washingtongang of boys extending their adolescence chorus in the background, minor chords, based Post Stardom Depression), Angell or whatever. But to me, it’s always been my metronome-precise rhythms and an armsfelt the name sort of signified the simplifamily. As far as my regular family, I didn’t open-wide attitude fied direction he was have the most solid background. toward electronics, going. “A band kind of became my family. [The Thursday, Jan. 28, 9 p.m., $5 horns, woodwinds, “It’s back to baMissionary Position] is pretty like-minded, keyboards and feedsics, isn’t it?” Angell With Microbabies, Le Fleur and Vagerfly. and now this drummer is turning out to be back. Add Angell’s asked. “Looking THE RED ROOM TAVERN pretty consistent, so if we can make it work gritty vocals to the somebody in the eye? 603 Main St. for Gregor, that will be our unit for a while.” mix and the whole That’s a romantic myspace.com/theredroomboise However, Angell is also not willing to let album is as dense as a way of looking at it, I the whims of someone else get in the way of warm front. suppose.” making music. But that deep dark music is, in large While Angell may romanticize his musical “If you have too much of a group impart, a vehicle for Angell’s introspective lyrmoniker, The Missionary Position’s music is ics, each word carefully chosen as if it were pact, as people start to fall off, you’re just anything but mushy. left on your own,” he said. “If somebody a fine jewel. The seriousness with which Angell and else wants to join in, that’s great, and if “We won’t put a song out that has a Anderson approach their sound seems to stem from a crystal clear understanding that lyric I don’t believe in,” Angell said. “Some they want to stick it out, we’re happy to have them. On the other hand, we’re not people are looking at: what’s the flavor of if they take it too lightly, it just isn’t going the month? I’m looking at: can I maybe one going to let that hold us back. to work. “I’ve found what I like to do with my time day write lyrics as good as Leonard Cohen Before The Missionary Position even on the planet: write songs and play live.” came together, Angell didn’t feel like he was or Nick Cave?” WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

On Sunday, Jan. 23, surrounded by a block of empty bars, Pengilly’s Saloon pulsated with a feverish energy. A steady stream of folk and blues poured past the “filming in progress” sign taped to the front door and the sound of excited whoops and claps filled the silent streets. “There are more people in this bar than anywhere else on Sixth and Main,” noted patron Ryan Hill. Shooting the pilot episode for a new TV series titled John Doe, American Music, local company Wide Eye Productions packed the small bar with camera equipment, stage lights and wall-to-wall music fans. The show’s premise is simple but genius: for each episode, the host—John Doe of the seminal Los Angeles punk band X— will travel to a new town, where he’ll first inter view and then rock out with a handful of local bands. Those musicians included local luminaries like Cur tis Stigers, Bill Coffey, Jeremiah James, A.K.A. Belle (formerly Belle of Les Bois), Ned Evett, Hillfolk Noir and Joshua Tree. “Not only do we see these musicians in their lives, interacting with John, but then we also get to see them play,” explained Tom Hadzor, director of photography at Wide Eye. There was a familial air to the evening as each act swapped in guest musicians from other bands on the bill. While many attendees were lured into Pengilly’s by the line-up or the lime light, an equal number were there to catch a glimpse of the show’s legendar y host. “It was a little ner ve-racking,” said musician Catherine Merrick of A.K.A. Belle, describing per forming in front of Doe. As it turns out, Merrick and Cur tis Stigers were in a band that played X cover songs years ago. Though both musicians have gone on to achieve their own successes, Stigers’ face belied an undeniable giddiness when Doe joined him on stage for a cover of Kris Kristofferson’s “Help Me Make it Through the Night.” And that giddiness also spread into the crowd. While audience members were excited to par ticipate in what could be a new hit TV show, they were also amped to see the Boise music scene finally get the attention it deser ves. “We have so much talent here and people don’t really know that,” said Merrick. “I really hope it helps put Boise on the map.” —Tara Morgan

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 21


LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY JAN. 27

THURSDAY JAN. 28

FRIDAY

THE GHOST INSIDE, FOR THE FALLEN DREAMS, SUFFOKATE, YOUR DEMISE, VERSAILLES—6:30 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. The Venue

MERE CAT—9 p.m. $3. Terrapin Station

ACCOUSTIC3—With Sandon Mayhew and Tom Jensen. 7:30 p.m. $5. The Linen Building BLACK SMITH, BUKKIT— 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux BLIND ARROWS SET SAIL, LOW-FI, SELF CONCLUSION— 8 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective

KEN HARRIS—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

THE METAL AS ART TOUR, JAN. 28, GUSTO Too Much Distortion’s Justin Cantrell may need to sleep in on Friday, Jan. 29, because on Thursday, Jan. 28, he’s bringing two big shows to the Sixth and Main area downtown. The Missionary Position will be on top of it at Red Room along with Microbabies, Le Fleur and Vagerfly (see Noise, Page 21) and the monster Metal as Art Tour will rip through the walls at Gusto with France’s Hypno5e, Boston-based Revocation and New Jersey boys The Binary Code. Experimental metal makers Hypno5e are hot on the heels of their debut release Des Deux L’une Est L’autre, an eerie mind-bending swath of head-banging music. Revocation creates soundtracks for the gods of yore. And The Binary Code’s progressive metal makes the best use of ones and zeros ever. —Amy Atkins Thursday, Jan. 28, Hypno5e, Revocation and The Binary Code, 9 p.m., $8. Gusto, 509 W. Main St.; The Missionary Position, Microbabies, Le Fleur and Vagerfly, 9 p.m., $5, Red Room Tavern, 601 W. Main St., 208-343-7034.

22 | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | BOISEweekly

NOMO—See Listen Here, Page 23. 8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux POLYPHONIC POMEGRANATE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

METAL AS ART TOUR: HYPNO5E, REVOCATION, THE BINARY CODE, END OF ALL FLESH— France’s Hypno5e est un tour de force de metal. 9 p.m., $8, Gusto MISSIONARY POSITION, MICROBABIES, LE FLEUR, VAGERFLY— See Noise, Page 21. 9 p.m. $5. The Red Room

REBECCA SCOTT—8 p.m. FREE. Reef REBELUTION, SONJA, ZION I—7:30 p.m. $12.50-$30. Knitting Factory THE RED LIGHT REVIEW—A peppery evening featuring the ladies of burlesque paired with open mic and live music by Dan Costello, Jonathan Warren and the Billy Goats, and Oilslave. The review also features poets from the Big Tree Poetry Slam. Hosted by The Red Light Variety Show. VAC is a 21-and-older venue. 8 p.m. $7. Visual Arts Collective SK8 NIGHT—Farley Overdose, Bone Dance, Ohadi, Jument, Hummingbird of Death. 9 p.m. $3. Gusto

The Polish Ambassador

JAN. 29

FIVE ALARM FUNK—An 11-piece Vancouver-based band. 10 p.m. $3. Reef GAYLE CHAPMAN—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub JIMMY BIVENS—8 p.m. FREE. Sockeye LEE PENN SKY—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s NO QUARTER, BOISE ROCK SCHOOL—8 p.m. $11.50$21.50. Knitting Factory PATRICIA FOLKNER—7 p.m. FREE. Woodriver Cellars

THE POLISH AMBASSADOR, OWLRIGHT, DJ SPASTIK, HOY—Dance your booty off. 8 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective

PAUL PETERSON AND THE BLUES CLUB—9 p.m. FREE. The Bouquet

THE THROWDOWN, BATTLE OF THE BANDS—9 p.m. FREE to listen, $1 to vote. Liquid

REBECCA SCOTT, ROB HILL, DEBBIE SAGER—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

WILLISON, ROOS AND YOUNG—7 p.m. FREE. Reef

SOUL SERENE—9 p.m. $1. Liquid WAYNE WHITE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Music of the Vine

SATURDAY JAN. 30 BILL COFFEY, NED EVETT—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s ERIC GRAE—6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill GAYLE CHAPMAN—8:30 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub HANDGUNS—Pop punk. 9 p.m. $3. The Bouquet HOT LOCAL KNIGHTS—A five-week Battle of the Bands. Tonight is indie/acoustic with Blind Justice, Jerry Fee, The Ancible, Count Yourself to Sleep, B4G, Jeremy Snook, Illyria, Snocap Summer, Apple Horse, 23 and Homeless, Clyde Webb, Aaron and Your Friend Peter Giles. 4 p.m. $8. The Venue JIMMY BIVENS—9 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub JONATHAN WARREN AND THE BILLY GOATS—8 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s LANGHORNE SLIM, APRIL SMITH AND THE GREAT PICTURE SHOW—8 p.m. $5. Neurolux LARRY CONKLIN—7:30 p.m. FREE. Music of the Vine LIVE AMERICANA—9 p.m. FREE. Pitchers and Pints

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE GUIDE MOJO ROUNDERS—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s NEW TRANSIT (FORMERLY KILL UNCLE)—9 p.m. FREE. The Plank PAT MCDONALD AND THE TROPICAL COWBOYS—7:30 p.m. FREE. Sun Ray Cafe POKE—9 p.m. $1. Liquid RIPCHAIN, HALF THE WORLD, LUST GREEDS ENVY, YEXOTAY, STOP DROP AND PARTY—7:30 p.m. $6. Knitting Factory STAXX BROTHERS—10 p.m. $5. Reef UZALA, BEAUTICIAN, PUSSYGUTT, ACES AND EIGHTS, OILSLAVE—8 p.m. $5. Visual Arts Collective

