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LOCAL, INDEPENDENT NEWS, OPINION, ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT WWW.BOISEWEEKLY.COM VOLUME 18, ISSUE 27 DEC. 30, 2009 – JAN. 5, 2010

TAK EE E ON E! NEWS 7

ON THE LEDGE A preview of what’s to come under the rotunda FEATURE 8

SPUDS AND DUDS 2009 The best, the worst, the unexplainable PICKS 12-13

HAPPY NEW YEAR Get out and go do something FOOD 22

TOTALLY TWISTED Hinterland tavern Twisted Timber vs. BW reviewers

“Never start thinking the universe revolves around humanity.”

BILL COPE 5


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NOTE AND THAT, LADIES AND GENTS, WAS 2009. In the ďŹ nal edition of Boise Weekly for the year, you’ll ďŹ nd our annual year-end undertaking, Spuds and Duds. It’s our way to get in the last word on the year’s most outrageously great and outrageously bad deeds and stories. As I read through the highlights and the low points of the last year, courtesy of Bill Cope’s “Spuds and Duds,â€? my left eye started to twitch with a twinge of regret. Perhaps we should have spanned the entire decade at its close in this issue rather than conďŹ ning ourselves to only the last 12 months. I thought seriously what that list would have looked like: UĂŠ Ă•`\ĂŠ Â?iVĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂœvÊÓäää UĂŠ Ă•`\ĂŠ-iÂŤĂŒÂ°ĂŠÂŁÂŁ]ÊÓää£ UĂŠ Ă•`\ĂŠ ˆ}Â…ĂŒĂŠĂži>Ă€ĂƒĂŠÂœvĂŠĂœ>Ă€ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠv}Â…>Â˜ÂˆĂƒĂŒ>˜ UĂŠ Ă•`\ĂŠ-ˆĂ?ĂŠ>˜`ĂŠÂ…>Â?vĂŠĂži>Ă€ĂƒĂŠÂœvĂŠĂœ>Ă€ĂŠÂˆÂ˜ĂŠĂ€>Âľ UĂŠ Ă•`\ĂŠ,iViĂƒĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ĂŠĂ•Â˜i“Â?ÂœĂžÂ“iÂ˜ĂŒ]ĂŠĂ€i>Â?ĂŠiĂƒĂŒ>ĂŒiĂŠLĂ•LLÂ?iÊ°°° And this is just the list I came up with before watching CNN’s “The Decade in Seven Minutes.â€? That was the most depressing seven minutes of my week. Not only did I get a full seven minutes to relive all the political and natural disasters of the last decade—terrorist bombings, Southeast ĂƒÂˆ>Â˜ĂŠĂŒĂƒĂ•Â˜>“ˆ]ĂŠ>ĂŒĂ€ÂˆÂ˜>]ĂŠĂŒÂ…iÊÓää{ĂŠiÂ?iVĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ĂŠ->Ă€>Â…ĂŠ*>Â?ˆ˜pLĂ•ĂŒĂŠ I was reminded that it wasn’t until this decade that the ďŹ rst black woman received a Best Actress Oscar (Halle Berry), the ďŹ rst woman took the seat as the Speaker of the House (Nancy Pelosi), and of course, we’ve only just elected our ďŹ rst black president. Sadly, the highlight of CNN’s seven minutes was a clip of Steve Jobs introducing the ďŹ rst-generaĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠÂˆ*Âœ`ĂŠ>Â?Â“ÂœĂƒĂŒĂŠÂŁĂ¤ĂŠĂži>Ă€ĂƒĂŠ>}ÂœÂ°ĂŠ Has the last decade really been that bad? Thankfully, Cope has a better attitude than I do. He managed to ferret out plenty of spuds and has doled them out accordingly. I hope you enjoy this short trip down the “iÂ“ÂœĂ€ĂžĂŠÂ?>˜iĂŠÂœvÊÓä䙰Ê And just one ďŹ nal reminder: BWHQ is closed until Mon`>Ăž]ĂŠ>Â˜Â°ĂŠ{]ĂŠĂƒÂœĂŠÂˆvĂŠĂžÂœĂ•Â˝Ă›iĂŠLiiÂ˜ĂŠĂ•Â˜>LÂ?iĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠĂ€i>VÂ…ĂŠĂ•ĂƒĂŠĂœÂ…ÂˆÂ?iĂŠÂœĂ•Ă€ĂŠ ofďŹ ces are closed for the holidays, be patient. We’ll be back ˜iĂ?ĂŒĂŠĂœiiŽ° —Rachael Daigle

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INSIDE EDITOR’S NOTE 3 MONDO GAGA 4 BILL COPE The Flutter, No. 4 5 TED RALL 6 NEWS Looking ahead at the 2010 Idaho State

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Legislature FEATURE Spuds and Duds 2009 BW PICKS What to do FIND 8 DAYS OUT

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CLASSIFIEDS

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HOME SWEET HOME NYT CROSSWORD FREEWILL ASTROLOGY

ARTS Looking back on the last year of art 20 FOOD Twisted Timber 22 WINE SIPPER 25

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BILL COPE/OPINION

THE FLUTTER: ISSUE 4

The “Society For Making People Better” newsletter We have a birthday in the house. Sing along, everybody! C’mon, it’ll be fun. Happy birthday to you! Happy birthday to you! Happy two-hun-dredth birth-day, Charl-ie Daaaar-win. Happy birthday to you! All right then, the Creationists among you are dismissed. Go rinse your mouth out with Listerine if you think that will help. U Welcome to the last The Flutter of 2009, and I apologize for being so tardy with this nod to SFMPB Honorary Member Darwin. His actual birthday was way back in February, but I missed it. Some-body forgot to invite me to the party. However, I simply could not let 2009 slip by without acknowledging Chuck’s big Two-Oh-Oh. We owe him much, by cracky. Had he never been born, I imagine someone else would have eventually figured out the evolution thing. But then, had Archimedes never been born, someone else would have eventually figured out that “pi” thing. And without Copernicus, somebody else would have eventually figured out the sun doesn’t revolve around Earth, and without Newton, someone else would have eventually figured out gravity. But there is much to be said about being first, and Darwin was first. And those of us who operate under the principle that it is better to try to understand the workings of our universe through the disciplines of the scientific method rather than the “Taketh my word for it” provinces of faith have to be grateful he came up with his theories so long ago. He got the hard work done early. Really, can you imagine what would happen if a contemporary Darwin had just recently proposed that Pat Robertson and Sarah Palin are relatives of apes? Woowee! That earthshaking thesis would be gathering dust in a sub-basement somewhere, along with Jimmy Hoffa’s mummy and the Bush administration policy on global warming. U One more thing about Mr. Darwin and his theory: We here in the SFMPB general offices have become aware of criticism being leveled at Chaz’s legacy, and as he isn’t here to answer those critics, we thought it proper if we did it for him. After all, without Darwin and his stunning revelation that humanity has evolved from humble beginnings—thereby implying that we may be capable of evolving much further; that there is possibly no limit to how far our species might progress—there would be little to be gained by investing our hopes in the Society For Making People Better. I personally, as the Founder and So-FarUnchallenged Grand Marshal of the SFMPB, consider Darwin to be our society’s original inspiration, a central figure to the proposition that we have a fine and noble potential, if we WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

so choose to aspire to it. Yet there are those who say Darwin’s revelations have resulted in all the terrible things that have happened since the publication of On the Origin of Species 150 years ago. In a letter printed in another local newspaper, a Meridian man (definitely not me) credited Darwin’s discoveries as being at the root of everything from Lenin’s communism to the Holocaust to the sexual revolution of the ’60s. If this nonsense were coming only from a lone Meridian man, we might sluff it off as further proof that it’s highly unlikely the next wave of intellectual advance will come from Meridian. But a British journalist—Dennis Sewell, interviewed by Time—has made similar accusations. Sewell even implies that the Columbine killers must have had Darwin in mind, as evidenced by a “Natural Selection” T-shirt Eric Harris wore that tragic day. Our experience tells us that if there are even a few examples of such superficial tripe loose in the world, there is probably a powerful current of it flowing through society among people eager to believe in superficial tripe. We find it worthwhile to answer this tripe, even if that’s all it is. For instance, if Mr. Sewell’s and the Meridian man’s line of logic were applied throughout the realm of scientific discovery, we must blame Isaac Newton for every death by gravity, since Newton is the first to describe that natural phenomenon in depth. Archimedes must take the blame for Hitler’s V-2 rockets and Saddam’s SCUD missiles, as rocketry (not to mention atomic weaponry) could not exist without an understanding of “pi.” And honestly, if a book such as On the Origin of Species could be the provocation for millions of murderous acts, would we also not be better off without the Bible? But the biggest lesson here is not to be drawn from taking absurd notions to even more absurd extrapolations. The real point is that the truths unveiled by science are not to be confused with what works out best for society. “Pi” would always be a mathematical relationship, even if it had never been used to compute a missile’s trajectory. Gravity would still be the clockwork to the cosmos, even if there were no Golden Gate Bridge and no sapient apes to jump off it. That’s right, a tree falling in the forest makes a noise regardless of whether anyone’s around to hear it, and species evolve even if they don’t all evolve into Baptists. That’s what we owe our man on the H.M.S. Beagle—an invaluable truth that has nothing whatsoever to do with whatever man-made evil that truth is used to justify. All of which leads us to the newest entry in the SFMPB rule book: Rule 10) Never start thinking the universe revolves around humanity. That makes you stop seeing what’s really happening.

LISTEN LOCALLY. THINK GLOBALLY.

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| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | 5


OPINION/TED RALL *Editor’s Note: This column originally ran Jan. 26, 2005.

SAFE AND COMMON

We could restore sanity to immigration if we wanted

“ IT’S A BIG OL’ MOVIE THE WAY ‘LAWRENCE

OF ARABIA’ WAS A BIG OL’ MOVIE.

It’s a triumphant return for Woo, who can still show the fantasy/action boys how it’s done.” -John Anderson, THE WASHINGTON POST

RED CLIFF

NEW YORK—The Cold War you never thought about, the one between China and the Soviet Union, had been dead for a decade when I made the trip from what is now called the Kyrgyz Republic to western China in 1999. Although troops no longer massed for possible war at this border, crossing the high-altitude Torugart Pass remained an arduous bureaucratic odyssey, which required presenting a special exit visa at a dozen checkpoints on the way up to the border outpost. On the Chinese side came another 20 kilometers of DMZ: minefields, row after row of razorwire, watchtowers, the dirt raked regularly in order to reveal the footsteps of would-be illegal immigrants. The Soviets had maintained similar fortifications along thousands of miles of their southern borders with nations like Iran, Afghanistan and China. As you’d guess, Soviet border controls were highly effective. They kept out unwanted intruders and imprisoned millions of wouldbe emigres. Why is it, then, that the wealthier and technologically sophisticated United States can’t seal its much shorter border with Mexico—the source of 70 percent of its illegal immigrants? Because it doesn’t want to. The INS estimates that there are about 9 million illegal immigrants, mostly Mexican, living and working in the United States. With about 300,000 more entering the country annually (not including migrant laborers who travel back and forth), a staggering 10 percent of the U.S. workforce is currently undocumented.

George W. Bush, master plagiarist of liberal catchphrases, says illegal immigrants “take the jobs that Americans won’t take.” A more accurate reading of the situation is that because these workers’ illegal status makes them vulnerable to exploitation, employers create jobs for them to take—while eliminating better jobs for Americans. Rapacious employers use illegals to fill two types of jobs: those that would otherwise go to Americans and those that exist only because it’s possible to pay slave wages. Labor costs account for about two-thirds of the expenses of an average business. The last “reform” corporate America wants is a genuine crackdown on illegal immigration. And Congress, reliant on business for campaign contributions, isn’t about to start one. While we encourage illegal immigration, we’ve made it virtually impossible for a foreigner who dreams of becoming an American to do so legally. Legal immigration is limited to people who already have relatives here, are sponsored by an employer or are seeking political asylum from a tiny list of approved countries. Had these rules been enforced since 1776, there would be more Native Americans than immigrants. A sane immigration policy would reverse these attitudes. Legal immigration should become safe, legal and commonplace. At the same time, no nation worthy of the name can tolerate porous borders. We can and must seal our borders to prevent economic migrants, terrorists and others with unknown motives from entering the United States. It’s time to stop sucking up to big business.

    



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NEWS/CITYDESK NEWS

NO MONEY, NO HONEY In stimulus rebound year, state retains revenue problems ANDREW CRISP But it’s the looming fight over taxes in an election year that could shape Idaho’s budgets for years to come. Boise Democrat Rep. Branden Durst wants counties and cities to be able to offer local exemptions. “Jobs, jobs, jobs. That’s the key. Any way that we can help our state become more competitive. I’ve got a bill that’s intended to

NOAH KROESE

Despite signs that stimulus spending has at least stabilized the national economy, Idaho still faces the aftermath of the recession squall and the prospect of balancing another smaller state budget. Lawmakers say they’re gearing up to get their 2010 business done quickly, despite the lingering aftertaste of the stimulus spendingfueled, weeks-long standoff that marked last year’s 117-day-long session, the final in the cramped halls of the Capitol Annex. But the state still has to deal with myriad financial issues, including the recent surge in public assistance and unemployment demands, the lack of funding for basic road maintenance and the ever-dwindling “catastrophic fund” for out-of-luck residents with health-care debt. The upcoming session will focus on the dwindling state budget. Idaho’s budget is still coming in short in the current fiscal year, even as budget writers assume further cutbacks for next year. Even Gov. C. L. “Butch” Otter has signaled, through his transportation task force, that he won’t request revenue increases for roads during the upcoming legislative session. With $100 million in budget holdbacks for most state agencies already in place, Otter projects another $39 million to $51 million budget shortfall, according to Jon Hanian, spokesman for the Governor’s Office. But some members of the Legislature, particularly Boise lawmakers, are looking for creative ways to increase the state’s revenue in certain areas. For example, Rep. Phylis King, a Boise Democrat, wants to change Idaho’s seat belt statutes to benefit the catastrophic fund. “Right now, you can’t be stopped for not wearing your seat belt. If we can pass this primary seat belt law, we can receive $4.5 million in federal subsidies. Eighty-five percent of us are wearing our seat belts already,” King said. Speaker of the House Lawerence Denney sent out a memo echoing Otter’s call to keep the legislative session short, and Rep. Grant Burgoyne, another Boise Democrat, plans to float a bill that would limit each session to 90 days to help the state save money—an estimated $35,000 a day to keep lawmakers in Boise. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

offer counties and cities a local option for tax exemption, with the express intent to create some jobs,” Durst said. Boise Democrat Sen. Nicole LeFavour also supports reform of tax-exemption statutes at a state level. “Right now we have people come and give us a compelling story, or have a lobbyist inform us that they need tax exemption. It’s far better if we create a consistent policy,” she said. House Majority Leader Mike Moyle of Star counters with a proposal for lowering taxes. He argues that part of the shortfall stems from Idaho’s high income tax rates. “We were the 13th highest tax burden in the nation last year. Thirteenth highest.” Moyle, along with Republican Reps. Raul Labrador of Eagle and Marv Hagedorn of Meridian, propose lowering the interest rates on corporate and personal income taxes to a flat 4.9 percent, in hopes of luring businesses from cheaper neighboring states. They argue lower taxes will spur economic growth. A recently released study from the Idaho State Tax Commission, that relies on Census data, makes a case that Idaho has the 46th

highest tax burden in the nation, 24.8 percent below the national average tax burden. The tax debate will be joined by a new look at local improvement districts, which Boise plans to use to help fund a downtown streetcar. Some legislators, including Moyle and Labrador, who is running for Congress, aren’t happy about city councils’ ability to create an LID without voter approval. Moyle suggested that the Legislature may present a bill to change that. Moyle went on to say that a bill may be introduced that requires either a cap on the amount of money a council-initiated LID can raise, or a requirement that twothirds of residents or 60 percent of landowners approve the project first. Another hotbutton issue for the legislators is health care, with state lawmakers unsure what the U.S. Congress may approve in terms of health-care reform. Part of the controversy in Idaho surrounds healthcare benefits for state employees, who have seen drastic hikes in their health-insurance costs. Boise Sen. John Andreason, Republican chairman of the Commerce and Human Resources Committee, said the Legislature will be asked to ratify increases in health-insurance pricing, especially for parttime employees. “This will be the second year that we won’t be giving the state employees any consideration,” Andreason said. He said that this will be the second year that his committee, which normally considers cost-of-living increases for state workers, will not meet because of the governor’s cuts. “They’re not working part-time for their convenience. They’re working part-time for our convenience. There are many of them that won’t be able to maintain their health insurance because of the drastic increase in costs,” Andreason said. Sen. Minority Leader Kate Kelly agreed the stimulus influx may have helped for this year, but adds it could continue to help in 2011. “The stimulus helped us with this year’s budget, but we’re still coming up short. There’s still stimulus funding that hasn’t been spent. There’s still money on the table,” Kelly said.

