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BOISE WEEKLY LOCA L A N D I N D E PE N D E N T

M A RC H 3 0 – A P R I L 5 , 2 0 1 6

“My friends call me the ‘Douche Whisperer.’”

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Waste Not

How the city of Boise wants to turn food waste at the dump into a boon for gardeners

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VO L U M E 2 4 , I S S U E 4 1

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN 30

Foolish History

Mapping the origins of April Fools’ Day and its surprising influence on Idaho

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Smoothing the Way

A new push is on to make the Boise Foothills more accessible to disabled users FREE TAKE ONE!


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BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BOISEweekly STAFF Publisher: Sally Freeman sally@boiseweekly.com Associate Publisher: Amy Atkins amy@boiseweekly.com Office Manager: Meg Andersen meg@boiseweekly.com Editorial Editor: Zach Hagadone zach@boiseweekly.com News Editor: George Prentice george@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Harrison Berry harrison@boiseweekly.com Staff Writer: Jessica Murri jessica@boiseweekly.com Listings Editor: Jay Vail Listings: calendar@boiseweekly.com Contributing Writers: Bill Cope, Minerva Jayne, David Kirkpatrick, Nicole LeFavour, Chris Parker Interns: Jonathan Reff Advertising Account Executives: Ellen Deangelis, ellen@boiseweekly.com Cheryl Glenn, cheryl@boiseweekly.com Jim Klepacki, jim@boiseweekly.com Darcy Williams Maupin, darcy@boiseweekly.com M.J. Reynolds, mj@boiseweekly.com Classified Sales/Legal Notices classifieds@boiseweekly.com Creative Art Director: Kelsey Hawes kelsey@boiseweekly.com Graphic Designers: Jason Jacobsen, jason@boiseweekly.com Jeff Lowe, jeff@boiseweekly.com Contributing Artists: Elijah Jensen-Lindsey, E.J. Pettinger, Ted Rall, Jen Sorensen, Tom Tomorrow Circulation Man About Town: Stan Jackson stan@boiseweekly.com Distribution: Tim Anders, Char Anders, Becky Baker, Tim Green, Shane Greer, Stan Jackson, Barbara Kemp, Ashley Nielson, Warren O’Dell, Steve Pallsen, Jill Weigel Boise Weekly prints 32,000 copies every Wednesday and is available free of charge at more than 1,000 locations, limited to one copy per reader. Additional copies of the current issue of Boise Weekly may be purchased for $1, payable in advance. Subscriptions: 4 months-$40, 6 months-$50, 12 months-$95, Life-$1,000. ISSN 1944-6314 (print) ISSN 1944-6322 (online) Boise Weekly is owned and operated by Bar Bar Inc., an Idaho corporation. To contact us: Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702 Phone: 208-344-2055 Fax: 208-342-4733 E-mail: info@boiseweekly.com www.boiseweekly.com The entire contents and design of Boise Weekly are ©2016 by Bar Bar, Inc. Calendar Deadline: Wednesday at noon before publication date. Sales Deadline: Thursday at 3 p.m. before publication date. Deadlines may shift at the discretion of the publisher. Boise Weekly was founded in 1992 by Andy and Debi Hedden-Nicely. Larry Ragan had a lot to do with it, too. Boise Weekly is an independently owned and operated newspaper.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE ONTO THE NEXT THING I don’t know about you, but the past week or so has felt a little like being dragged through a knot hole. We had Bernie Sanders in town on March 21, followed by the insanely huge Idaho Democratic caucuses on March 22. Before we could catch our breath, on March 23, Treefort Music Fest 2016 kicked off its five-day takeover of downtown Boise. Some of our reporters barely made it out alive, but we still had to contend with the waning days of the 2016 session of the Idaho Legislature, which signed off for the year on March 25. As if all that wasn’t enough, Boise Weekly was deadlining on its annual Bar and Restaurant Guide, which we sent to the printers with a sigh of relief before collapsing into the weekend. You’ll see the BRG, in all its glossy glory, inserted into the April 6 edition of BW. After a week like that, it feels good to look forward to spring, when the livin’ becomes a little easier. In this week’s paper, we take a look at a proposal from the city of Boise that might make some local gardeners’ lives easier. In 2014, BW reported on the massive amounts of edible food that end up in the Ada County Landfill. Now, the city is considering launching a curbside collection program for organic waste, which would be trucked off to an as-yet-unconstructed composting facility. The resulting fertilizer would then be offered—gratis—to residents who participate in the program. Find that report on Page 7. In another nod to the season, on Page 10, we’re featuring a piece from Dr. Roberta T. Axidea, formerly of Boise State University, examining the historical origins and cultural impact of April Fools’ Day, which this year lands on Friday. Beyond recounting the genesis of the tricksy day, Axidea also reveals some surprising ways April Fools has shaped Idaho. Finally, as the weather (supposedly) turns warmer and Boiseans start casting their eyes to the foothills, one group of users is asking planners to take their physical limitations into consideration when managing trails. Get the who, what, when, where, how and why on Page 22. —Zach Hagadone

COVER ARTIST Cover art scanned courtesy of Evermore Prints... supporting artists since 1999.

ARTIST: Wingtip Press TITLE: “Leftovers VI” supporting Idaho Hunger Relief Task Force MEDIUM: Fine Art Printmaking, relief, intaglio and planographic. ARTIST STATEMENT: Artist Statement: Wingtip Press auctions these delicious prints and dozens more to support the fine work of the

Idaho Hunger Relief Task Force. Join us at Ming Studios Thursday, April 21 from 6-9 p.m. and Friday, April 22, 5-9 p.m. for our annual exhibition and silent auction. Prints from left to right by: Tara Kennedy, Boise-Wheat Field, Storm; Sandy Craig, Wales-Aredig; Patricia L. Giraud, Oregon-Bather 3; Clayton Hollified, Washington-Flint, MI, USA; Line Marsdal, Norway-Juge Juge Juge; Cassandra Schiffler, Boise, -Charlie’s Block Toys.

SUBMIT Boise Weekly publishes original local artwork on its cover each week. One stipulation of publication is that the piece must be donated to BW’s annual charity art auction in November. A portion of the proceeds from the auction are reinvested in the local arts community through a series of private grants for which all artists are eligible to apply. Cover artists will also receive 30 percent of the final auction bid on their piece. To submit your artwork for BW’s cover, bring it to BWHQ at 523 Broad St. All original mediums are accepted. Thirty days from your submission date, your work will be ready for pick up if it’s not chosen to be featured on the cover. Work not picked up within six weeks of submission will be discarded.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | 3


BOISEWEEKLY.COM What you missed this week in the digital world.

BANG BANG IDAHO GOV. C .L. “BUTCH” OT TER SIGNED INTO L AW A CONTROVERSIAL BILL MAKING IT LEGAL FOR CITIZENS OVER THE AGE OF 21 TO CARRY C O N C E A L E D WE A P O N S WITH O U T A PERMIT OR ANY TR AINING. CRITIC S ARE CONCERNED THE NE W L AW WILL LE AD TO MORE GUN DE ATHS WHILE PROPONENTS SAY IT’S AN E X TENSION O F S EC O N D A M E N D M E N T RIGHT S . GE T MORE AT NE WS/CIT YDESK.

CHAPEL CLAIM A lawsuit challenging Coeur d’Alene’s nondiscrimination ordinance has been thrown out—except for one claim from north Idaho wedding chapel the Hitching Post. More on News/Citydesk.

BORDER BOOZE The Oregon-Idaho border might get wetter if Beaver State officials move on a proposal to privatize liquor sales. If past is prelude, Idaho will pick up some booze biz. Details on News/Citydesk.

FAREWELL TMF Treefort Music Fest 2016 is in the books but if you’re nostalgic—and hopefully no longer hungover—check out our collection of slideshows. Find them at Music/Music Reviews.

OPINION

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BOISE WEEKLY.COM


OPINION CRUMBLING FOUNDATIONS 7 Don’t fool Idaho, either BILL COPE “The more desperate parents can be convinced that the public system is beyond salvation, the better positioned education-for-profit interests are.” —from “Crumbling Foundations 1,” Feb. 16, 2011 If quoting myself from five years ago seems self-indulgent, forgive me. But after running this series through seven installments from 2011 to March 3, 2016, I’ve never found anything else said that nails more succinctly what I, and others, believe the J.A. and Kathryn Albertson Foundation is up to. That quote is exactly what the foundation’s meddling in the politics of public education is about: Parents, who understandably want the best future for their children, are being sold the false and frightening notion that if they don’t allow politicians to direct more and more public monies dedicated to education into for-profit ventures, their kids will suffer the consequences. I resurrected this series in response to the foundation’s latest spiel—its ubiquitous ad featuring a kid getting on the bus at school, but not showing up as expected at home. If I believed the sole motive behind that ad was to promote the best solutions to problems no one can honestly deny are plaguing modern education, I wouldn’t be as outraged at the disingenuousness of it. But for at least 15 years, key players in the Albertson Foundation have been investing—heavily—in the very thing they are so heavily promoting. This has to do with much more than our nation’s education policies. If you’ve ever wondered how the very rich just keep getting richer—how the rush of wealth to the “1 percent” never seems to even slow down, let alone stop—the influence that Foundation leaders have exerted on Idaho politics with ample complicity from Idaho politicians can be considered a manual on how, with enough money priming the right pumps, one can gain access to that great aquifer of steady revenue: the American taxpayer. Following is a timeline assembled largely by Grove Koger, a lifelong friend and a very picky researcher. Further information came from an Associated Press probe into the relationships between the foundation, at least one member of the corporate for-profit education community and ex-Superintendent of Public Instruction Tom Luna’s push to radically reform Idaho’s schools. There is nothing new about any of this. Most of it relates to the decade leading to Luna’s reform scheme. But as the Albertson Foundation has shown, it refuses to give up on making that scheme a reality, so must we keep reminding BOISE WEEKLY.COM

ourselves why we rejected it so decisively. • Together, Joseph Scott—the grandson of Joe and Kathryn Albertson and heir to much of their fortune—and his business partner, Thomas Wilford, founded Alscott Inc., an investment arm of the Albertson-Scott family. Wilford was installed as president of the business concern in 1993. From 1995 to 2003, he was also the president of the Albertson Foundation. Even now, Alscott and the foundation share the same address and, at least until 2011, the same phone number. • In 2002, the Idaho Virtual Academy was created with administrative direction and educational material provided by K12, Inc., the Virginia-based source of online education founded three years earlier by Bill Bennett, former secretary of education. Bennett had contributed $1,000 to Tom Luna’s first, and failed, 2002 campaign. That same year, while still the president of the Albertson Foundation, Wilford was appointed a seat on the K12, Inc., board of directors. The next year, he was named CEO of the foundation. • By 2005, the foundation was handing out grants to charter schools, including the Idaho Virtual Academy, which has grown to be the state’s largest online public charter school. Its curriculum was (and is) provided in full by K12. Wilford contributed to Luna’s 2006 campaign, as did out-of-state for-profit education concerns, including K12, whose campaign contributions ran into several thousands of dollars. Wilford’s compensation as a K12 director soared from less than $500 in 2007 to $107,114 in 2010. • In 2011, immediately after re-election, Luna introduced his reforms, relying heavily on charter schools and for-profit curriculum providers for solutions to Idaho’s public education woes—woes that were largely the result of inadequate funding from the same state leaders who supported Luna. Even while the foundation was running expensive ads in newspapers across Idaho hawking those reforms, Alscott Inc. held 826,000 shares in K12, Inc. By then, Idaho public monies going to K12 coffers was running into the tens of millions of dollars a year. Wrote Joe Miller of the AP: “All the while [Joseph] Scott’s family’s education foundation was actively promoting Idaho’s fledgling online education programs—something Luna has made a centerpiece of his reforms.” The siphoning of those public monies continues to this day. I have never claimed there isn’t room for improvement in our public schools. But the two most horrifying and damaging blunders Idaho could make is handing over our public schools and/or our public lands to private interests. Once we go there on either, we’ll never get them back. BOISEweekly | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | 5


OPINION FROM THE FAR MARGINS Leaving the parties behind NICOLE LEFAVOUR I stood on the floor of the arena looking up. I wandered the lines, the crowds and the streets filled with people waiting to get in. This was not a night about political parties. We were independents, greens, Republicans and unaffiliated voters, and Democrats had chosen to let us all in to vote. On one side of the arena the faces were mostly familiar, mostly party officials, elected officials, those who’ve carried the big tattered banner with the donkey on it—tired, worn from losing battle after battle in our state. I was one of them once. I stood on the floor of the Idaho House and the Senate pushing for what I care about. Even more than being gay, the banner weighed me down. In America we have come to believe in two banners and they’ve divided us in ways that help neither democracy nor the people policymakers are elected to represent. We rally behind one or the other banner and sling mud at the other side—at whole families, at good people, at what we perceive as greed and malice. We sling mud because winning is all that seems to matter any more. Standing in the arena I saw the beauty of no labels, no banners, just the mass of people across the ice rink from the ones who still carry the big donkey banner. Once separated, we gathered to caucus for a candidate who served as an independent in our nation’s highest lawmaking body; a Congress member who refused to take a banner there for 15 years. But the man is a realist about things that involve math. One doesn’t win without a banner in America right now— though maybe by running he has convinced us that perhaps, locally, a person can. We across the arena caucused with and without banners. We know that from a dream comes hope and work, and a way to make change. If you do not understand why so many gathered for Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, why so many threaded lines for hours to cast a ballot, think of the struggles we face. Yes, we face sexism, which burns in its cruelty, but in the face of economic stress of shrinking wages, no access at all to health care and the frustration of watching political parties play football with our lives, we choose the candidate with the small banner. Many of us who packed the west side of the arena want a president who will move us closer to a country without banners, bigotry or absurd mud slinging—one who leads by example every day. I stood on the arena floor and faced the side of the room where the big donkey banners waved and I thought about how the repeated 6 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

announcements and efforts to get us to fly a banner felt odd. I thought about how the Democratic Party’s insistence on banners is a choice it faces right now; one that could save it or sink it for another decade or two. Why were all the party officials over there on that side of the big room? How could they be that disconnected from what drives the passion of the young voters they always try so hard to court? Republicans have closed their primaries to all but those publicly willing to declare themselves Republicans. Democrats have chosen to open their doors to anyone of any political party to caucus if they choose. I’m grateful they opened their doors and raised the money the state will not pay to allow independents, greens and unaffiliated voters to vote. I worry, though, that Idaho Democrats will not see the power in radical notions; the power of making policy rather than parties important. I worry they do not understand hope and the power of working for what everyone says can’t be done. I worry they will fail to capitalize on the energy they saw and focus too much on trying to get us to fly a banner rather than engaging us to help in something like running ballot initiatives for open primaries with instant runoff elections, where the top three vote getters—regardless of political party—run in the general election. This would empower now downtrodden moderate Republicans, getting them out from under the thumb of extremist party leadership. It would open up and end skewed primaries that force all to run to the right—bringing Democrats and Republicans, Constitutionalists and unaffiliated voters together to decide who best represents our state and local communities. I cannot say if this would be good or bad for the Democratic Party, so I would not blame it if it resists such change—but I do definitely believe it would be good for our Legislature and the policy it produces. Maybe I’m alone in believing this, but I do believe it is in all of our best interest to move away from political parties and banners. Along with limiting corporate political contributions, it is a means of making these end-of-legislativesession days less a time of mourning over policy that devastates those not of a particular economic class, race, religion, sexual orientation, gender or political ilk. Nicole LeFavour is a longtime educator and activist, former Boise Weekly reporter, and served in both the Idaho House of Representatives and Idaho State Senate. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


Boise is cooking up a curbside compost plan GEORGE PRENTICE The concept of composting is nearly as old as gardening itself but, while the rise of “farm-totable” food sourcing has brought composting heaps to city-living, the idea of turning rotting waste into nutrient-rich humus remains an oddity for most urbanites. “Folks outside the city have larger lots or acreage, so there’s more opportunity to manage compost out there,” said Catherine Chertudi, Environmental Programs manager for the city of Boise. Chertudi has been talking trash at City Hall for more than 25 years, following six years at the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality and a year as an environmental paralegal in the Idaho attorney general’s office. “We have over 97 percent of Boise households currently signed up for recycling services,” she said. That’s a long way from 2009, when Boise Mayor Dave Bieter’s hotline lit up with citizens complaining about how their trash was being handled differently. Even city officials said at the time there were some “hiccups” during the rollout of color-coded trash carts, intended to eliminate the unsightly presence of mountainous heaps of curbside trash bags. Equally important was the successful introduction of curbside recycling of cans, paper and plastics. An additional glass recycling pick-up soon followed. “And today, I can tell you that we collected 12,464 tons of recyclables in 2015,” said Chertudi. Still, it turns out we still have a bit of work to do—albeit voluntarily. During a May 2014 visit, Boise Weekly witnessed tons of garbage being pushed around what is known as the North Ravine Cell, a 281-acre mound of waste that is only of the 14 stages of the 2,700-acre Ada County Landfill Complex. Among the sea of trash was a jawdropping amount of organic waste—particularly food—that was being dumped over and over and over again. The good news is Ada County was already knee-deep in what it called an historic analysis, as teams of moon-suited auditors manually sorted through the tons of garbage. By early 2015, a stunning trend had been officially chronicled: thousands of tons of so-called “edBOISE WEEKLY.COM

HHS official: “The consequences of a state rejecting Medicaid expansion are far-reaching.”