SUNDAY JAN. 31 BENEFIT FOR BARBACOA—An evening of music, drinks and auctions to benefit employees who lost their jobs after Barbacoa was gutted by fire. Carl Scheider from Boise State radio will host the event. Musicians include Marcus Eaton, Gayle Chapman, The Frim Fram Fellas, Phil Garonzik, Shawn Brazell, Rob and Tanya Baker, Kurt Sackett, Andrew Cortens, Steve Eaton, Jon

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Hyneman, Camden Hughes, Pat Hyneman, John Jones Trio, Kevin Kirk, Jon Klein, Tom Moors, Wendi Phelps, Carl Scheider, Rebecca Scott, Mike Seifrit, The Sidemen, Rick Connelly, Greg Perkins, The Sally Tibbs Jazz Sextet, Tom Thompkins and Janessa White. 5:30 p.m. $25 adv., $30 door. $100 primo package, which includes free valet parking, an aperitif from Chandlers, shuttle to the show and a meet-and-greet with all of the musicians. Egyptian Theatre

WEEKLY GIGS

JIM FISHWILD—Wednesdays, 6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow

BILLY BRAUN—Mondays, 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

JOHNNY SHOES—Wednesdays, 6 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—Mondays, 8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

LIVE LOUNGE—Fridays and Saturdays, 8 p.m. FREE. The Gamekeeper

BUD GUDMUNDSON, MATT HARTZ—Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews

LIVE SETS—Fridays, 10 p.m. FREE. Bittercreek; Wednesdays, 7 p.m. FREE. Pitchers and Pints

DAVID MARR—Fridays, 7 p.m. FREE. The Cole/Marr Gallery

NOCTURNUM WITH DJ BONES—Sundays, 9 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station

FRIM FRAM 4—Thursdays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

TUESDAY FEB. 2 JOE FIRSTMAN, THE WHITE BUFFALO—9 p.m. $3. Reef SCOTT TYLER—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s

FUEGOGO!—Tuesdays, 9:30 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station

POLYPHONIC POMEGRANATE—Wednesdays, 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

JAM NIGHT—Wednesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. Montego Bay

PUNK MONDAY—Mondays, 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

JAZZ NIGHTS—Mondays-Saturdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill; Kevin Kirk Tuesdays-Saturdays and The Sidemen on Sundays. 7 p.m., FREE, Chandlers

ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—with DJ Naomi Sioux. Wednesdays and Fridays. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s

JEANNIE MARIE—Fridays, 7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s

WEDNESDAY FEB. 3 REBECCA SCOTT BAND— 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid TREVOR HALL, TOMORROWS BAD SEEDS—9 p.m. $5 adv., $7 door. Reef

SOUL SERENE—Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’Penny

JEREMIAH JAMES AND NED EVETT—Tuesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel

SPINDLE BOMB—Wednesdays, 10 p.m. FREE. Fridays, Saturdays, 9:45 p.m. $3. Tom Grainey’s

JEREMIAH JAMES GANG— Wednesdays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THOMAS PAUL—Sundays, 10 a.m. and Mondays, 7 p.m. FREE. Red Feather

V E N U E S

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

NOMO, JAN. 27, NEUROLUX It’s going to be a body-shaking revolution with Ann Arbor, Mich.-based “post Afro-beat dance explosion” band NOMO. The band’s world-music sound comes from a bounty of instrumentation, including saxophones (plural), kalimba, guitar, drums and trumpet with spacey blips and bloops interspersed among the rich tones and beats so tight they don’t seem manmade. The African funk with a jazzy attitude lends the music an organic feel as layers are built up, removed and added back in what seems like a crazy game of Jenga. It’s easy to get down with NOMO’s music, riding along on trippy trumpet or stuttering through the electronic dots and dashes while a deep bass and pristine percussion help feet move in tandem. It’s also possible to completely let go and feel the pull of the Afro-pop rhythms take over. Either way, it’s impossible not to dance. —Amy Atkins Wednesday, Jan. 27, with DJ Noah Hyde spinning soul/ funk, 8 p.m., $8 adv., $10 door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., neurolux.com.

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 23


NEWS/ARTS ARTS/VISUAL

John Killmaster, Sunday Afternoon on the Payette

ART, PLEIN AND SIMPLE Listen up ladies: Applications are currently being accepted for the “We Art Women” exhibition, an annual benefit for the Women’s and Children’s Alliance shelter. Now in its 19th year, WAW has steadily

LAU R IE PEAR M AN

IDAHO SECURES TWO ARTS NW SPOTS Organization works to connect artists, venues and the public TRAVIS ESTVOLD

outgrown both Humpin’ Hannah’s, where it went by the name “A Celebration of Women in the Ar ts” for 15 years, and the Esther Simplot Per forming Ar ts Academy, where it has been for the last three years. This time around, the juried exhibition will take over the Visual Ar ts Collective in Garden City. The night of “We Ar t Women,” Thursday, April 8, 20 percent of ar t sales will go to WCA, and a number of pieces will also remain on display at VAC for a two-month run. If you want to par ticipate, but are unsure of what exactly the judges expect from entrants, pop into the Ar t Source Galler y on Sunday, Feb. 17, from 6-9 p.m. for a free workshop on the rules and procedures of entering a juried show. Barbara Robinson from the Idaho Commission on the Ar ts will join WAW juror and Boise State ar t faculty member Sue Latta to shed light on what can often be a confusing process. All submissions are due with a $20 entr y fee by Friday, March 5. For more information or to download an entr y form, visit wear twomen.org. Now for news on another local arts group with a fun-to-say acronym—the PleinAir Painters of Idaho, or PAPI. This group of artsy outdoorsmen and women have been invited to participate in the opening exhibit at the newly restored Idaho State Capitol. Titled “Landscapes of Idaho,” the exhibition features work by Meridian watercolorist Naomi Elton, Boise oil artist Wendy Blickenstaff, Meridian watercolor/ oil artist Ann Winslow and Twin Falls oil painter Jane Hulsey, among many others. If you haven’t made it out to the revamped Capitol yet, we recommend taking a quick lunch-time jaunt to wander the air y corridors and glimpse some soothing plein-air landscapes. Ah, what stately majesty.

What Tony Harrison types on his computer The curtains have opened on act one of Tony Harrison’s Arts Northwest tenure. reads like a raised voice. He doesn’t shout or use excessive capitalization, but his phraseology always finds a way to exclaim, “Hey, I’m in Idaho. Johnson says though it doesn’t ofand Idaho (typically in Boise). The 2009 excited. And I’m not quitting until you’re ficially attempt to regulate where its leaderconference was held in Boise. excited, too.” The conference consists of workshops, an ship hails from, the organization strives to Harrison is a Nampa-based businessmaintain a balance of the states from which man, public relations gun-for-hire and artist exhibit hall (described by Arts Northwest Arts Northwest pulls its leadership. Harrison President Brian Johnson as a “talent tradedevelopment guru, all of which keep him acknowledges he’s never seen Idaho receive plenty busy, but the newest hat he’s donned show”) and artist showcases, among other anything less than fantastic service from things. Hundreds of performing artists— is that of a board member for Arts NorthArts Northwest. But given his background from classical, jazz and folk musicians to west. The group describes itself as a “nonin public relations and years of experience dance and theater troupes—submit online profit membership organization facilitating with the organization, he’s downright excited professional interaction between performing applications to take part in the annual about the potential doors that might now be arts presenters, performing artists, manage- conference. An Arts Northwest committee selects 25 of these acts to perform in juried ment and performing arts service providers showcases and another 25 to feature in an throughout the Western U.S. and Canada.” after-hours format. The fact that the name and description Securing a 12-minute set in an artist don’t ring a bell probably doesn’t surprise showcase can run entrants several hundred Michael Faison, executive director of the Idaho Commission on the Arts whose job it dollars in entry and booth fees, and even a is to help keep the arts alive and well in the well-received performance doesn’t lock up a schedule full of gigs. But with a quality Gem State. performance and a bit of leg work after“Idaho audiences probably will never ward, a successfully executed showcase know how much Arts Northwest benefits can lead to loads of exposure, especially their performing arts experience,” Faison during conference block-booking meetings says. “They’ll just know that they enjoyed a great performance at a reasonable price. Both in which typically non-colluding venues and artists team up to fill schedules—and lower are quietly facilitated by Arts Northwest.” opened given the appointments of additional the end prices of admission for audiences. Turns out, plenty of artists have heard of board members from Idaho. In fact, without this block-booking, many Arts Northwest—and if Harrison gets his “It is exciting to have them on the Arts Idaho venues would not be able to afford way, every Idahoan will be familiar with the Northwest board,” Faison agrees. “This some of the artists Arts Northwest has sent organization when his tenure is through. partly is because both of them are so expetheir way. “Historically, I don’t think the organization rienced, bringing their skill to an already In 2009, three local dance entities were has pursued many publicity opportunities, well-run organization to keep up that high involved with the conferand I plan to rectify that durstandard. But it also benefits Idaho … More ence in Boise: Trey McIntyre ing my tenure on the board,” ARTS NORTHWEST Project, Idaho Dance Theatre Idaho performing artists should be Idaho he said. “Arts Northwest is BOOKING CONFERENCE touring artists.” With Harrison on the prowl, and Basque music and dance entering its 30th year, and rest assured, more of them will be. troupe Amuma Says No. what we’re doing now will October 14-17 The 30th Annual Northwest BookPast Idaho artists who’ve help ensure the organization Held in Seattle, Washington. ing Conference will be held in October in participated in Arts Northcontinues to thrive for another Submissions are due by Monday, March 8. Bellevue, Wash., and submissions for artist west showcases include Steve three decades and beyond.” For more information, visit showcases—which can be a bit lengthy to Fulton, Curtis Stigers and From the outset, Arts artsnw.org. compile—are due by Monday, March 8. High Street. Northwest was built to One of Harrison’s first orders of busiHarrison thinks the elecstreamline the process of ness is to launch a “PR blitzkrieg” to get tion of himself and Dyno Wahl, executive connecting artists and presenters. In fact, Idaho artists up to speed on the value of Arts director of The Festival at Sandpoint, to the body’s primary task is annually staging Northwest. With the ferocity he intends to the Arts Northwest board—meaning Idaho the Northwest Booking Conference, which devote to the process, Idaho’s arts scene will residents now occupy one-third of the board rotates yearly among Washington (usually in have a new voice. seats—will only help bolster the arts scene the Seattle area), Oregon (often in Eugene)

IDAHO AUDIENC ES PR OB AB LY WILL NEVER K NOW HOW MUC H ANW B ENEFITS THEIR PER FOR MING ARTS EXPERIENCE.”