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ON IDAHO’S TAX BURDEN Tax burden, the amount of income spent on taxes by some accountings, is in the eye of the beholder. A recent plan, floated by the Republican leadership in the Idaho House of Representatives, calls for lowering some personal and corporate income taxes to better compete with neighboring states. As House Majority Leader Mike Moyle tells BW’s Andrew Crisp this week (See story this page): “We were the 13th highest tax burden in the nation last year. Thirteenth highest.” Moyle’s assertion flies in the face of a recent analysis by the Idaho State Tax Commission that ranks Idaho 42nd nationally and ninth among the 11 Western states when taxes are taken as a proportion of income. If you just count the per capita tax burden in Idaho, the state ranks 46th nationally and last among the Western states. So what is Moyle talking about? The study he cites is from the (tax-exempt) Tax Foundation, a nonpartisan Washington, D.C., research group that generally feels taxation is unfair and excessive. The Tax Foundation ranked Idaho 13 for tax burden last year, just behind Minnesota and above Arkansas. But the group uses a different formula to calculate its rankings. It counts tax burdens paid by Idaho residents in other states toward Idahoans’ burden and strips out taxes paid to Idaho by residents of other states. The Tax Commission only counts taxes paid to Idaho in its calculations. Both rely on Census data for their calculations, though other nonpartisan, more tax-philic groups like the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities have criticized the Tax Foundation’s methodology. The Tax Foundation report shows that Idahoans import a large chunk of their tax burden. For every $2,374 per capita paid to Idaho tax collectors, Idaho residents spend another $1,296 in tax dollars in other states. The Tax Commission study reflects Idaho’s own tax structure more accurately. And it does make some points that help Moyle’s argument. While Idaho ranks about the middle in individual and toward the bottom (35th) in corporate income taxes across the country, its individual income taxes are 8 percent above the median for Western states and corporate is on par with neighboring states. So Moyle, along with Reps. Raul Labrador and Marv Hagedorn, hope to lower those two tax categories starting in 2012. Idaho significantly lowered property taxes in 2007, shifting school funding to other tax categories. But the Tax Commission reports that Idaho’s tax burden remains basically balanced on what lawmakers like to call the three-legged stool of property, sales and income tax. On top of that three-legged stool is the state budget, which pays for schools, police, roads and everything else state government does. Which leg gets kicked out depends on which report you choose to believe. —Nathaniel Hoffman

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E

very year ’twixt Halloween and Thanksgiving, Boise Weekly editors and writers gather in the pow-wow room to determine which events and individuals will be designated either Spud or Dud for what has taken place during the previous 12 months. It is a solemn occasion, as we understand that the Spuds and especially the Duds might follow the awardees through life like a swath of toilet paper stuck to one’s dress shoe. But we are convinced it must be done, this annual compiling of the best and worst, for what are the Spuds and Duds if not old news? And what is old news if not history? And what is history if not something either to repeat or avoid repeating—depending, of course, on whether we’re looking at reliving a Spud or a Dud? So if you will, think of this issue as a road map to the future of our community and state. There are so, so many incidents we must leave out owing

to the limits imposed by space, and many of you will be dismayed by our choices. How, for instance, can we have ignored former Secretary of the Interior Dirk Kempthorne’s $235,000 bathroom remodel (it likely would have earned him a Dud, should you wonder) or Ada County Commissioner Sharon Ullman’s decision not to “interact with the media directly” (also on the fast track for a Dud)? Should we have rejected other items so that we might have had room to Dud University of Oregon Duck LeGarrette Blount for sucker-punching Boise State Bronco Byron Hout? Shouldn’t we have Spudded the fellow in Kuna who persuaded his school to drop the donkeys from the donkey basketball games? Where on the Spud-Dud scale would have been the much talked about tea-baggers, had we bothered to bother with them? And what about the governor—a believer in “Buy Idaho,” we assume—getting caught with an out-of-

SPUDS DUDS && DUDS LEGISLATORS AND CONGRESSMEN

THE HIGHS AND LOWS OF 2009

DAY-CARE REFORM Idaho now requires criminal background checks on day-care providers. Finally.

TOM TRAIL, DUDE! In October, Moscow Republican lawmaker Tom Trail announced his intentions to bring a medical marijuana bill to the state Legislature in the coming session. Odds setters in Vegas put the chances of such a bill passing in the Idaho Leg. at something less than 1 in infinity, but we admire Mr. Trail’s chutzpah in this matter of medical marijuana. We wish him success, and some of our reasons actually have to do with the medical part.

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FIERCE CREATURES LIABILITY ACT Athol Republican Phil Hart tried to make it a felony to introduce dangerous animals to Idaho, a not-so-subtle swipe at wild wolf supporters. But the bill did not specify wolves, so if you’re ever in Athol and trip over Rep. Hart’s pot-bellied pig, feel free to bring charges. We’re sure he will understand.

| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly

state coffee mustache? Speaking of Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter, should we not have passed Dud judgment on his tantrum of vetoes late in the legislative session, or did the legislators deserve that Dud for their refusal to help him get some much-needed road work done? How would we have awarded Rep. Rich Jarvis’ proposal to raise the age children can drop out of school to 18, or Sen. Gary Schroeder’s idea to sell excess wolves to other states, or the Nampa Classical Academy’s refusal to make its records public, or the Boise Police Department’s tactic of ticketing homeless people for illicit sleeping? And who would have gotten what in the great and ongoing streetcar debate? You’ll never know, because in the end, our choices came down—as it so often happens in the year-in-review biz—to what gets written before the word limit has been reached. Following are those items that came in before the gate closed.

BY BILL COPE

IDAHO VS. HUMAN RIGHTS THE NEXUS OF GUNS, CARS AND CO-WORKERS It was a banner day for crazed, disgruntled employees with visions of revenge and mayhem in their heads when our legislators made it impossible for employers to bar guns from being brought to the company parking lot and left in the car.

In another example of why state legislatures can’t be trusted with the duty to protect all citizens, the State Affairs Committee, under the chairmanship of Nampa Republican Sen. Curt McKenzie, wouldn’t even print the bill that would have made it illegal to discriminate against gays in employment, education and housing.

CRAPO: SAVIOR OF CANYON LANDS THE ENDLESS SESSION This year’s legislative session was one of the longest in state history, lasting 117 painful days. As fun as it is to have people like Lenore Barrett and Steve Thayn hang around Boise for months on end, let’s hope the 2009 marathon was an anomaly and not a sign of legislatures to come.

Not just for ourselves, but for generations of future Americans, we Spud up Sen. Mike Crapo for the magnificent work he’s done to accomplish Owyhee Canyonlands preservation. (And Mike, don’t listen to what Lenore Barrett said about the deal. She’s cuckoo.) WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


ADAM R OS ENLU ND

PATTI ANNE LODGE’S CONSCIENCE Huston Republican Sen. Patti Anne Lodge aborted the bill Rep. Tom Loertscher, a Republican from Iona, introduced that would have eliminated any risk to pharmacists who refuse (on the grounds of conscience and/or church dictate) to sell the “morning-after” birth control pill, RU-486, or any legal drug. “Pesky wimin!” we imagine Loertscher thinking. “Why won’t they keep their noses out o’ this reproductive rights bidness!?”

FRIEND OF KUNA Minnick stood up for Kuna, asking the Bureau of Land Management to help Idaho Power find a route for their proposed 500,000-watt lines that didn’t violate that town’s city limits.

NANCY PELOSI NON-PILER-ON-ER

RISCH AND CRAPO: MITCH MCCONNELL’S HOUSE BOYS In a spectacular display of heinie-sucking partisan obedience, Sens. Jim Risch and Mike Crapo bowed to party leaders’ dictates and voted against the confirmation of Sonia Sotomayor to the nation’s Supreme Court. When Hispanics are the majority in Idaho, they’ll have to remember this vote when deciding who to name schools and bridges after.

CRAPO: SAVIOR OF SALMON? At long last, a possible breach in the traditional intransigence Idaho leaders have shown on the subject of breaching. In May, Sen. Crapo announced the option of taking down Lower Snake River dams must be included in any negotiations concerning how best to restore the salmon runs. It may look like an insignificant crack, but it’s a start.

Rather than lambasting the House Speaker Pelosi when she claimed the CIA had lied to her, as did Mike Simpson and every other piss-andmoan Republican in Congress, Minnick chose to wait until the facts were known. And as we know now, those facts vindicated Pelosi.

CLIMATE CHANGE DO-NOTHING-ER Minnick voted against the “cap and trade” bill approved in the House, explaining how a recession is an inopportune time to try to save the planet.

HOUSE HEALTH-CARE REFORM BILL Minnick voted against it.

IDAHO PERSONALITIES DAN POPKEY’S MOVIE CAREER

SPECIAL WALT MINNICK SECTION OBAMA’S STIMULUS PACKAGE Minnick voted against it. WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

When Idahoans flocked to see the documentary Outrage, a film that explores the hypocrisy of gay Republican officials who build their careers, in part, by making life miserable for gays, we were pleasantly surprised to find one of our favorite local reporters playing a prominent part in the movie. Dan Popkey of The Other Paper In Town was instrumental in the outing of a certain, 6-foot, 4-inch, Idaho senator, and for his efforts, Popkey was interviewed for the film. Looking good, Dan. And your makeup was fabulous.

LARRY CRAIG: WORKING MAN Over the years, Craig has provided us with such a rich cornucopia of remarkable material that we could not let 2009 pass without checking in on what he’s up to. We’re pleased to see he’s opened a consulting firm and that this enterprise has been contracted by commissioners from Minidoka and Cassia counties to help snag a medium-security federal prison for the East Idaho town of Malta. True, it’s a lobbying gig, and ex-Sen. Craig is prohibited from lobbying members of Congress for another full year. But there are ways around that rule stuff if you know what you’re doing, and nobody should know more about that sort of bathroom… er, ’scuse us ... back room finagling than our Larry Craig.

THE VACUUM THAT WAS BRYAN FISCHER This may seem a tad confusing, so let us explain: We are not giving Bryan Fischer a Spud. That is unlikely to ever happen, not as long as Fischer remains a self-righteous bubble of acid reflux nastiness. But since Fischer flew the coop last summer, winging it south to a radio talk show job in Mississippi, there is a noticeable empty spot in the Idaho opinion skyline. That space has always been reserved for whichever member of the local Religious Right could draw the most attention to himself, but with Fischer gone, no one seems willing or able to fill that void. We’ve lost track of Brandi Swindell (who cohorted with Fischer on the Ten Commandments crusade) and Dennis Mansfield claims he’s turned nice, so who does that leave? As of today, no one. Frankly, we’ve been enjoying the silence. Therefore we award the Spud to that unfilled hole that once went by the name of Bryan Fischer. Get it?

problem. And we find it interesting that he chose to skip to the one state that remains in so many categories more backwards than Idaho. But the reality is that he hasn’t been gone from Boise a full year yet. So in a lingering-stink sense, we still have to consider him part of the Gem State zeitgeist, entitling him to a well-earned Dud.

PISTOL-PACKIN’, RON PAUL-BACKIN’, FORECLOSURE INSPECTOR Challis McAffee’s job was to go to homes of people behind on their mortgages and take pictures of the houses. A homeowner in Meridian came out and asked him what he was doing, and with what appears to be little reason, McAffee pulled a gun on him. What gives the story its zing is that Mr. McAffee is the Idaho Republican Party district 16 chairman and a member of the GOP’s Central Committee. With that sort of juice, it’s not surprising that McAffee would feel entitled to carry a gun. But it comes to us as a scary shock to learn how easy it is to panic a Second Amendment nut.

BLAKE HALL: ICKY EWW In news of other Republican officials, Blake Hall has been court ordered to stay at least 300 yards away from the Idaho Falls woman he once considered his sweetie. The court maintains that Hall stalked her, littered her lawn with used condoms and “represents an immediate and present danger of doing domestic violence” to her. Again, this would be a simple and common story of another abusive bum with a history of frightening women, were it not for Mr. Hall’s eminence in the state GOP. He was party chair from 1985 to 1989, and until recently, was a delegate to the Republican National Committee. Until recently, he was also a member of the Idaho State Board of Education and was on the payroll of the Bonneville County prosecutor. Oh, and did we already mention how he littered the woman’s lawn with used condoms?

BRYAN FISCHER He hadn’t been gone more than a few months before he said something about Muslims and the military that should embarrass all Americans. Yes, officially, Fischer is a Mississippi

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ODDS AND ENDS INVASIVE BIVALVES SPECIAL OLYMPICS COME TO IDAHO A good, good thing.

RETRACTING THE DALAI LAMA’S INVITATION TO THE SPECIAL OLYMPICS IN IDAHO TO SOOTHE THE CHINESE OCCUPIERS OF TIBET A bad, bad thing. Shame!

IDAHO POTATO COMMISSION Who’d a thought you couldn’t say “Idaho” and “potato” in the same breath without getting approval from a bunch of spud farmers? But as the Boise Fry Company, nee Idaho Fry Company found out, in 1966, the IPC registered (with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office) the word “Idaho” when used in conjunction with “potato” or any way in which one might prepare that marvelous tuber. Therefore, if you have any plans of opening an Idaho Tater Tot Emporium or an Idaho Hash Browns ’R‘ Us, think again.

THE SEARCHERS As horrid and tragic as the Robert Manwill story turned out, we were still inspired by the estimated 2,300 people who volunteered to search for the boy. Well done, good hearts.

BUTCH OTTER: MERCURY WARRIOR For years, various federal agencies have regarded Idaho—in particular, the part of Idaho down Arco way known commonly as the INL—as a place to send gobs of nasty toxic crap. And for years, Idaho governors have been forced to go rebel on their bureaucratic asses, e.g. Cecil Andrus using state troopers to stop shipments of nuclear waste into Idaho. Now it’s up to Butch to stop the transfer of 17,000 tons of mercury to the sands atop the Snake River Aquifer. So far, so good. He’s looking pretty firm. He claims neither he nor his staff were told INL was one of several sites being considered as a mercury toilet, and he says that made him mad. Let us just hope he’s pissed enough over the perceived slight that he refuses to budge on the more substantive matter.

BALL-TASERING COP (AND ACCOMPLICES) First, a city cop Tasers a handcuffed man’s nether regions, and his cop buddies back him up, claiming the perp was resisting arrest, even though the audio record of the incident doesn’t support that charge. Then, a supervisor erases part of the taped interview with the arrested man. If this kind of thing continues, we’re gonna need a bigger ombudsman.

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| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Stay away, you stinking zebra mussels! We don’t want your kind here! These waters are for freshwater clams only! Go back to Russia and leave our lakes alone!

GOOD OL’ IDAHO TRANSPORTATION BOARD Hard to say at this point if it’s Clarence Thomas vs. Anita Hill all over again, but we can say this much for sure: In 2006, the ITD board of directors promoted Pam Lowe to the department’s top spot. In 2009, they fired her. In August, she brought suit, insisting her dismissal was, in part, the result of gender discrimination. Ms. Lowe submitted a statement quoting ITD board member Gary Blick as allegedly saying, “No little girl would be able to run this department,” when she was being considered for the job. According to Lowe, Blick went on to question what would happen should she decide to start a family. If true, rumors of working mothers evidently have not reached Blick’s corner of the world down in Castleford. We withhold judgment as to who is telling the truth here. But our instincts tell us that the (at that time) all-male ITD board of directors could certainly have handled this better.