THE HYPERBOLE AND HORROR OF IDAHO HEALTH CARE

Tifani Henderson, of Diamond Street Recycling, grabs a couple of fists full of nutrient-rich compost: “We even supply it to the Idaho Botanical Garden all year. They order it by the truckloads.”

ible food” end up in the landfill. According to the odorous census, more than 53,000 tons of food waste is sent to the Ada County Landfill each year, and more than 17,000 tons of it was edible at the time it was discarded, including vegetables, fruit, bread, meat, pasta, cheese and more. “A year later, it’s pretty much the same. It just keeps coming,” said Ted Hutchinson, deputy solid waste director for Ada County. “So much of that food is tossed out when the ‘sell-by’ date has expired. A good many people think food is no good after a ‘sell-by’ date. But changing their thinking takes a good amount of time.” The analysis also revealed that we send approximately 52,570 tons of yard debris to the Ada County Landfill each year, much of it grass clippings and trimmings from bushes and trees. Not surprisingly, the survey found, 34,500 tons of that yard debris come from single-family homes in the city of Boise. The analysis concluded food waste from Boise single-family residential customers totaled more than 16 percent of total waste disposed and yard debris accounted for another 29.5 percent. The bottom line: organic waste makes up more than 45 percent of all waste delivered to the landfill from Boise homes. That means each person in Boise is responsible for approximately 390 pounds of organic materials in the landfill. Even an amateur gardener knows the opportunity of composting all of that organic

waste could yield some of the most bountiful garden beds and vegetable patches in the region. Boise city officials see that opportunity, too. According to new figures, Boise could recycle nearly 42,000 tons of organic materials each year if waste managers diverted food and yard debris to a separate composting facility. The simple but game-changing question to be placed before Boise citizens: How would you like a curbside compost service? “First of all, it’s important to stress that this is just a concept right now,” said Mike Journee, spokesman for Boise Mayor Dave Bieter. “There are a lot of players inside and outside of City Hall and they’re going to have to be a part of this in order for it to work. There are a lot of bridges to cross and quite a few off-ramps along the way.” City staff first approached Republic Services Waste Collection to consider a curbside organics collection that would be available to nearly 73,000 households. The initial proposal would include 95-gallon carts of organic waste collected weekly. However, a massive composting facility wouldn’t end up at that the Ada County Landfill. “Yes, the city of Boise approached us,” said Hutchinson, “and we placed it before the Ada County Solid Waste Advisory Committee last fall.” The committee, comprised of citi8 zens, county officials and representatives from each of the county’s municipali-

At the same time Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter, Senate President Pro-Tem Brent Hill (R-Rexburg) and House Speaker Scott Bedke (R-Oakley) were congratulating each other for what they called “a successful session”—in spite of not addressing the Medicaid coverage gap—officials with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services unveiled yet another study pointing to the ill effects of not expanding the program. “I have to say, I think we had a pretty good legislative session,” Otter said March 28, adding he had no intention of calling for a special session of the Legislature to deal with the nearly 78,000 Idahoans ineligible for health care assistance. “You have a firm commitment from the House of Representatives that we want to do something on this issue,” said Bedke. Only 72 hours before, Bedke gaveled the 2016 session of the Idaho Legislature closed, Sine Die (“without a day”), after Republican majority leadership led a tidal wave of dissent against any proposal to consider the tens of thousands of Idahoans who either make too little to participate in the state-run health care exchange or too much to be eligible for Medicaid. The House adjournment came one day after a stunning remark on the floor of the Idaho Senate from Sen. Jim Rice (RCaldwell). “Not one of those who left bloody tracks in the snow at Valley Forge did so over free health care. It’s not a right,” Rice said. Instead of referencing Rice’s hyperbole, Bedke chose to chastise Dr. Kenneth Krell, director of critical care at Eastern Idaho Regional Medical Cente. Bedke testified Feb. 2 that as many as 1,000 Idahoans have died prematurely over the past three years because the state hasn’t expanded Medicaid. “Hyperbole and horror stories. While they’re useful to a point, I think that we’ve heard those,” Bedke said 8 March 28. It’s a fair bet Bedke hadn’t heard BOISEweekly | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | 7

KE L S E Y HAWES

GEORGE PRENTICE

TABLE TO FARM

NEWS

UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA


NEWS ties, was born from the landfill analysis, inspiring more solution-based dialogue. But it turns out the committee didn’t think a composting facility at the landfill complex was a good idea, in spite of the fact that the organic waste is ending up in the dump anyway. “One of the major concerns that the committee had was that, if composting facilities are not managed correctly, they can generate quite an odor,” said Hutchinson. “And we have some neighbors that are quite sensitive to the landfill’s odor already. As a result of the odor issues, the use of the county landfill property was taken off the table.” At Boise City Hall, Chertudi said odor should never be an issue with a well-run composting operation. “Compost odors occur only when a facility is improperly managed,” she said. “Properly managed compost smells like rich soil.” Chertudi added that large composting facilities in areas that experience an inordinate amount of precipitation may experience a rapid breakdown of organics, thus triggering some unpleasant odors. “But we don’t have that here in our climate,” she said. “In southwest Idaho, we would probably have to add water to keep it working well. So again, it’s only when things are improperly managed and the compost is allowed to go anaerobic when you get those odors. Obviously, Diamond Street Recycling is doing just great with their composting and I haven’t heard a single complaint about that operation.” At Diamond Street, which is locally owned and operated by Dale and Lonnie Hope, of Boise, the operation runs clean and organized—a feat, considering it encompasses 32 acres of waste. “It’s a non-stop freeway here,” said Tifani Henderson, sitting in the Diamond Street office as a steady stream of trucks rolled through the gates. “The trucks are lined up before sunrise when we open and at the end of the day, we can barely get the gates closed.” Diamond Street cautions the public that they don’t take trash, but they gladly receive remnants from trees and shrubs ($5 per cubic yard); grass, leaves and clean wood ($3/cy); painted or treated wood ($10/cy); and concrete, gravel and mixed asphalt ($8 per pickup). The wood is constantly being chipped and shipped to both large and small farming operations for cattle and horse bedding. Mulch, in five different colors, is picked-up or shippedout, including to Diamond Street’s newest customer, Boise State University. “But it’s our compost that is a huge seller,” said Henderson, pointing to evenly cut rows of decomposing grass clippings and brush. “We lay it out and cook it for 90 days. We add a

GEORGE PRENTICE

KE L S E Y HAWES

UNDA’ THE ROTUNDA

7

Gov. Otter: “Those who suggest Republicans don’t care about the 78,000 are dead wrong.”

of the latest data from HHS. The new study shows an increasing number of people who could benefit from Medicaid expansion also have behavioral health needs. The study indicates as many as 39 percent of uninsured Idahoans ineligible for Medicaid assistance reported mental illness or substance use disorder. That percentage, according to the study, represents as many as 30,000 uninsured Idahoans. “The facts are clear. The consequences of a state’s decision to reject Medicaid expansion are far-reaching,” said Vikki Wachino, director for the Center for Medicaid and CHIP (Children’s Health Insurance Plan) Services, part of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Dr. Richard Frank, a Harvard Medical School professor and HHS assistant secretary for Planning and Evaluation, said by accessing federal funds to expand Medicaid, states such as Idaho can drill down into what he called “more vexing issues.” “This would open up new opportunities to meet other pressing mental health and health care needs,” Frank told Boise Weekly. “And states such as yours could also better address vexing problems such as homelessness through Medicaid expansion.” Meanwhile, at the Idaho Statehouse, Otter bristled at outside criticism. “Those who suggest that the Republicans in the Legislature don’t care about the 78,000 are dead wrong. We care,” said Otter. “We’re just trying to get a solution and trying not to make false promises.” As for the future, Hill and Bedke said they were looking forward to “working with the governor’s office to craft a state-based solution” over the next several months. “But the House feels strongly that there has to be a legislative component to that solution,” said Bedke. Hill echoed Bedke’s remarks, adding, “We didn’t get everything done. We’ll have some things for next year.” 7

—George Prentice 8 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Organic waste makes up more than 45 percent of all waste delivered to the landfill from Boise homes. Each person in Boise is responsible for approximately 390 pounds of organic materials in the dump.

little bit of very fine wood chips and monitor the pH and nitrogen levels. We even supply it to the Idaho Botanical Garden all year. They order it by the truckloads. But it’s available to anyone at $28 per cubic yard. We have a lot of little old ladies who want a small bucket or bushel of compost and we love when they come back to us again and again.” Chertudi said Boise’s demographic of greenthinking customers covers both ends of the spectrum. “Yes, we see a lot of older citizens who are big recyclers. They grew up with less, perhaps in the Depression,” she said. “But the other group that we see a lot of interest from are college and high-school students. They really see the need to care for the future.” As for the immediate future, Chertudi said private operators such as Diamond Street do just fine but they simply couldn’t handle a citywide compost facility. Since the Ada County Landfill is out of the question, it appears city officials are looking at Plan B. That “B” stands for “biosolid,” as in the 20-Mile South Biosolids Farm Site, 4,000 acres of city-owned land on South Cloverdale Road about 20 miles south of Boise. Better known as TMSF, the facility receives the biosolids from the city’s two main wastewater treatment plants. Treated biosolids are sold to farmers to help grow crops and, it turns out, nine acres of the site are unused and therefore being considered as a possible location for the city-run composting facility.

“This is very early in the process,” said Journee, who quickly added that it’s never too early for the city to champion more recycling efforts. “We’re always talking about sustainability here and I know that everyone knows that we’re continually talking about being the most livable city in the country. And that can mean a lot of different things to different people. But recycling is about being livable. So, yes this is part of that vision.” Chertudi said composting has been on the city’s radar for some time now. “For years we’ve offered composting classes for Boise residents,” she said, “and we even sell composting bins.” The city and Republic Services sells 75-gallon “SoilSaver” composting bins for about $60. “But we want to design a program that meets the needs of an incredibly broad range of customer,” Chertudi added. “If indeed we go down this path, we have to have a program that works as well for someone who lives in a townhome or condo as someone in traditional home.” Should the composting concept become reality, the plan would include the public and city facilities having free access to the nutrient-rich compost, with the city selling about 50 percent of the materials to commercial operations. According to an internal city document, curbside organics could be begin as early as March 2017. BOISE WEEKLY.COM


March 4-20, 2016 Idaho Public Television thanks our Sponsors, Friends and Companies whose generosity helped make Festival 2016 a success. SPONSORS

Anne Voillequé Avista Corp. Blaisdell Family Dentistry Boise Basin Quilters The Boise Columbian Club Cable ONE CH2M Citi Cards CSHQA Delta Dental of Idaho D.L. Evans Bank Downtown Boise Association (DBA) Garden Plaza of Valley View Retirement George and Bev Harad Hawley Troxell Hewlett-Packard Idaho Power Intermountain Gas Company J.R. Simplot Company James and Barbara Cimino Foundation Key Bank Meldon L. Glenn Memorial Mended Hearts Micron Foundation Mountain Monkey Business Mountain West Bank Parkwood Business Properties and Steve and Judy Meyer Pioneer Federal Credit Union Poor Ediths Primary Health Medical Group The Riverside Hotel Saint Alphonsus

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Snake River Pool & Spa / Blue Lakes Inn SUEZ U.S. Bank UBS Financial Services Walmart Westmark Credit Union Zamzows

FOOD & IN-KIND CONTRIBUTIONS Albertsons Angell’s Bar & Grill Renato Asiago’s Bardenay Big Jud’s Bittercreek Alehouse/Red Feather Lounge Blue Feather Bakery Blue Sky Bagels Boise Fry Company Chick-Fil-A City Peanut Shop CSB – Craig Stein Beverage Culligan of Southwest Idaho Dawson Taylor Coffee Roasters Deli George Extreme Pizza Flying Pie Pizzeria Goodwood Barbeque Company Graeber & Company Leslie Charles Catering Life’s Kitchen Manfred’s Catering Meadow Gold Dairy Noodles / Broadway Noodles / Eagle

Norco Pop’s Popcorn Porterhouse Meats, Deli & Catering Reel Foods Fish Market and Oyster Bar The Modern Hotel Winco Zee’s Catering Zee’s Rooftop Café Zimm’s Burger Stache

SPECIAL THANKS

CMoore Live The Cellar, Coeur d’Alene Fred Choate Colonial Theatre, Idaho Falls Idaho Shakespeare Festival, Boise Intermountain Gas Company, Boise The Knitting Factory The Morrison Center for the Performing Arts Nampa Civic Center Reel Foods Fish Market, Boise River Dance Lodge, Kooskia ROW Adventures, Salmon Salmon River Rafting Company Sumpter Valley Railroad, Sumpter, OR Sun Valley Opera, Sun Valley Sun Valley Resort, Sun Valley State and Lemp, Boise Taco Bell Arena Teton Aviation, Driggs Three Peaks Dinner Table, Driggs Warbirds Café, Driggs Wood River Inn, Hailey

BOISEweekly | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | 9


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An April Fools’ guide to Idaho history BY ROBERTA T. A XIDE A , PH. D.