—Tara Morgan

24 | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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SCREEN

WHAT WOULD YOU DO? Parents risk everything in Extraordinary Measures DAN HUDAK In the surprisingly effective Extraordinary Measures, two action-movie stars face an insurmountable foe, and just about every step they take is met with resistance and difficulty. For Harrison Ford (Indiana Jones) and Brendan Fraser (The Mummy), this is nothing new. But what is new is the villain, which is more deadly and dangerFord and Fraser will do anything to find the cure for Pompe disease—they’ll even drink domestic beer. ous than any they’ve ever faced. It’s called Pompe disease, and it’s a rare And Ford (Regarding Henry) may do a lot And so Crowley and his wife, Aileen genetic disorder in which the inability to (Keri Russell), lead a fund-raising campaign of yelling here, but Stonehill is always a break down glycogen (loosely, this is a sugar likeable old crank with a good heart. in a race against time, and the story takes naturally produced by the body for energy) Touching as it is, Extraordinary Meacauses muscle weakness throughout the body, off from there with family drama, corporate greed and plenty of close calls. There’s a fair sures is not easy to watch. Parents will affecting the skeletal muscles, diaphragm, especially have a hard time seeing Megan amount of medical jargon thrown around, nervous system, liver and heart. It often afand Patrick suffer, and the frustrations of flicts children and is similar to other muscular but director Tom Vaughan never gets lost corporate bureaucracy—though smart from in the science—this is a human story first disorders such as Lou Gehrig’s disease. a business perspective—are infuriating in and foremost, and Vaughan does a nice For John Crowley (Fraser), the disease has that they contradict the best interests of the job of creating energy been devastating. children. and suspense without Two of his children, Ultimately, though, the movie, which is letting the film get too Megan (Meredith EXTRAORDINARY MEASURES (PG) based on a true story, is rewarding and upliftmelodramatic. Droeger) and Patrick Directed by Tom Vaughan ing. It should also serve to heighten awareVaughan should (Diego Velazquez), Stars Harrison Ford, Brendan Fraser and ness of Pompe and numerous diseases similar also thank Fraser and suffer from it, and Keri Russell to it, and in doing so, may help save the lives Ford for their fine it will soon be the Now playing at Edwards 22 of afflicted children. Fraser and Ford have performances. Each cause of their deaths given us plenty of bang for our buck in the has successfully done if Crowley isn’t able past, so kudos to them for bringing to life a drama before, and the to get them help. experience shows. Fraser (Crash) never goes story with meaning and heart. His search leads him to Dr. Robert Stonehill (Ford), who believes he’s found a way to treat over-the-top desperate-dad crazy, a smart Visit hudakonhollywood.com for more move given that Crowley’s business sense the disease but lacks the funding to complete reviews. has a lot to do with saving his children. his research.

SCREEN/LISTINGS special screenings AFTER THE STORM—A benefit screening for the After the Storm Foundation, which aids in the rehabilitation of New Orleans communities. Following the documentary, there will be a Q & A with director Hilla Medalia, executive producers John and Ed Priddy and author and Boise State professor Clay Morgan. Tue., Feb. 2, 7 p.m. $10 general adv., $5 students. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3450454, www.egyptiantheatre. net. BOLD AND FRESH TOUR: O’REILLY AND BECK—Popular in some circles, Fox News host Bill O’Reilly has teamed

up with Glenn Beck for what they say will be a “bold and fresh” discussion regarding the political and economic goings-on of worldly affairs. Airing live on Jan. 30 with an encore, rerun night on Feb. 2. Sat., Jan. 30, 6 p.m. and Tue., Feb. 2, 6 p.m. $9.50 adult, $7 seniors, $6.75 child. Edwards Spectrum 22, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-1700, www. uatc.com. THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: CARMEN ENCORE— Endowed with more than four hours of drama, sex, violence and unruly behavior, George Bizet’s opera Carmen airs on the big screen from a live performance captured at the MET. Wed., Feb. 3, 6:30 p.m. $9.50

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adult, $7 seniors, $6.75 children. Edwards Spectrum 22, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-1700, www. uatc.com.

opening

resuscitate his career and public image in director Martin Campbell’s (Casino Royale) dark thriller. Gibson plays Thomas Craven, a widowed Irish Boston cop whose daughter Emma (Bojana Novakovic) suddenly returns home. When Emma is murdered in front of him, Craven goes on rampage to find her killer. With the help of an oddly friendly yet informative hitman (Ray Winstone), Craven discovers a world of corporate conspiracy and terrorism. Could Emma have gone from daddy’s little girl to a threat to national security? (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

EDGE OF DARKNESS —Mel Gibson attempts to

LOOKING FOR PALLADIN— Despite his lavish wealth, ex-A list actor Jack Palladin

THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: DER ROSENKAVALIER ENCORE—Encapsulating love and drama in 18th century Vienna. Recorded live at the MET on Jan. 9, 2010. Wed., Jan. 27, 6:30 p.m. $9.50 adult, $7 seniors, $6.75 child. Edwards Spectrum 22, 7701 W. Overland Road, Boise, 208-377-1700, www.uatc.com.

(Ben Gazzara) works for pennies on the dollar as a short order cook in a small village in Guatemala. A Hollywood agent (David Moscow) ventures to Palladin’s village to offer him a $1 million dollar paycheck for a small film role. The tight-knit village, including Palladin’s lover Rosario (Talia Shire) and genial boss (Vincent Pastore) give their thoughtful yet humorous advice to the ambivalent actor. Polish director Andrzej Krakowsi intertwines the stories of the witty thespian and wide-eyed young agent in an endearing and comical manner. (NR) Flicks HEN IN ROME— Successful, love-starved New York art curator Beth (Kristen Bell) ventures to Rome for her

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 25


SCREEN/LISTINGS sister’s wedding. In a desperate attempt to rejuvenate her love life, she takes coins from the fountain of love. An eccentric bunch of suitors including a clumsy painter, a street magician, self-absorbed model and sausage mogul follow her back to New York. Josh Duhamel, Will Arnett, Jon Heder and Anjelica Huston also star in this romantic comedy, a loose remake of the 1954 film Three Coins in the Fountain. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

SCREEN/MOVIE TIMES WEDNESDAY, JAN. 27- TUESDAY, FEB. 2 A SINGLE MAN—

ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS, THE SQUEAKQUEL— Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:35, 1:45, 4:20, 6:45, 9 AVATAR—

WE DON’T GET EDWARDS 22 TIMES BEFORE WE GO TO PRESS, BUT HERE’S WHAT’S OPENING. PLEASE CALL 208-377-9603 FOR A LIST OF CURRENT TIMES.

Flicks: W-Th: 5:20, 7:20, 9:15; F-Su: 1:20, 3:20, 5:20, 7:20, 9:15; M-Tu: 5:20, 7:20, 9:15

Edwards 9: W-Th: 3:40, 7:05, 10:30; F-Tu: 3:35, 7, 10:30 Edwards 22: W-Th: 4:05, 7:45

AVATAR, DIGITAL 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:10, 1:10, 3:45, 4:40, 7:20, 8:15

AVATAR, IMAX 3D—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:50, 3:15, 7, 10:20

BAD LIEUTENANT: PORT OF CALL NEW ORLEANS—

continuing ALVIN AND THE CHIPMUNKS: THE SQUEAKQUEL—Ever ybody’s favorite trio of rodents: Alvin, Simon and Theodore, achieved pop-sensation status in their first movie. Now, the runts are returning to school to save the struggling music program by winning $25,000 in a music competition. The boys are smitten when they meet their match: the Chipettes. The romance makes for a ver y special Squeakquel. (PG) Edwards 22 A SINGLE MAN—Fashion-mogul Tom Ford financed and directed this film, which is based on the novel by Christopher Isherwood. The 1960s-era story follows a single day in the life of gay British professor George Falconer (Colin Firth) after his long-time companion dies. With production design by the Mad Men team matched with Ford’s meticulous eye for beauty, A Serious Man is a visual and emotional stunner. (R) Flicks AVATAR—James Cameron (Aliens, Titanic) is back as both director and writer of this 3D, graphically gorgeous sci-fi flick. Paraplegic war vet Jake Sully (Sam Worthington) is sent to the planet Pandora to make contact with the planet’s natives, the Na’vi, through an avatar. Hopefully his avatar can also help stem the rising conflict between the humans and the Na’vi. Critics are calling this one “jaw-dropping,” “mind-blowing” and “the most dazzling film of the decade,” ... and they aren’t just talking about the $400 million price tag. (PG-13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22, Edwards Digital 3-D, Edwards IMAX BAD LIEUTENANT: PORT OF CALL NEW ORLEANS— Arthouse director Werner Herzog brings to life the story of New Orleans police sergeant Terrence McDonagh (Nicholas Cage) who injured his back while saving a life during Hurricane Katrina. Pain medication leads McDonagh down a path of addiction, until he finds himself wrapped up with notorious drug dealer Big Fate (Alvin “Xzibit” Joiner). This formerly good lieutenant quickly turns terrifyingly bad. (R) Flicks Ends Thursday THE BLIND SIDE—This film tracks the story of Michael Oher (Quinton Aaron), a homeless African American high school student who was taken in by Leigh Anne Tuohy (Sandra Bullock) and her wealthy white family. Oher