CHEAP SHOTS AT UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO “CHIEF INSPIRATION OFFICER” When we first heard the University of Idaho was paying Magaly Rodriguez $12,500 a month (total of $112,500 annually) to provide “inspiration” to the school, we thought, “How silly. If they need inspiration that badly, maybe they should just drive over to Pullman and pick up some of that medical marijuana.” And everyone here in Bronco Nation seemed to agree: “What are those damn Vandals thinking? Paying such big bucks for a ‘chief inspiration officer?’ Why, it’s an outrage!” But after learning a bit more about it, we find Ms. Rodriguez’s duties were to mediate conflicts between university employees and departments—a job for which $112,500 a year doesn’t sound so outrageous, especially when a football coach from the same state can pull in over $800,000 annually—and that the phrase “chief inspiration officer” was never part of her job description and was very likely something she called herself in jest. It is wonderful, we suppose, that the Statesman’s editorial staff sees fit to criticize the management of Idaho’s premier university so often and vociferously. But if they are so concerned with the higher-education bang Idahoans get for their taxpayer buck, perhaps they might look into why Boise State’s academic rankings are so dismal. (The school didn’t even show up on the Washington Monthly rankings of 258 universities. P.S. U of I placed 58th.) Perhaps Boise State could use an inspiration or two, itself.

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BOB KUSTRA: PART-TIME STATE EMPLOYEE OF THE YEAR Twisted, is what it is, that Butch Otter would raise the insurance premiums on part-time state employees by up to a factor of 10 ($30 a month to a possible $302). Even twisteder is that he would re-classify professors, custodians, office workers and other university employees as part-time. Twistedest of all is that Otter, along with his calf-strangling pard Mike Gwartney, would dream up such a scheme with little public discussion or input. During the State of the University address in August, Bob Kustra—Boise State’s president—called Otter’s measure for what it is: “an injustice.” Spud to President Kustra for standing up to his part-time boss.

CANYON COUNTY BOISE STILL BREATHING 2C FUMES In spite of signs from Nampa officials that they might be amenable to vehicle emissions testing, the County Commission refuses to budge on the testing policy—best described as “Screw Them Ada County Sissies”—that has contributed to our inversions for decades. What we see happening is that the City of Nampa, as it grows and becomes more cosmopolitan, is gradually realizing there is an obligation among human beings not to poison the atmosphere we share, while the commissioners—who must think they represent only the hillbillies who live up in Libertarian Holler—continue to see asthma and lung disease as a lifestyle choice.

2C DWT FIGHTERS Canyon County, never before known as a hotbed of social consciousness, has taken steps to stop DWT (Driving While Texting). Studies have shown that behind-the-wheel texters are several times more likely to wreck than non-texters, yet Democrats couldn’t convince the Republicans to join the 18 states that have already banned texting behind the wheel. But County Prosecutor John Bujak thinks it could be done without any new laws on the books. We here in Ada County believe it would be a shame if Canyon County beat us to the punch on a life-saving measure. C’mon, let’s make it a race.

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CANDIDATES FOR ’EM: QUIRKY QUIRKS IN THE OFF-OFF YEAR ELECTION MELISSA SUE ROBINSON And here’s to you Ms. Robinson, not so much for entering the Nampa mayoral race— anyone could do that—but for entering it as a self-described “male-to-female post-op transgendered person.” Not everyone could do that. Melissa Sue Robinson has lived in Nampa for only a year, but she’s certainly made a splash. Having been a man who owned a construction company in Michigan, then a woman running for mayor in one of the most conservative venues this side of Rush Limbaugh’s toilet reading rack, caught the attention of major media from Los Angeles to New York. That’s the most attention anyone from Nampa has gotten since ... since ... uh, come to think of it, has anyone else from Nampa ever gotten that much attention?

 DAVID WEBB’S PUBLICITY PHOTO

REX RAMMELL

This Dud we are awarding to David Webb’s publicity photo is not to be confused with any opinions we have of David Webb, himself. We are certain that (losing) city council candidate David Webb cannot possibly be as satisfied with his own debonair-ness and suave-icity as his publicity photo would suggest. No way. So to repeat: This Dud goes not to David Webb, who we’re sure is a fine fellow, but to his publicity photo, which by all appearances is a weenie.

In putting this year’s review together, we could not help but notice a certain drabness to the collection. No single event sizzled, sparkled or sang out, thereby lending the year either a pizzazz, a panache or a pinata-level moment. Contemplating further, we realized this dull, uniform surface to Idaho’s past year was very likely a symptom of having lost so many sizzling, sparkling, singing pizzazzers. Our beleaguered governor has immersed himself in trying to get some highway upgrades, so he’s been no fun at all. And our congressional delegation is starting to look like a Mormon missionary super-cell. All that’s missing are the bicycles and helmets. So where are our current Bill Salis, our Helen Chenoweths ... our Larry Craigs? Is there no highly placed person left who can embarrass the pee-wadding out of us? Is our dear Idaho, without a central figure to give voice to her loonier side, turning into ... (gasp!) ... Utah?! Be that as it may, we are still bound by duty and tradition (I believe the tradition goes all the way back to 2007) to award a Dud of the Year, and we award it to Rex Rammell. Rammell is running for governor after losing to his old nemesis Jim Risch in the last senatorial race. However, that’s not the reason Rex Rammell has earned the Dud of the Year. By all rights, he should share it with the man who, at a fund-raising event in Twin Falls, asked the candidate about “Obama tags,” referring to the licenses hunters must have to kill deer, elk and other game animals. But that particular yahoo managed to remain nameless and besides, he wasn’t the one running for Idaho governor. The only one present who was running for Idaho governor—Rex Rammell—answered the dope’s tasteless joke with one of his own: “Obama tags? We’d buy some of those.” Yes, we know—about as funny as a squished kitten. But having a state office candidate make an implicit threat to the life of the president of the United States cannot be overlooked, and we hope the Secret Service was paying more attention than it was during that state dinner a few weeks back. When Rammell was harshly criticized by other present and past state leaders, he fought back like the feisty farce of a man he is, insisting that Mike Crapo should “apologize for giving away 2 million acres to the environmentalists,” (referring to the Omnibus Public Lands Act) and “Phil Batt should go to jail for allowing wolves to enter Idaho in the first place.” Therefore, in lieu of having no serious competition, Rex Rammell has earned 2009’s top Dud, and we expect little more from him in the future.

IMPERSONALS TAMARACK: A HAIKU ghost town with ski-lift crow nests in upscale condo snow drifts in hot tub

BOOKSTORE BITES THE DUST

COULD-BE GOVERNOR: PETE PETERSON Not sure what he stands for or what his idea of a pressing issue is, but we have to hand it to Mr. Peterson. There can’t be many politicians who would make their candidacy announcement in a strip joint, but that’s what Peterson did. We’re not even sure what to call it. Class?… probably not. Style? ... of a sort. Moxie? ... maybe. Funny? ... not if you’re a Nazarene. But however we might describe Pete’s bikini bar bravado, we know this: He is a retired state employee who now spends his time doing standup comedy in various venues and has decided to run in the GOP gubernatorial primary. Think of him as Mr. Smith Goes To Shecky Green. We can’t predict what sort of governor he might make, but if he wins, we’d sorta like to see him bring some of his Torch II friends to the State of the State addresses.

D;I=:N:6G

Boise’s most durable independent bookstore, Vista Book Gallery, closed its doors last summer after 33 years in business. We can’t blame owner Diane Leaverton for choosing to retire and spend time with her husband, but it’s such a shame. This store carried a healthy selection of reading material penned by Idaho writers, and in that respect alone will be sorely missed. Furthermore, we cannot help but bemoan the reality that independently owned bookstores are going the way of the passenger pigeon, due to the proliferation of chain stores and Internet sources.

THE WOLF HUNT Listen, we understand that it might not be one of Mankind’s best ideas to let the reintroduced wolves increase exponentially forever and ever. We get that. We also get that Idaho Fish and Game’s function is not to allow nature to take its course, but to kiss the collective ass of the hunters and sportsmen whose user’s fees fund them. But still, we think there’s some kind of minor evil at work when so many backwards bozos (70,000 tags were expected to be purchased) with high-powered rifles are so eager to kill something they can’t eat, and which by many accounts is as intelligent as they are.

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BOISEvisitWEEKLY PICKS boiseweekly.com for more events WEDNESDAYMONDAY DEC. 30JAN. 11 lights IBG AUCTION As Idaho Botanical Garden’s Winter Garden aGlow continues throughout the month, trippy, flashing light lovers will have plenty of chances to eyeball the assor ted decorations. However, behind all the glitz and holiday festivities lies a nonprofit organization, and of course, nonprofits can’t sur vive without donations. Enter the Winter Garden aGlow Auction, Idaho Botanical Garden’s biggest fundraiser—which will take place completely online this year—allowing IBG lovers to bid at their leisure from the privacy (and warmth) of their own homes. Bidders can duel it out for a plethora of items ranging from Roaring Springs day passes and Boise Contemporar y Theater tickets to a date-night package featuring tickets to see Howie Day at Knitting Factor y and a one-night stay in the Boutique Room at Hotel 43. Par ticipants can also place their bids on items like the Great Garden Escape package, which features a concer t pass wor th 10 free admissions to concer ts held at IBG this summer. Add limited edition garden prints by ar tist Ward Hooper, Silver wood Theme Park day passes and even more concer t tickets and gift cards, and you’re looking at a decently stacked auction. Proceeds will benefit Idaho Botanical Garden’s education and hor ticulture programs all year long, so plop down into that easy chair and bid for the cause. Bidding ends Monday, Jan. 11, 208-343-8649, idahobotanicalgarden. auctionfrogs.org.

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Aug-ment your New Year’s Eve buzz with a shot of Auggie Smith.

This kitten pic has absolutely nothing to do with anything written on this page. Happy New Year!

THURSDAY DEC. 31 laugh riot BOB AND TOM COMEDY ALL-STARS TOUR

THURSDAY DEC. 31 culture BOISELIFE NYE PARTY We have to be frank: When we first happened upon the BoiseLife Web site, we immediately started sniffing around for signs of organized religion. But while the name might sound youth group-y, it turns out BoiseLife is actually a pretty rad, multifaceted community resource with a mission to “enjoy, serve and learn Boise.” Over the past two years, BoiseLife has organized a number of community volunteer events, from cleaning up Table Rock to delivering bicycles to Boise refugees. Their goal for 2010 is to open a physical volunteer center where local volunteers and nonprofits can collaborate and share resources. But in order to do this, they have to throw a debaucherous New Year’s Eve party first. All of the proceeds from BoiseLife’s NYE 2010 party—$25 per person, which includes two drinks, hors d’oeuvres, dancing, a silent auction and “good karma”—will go toward opening the volunteer center. From 9 p.m. on Thursday, Dec. 31, to 2 a.m. on Friday, Jan. 1, attendees will get down at the Rose Room while dressed as their favorite decade. Those without flapper dresses or powder blue polyester suits are encouraged to stop by The Costume Shop, where tickets for the event are also available. 9 p.m.-2 a.m., $25, 21 and older, Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., 208-381-0483, boiselife.org.

THURSDAY DEC. 31 laser tag COUNTDOWN AT WAHOOZ While many New Year’s celebrations involve drinking copious amounts of alcohol and staggering down Main Street, there are more kid-friendly alternatives.

| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly

Wahooz Family Fun Zone invites families to usher in 2010 with their family New Year’s Eve party. Partygoers can get crazy with a variety of family friendly festivities, from unlimited laser tag to go-karts to mini golf. It wouldn’t be a proper New Year’s party without the famous countdown, which Wahooz has covered with a midnight balloon drop. A ticket to the event nets you 10 arcade tokens

for the bevy of games available, but if you donate a canned food item, you’ll get an extra 10 for your generosity. Score. Though you won’t be gulping down champagne, imagine how great you’ll feel New Year’s Day clutching a brand-new giant stuffed lion. 5 p.m.-midnight., $12 plus tax, $15 at door, Wahooz Family Fun Zone, 1385 Blue Marlin Lane, 208-8980900, wahoozfunzone.com.

Among the glut of syndicated morning radio programs, Bob Kevoian and Tom Griswold of The Bob and Tom Show—heard here in the Treasure Valley on KKGL 96.9 The Eagle—have carved out a niche for themselves by providing a morning commute full of belly laughs, courtesy of their myriad standup comic guests, many of whom have jump-started careers through those appearances. The show also provides an opportunity to see those comics live with the “Bob and Tom Comedy All-Stars Tour,” which makes its stop in Boise at the Morrison Center this year on a most auspicious date: Thursday, Dec. 31. That’s right, New Year’s Eve. And joining show hosts Kristi Lee and Chick McGee are comics Henry Phillips, Donnie Baker and the Pork Pistols and, as he’s done for the last few years, Auggie Smith. Smith is appreciated among audiences and other comics for his sarcastic social commentary and ferocious take on the government and pop culture, as well as his ability to make the humdrum hilarious. At home in Portland, Ore., Smith said he’s been looking into the idea of classification in our society. “It’s like, 15 years ago, the American Medical Association decided alcoholism is a disease,” Smith said, the pitch and volume of his voice rising. “We’re not just drunk anymore. Now we have a disease. The only people who seem to catch this so-called disease are the most narcissistic and self-involved people. There aren’t a lot of other diseases you can quit.” Smith is also a little burned out on the government’s flipflopping on the legalization of marijuana. “The Obama administration is no longer prosecuting medical marijuana. Either it is a drug or not. My favorite part about Oregon’s medical marijuana is that when we first got it, you had to grow it yourself,” Smith said caustically. “Great news, 90-year-old woman with bone cancer. If you can work on your hydroponic experiment long enough, you can grow the only herb that gives you an appetite and takes away your searing pain.” An evening with Smith—and the rest of the Comedy AllStars group—will have you feeling pain yourself ... the kind that comes from laughing so hard, your aching stomach muscles will wish they could get a cab home and leave you at the show. But note, this gig will be full of adult content so leave the kiddies behind. 7:30 p.m., $34.50. Morrison Center, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, 208-426-1609, mcboisestate.edu. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


SHOOK TWI NS P HOTOGRA P H BY KA LE E P E TE RS

FIND

Left to right: Jupiter Holiday, The Shook Twins and Polyphonic Pomegranate.

THURSDAY DEC. 31

QUEER CONTROL RECORDS

music FOR THIS STONEY HOLIDAY, GET ALL SHOOK UP WITH A POMEGRANATE We would bet that you or someone close to you plans to make a New Year’s resolution that includes terms like “healthier” or the word “more” before the word “exercise.” When Jan. 1 hits, you don’t want to look back, knowing that long painful hours on the stair-stepper await you, wishing you had partied like it’s 1999 while you still had the chance. If you want to send 2009 into the history books with a bang, make plans to hang out at The Bouquet on New Year’s Eve with local folky funksters Stoney Holiday, The Shook Twins and Polyphonic Pomegranate. Even the names sound entertaining, right? Stoney Holiday is a groovy amalgamation of vocalist Tyler “Stoney” Stonehocker and members of psychedelic jam band, Jupiter Holiday. Northern Idaho twins Katelyn and Laurie Shook (another apropos band name) blend not only their harmonically per fect voices, but a variety of instrumentation from banjo and fiddle to beat-box and ocarina—Link would be jealous. You can find them featured on a number of songs by other Boise musicians. Polyphonic Pomegranate (we’re not even sure how to start poking fun at their name) will bring a keyboard-laden, jazzy funk fusion to the night. The night of bluegrass, funk, folk and dance music will have you tapping your feet and clapping your hands so hard, you’ll work off at least a few of those Christmas cookie calories. 9 p.m., $5. The Bouquet, 1010 W. Main St., 208-3456605, thebouquet.net.

Does a bloody Mary count as one or two servings of vegetables?