“When viewed from one perspective, it could be said that April Fools’ Day adventures may have had as much influence on the shaping of the Gem State as any single governor, legislature, or historical event.” —from Fooled You Good! The Part Tomfoolery Played in Shaping Idaho, by Dr. Malcolm Flaut

on’t say we didn’t warn you. On Friday, April 1, your friends, coworkers, spouse, perhaps even your children, will be hiding your car keys, putting hand sanitizer in your toothpaste, rearranging the furniture in your cubicle, posting Photoshopped pictures of you kissing a pig or doing whatever passes for pranks in your particular social circle. The occasion—April Fools’ Day—along with only Christmas and Easter, is a day recognized by virtually the whole world for a specific activity. April Fools’ Day may be even more universal than Christmas and Easter. While the roots of this day so revered by tricksters are to be found in Middle Ages Europe (see Page 11) the perverse pleasure so integral to the day has spread throughout the New World and much of Asia. In most countries, the antics have no set traditions or official sanction, although in

neighbors could not be suppressed. In 1607, at the earliest English settlement on the North American continent, Jamestown, it is reported one of the favorite diversions among some of the younger males was to race through the fort in the middle of the night, shrieking that a band of “wild men” were attacking the outer defenses. After many a panicked response, the jokesters were ignored. However, the actual “wild men”—the indigenous Powhatan MONKEYSHINES IN AMERICA tribe on whose land Jamestown was founded—came to be so offended by April Fools’ Day got off to an the recurring joke, they eventually uneasy start in the North American did attack the fort. colonies. In territories controlled by Benjamin Franklin was the most the French, stretching from the Misprolific April Fools’ prankster in early sissippi delta on the Gulf of Mexico north to what would become French- American history. Almost forgotten is that his initial reason for flying a kite speaking provinces of Canada, April in a thunderstorm was that he was Fools’ Day was wildly popular and seen as a tribute to St. Martin of Tours trying to convince a gullible nephew (circa 325-397A.D.), the patron saint he was “angling for flying fish.” It was only after the kite was struck by lightof troubadours and jugglers. ning that he got the idea of capturing In the Puritan and Quaker electricity. It is also telling that the settlements of Massachusetts and first issue of Franklin’s Poor Richard’s Pennsylvania, frivolity and jest were Almanack was released on April 1, frowned upon, so any observance 1732—which might explain why of April Fools’ Day could earn an within it were predictions of “a deluge offender a day in the stocks. Cotton from the skye of frogges and toades Mather, the infamous prosecutor come reaping season” and an article of witches in Salem and elsewhere, actually condemned a farmer’s young detailing the best method to sow lima beans was at midnight during a full wife to death by stone crushing for moon, with the sower as “naked as a the homely offense of putting a fake newly-hatched jay.” spider on her husband’s shoulder as he ate breakfast and shrieking “April Foolishness!” when he was startled by HI-JINX IN IDAHO the hand-knotted creature. Perhaps because of the nature of Still, the impulse among the new- the earliest white people to come in comers to pull tricks on friends and consequential numbers, arranging 10 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

practical jokes on each other was a significant amusement in the Idaho Territory. They were overwhelmingly men come to find gold, and they were overwhelmingly single. With little to divert themselves from the rigors of scrabbling for precious metals—other than drinking the home-brewed hooch ubiquitous in the mining camps—they would concoct elaborate plans for trickery, whether it was April Fools’ Day or not. It was common for a sleepy miner to drop into his “glory hole” first thing in the morning and find an enraged badger or frantic bear cub in there with him, as eager as not to claw its way out of the hole using the startled miner as a ladder. The shenanigans often stretched for days and even weeks beyond April 1. The Idaho World, the earliest newspaper in the territory, reported in 1864 that a man named Oscar Pinlap went about Idaho City discreetly posting hand-written announcements that “Lop-Eared Louise,” a notorious prostitute who made the rounds of Idaho mining camps, would be “parkin her wagin on the Little Nugget Road on the evnin of April One. Bring some dust, boys. She ain’t givin it out for free.” According to the paper, several dozen men showed up and waited all night for the rolling bordello to arrive. Pinlap continued to mislead the lovelorn men, putting up poster after poster for days after, promising that Louise was coming. He was eventually discovered late one night, tacking yet another false promise to a pine tree near the center of town, and was hanged “ faster than you could loop a

Thailand and Cambodia, the day has taken on such cultural relevance that Buddhist priests wear their robes inside-out and burn incense of the most offensive odors imaginable, all to signify the capricious nature of existence. In many of the isolated villages of Bolivia and Paraguay, one man or woman is picked by secret ballot to be the Abril Tonto, and is strapped to a pole, then carried about the community from dawn to dusk by revelers who grow increasingly intoxicated on singania, a brandy native to the Andes. In Japan the day is called “When Fish Walk On Land” and among Hindi-speaking Indians it translates to “The Day Shiva Looks Askance.” Even the Inuit of Greenland have a version of April Fools’ Day, when unsuspecting seal hunters might find an unpleasant surprise stuffed into the bow of their kayaks, usually in the form of some rotting fish or walrus blubber.

noose,” as the Idaho World reported. In the years leading up to statehood in 1890, hoaxes were plentiful and carried with them political sentiments from both sides of the statehood debate. In 1888, as it became clear that statehood was likely, a rumor circulated in the southeastern parts of the state implying that if Idaho became a state, the LDS population would pick up en masse and migrate to Utah, which wouldn’t be granted statehood until 1896. It was suspected the rumors were coming from the LDS community itself, which feared that official statehood would interfere with the polygamy still common in the area. On April 1, 1889, crude posters were nailed on fence posts and sheds all over Franklin County announcing that Utah was closing its northern border at dawn of the following day, and that if “Any you Mormons whose thinking about gittin had better git gittin afore its too late.” By the end of the day, according to an item in the Preston Citizen, at least 20 families, mostly from the neighboring town of Franklin, “went scooting across the border with everything they could fit in a buckboard, even if it meant some of the extra wives had to walk along behind.” Yet another town whose destiny hinged on an April Fools’ antic was Kuna. In 1930, that settlement was little more than a one-pump gas station that sold groceries, a feed store, and a scattering of farm houses and outbuildings. Early in the morning of April 1, 1930, townspeople were surprised to see “Big Jim” McClorry

strutting down the middle of the street with nothing on but his long johns and a ragged towel draped over his shoulder. When asked what he was doing, he explained he was on his way to the “mineral muds,” which turned out to be a bare spot on the banks of Indian Creek. The spot was where Ammon Jenkins’ herd of Guernsey milk cows had beaten a path down the bank on their way to water. McClorry claimed he had been going there for days—before the sun rose so he wouldn’t be seen—to “wallow,” as he put it, in the sloppy combination of clay, composted plant material and cow dung that comprised the spot. Since this activity had seemingly cured him of both the arthritis and the drunkenness that had plagued him for years, he had decided to do it in broad daylight to let his neighbors know what a blessing they had been living next to. For weeks after, shy residents of Kuna would sneak down to the mud hole to test out McClorry’s claim, and report after report confirmed the mud’s healing properties. Psoriasis, bad backs, weak knees, heart murmurs, dropsy, nervous tics, even impotence seemed to be no match for the mud, it was said. Eventually word spread throughout the Boise Valley from Caldwell to Mountain Home of the miraculous, odiferous, muck. On warmer days there could be up to 100 people lining up for a spin in the slop. New enterprises sprang up to capitalize on the attraction and over a two-year span, Kuna’s population quadrupled. Ammon Jenkins started BOISE WEEKLY.COM


charging a $2 admittance to his property—christened the “Jenkin’s Mineral Mud Baths”—and for another 25 cents, he offered a hosing station for the guests to clean up after their wallow. He sold off his herd of Guernseys and had put together a coalition of investors for a 26-room hotel on his alfalfa field when Jim McClorry got drunk one night at the newly-opened Red Eye Saloon and bragged to everyone there that he’d made the whole thing up as a joke. Jenkins’ Mineral Mud Baths collapsed when people realized they had no reason to feel any better than before, and Ammon sold the farm and moved to Iowa to escape the ridicule. Meanwhile, Kuna had become a bona fide spot on the Idaho map, and today is one of the fastest growing communities in the state. Animals were often included in the April Fools’ revelry. Idaho children who grew up giggling at tall tales of “jack-o-lopes” might be surprised to learn these elusive creatures weren’t the first fantastical hybrids to crop up in the Gem State’s isolated places. During the early 1920s, people in town after town along the Snake River were alarmed over reported sightings of “racooyotes,” a particularly “ornery and cagey” cross between coyotes and raccoons. The beasts were said to have first been spotted in the Burley area, lurking in the heavy brush on the banks of the Snake. Even more terrifying than their existence was that the racooyotes were said to run in packs and had been seen taking down deer, free-ranging cattle and even wild mustangs that roamed the high desert south of the river. In Twin Falls County, the sheriff organized hunting parties to go in search of the “vicious, predatory abominations,” as the Burley Weekly Mailer called them, and was pleased that as many as 50 men showed up with shotguns, rifles, pistols and even sticks of dynamite, to blast the dens of the fast-breeding critters. A great deal of anxiety would have been spared the poor people of these Idaho communities had someone noticed that the edition of the Daily Mailer first alerting them to the threat of racooyotes had come out on March 31—just in time for April Fools’ Day.

THE SCIENCE OF SILLINESS Dr. Malcolm Flaut, who heads the Cultural Psychology Department BOISE WEEKLY.COM

at Northwest Nazarene University, has authored, Fooled You Good! The Part Tomfoolery Played in Shaping Idaho, exploring the unintended consequences of hoaxes, pranks and tricks throughout Idaho history. He sees April Fools’ mischief as something deeper than mere pursuit of humor. “In the sociologist’s eye, it has less to do with the false stories the pranksters are willing to spread than it has to do with what the victims are willing to believe,” Flaut told Boise Weekly. “The most successful April Fools’ hoaxes reach a fearful place in people they may not even know is there. The racooyotes, for instance.” Flaut’s book has an entire chapter exploring how a prank pulled on the residents of the panhandle mining town of Wallace by a hard-rock miner—who claimed, on April 1, 1903, he had discovered an Egyptian mummy at the bottom of the JackAss Mine, 6,000 feet underground— played an integral part in the events leading to the assassination of Gov. Frank Steunenberg. Another chapter deals with an article in this paper that had many Boiseans ready to revolt. “Boise Weekly printed a perfectly believable story that the two oldest cemeteries in the state capital were being sold to a developer, and that the bodies therein would be disinterred and moved to a new cemetery in the desert south of Mountain Home,” he said. “It upset so many people in such a visceral way that a group of armed men calling themselves the ‘Morris Hill Militia’ actually camped out in that cemetery for three nights, determined to stop the bulldozers when they arrived. It was a perfect example of how the general dissatisfaction with both government and the rampant change happening in the vicinity led to irrational behavior.” Such behavior can mark the culture, and even politics, of a state. Perhaps the best illustration of this is the “anal eels” panic around Lake Lowell in 1962. As Flaut writes, the prank had its roots in 1960, in the College of Idaho student newspaper, then called The Dandy Scholar. On March 29 of that year, three days before April Fools’, a student journalist wrote about the appearance in Lake Lowell’s waters of a pest common in Indochina, the dreaded

Mekong anal eel (Gymnothorax lennybruceus). The article told in detail of how during a fraternity hazing ritual involving a moonlit skinny-dip in the reservoir, the party was beset by the yard-long, three-inch-thick creatures, aggressively trying to gain access to the young men’s lower gastrointestinal tract. That hoax didn’t reach much beyond the C of I campus, but two years later, the short-lived Karcher Independent Weekly revived the story with an added twist: The anal eels had evolved stubby, rudimental legs and were slithering out of the water to terrorize sleeping farm animals. Worse, they had been discovered trying to climb into the beds of those who had installed pet doors in their homes. The ensuing panic lasted for more than three weeks. Anyone who lived within a mile of Lake Lowell, whether they believed the story or not, were taking no chances. They demanded action be taken, but since no one knew exactly who was in charge of the lake, most of their demands went to the Canyon County commissioners, who in turn went to the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service—neither of which had any idea what the alarmed citizens were talking about, having never heard of the Mekong anal eel. Ten days after the story appeared, a group of eight local men threw an entire case of dynamite into the waters, one stick at a time. It was estimated that between two and three tons of catfish, crappie, perch, bass, trout and bluegill—almost all of which had been planted by the Fish and Wildlife Service—floated to the surface. But not a single Mekong anal eel. Rather than admit they had been made fools of, the dynamiters returned to shore and assured neighbors and families they were confident there wasn’t an anal eel left alive in the reservoir. Residents were so relieved, a petition was circulated to urge the men to run for office on the platform that government could never perform as well as determined citizens free of bureaucratic red tape. Seven of the eight agreed to enter politics, and thus began the Idaho Libertarian Party. “The biggest danger from hoaxes may not be what people believe

is true but isn’t, but what is true, yet is discounted as a hoax,” Flaut said. “Global warming is a prime example, as well as the announcement that natural gas fracking will commence this coming summer in and around Eagle. Those people still think it’s a hoax, and will probably

THE FIRST APRIL’S FOOL While most people know the name of the month April is taken from the Latin god Aperlitifium— one of the lesser Roman deities whose duty it was to provide wine and merriment to Jupiter’s many dinner guests—few realize that references to April Fools’ Day go back at least to the mid-14th century. In 1353, Giovanni Bocaccio finished The Decameron, his collection of tales of love and lust, tragedy and comedy, most of which he appropriated from other sources. One such entry, traced by scholars to as far back as the Emperor Constantine’s conversion to Christianity, was the story of Aperlitifium being cuckolded by his goddess wife Hebredeleia and Mars, the Roman god of war, agriculture and phallic vigor. As Bocaccio wrote it, for 31 days Mars and Hebredeleia frolicked with abandon behind Aperlitifium’s back as he went about his business of procuring the finest wines and most engaging party favors to please Jupiter and his wife, Juno. On the 32nd day of the period named in Mars’ honor—March—Aperlitifium returned to his palace earlier than expected and walked in on the couple in flagrante delicto (a phrase credited to Boccaccio). Needless to say, Aperlitifium was outraged and reached for his blade. After uncoupling from Hebredeleia, Mars stood, faced the aggrieved husband and said, “I believe I got to her in time.”

continue to right up until their tap water catches fire.” Roberta T. Axidea, Ph.D., recently left her position as adjunct instructor of Comparative Mythology at Boise State University and is currently pursuing a career in podcasting.

Flummoxed, all Aperlitifium li ifi fi could think to say was Quod loqueris?—translated: “What?” Mars went on to explain he had stopped in to see if Aperlitifium needed any help getting the great vats of fruity wines to Jupiter’s palace in preparation for the feast to celebrate the advent of spring, and he’d found Hebredeleia in her bath, naked, choking on a candied ram’s testicle—in mythological contexts, one of the few items from the world of men that could penetrate a god’s immortality if not properly prepared. Mars told how he had pulled her from the scented water, threw her onto the gossamer sheets, fallen upon her repeatedly, pumping her convulsing form with his full weight until the sweetmeat dislodged from her throat and flew off his own lips to the floor, thus saving her life and preserving her immortality. As Bocaccio told it, Hebredeleia nodded her head vigorously, crying, Quod quodomo factum est, dilectissimi! (“That’s just how it happened, Sweety!”) Whether Aperlitifium actually believed this explanation, or merely pretended to, Bocaccio didn’t make clear, though he did hint that it was to the lesser god’s benefit not to start swinging swords with the God of War. Aperlitifium thanked Mars and apologized to his wife for leaving candied ram’s testicles lying about, knowing she found both sweets and testicles irresistible. According to Bocaccio, from then forward the 32nd day of March was referred to as “Aperlitifium the Ninny’s Day,” and even before the fall of the Roman Empire, it had become a day to pull tricks on one another. The tradition continued even as the new month became “April” and Aperlitifium was modernized to what it is now—April Fools’ Day.

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CALENDAR WEDNESDAY MARCH 30 Festivals & Events IDAHO JOB AND CAREER FAIR—Check out salaried, hourly, commission and own-your-own-business opportunities. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, ibleventsinc.com.

On Stage BROADWAY IN BOISE: THE MIDTOWN MEN— Don’t miss the four stars from the original Broadway cast of Jersey Boys in this one-of-a-kind concert experience celebrating the music that defined the ‘60s. 7:30 p.m. $37.50-$57.50. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1110, mc.boisestate.edu.

RACING EXTINCTION— A team of artists and activists exposes the hidden world of extinction with never-before-seen images that will change the way you see the planet. 6:30 p.m. FREE. MK Nature Center, 600 S. Walnut St., Boise, 208-334-2225.

Workshops & Classes LAWN AND IRRIGATION—Learn how to grow a beautiful lawn. 6 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library Hayes Auditorium, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, boisepubliclibrary.org. WATCH N’ LEARN ABOUT STARTUPS—Join Trailhead for a weekly discussion group covering Sam Altman’s “How to Start a Startup” video lectures. Noon. FREE-$30. Trailhead, 500 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-344-5483, trailheadboise.org.

Art

p.m. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. FOLK ART: THE DREW AND KATIE GIBSON COLLECTION— Check out BAM’s new exhibition of folk, naïve, outsider and visionary art, made possible by gifts and loans from Drew and Katie Gibson. Through July 24. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org. BOISE STATE ART METALS ANNUAL SILENT AUCTION—Through March 31, 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. FREE. R. Grey Gallery Jewelry and Art Glass, 415 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-385-9337, rgreygallery.com. FOLK ART: THE DREW AND KATIE GIBSON COLLECTION— Check out BAM’s new exhibition of folk, naïve, outsider and visionary art, made possible by gifts and loans from Drew and Katie Gibson. Through July 24. FREE-$6. Boise Art Museum, 670 Julia Davis Drive, Boise, 208-345-8330, boiseartmuseum.org.

ADONNA KHARE: THE KINGDOM—Through May 29. 10 a.m.-6

FRIDAY-SATURDAY, APRIL 1-3

I NEED TO TELL YOU SOMETHING: THE LOST ART OF LETTER WRITING—Through May 6. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Sun Valley Center for the Arts, 191 Fifth St. E., Ketchum, 208-726-9491, sunvalleycenter.org. JOSE BENITEZ SANCHEZ: PEOPLE WALKING IN SEARCH OF SUNRISE—Through April 15. 3-7 p.m. FREE. MING Studios, 420 S. Sixth St., Boise, 208-949-4365, mingstudios.org. KARL LECLAIR: PHENOMENA— Through April 15. 7 a.m.-midnight. FREE. Boise State SUB, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-1242, finearts.boisestate.edu. TVAA 6 BY SIX SHOW—Through March 31. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. FREE. Art Source Gallery, 1015 W. Main St., Boise, 208-331-3374, artsourcegallery.com. TVAA: THIS AMERICAN LIFE— Through April 8. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Boise State Public Radio, Yanke Family Research Building, 220 E. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise, 208-426-3663, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org.