26 | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Flicks: W-Th only: 4:30, 7, 9:30

THE BLIND SIDE— Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:05, 4:05, 7:10, 10; F-Tu: 4, 7:05 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:55, 4, 6:50, 9:40 THE BOOK OF ELI—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:25, 4:20, 7:25, 10:10; F-Tu: 1:20, 4:10, 7:10, 9:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:30, 4:55

DAYBREAKERS—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 9:25

EDGE OF DARKNESS—

Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1:30, 4:25, 7:25, 10:10 Edwards 22: F-Tu: 1, 3:55, 7, 9:55

EXTRAORDINARY MEASURES— Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:50, 4:25, 7, 9:30 THE IMAGINARIUM OF DR. PARNASSUS— Flicks: W-Th: 5:10, 9:35; F-Su: 12:20, 5, 9:35; M-Tu: 5, 9:35 INVICTUS—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:15

IT’S COMPLICATED—

LEAP YEAR—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1, 4:45, 7:50, 10:35; F-Tu: 1, 9:55 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:50, 3:30, 6:35, 9:15 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:25, 2:55, 5:20, 7:55, 10:15

LEGION—

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:30, 4:25, 7:20, 9:50; F-Tu: 1:45, 4:40, 7:50, 10:35 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:40, 12:30, 2, 3, 4:35, 5:35,7:10, 8:10, 9:35, 10:30

LOOKING FOR PALLADIN—

Flicks: F-Su: 2, 4:30, 7, 9:30; M-Tu: 4:30, 7, 9:30

THE LOVELY BONES— Edwards 9: W-Th only: 1:10, 4:10, 7:05, 10:20 Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:45, 1, 3:50, 7:15, 10, 10:35 NEW MOON—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:40, 3:35, 6:30

PRECIOUS—

Flicks: W-Th: 7:25; F-Su: 3, 7:25; M-Tu: 7:25

PRINCESS AND THE FROG— TO SAVE A LIFE— SHERLOCK HOLMES—

THE SPY NEXT DOOR— THE TOOTH FAIRY—

UP IN THE AIR—

Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:40, 1:50 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:30, 4:15, 7, 9:45 Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:40, 4:50, 7:40, 10:40; F-Tu: 1:05, 4:05, 7:20, 10:40 Edwards 22: W-Th: 1:55, 3:55, 6:55

Edwards 22: W-Th: 12:05, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 9:55 Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:20, 4:30, 7:30, 9:55; F-Tu: 1:10, 4:20, 7:40, 10 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:50, 1:35, 2:25, 4:10, 5:05, 6:40, 7:35, 9:05, 10

Edwards 9: W-Th: 1:45, 4:50, 7:45, 10:15; F-Tu: 1:40, 4:45, 7:45, 10:15 Edwards 22: W-Th: 11:45, 2:15, 4:45, 7:25, 10:05

WHEN IN ROME— THE YOUNG VICTORIA—

Edwards 9: F-Tu: 1:25, 4:30, 7:30, 10:20 Flicks: W-Th: 4:55, 7:10, 9:20; F-Su: 12:30, 2:45, 4:55, 7:10, 9:20; M-Tu: 4:55, 7:10, 9:20

T H E A T E R S Edwards 22 Boise, 208-377-1700, www.regmovies.com; Edwards 9 Boise, 208-338-3821, www.regmovies.com; The Egyptian Theater, 208-345-0454, www.egyptiantheatre.net; The Flicks, 208-342-4222, www.theflicksboise.com; FOR SECOND-RUN MOVIES: Northgate Cinema, Towne Square Reel, Country Club Reel, Nampa Reel, 208-377-2620, www.reeltheatre.com. Overland Park $1 Cinema, 208-377-3072, www.opcmovies.com. Movie times listed were correct as of press time. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


LISTINGS/SCREEN VIDIOT/SCREEN

goes on to academic success and an NFL football career. (PG13) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 THE BOOK OF ELI—Another addition to the ever-growing cannon of post-apocalyptic films, The Book of Eli follows Eli (Denzel Washington) on his trek across the wasteland that once was America. Driven by his hope for the future, Eli serves up some serious ass-kicking, putting members of murderous gangs in their place. But Carnegie (Gary Oldman), the ruler of a makeshift town of thieves, wants desperately to stop him. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22 DAYBREAKERS—In a future world, where most humans have become vampires and the remaining few are stored in banks and farmed for blood, researcher Edward Dalton (Ethan Hawke) is searching for an artificial blood substitute. With the help of human survivor Audrey Bennett (Claudia Karvan) Dalton will make a startling breakthrough. But can he save the dwindling human race? (R) Edwards 22

Are you seeing double? Sort of: Dan and Dean Caten (we don’t know who is who) and fashion maven Lady Gaga.

IS LAUNCH MY LINE BRAVO’S NEXT GOLDEN GOOSE? If I were a Bravo executive, when Project Runway left for the Lifetime Network, I would’ve felt a little like the giant from Jack and the Beanstalk after his golden goose was repossessed. The show was the network’s centerpiece. But rather than let the desertion ruin them, Bravo countered with a new fashion show, hoping it will be Project Runway’s runaway replacement. Hosted by fashion-designing twin brothers Dean and Dan Caten, Launch My Line premiered at the beginning of December 2009. Rather than duplicate their prior success, Bravo has taken a different route. This time, contestants aren’t even designers. Well, half of them aren’t. Ten individuals, successful in their own areas of expertise—choreography, music, writing, architecture, business—are selected to design their own clothing line. Paired with actual designers, many who have clothed the famous, the contestants compete in weekly challenges. If you’re a fan of Project Runway, Launch My Line’s glaring differences are offensive at first. Who are these contestants? Why are they so bitchy? Why would I want to wear clothes designed by a disc jockey? And who are these pint-sized hosts? They look and sound like little boys playing dress-up. But all of the things that were annoying at first, slowly became charming after watching a handful of episodes. The Caten twins—uber-famous designers of their own Dsquared2 clothing line—are quirky little Canadians. The fact the contestants aren’t fashion insiders makes for interesting designs— or, sometimes, an interesting lack thereof. And as the paired designers range from quiet pros to loudmouthed prima donnas, the unavoidable personality conflicts—while perhaps hindering the design process—sure make for fun train wrecks. Because the contestants were asked to select their lines’ fabrics in only a few minutes at the show’s outset, and were not even given a choice on who they were partnered with, expecting a coherent fashion line to result seems farcical. But again, this is no Project Runway. It either isn’t meant to be, or it isn’t allowed to be. So then, can Launch My Line fill the void left by its popular predecessor? It’s hard to tell for sure. Though it may be the worst reality competition on Bravo—which isn’t saying much given the appeal of Top Chef, Top Design, Shear Genius and now-gone PR—it has room to grow into something good. Clearly, if it doesn’t, it’ll be saying “auf Wiedersehen” (a la cancellation) as well. —Travis Estvold WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

EXTRAORDINARY MEASURES—The aging-evergracefully Harrison Ford stars as eccentric Dr. Robert Stonehill, a man tasked with searching for a cure for a rare genetic disorder affecting John (Brendan Fraser) and Aileen Crowley’s (Keri Russell) children. Based on a true story, the Crowleys struggle to raise enough money to fund Stonehill’s research learning as much about themselves and Stonehill as they do the disease. The tagline for this tear-jerker? “Don’t hope for a miracle, make one.” (PG) Edwards 22 THE IMAGINARIUM OF DOCTOR PARNASSUS—From the drawings and imagination of writer and director Terry Gilliam (Monty Python’s Flying Circus) comes the story of Dr. Parnassus and his magical traveling show, in which visitors are treated to more than entertainment. The good doctor leads viewers to visions of their spirits freed but, not unlike Pandora’s Box, when a door is opened for good, sometimes evil finds a way out as well. The cast includes Johnny Depp, Colin Ferrell, Jude Law and Tom Waits and the film features the final performance of the late Heath Ledger. (PG-13) Flicks INVICTUS—Clint Eastwood directs Morgan Freeman as Nelson Mandela who, during his first term as president of South Africa, tried to bring the nation together by pushing the national rugby team to win the 1995 Rugby World Cup. The title Invictus is taken from the poem of the same name—written by William E. Henley—which inspired Mandela during the nearly 30 years he was jailed for speaking out against apartheid. (PG-13) Edwards 22 IT’S COMPLICATED—Jane (Mer yl Streep) and Jake (Alec Baldwin) were married, had three kids, and subsequently divorced after Jake’s extramarital affair with a stunning 20-something named Agness (Lake Bell). But when Jake’s new marriage to the younger woman hits the skids, an innocent meal with Jane turns into an affair with her ex. Adam (Steve Martin) is caught in the middle of their re-ignited flame, and soon becomes part of a love triangle. (R) Edwards 9, Edwards 22

BOISEweekly | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 27


NEWS/FOOD FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

SWEETWATER’S TROPIC ZONE McNeil designed holiday cards as a fundraiser for Dining for Women.