FRIDAY JAN. 1

Pennsylvania group Pariah Piranha released People, People (say that three times fast) this fall. Singer Tara Gordon channels Grace Slick as she sing-growls her way through “Green Rooms,” belting out “Pariah! Piranha!” at the end. But what rocks even more, is that People, People came out on San Francisco’s Queer Control Records, an LGBTQ label that sprouted from the Riot Grrl and queercore movements. Label CEO and president Marlene Melendez explained that QCR, which has been around since 2007, wouldn’t dismiss music by hetero bands out of hand, but the label’s focus is really on fostering musicians in the queer community. And though Queer Control Records began with the idea of releasing music, they began doing so much in the gay community—organizing and sponsoring festivals and events—that they soon became a non-profit organization. Each year or so, Melendez and her fellow QCRers choose a handful of new resident artists, bands or musicians whose music they believe deserves more exposure and to whom they offer funding and support. QCR’s current lineup of resident artists includes Pariah Piranha, drum and guitar duo Once a Pawn (check out drummer/vocalist Catherine Balta’s unique vocals), Shenandoah Davis, dykecore trio Box Squad and L.A. boys Nancy FullForce. A queer record label. Who knew? —Amy Atkins Queercontrol.com

hair of the dog BETTY FORD RECOVERY BRUNCH

SATURDAY JAN. 2 music HOT LOCAL KNIGHTS Sadly, that’s not the name of a sexy Society for Creative Anachronisms calendar. There will be no beefcakes in chain-mail banana hammocks flexing their pale biceps for the blushing ladies. Actually, Hot Local Knights is The Venue’s annual battle of the bands competition. Each Saturday in Januar y will feature a different genre: Jan. 2 is alternative

S U B M I T

rock, Jan. 9 is hardcore, Jan. 16 is alternative punk, Jan. 23 is metalcore and Jan. 30 is indie/acoustic. At the end, two bands from each round will emerge victorious and continue to the final showdown on Saturday, Feb. 6. With far too many bands involved to list them all, we arbitrarily selected a few of our favorite names: Nuckle Duste, Cluster funk and The Dude Abides. See the full lineup at boisevenue.com. Saturday, Jan. 2-Feb. 6, 3:30 p.m. doors, 4 p.m. show, $8-$10, The Venue, 521 Broad St., 208-9190011, boisevenue.com.

When pill-popping and bottle-hugging celebs need a little break from the rigors of stardom, they throw on some dark glasses and head to the one-and-only Betty Ford Center in Rancho Mirage, Calif. Co-founded by First Lady Betty Ford, the center has become a pop cultural touchstone—figuring into episodes of shows like Absolutely Fabulous and The Simpsons. When non-celebrity Boiseans need to recover from a particularly rough night out on the town, they can check themselves into the next best thing: the Betty Ford Recovery Brunch at the Red Room Tavern. Though the Red Room Tavern doesn’t offer any type of addiction counseling, it will feed your need for a fix with $6 bottomless mimosas and $5 spicy bloody Marys. Once your post-NYE headache starts to wane and you can once again read text, you’ll see that the menu offers options like the Coronary ($8)—two open-faced biscuits topped with scrambled eggs, oozing cheese, bacon, sour cream and a healthy ladle of sausage gravy—or black bean huevos ($8) served with pico de gallo and corn tortilla chips. While the recovery brunch usually runs from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays, this New Year’s Day, Red Room Tavern will cater to the quaking, bleary-eyed New Year’s crowd with a special brunch from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 11 a.m.-4 p.m., prices vary, Red Room Tavern, 601 W. Main St., 208-343-7034.

an event by e-mail to calendar@boiseweekly.com. Listings are due by noon the Thursday before publication.

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8 DAYS OUT WEDNESDAY DEC. 30 Festivals & Events CHRISTMAS LIGHTS TOUR OF BOISE—See the lights of Boise from on high in a helicopter tour. The tour departs from Western Aircraft at the Boise airport, flying over downtown and Idaho Botanical Garden. Tours depart at sunset and last about 15 minutes. Give the gift of flight. 6 p.m. $125 couple, $150 three people. Silverhawk Aviation at Western Aircraft, 4300 S. Kennedy St., Boise, 208-4538577, www.silverhawkaviation. net. HOLIDAY LIGHTS TOUR—Hop on the trolley for a 60-minute holiday light tour around the great city of trees. Tours leave on the hour from the Moxie Java at Cole Village Plaza parking lot. 6 p.m., 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. $14 adults, $6 children. Tickets must be purchased via the Web, www. boisetrolleytours.com.

Art WINTER WINDOW GALLERY STROLL— Take a stroll through downtown Boise to view beautiful outdoor works from local artists. For more information, visit www. downtownboise.org.

Kids & Teens HOLIDAY DAY CAMP—Two weeks of festivities await Boise’s youth, ages 5-12, at Club Kid. Counselors will delight the kids with full days of educational activities, rock climbing, inflatables, art, science and more. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. $34 daily. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, www. wingscenter.com.

NEW YEAR’S 2010 LIVE AT THE LINEN—Wrap up 2009 and trade it in for the meatier, more luscious year of 2010. The Linen Building hosts an all-ages event with live music from the little dudes at Boise Rock School and locals Low-Fi. Festivities also include a Go Listen Boise info booth and the Garden City Kraft Mafia with screen printing and other activities. Snacks and a full bar round out the night. 7 p.m. $3 ages 5 and younger, $5 ages 6-12, $10 ages 13 and older. The Linen Building, 1402 W. Grove St., Boise, 208-3850111, www.thelinenbuilding.com. CIRCUS SHOW AND BARN DANCE—It’s time to ring in the new year circus-style. The Invaders of the Heart Post-Apocalyptic Renegade Circus present an evening of acrobatics and sword fighting. The best news is they want you to dress up, too. Have your dancing shoes and be ready to shake on down to the sounds of Hillfolk Noir and other guests. Show at 10 p.m., dancing begins at 12:01 a.m. $5-$500, based on a sliding scale. Visual Arts Collective, 3638 Osage St., Garden City, 208-424-8297, www. visualartscollective.com. ROARING TWENTIES NEW YEARS EVE PARTY—Flappers and gentlemen, it’s time to dance. Don your best ’20s attire and enjoy an evening of prizes, scrumptious foods and a pairing of champagne and truffles to bring in the new year. Don’t forget the costume contest at 10 p.m. 9:30 p.m.-12:30 a.m. $10. Corkscrews Wine Shop and Pub, 729 N. Main St., Meridian, 208888-4049, www.corkscrews1. com. SINGLES’ NEW YEAR’S PARTY AND PUB CRAWL—The peeps at Boise Trolley Tours are celebrating the new year with a champagne toast, snacks, sandwiches, throw beads, horns and a safe ride home. Meet up at the

Moxie Java in the Cole Village parking lot to head downtown at 10 p.m. 10 p.m.-midnight $25. Cole Village Shopping Center, 3255 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208376-1942. TROLLEY HOLIDAY LIGHT TOURS—Hop aboard the holiday trolley for a splendid tour of the sweet city of Boise, lit by holiday lights. All passengers receive a free grande barista beverage prior to departure. 6:30-8:30 p.m. and 8-10 p.m. $9.95 adults, $7.95 students, $6.95 children 12 and younger. Tickets must be purchased in advance. Contact Jill at 208-629-9750 or e-mail jill@tullysidaho.com. Tully’s Coffee, 794 W. Broad St., Boise, 208-343-2953, www. tullys.com.

On Stage BOB AND TOM COMEDY ALL STARS—See Picks, Page 12. 7:30 p.m. $34.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, mc.boisestate. edu.

Food & Drink NEW YEAR’S EVE WINE AND DINNER PARTY—A sevencourse dinner with wine pairings from Penfold’s Winery. Live music by Rex and Beverly, free champagne and party favors will toast in the new year. 7 p.m. $109 per person plus tax and gratuity. The Gamekeeper Lounge, 1109 Main St., Boise, 208-343-4611, www.owyheeplaza.com. PAIR’S STARLIGHT LOUNGE NEW YEAR’S EVE DINNER—Featuring a special dinner at $75 a head, which includes an 16 appetizer, salad, entree,

DUDE HOWDY by Steve Klamm

THURSDAY DEC. 31 Festivals & Events BOISELIFE NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY— See Picks, Page 12. 9 p.m.-2 a.m. $25. Tickets available at Jenny’s Lunch Line and online, boiselife.ning.com. Rose Room, 718 W. Idaho St., Boise. CHRISTMAS LIGHTS TOUR OF BOISE—See Wednesday. 6 p.m. $125 couple, $150 three people. Silverhawk Aviation at Western Aircraft, 4300 S. Kennedy St., Boise, 208-4538577, www.silverhawkaviation. net. FAMILY NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY—See Picks, Page 12. 5 p.m.-midnight, $12 adv., $15 door. Wahooz Fun Zone, 1385 S. Blue Marlin Lane, Meridian, 208-898-0900, www.wahoozfunzone.com. Dude Howdy by Steve Klamm was the 1st place winner in the 8th Annual Boise Weekly Bad Cartoon Contest.

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8 DAYS OUT 14

dessert and a bottle of champagne on the table. Make sure to e-mail eatdrinkshare@ yahoo.com to book your reservations early, as the new Pair seats only 40 party people. Restaurant opens at 4 p.m. $75 per person. Pair, 603 Main St., Boise.

Art WINTER WINDOW GALLERY STROLL— Stroll through downtown Boise to view beautiful window designs from local artists. For more information, visit www.downtownboise.org.

Kids & Teens HOLIDAY DAY CAMP—See Wednesday. 7 a.m.-6 p.m. $34 daily. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, www.wingscenter. com. NEW YEAR’S OVERNIGHTER—Make your child stoked with loads of activities and a chance to celebrate the new year. They’ll rock climb, party in inflatables, play gym games, eat pizza, watch wall-size movies and hoot and holler at midnight. 7 p.m.-9 a.m. the following morning. $40, $35 each additional child, $5 discount for pre-Christmas registration. Wings Center of Boise, 1875 Century Way, Boise, 208-376-3641, www.wingscenter.com.

FRIDAY JAN. 1 Festivals & Events CHRISTMAS LIGHTS TOUR OF BOISE— See the lights of Boise from a helicopter. The tour departs from Western Aircraft at the Boise airport, flying over downtown and Idaho Botanical Garden. Tours depart at sunset and last about 15 minutes. 6 p.m. $125 couple, $150 three people. Silverhawk Aviation at Western Aircraft, 4300 S. Kennedy St., Boise, 208-453-8577, www. silverhawkaviation.net.

Food & Drink BETTY FORD RECOVERY BRUNCH—See Picks, Page 13. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Prices vary. The Red Room Tavern, 601 W. Main St., Boise, 208-343-7034.

Art FIRST FRIDAY ART IN EAGLE—Take a stroll through downtown Eagle and visit local merchants and galleries along the way. First Friday invites the public to stop in to shop and enjoy a drink, art and music. Held in downtown Eagle. 4-9 p.m. Downtown Eagle, 310 E. State St., Eagle.

Sports & Fitness REGISTER TO RIDE IDAHO—Cyclists, meet Idaho. If you’ve already met, get to know Idaho a little better on a seven-day, fully supported, noncompetitive cycling tour. The route will be announced during open registration on Jan. 1 via the Web site at www.rideidaho.org. The event is scheduled to take place Aug. 8-14. 9 a.m. $625.

SATURDAY JAN. 2 Auditions THIS IS OUR YOUTH—Boise Little Theater’s Black Box theatrical project, The Broken Illusion Project, wants two males and one female, aged 18-25, for their upcoming production of This is Our Youth, by Kenneth Lonergan. Style: cold reading from the script. Play contains adult content. 2-5 p.m. Boise Little Theater, 100 E. Fort St., Boise, 208-3425104, www.boiselittletheater.org.

Workshops & Classes START HERE—Facilitator Carolyn Failla of FaillaDrums leads a weekly music-making class on how to build a song from the ground up. Everyone is welcome. The classes are located at 1717 N. 13th St. in Boise. For more information, e-mail failladrum@yahoo.com. 10 a.m. www.failladrums.com.

SUNDAY JAN. 3 Festivals & Events LIQUID LAUGH TRACK—Every Sunday, the funny is found in BODO during Laugh Track, featuring stand-up comedy from amateurs and professionals looking for laughs in a live setting. 8 p.m. FREE. Liquid, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-287-5379, www.liquidboise.com.

Religious/Spiritual ZEN MEDITATION AND BUDDHISM—Meet for meditation and a free public talk every Sunday at the White Cloud Zen Center, a nonprofit organization dedicated to supporting zen practice of those who live in Idaho. 9-10:30 a.m. White Cloud Zen Center, 1315 W. Washington St., Boise.

MONDAY JAN. 4 Food & Drink WINE TASTING—Woodriver Cellars’ tasting room is open seven days a week. Taste wines with grapes grown in Idaho while taking in the view from the pavilion and pond. Woodriver Cellars, 3705 N. Hwy. 16, Eagle, 208-286-9463, www.woodrivercellars. com.

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8 DAYS OUT Workshops & Classes TEA MEDITATION—This 60-minute class begins with drinking tea, followed by meditation and sharing intentions. Participants finish feeling refreshed and relaxed. 9-10 a.m. $25. Morning Glory Teahouse, 4346 Rose Hill St., Boise, 208-859-0594, www. morninggloryteahouse.com. WEST AFRICAN RHYTHMS— Instructor Rick Thomson leads the class in djembe, dunun and song for level one. 7 p.m. $10 per class or $30 per month. Drum Central, 2709 W. State St., Boise, 208-424-9519, www. boisedrumcentral.com.

Art MONDAY NIGHT DEMOS NAMPA ART GUILD—Monday night demos are held on the first Monday of each month. Nonmembers are welcome for a small charge of $5 for paintalongs and Monday night demos. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Nampa Valley Grange, Fifth Ave. and Second Street S., Nampa.

Talks & Lectures PUBLIC DIALOGUE SERIES— A monthly meet to engage in discussions pertaining to science, ethics, culture, philosophy, humanism and freemasonry, hosted by Praxis Lodge. Each

session features a presentation followed by open dialogue. Everyone is invited to attend. 7-9 p.m. FREE. Front Door Northwest Pizza and Tap House, 105 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-287-9201, www.thefrontdoorboise.com.

TUESDAY JAN. 5 Festivals & Events PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP AND POETRY SLAM OF STEEL—The Idaho LoudWriters Program includes a performance poetry workshop at 6 p.m. followed by an all-ages poetry slam. The Slam of Steel is a chance for poets to perform their own brand of spoken-word poetry, a combination of literature and performance, in front of a crowd. Signups are at 6:30 p.m. and the show is at 7 p.m. For more information, e-mail cheryl_maddalena@yahoo. com. 7 p.m. FREE for workshop; $5 poetry slam, $1 with student ID, www.boisepoetry.com. Woman of Steel Gallery and Wine Bar, 3640 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-3315632.

Kids & Teens LITTLE PICASSOS ART CLASS—This class introduces preschool-age children to the world of art. New classes begin monthly. 10-10:45 a.m. Fullfacility member $25; program member $50. YMCA, 1050 W. State St., Boise, 208-344-5501, www.ymcaboise.org.

Odds & Ends OPEN POLE DANCE CLASSES—Not quite the full workshop, open pole classes enable those who are a bit timid, or would simply like a practice space, to suss out their skills. 6:30 p.m. $12. Ophidia Dance and Art Studio, 200 E. 37th St., No. 7, Garden City, 208-4092403, www.myspace.com/danceophidia.

WEDNESDAY JAN. 6 Food & Drink JULIA CHILD’S COQ AU VIN— Join Boise Co-op for a peek at Julia Child’s “rooster in red wine” delicacy. 6:30-8:30 p.m. $40 members, $50 nonmembers, 208-472-4500, boisecoop. com. Boise Co-op, 888 W. Fort St., Boise.

Literature THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

BOISE NONFICTION WRITERS—Join a group of nonfiction writers who meet to learn from guest speakers and from each other. Arrive at 6 p.m. to browse bookshelves and chat it up with other aspiring writers. For more information, e-mail hshaklee@ uidaho.edu. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE, www.sageecosci.com/Writers. html. Rediscovered Bookshop, 7079 Overland Road, Boise, 208-376-4229.