SATURDAY, APRIL 2

If you’ve got game, this con is for you.

Literature SPRING AUTHOR SERIES—Romantic suspense fiction writer Diana Robinson. Noon, FREE. Boise Public Library at Cole and Ustick, 7557 W. Ustick Road, Boise, 208-972-8300, boisepubliclibrary.org.

Kids & Teens FIRST REGIONAL ROBOTICS COMPETITION—This competition pits high-school teams and their student-designed robots against each other in a fun and competitive robotic game. March 30-April 2. Taco Bell Arena, 1910 University Drive, Boise State campus, Boise, 208-426-1900. firstinspires.org/ robotics/frc.

Odds & Ends COMEDY OPEN MIC—8 p.m. FREE. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

THURSDAY MARCH 31 Festivals & Events BOISE METRO CHAMBER’S MARCH BUSINESS AFTERHOURS—Join Fisher’s Technology for live music, hosted beer, wine and appetizers. 1-7 p.m. FREE. Fisher’s Technology, 575 E. 42nd St., Garden City, 208-947-3606, fisherstech.com/afterhours.

On Stage COMEDIAN BRYAN COOK—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL—Performances include the Boise State Jazz Ensemble with Randy Brecker (4:45 p.m.), Outstanding Student Ensembles Showcase Concert (7

SATURDAY, APRIL 2

To market, to market we go.

In with the new.

GEM STATE GAMING CONVENTION

BOISE FARMERS MARKET

CENTRAL ADDITION BLOCK PARTY

Like the rise of vinyl records in a digital media world, card and board games are having a serious comeback. This year at Treefort Music Fest, the explicitly digital Hackfort hosted an Analog Gaming Happy Hour. Virtual and real gaming are pleasures shared by the same people. From Friday, April 1 to Saturday, April 3, go full analog with the Gem State Gaming Convention, hosted at the Riverside Hotel and Convention Center. Try out new games like Love Letter and Splendor at Learn to Play events, go head-to-head in rounds of Settlers of Catan, Star Realms, try your hand in Star Realms tournaments, and get serious with epic team Warhammer 40K and Bang! tourneys. One-day badges cost $10-$20, and $30 gets you access to the entire convention all weekend. Noon-6 p.m., $10-$30. Riverside Hotel, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, gemstategamingconvention.org.

When a group of vendors decided to part ways with the longrunning Capital City Public Market in 2013, more than a few people thought the idea was doomed. How, they wondered, could Boise support two separate outdoor Saturday markets within a few blocks of one another? Three years later, the only question is: Why did anyone think Boise couldn’t support two Saturday markets? With that in mind, the Boise Farmers Market is first out of the gate, opening Saturday, April 2, in the parking lot at 10th and Grove streets. This year, nearly 90 vendors are on tap to sell fresh veggies, flowers and other goodies. Many of the vendors now have locations at both the Boise Farmers Market and the CCPM, which is scheduled to start its season Saturday, April 16. See? Everybody can get along. Saturdays, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. 10th and Grove streets, 208-3459287, theboisefarmersmarket.com.

No landscape in downtown Boise has changed more rapidly than Central Addition—framed by Front and Myrtle streets, WinCo and Trader Joe’s. It was one of Boise’s first neighborhoods, sprouting up in the early 1800s and attracting the trendiest, wealthiest citizens. A raft of historic homes have been moved to other neighborhoods around the city, with one deconstructed and rebuilt as far away as Garden Valley. The revamped Central Addition will include the Fowler—a 220,000-square-foot apartment and retail guilding. The Central Addition Block Party celebrates the future, with a ribbon cutting at noon for George’s Cycles’ new shop on Third Street, bike demos, food trucks, beer tasting at Boise Brewing and live music by Sunset Goat. 11 a.m.-2 p.m., FREE. Central Addition, Third and Broad streets, facebook.com/livboise.

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CALENDAR p.m.), and Gene Harris Festival Superband with Randy Brecker (8 p.m.). For a complete schedule of events, visit the festival website. 4:45 p.m., 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. $15 day pass. Boise State SPEC, 1800 University Drive, Boise, geneharris. org/schedule.

Art 6X6 ART SHOW—Eagle Art Gallery presents 6x6 art created exclusively for the gallery. Plus wine and refreshments. 5:30-8:30 p.m. FREE. Eagle Art Gallery, 50 2nd St., Eagle, 208-938-6626, eagleartgallery.net. ST. LUKE’S CREATIVE HEALING ART EXHIBIT— Nine former patients of St. Luke’s Rehabilitation display works of fused glass, oil paint, woodwork and tempera finger paints. All artwork will be available for sale, and all proceeds will go directly to the artists. 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Hospital (formerly Idaho Elks), 600 N. Robbins, Boise, 208-4894444, stlukesonline.org.

Talks & Lectures THE PEREGRINE FUND SPEAKER SERIES: AMERICAN KESTREL PARTNERSHIP—Boise State University Professor Julie Heath and The Peregrine Fund’s AKP Director Dr. Chris McClure will discuss their cooperative research into the steady decline of North America’s smallest falcon. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. World Center for Birds of Prey, 5668 W. Flying Hawk Lane, Boise, 208-362-8687, peregrinefund.org.

Citizen IDAHO HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION MEETING—3 p.m. FREE. Idaho Human Rights Commission, 317 W. Main St., Boise, 208-3342873, humanrights.idaho.gov.

SATURDAY-SUNDAY, APRIL 2-3

FRIDAY APRIL 1 Festivals & Events 2016 FOOLS DAY SEASON ANNOUNCEMENT AND MEMBERSHIP APPRECIATION PARTY— Join The Sun Valley Center for the Arts and Company of Fools for the annual unveiling of The Center’s dynamic summer programming and of COF’s 21st season. You’ll enjoy homemade desserts, an opportunity to win COF 21st season tickets, music, wine, great company and festivities. 5:30 p.m. FREE. Liberty Theatre, 110 N. Main St., Hailey, 208-578-9122, companyoffools.org. ART SPARKS! DAY KICKOFF PARTY CONCERT ON THE LAWN—Join the Idaho Commission on the Arts on the lawn of the Warden’s House at the Old Idaho Penitentiary for this casual community concert as part of Art Sparks! Day, a social media event encouraging all Idahoans to engage in an act of art. Featuring local bands Idyltime and Afrosonics, as well as a jam session/open mic. Visit the Art Sparks! Day Facebook page for more info on how you can participate. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Idaho Commission on the Arts, 2410 N. Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208334-2119. BBP RIDING TO RAISE THE ROOF CAMPAIGN LAUNCH PARTY—Join Boise Bicycle Project at the shop to help launch the group’s campaign to raise $100,000 in 90 days for facility expansion. There’ll be FREE New Belgium Brewing beverages, group imagination tours of the new space, RtRtR bingo, and “on stage” photo ops. 6:30 p.m. FREE. Boise Bicycle Project, 1027 Lusk St., Boise, 208-429-6520, boisebicycleproject.org. BELLES AND BEAUX—Enjoy a fun girls’ night out featuring fashion, five wine tastings and hors d’oeuvres. Local wedding and fashion vendors will showcase the latest trends and designs. 5-9 p.m. $20-$25. Chateau des Fleurs, 175 S. Rosebud Lane, Eagle, 208-3869196, chateaueagle.com.

Raggedy Ann-ihilation.

SPUDTOWN KNOCKDOWN TOURNAMENT It’s hard to decide what’s the best part of a good roller derby match. There’s the retro cool of roller skates, the intimidation factor of women who could crunch you up and eat you for breakfast, the sheer athleticism of the game, the creative player names (i.e. Dawn of the Shred, Oh Yoshi Didn’t, Jane Eyre Raid, Phantom of the Dropya and Raggedy Ann-ihilation) and the miniskirts. Everybody likes mini-skirts. The Seventh Annual Spudtown Knockdown Tournament promises all of the above and more. Teams from across the country will compete at Expo Idaho in 20 bouts over the weekend. Saturday, 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sunday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; $10-$20. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, spudtownknockdown.com. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

GEM STATE GAMING CONVENTION—Check out some new games, and meet some new friends at this convention designed to help the gaming community here in Idaho grow and come together as one big scene. 10 a.m.-11 p.m. $1530. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871. gemstategamingconvention.org. MINING AND GEOLOGY MUSEUM 2016 SEASON OPENING DAY—Drop by to see the museum’s latest upgrades. Noon-5 p.m. FREE. Idaho Museum of Mining and Geology, 2455 Old Penitentiary Road, Boise, 208-3689876, idahomuseum.org.

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CALENDAR SALSA LOCA II—Enjoy dinner, drinks and dancing to the tropical beats of Salsa, Bachata, Cumbia, Reggaeton and Merengue. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. $8. Big Al’s, 1900 N. Eagle Road, Meridian, 208-615-0590, 208latindance.com.

THE PIRATES OF PENZANCE—Opera Idaho presents The New York City Gilbert and Sullivan Players in their production of this operetta. 7:30 p.m. $15-$80. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-426-1609, box office: 208426-1110, mc.boisestate.edu.

On Stage COMEDIAN BRYAN COOK—8 p.m. and 10 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-9412459, liquidboise.com. THE FUTURE SOON: A SCI-FI MUSICAL—Two young robotocists try to save the world while the girl who loves them becomes their cyborg nemesis in this Broadwaystyle musical based on the music of Jonathan Coulton. 8 p.m. $16. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, thefuturesoon.wikidot.com. GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL—4:45 p.m., 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. $15 day pass. Boise State Special Events Center, 1800 University Drive, Boise, geneharris.org. JOANNA NEWSOM—The pop star is touring behind Divers, her first new album in five years. 8 p.m. $28-$40. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, pitchperfectpr.com/joanna-newsom.

Workshops & Classes WOMEN IN THE CONSTRUCTION TRADES AND NON-TRADITIONAL OCCUPATIONS CAREER FAIR— Tradeswomen from all over the state will be demonstrating their high-paying trades that provide great benefits and financial security. Designed to introduce women and girls to the possibility of a future career in skilled trades. Call Teresa or Jason at 208-321-4814 for more info. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. FREE. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City. 208-321-4814, idahoafl-cio.org.

Art ART ZONE 208 FIRST FRIDAY— See some wonderful work by featured artists, while enjoying food, beverages, music and art demos. 6-9 p.m. FREE. Art Zone

MILD ABANDON By E.J. Pettinger

208, 3113 N. Cole Road, Boise, 208-322-9464, facebook.com/ artzone208.

Literature AUTHOR AMY ALLGEYER: DIG TOO DEEP—The Boise young-adult author will read from and sign copies of her debut novel. 7 p.m. FREE. Rediscovered Books, 180 N. Eighth St., Boise, 208-376-4229. albertwhitman.com/book/dig-too-deep.

Odds & Ends JUST BETWEEN FRIENDS MATERNITY AND CHILDREN’S CONSIGNMENT SALE—10 a.m.-8 p.m. FREE-$2. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, jbfsale.com.

Food 3RD ANNUAL SHORE LODGE CULINARY FESTIVAL—The culinary weekend kicks off with four simultaneous cooking classes and a Meet the Chefs reception. Then, enjoy the Culinary King of the Mountain competition, Farmers and Fair Trade Market, a wine education class and winemaker’s dinner, featuring Spottswood. Wrap up the weekend with an omelet class and fine dining brunch. 6 p.m. $27-$140; packages start at $481. Shore Lodge-McCall, 501 W. Lake St., McCall, 1-800-657-6464, shorelodge.com.

GEM STATE GAMING CONVENTION—10 a.m.-11 p.m. $15-30. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871, gemstategamingconvention.org. INTERNATIONAL FOOD, SONG AND DANCE FESTIVAL—Celebrate Boise State’s international population with food and entertainment from around the world. FREE parking in the Lincoln Avenue Garage. 5-8 p.m. $12. Boise State SUB, 1910 University Drive, Boise, 208-426-3652. SPRING GREAT OUTDOOR DAYS—Youth turkey hunting tips, inflatable archery range, sporting dog training techniques, fly casting and more. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Cabela’s, 8109 W. Franklin, Boise, 208-672-7900, cabelas.com. TEA AND CAKE AT MONDAES— Help Puffy Mondaes Maker Space provide low-cost pottery classes for youth and adults. Students, instructors and local potters are working to raise $5,000 to purchase new kilns.The new kilns will help lower firing costs and provide kiln time for schools. Live music starts at 7 p.m. 9 a.m.-10 p.m. $10 adv., $15 door. Puffy Mondaes, 200 12th Ave. S., Nampa, 208-407-3359, puffymondaes.com.

On Stage AN EVENING WITH LES BOIS JUNIOR BALLET—Featuring Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf, and The Puppet-show Man, based on the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale. (Children age 4 and older only.) 6:30 p.m. $11. Nampa Civic Center, 311 Third St. S., Nampa, 208-4685555, nampaciviccenter.com. COMEDIAN BRYAN COOK—8 p.m. $12. Liquid Lounge, 405 S. Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com. THE FUTURE SOON: A SCI-FI MUSICAL—8 p.m. $16. The Playhouse Boise, 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092. thefuturesoon.wikidot.com. IDAHO THEATER FOR YOUTH: THE SHAKESPEARE STEALER— Appropriate for ages 5 and up. No tickets or reservations required. 2 p.m. FREE. Morrison Center for the Performing Arts, 2201 Cesar Chavez Lane, Boise, 208-4261110, mc.boisestate.edu. LUNAFEST—Enjoy short films celebrating the unique, touching and inspirational roles of women in our communities. Followed by a

THE MEPHAM GROUP

| SUDOKU

social at 2 p.m. Proceeds benefit the Breast Cancer Fund and Soroptimist International of Boise. 12:30 p.m. $15. The Flicks, 646 Fulton St., Boise, 208-342-4222, lunafest.org/boise0402. TEDXBOISE 2016: REFRAMING RADICAL— Who is radical and should we listen to them? Find out at TEDxBoise 2016, a day of diverse, reframed, possibly radical new perspectives. 1-9 p.m. $93. Egyptian Theatre, 700 W. Main St., Boise, 208-345-0454, tedxboise. org/2016.

Workshops & Classes BEST PRACTICES FOR PLANTING, SOIL PREP AND IRRIGATION—11 a.m. FREE. Madeline George Garden Design Nursery, 10550 W. Hill Road, Boise, 208995-2815, madelinegeorge.com. PRINTMAKING WITHOUT A PRESS—12:30-4 p.m. $20-$45. Idaho Parents Unlimited, 4619 Emerald, Ste. E, Boise, 208-3425884, treasurevalleyartistsalliance. org/workshops. SPRING CONTAINERS—10 a.m. FREE. FarWest Garden Center, 5728 W. State St., Boise, 208-8534000, farwestgardencenter.net. TREE PLANTING AND PRUNING DEMONSTRATION—10 a.m.-Noon, FREE. Lakeview Park, Garrity Boulevard at 16th Avenue North, Nampa. 208-468-5858, nampaparksandrecreation.org.

Sports & Fitness

SATURDAY APRIL 2

ELITE RODEO ATHLETES LEAGUE OF RODEO CHAMPIONS—Enjoy two nights of nonstop rodeo competition, including bull riding, bareback riding, saddle bronc riding, steer wrestling, tie-down roping, team roping and barrel racing. 7:30 p.m. $32-$77. Ford Idaho Center, 16200 Idaho Center Blvd., Nampa, 208-468-1000, eraprorodeo.com.

Festivals & Events CENTRAL ADDITION BLOCK PARTY—Celebrate the creation of the new Central Addition LIV District with booths, a raffle benefiting Ridge to Rivers, bike demos, food trucks, Boise Brewing tastings and live music by Sunset Goat. At noon, there’s a ribbon cutting for George’s Cycles new shop at 312 S. Third St. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. FREE, Third and Broad Streets. facebook. com/livboise.

14 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

7TH ANNUAL SPUDTOWN KNOCKDOWN ROLLER DERBY TOURNAMENT—Don’t miss this competitive tournament, featuring teams from Arizona, California, Canada, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah and Washington. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. $10-20. Expo Idaho 5610 Glenwood St., 208-287-5650, spudtownknockdown.com.