WOMEN FOR WOMEN VIA THE DINNER TABLE

28 | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | BOISEweekly

LAU RIE PEARMAN

If you dine out as often as Food News, you spend some serious coin in the local restaurant economy. Think about how much one of those restaurant meals has cost you. Then, set that amount aside, whip up your favorite dish at home, take it to a friend’s house to share and donate that saved cash to an organization benefitting women in impoverished nations all over the globe. That’s the idea behind Dining for Women, a national organization that brings first-world women together to break bread and raise dollars for programs focusing on health, education and financial success for women in the developing world. The first chapter launched in 2003 in South Carolina and in June 2009, Debi McNeil established Boise’s first chapter. Every month, an ever-expanding group of Boise women get together for a potluckstyle dinner, hosted by one of the group’s members, and pass the collection plate for donations. Don’t let that metaphor sour you, though, Dining for Women is not affiliated with any religious or political agenda. In the six months since McNeil first convened the Boise group, the chapter has doubled in size, from 14 women the first meeting to 27 in January, and has raised nearly $3,000 from individual donations ranging from $5 to $100. Every penny collected by the Boise chapter is turned over to the national coffers, which writes a check to a designated cause every month. In January, Dining for Women’s goal was to raise $15,000 for Darfur Women’s Center and McNeil’s group brought in $786 toward that goal. Despite the growing success of the Boise chapter, McNeil has bigger ideas. “It’s becoming more than just a giving circle,” she explains. “We’re getting more involved.” Raising awareness of women’s issues globally is a focus of the group on a national level and locally, McNeil says she’d like to start involving women from Boise’s refugee community, who often—were it not for their relocation to Boise—could have been the very women Dining for Women strives to reach in countries like Darfur, Kenya, Afghanistan. As Boise’s single chapter of Dining for Women grows, McNeil acknowledges that accommodating 30 people for dinner is no easy task. She anticipates that soon, the group will split in two, offering two nights a month for dinner and a more intimate experience at each. Want in? Visit diningforwomen.org for more information and then contact McNeil at dmcneil31@gmail.com or 208-890-5388. —Rachael Daigle

There’s nothing subtle about Sweetwater’s Tropic Zone. From the The Afro-Caribbean menu at Sweetwater’s is both thorough and aumoment you step into the color-splashed space—with its lightweight thentic, with goat, spicy seafood, barbecue—generously flavored with cantina tables, ceiling-mounted pink flamingos and echoing reggae— heat and tropical fruits and nuts—and staples like jerk chicken and you know you’re on Jimmy Buffet’s turf. Cuban steak sandwiches. However, on my first trip to this relatively Billed as “laid back tropical cuisine,” Sweetwater’s eclectic menu— new downtown restaurant, I did not need to look at the menu. I was which includes Cuban, Dominican, Hawaiian, Thai and Jamaican there for curried goat ($15). fare—is the United Nations of island grub. When done right—like the The meat is served on the bone, as it should be, and I dug in with curried avocado and jasmine rice ($14)—these varied coastal influences relish, gnawing off every last morsel, holding the meat in one hand and dance in step, rich curried coconut-milk, diced tomatoes and cilantro spoonfuls of white rice in the other. I did eyeball a friend’s plate, which swaying to a spicy, peanut-y beat. When done wrong—like the dry, appeared to have a much meatier piece of goat than mine, but the acgingerbread-ish buttermilk cornbread ($2.25)—it’s a scratched record. companiments and the giant bottle of Red Stripe ($7) filled my belly. On a recent visit to Goat is rare Sweetwater’s, I opted enough on a Boise to sit in the upstairs menu to be worth a dining area. Lit by trip. So is the locally the warm glow of raised alligator appeChristmas lights, I tizer, which Sweetwatched the winter water’s serves as tots wind claw at the win($9.25)—alligator dows and relished the tail deep fried in a effervescent ping of spicy, dark-colored champagne bubbles batter and dipped as they slid down in a very complex my throat ($4.50, ginger, pineapple Segura Viudas cava tartar sauce. Squeeze mini bottle). At that of lime optional, but moment, the joint’s recommended. tropical theme was a For lunch, on welcome escape. another trip, I started My date and I with one of Sweetwastarted things off ter’s clever beer/wine with a half-dozen drinks: The Kingston oysters, which our ($5). Green-tinted server let us split half ginger beer forms the Kumamoto and half lower third of the Hunter Point ($10). glass, topped by three The oysters were a fingers of Land Shark Cuban, Dominican, Hawaiian, Thai, Jamaican and Idahoan ... it’s a delicious mix. refreshing indulgence, Lager and two fingers garnished with a of Guinness, engiSWEETWATER’S spray of lemon and neered to resemble TROPIC ZONE both a ginger-shallot the Jamaican flag. 210 N. 10th St. and mango-lemon mignonette. I favored the finely diced If there is one thing missing at Sweetwater’s, it’s a 208-433-9194 mango, which played off the bivalves’ inherent sweetness sweetwaterstropiczone.com liquor license; a mojito with the pan con bistec ($12.50) Open Mon.-Sat., without distracting from their sea-netted freshness. would have been idilico. The sandwich comes on a beau11:30 a.m.-close After recalling how filling the curried avocado dish tiful airy baguette, made by Gaston’s Bakery, that seems closed Sun. had been on a previous visit, my date and I opted to split custom-made for the thin slices of top sirloin inside. The our entree, the pineapple curry seafood stew ($20), and meat is topped with grilled onions and a honking piece beef it up with a couple of sides. The stew arrived looking like a musical of proletarian lettuce. The sweet plantains on the side were perfectly number from Little Mermaid—singing clams and mussels perched atop browned, whereas my wife’s green plantains were dissatisfyingly dry. a bed of tap-dancing, tails-on shrimp. The dish’s flavor—sweet and We asked for more of the tartar sauce for the dry fries, but instead got creamy with a hint of spice—lived up to the presentation. Spooned over some infused catsup that did not do the trick. a mound of moist rice with crunchy slivers of grilled coconut, it was My wife’s jerk chicken ($13.50, plus $1.50 avocado salad upgrade), heavenly. But the same can’t be said for the sides. The red peas and rice on the other hand, was blackened on the outside, and perfectly moist ($3.50), cooked in coconut milk and spices, was an unsightly and under- and jerked on the inside, almost, but not quite falling off the bone. The whelming mush, while the mashed potato, plantain and yam “smash” Jamaican seasonings were sweet at first bite, gradually heating up. ($3.75) could’ve used a healthy dash of salt and some spicy zing. Speaking of sweet heat, the avocado salad may be the best thing on Surveying the damage we’d done—piles of empty clam, mussel and the menu and a meal in itself. Sticky coconut rice is slathered in a thick, shrimp shells—my date and I agreed that, though our culinary experihot yellow curry and topped with generous chunks of avocado. But ences at Sweetwater’s have been overwhelmingly enjoyable, it’s the that’s not it. The more you dig into this salad the more treats you find: context that gives us pause. With prices comparable to other high-end peanuts, raisins, tomato … downtown establishments and the atmosphere of a Joe’s Crab Shack, it’s The blues and Rasta soundtrack in this restaurant, the island motif a rare mood that would entice me into Sweetwater’s over other nearby and mix-matched silverware along with the diverse and experimenoptions. On the other hand, the fresh oysters and inexpensive chamtal menu are enough to make you cry. Or is that the chili sauce I just pagne will undoubtably turn me into a happy hour regular. rubbed in my eye? —Tara Morgan thinks the time has come to talk of many things.

—Nathaniel Hoffman likes the voodoo that you do. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


DINING/FOOD North Boise 20TH CENTURY LANES—The list of places in which you can find a chili dog is no foot long. You can get one here, but you can also get sliders and fries, Idaho’s ubiquitous food (fingersteaks), and even breakfast. 4712 W. State St., 208-342-8695. $ SU OM .

36TH STREET BISTRO—Enjoy breakfast, lunch and dinner in the sprawling 36th Street Garden Center. The cafe serves espresso and pastries, sandwiches and salads and an ever-changing depending on what’s fresh and in season. The rotating menu features locally grown and raised foods. 3823 N. Garden Center, 208-433-5100. SU . $-$$

BEER GUZZLER/FOOD

If you’re looking for a session pour, look elsewhere. Barley wines are ales, of course, not wines. But they are big, rich brews best suited for sipping at cool room temperature. Traditionally, British brewers called their strongest ales barley wines. Here in the United States, these eminently ageworthy offerings have gained in popularity over the last 25 years. Three new arrivals have hit the shelves in Boise. ANCHOR STEAM OLD FOGHORN BARLEYWINE STYLE ALE As the first modern barley wine brewed in the United States a quarter of a century ago, the Old Foghorn is still one of the best. This dark-copper ale is lightly carbonated with sweet, fruity esters on the nose. Rich and creamy in the mouth, sweet toffee mingles with subtle orange, and light hops come through on the finish. It’s one of the easier drinking barley wines you’ll find. FULL SAIL OLD BOARDHEAD BARLEYWINE ALE, RESERVE ’09 Another winner from this employee-owned Oregon brewery, the Old Boardhead pours a hazy copper with a nice, frothy head and aromas of fresh-baked bread with light touches of citrus-laced hops. There’s a nice depth of flavor here, with exceptional balance between the caramel-hued, sweet and toasty malt and the smooth hops with hints of mineral and herb. This ale is robust and delicious now, but should also age well. 2009 PIKE OLD BAWDY BARLEY WINE STYLE ALE This 20th anniversary addition is the most hop-driven of the three. The dark-amber color suits the ripe apple and citrus zest aromas. Another beautifully balanced effort, but the hops are definitely more forward in this one and show good persistence throughout, resulting in a surprising dry brew for the style. A complex array of flavors includes earthy citrus, caramel, coffee and herb, all wrapped up in sweet malt. It’s surprisingly fresh and dangerously drinkable. —David Kirkpatrick

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RE S —Reservations

BUNGALOW RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE—Sometimes sweet and other times savory, always delightfully delicious. Stop in for a light lunch (served Monday through Friday) with items varying from soups and salads to an extensive “munchies” menu, including shrimp, grits and calamari. Their entrees cover the dining spectrum as well, with marinated pork chops, pan roasted wild salmon and stuffed free range chicken. 1520 N. 13th St., 208-331-9855. SU OM . $$-$$$ CAFE VICINO—Chefs Richard Langston and Steve Rhodes serve up fresh and innovative foods, offering a casual lunch menu with choices like daily quiche, salads and portobello mushroom sandwiches. Dinner choices lean toward finer dining, offering carpaccio, a variety of pastas and entrees that run the gamut from braised lamb shanks to a New York steak to cioppino. 808 W. Fort St., 208-472-1463. OM. $-$$$

NEW BARLEY WINES

AVERAGE PRICE PER ENTREE: $ —Less than $8 $$ —$8 to $14 $$$ —$14 to $20 $$$$ —Over $20

BOISE CO-OP DELI—You just can’t leave the Co-op without at least one deli delight in your bag. Each day brings a new selection of delicious foods made with the freshest ingredients. 888 W. Fort St., 208-472-4500. $-$$ SU OM.