CONTINUING Holiday

| EASY

| MEDIUM |

HARD | PROFESSIONAL |

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk. Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

WINTER GARDEN AGLOW—Idaho Botanical Garden is glowing with more than 250,000 sparkling lights. Families and friends will enjoy the magic of the valley’s lights with views from the top of the Lewis and Clark Native Plant Garden, holiday music, hot refreshments and roaring bonfires. Santa will make special appearances throughout the event. Proceeds benefit the Garden’s education and horticulture programs. Daily, 6-9 p.m. $6 adults, $4 children ages 4-12, $4 members. Idaho Botanical Garden, 2355 N. Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-343-8649, www.idahobotanicalgarden.org.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2009 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

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LISTEN HERE/GUIDE GUIDE WEDNESDAY DEC. 30 DUDE BRO MAN AND THE FUNK YEAHS—9 p.m. Terrapin Station

SOUNDS OF SEATTLE, JAN. 2, KNITTING FACTORY While we aren’t usually ones for cover bands—call it a tribute band if you like, but a rose is a rose is a rose—we are all about the grunge sounds that took root in Seattle. And although the Sounds of Seattle Tour contains no original band members, it might be worth a listen. On Saturday, Jan. 2, slip on your flannel, loose jeans, vintage Chuck Taylors and affect a who-gives-a-shit attitude for a couple of hours while you listen to Ten, Badmotorfinger and Facelift. Maybe by the names you can tell whose covering whom but if not, we’ll help: Ten is a tribute to Pearl Jam, Badmotorfinger delivers the Chris Cornellitude of Soundgarden and Temple of the Dog, and Facelift offers its take on Alice In Chains who play the Knitting Factory next month. (Tickets are already sold out.) The names of the tribute bands, by the way, are the names of albums by the original bands. You can return to clean clothes, combing your hair and caring what people think about you on Jan. 3. —Amy Atkins Saturday, Jan. 2, 8 p.m., $13-$30. Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., bo.knittingfactory.com.

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JIMMY BIVENS—9 p.m. FREE. Piper Pub

THE LYRES—8:30 p.m. FREE. Willi B’s

POLYPHONIC POMEGRANATE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

MOTTO KITTY—New Year’s Eve party. 9 p.m. FREE. The Airport Lounge

RADILLAC, QUICKES, WILT— Hot mama pickled sausage eating contest. 9 p.m. FREE. Gusto

NEW YEAR’S DANCE PARTY— With Rock Robb and DJ DUBLOW. 9 p.m. $5. Neurolux

THE THREE—Cover band performing everything from Cream to Led Zeppelin and back around to the Grand Funk Railroad. 8 p.m. FREE. Reef

NEW YEAR’S EVE—See Picks, Page 13. Get down in 2010 with Stoney Holiday, The Shook Twins and Polyphonic Pomegranate. 9 p.m. $5. The Bouquet

THURSDAY DEC. 31

NEW YEAR’S EVE JAMS—Russ Pfeiffer and Eric Grae from 5-8 p.m. The Terri Eberlein Duo and Terry Jones Duo welcome in the new year from 8 p.m.-midnight. 5 p.m. FREE. Berryhill

BOISE ROCK SCHOOL, LOW-FI—Rockin’ out as part of the New Year’s Eve party. 7 p.m. $3 ages 5 and younger, $5 ages 6-12, $10 ages 13 and older. The Linen Building

NEW YEAR’S EVE SPECIAL— Kevin Kirk and Sally Tibbs perform from 8-9 p.m. The Sally Tibbs Dance Band will rock into the new year from 9:15 p.m.1:15 a.m. 8 p.m.-1:15 a.m. FREE. Chandlers

FIVE SMOOTH STONES—9 p.m. FREE. Monkey Bizness JEREMIAH JAMES GANG— New Year’s Eve party. 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SATURDAY JAN. 2

LORI B AND THE BLUE DIAMONDS—8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH MICKEY AND THE MOTORCARS—See Listen Here, Page 19. 9 p.m. $25-$100. Knitting Factory

Rex and Beverly OCTANE—With a champagne toast, party favors and giveaways. 9 p.m. $3. Liquid PILOT ERROR, LIVE DJ— Classic rock covers followed by a late-night DJ session. 9:30 p.m.-2 a.m. $5. Reef REX AND BEVERLY—9 p.m.midnight. FREE. The Gamekeeper SOUL SERENE—9 p.m. $5. Terrapin Station WAYNE WHITE—7:30 p.m. FREE. Music of the Vine

FRIDAY JAN. 1

DJ EVOL G—11 p.m. $3. Neurolux FIVE SMOOTH STONES— 9 p.m. FREE. Monkey Bizness HOT LOCAL KNIGHTS— See Picks, Page 13. A five-week Battle of the Bands, featuring 66 local rockers. Tonight is alternative rock: Nuckle Duste, Candread and Rizing Rezistance, Cauzin Wreks, Inshallah, Disciples of Rock, Avedus, Craving Dawn, The Forgotten, Drop Clutch, Clusterfunk and Workin’ on Fire. 4 p.m. $8. The Venue KILL UNCLE—9 p.m. FREE. The Plank THE NEW TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. The Gamekeeper POKE—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

CLYDE, SUNSHINE AND THE VALLEY—9:30 p.m. $5. Reef DJ MATT ALLEN—11 p.m. $3. Neurolux FIVE SMOOTH STONES— 9 p.m. FREE. Monkey Bizness STEVE EATON AND PHIL GARONZIK—8:15 p.m. FREE. Chandlers VOICE OF REASON— 9 p.m. $1. Liquid

SOL’JIBE—Mixing it up with Latin jazz-rock. 9:30 p.m. $5. Reef THE SOUNDS OF SEATTLE— See Listen Here, this page. 8 p.m. $13-$30 through ticketfly. com. Knitting Factory STONEY HOLIDAY—9 p.m. $1. Liquid TYLER JORDAN AND RICK GIBSON—7:30 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews

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GUIDE/LISTEN HERE DU S TIN DOW NING

GUIDE SUNDAY JAN. 3

WEDNESDAY JAN. 6

COUNTRY NIGHT—Featuring Kissin 92.3 with Steve Shannon. Fridays, 9 p.m. FREE. Cowgirls

LAST CALL TRIVIA AND KARAOKE—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid

GLORIANA—Tom Gossin, Mike Gossin, Rachel Reinert and Cheyenne Kimball are Gloriana, a four-part harmony-driven country outfit. With the Jeremiah James Gang. 7 p.m. $15 general, $40 platinum skybox. Knitting Factory

DAVID MARR—Fridays, 7 p.m. FREE. The Cole/Marr Gallery

JAMES ORR—8 p.m. FREE. Reef

HIGH DESERT BAND— Thursdays, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Whitewater Pizza

MONDAY JAN. 4

MAGNETICS, ZEN ZERO— 8 p.m. $3. Neurolux BILLY BRAUN—6:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JAZZ JAM—7 p.m. FREE. Reef PUNK MONDAY—Third annual Battle of the Bands. Free to listen, 5 bucks to vote. 9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

PATRICIA FOLKNER AND JOEL KASERMAN—7 p.m. FREE. Flatbread POLYPHONIC POMEGRANATE—9 p.m. FREE. Liquid

WEEKLY GIGS TUESDAY JAN. 5

BILLY BRAUN—Mondays, 7 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

BEN BURDICK—7 p.m. FREE. Reef

BOISE BLUES SOCIETY JAM SESSION—Mondays, 8 p.m. FREE. Jo’s Sunshine Lounge

RUSSELL TURNER—7 p.m. $3. The Bouquet SMOOTH—7 p.m. FREE. Liquid

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COUNTRY AND TOP 40—Saturdays, 9 p.m. $5. Cowgirls

FRIM FRAM 4—Thursdays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s FUEGOGO!—Tuesdays, 9:30 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station

JAM NIGHT—Wednesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. Montego Bay JAZZ NIGHTS—Monday-Saturday, 6:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill; Thursdays, 7 p.m. FREE. Rembrandt’s; Featuring Kevin Kirk Tuesday-Saturday and The Sidemen on Sundays. 7 p.m., FREE, Chandlers JEANNIE MARIE—Fridays, 7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s JEREMIAH JAMES AND NED EVETT—Tuesdays, 8 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel JEREMIAH JAMES GANG— Wednesdays, 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

THE BUCKSHOT BAND—Saturdays, 9 p.m. FREE for anyone in a cowboy hat. Shorty’s BUD GUDMUNDSON, MATT HARTZ—Thursdays. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Corkscrews

V E N U E S

JIM FISHWILD—Wednesdays, 6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow JOHN CAZAN—Fridays, 5 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel JOHNNY SHOES—Wednesdays, 6 p.m. Lock Stock & Barrel LIVE LOUNGE—Fridays and Saturdays, 8 p.m. FREE. The Gamekeeper LIVE SETS—Fridays, 10 p.m. FREE. Bittercreek; Wednesdays, 7 p.m. FREE. Pitchers and Pints NOCTURNUM WITH DJ BONES—Sundays, 9 p.m. FREE. Terrapin Station ROBIN SCOTT—Saturdays, 7 p.m. FREE. Orphan Annie’s ROCCI JOHNSON BAND—with DJ Naomi Sioux Wednesdays and Fridays. 9:30 p.m. FREE. Hannah’s THE SALOONATICS—Thursdays and Saturdays. 9 p.m. FREE. The Buffalo Club SOUL SERENE—Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. FREE. Ha’Penny SPINDLE BOMB—Fridays, Saturdays, 9 p.m. $3. Tom Grainey’s THOMAS PAUL—Sundays, 10 a.m. and Mondays, 7 p.m. FREE. Red Feather

Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

MICKY AND THE MOTORCARS, DEC. 31, KNITTING FACTORY With a convincing Southern drawl for an Idaho native, Micky and the Motorcars front man Micky Braun sings classic Americana ditties about love, cheating hearts and life on the open road. True to their name, the Motorcars spend 215 days a year motoring across the country and rocking out in dive bars around their home base of Austin, Texas. Fronted by Braun, the band is also comprised of brother Gary Braun and a handful of other musicians. The Braun lads—who include brothers Willy and Cody Braun of the band Reckless Kelly—grew up in Idaho watching Braun pop Muzzie and his bro Billy perform together as the Braun Brothers. Micky and the Motorcars will return to Idaho for a special family-filled New Year’s Eve performance with Muzzie and Billy Braun and the Jeremiah James Gang. —Tara Morgan Thursday, Dec. 31, 7:30 p.m. doors, 9 p.m. show, $25$100, Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

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NEWS/ARTS THE PHIL FOR KIDS AND AUDITIONS FOR ADULTS What do cumulonimbus clouds and contrabassoons have in common? This January, they’ll be teaming up to teach Boise students how to better understand classical music. With the help of Channel 6 meteorologist Scott Dorval, students will examine connections between layers of music and layers of clouds. As a part of Boise Philharmonic’s annual children’s concert program, over 12,000 students from Boise, Meridian and Nampa schools will be bussed to various locations for this three-day symphonic event. The concerts will go down on Tuesday, Jan. 26, 2010, at Meridian Middle School, Wednesday, Jan. 27, at the Morrison Center and Thursday, Jan. 28, at Northwest Nazarene University’s Swayne Auditorium. In addition to these upcoming children’s concerts, Boise Philharmonic is kicking off a brand new educational program called Musicians In the Schools, which will acquaint 7,000 second-grade students in more than 275 Boise, Nampa and Meridian classrooms with orchestra musicians. The MITS program is based on research done by Boise Philharmonic artistic director Robert Franz showing that the same active listening skills cultivated by listening to classical music can be translated to reading comprehension. For more information on upcoming Boise Philharmonic educational events, including the Sounds Like Fun series, visit boisephilharmonic.org. If your New Year’s resolution involves rising triumphantly to the top of the local theater scene, then there are a couple of upcoming auditions to keep in mind. On Saturday, Jan. 2, from 2-5 p.m., Boise Little Theatre’s Broken Illusion Project is holding auditions for This is Our Youth by Kenneth Lonergan. The play, set in Regan-era New York City, follows three post-adolescents as they explore their futures and the generational divide with their parents. Boise Little Theatre is seeking two males, ages 18 to 25, and one female, age 18 to 25. Aspiring actors will be asked to do a cold reading from the script, head shots and resumes are optional. Also on the audition horizon is a travelling production of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird. The play, a part of the American Library Association, Boise Public Library and the Ada Community Library’s The Big Read event, will be performed at various locations, including Stagecoach Theater and the Ada County Courthouse on Feb. 27, Mar. 6 and Mar. 13. The play’s directors are seeking one black man, mid-20s; one black man, age 50 or older; one white woman, age 50 or older; and one white male, age 12 to 15. Auditions will be conducted by appointment only and can be set up by calling Kim Labrum at 208-559-1979, or e-mailing kimlabrum@hotmail.com. —Tara Morgan

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ARTS/VISUAL

April VanDeGrift (AIR annex) and Jennifer Wood (TMP 9+1) know the value of an artful mustache.

ARTFUL ACCOMPLISHMENTS Events of 2009 we plan to still talk about in 2010 AMY ATKINS AND TARA MORGAN

TMP 9+1 In 2009, Trey McIntyre Project artistic director Trey McIntyre tapped a group of artists on the shoulders and whispered in their ears, “Would you be interested in creating a physical expression of our company?” With embroidery, glass, music, photography, poetry, paint, graphic design, gold leaf, chocolate and liquor they answered with an resounding “Yes.” The result was a show at J Crist Gallery incorporating literal images as well as abstract ideals in which the company—the nine dancers and McIntyre— was represented by color and shape. It was an intricate, elegant exhibit that combined disparate work from different artists in one cohesive experience. And in case you missed it, worry not. McIntyre is already nudging artists for 2010. treymcintyre.com

MODERN ART Often when a hotel room is portrayed in the movies, the TV is bolted down, ugly lamps cast a grim light and the art on the walls is so unappealing, the wallpaper would make for a better view. So even though the inaugural Modern Art event was successful, when the Modern Hotel and Bar opened its numbered doors to Boise artists for the second time, we suspected it might devolve into a gathering of artists for whom muted landscapes are de rigeur. We were de rig-wrong. 2009’s Modern Art event drew nearly 5,000 visitors on a May evening to 34 of the hotel’s rooms that had been transformed into unique avant-garde mini galleries. Like a crowded indoor market, the paintings, film, performance, textiles, glass, sculpture and more beckoned from each threshold as visitors scooched along the corridors.

| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly

The analogy of sardines was never before so appropriate, as people worked their way around the Modern. Events have a way gaining traction in this city. Since the first Modern Art brought in about 2,000 people and the second more than doubled that, the Modern Hotel and Bar might have to think about adding on a wing next year. Or two. themodernhotel.com

GALLERY ALEXA ROSE After 12 months in existence, Gallery Alexa Rose has swiftly solidified its place on the First Thursday map. The subterranean space, adjacent to the Superb Sushi courtyard, has hosted a bevy of contemporary, cutting-edge exhibitions that span the gamut from performance art to mixed-media installations. Though the gallery is comprised of a loose, fluctuating collective of artists who go by the moniker Apples and Oranges, it is bound at the center by watercolorist and soft-spoken matriarchal figure Alexa Rose Howell. From short films to feather-andnail covered dresses to pink-wigged modern dance solos, the gallery has provided burgeoning young artists with a place to flex their creative muscles without being muscled into selling their work for profit. Unlike many other downtown galleries, Alexa Rose doesn’t have to court collectors to keep the doors open: Howell’s husband owns the company that manages the building the gallery is in. Because of the Howells’ generous dedication to supporting young, contemporary art, downtown Boise has been gifted with a unique new venue. After groundbreaking shows like “Incidentally, Yours” and most recently “Make Your Mark,” we’re amped to see what Alexa Rose has in store for 2010.