COUNTY LINE BREWING ANNIVERSARY BLOCK PARTY—Celebrate one year of great beer with County Line Brewing. Food will be provided by Big Mike’s Tids and Bits. With live music by the Big Wow Band from 6-9 p.m. For all ages. 6-10 p.m. FREE. County Line Brewing, 9115 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-830-2456.

Complete the grid so each row, column and 3-by-3 box (in bold borders) contains every digit 1 to 9. For strategies on how to solve Sudoku, visit www.sudoku.org.uk.

CWI COMIC CON—The first CWI Comic Con features panels, contests, an artist alley, workshops and more. 1-8 p.m. FREE. College of Western Idaho, 5725 E. Franklin Road, Nampa, 208-562-3000, facebook.com/cwistudentlife.

Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under odds and ends for the answers to this week’s puzzle. And don’t think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

VERTICAL ENDURANCE BOISE SPRING RUNS 5K, 10K, HALF MARATHON—7:45 a.m.-noon. $14.71-$64.29. Barber Park, 4049 Eckert Road, Boise. 208-340-4837, verticalendurance.com.

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

© 2013 Mepham Group. Distributed by Tribune Media Services. All rights reserved.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CALENDAR Kids & Teens

Odds & Ends

COMMUNITY COLLEGE 101—The CWI Enrollment Team can help you understand the admissions and financial aid processes. 2-4 p.m. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 208-9728200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

JUST BETWEEN FRIENDS MATERNITY AND CHILDREN’S CONSIGNMENT SALE—9 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE-$2. Expo Idaho (Fairgrounds), 5610 Glenwood St., Garden City, 208-287-5650, jbfsale.com.

UNITED WAY CHILDREN’S BOOK DRIVE KICKOFF PARTY—First 100 kids to take five or more used kids books will receive a $5 Barnes and Noble gift certificate. 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. FREE. Barnes & Noble Booksellers, 1315 N. Milwaukee, Boise, 208-375-4454, unitedwaytv.org.

Food SHORE LODGE CULINARY FESTIVAL—9 a.m.-6:30 p.m. $26.75$139.96. Shore Lodge-McCall, 501 W. Lake St., McCall, 1-800-6576464, shorelodge.com.

SUNDAY APRIL 3 Festivals & Events GEM STATE GAMING CONVENTION—10 a.m.-11 p.m. $15-30. Riverside Hotel, 2900 Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871. SPRING GREAT OUTDOOR DAYS—10 a.m.-1 p.m. FREE. Cabela’s, 8109 W. Franklin, Boise, 208-672-7900, cabelas.com.

On Stage COMEDIAN BRYAN COOK—8 p.m. $10. Liquid Lounge, 405 S.

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

Eighth St., Boise, 208-941-2459, liquidboise.com.

Kids & Teens

IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION—Nashville writers Sergio Web, Larry Dean and Gail Davies. 3 p.m. $10-$25. Cinder Winery, 107 E.44th St., Garden City, 208-3764023, cinderwines.com.

GIRLOLOGY AND GUYOLOGY HEALTH PROGRAMS—Doctors help start conversations about adolescent health. Fourth- and fifth-graders are invited to the Puberty Program: girls and parents 1-3 p.m.; boys and parents 4-6 p.m. $65-$98. St. Luke’s Anderson Center, 100 E. Idaho, 208-381-9000, girlology.com.

Sports & Fitness SPUDTOWN KNOCKDOWN ROLLER DERBY TOURNAMENT—8 a.m.5 p.m. $10-20. Expo Idaho, 5610 Glenwood St., 208-287-5650. spudtownknockdown.com.

Food SHORE LODGE CULINARY FESTIVAL—9 a.m. $26.75-$139.96. Shore Lodge-McCall, 501 W. Lake St., McCall, 1-800-657-6464, shorelodge.com.

MONDAY APRIL 4 Festivals & Events VETERANS HOUSING OUTREACH—Veterans can get connected with essential services like housing and medical care on Mondays in the Simplot Room. Bryan Bumgarner of Healthcare for Homeless Veterans from the Boise VA Medical Center, will be on hand to lend a helping hand, so vets are encouraged to drop by. 10:30 a.m.-noon. FREE. Boise Public Library, 715 S. Capitol Blvd., Boise, 18 208-972-8200, boisepubliclibrary.org.

BOISEweekly | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | 15


– t s u r T n a c u o y s r ! e e c m a r r a T F n a c u o y Food

Every Saturda

Opening This Sat Tamales Nelly

REAL FARMERS

10th &

Every Saturday –

firefly Garden art

16 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly 

B O ISE WE E KLY.C O M


ay - 9 am-1 pm

turday April 2nd – REAL FOOD

Grove

– 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

B OI S E WEEKLY.C O M

ARTISAN BAKERY

BOISEweekly | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | 17


CALENDAR On Stage 15

BCT 5X5 READING SERIES: ERIC COBLE— Eric Coble’s new play, In Vivo, is a riveting exploration of faith and community in small-town America. Then stick around for a discussion with the actors, directors and others who bring these remarkable works of art to life. 7 p.m. $8-$12. Boise Contemporary Theater, 854 Fulton St., Boise, 208-331-9224, bctheater.org. ONE MIC STAND COMEDY—8-10:30 p.m. FREE. The Playhouse Boise (formerly AEN Playhouse), 8001 W. Fairview Ave., Boise, 208-779-0092, playhouseboise.com.

Talks & Lectures BORAH SYMPOSIUM: SAMANTHA NUTT— Join award-winning humanitarian, bestselling author and acclaimed public speaker Samantha Nutt for “The World is Your Backyard” at the University of Idaho’s 2016 Borah Symposium. A medical doctor and founder of the renowned international humanitarian organization War Child, Nutt has worked with children and their families at the frontline of many of the world’s major crises. 7 p.m. FREE. Borah High School, 6001 Cassia, Boise, 208-322-3855, uidaho.edu/class/borah/2016schedule.

Citizen

PRINTMAKING APRIL PANEL—Artist and educator Cassandra Schiffler leads a panel of distinguished artists to discuss the unique art form of printmaking. 6:30-8 p.m. FREE. Idaho Parents Unlimited, 4619 Emerald, Ste. E, Boise, 208342-5884, treasurevalleyartistsalliance.org.

SPECIAL OLYMPICS FUEL THE PASSION RAFFLE—Help Special Olympics Idaho fuel the passion of their athletes on and off the field and maybe win a 2016 Toyota Tacoma SR5 4x4 Access Cab pickup valued at more than $30,000. Second prize is an Idaho Steelhead fishing trip for two. Drawing held Saturday, June 11. Buy tickets at the Special Olympics office, by phone or at idso. org. Monday-Friday, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. $10. Special Olympics Idaho, 199 E. 52nd St., Garden City, 800915-6510, idso.org.

TUESDAY APRIL 5

TUESDAY DINNER—Volunteers needed to help cook up a warm dinner for Boise’s homeless and needy population, and clean up afterward.

Art

On Stage IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION WCA FUNDRAISER—Join the tribute to the outstanding Treasure Valley women who are selected each year for special recognition by the Women’s and Children’s Alliance of Boise. Featured musicians include Steve Eaton and the Grateful Dudes, plus Clay Moore, LeAnne Town, Deborah Day and Gayle Chapman. All proceeds benefit the WCA. 7:30 p.m. $10$15 adv., $12-$17 door. Riverside Hotel Sapphire Room, 2900 W. Chinden Blvd., Garden City, 208-343-1871. facebook.com/ idahosongwriters.

E VENT S

Event is nondenominational. 4:30-7:30 p.m. FREE. Immanuel Lutheran Church, 707 W. Fort St., Boise, 208-344-3011.

Odds & Ends FLYING M TRIVIA NIGHT—Enjoy a spirited competition filled with your favorite music between questions. Prizes include a $30 Flying M gift card for first place, $20 for second, and $10 for third. Produced by Last Call USA. 7 p.m. FREE. Flying M Coffeegarage, 1314 Second St. S., Nampa, 208-467-5533. ISU-MERIDIAN FREE HEARING SCREENINGS—Get your hearing checked for FREE by ISU speechlanguage pathology graduate students, supervised by licensed speech-language pathologists. No appointment necessary. Call 208373-1725 with questions. For ages 3 years and up. 3-6 p.m. FREE. ISU-Meridian, 1311 E. Central Drive, Meridian, isu.edu/meridian, 208-373-1725.

Food 1ST TUESDAY COMPLIMENTARY WINE TASTING—Enjoy complimentary wine tastings on the first Tuesday of the month. Like what you taste? Get a glass for $2 off or $5 off a bottle to consume or to go. 6-8 p.m. FREE. Rice Contemporary Asian Cuisine, 228 E. Plaza St., Eagle, 208-939-2595, riceeagle. com.

visit our boiseweekly.com for a more complete list of

calendar events.

EYESPY

Real Dialogue from the naked city

Workshops & Classes BOISE CERTIFIED SCRUMMASTER (CSM) WORKSHOP—This highly interactive two-day course not only provides the fundamental principles of Scrum, it also gives participants hands-on experience through a variety of interactive exercises. Facilitated by Certified Scrum Trainer Bob Sarni. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $1,049. Holiday Inn Express BoiseUniversity Area, 475 W. Parkcenter Blvd., Boise. 309-531-1035, bit.ly/ Boise_April_CSM.

Overheard something Eye-spy worthy? E-mail production@boiseweekly.com

18 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


NOISE SWEET AND SOUR Say ‘yes’ to Yuck’s Stranger Things CHRIS PARKER The word “yuck” is perhaps not the most generous association possible for a band, but like a car crash or Twitter, there’s an undeniable attraction to things that repulse. That same approach/avoidance dynamic is at play on the U.K. quartet Yuck’s third album, Stranger Things (Balaclava Records, Feb. 2016), which clothes unpleasant feelings and expressions of disconnect in sweet, chunky/shimmering rock melodies. While singer/guitarist Max Bloom said he has heard others describe Yuck’s sound as a sweet-andYuck frontman Max Bloom (holding goose) said “a difficult couple of years” led to Stranger Things. sour combo, “I definitely wasn’t aware of that. I think it’s because music and lyrics are to quite different things to me. When I’m playing music, I’ll From the outset, Bloom and Blumberg weren’t the same flat where they recorded their first album hum words along or say phrases that don’t really and self-produced it. make sense over the music and then kind of fill in sure their alt-punk amalgam would succeed. “The second album was a very difficult album “[I]t was something we really believed in and the gaps a bit later.” to make for a number of reasons, but I’m still we were willing to risk sort of everything for it,” The loping psych-pop flavored “I’m OK” extremely proud of it. This record I wanted just Bloom said. “It probably has something to do laments losing “someone to rely on / got no shoulder to cry on.” Elsewhere Bloom notes how with the fact that we were really young and naive, to learn from everything that we had done in the past,” Bloom said. “It wasn’t easy working with a and we were willing to put 100 percent of our hard it is to be “Two Hearts In Motion,” while lives into it. So yeah, we really believed in it, but it producer, so I just wanted to make an album that the Big Star-ish title track, asks “Why do you was completely on our terms and from the heart, could’ve easily crashed and burned.” feel sad over a girl? / It’s hard to think we were essentially, and that’s what I feel like I’ve done.” The needle-pegging fuzz won over many always meant to be.” He hinted at a sense of frustration with the While the music is bright and ringing, the lyri- critics and raised expectations. Perhaps it wasn’t last album’s level of production, but didn’t want what Blumberg had in mind. While the band cal tone is more melancholy—not an altogether to get into it. waited to record its follow-up, he was tinkering uncommon pairing. “I don’t really like thinking about the past,” with his personal project, Hebronix. Ultimately, “I quite enjoy writing about myself and I Bloom said. guess I enjoy writing lyrics about quite mundane Yuck took a backseat and Blumberg left the “I just wanted to make an album’s worth of band. In an interview a month after the breakup things. I guess lyrically it was pretty inspired by things that I had been going through for the last was announced in 2013, Blumberg described his really fun songs that would be easily translatable when performing them live, just so that we don’t departure as “the way that Max few years,” Bloom said. “It’s have to make any sacrifices,” he added. “When and I can best progress.” been a difficult couple of years YUCK There’s more to it than that, of you get carried away in the studio it’s quite frusand it’s just something that I With Big Thief and Western trating that you can’t bring that to the stage … course, but Bloom’s not spilling. wanted to write about because Daughter. Thursday, March 31; 7 p.m. doors; $10 advance, $12 and I disagree on every level with backing tracks.” “There’s definitely a lot more it felt cathartic.” door. Neurolux, 111 N. 11th St., Yuck’s sound has evolved since that first althat happened during that time, Yuck first burst on the scene 208-343-0886, neruolux.com. bum, even though it’s always been Bloom writing but a lot of that I probably don’t with its eponymous 2011 dethe music—that’s the nature of Bloom’s muse, want to talk about,” he said. “I but, beating peers to the punch guess there was a lot of stuff that he wanted to do which finds it hard to sit still, and explains how by biting into that late-’80s/early-’90s alt-rock alt-rock gave way to Glow & Behold’s shoegaze and I guess he couldn’t commit at the end of the crunch. Yuck was the brainchild of Bloom and vibe and the lively power/psych-pop flavors of Daniel Blumberg, childhood chums whose band, day. So we decided to carry on. That’s the most Stranger Things. simplistic way of talking about it.” Cajun Dance Party, earned them some attention “That’s just the way I make albums,” Bloom While Blumberg had written the lyrics and as teens and resulted in 2008’s The Colourful Life, come up with the vocal line, the songs themselves said. “I enjoy listening to albums that take produced by Suede guitarist Bernard Butler. you on a journey and sort of explore different were Bloom’s. Producer Chris Coady (Smith They bailed before the band imploded and Westerns, Beach House) helped them record Glow avenues rather than just listening to an album threw themselves into Yuck, indulging shared that’s just sort of the same tone from start to & Behold (Mercury Records, Sept. 2013), but it interests in American alt-rock acts like the Pixies, finish. So I guess that’s just the path that things wasn’t a pleasant process. Replacements and Dinosaur Jr., as well as classic For Stranger Things, Yuck members returned to naturally took.” U.K. punk like Alternative Television and Wire. BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | 19


AB I G A I L G I L L A RD I

LISTEN HERE

X AMBASSADORS, MARCH 30, KNITTING FACTORY If you watch American Idol, The Voice or X Factor, you’ve probably heard X Ambassadors even if you’ve never heard of X Ambassadors. The Brooklyn-based alt-rock band released its label debut EP Love Songs, Drug Songs (Interscope, 2013) three years ago, but emotional lyrics and driving rhythms sent XA tunes charging up the charts. Coupled with lead vocalist Sam Harris’ impassioned delivery and effortless falsetto, XA’s anthemic songs are ideal for singing competition contestants who want to show off their chops. Less than a year ago, XA dropped its full-length debut VHS (KidInAKorner/Interscope, 2015), which hit No. 7 on the Billboard 200. It’s a dense 20-tracks, featuring Imagine Dragons and XA label mate Jamie N Commons. It also features the single “Unsteady,” which is covered by hopeful singers across the world in hopes it’ll be their big break—or at least convince Adam Levine or Blake Shelton to turn around. —Amy Atkins With Seinabo Sey and Savior Adore. 7:30 p.m., $40. The Knitting Factory, 416 S. Ninth St., 208-367-1212, bo.knittingfactory.com.

20 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

MUSIC GUIDE WEDNESDAY MARCH 30

THURSDAY MARCH 31

FRIDAY APRIL 1

ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

BEN BURDICK TRIO WITH AMY ROSE—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

ALMOST FAMOUS KARAOKE—9 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CRUNK WITCH AND GIRL PUKE—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

CULLEN OMORI—With Living Hour. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux

DOUGLAS CAMERON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

ART SPARKS! DAY KICKOFF PARTY CONCERT ON THE LAWN—Featuring Idyltime and Afrosonics, with a jam session/ open mic. 4-7 p.m. FREE. Idaho Commission on the Arts, 2410 N. Old Penitentiary Road.