FANCI FREEZE—Shakes, malts, spins, sundaes and the Boston shake (one part sundae, one part shake) are what have made Fanci Freeze a Boise favorite for years. But because we can’t live on ice cream alone, Fanci Freeze also serves a whole mess of burgers, some of the crispiest tots in town and even a grilled cheese for the non-meat-eater. 1402 W. State St., 208-344SU OM. 8661. $ GOODY’S SODA FOUNTAIN— From the moment you walk in, the smells of fresh caramel corn, homemade ice cream, hand-dipped chocolate and every kind of sugary delight hit you like a ton of gummy bricks. 1502 N. 13th St., 208-367-0020. $ SU. HIGHLANDS HOLLOW BREWHOUSE—Whether it’s their appetizers (Monty’s Hummus, Hollow Hot Wings), their entrees (Pan Fried Oysters, Mess-O-Chops) or their burgers and sandwiches (Black Bean Chili Burger, Reuben), stopping in at Highlands Hollow after winter skiing or hiking up Camel’s Back hill in the summer is always a great idea. 2455 Harrison Hollow, 208-343-6820. $-$$ SU OM. HYDE PARK PUB—Harry’s is that special bar that’s inviting no matter what your mood. With its dog-friendly patio and a menu chock full of twists on American classics, this is a neighborhood bar that feels like it’s in your neighborhood. 1501 N. 13th St., SU. 208-336-9260. $

needed/recommended —Patio S U —Open on Sunday O M —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 208-342-4733.

WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

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Joe Albertson built this 1101 S. OWYHEE, BOISE house for his family in 1939, $484,900 the same year the ďŹ rst 3 Bed/4 Bath 3,631 Square Feet Albertsons grocery store Keller Williams Realty was opened. A humble lawn Lori Gluch, 208-713-9167 plaque inscribed with the KWBoise.com initials â&#x20AC;&#x153;J.A.â&#x20AC;? still stands in MLS #98404636 the front yard. Situated on .54 acres in Boiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Central Bench district, the three-level residence was constructed in period style and still oozes vintage character. Details like arched doorways, coved ceilings, glass-block windows and original tile work in the two upper bathrooms have been preserved by the current owner, who purchased the home from the Albertson family in 1968. The ďŹ&#x201A;oor plan places a cavernous formal dining room and large formal living room at the front of the house. A cozy library, the kitchen and a den are also on the main ďŹ&#x201A;oor. Upstairs youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd a junior suite with verdant backyard views and the master suite, which has a remarkably spacious closet and a hidden storage room that could be converted to an ofďŹ ce. The basement is where youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd laundry facilities, a sewing room, a wine closet, two bedrooms and a full bathroom. The homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s builders used every inch of space by creating builtin cabinets, drawers and nooks galore throughout the dwelling. Outside youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll ďŹ nd a landscaped front yard, giant maple trees shading a spacious brick patio and a deep back lawn edged with mature shrubbery. Pros: Period-style family home on large lot. Cons: Vintage bathrooms may not appeal to some. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jennifer Hernandez

7:C8==DB:)G:CI 2424 Jean St. 2BD,1BA, 1 car grg. attached + ďŹ nished bonus room. Fully fenced yard. W/D. Pet negotiable, $200 pet deposit. $800/ mo. $600 dep. $20 application fee. Serious inquiries call Rosenberg Property Management 208841-6281. <G:6I6E6GIB:CIC:6G7HJ 6 mo. lease available. Will cover security deposit, $200 and app. fee, $35 if accepted. Rent is $560/mo. Great place with good neighbors! For more info contact c-j_west@ hotmail.com or hailey.wall@ gmail.com =>HIDG>8BD9:GC6E6GIB:CIH We have a unique selection of historic & modern aparment homes in the North End, Downtown, Parkcenter, Bench, and West Boise areas! Rents vary but can start as low as $410 Studioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, 1 & 2BD (some w/lofts). Deposits $300, application fees $20/person. Call Trish for a tour at 208-761-9696. Visit our website to view properties www.parklaneco.com C:6G7HJ"C:L7>"A:K:AIDLC=DJH: 2129 Amy. 1624 sq. ft. 3BD, 2.5BA, 2 car grg. *Move In Special* $99 w/6 mo. lease, $850/mo. $700 Security Deposit. Call Cobblestone to view 208-322-8077. CDGI=:C9 1BD, 1BA apt. close to downtown shopping and BSU. $475/mo., $350 deposit. All util. includ. but electric. Kitchen with stove & refrigerator, walk-in closet. Electric baseboard heating, A/C. Convenient upfront parking. 208-8844899 or 208-562-7551. DC<G::C7:AI 3BD, 2BA, $795/mo. on Greenbelt. Very nice home and neighborhood. 208-968-4194 or 208-5770620. FJ6>A<A:C6E6GIB:CIH Large 1BD/1BA & 2BD/1BA with Central heat & air, W/D, and DW. A must see... Ask about our movein special 208-495-2484. Quailglen@gmail.com

CAREERS BW HELP WANTED 7D>H:<GDJE=DB:H Make a difference assisting adults w/ developmental disabilities. Must be 21 w/ clean driving record. Stop by 30 S. Cole Road, 9am-4pm.

FOR SALE BW STUFF =DC:N7::H Want to start beekeeping? 3lb package with Queen $89.62 +tax. Order by March 22, pick up in Twin Falls April 23. Call 208-961-0969. www.tubbsberryfarm.com

G6HE7:GGN! 7A68@7:GGN! <G6E:H::9H####

Here are a list of seeds we currently have available and the prices per pack: $2 Seed Packs: Concord Grape, Mandarin Orange, Meyer Lemon, Northstar Pie Cherry. $5 Seed Packs: Arguta Kiwi, Aroma Strawberry, Picnic Strawberry, Bluecrop Blueberry, Darrow (Thorny) Blackberry, Tripple Crown Blackberry (Thornless), Canby Thornless Raspberry, Heritage Everbearing Red Raspberry. Call 208-392-0476. ;G::"=DE86C9N Stop by Nampa Brewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center for Free Sample of Hop Candy. 468-7724.

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 9>HIG>7JIDGHL6CI:9 Nutritional beverages make up a speciďŹ c niche market in the health/wellness industry â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a multi-billion-dollar market! Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the fastest-growing segment of the industry! The importance of Antioxidants are known worldwide. They have been promoted heavily by the medical community, the media & the health/wellness industry. Come join a growing company. Call today to see if you have the skills and talents we are looking for. Call 208-870-9277.

BW ART, ANTIQUES, & COLLECTABLES 8JHIDB:I8=:9<A6HHH6A: 20% off all glasswear from now until Valentineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day! A ReďŹ&#x201A;ection In Glass (Custom glass etching) 208-377-2607 We can etch anything! We sell items as singles or bulk quantities!

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT BW HEALTH & FITNESS

BARTER BW HAVE ;JGC>IJG:G:E6>G 10 yrs. exp. on-site furniture repair and touch up. Including: Dents, dings, broken parts, pet damage, water rings. Wear & tear & touch ups. Call Cotton 208-313-6843. Sample work at http://picasaweb. google.com/Coltron4040/Furnitur ePortfolio?feat=directlink IG69:8DCHIGJ8I>DC;DG4444 I am a fully licensed, registered & insured framing, siding, and remodel contractor looking to trade labor for your unwanted items of value. E-mail a description of what you need done and what you have to trade. quickquality3@aol. com. Services available but not limited to: remodels, framing, siding, decks, fences, covered patios, tile, painting, rooďŹ ng, gutter clean out, shops & shelves.

@:IIA:7:AALDG@H=DE Basic Kettlebell Workshop Jan. 30th or 31st. The ultimate fat burning tool. CertiďŹ ed instruction to get your training off to the right start. jbeaumont@idahokettlebells.com

BW MASSAGE

6B6I:JG B6HH6<:7N :G>8

1/2 hr. $15. FULL BODY. Hot oil, spa/showers, 24/7. I travel. 8805772. massagebyeric.com. Male Only. Boise & Nampa studios. Place your FREE on-line classiďŹ eds at www.boiseweekly.com. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy! Just click on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Post Your FREE Ad.â&#x20AC;? No phone calls please.

Open House: Saturday, Jan. 30, 2-4 p.m.

30 | JANUARY 27 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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Free Foot Bath for Body Detox with 1 hr. foot massage. Treatments for acute and chronic cold hands & feet. Body Massage with special techniques. Pain Releif. 3777711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

BOISE’S BEST! With Bodywork by Rose. 794-4789. www.roseshands.com Deep Therapeutic Massage by Muscular Guy. 869-2766. Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577. Thomas. =DJHE6 Steam sauna & massage. Corner Overland & S. Orchard. Open 7 days a week, 9-10pm. 345-2430. Massage Boise Hotels 869-8128.