AIR We joke about acronyms here at BWHQ, at how people and organizations will go through a number of naming conventions to come up with a clever three- or four-letter moniker. The Artist in Residence program, or AIR, at the 8th Street Marketplace—with annexes in the Alaska Building and in the basement of Renewal—was not spared our jests. But when we discovered what incredible opportunities were offered for the artists who are given studio space for three months, we stopped snickering and started paying some serious attention. The program has seen local artists, who work in myriad mediums create incredible new work or continue the creative process on existing projects including theater company Alley Repertory Theater, sound designer Ted Apel, choreographer/dancer Kelli Brown, multimedia artist Lisa Bufano, painter/custom framer Goran Fazil, visual artist Kirsten Furlong, visual artist/community organizer Chris Kennedy, poet Adrian Kien, dancer/choreographer Johanna Kirk, sculptor Sue Latta, painter/printmaker Benjamin Love, textiles artist Rachel Reichert, visual artist Holly Streekstra and painters Kristy Albrecht, Kate Masterson, Sandy Marostica, Laci McCrea Kelly Packer, Erik Sande, Jess Sanden, Emily Wenner and April VanDeGrift. Each round of artists brings something new and vibrant to the space and their willingness to allow the community to witness their work as it’s happening—visitors are welcome during the residencies and the First Thursday of each month. Believe it or not, thinking about what’s in store for 2010 has us walking on air. 8thstreetmarketplace.com

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NEWS/FOOD FOOD/REVIEWS On one plate then the other ... BW sends two critics to one restaurant.

TWISTED TIMBER PUB & GRILL Make Julia Child’s coq au vin at a Boise Co-op cooking class.

YOU SAY YOU WANT A RESOLUTION

22

LAU RIE PEARMAN

It’s that time once again when we pledge to make changes in the upcoming year. While dieting may be among the most popular New Year’s resolutions for Americans, Food News would never suggest you eliminate food from your life—even if it is just the high-calorie not-so-great-for-you food. It just ain’t our style; we like tots and finger steaks just as much as the next dude. (Unless, of course, you’re pledging to eliminate multinational fast-food corporations’ industrial crap from your diet, then we’re all for it.) So how does one endeavor to improve without eliminating? The cooking class. Boise Co-op has revived its cookingclass program with weekly classes at Pottery Gourmet in downtown Boise. First up in the new year is Julia Child’s coq au vin on Wednesday, Jan. 6. Stick with the French theme for another week to check out the French Bistro class, which features Parisian cafe favorites taught in French on Wednesday, Jan. 13. If all that rich French food has you feeling like you should make some attempt at New Year weight loss, the Fit and Fabulous class on Wednesday, Jan. 20, might help with healthy, low-fat recipes. All classes begin at 6:30 p.m. and cost $40 for members and $50 for nonmembers. Call 208-472-4500 or visit boisecoop.com for information or to register. Classes are held at Pottery Gourmet, 811 W. Bannock St. The Basque Market is also offering a handful of classes in January. On Thursday, Jan. 14, learn to make one-dish dinners like rioja braised chicken and paprika pot roast. Thursday, Jan. 28, it’s time to think ahead to Valentine’s Day with a lesson on a romantic meal of lamb chops stuffed with piquillo peppers and molten lava chocolate cake for dessert. Speaking of February, planning that far ahead isn’t a bad idea. On Thursday, Feb. 11, the Basque Market offers its very popular seafood paella and tapas class. Sign up early to get a space for that one. All classes begin at 6 p.m. and the cost varies by class. Call 208-433-1208 or visit thebasquemarket.com for information or to register. Classes are held at the Basque Market, 608 W. Grove St., Boise. —Rachael Daigle

I’ve yearned for a particular coffee shop in Fernley, Nev., for four years Since my parents are amenable to new dining experiences no matter now. It sits in a generic shopping plaza along the Interstate. It’s complihow far away, I took them to Twisted Timber Pub and Grill, a place so cated by bottles of liquor and wine behind the bar, white linen on the far from downtown, we wondered if we were still in Ada County. tables and a row of women gambling with the barista in the middle of With a tiny half-page menu of chicken wings, pizza and sandwichthe day. es and nothing but glasses of beer on the handful of occupied tables, The vibe at the corner of Cloverdale and Amity approximates the I guessed it a place where nearby residents go for a brew and where a formula at Brim’s Cafe in Fernley, though with much lower stakes. bite is an afterthought. My bad. Twisted Timber Pub and Grill used to be just a coffee shop called I’ve never ordered a buffalo wing in my life—not a fan of bone-in The Platinum Cup. meats or skin—but I In April, the owners acquiesced to bourbon added booze and a peppercorn chicken restaurant. The joint parts ($6). We took neighbors a 24-hour a long wait as a bad “family fitness cenomen, but slow service ter,” shares parking was not a result of with an orthodontist, inattentiveness. It was, and is the only sign of rather, a precursor to civilization for miles; freshly prepared food. it’s just churches, ranHoly bleu cheese dom subdivisions and dressing, Batman! Is livestock all around. this what you football I walk through watchers have been the doors and am eating on Mondays this greeted with warm, whole time? How did I blonde wood trim, a miss these? Though my case brimming with pop thought the wings pastries and a huge lacked a bourbon-andchalkboard listing black pepper zing, I coffee drinks. Like in was tongue-tied at how Nevada, I take in the the crack of pepper and scene before moseythe warm tang of booze ing in: empty. dressed an otherwise A young barista/ inedible appetizer. An TWISTED TIMBER barkeep hands me a simple menu of sandwiches and order of three sandwiches and a chicken-and-cheese PUB & GRILL pizza with a few starters thrown in. I order a Mack and quesadilla ($7) confused the cook, who looked for a 4563 S. Cloverdale Road Jack’s ($3.75), which comes in a chilled 16-oz. beer mug non-existent fourth person as he helped our server bring 208-362-7157 and a hot Turkey Avocado Club ($7.50). When the guy orders to the table—that ’dilla was thick enough to do Mon.-Thu. 11 a.m.-11 p.m., Fri.-Sat. 11 a.m.-2 a.m., disappears into the kitchen, I am left alone to explore duty as an entree. His misunderstanding was forgivable. Sun. 11 a.m.-11 p.m. the restaurant and take notes without getting caught. The “drizzled with sour cream,” which was stiff pastryMy eye drifts to the eclectic modern art and coffeepouch-poured swirls sitting atop the tortilla, was not. It bean bags on the walls, the four different types of seating, the regulation would have been a no-complaint dish sans the sour cream. shuffleboard table against one wall. Yes, Twisted Timber has a 22-footThe swiss, leaf spinach, tomato, spicy horseradish and roast beef long vintage 1962 coin-operated shuffleboard table that was picked up ($6.50) and turkey, tomato, jack-and-cheddar, leaf spinach and bacon from what the waiter describes as a North Idaho pastor’s man cave. ($6.50) sandwiches my dates ordered were hot, flattened panini-style I’m impressed. sandwiches with grill lines seared on both sides. The pink tinge of the There’s also a pool table and as my food arrives, four military guys beef poked through the edges and its juicy tenderness pushed past the come in and play a round. other flavors. That is of particular note because earlier that evening, The sandwich is an impressively grilled construction: pressed for per- I’d read on Twisted Timber’s Facebook page that they had a Reuben fect black lines but not to mash the contents. It has a generous helping special, but our server gently informed me that there would be no Reuof turkey, avocado, fresh tomatoes and lettuce and is sided by tortilla ben for me. The meat was too tough to serve. Big points to TT for not chips and salsa. After a few bites, I realize it is missing the bacon, the masking the meat in sauerkraut and sauce and serving it anyway. second time I’ve been slighted bacon at a meal in as many weeks. My second choice, the turkey avocado club ($7.50)—bacon, I pipe up and the server brings me a cup of hot bacon crumbles, spinach, swiss cheese and tomato—was served cold with the thick, which add a bit more pizzazz to the meal. plate-size slices of turkey folded over and over so that the sandwich I eat slowly, and more people come in for late lunches and for coffee. stacked nearly as high as my pint glass, and the snap of fresh spinach I order an Americano and buffalo wings to go, and the server disappears and tomato were a welcome surprise in December. into the kitchen again, presumably to make the wings from scratch. A sandwich without potato chips is like a cat without a purr, and I When I get them back to the office a good 20 minutes later they are still think tortilla chips are a poor substitute. However, when accompanied hot, in both temperature and spice, and my colleagues gobble them up. by a fair-sized plastic cup of medium salsa as ours were, that particular On my way out of Twisted Timber, I notice a little sign advertischeat can be forgiven. ing free coffee grounds for customers’ gardens. The other server tells I have a friend who lives near that Cloverdale no-man’s land beme they don’t like to throw them away. I might just plan in a stop at tween town and country. Now visits out to his neck of the woods will Twisted Timber on my next trip to Marsing. Or Fernley. seem less like treks and more like treats. —Nathaniel Hoffman pretends he’s wearing six shooters and that all doors swing both ways when on assignment.

| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly

—Amy Atkins tried to sell a potato chip on eBay that looked like Abraham Lincoln. WWW. B O I S E WE E KLY. C O M


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FOOD/DINING Southeast Boise ATZA PIZZA—Handmade dough and pizza sauce and fresh ingredients. Hit the salad bar, order jumbo wings, or go for the sandwiches and breadsticks option. Decide between thin or original crust and you’re halfway done building your own pie, or you may choose one of Atza’s specialty pizza creations. The Pizza Patrol Car even delivers within a certain range. 6564 S. Federal Way, 208-433-1112. $-$$ OM . AUBERGINE—Bistro/deli fare of grilled panini sandwiches, decadent salads and stellar bread pudding. Leave at your own risk without the addictive strawberry lemonade. They also boast breakfast sack lunch menus. 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., . 208-429-8775. $ BARBACOA—Theatrical tableside service is the standard in this carnivore’s restaurant. In the style of Argentine parrillas, meat is grilled over an open flame and served on ironwood platters. 276 Bob White Court, SU 208-338-5000. $$-$$$$ OM. BIG JUDS—Burgers as big as your head, the wall of burger fame for those who dared to down the one pound Big Jud, tots, pie, grilled cheese sandwiches, onion rings and fries. 1289 Protest Road, 208-343. 4439. $ BLUE COW FROZEN YOGURT— Make a delicious and nutritious treat by choosing from nonfat, premium or no sugar added varieties. Twelve different frozen yogurt flavors, with everything from fruit to New York Cheesecake, plus low-fat options are offered in ever-changing rotation. Customers decorate their yogurt desserts by helping themselves to more than 30 hard, fruit and syrup toppings. Place the creation on the scale and pay by the ounce. 2333 Apple St., 208338-1000. $ SU OM . BOISE BARGAIN BASKET— Gourmet and deal don’t often go hand in hand, but at “3B’s,” that’s the whole idea. Boise’s newest grocery store finds the grocery world’s deals—whether it’s overstock or manufacturer’s discontinued items—and passes on the savings to its customers. Find everything from dog food and batteries to organic cookies and rarely found ethnic ingredients. Adjacent to the store is 3 Bzzz Coffee Bar, where a weary shopper can get a caffeine boost, take in some local art and sometimes, even some music. 2141 Broadway Ave., 208-3315092. $ OM. BUSTER’S—A gazillion TVs, lots of male customers and the cutest bartenders and waitresses this side of the Payette. Satisfy those beer munchies with an extensive pub

AVERAGE PRICE PER PERSON: $ —Less than $8 $ $ —$8 to $14 $ $ $ —$14 to $20 $ $ $ $ —Over $20

menu. Burgers, finger steaks, loaded fries, beer, beer, beer. 1326 Broadway Ave., 208-345SU OM. 5688. $-$$ CHEF ROLAND’S—Chef Roland Joseph is serving up Cajun fare complete with hushpuppies, locally grown collard greens and red beans and rice. Choose between gumbo or jambalaya to go along with fried catfish, Cajun barbecue ribs or savory brisket. If there is room after all that flavor, go for a piece of key lime or sweet potato pie. 1221 W. Boise Ave., 208-344-4387. $-$$ SU. COBBY’S—Serving up soup, salad, brew and wine since 1978. Enjoy deli meats like pastrami, bologna, mortadella, colto and genoa, in addition to all the standards. Every size soup and sandwich can be combined. 1030 Broadway Ave., 208-3450990. $ SU OM. CORONA VILLAGE—Gut-busting burritos, incredible chips and Dos Equis on tap make the Village stand out among Boise’s family style Mexican restaurants. 2137 Broadway Ave., 208-3366711. $-$$ .

ranging seafood and vegetarian all the way to French Classical, Mexican and Italian cuisine. Soups and salads may be a good choice if a diner is going for the house specialty dessert made in-house by the pastry chef. Selections include a Chocolate Truffle Ugly Cake best experienced with closed eyes and an open mouth. 404 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208-322-2838. SU OM . $-$$ FLATBREAD COMMUNITY OVEN—Stone fired pizza, pasta and sandwiches served up from the community oven. A sleekly lined interior and two large fire pits beckon flatbread lovers to Bown Crossing. 3139 S. Bown Way, 208-343-4177. $-$$ SU . HUGO’S DELI—Unique sandwiches piled high with meat and cheese, fried chicken, deli salads and some of the biggest and best fries in town. 2789 Broadway Ave., 208-385-9943. . $

DONG KHANH—Vietnamese goodness. Lunch specials are a great bargain and the banquet dinners are a definite great crowd pleaser. 111 Broadway Ave., 208-345-0980. $.

ICHIBAN JAPANESE STEAKHOUSE—A sushi and sashimi bar as well as tepanyaki grill. The Ichiban roll is a tasty mouthful of soft shell crab, shrimp tempura, eel, cuke, lettuce, avocado and cream cheese with sweet sauce. If you’re in for the grill, the chef’s slice and dice and entertain all at once. 1233 Broadway Ave, 208-426-9188. $$-$$$$ .

FOCACCIA’S—Chef Bill Green transformed his catering business into a full-service restaurant with a rotating menu featuring specialty food items

LIFE’S KITCHEN—Have a lunch, save a life. Serving lunch three days a week: Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Students learn skills

FOOD/RECENTLY REVIEWED WILLOWCREEK GRILL, EAGLE 1065 E. Winding Creek, 208-938-3010, willowcreekgrill.com “It’s a wondrous land, where not only are fries fresh, hot, slightly crispy and delicious, but where traditional Russets commingle with their sweet potato cousins in harmony.” —Deanna Darr

JERRY’S STATE COURT CAFE 6767 W. Fairview Ave., 208-376-6767 “Jerry’s rose from the dead in July in an old Elmer’s Restaurant building on Fairview. From the corner booth, the place looks like any other generic pancake joint, packed with seniors ogling the abundant senior-citizen specials.” —Nathaniel Hoffman

KRUNG THAI RESTAURANT AND SUSHI HOUSE 3008 Garrity Blvd., Nampa, 208-442-5254, krung-thai.com “To my delight, the pad Thai with tofu ($8.95) also avoided a common shortfall of its peers. It walked the tightrope of deliciousness between being overly peanut buttery or overly vinegar-y and finished with a mildly spicy bow.” —Tara Morgan

—Wine & beer —Full bar —Delivery —Take-out —Open late RES —Reservations

needed/recommended —Patio SU —Open on Sunday OM —Online menu —Breakfast —Boise Weekly Card

Boise Weekly Dining Guide offers selective listings of editorial recommendations and advertisers. Listings rotate based on available space.

Updates from diligent readers and listed restaurateurs are heartily encouraged. E-mail to food@boiseweekly.com or fax to 342-4733.

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| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly

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DINING/FOOD for life and for the restaurant business at Life’s Kitchen under the supervision of chef instructor Maggie Kiefer. A new menu is published every Tuesday at www. lifeskitchen.org. 1025 S. Capitol Blvd., 331-0199. $$ . LUCKY 13 PIZZA/THE GARAGE—The former North End mainstay has moved essentially “as was” to Harris Ranch, where the best (and best-named) pizzas and sandwiches on the planet are still on the menu. 3662 S. Eckert Road, 208-344-6967. $ SU OM. MAZZAH—Visit the Med over lunch or drop on by for dinner. Gyros, hummus, falafel and baklava on the quick. Try the fatoosh salad; you won’t be disappointed. 404 E. Park Center Blvd., 208-3332223. $-$$ OM .

ONO HAWAIIAN CAFE—A wide variety of the flavors of Hawaii are offered in the form of pupus, sushi, sandwiches and satays. And where ever Ono’s catering operation, the Kanak Attack van is parked and serving, a BW staffer is most likely in the vicinity with money in hand. 2170 Broadway Ave., 208-4299111. $$-$$$ OM . PAD THAI—Pad Thai House is so confident that its Pad Thai is the best in Boise, the restaurant is named after it. 1473 S. Five Mile Road, 208-375-6014. $-$$ OM. PAPA JOE’S—Family owned and operated, Papa Joe’s uses family recipes for their pizza and pasta dishes. Food and drink specials all week long and a dozen flavors of gelato with which to reward your plate cleaning skills. 1301 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-344-7272.