FLO ELECTRONIC LIVE MUSIC AND DJ’S—9:30 p.m. FREE. Liquid JACK HALE—5 p.m. FREE. Schnitzel Garten JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers JOHNNY AND JEN—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel REBECCA SCOTT BAND—6 p.m. FREE. Highlands Hollow STEVE EATON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 WEDNESDAY NIGHT JAM— Hosted by The Blind Mice. 8 p.m. Grainey’s X AMBASSADORS: THE VHS TOUR 2.0—7:30 p.m. $18-$40. Knitting Factory

FRIM FRAM FOUR—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL— For a complete schedule of events (including daytime workshops), visit the festival website. 4:45 p.m., 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. $15 day pass. Boise State Special Events Center

BIG WOW BAND—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

JEREMY STEWART—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers KAYLEIGH JACK—9 p.m. FREE. Varsity Pub OPEN MIC WITH UNCLE CHRIS—7 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s SPENCER BATT—6 p.m. FREE. Meriwether Cider TYLOR BUSHMAN TRIO—7 p.m. FREE. Lock Stock & Barrel YUCK—With Big Thief. 7 p.m. $10 adv., $12 door. Neurolux

STEVE EATON AND JON KLIEN—6 p.m. FREE. Courtyard by Marriott Meridian REX MILLER AND RICO WEISMAN—5:30 p.m. FREE. Berryhill SALSA LOCA II—8 p.m. $8. Big Al’s SASSAFRAZZ—Featuring The Frazzette Singers; produced by Robert Sutherland. 7:30 p.m. $12$15 adv., $15-$18 door. Sapphire SEAN HATTON—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

BREAD AND CIRCUS—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

SUNFLOWER BEAN AND WEAVES—8 p.m. $8 adv., $10 door. Flying M Coffeegarage

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

UNDEROATH—With Caspian. 7:30 p.m. $23.50-$55. Knitting Factory

GENE HARRIS JAZZ FESTIVAL— 4:45 p.m., 7 p.m. and 8 p.m. $15 day pass. Boise State Special Events Center

WHITAKER AND OLIVER—7:30 p.m. FREE. High Note

HANG ELEVEN—10 p.m. $5. Reef HOOCHIE COOCHIE MEN—7 p.m. FREE. Sockeye-Cole JOANNA NEWSOM: DIVERS TOUR—8 p.m. $28-$40. Egyptian JOHN JONES TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

SATURDAY APRIL 2 ANDREW SHEPPARD BAND— 8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s BILL COURTIAL AND CURT GONION—6 p.m. FREE. Berryhill BILLY BRAUN—2 p.m. FREE. Artistblue

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


MUSIC GUIDE CHUCK SMITH TRIO WITH NICOLE CHRISTENSEN—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

OPEN MIC WITH REBECCA SCOTT AND ROB HILL—8 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

COUNTY LINE BREWING ONEYEAR ANNIVERSARY BLOCK PARTY—Big Wow Band. 6 p.m. FREE. County Line Brewing

SNOG—8 p.m. $5. Liquid

DJ REVOLVE—11 p.m. FREE. Neurolux

TUESDAY APRIL 5

FRANK MARRA—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

CASEY KRISTOPHERSON—7 p.m. FREE. Liquid

IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION: SERGIO WEB, LARRY DEAN AND GAIL DAVIES—With Jim Fishwild. 7:30 p.m. $10-$25. Cinder Winery

CHUCK SMITH TRIO—8 p.m. FREE. Chandlers

MICHAEL DUNTON—7:30 p.m. FREE. The District $OUL PURPO$E—10 p.m. $5. Reef POSSUM LIVIN’—9 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s RED LIGHT CHALLENGE—7 p.m. FREE. High Note ROB HARDING—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 ROOFTOP REVOLUTION: A BEATLES TRIBUTE—7:30 p.m. $10-$15 adv., $15-$20 door. Sapphire

ESTEBAN ANASTASIO—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THE FABULOUS BLUE RAYZ—7 p.m. FREE. Sockey-Cole GAYLE CHAPMAN—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365

IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION WCA FUNDRAISER— Featuring Steve Eaton and the Grateful Dudes, with Clay Moore, LeAnne Town, Deborah Day and Gayle Chapman. 7:30 p.m. $10$15 adv., $12-$17 door. Sapphire JEANNE SQUARED—5:30 p.m. FREE. O’Michael’s MICHAEL BARRIATUA AND CURT GONION—6 p.m. FREE. Courtyard by Marriott Meridian MICHAELA FRENCH—7 p.m. FREE. High Note RADIO BOISE TUESDAY: HAYBABY—With Jerkagram and We Are Apes. 7 p.m. $5. Neurolux THE RINGTONES—8:45 p.m. FREE. Pengilly’s

V E N U E S Don’t know a venue? Visit www.boiseweekly.com for addresses, phone numbers and a map.

LISTEN HERE

SERGIO GONZALES-GONZALEZ—11 a.m. FREE. High Note STEAM PUNK MASQUERADE BALL—9:45 p.m. $5. Liquid ZACK QUINTANA BAND—7 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s

SUNDAY APRIL 3 BILLY BRAUN—6 p.m. FREE. WilliB’s IDAHO SONGWRITERS ASSOCIATION: SERGIO WEB, LARRY DEAN AND GAIL DAVIES—With John Hansen. 3 p.m. $10-$25. Cinder Winery NOCTURNUM LIVE INDUSTRIAL DJ’S—10 p.m. FREE. Liquid THE SIDEMEN: GREG PERKINS AND RICK CONNOLLY—6 p.m. FREE. Chandlers THOMAS PAUL—11 a.m. FREE. High Note

MONDAY APRIL 4 ATLAS GENIUS—With Skylar Grey and Secret Weapons. 8 p.m. $17$35. Knitting Factory CHUCK SMITH—5:30 p.m. FREE. Chandlers DUANE PETERS GUNFIGHT—8 p.m. $TBA. The Shredder FRANK MARRA—5 p.m. FREE. Bar 365 MONDAY NIGHT OPEN MIC WITH CRAIG SLOVER—6:30 p.m. FREE. Gelato OPEN MIC—7 p.m. FREE. High Note

BOISE WEEKLY.COM

JOANNA NEWSOM, APRIL 1, EGYPTIAN THEATRE Musicians often strive to avoid being pigeonholed, which is something singer-songwriter-multi-instrumentalist Joanna Newsom will never have to worry about. Like her pixie-powerful predecessors Kate Bush, Bjork and Fiona Apple, Newsom’s ethereal features, whisper-to-a-scream vocals and intricate, history-lesson lyrics lend her an unearthly quality. Adding to her enigmatic nature, Newsom plays the harp, an unconventional (and unwieldy) instrument, particularly in pop music. Even music videos, like those for “Divers” and “Sapokanikan” from Newsom’s latest album Divers (Drag City, Oct. 2015) fall into the “unable-to-categorize” category, thanks to director Paul Thomas Anderson (There Will Be Blood, Magnolia), who cast her in 2014’s Inherent Vice, his eponymous film based on the 2009 novel by inscrutable author Thomas Pynchon. Newsom’s music can be as difficult to describe as it is to . In a review of Divers, The New York Times wrote of how her music “reflects the serious singer-songwriter folk-pop of the 1970s, American folk traditions, art song and operetta,” and how her voice is a “wild bunch of tonal shadings.” What is easy about Newsom, however, is recognizing what a gifted musician she is. Easier yet is seeing her live in Boise on Friday, April 1. No fooling. —Amy Atkins With Robin Pecknold. 8 p.m., $28-$40, bo.knittingfactory. com. Egyptian Theatre, 400 W. Main St., 208-387-1273, egyptiantheatre.net. BOISEweekly | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | 21


RECREATION

COURTESY OF PAT DOUGHERT Y

JES SICA MURRI

REC NEWS

THE PATH OF LESS RESISTANCE

Annalisa DeMarta and Ken Johnson plan to open the Lone Cone storefront in early May.

LONE CONE OFFERS PERSONAL PERSPECTIVE TO OUTDOOR GEAR The first business venture for husband and wife Ken Johnson and Annalisa DeMarta was selling rare books online. The couple soon realized estate sales and auctions aren’t as fun as the great outdoors, so they moved from Rochester, N.Y., to Idaho—Ken’s home state—and started selling outdoor gear instead. In January, the couple launched lonecone.com, selling everything from backpacks, ultralight stoves and hammock tents to Boise-inspired apparel and handcrafted German Montessori toys. Now, Johnson and Demarta are opening a storefront on Thursday, May 5, at 412 S. Sixth St. “We’re trying to build a community at Lone Cone,” Johnson said. “Our niche is in the everyday-ness of the outdoors. There’s a lot of technical talk about gear if you go into a specialty shop, and people are going to talk right over your head. Our goal is to make outdoor gear accessible to people.” Though the storefront is a fraction of the size of the Lone Cone warehouse in Meridian, the walls are filled with colorful displays of Deuter and Lowe Alpine backpacks, St. Croix fly rods, sleeping bags, LuminAID solar-powered lanterns and shelves of Forsake footwear. Vintage backpacks and outdoor gear scattered around the store are a reminder of the advances in outdoor products over the years. “We sell the products that we love and use,” said DeMarta. “We have three kids [ages 4, 3 and 1 years old], so that dictates how we get into the outdoors.” “Camping isn’t as much of a hardcore experience anymore,” Johnson added, “but it feels intense going camping with three little kids. They’re fascinated by the rocks in the stream. They don’t even need to see a moose. A bee is just as exciting.” What’s exciting for Johnson and DeMarta is raising their kids in a city surrounded by wilderness. “When you go to the river [in upstate New York], there’s a 100-yard section open to fishermen and they’re standing elbow to elbow, combat fishing for these little six-inch pikes and it’s crazy,” Johnson said. “It was killing me inside. We could have set this business up anywhere on the planet, but we came here just to have access to the outdoors.” —Jessica Murri 22 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Ridge to Rivers looks at ways to make foothills trails more accessible JESSICA MURRI Jeremy Maxand is bored of the Boise Greenbelt. He takes his hand bike out occasionally, but gets overwhelmed by the pedestrians, cyclists, kids, dogs, construction and chaos of the paved path along the Boise River. It’s not the experience Maxand wants when he gets outside. He wants to get above the city, away from the people, and reach a plateau with a nice view. Maxand wants to get into the Boise Foothills, but he can’t. “Even if you were to get to the trails, the trailheads are impossible,” Maxand said. “There are metal gates, and it’s those sorts of barriers that took that trail off the map, right at the trailhead.” Maxand is in a wheelchair because of a “totally random neurological thing” called transverse myelitis that developed when he was 14. It’s rare and acute, affecting its victims’ spinal column. Within a year, Maxand lost the ability to walk. “That’s it. Boom,” he said. “But it’s all good.” Now, he’s executive director of Life’s Kitchen (see Citizen, Page 25) but, in his spare time, he’s working with Ridge to Rivers to make the trails in the foothills more accessible. Ridge to Rivers staff is currently drafting its first-ever 10-year management plan for the Boise Foothills, and Maxand wants to make sure trail accessibility is addressed. So far, he’s hosted a meeting with a handful of other chair users to talk about how the foothills trails could change. He sent out an online survey to people with physical disabilities such as visual and hearing impairments and mobility challenges. He received nearly 50 responses detailing what trails they visit and what kind of changes they’d like to see. The survey showed 65 percent of respondents want to see a trail fully compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act, which would meet the federal standard for grading, surface material and width. The other 43 percent wanted dirt trails with more challenging slopes, but with adequate width for wheelchairs and hand bikes. “The survey demonstrates people are using the trail system however it works for them,” Maxand said. “There’s definitely a need to better incorporate some of these [ADA] ideas.” Maxand said chair users are forced to think about every aspect of a trail before setting out,

After a motocross accident left Pat Dougherty paralyzed, he engineered a dettachable front wheel to his chair to make rolling in grass, sand and dirt easier. He’s sold thousands of his invention, the FreeWheel.

from the grade of the trail to the surface material. “Every foot, I’m just like, ‘OK, am I going to sink into something? Am I going to get stuck? Go sideways?’ You don’t know,” he said. “Since 1989, I’ve had to stare at the ground, constantly stressed out about hitting something and eating shit.” Adapting the trails to be more accessible is a challenge, but Ridge to Rivers Program Coordinator David Gordon is ready for it. His crew has been talking for years about doing a better job of providing opportunities for everyone. Gordon said it’s not possible to widen many of the single-track trails in the foothills, but he already has some possible loops in mind. They would be wide, gentle and covered in an all-weather compacting road mix that provides a better surface for wheelchairs. He’s already identified possibilities in Lower Hulls Gulch, Castle Rock Reserve, Harrison Hollow and Military Reserve. “The adaptive community is much like the rest of the trail community,” Gordon said. “They’re looking for a wide range of experiences. Then there are people like Pat who are out there, getting on trails you would never expect someone with a physical challenge to be able to do.” Gordon is talking about Pat Dougherty, who suffered a motocross crash in 2003 and became quadriplegic. Dougherty was angry when he could barely push his wheelchair through the grass in his backyard to play with his kids. Being an engineer from the University of Idaho, he took apart an old bike frame with the help of a friend and crafted the FreeWheel. The FreeWheel attaches to the front of a wheelchair, not unlike a jogging stroller. It creates stability and lifts the small wheels off the ground, so they don’t get stuck in grass, sand or dirt.

“It’s life-changing,” Maxand said. “This thing, you can pop it on and off and you can go fucking crazy anywhere. Beaches, grass, snow, ice, rocks. Imagine 10 years of wearing high heels and somebody says, ‘Hey, try these mountain boots on.’” Dougherty has sold thousands of his invention in more than 40 countries. They start at $600 and can be ordered online or purchased at medical supply stores like Norco. After his wreck, Dougherty had no interest in giving up on the foothills. Using a custom arm-powered mountain bike, he cranks his way up trails like Kestrel and Crestline in Hulls Gulch. He bikes all over Blaine and Valley counties. “I’m a stubborn SOB and I’m going to find a way to ride no matter what,” Dougherty said. “I really enjoy finding out if I can do these trails or not.” Dougherty runs into the same problems as Maxand. Trailhead gates are just a few inches too narrow, or trails are narrow and steep and off camber. “I’m not going to kid ya’,” he said, “I’ve rolled down the mountain on my head a few times.” Like Maxand, Dougherty is excited to help the city find ways to make trails more accessible. Gordon said he hopes to have at least one accessible trail completed in the next two years. In the meantime, it’s about looking at current trails and identifying opportunities to overlay ADA characteristics. Maxand calls it an “experiment.” For anyone who wants in on it, he encourages them to email him at jmaxand@ hotmail.com. “Every step is just a step through the dark,” Maxand said. “I’m just glad Ridge to Rivers is willing to include this stuff in the management plan. That’s a huge win.” BOISE WEEKLY.COM


BEERGUZZLER TAKE A WALK ON THE LIGHT SIDE The last few weeks of winter may have been warmer than the first few days of spring, but I’m already looking ahead to summer. This time around it’s a trio of easy drinking, oh-so-refreshing, lighter styled beers perfect for enjoying after mowing your lawn. BALLAST POINT KOLSCH STYLE PALE ALE, $1.70-$2 Kölsch is a German style that’s brewed with ale yeast, then cold conditioned like a lager. Ballast Point’s has a slightly hazy straw color with a thin white head. Grain and biscuit aromas dominate the nose along with light whiffs of malt and floral citrus. “Pleasant” is the word that best describes this eminently quaffable brew—light, clean and well balanced between the soft malt and smooth hop flavors.

LEARN TO PLAY BRIDGE We welcome new members! Now is your chance to learn the world’s best card game. You have heard of it: now you can play it.