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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Wknds.Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. B6HH6<: Bali Spa. 401 N. Orchard St. 3751332. Open 9am-10pm. Mention you saw it in the Boise Weekly for $20 Off! I:6A:6; Massage by Asian at Tea Leaf Spa. 1975 Broadway Ave., Suite B. 344-4188. Stop by.

B6HH6<: My signature is a slow-soft-soothing-very relaxing sensitive touch. You will love the experience and my techniques. Women ~ Men ~ Couples ~ Call Thomas 208 8631577. * Day or evening* Prof. therapeutic massage only by trained & exp. masseur. New client spec. Robert 484-6251.

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We’ve moved. Same great service, new location & freshly remodeled spa. Massage~Bath. 1512 Broadway Ave. 713-6142. ULM 340-8377.

ADOPT-A-PET These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

CAREERS

SPARKLE: 1-year-old female Catahoula leopard dog mix. House-, crate- and leash-trained. (Kennel 322 - #9466225)

GINGER: 15-month-old female American pit bull terrer/border collie mix. Smart and highly trainable. (Kennel 315 #6332479)

OZZIE: 2-year-old male short hair. Litterbox-trained and ready for new home immediately. (Kennel 81 - #9278845)

SCOOBY: 10-year-old male tat terrier mix. House- and cratetrained. Knows some commands. (Kennel 319 - #9461328)

RUBY: 6-year-old female rottweiler. Alert, strong and smart. Needs experienced owner. (Kennel 421 #9430914)

GUNNER: 3-year-old male tabby short hair. Litterbox-trained, neutered. Not good with small children. (Kennel 22 - #9447274)

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats. www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

OLIVER: Charming lad looking to find a loving friend to call my own.

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XANADU: Delightful young chap seeks outgoing companion.

SPUNKY: Big ol’ gentleman searching for a quiet home with a warm lap.

BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 31


| REAL ESTATE | CAREERS | TRANSPORTATION | BARTER | FOR SALE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | | PETS | SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

BW PSYCHIC

orientation. We offer Meditation; Inspirational Music, and Transformational Messages. Our Youth Education is filled with positive spiritual lessons, music, and thought-provoking arts and crafts. The children’s program is a very important part of our Sunday Celebration. Children of all ages are welcome. 9:45-10; “Preparing Our Sacred

BW SPIRITUAL

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Psychic Medium: Available for large events, small gatherings & private readings. Call 208-323-2323.

8:CI:GD;E:68: A Spiritual Community where ALL are welcome! Our Sunday morning gatherings are allinclusive. We respect and welcome people of all ages, faiths, genders, races, and sexual

Space”; 10-10:20 “Meditation”; 10:30am “Our Spiritual Gathering” Child care available – 9:30. Youth Education 10:30.

PETS BW PETS

;G::DC"A>C: 8A6HH>;>:969H

Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

E:IG6IH"<G:6IL>I=@>9H They’ve been handled since they were born. Very sweet, mildmannered, inexpensive & easy to care for. NOT feeder rats. Unlike hamsters or gerbils they’re social, intelligent, inquisitive pets with personality that can be litterbox trained & can learn tricks. Great 1st pets. 392-0689.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

SERVICES BW HOME I

NYT CROSSWORD | 1 Blubber 4 Updates electrically 11 Liturgical reference 17 Ivanhoe’s lady 20 Spiritedly, in scores 21 Santiago is its patron saint 22 Slip hider 1 17

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23 Dr. Westheimer telling it like it is? 25 Grammar class exercise 27 Chief Ouray’s tribe 28 Fourth word in the “Star Wars” opening crawl 29 Angel, e.g., for short

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=DJH:8A:6C>C<>C7D>H: am offering house cleaning service. Call 331-0278 for a free quote.

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Viscera Playmate of Piglet ___ Gillis of 1960s TV Spade, e.g., for short Rapper’s retinue Father of Ariadne Abbr. after many a capt.’s name 64 Essence 65 Tome that makes a pub owner feel nostalgic? 70 “Hard ___!” 72 Pol Paul 73 Cel 74 Great trait 77 Eighth or ninth word in the “Star Wars” opening crawl 78 Law school course 80 1977 Sex Pistols song … or their first record label 81 Longtime Buick model 83 Scottish seaport 84 Where to find a bestselling CD? 87 “Ghost Whisperer” skill 88 Bleach brand 90 Cabbage batch? 91 Julio to julio 92 Sacrament, e.g. 93 Tea leaves alternative 94 Help, wrongly 96 “The Office” city 99 Something kids might ver y well tune out? 102 Orange-roofed establishment, in brief 104 Inter ___ 107 Author Deighton 108 Married mujer: Abbr. 109 Scoldings 112 Advice to Tin Man costume designers? 117 “Good Guys Wear Black” star, 1979 118 Strapped 119 Topsy-tur vy 120 Hickman who played 58-Across

121 Subject of a Scottish myster y, informally 122 Good outcome 123 Carpenter ___

DOWN 1 Recording period 2 “Anna Christie” playwright 3 Web site for Charlotte 4 Paper that dishes dirt 5 “Knock it off!” 6 Lumber dimensions 7 “No more, thanks” 8 Shout at a bowl 9 W.W. II command area 10 Voiced, in phonetics 11 Quark/antiquark particle 12 Suffix with cruciverbal 13 Exterminator, often 14 Handel oratorio king 15 Starting stake 16 Bert who was a Leo, aptly 17 Name on the street 18 Algerian port 19 Debugger’s mission? 24 Stars can have big ones 26 Free 32 Romance lang. 33 Eye layer 34 Galloping 35 Living ___ 37 Touch, e.g. 40 Damage to a paperback edition? 41 Nocturnal fledgling 42 College course, briefly 43 Radar image 44 City near old silver mines 46 Scan for slips 47 “West Side Stor y” girl 49 ___ of Souls, Na’vi temple in “Avatar” 50 Composer Satie 51 Like a ___ bricks 52 Language from which “sky” and “egg” are derived

98 Nonplussed 100 Duck 101 “This I Promise You” band, 2000 103 Ken of “thirtysomething” 104 Good situation for a ser ver 105 Unattended 106 Imarets, e.g. 110 “___ partridge in …” 111 V.I.-to-Trinidad dir. 113 King, in Portuguese 114 Toon for which Hank Azaria won a 1998 Emmy 115 Japanese I.T. giant 116 Mag. team

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Skeptical rejoinder Arthur with a racket Shevat or Sivan Poetr y contests Exterminator’s target ___ Zoo ___ cloud (solar system outlier) 68 Cross out 69 Opposite of stout 70 “Is that ___?” 71 Eric Clapton love song 75 Once, formerly 76 Variety 78 Its crown is in your head 79 Waste line 81 Cocktail party ser ving 82 College course, briefly 85 Karma 86 ___ avis 89 Pivots 92 Attic scurrier 94 Galoots 95 Ethnic group including Zulus 96 Walked boldly 97 Port sights L A S T

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Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

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| REAL ESTATE | CAREERS | BARTER | FOR SALE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | PETS |

| SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

76G:;DDI8A:6C>C<8DBE6CN Get 20% off of your Carpet Cleaning when you donate 5 cans or boxes of food for charity. We use top of the line equipment and well established in the Treasure Valley. So please give us a call for a firm quote. Thanks, Clint 830-8215.

BW CHILD

NOTICES BW NOTICES GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484.

BW LEGAL NOTICES

BW PROFESSIONAL 86GIDDC<JN I offer animated and illustration services very reasonable. Check out what I can do for your next project. www.shontoon.com 8DIIDCLDD98G::@9:CI6A Dr. Michael Dolby offers the latest techniques & equipment to make going to dentist easier than ever. Call today! 323-8545. EG>K6I:>CK:HI><6IDG Is your partner acting suspicious? We specialize in insurance and infidelity investigations. We offer surveillance, GPS tracking, and polygraphs. We have the experience and background you need when hiring a specialist. We understand making this decision can be difficult but the alternative of not knowing the truth is far more destructive. View our site and call today to discuss some options. Rogers & Associates, LLC 208344-4029 www.asubrosa.com

CDI>8:D;=:6G>C<DCC6B:8=6C<: A Petition to change the name of Eeshwar Parthasarathy born 01/07/04 in Boise, ID residing at 8541 W. Fairview Ave, Apt 103, Boise, ID, has been filed in Ada County District Court, Idaho. The name will change to Eshwar Parthasarathy because the pronunciation of the first name should only have one E in the beginning. The child’s father is living. The child’s mother is living. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock pm on March 25, 2010, at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Jan. 20, 2010. By D. Price, Deputy Clerk.

MUSIC BW MUSICAL INSTRUCTION/OTHER Bag Pipe Lessons. Contact John at 331-5675. 8:AAD;DGHIJ9:CI Half-size student cello in great condition. Hard stand-up travel case included. Call to check it out. 3671289. K>DA>C6C9$DG;>99A:A:HHDC Fiddlin’ Frog String Studios is now accepting new students of all ages/levels. Opportunity to play with a group once tunes are learned. We have rentals available, for more information call 208- 344-7297 or e-mail: Fiddlinfrog@gmail.com

SERVICES

BW FUNDRAISERS I=:G:6A>INB6<>8H=DL A Magical night your family will not forget! 100% of all ticket sales support Wishing Star Foundation, Project Patch and Camp River Run. Tue., April 13th at 7pm at Nampa Civic Center. Tickets are $10/person. For Tickets and information call 208-345-3008 or tracys@wishingstar.org

Three Great Stores in One Stop! Caledonia~Fuzz~Twigs and Twist. Stop by & see what we have to offer at 605 Americana Blvd. Call 338-0895.