WINE SIPPER/FOOD

1301 S. Capitol Blvd., 208-344-7272. $-$$ SU OM. PAT’S THAI KITCHEN—Pat’s promise to deliver “delicious authentic Thai food” certainly hold true each and every visit. Tom Ka Gai like you find in Chiang Mai, noodles and rice of all varieties and curry done Thai spicy or mild for the farang in you. 577 E. Park Blvd. #C110, 208-345OM. 0026. $-$$ PIEHOLE II—Pizza plain and simple. Nineteen-inch pies by the slice or by the pie and calzones everyday. Try their infamous potato and bacon, or go cheap with the special of the day for two bucks. 205 N. 8th St., SU OM 208-424-2255. $-$$ . POWELL’S SWEET SHOPPE— Old-school, new-school, grossschool and too-cool-for-school school, Powell’s has just about every candy you, your grandmother and your kids have loved over the years. The original Charlie and the Chocolate Factory plays all day, and like it or not, Powell’s is always packed. 3064 South Bown Way, 208-424-6099. $ SU OM. THE RAM—Beer brewed on site, more TVs than you can count and plenty of specials from happy hour to daily dinners. 709 E. Park Blvd., 208-345-2929. SU OM. $-$$

CELEBRATE WITH BUBBLES Nothing says celebration like the pop of a champagne cork. It’s a New Year’s Eve tradition and, recently, we were lucky enough to taste a wide range of sparkling wines, from budgetconscious Spanish Cava to budget-busting French champagne. Here they are, listed by price: SEGURA VIUDAS BRUT RESERVA, $9.99 You will not find a better buy in Boise than this Spanish blend. It costs less than 10 bucks for a magnum (1.5 liters). Made using the traditional champagne method, it spends three years in the bottle, which is unheard for a sparkler at this price. This bubbly offers lovely floral notes, with rich fruit flavors and a creamy texture that plays against lively crispness. TALTARNI BRUT TACHE, $18.99 From Australia, this is a classic blend of champagne grapes kissed with a touch of shiraz to add color; tache means “stained.” It’s marked by persistent pinpoint bubbles with soft aromas of strawberry and yeasty bread dough. Ripe raspberry flavors are balanced by bright acidity and backed by hints of apple, citrus and rhubarb. This is a very good value. TAITTINGER PRESTIGE ROSE, $69 This true French champagne is elegant and refined, with an almost iridescent pink color and lively tart cherry and green apple aromas. An explosion of finely textured bubbles goes on and on, releasing flavors of sweet citrus and soft berry, with a touch of candied lemon zest on the finish. Splurge if you can. KRUG BRUT GRANDE CUVEE, $215 From one of the top names in champagne and priced accordingly. Heady aromas of dark berry, toast, creme brulee and Spanish almonds open this Energizer bunny of tiny bubbles. With sublime flavors of ripe apple and fresh baked sour dough up front, sweet brioche plays against bright citrus on the finish. —David Kirkpatrick WWW. B OISEWEEKLY.C O M

THE REFUGE—Serving the same menu as loved Harry’s of Hyde Park with burgers, fingersteaks, homemade chips from flour tortillas and other bar favorites and pool, beer and TVs to keep diners entertained. 404 E. Parkcenter Blvd., 208-424-8211. SU. $-$$ SMOKY MOUNTAIN PIZZA AND PASTA—When you’re in the mood for a good, traditional pizza, this is the place. The pastas, starters, sandwiches and salads are equally delicious, and the list is as long as your arm. 415 E. Parkcenter Blvd., OM. 208-429-0011. $-$$ STUBS SPORTS PUB—This pub has a highly sports-devoted setting, including sports-tuned TVs and seating in The Den. Even the food is named with sports references. Try their chili, taquitos, pizzas or buffalo tenders, as well as a variety of tasty sam-iches. The pickled eggs are an alleged must-have. 3662 Findley Ave., 208-3367882. $ SU. TAVERN AT BOWN CROSSING—Choose between the first level streetside balcony where all the passersby can watch you enjoy a bottle of wine and a steak, or lounge on the second level patio with a roll of sushi and a martini. 3111 S. Bown St., SU 208-345-2277. $$-$$$ OM . THAI CUISINE—Serving traditional Thai food in a casual and elegant environment. 6777 W. Overland Road, 208-6580516. $$ . THE TROLLEY HOUSE—The only remnant of Boise’s streetcar system and a favorite neighborhood diner. No-frills atmosphere, efficient service and a giant menu with everything from eggs Benedict to burgers to a lo-cal section. BYOB. 1821 Warm Springs Ave., 208-345SU . 9255. $-$$

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Painted a cheerful yellow 2004 HARRISON BLVD., BOISE and situated on a .15-acre $398,950 corner parcel facing Boiseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 3 Bed/2 Bath 3,260 Square Feet historic Harrison Boulevard, Urban Agent Team this handsomely renoLindsay Dofelmeir, 208-841-2263 vated 109-year-old American urbanagentteam.com foursquare contains many MLS #98411913 original and period details. Solid-oak ďŹ&#x201A;ooring gleams underfoot on the main level and second story. Wide bands of white trim cap doorways and tall windows throughout the residence. Vintage ball hinges and antique doorknobs with fancy back plates open interior doors that lead to the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three bedrooms and two bathrooms. Built in 1900, the ďŹ&#x201A;oor plan places the living room, formal dining room, kitchen, sunroom, and a three-quarter bathroom with a two-person shower stall on the main level. Upstairs, there are three bedrooms and one full bathroom. Out back, there is a big sun deck and a one-car garage with a carport. The updated kitchen blends warm woods with cool metal ďŹ nishes. The luster of stainless steel countertops and appliances glows against honey-tinted cherry wood cabinetry. A stainless steel hood vent hangs above the center work island, where a six-burner stove is set into a thick slab of solid butcher block. The foursquare design was popular around 1890-1930 because its simple box shape and two-and-a-half story height provided generous interior square footage, while needing only a small footprint to ďŹ t on a city lot.

;G::BDC:NID=DB:7JN:GH Free money available to ďŹ rst time and NON ďŹ rst time home buyers! $6500 for non 1st time buyers and $8000 for ďŹ rst time buyers is available.... absolutely free if you purchase a home. No cost/obligation to see if you qualify! No money down (O.A.C.), no payment for up to 2 months, closing costs paid for you, No charge to work with top producing buyer Agent. Easy/ Simple qualiďŹ cation process. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t hesitate! This free money expires in the Spring so it is important to get started NOW! Tired of the run around? Call Heidi, Market Pro Real Estate Services at (208) 440-5997. HeidiJC@cableone.net www.ChallengerBoiseHomes.com 2009 IHFA Top Agent for ADA County! Want to work with a Straight shooter? Someone easy to work with? Someone who is very skilled at negotiating and ďŹ nding good deals? All this and more is available to you for NO CHARGE! (208) 440-5997. 8DCK:C>:CIID=E Comfortable 3BD, 2BA. Great location, new paint in & out, new carpet, vinyl, lighting, plumbing & window coverings. Affordable & move-in ready. Full size lot is zoned residential/ofďŹ ce, fenced private N. facing backyard, patio, RV parking, mature landscaping. Clean! Only $118K. Call Deborah Bell with Idaho Properties GMAC at 208-484-0752 to see 12178 W. Alfred, Boise.

CAREERS BW HELP WANTED

Amateur Massage by Eric. See LARGE ad.

BW CAREER EDUCATION

B6@:BDG:BDC:N

With a better job and a degree. Evening, day and online classes start next month. Financial aid is available for those who qualify. Stevens-Henager College, Boise Branch, 800-716-5645 www.stevenshenager.info

BW BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Place your FREE on-line classiďŹ eds at www.boiseweekly.com. No phone calls please.

FOR SALE BW STUFF 8DBEDHI>C<7>CHLDGBH For Gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sake is now open for business! Check out our selection of 100% recycled plastic Gusanito composting bins to start turning your kitchen scraps, paper waste and cardboard into soil rich in nutrients that you can use for your garden and household plants. www.GardensSake.com

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Hot tub available, heated table, hot oil full-body Swedish massage. Total seclusion. Days/Eves/ Wknds.Visa/Master Card accepted, Male only. 866-2759. Full body massage by experienced therapist. Out call or private studio. 863-1577. Thomas. =DJHE6 Steam sauna & massage. Corner Overland & S. Orchard. Open 7 days a week, 9-10pm. 345-2430. B6HH6<: Bali Spa. 401 N. Orchard St. 3751332. Open 9am-10pm. Mention you saw it in the Boise Weekly for $20 Off! Massage Boise Hotels 869-8128.

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Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve moved. Same great service, new location & freshly remodeled spa. Massage~Bath~Sauna. 1512 Broadway Ave. 713-6142. ULM 340-8377.

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Free Chair Massage for your neck, shoulders & back with an hour Foot ReďŹ&#x201A;exology Massage only $29.99. Full body massage with special technique. Pain relief. 3777711. Stop by 6555 W. Overland Rd near Cole.

Pros: Classy Harrison Boulevard foursquare. Cons: One-car garage.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Jennifer Hernandez Open house: Saturday and Sunday, Jan. 2-3, 1-4 p.m.

| DECEMBER 30, 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JANUARY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

7D>H:<GDJE=DB:H Make a difference assisting adults w/ developmental disabilities. Must be 21 w/ clean driving record. Stop by 8310 W. Ustick #300, 9 am-4 pm.

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|

PETS

BW PSYCHIC

SERVICES

BW PETS

BW HOME

B>C6IJG:E>C8=:GEJEEN Mazi is an adorable dog with a lot of personality very friendly and loving does great with children. $150.00 to a good home please call Cody at 208-407-2205 for more info. B>HH>C<9D< The lady of the house is missing! Please help us find her, she is white with light shades of brown with blue eyes. Her name is Lady, please help us find her. Contact 208-570-4499.

86GE:I6C9I>A:8A:6C>C< IICRC Certified.Call today for our December special! We specialize in carpet cleaning, upholstery cleaning, tile and grout cleaning and sealing, Pet Odor Treatment, Carpet Repairs, Red Stain Removal. We also provide 24 Hour Emergency Service. Commercial/ Residential. (208) 724-0586.

86GE:I8A:6C>C<HE:8>6A Barefoot Cleaning Company will steam clean 3 rooms + halls or stairs for $89. We use natural detergents. Call 830-8215 or visit us at barefootcleaningcompany.com :JGD"EGD8A:6C>C< Family owned business that provides cleaning services for homes, businesses, rentals, and new construction cleanups. Moving in or moving out we will make your home or office shine. We offer long and short term contracts. We guarantee and stand behind our services. A limited trial period of three months is offered with no contract. Contact us at(208)5627832.

>CI:G>DGE6>CI>C< Very reasonable prices! Help with colors, inside wall repair, texture, stain blocking and sealing, kitchen cabinets repainting, brush, roll and spray finish, attention to detail, 25 years of experience, dependable, references available! Call Joe-Bohemia Painting for a free written estimate! 208-3458558 or 208-392-2094.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

ADOPT-A-PET 6C<:AG:69:G

Psychic Medium: Available for large events, small gatherings & private readings. Call 208-323-2323.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society. www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

BW SPIRITUAL

B:9>I6I>DC G:IG:6I

Live the life of inner joy. Half day meditation retreat with Dana Marsh. All are welcome to attend. Jan. 9th, 9:30-1pm. Located at ICAN 3450 Hill Rd, 921-4062. www.heartofdharma.org

76GI:G>H 7:II:G

TIA: 3-year-old female domestic shorthair. Relaxed, mellow, would be a great housecat. (K. 21 - #9171582)

BEAR: 1.5-year-old male German shepherd/heeler mix. Would make a great exercise partner. (K. 425 - #6192046)

HOSHI: 3-year-old male domestic shorthair. Enjoys sitting in your lap to receive attention. Litterbox-trained. (K. 75 - #9224059)

TARA: 3-year-old female domestic shorthair. Will provide hours of entertainment. Very talkative. Social butterfly. (K. 79 - #9240021)

TIPPY: 10-month-old female border collie/ terrier mix. Gentle, loving puppy. Playful! Bonds quickly. (K. 423 - #9224491)

LINDY: 8-year-old female Lab mix. Nervous at the shelter. Will make a great, lowenergy companion. (K. 303 - #9228630)

Looking for barter? Post what you have, find what you need. Always free at www.boiseweekly.com.

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

GIDEON: I like candlelight tuna dinners and long snuggles on the couch. Room 9

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IBANEZ: I’m looking for someone who will lay in the sun and make music with me. Room 7

EVA: My biggest dream is to be a not-sodesperate housewife. Room 6

| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | 27


| REAL ESTATE | CAREERS | TRANSPORTATION | FOR SALE | MIND, BODY, SPIRIT | PETS |

| SERVICES | NOTICES | MUSIC | COMMUNITY POSTINGS | CONNECTION SECTION |

BW PROFESSIONAL 9>KDG8: Settlement is faster and less expensive than litigation. Free initial consult. CAPITAL MEDIATION SERVICES, LLC 208-968-2483. 8DBEJI:GEGD7A:BH44 FREE In-Store Computer Diagnostics 50% OFF ANY In-Store Service Virus/Spyware/Malware Removal Onsite/In-Store Service Business and Residential Quick Turnaround Times 100% Satisfaction Guarantee Call 345-3999 The Tech Pros, LLC. 8DIIDCLDD98G::@9:CI6A Dr. Michael Dolby offers the latest techniques & equipment to make going to dentist easier than ever. Call today! 323-8545. FJ6A>IN6GI>C8# Your local art and frame supply warehouse. HUGE selection of art supplies, frames and school craft supplies. Every day discount of 20% off supplies and 30% off frames. Join us on Face Book and My space for up to date events and discounts. Contact our office and join our email list and receive special coupons and promotional offers. 672-0530 Boise ID

BW NOTICES GAIN NATIONAL EXPOSURE. Reach over 5 million young, active, educated readers for only $995 by advertising in 110 weekly newspapers like this one. Call Jason at 202-289-8484.

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BW ANNOUNCEMENTS

Elvis impersonator for hire. Guitarist to play oldies, 50’s, 60’s. Located in Mtn. Home. John 587-5719.

BW CLASSES

At Fuzz! New Year ~ New Project. Call for upcoming class schedules. Stop in for your winter knitting supplies at 605 Americana Blvd., 343-3899.

Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy!

;G:98=D6I:D>A8A6HH:H At Quality Art Inc in Boise for $20/ class. Students receive 40% off all products they would like to purchase the day of class. Fred currently is teaching Mon. & Tues. mornings. Please contact Quality Art Inc. at 672-0530 for more information. @>G6769O>868GNA>88A6HH:H Kira Badzic holds acrylic classes at Quality Art Inc in Boise for $20.00 per class. Students receive 40% off all products they would like to purchase the day of class. Kira currently is teaching Monday and Wed. nights and Saturday mornings. Class schedule will change after Christmas. Please contact Quality Art Inc at 672-0530 for more information. A:6GCIDCDG9>8H@>I=>HL>CI:G Novice, recreational, weekend warrior or advanced skier-learn proper skating & classic technique w/ coaches & athletes of the Bogus Basin Nordic Team. Sun., 1/10. 2 sessions, $39/session. Pick one or both 9:30-11:30am & 1-3pm. Reserve now! bbntclinic@gmail. com. All proceeds benefit BBNT, a non-profit org.

INSIDE DOPE BY ALAN ARBESFELD / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ

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BW MUSICIAN’S EXCHANGE

;G::DC"A>C:8A6HH>;>:969H Place your FREE on-line classifieds at www.boiseweekly.com. It’s easy! Just click on “Post Your FREE Ad.” No phone calls please.