Beginning Bridge Lessons Wednesdays, 6 Weeks April 6, 2016-May 11, 2016 6-8pm The Bridge Cooperative of Boise, 5903 W Franklin. $40 For 6 Weeks and Textbook To register, email bridgeco14@gmail.com or phone Kay at (208) 484-2714 Sponsored by Boise Unit 394 of The American Contract Bridge League ACBL BoiseBridge

FIRESTONE PIVO PILS, $1.50-$1.80 Poured from a can, it’s a bright straw color with a billowy head that fades quickly. The resiny, herbal hop aromas, with their fresh grass and floral notes, are inviting. The flavors are balanced and smooth, offering an immediate hit of bitter hops playing against creamy malt. You get a hint of caramel and apple on the long finish. SHINER 107 HOPPY PILSNER BIRTHDAY BEER, $1.50-$1.80 Texas-based Spoetzl Brewery is celebrating 107 years in business with this crystal clear, very pale yellow ale. There’s a bit of pleasant herbal earthiness to the nose along with floral hops and ripe lemon. Flavor-wise, calling this brew “hoppy” is a bit of a stretch. The flavors center on fruity malt, cracker and bright tropical fruit, with just a touch of hops that you feel more than taste. —David Kirkpatrick BOISE WEEKLY.COM

BOISEweekly | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | 23


SCREEN HELLO AGAIN Sally Field stars in the first must-see film of 2016 GEORGE PRENTICE

®

®

ACADEMY AWARD WINNER

ACADEMY AWARD NOMINEE

HELEN AARON ALAN BARKHAD MIRREN PAUL RICKMAN ABDI

About 30 minutes into Hello, My Name of Doris—the first all-out indie hit of 2016—the 20-something John (Max Greenfield) approaches his coworker, the 60-something Doris (the amazing Sally Field) and says, “You know what Doris? You’re a baller… straight up.” He reaches out for a fist-bump and a puzzled Doris has to think for a moment before grabbing his fist and shakes his arm. Doris doesn’t seem to fit it anywhere—not at work, not with her family and not with much of the 21st century. In her solitude, she isn’t aware that she’s out-of-synch with practically everyone. “Sometimes people throw away nice things. Sally Field is Doris: “Sometimes people throw away nice things. You would be be surprised.” You would be surprised,” Doris says, before carrying another piece of sidewalk junk home about the swoon-worthy Sally Field? To baby of “Baby Goya.” The EDM artist is instantly to her house of hoards. boomers, she’s Gidget, The Flying Nun and Much to Doris’ delight, John sees quirk and enamored of Doris’ style and begs her to pose Sybil. To others, she’s the best part of Smokey for his new album cover, which she does to style instead of the deeply troubled singleton and the Bandit. To others still, she’s mother to John’s delight. that she has become. Things go well for Doris… Forrest Gump, Aunt May to Spiderman or Mary However, Doris misTodd to Daniel Day Lewis’ Lincoln. Let’s not until they don’t. We can see interprets his interest HELLO, MY NAME IS DORIS (R) forget her two Best Actress Oscars for Norma where Doris’ fantasy is headas romantic. Soon Starring Sally Field, Max Greenfield, Jack ing but it doesn’t make it any Rae and Places in the Heart. enough, she begins Antonoff What an absolute joy it is for an actress less heartbreaking. The loststalking John (in a Written/Directed by Michael Showalter such as Field to mine a gem of a leading role at and-found tale of Hello, My somewhat sweet, rather Opens Friday, April 1 at The Flicks this point in her career. Name is Doris just builds and than creepy way). One According to website Rotten Tomatoes, the builds, with the expert care of night, Doris follows her writer/director Michael Show- audience score for Hello, My Name is Doris is a decades-younger prey alter (Wet Hot American Summer) and the film near-perfect 100 percent (the critics have been to an EDM concert, where Grammy-winning kind, as well). My sense is this is the first mustgoes from good, to very good to pretty great. singer/songwriter Jack Antonoff hilariously And Sally Field. My, oh my. What can I say see film of the year. plays the fictional recording artist by the name

SCREEN EXTRA LUNAFEST 2016 Celebrating 15 years of championing films by, for and about women, Lunafest returns to The Flicks Saturday, April 2, sponsored by Soroptimist International of Boise. Culled from nearly 10,000 submissions, the 2016 edition of Lunafest features six gems, including Finding June, from filmmaker/American Sign Language interpreter Anna Schumacher, which tells the story of a young, breast cancer-diagnosed deaf woman at a time when communication means everything. Raising Ryland, from director Sarah Feeley, explores the transgender experience as lived by a 6-year-old boy. Boxeadora, from filmmaker Meg Smaker, chronicles a woman who dreams of becoming Cuba’s first female Olympic boxer. The bundle of six Lunafest films gets under way at 12:30 p.m.

BLEECKER STREET AND ENTERTAINMENT ONE FEATURES PRESENT A RAINDOG FILMS/ ENTERTAINMENT ONE FEATURES PRODUCTION A GAVIN HOOD FILM HELEN MIRREN AARON PAUL ALAN RICKMAN “EYE IN THE SKY” BARKHAD ABDI JEREMY NORTHAM CASTING MUSIC COSTUME AND IAIN GLEN BY DEBORAH AQUILA TRICIA WOOD KATE DOWD BY PAUL HEPKER AND MARK KILIAN DESIGNER RUY FILIPE PRODUCTION DIRECTOR OF EXECUTIVE EDITOR MEGAN GILL DESIGNER JOHNNY BREEDT PHOTOGRAPHY HARIS ZAMBARLOUKOS BSC PRODUCERS CLAUDIA BLUEMHUBER ANNE SHEEHAN GUY HIBBERT STEPHEN WRIGHT XAVIER MARCHAND BENEDICT CARVER WRITTENBY GUY HIBBERT PRODUCED DIRECTED BY GED DOHERTY COLIN FIRTH DAVID LANCASTER BY GAVIN HOOD EyeInTheSkyTheMovie.com

ARTWORK © 2015 BLEECKER STREET MEDIA LLC. MOTION PICTURE © 2015 EONE FILMS (EITS) LIMITED. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

STARTS FRIDAY, APRIL 1ST 24 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

Raising Ryland, one of the six shorts in Lunafest 2016, explores the transgender experience as lived by a 6-year-old boy.

—George Prentice

BOISE WEEKLY.COM


CITIZEN JEREMY MAXAND

Everything but the kitchen sink JESSICA MURRI

Jeremy Maxand’s resume is long. First, he got an associate’s degree in criminal justice, then a bachelor’s degree in sociology, then a master’s degree in history, all at Boise State University. He worked for the Idaho Community Action Network, became the director of the Snake River Alliance, threw his stuff into his Volkswagen and moved to Mexico, then worked with at-risk kids in the wilderness of Alaska. He was also once the mayor of the city and borough of Wrangell, Alaska. Now Maxand is at Life’s Kitchen, where he has been the executive director for three years and looks forward to the future of Life’s Kitchen at its new location near the Boise River. Construction is slated to finish by the end of 2017. What was your plan for your mix of degrees? My first sociology class blew my mind. I got really excited and I wanted to work with people on social problems and inequality issues. I didn’t really have a plan. Instead of getting a degree that I thought would be good for a job, I went after a degree that I felt passionate about. Nonprofits and social justice became my path. Then you left. I was the director of the Snake River Alliance and George Bush [Jr.] was the president. I was like, “I’m done with the United States. I’m going to move to Mexico and check out.” So I did. I sold my house, quit my job, paid off my debt, flew to San Diego, bought a Volkswagen and headed to Baja, Mexico. I was like, “See ya.” I stayed for a couple of months, then I got pretty bored. I went back to Alaska and got a job working for a wilderness therapy program that took at-risk kids out for 50 days around British Columbia. Their families would just ship them over and say, ‘You need a branch up your ass?’ Yeah, they were all around 14 to 18 and had drug or alcohol issues or behavioral issues. They were mostly from villages way up north, where they had to take a military helicopter off an island to get to us. It was my first experience working with at-risk kids. Every time we had a graduation, it was really inspiring to see the impact that being out, away from everything, has on your mental health. But yeah, it’s frightening when you take 15 kids out BOISE WEEKLY.COM

into the wilderness, and when the weather gets bad and somebody runs away. Holy shit, it’s scary when you’re totally functional and you have all the training and supplies, but throw in unpredictable kids that are already at risk at an urban setting. It was intense. What was next? Well, I was an organizer for the conservation group that was basically blamed for the collapse of the timber industry in Alaska while I was also the mayor. Hold up. You were the mayor? I was the mayor of Wrangell, Alaska, for two years. It’s like 2,400 people but 3,000 square miles. It was probably the most rewarding thing I’ve done professionally. At the same time, I had to be really patient and have a good temperament. People like to attack public officials. Is that why you’re in a wheelchair? Did you get attacked? [Laughs] No. It was a totally random neurological thing that happened when I was 14. It’s called transverse myelitis. They don’t know how it happens, but it affects your spinal column and that’s it. Boom. It took about a year of having difficulty walking before I was in a chair. That was 26 years ago, but it’s all good. You’re still active in city matters, though. I’m on the Ridge to Rivers advisory committee. There hasn’t been a lot of emphasis placed on how to create more opportunities for access to trails. The technology has really changed with hand cycling and off-road stuff, even adaptive gear that goes on your chair. I’m trying to help Ridge to Rivers create a trail system where some are paved and ADA-compliant and others are more challenging. [For more on ADA trail accessibility, see Rec, Page 22.] Being in a wheelchair isn’t my identity. I’m passionate about all kinds of things, but right now I’m feeling a little more passionate that, like, I can’t go to a yurt in Idaho City with my friends because none of them are accessible. We’re still dealing with parking spaces downtown. Seriously, the Capitol isn’t more ADA-accessible? Who was their architect? We should be beyond this and we’re not. BOISEweekly | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | 25


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73 Take a clothing slogan too seriously? 78 Like Loyola and Xavier universities 82 Clobbers 83 Fish eggs 84 1 + 2, in Germany 86 Prefix with -scope 87 Investment sometimes pronounced as a name 88 Risky 92 Surmise 93 Video-game playing, e.g. 96 ____ Day (Hawaiian holiday) 97 SEAL Team 6 mission 99 Chinese calendar animal 100 Tulle, to brides? 104 Carriage 105 Dundee turndown 106 Messenger of biochemistry 107 French film director Clair 108 Gray matter? 110 Have in view 112 ____-d’Oise (French department) 115 “American Greed” channel 118 “After all that hard work, I’ll order some cake”? 124 Latin word on the back of a dollar bill 125 Compact 126 People holding things up 127 Bellyache 128 Antarctic waters 129 “Perfecto!”

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39 Encouraging words from slug enthusiasts? 45 Word said with right or rise 46 Nothing: Fr. 47 Grp. that gets the lead out? 48 Bust supporter 51 Fifth-to-last word in the Lord’s Prayer 53 “Sharp” fashion 56 Creature on the Australian coat of arms 11

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COMMUNITY BW ANNOUNCEMENTS BOISE WEEKLY CALL TO ARTISTS Help us celebrate our 25th Anniversary this June. Seeking all local artists/ crafters and creatives to show and sell their wares during our downtown block-party event. Please email: ellen@boiseweekly. com for details. KIBROM’S ETHIOPIAN RE-OPENS! Those of you still mourning the loss of Kibrom’s Ethiopian food have to wait no longer! They have opened a new restaurant and are back to serving their delicious food. Go see them at 3506 W. State Street in Boise.

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16 Indian retreats 17 Hook, line and sinker 18 Game for little sluggers 19 Fan part 24 Huge spans 25 Little darling 31 “Climb ____ Mountain” 32 Sicilian six 34 Long race, in brief 36 Top-notch 37 Like most trivia, in the real world 39 Carried on 40 Kemper of “The Office” 41 Try 42 Stoned 43 Derisive cry 44 Mormons, for short 49 What a bandoleer holds 50 Party with pu-pu platters 52 Cotton candy additive 54 Mummy in “The Mummy” 55 Saverin who co-founded Facebook 58 Musical lead-in to -smith 60 Like some losers 61 Up 63 Rogers, Orbison and Yamaguchi 65 Magazine edition: Abbr. 66 “Hey, I want to listen here!” 67 Roman gods 68 Country whose name is one letter different from a mountain 70 Gheorghe ____, former 7’7” N.B.A. player 73 “Ooh, dat hurt!” 74 1-5 on a cellphone screen 75 Precision 76 iRobot vacuum 77 Cape Cod town 79 Cut ties with, in a way 80 Best

81 Law-school class 85 Whom “I saw” on a seesaw, in a tongue twister 88 Peter Pan rival 89 Ring master 90 Play 91 One-named hitmaker of the 1950s-’60s 92 Word with two apostrophes 94 Leading 95 Pasta whose name is Italian for “feathers” 98 Sale tag abbr. 101 “Speed” star 102 ____ bean 103 Make secret 104 “Where to Invade Next” filmmaker 108 Letters of invitation? 109 1914 battle site L A S T B S C H O O L

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T F I C E P E A P O C R Y A S G R O A L A M G U T E E T D E P A L U F O R S A D A K U S I L E T T Y P L E A M I G I N O L E D O S A

111 Desires 113 Comparable (to) 114 Golf’s Champagne Tony 116 City and province of southern Italy 117 Anatomical sac 119 Composer of the Windows 95 start-up sound 120 Some offensive linemen: Abbr. 121 “____ sport!” 122 New York engineering sch. 123____ Aviv Go to www.boiseweekly.com and look under extras for the answers to this week’s puzzle. Don't think of it as cheating. Think of it more as simply double-checking your answers.

W E E K ’ S

A N S W E R S

E Q U A T I O N

A R I A

R A I T T E N O K I S

S U N T A N S S A U T E P A N E R A S

S I T I C N A S T M I O L D E S U P A T N O N Y O S U A L T

H O H O H I M

U N I S

I N B A D

D E P T H E S M O S B A A D N I D E S S M I O P L P D E O D V O A N

J C O A S L H C U L U A L L C A A T R M E D E D O N R D U P M I L A M I C I T A N R G R E A N D A

E M I R T R A M

S P E E C H B U B B L E S

R U E D A C H O O U P P O L N E

A L U M N A

R E P E N T

N E W I S H

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D O W N L O W

E L I D E R S

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BW EVENTS INITIAL POINTE GALLERY RECEPTION Come to Meridian City Hall’s Initial Pointe Gallery reception for our April’s artists: Joyce Ackerman & Jessica Tookey. Join us Tuesday, April. 5th from 4:30-7:30. 33 E Broadway Ave in. Meridiancity. org/mac/. NAMPA’S FARMERS MARKET OPENING! Join us for our season opening April 30th from 9 am-1 pm. Enjoy music from Mom & Double Image and Hispanic Folkloric Dancers of Idaho. Located at Lloyd Square in historic downtown Nampa:14th and front.

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OFFICE HOURS Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

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riverworksimaging.com • 2418 Main Street • 208 340-8788

First Thursday April 7th

ADOPT-A-PET

Stop in the store to sign up for our Diamond stud earring giveaway..

These pets can be adopted at Simply Cats.

Engagement rings, Fine Jewelry, Jewelry Design, Sterling Silver Jewelry, Jewelry repair

www.simplycats.org 2833 S. Victory View Way | 208-343-7177

P.O. Box 1657, Boise, ID 83701

OFFICE ADDRESS Boise Weekly’s office is located at 523 Broad Street in downtown Boise. We are on the corner of 6th and Broad between Front and Myrtle streets.

PHONE (208) 344-2055

FAX (208) 342-4733

E-MAIL classified@boiseweekly.com TWILIGHT: Looking for an energetic, vivacious cat that’s never boring? Let’s play. 1008 Main Street, Boise 208-426-8592 randallscottjewelers.com

FIFI: I’m a sweet and polite lap cat who’d love lots of gentle attention from you.

MUFASA: I’m large and in charge—get ready to play, then receive lots my rubs and purrs.

These pets can be adopted at the Idaho Humane Society.

GRAY MATTERS

www.idahohumanesociety.com 4775 W. Dorman St. Boise | 208-342-3508

DEADLINES* LINE ADS: Monday, 10 a.m. DISPLAY: Thursday, 3 p.m. * Some special issues and holiday issues may have earlier deadlines.

RATES We are not afraid to admit that we are cheap, and easy, too! Call (208) 344-2055 and ask for classifieds. We think you’ll agree. COQUETA: 1-year-old, female, Chihuahua mix. Lots of potential. Will need socialization with other dogs. Best with older kids. (Kennel 305 – #30976654)

ROMEO: 6-year-old, male, Chihuahua mix. Loves to cuddle and be held by adults. Best with older, respectful kids. Knows how to dance. (Kennel 309 – #31018255)

MOXIE: 3-year-old, female, Chihuahua mix. Mature for her age. Loves walks. Independent but loving. Does well with other dogs. (Kennel 310 – #31097088)

DISCLAIMER Claims of error must be made within 14 days of the date the ad appeared. Liability is limited to in-house credit equal to the cost of the ad’s first insertion. Boise Weekly reserves the right to revise or reject any advertising.