;>7:G6GI 8A6HH:H

BW MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE Elvis impersonator for hire for parties etc. Reasonable rates. John 587-5719.

BW FOUND >;DJC9JG9D<EA:6H:G:69 I Found your Chesapeake Retriever 01/16/2010, Vista- Canal Area. Hi, I am the lady that found your dog you p/u at the humane society. I was however, curious as to what the heck his name was. There are four of us trying to figure it out. If you could e-mail me back with his name (we have a bet going) that would be awesome. I hope I didn’t cause you any financial burden by taking him to the humane society, again sorry for that but it was his best chance. Thank You. sittinonmahcouch@gmail.com

BW LOST

BW CLASSES

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Looking for barter? Post what you have, find what you need. Always free at www.boiseweekly.com. ;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

>96=D6FJ6G>JB8AJ7 The Idaho Aquarium Club Launched this week check it out ay http:// idahoaquariumclub.com

At Fuzz! Fiber art classes available. Stop in for your winter knitting supplies at 605 Americana Blvd., 343-3899. Free Advice! We’ll Help You Choose A Program Or Degree To Get Your Career & Your Life On Track. Call College bound Network Today! 1-877-892-2642. L=>GA>C<8>G8A:HHIJ9>D Classes begin Feb 8th, a teaching studio presenting foundational and special topic classes for all ages in McCall. For class & workshop infor. contact Debra Facchin at 6303660. debraf@frontiernet.net

ADHIEG:H8G>EI>DC<A6HH:H ln zippered black case between Record Exchange and The Modern. Dec. 3rd. 336-5482. ADHIL:>B6G6C:G Went missing early evening Dec 27th from Mace Rd. (East of Eagle Island state park, by Two Rivers subdivision) No collar. 2 yr. old neutered male, all light grey in color, rear leg scarred up from past knee surgeries, very friendly loved very much! Microchip #0006-AB99-D9 registered at Intermountain Pet Hospital. Please call Dan 407-5144 or Doniel 8603190 if found.

76GI:G>H 7:II:G

Looking for barter? Post what you have, find what you need. Always free at www.boiseweekly.com. ;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy!

CONNECTION SECTION BW ADULT ENTERTAINMENT BUYER BEWARE Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services. ALL KINDS OF SINGLES. Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7582, 18+. Come Where Single Play. Call 208287-0343 FREE w/code 5500 Call 800-210-1010. HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Call 208-489-2162 or 800-7778000. FREE w/ code 2982. MEET LOCAL SINGLES. Listen to Ads FREE! 208-345-8855. Use FREE Code 7584, 18+. SEEKING SEXY SINGLES? Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7583. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. WHERE HOT GUYS MEET. Browse & Respond FREE! 208-472-2200, Code 5801 or MegaMatesaMen. com, 18+.

BW KISSES &'%%96NH WP, Though the valleys, at times, could be be cold and dismal, the climb to the top was always invigorating. And, the view devine. XOW. Proclaim your love in the Boise Weekly. Up to 4 Valentine Love Lines for $14. Call 344-2055 today!

CONNECTION SECTION - ADULT

COMMUNITY POSTINGS BW ANNOUNCEMENTS <DJGB:IK6A:CI>C:¼H<>;IH Treasure Valley Fudge specializes in delicious fudge, bark, peanut brittle and more. Buy Idaho products and place your gift orders at TreasureValleyFudge.com We ship globally and hand deliver locally! @>AGDN@D;;::@A6I8= Warhawk Air Museum is excited to announce the monthly “Kilroy was Here” coffee klatch. 1st Tuesday of every month. 10-11:30am. Warhawk Air Museum, 201 Municipal Dr, Nampa. HDN86C9A:H6C98J7:H I am the local Candle consultant for ‘For Every Home’, our company sells eco-friendly soy-based candles, cubes and we also have a line of odor eliminator products. Home-show, catalog party or office party. 208-447-6317 Check out all our products on my website: www. foreveryhome.net/lynnette

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BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | 33


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): Shakespeare got modest respect while he was alive, but his reputation as a brilliant bard didn’t gel until almost 50 years after he died. By then, all his colleagues and compatriots were gone. He himself left little information to build a biography on. That’s why next to nothing is known about the person who made such a dramatic impact on the English language and literature. I suggest you take this as a metaphorical prod that will inspire you not to be blase about the greatness in your vicinity. Don’t take superlative intelligence, talent or love for granted. Recognize it, bless it, be influenced by it. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You are the lord of all you survey! I swear to God! I’m almost tempted to say that you now have the power to command whirlwinds and alter the course of mighty rivers! At the very least, you will be able to mobilize the ambition of everyone you encounter and brighten the future of every group you’re part of! Act with confident precision, Taurus! Speak with crisp authority! Your realm waits expectantly for the transformative decisions that will issue from the depths of your emotional intelligence! GEMINI (May 21-June 20): It’s time for you to fly away—to flee the safe pleasures that comfort you as well as the outmoded fixations that haunt you; to escape at least one of the galling compromises that twists your spirit as well as a familiar groove that numbs your intelligence. In my astrological opinion, Gemini, you need to get excited by stimuli that come from outside your known universe. You need fertile surprises that motivate you to resort to unpredictable solutions. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “I never meet anyone who admits to having had a happy childhood,” said writer Jessamyn West. “Everyone appears to think happiness betokens a lack of sensitivity.” I agree, and go further. Many creative people I know actually brag about how messed up their early life was, as if that was a crucial ingredient in turning them into the geniuses they are today. Well, excuse, but I, Rob Brezsny, had a happy childhood, and it did not prevent me from becoming a sensitive artist. In fact, it helped. Now, I ask you, are you brave enough to go against the grain and confess that your early years had some wonderful moments? You’re in a phase of your cycle when recalling the beauty and joy of the past could be profoundly invigorating. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Usually I overflow with advice about how to access your soul’s code. I love to help you express the unique

34 | JANUARY 27 – FEBRUARY 2, 2010 | BOISEweekly

blueprint that sets you apart from everyone else. Every now and then, though, it’s a healing balm to take a sabbatical from exploring the intricacies of your core truths. This is one of those times. For the next 10 days, I invite you to enjoy the privilege of being absolutely nobody. Revel in the pure emptiness of having no clue about your deep identity. If anyone asks you, “Who are you?”, relish the bubbly freedom that comes from cheerfully saying, “I have no freaking idea!” VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): French novelist Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880) is generally regarded as one of the greats. His book Madame Bovary appears on many lists of the greatest novels of all time. And yet writing didn’t come especially easy for him. He worked as hard as a ditch digger. It wasn’t uncommon for him to spend several agonizing days in squeezing out a single page. On some occasions, he literally beat his head against a wall, as if trying to dislodge the right words from their hiding place in his brain. He’s your role model in the coming week, Virgo. You can create something of value, although it may require hard labor. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): My theory is that right now the whole world is in love with you. In some places, this simmering adoration is bordering on infatuation. Creatures great and small are more apt than usual to recognize what’s beautiful and original about you. As a result, wonders and marvels are likely to coalesce in your vicinity. Is there anything you can do to ensure that events unfold in ways that will yield maximum benefits for everyone concerned? Yes: Be yourself with as much tender intensity as you can muster. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I hope that you saw the horoscope I wrote for you last week. And I hope that you acted on my advice and refrained from all sweating and striving and struggling. These past seven days were designed by the universe to be a time for you to recharge your psychic battery. Assuming that you took advantage of the opportunity, you should now be ready to shift gears. In this new phase, your assignment is to work extra hard and be extra sweet on yourself. By that I mean you should make your way down into your depths and change around everything that isn’t functioning with grace and power. Tweak your attitudes. Rearrange your emotional flow. Be an introspective master of self-refinement. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): This horoscope borrows from one of my favorite Sagittarian visionaries, Jonathan Zap. The advice he gives, which is in accordance

with your astrological omens, is designed to help you avoid the fate he warns against. Here it is: “Many of the significant problems in our lives are more about recognizing the obvious rather than discovering the mysterious or hidden. One of the classic ways we deceive and hide from ourselves is by refusing to recognize the obvious, and shrouding what is right before us in rationalization and false complexity. We often delay and deny necessary transformation by claiming that there is a mysterious answer hidden from us, when actually we know the answers but pretend that we don’t.” (More at bit.ly/ZapOracle and Zaporacle.com.) CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): It’s a good time to take inventory of all the stories you allow to pour into your beautiful head. Do you absorb a relentless stream of fear-inducing news reports and violent movies and gossipy tales of decline and degeneration? Or do you tend to expose yourself to comedies that loosen your fixations and poems that stretch your understanding of the human condition and conversations about all the things that are working pretty well. If so, you’re taking good care of your precious insides; you’re fostering your mental health. Now please drink in this fresh truth from Nigerian writer Ben Okri: “Beware of the stories you read or tell; subtly, at night, beneath the waters of consciousness, they are altering your world.” AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In the coming week, I predict that you will NOT experience disgusting fascinations, smilingfaced failures, sensationalized accounts of useless developments, or bizarre fantasies in the middle of the night. You may, on the other hand, have encounters with uplifting disappointments, incendiary offers of assistance, mysterious declarations of interdependence, and uproars that provoke your awe and humility in healing ways. In other words, Aquarius, it’ll be an uncanny, perhaps controversial time for you—but always leading in the direction of greater freedom. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Congrats on your growing ability to do more floating and less thrashing as you cascade down the stream of consciousness. I think you’re finally understanding that a little bit of chaos isn’t a sign that everything’s falling apart forever omigod the entire planet’s crashing and evil is in ascension ... but rather that a healthy amount of bewildering unpredictability keeps things fresh and clean. My advice is to learn to relax even more as you glide with serene amusement through the bubbling and churning waters of life.

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Boise Weekly Vol. 18 Issue 31