20 Where to go for the big bucks? 21 Item on a toothpick 22 La ___, Calif. 23 It has a large canopy 25 Average Joes 27 Connected with 28 Rugby action

1 Crib cry 5 N.B.A. Hall-of-Famer Thomas 10 Like some waves 15 Pillow cover 19 Jessica of “Fantastic Four”

COMMUNITY POSTINGS

BW MUSICAL INSTRUCTION/OTHER

@>AGDN@D;;::@A6I8= Warhawk Air Museum is excited to announce the monthly “Kilroy was Here” coffee klatch. 1st Tuesday of every month. 10-11:30am. Warhawk Air Museum, 201 Municipal Dr, Nampa.

Three Great Stores in One Stop! Caledonia~Fuzz~Twigs and Twist. Stop by & see what we have to offer at 605 Americana Blvd. Call 338-0895.

MUSIC

NYT CROSSWORD | ACROSS

;:B6A:9GJBB:GL6CI:9 Female drummer wanted for gigging band. We practice twice a week and having your own equipment is a must. If interested please call or e-mail Heather at 353-3279. ADD@>C<;DG9GJBB:G Boise band is looking for a drummer to complete their ensemble. Must make practice and have your own equipment. If interested please contact me, Trevor at 409-9231. Original rock like material needs to be recorded. Looking for and enthusiastic keyboardist to join us. Call Ed, 389-9619.

NOTICES

| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly C L A S S I F I E D S

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Battery option Bruin great Lab inspector? Busboy’s assignment Lincoln trademark One who might be left holding the bag? 63 Sesame Street resident 64 Lay to rest 65 N, E, W and S 66 Title role for Arnold Schwarzenegger 69 French seaport 72 Not orig. 74 “You bet” 78 Stop a trip? 82 Avenue ___ ChampsÉlysées 83 Charlotte of “Diff’rent Strokes” 84 Big name in kitchen utensils 85 Boy’s name that means “the king” 86 Horace, e.g. 88 Goes to hell 89 Attack, bear-style 92 British gun 93 ___ Vivien, British poet known as the Muse of the Violets 94 Makeup boo-boo 96 Rafael Nadal specialty 101 Associate 103 “Gotcha!” 104 With 40-Across, some Election Day prizes 105 Wild 106 Lead-in to phobia 108 “Fa la la la la la la la la” and others 112 Expect, everything considered 114 Unite 116 Whitaker’s Oscarwinning role 117 Army of the Potomac commander during the Civil War 118 Seething 119 Put in the ground, in a way

120 Director Vittorio De ___ 121 Prize for Paganini 122 Country singer Travis 123 Tolkien tree creatures

DOWN 1 Target of salicylic acid 2 Jai ___ 3 Title fellow in a 1922 Broadway hit 4 Shop tools 5 Like some transfers 6 In a way 7 Communism, for one 8 Two-time loser to D.D.E. 9 Intense attraction, with “the” 10 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc., on a standard keyboard 11 Mistreatment 12 Geom. measure 13 Prefix with fauna 14 Three-time U.S. Open champion 15 Barely contain one’s anger 16 “Oh, you’re back” 17 Obliquely 18 Hoi polloi, with “the” 24 Belong 26 Like some starts 29 Dice 32 Everett of “Citizen Kane” 34 Request from 35 Windows precursor 36 Patient record 37 Home of the mask of King Tutankhamen 38 Old Coney Island’s ___ Park 39 Frequent Borat target 44 Library section, for short 46 State, e.g.: Abbr. 47 Play to ___ 48 Takes to the hills? 49 Meteor trailer? 51 “Wheel of Fortune” request 52 Obituary datum 54 20-ounce coffee size

56 Page of music 57 Does Rudolph’s job 58 1962 film set partly on Crab Key 60 Discover alternative 61 Before 65 “A woman’s ___ often opens the door to love”: Henry Ward Beecher 67 Lib. references 68 Dmitri’s denial 69 Good pal 70 Reagan White House dog 71 Having I trouble? 73 Jersey call 74 Nash and others 75 Money in Malmö 76 Put away 77 Was sycophantic to 79 Just out 80 Scruggs’s partner in bluegrass 81 “Don’t look at me!” 87 Second-rate 88 Run through 90 Trattoria offering L A S T

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91 Kitchen draw 92 Lock horns (with) 93 Back in 94 Explores with a tank 95 French term of address 97 Taoists’ locale 98 Held (up) 99 Low soccer score 100 Fund-raising option 102 Old French coronation city 106 Miles off 107 Stuck, after “in” 109 Che Guevara, e.g. 110 House speaker between Tom and Dennis 111 Some employment records: Abbr. 113 It’s not gross 115 U.K. award Go to www.boiseweekly. com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-

W E E K ’ S

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A:6GC6C:LA6C<J6<: ;DGI=:C:LN:6G At Puentes! Adult Spanish classes now formiing. Conversational Spanish that really works. 344-4270. www.puentes.biz

A:6I=:G A68:

Has All Your Adult Desires, Open 7 Days A Week. 384-5760. MEET HOT LOCAL GUYS Browse & Respond FREE! 208-472-2200, Code 5724. Visit MegaMates. com, 18+. SEEKING SEXY SINGLES. Listen & Reply to Ads FREE! Straight 208345-8855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7343. Visit MegaMates.com, 18+. WHERE SINGLES MEET Browse & Respond FREE! Straight 208-3458855. Gay/Bi 208-472-2200. Use FREE Code 7261, 18+. WILD LOCAL DATELINE Listen & Respond FREE! 208-345-8855 Code 7262. 888.MegaMates.com 18+.

BW PERSONALS BROWSE-POST-CONNECT Connect with these and many more proďŹ les on BW Love! www.boiseweekly.com/love

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WOMEN SEEKING MEN

BW ADULT ENTERTAINMENT BUYER BEWARE Whenever doing business by telephone or email proceed with caution when cash or credit is required in advance of services. Come Where Single Play. Call 208287-0343 FREE w/code 5500 Call 800-210-1010. HOT GUYS! HOT CHAT! HOT FUN! Call 208-489-2162 or 800-7778000. FREE w/ code 2982.

CHERRY BOMB Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m 21 and I like going to bars and hanging out, listening to music, a good conversation and living life. I guess Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m looking for someone with the same interests thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s around my age. gabraella, 21, #101102. ECLECTIC SWEETHEART SEEKING CO-ADVENTURER I ďŹ nd magic in singing softly while looking up at the stars. Winter is a great time to spend outdoors and I am hoping to meet someone special who would like to join me in planning adventures and making memories. Satorii, 29, #101093.

SERVICES

YOUR 4TH SHOT OF ESPRESSO Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m what would happen if Oprah got it on with Stephen Hawking & had South Park babies. Love talking about politics, religion, philosophy, science, paradigm shifts... nerdy stuff like that. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to meet fellow nerds & build on my nerdome. ShannonYouGiveGoodQuoteMorgan, 29, #101082. GEEKY OBAMA LEFTIE I am a computer geek with far left liberal political ideals. I read sciďŹ and political books, like to ride my mountain bike and my dirt bike, and hate jogging/running but like hiking. LeftOfCenter, 41, #101069. MASOCISTIC, PATHETIC, DOLL Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lived in Boise my whole life. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m the nicest girl, and I get along with just about anyone. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m addicted to movies, strong lyrics, and jeans. I have a unhealthy texting habit and I love Seattle and tattoos. redrummufďŹ n, 22, #101065. CRAZY, FUN AND LETTING GO Life is too short not to just wing it and have fun. I am a very busy lady, with a good job and several years till retirement. But I enjoy life and love to be outdoors. Openheart, 60, #101061. SUNSHINE COMING YOUR WAY. Are you looking for a really nice-looking woman who is interested in a lifetime commitment? Looking for a man about 55-69 who has a zest for life and has a great sense of humor. I am an ex-Georgia Peach. Sunny. irishlass, 64, #101057. MULTIFACETED, CHARISMATIC, TWENTY-SOMETHING SEARCHING ADVENTURE! From shopping Fifth Avenue to rafting the rivers of Idaho my interests will keep you guessing. Always on the move, I embrace the culture of my community. Motivated by friends/family, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m always looking for lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s next great challenge. UrbanAsset, 28, #101039. SWEET N NEWLY SINGLE... What can I say, I am truly an open minded, easy going girl. I love doing everything from outdoor activities and camping to reading and watching movies. I will try anything at least once! SweetGirl1981, 28, #101036. ISO SOUL MATE, BEST FRIEND,... I am a â&#x20AC;&#x153;born touristâ&#x20AC;?, well educated, great sense of humor, like movies, dining, coffee in the hot tub, affection, and romance. Must be able to laugh, hopefully well educated, and travel. Must be emotionally available, able to commit. cherub55, 54, #101029. WHO ELSE IS READY? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m honestly delightful. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d say my best character traits are friendliness, genuineness, soulfulness and all womanness. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m ready for some fun. With someone who doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take it all so seriously. Who else is ready? sweetinboise, 44, #101026.

LAIDBACK, HAPPY, SWEET, HELPLESS ROMANTIC I prefer the simple things in life, and the ďŹ ner things too. I like long walks and I always stop to smell the ďŹ&#x201A;owers. another mans trash is my treasure. pestorpet? Between the lines there is always a gray area. mcsquared, 22, #101087.

HOPING TO PIQUE YOUR INTEREST... I am a very spontaneous person and I like to surprise the one I am with. I enjoy the ďŹ ner things in life. Expect it when you least expect it. sboisean, 46, #101080.

CIRCLES Jack of all trades. what attracts me most is someone who is not afraid of life, who has talents herself (dancing, singing, playing an instrument, SOMETHING) and is of culture and worldiness. Brandon2lpol, 23, #101077.

MEN SEEKING WOMEN CELULITE IS SEXY! BHM in search of BBW. Age, race, looks not important honesty is a must. I have many interests. Looking forward to hearing from you. recarter64, 45, #101095. ENCOUNTERS SOUGHT, MAYBE WITH YOU... Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m easy going, but love to explore and have new experiences. Mostly I am looking for someone I can really connect with that respects my autonomy. blueye, 39, #101091.

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| DECEMBER 30, 2009 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; JANUARY 5, 2010 | 29


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): One of my favorite landscape painters makes a living from her art. She has garnered much critical acclaim. That’s the good news. The bad news is that she feels obligated to keep churning out more landscape paintings—even when her muse nudges her to take a detour into, say, abstract expressionism or surrealistic portraits. Galleries don’t want anything from her except the stuff that has made her semi-famous. “Sometimes I fantasize about creating a series of ‘Sock Puppet Monkeys Playing Poker,’” she told me. If she were an Aries, I’d advise her to do what I think you should do in 2010: Listen to what your version of the sock puppet monkeys are urging you to do. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): My Taurus friend Jill had a dream in which she stopped by a blackberry bush on a summer afternoon. All the ripe berries were just out of reach. She stood there, gazing up at them for a long time. Finally three people in medieval garb came by, as if they stepped out of a deck of Tarot cards—a warrior, magician and priestess. “I really want those blackberries,” she said. “Could you give me a boost?” They stooped down and she climbed on their backs, but still couldn’t reach the berries. “Oh well, we tried,” she said. “Follow us,” said the priestess. After a while, they came to another bush whose blackberries were lower. Then the four shared the feast. After analyzing the omens for 2010, Taurus, I’ve come to the conclusion that Jill’s dream is an apt metaphor for your best possible destiny in 2010. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “We should not think of our past as definitely settled, for we are not a stone or a tree,” wrote poet Czeslaw Milosz. “My past changes every minute according to the meaning given it now, in this moment.” I suggest you make abundant use of this wisdom in 2010. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you will have unprecedented power to revision and reinterpret your past. Keep the following question in mind as you go about your work: “How can I recreate my history so as to make my willpower stronger, my love of life more intense, and my future more interesting?” CANCER (June 21-July 22): I think everyone should have an improbable quest playing at the edges of their imagination—some heroic task that provokes deep thoughts and rouses noble passions even if it also incites smoldering torment. I’m talking about a goal that constantly rouses you to stretch your possibilities and open your mind; a wild hope whose pursuit makes you smarter and stronger even if you never fully accomplish it. The coming

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| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | BOISEweekly

year would be an excellent time to keep such an adventure at the forefront of your awareness.

creative energy or a breakthrough in your ability to access your own higher powers.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): A guy who goes by the name of Winter has made it his goal to visit every Starbucks in the world. According to his Web site, he has thus far ordered drinks in 9,874 stores. His project contrasts dramatically with an acquaintance of mine who calls herself Indian Summer. She is in the midst of a global pilgrimage to the hundreds of sites listed in Colin Wilson’s book The Atlas of Holy Places and Sacred Sites, including cave paintings, dolmens, medicine wheels and temples. Guess which of these two explorers I’m nominating to be one of your inspirational heroes in 2010.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You Sagittarians may wander farther and wider than the other signs of the zodiac, and you may get itchier when required to stay in one place too long, but you still need a sense of belonging. Whether that comes from having a certain building where you feel comfortable, or a wilderness that evokes your beloved adventurousness or a tribe that gives you a sense of community, you thrive when you’re in regular touch with a homing signal that keeps you grounded. According to my analysis, 2010 will be prime time for you to find or create or renew your connection to a source that serves this purpose well.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Scientific studies have proven what we all knew already: A person who’s only mildly interesting to you will probably become more attractive if you drink a couple of pints of beer. What if I told you, Virgo, that in 2010 you could regularly create the same effect without drinking the beer? I have it on good astrological authority that this will be the case. Due to fundamental shifts in your relationship with the life force, and having nothing to do with how much alcohol you consume, the entire world will often be at least 25 percent more attractive to you than it ever was before. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your limitations will be among your greatest assets in 2010. Yes, you heard me right, Libra, I’m not speaking ironically. During the coming months, you will be able to benefit from circumstances that you might otherwise imagine would prevent you from operating with maximum freedom. It might require you to look at the world upside-down, or work in reverse to your habitual thought patterns, but you could actually generate interesting opportunities, vital teachings and maybe even financial gain by capitalizing on your so-called liabilities. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Dear Rob: I sure don’t like so much God stuff mixed into my horoscopes. Can you cut it out, please? I understand it’s common for the masses to believe in an Ultra Being, but you? Pullease. You’re smarter than that. I just can’t abide all the ‘Divine Wow’ this and ‘Cackling Goddess’ nonsense that you dispense; it doesn’t jibe with the practical, sensible, unsuperstitious, nonmushy world I hold dear. —Sally Scorpio.” Dear Sally: I predict that many Scorpios will have sensational, ongoing, up-close and personal communion with the Divine Wow in 2010. You’re free, of course, to call it something else, like an unprecedented eruption of

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I am a man of fixed and unbending principles, the first of which is to be flexible at all times,” said American politician Everett Dirksen. That’s the kind of playful and resilient spirit I urge you to aspire to in 2010, Capricorn. I think you’re most likely to have a successful year if you regularly explore the joys of improvisation. The more empirical and less theory-bound you’re willing to be, the better you’ll feel. Practicing the art of compromise doesn’t have to be galling, I promise you; it may even turn out to be more fun and educational than you imagined possible. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Who and what do you hold most dear, Aquarius? I encourage you to get clear about that. Once you do, make a vow to bestow extra care and attention on them in 2010—I mean literally write out a one-page oath in which you describe the inner states you will cultivate in yourself while you’re in their presence and the specific actions you’re going to take to help them thrive. Nothing else you do will be more important to your success in 2010. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): The philosopher Nietzsche said there was no middle ground: You either said “yes” to life or you said “no.” You either celebrated your vitality, enjoyed your power and thrived on challenges, or you practiced constant self-denial, hemmed yourself in with deluded rationalizations and tormented yourself with indecision. I’m not so sure it’s always as clear-cut as that. While I’m usually in the “yes to life” camp, I’ve gone through “no to life” phases, as well as some extended “maybe to life” times. What about you, Pisces? Whatever you’ve done in the past, I hope that in 2010, you will take maximum advantage of the cosmic rhythms, which will be encouraging you to give life a big, resounding, ongoing “yes.”

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| DECEMBER 30, 2009 – JANUARY 5, 2010 | 31


Boise Weekly Vol. 18 Issue 27  

Idaho's Only Alternative

Boise Weekly Vol. 18 Issue 27  

Idaho's Only Alternative