PAYMENT MEISER: 1 ½-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Still has some kitten energy. Enjoys head pets and will meow if he wants some attention. (Kennel 20 – #31051070)

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DOROTHY: 4-year-old, female, domestic shorthair. Stressed out in the shelter. Best in a gentle environment. May prefer to be an only pet. (Kennel 106 – #30485830)

ROBO: 3-year-old, male, domestic shorthair. Affectionate, will happily hang out around the house. Crazy for toys. No small kids or dogs. (IHS cattery – #29977590)

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YOGA

BW YOGA WANTED FOR LOCAL YOGA STUDIO Wanted radiant yoga, tai chi, or Qigong teachers for a local yoga studio. Please call 340-4771 for more info.

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): According to my astrological analysis, you would benefit profoundly from taking a ride in a jet fighter plane 70,000 feet above the Earth. In fact, I think you really need to experience weightlessness as you soar faster than the speed of sound. Luckily, there’s an organization, MiGFlug (migflug.com), that can provide you with this healing thrill. (I just hope you can afford the $18,000 price tag.) APRIL FOOL! I do in fact think you should treat yourself to unprecedented thrills and transcendent adventures. But I bet you can accomplish that without being quite so extravagant. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “People only get really interesting when they start to rattle the bars of their cages,” says philosopher Alain de Botton. If that’s true, Taurus, you must be on the verge of becoming very interesting. Metaphorically speaking, you’re not just rattling the bars of your cage. You’re also smacking your tin cup against the bars and trying to saw through them with your plastic knife. APRIL FOOL! I lied. You’re not literally in a prison cell. And I got a bit carried away with the metaphor. But there is a grain of truth to what I said. You are getting close to breaking free of at least some of your mind-forged manacles. And it’s making you more attractive and intriguing.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If I had to decide what natural phenomenon you most closely resemble right now, I’d consider comparing you to a warm, restless breeze or a busily playful dolphin. But my first choice would be the mushrooms known as Schizophyllum commune. They’re highly adaptable: able to go dormant when the weather’s dry and spring to life when rain comes. They really get around, too, making their homes on every continent except Antarctica. But the main reason I’d link you with them is that they come in over 28,000 different sexes. Their versatility is unprecedented. APRIL FOOL! I exaggerated a bit. It’s true that these days you’re polymorphous and multifaceted and well-rounded. But you’re probably not capable of expressing 28,000 varieties of anything. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Whatever it is you’re seeking won’t come in the form you’re expecting,” warns Japanese novelist Haruki Murakami. If that’s true, why bother? Why expend all your precious yearning if the net result won’t even satisfy your yearning?! That’s why I advise you to ABANDON YOUR BELOVED PLANS! Save your energy for trivial wishes. That way you won’t be disappointed when they are fulfilled in unanticipated ways. APRIL FOOL! I was messing with you. It’s true that what you want won’t arrive in the form you’re expecting. But

28 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

I bet the result will be even better than what you expected. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’re due to make a pilgrimage, aren’t you? It might be time to shave your head, sell your possessions, and head out on a long trek to a holy place where you can get back in touch with what the hell you’re doing here on this planet. APRIL FOOL! I was kidding about the head-shaving and possessionsdumping. On the other hand, there might be value in embarking on a less melodramatic pilgrimage. I think you’re ready to seek radical bliss of a higher order—and get back in touch with what the hell you’re doing here on this planet. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Are you ready to fight the monster? Do you have the courage and strength and stamina and guile to overcome the ugly beast that’s blocking the path to the treasure? If not, turn around and head back to your comfort zone until you’re better prepared. APRIL FOOL! I lied. There is a monster, but it’s not the literal embodiment of a beastly adversary. Rather, it’s inside you. It’s an unripe part of yourself that needs to be taught and tamed and cared for. Until you develop a better relationship with it, it will just keep testing you. (P.S. Now would be a good time to develop a better relationship with it.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Your advice for the near future comes from poet Stephen Dunn. “If the Devil sits down,” he says, “offer companionship, tell her you’ve always admired her magnificent, false moves.” I think that’s an excellent plan, Libra! Maybe you’ll even be lucky enough to make the acquaintance of many different devils with a wide variety of magnificent, false moves. APRIL FOOL! I lied. In fact, I think you should avoid contact with all devils, no matter how enticing they might be. Now is a key time to surround yourself with positive influences.

the words of author Ray Bradbury: “May you be in love every day for the next 20,000 days, and out of that love, remake a world.” I have reason to believe that this optimistic projection has a good chance of coming true for you. Imagine it, Sagittarius: daily swoons of delight and rapture from now until the year 2071. APRIL FOOL! I lied, sort of. It would be foolish to predict that you’ll be giddy with amorous feelings nonstop for the next 54 years and 10 months. On the other hand, I don’t think it’s unrealistic for you to expect a lot of that sweet stuff over the course of the next three weeks.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In 1841, a British medical journal prescribed the following remedy for the common cold: “Nail a hat on the wall near the foot of your bed, then retire to that bed, and drink spirits until you see two hats.” My expert astrological analysis reveals that this treatment is likely to cure not just the sniffles, but also any other discomforts you’re suffering from, whether physical or emotional or spiritual. So I hope you own a hat, hammer, and nails. APRIL FOOL! I lied. The method I suggested probably won’t help alleviate what ails you. But here’s a strategy that might: Get rid of anything that’s superfluous, rotten, outdated, or burdensome.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “I am tired of being brave,” groaned Anne Sexton in one of her poems. “I’m sick of following my dreams,” moaned comedian Mitch Hedberg, adding, “I’m just going to ask my dreams where they’re going and hook up with them later.” In my opinion, Capricorn, you have every right to unleash grumbles similar to Hedberg’s and Sexton’s. APRIL FOOL! The advice I just gave you is only half-correct. It’s true that you need and deserve a respite from your earnest struggles. Now is indeed a good time to take a break so you can recharge your spiritual batteries. But don’t you dare feel sorry for yourself.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): To begin your oracle, I’ll borrow

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1991, hikers in the Italian Alps

discovered the well-preserved corpse of a Bronze Age hunter. Buried in the frigid terrain, the man who came to be known as Otzi the Iceman had been there for 5,000 years. Soon the museum that claimed his body began receiving inquiries from women who wanted to be impregnated with Otzi’s sperm. I think this is an apt metaphor for you, Aquarius. Consider the possibility that you might benefit from being fertilized by an influence from long ago. APRIL FOOL! I was just messing with you. It’s true you can generate good mojo by engaging with inspirational influences from the past. But I’d never urge you to be guided by a vulgar metaphor related to Otzi’s sperm. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Caligula was an eccentric Roman emperor who had a physical resemblance to a goat. He was sensitive about it. That’s why he made it illegal for anyone to refer to goats in his company. I mention this, Pisces, because I’d like to propose a list of words you should forbid to be used in your presence during the coming weeks: “money,” “cash,” “finances,” “loot,” “savings,” or “investments.” Why? Because I’m afraid it would be distracting, even confusing or embarrassing, for you to think about these sore subjects right now. APRIL FOOL! I lied. The truth is, now is a perfect time for you to be focused on getting richer quicker.

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DO YOUR TREES NEED HELP? Tree Work Boise is a local, veteranowned business that can handle all of your tree service needs: pruning, removals, stump grinding, planting, cabling, etc. Contact us for a free consultation with an ISA Certified Arborist. We are licensed and insured. Email for info: info@treeworkboise.com. NEED JUNK REMOVAL? JNK Hauling offers junk removal and handyman services including: eviction clean out, yard clean up, home repair and much more! We affordable and offer free estimates. Call us today: 573-4450.

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RANDALL SCOTT JEWELERS GRAND OPENING Randall Scott Jewelers (formally M & M) has opened a new store in downtown Boise! Join us First Thursday, April 7th, for our Grand Opening Party! 30% off storewide. Jewelry starting at only $9! Stop in the store to sign up for our diamond stud earring giveaway. We offer engagement rings, fine jewelry, jewelry design, sterling silver jewelry and jewelry repair. 1008 Main Street. BRITE SIGNS Sign Rental. 208-866-6843.

LEGAL & COURT NOTICES Boise Weekly is an official newspaper of record for all government notices. Rates are set by the Idaho Legislature for all publications. Email classifieds@boiseweekly. com or call 344-2055 for a quote. IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT OF THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: ROBERT JAMES SNEIDER and SOPHIA ANN MOORE, Legal Name

BW NEED SEEKING TATTOO ARTIST Seeking Tattoo artist who is willing to come to my home or for me to come to his/her home. They need to be handy with a tattoo gun but extensive experience not required. Seeking someone who is looking for a long term client. Call Ed Matous at 389-9619.

BW KISSES THANKS MOM My mom said (to my boyfriend) if you’re hungry get something to eat.. just not my daughter.

FOOD BW EAT HERE CUPCAKE PARADISE If you haven’t been in....you’re missing out! We’re located at 813 W Bannock St. in downtown Boise. We offer a variety of delicious cupcakes. Grab a dozen for the office party or just because!

AUTOMOTIVE BW 4 WHEELS

BW CONFESSIONS Got lost in a parking lot downtown after getting baked… I thought you needed a car to leave. When I’m in the shower, I put my phone in a ziplock bag and watch Netflix.

LEGAL

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! We Buy Like New or Damaged. Running or Not. Get Paid! Free Towing! We’re Local! Call For Quote: 1-888-420-3808.

Case No. CVNC 1602679 NOTICE OF HEARING (Adults) A Petition by ROBERT JAMES SNEIDER, who was born May 5, 1989 at Sebastopol, California, and SOPHIA ANN MOORE, who was born January 26, 1978 at Boise, Idaho, both of whom now reside at 201 N. Flume Street, Boise, County of Ada, State of Idaho, have filed with the above-entitled Court a Petition for change of their “Family” surname to MOORE-BRIDGES, and that they hereafter be known as ROBERT JAMES MOORE-BRIDGES and SOPHIA ANN MOOREBRIDGES, respectively, the reason being that they want to adopt a new combined “family” name, utilizing husband’s grandmother’s maiden name. The Petition for Change of Name will be heard at 130 o’clock p.m. on the 10th day of May, 2016, at the Ada County Courthouse, located at 200 W. Front Street, Boise, Idaho. Objections may be filed by any person who can, in such objections, show the court a good reason against such a change of name. WITNESS my hand and seal of said District Court this 18th day of Feb., 2016. By: CHRISTOPHER D. RICH and

DEIRDRE PRICE Deputy Clerk PUB March 09,16,23 and 30, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Natalie Marie HarringtonSmith. Legal name of child Case No. CV NC 1603553 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Minor) A Petition to change the name of Natalie Marie Harrington-Smith, a minor, now residing in the City of Meridian, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Natalie Marie Berry. The reason for the change in name is: I have re-married and biological father has signed the form to terminate his parental rights 10/2015. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on May 17, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Feb 25, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Christopher D. Rich CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT and Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk. PUB March 16, 23, 30 and April 6, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Beth Marie Taylor. Legal Name Case No. CV NC 1601442 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult)

ing on the petition is scheduled for 130 o’clock p.m. on APR 12, 2015 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: FEB 18, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price Deputy Clerk PUB March 16, 23, 30 and April 6, 2016. IN THE DISTRICT COURT FOR THE FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT FOR THE STATE OF IDAHO, IN AND FOR THE COUNTY OF ADA IN RE: Katerina Goodwin Legal Name

has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Katerina Chlouba Hayes. The reason for the change in name is: marriage. A hearing on the petition is scheduled for 1:30 o’clock p.m. on May 17, 2016 at the Ada County Courthouse. Objections may be filed by any person who can show the court a good reason against the name change. Date: Feb. 25, 2016. CLERK OF THE DISTRICT COURT By: Deirdre Price, Deputy Clerk. PUB March 30, April 6,13, 20, 2016.

Case No. CV NC 1603220 NOTICE OF HEARING ON NAME CHANGE (Adult) A Petition to change the name of Katerina Goodwin, now residing in the City of Boise, State of Idaho,

ADULT

A Petition to change the name of Beth Marie Taylor, now residing in the City of Star, State of Idaho, has been filed in the District Court in Ada County, Idaho. The name will change to Phedre Marie Delaunay. The reason for the change in name is: I do not identify with my legal name, family issues. A hear-

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FIND

MINERVA’S BREAKDOWN

OUTDOOR EXCHANGE GEAR RENTAL PROGRAM

$GYLFHIRUWKRVH RQWKHYHUJH

DEAR MINERVA, I’m in a relationship that makes me extremely happy, but several of my friends and family members don’t support it. One of my best friends even stopped talking to me because I am dating this fine fellow. Though we’ve had our ups and downs in the past, we’ve both grown into stronger, more loving and kick-ass people. How do I get my friends and family to see that? How do I cope with the judgement my friends are passing on me? —Can’t Have It All

DEAR CAN’T, You are in charge of your own happiness. With that said, if your family and friends—including your best friend—want nothing to do with him and are upset about it, maybe they see something that you cannot. Ultimately, we all have to weigh our choices. My friends call me the “Douche Whisperer” because I have never met a man I didn’t like and that can lead to trouble. I have come to depend on my friends to let me know when there is something I am too blinded by love, lust or loneliness to see. My suggestion is make a pro and con list of the situation. Make your decision and once you do, resolve yourself to live with the consequences. Depending on your “ups and downs,” maybe he isn’t worth losing friends and family. Maybe he is. Can you handle it? As for judgement, what they think usually says more about them than you. Make your choice and ignore their judgement. SUBMIT questions to Minerva’s Breakdown at bit.ly/MinervasBreakdown or mail them to Boise Weekly, 523 Broad St., Boise, ID 83702. All submissions remain anonymous.

Renting a stand up paddleboard for the day can cost up to $45 at local river supply stores. Tracy Crites, owner of Outdoor Exchange (1405 W. Grove St.), said rental costs can be prohibitive. “A lot of families find $45 is out of their price range, especially if they need more than one board,” Crites said. “So they would just end up not trying that new activity.” outdoor-exchange.com, Outdoor Exchange—a local outdoor 1405 W. Grove St. gear consignment store—was recently awarded $3,000 from the Zions Bank Smart Women’s Grant, which helped Crites launch her own low-cost rental program in January. Rentals include men’s, women’s and children’s snowshoes for $10, backcountry safety packs —which include a backpack, beacon, probe and shovel—for $35, five-foot surfboards for $25, and stand up paddleboards for $25 per day. “It’s a passion of ours to keep things affordable,” Crites said. “That’s the mission of the shop.” —Jessica Murri

Taken by instagram user pockethouse.

FROM THE BW POLL VAULT

RECORD EXCHANGE TOP 10 SELLERS

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

“OUR GURU BRINGS US TO THE BLACK MASTER SABBATH,” WEEED “DIG IN DEEP,” BONNIE RAITT “POST POP DEPRESSION,” IGGY POP “BLACKSTAR,” DAVID BOWIE “WE CAN DO ANYTHING,” VIOLENT FEMMES

6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

“SOUND AND COLOR,” ALABAMA SHAKES

Are you in favor of removing a lane of traffic on Main and Idaho streets in downtown Boise to create buffered bike lanes?

“BLURRYFACE,” TWENTY ONE PILOTS

Yes: 44.44%

“BEACH MUSIC,” ALEX G

No: 53.54%

“YOU AND I,” JEFF BUCKLEY

I don’t know: 2.02%

“FULL CIRCLE,” LORETTA LYNN

Disclaimer: This online poll is not intended to b e a s c i e n ti f i c s a mp l e o f l o c a l, statewi d e o r nati onal op i ni on.

434,211

7,364

10.7%

4.9%

22,751

11,826

10,925

1,654,930

Population of Ada County, as of July 2015.

Number of Ada County residents added July 2014-July 2015, a 1.6 percent population increase.

Ada County population increase, April 1, 2010July 1, 2015.

City of Boise population increase, April 1, 2010July 1, 2014, for a total of 216,282

Number of births recorded in Idaho, July 2014-July 2015.

Number of deaths recorded in Idaho, July 2014-July-2015.

Net gain in Idaho population, July 2014-July 2015.

Total Idaho population, as of July 1, 2015.

(U.S. Census)

(U.S. Census)

(U.S. Census)

(U.S. Census)

(U.S. Census Bureau)

(U.S. Census)

30 | MARCH 30 – APRIL 5, 2016 | BOISEweekly

(U.S. Census)

(U.S. Census)

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Boise Weekly Vol. 24 Issue 41  

Foolish History: Mapping the origins of April Fools’ Day and its surprising influence on Idaho

Boise Weekly Vol. 24 Issue 41  

Foolish History: Mapping the origins of April Fools’ Day and its surprising influence on Idaho