CCR June 21

Page 1

CCR ROUNDTABLE: CONSTRUCTION EXECS ON LIFE IN THE NEW NORMAL

June 2021 • www.ccr-mag.com

Attitude matters How citzenM is reshaping how the industry thinks about hotels

Ernest Lee, Managing Director, Americas, citizenM

Official magazine of

Also inside:

Exclusive Inside: The art of building safety and productivity with technology The road ahead for healthcare construction Leading GM, Lighting Manufacturer reports



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Vol. 20, Issue 6, 2021

40

28

80

FEATURES 28 Attitude matters How citzenM is reshaping how the industry thinks about hotels 40 The revival continues Construction executives discuss life as things start to open back up 80 Small-Scale, Big City Houston’s The Gordy theaters add intimacy and variety to cultural landscape 88 Do Well and Do Good Why giving back matters—and why it is something your company should practice

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


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Vol. 20, Issue 6, 2021 INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

48 General Contracting Firms 70 Lighting Firms

DEPARTMENTS 4 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 140 Women in Construction 156 Commercial Construction & Renovation Data 158 Ad Index 160 Publisher’s Note

SPECIAL SECTIONS

Multi-Housing 99 Invest. Innovate. Build. How Suffolk continues to change the commercial construction game

117

Commercial Kitchens 117 When art meets food Inside the mastery behind Bennett’s American Cooking The Cannabis Operations 129 Knock, Knock… The Open Dør is helping turn cannabis enthusiasts into franchise owners—one license at a time Hospitality in Commercial Construction 143 Hip. Cool. Repeat. How the Bellyard is helping redefine Atlanta’s Westside streetscape

129

Craft Brand and Marketing 149 Saving grace How Vitamin Sea Brewing became a beacon of hope for Massachusetts’ craft lovers

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


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EDITOR’S NOTE

EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

The best part of the summer T he little things are what we tend to remember the most. Like all those times my parents used to take my brothers and me for our annual jaunt to the Southern Park Mall in Boardman, Ohio. Built more than 50 years ago, the mall was one of the first premiere shopping centers in the country—the quintessential "onestop-fits-more-than-you-will-ever-need-tomake" shopping destination. A larger than life food court (where I had my first Chick fil A experience), the latest sporting goods and licensed product apparel store, a gaming center and carousel, and seemingly miles and miles of endless hallways with more retail stores than you can imagine. Just on the outskirts of Youngstown, off Route 224 and Route 7, the massive en-

closed mall was the American Dream. With some 1,198,000 square feet of space, the Southern Park Mall helped shape the vision for America's burgeoning retail scene by giving shoppers everything, and anything, they wanted under one roof. My cousin on my mother's side—where the majority of her family took root after coming from Italy—was one of the chief architecture designers of the mall. As fate would have it, just as it had more than a century ago, the Southern Park Mall again is on the forefront of change. Now owned by Washington Prime Group, the mall is evolving once more. By the fall, the space that once housed Sears and the outparcel that was home to the Sears Auto Center is being replaced with DeBartolo Commons, a

greenspace featuring a bandstand, athletic field and retail spaces along the mall’s exterior wall. Also among the tenants will be a 37,000-square-foot indoor golf center with an accompanying restaurant. To help balance things out, there also is talk of a fitness company joining the tenant ranks. The town center concept—being dubbed "power centers"—is the new mall. Greenspaces. Wall to wall entertainment. Fitness. Living. The symbiotic relationship between indoors and outdoors is in vogue. And with a pandemic that continues to spar with the stubbornness of politics and science, today's developers will continue to navigate the landscape. Proof already abounds. New real estate industry data from JLL predicts that US indoor mall vacancy rates will peak at just under 9% this year compared to 7.8% for outdoor shopping centers and 7% for "power centers." As property owners focus their investment on open air locations and smaller stores in cheaper locations where shoppers can feel more at ease in a "postCOVID world," analysts say that indoor malls could surpass those in suburban shopping centers and strip malls. So, as we push forward in this new landscape, only time will tell what the future holds for a retail world being pushed from two very dramatic sides: the crush of online shopping versus the need to engage and interact with each other. Who and what will win? Only time will tell. Until then, our industry will continue to do what it does best—adapt.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


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F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC P.O. Box 3908 Suwanee, GA 30024 678.765.6550 • Fax 678.765.6551

EDITORIAL EDITOR: Michael J. Pallerino 678.513.2397 • mikep@ccr-mag.com SENIOR ART DIRECTOR/AD PRODUCTION MANAGER: Brent Cashman 404.402.0125 • bocdesign@me.com CONTRIBUTING WRITER: Ron Treister rlt@communicatorsintl.com • 561-203-2981

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F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC Commercial Construction & Renovation is published monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Articles/content appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

CIRCLE NO. 6

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


CIRCLE NO. 7


CCR EDITORIAL BOARD RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO TD Bank VP Regional Facilities Manager AVP New England DAVE CRAWFORD Vice President of Design & Construction Belk Inc. STEVE KOWAL VP Construction & Property Management Hibbett Sporting Goods

RESTAURANTS GREGG LOLLIS Sr. Director, Design Development Chick-fil-A DAVID SHOTWELL Construction Manager Atticus Franchise Group ISYOL E. CABRERA Director Development and Construction Focus Brands LLC DEMETRIA PETERSON Project Director, Design and Construction at HMSHost

BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target

DAVID THOMPSON Construction Manager Scooter’s Coffee

JOHN MIOLOGOS Director, Store Standards Store Design and Planning Walgreens Company

ROB ADKINS, LEED AP CDP Project Development Manager- Licensed Stores- National Accounts Starbucks Coffee Company

JERRY SMITH Head of Construction Bluemercury LAURA GROSS Retail Facilities Manager American Signature Furniture ERRAN THOMAS ZINZER Senior Manager Real Estate Services, Construction & Design RON VOLSKE Construction Project Manager Orscheln Farm & Home DEDRICK KIRKEM Retail Facilities Consultant

HEALTHCARE CLINTON “BROOKS” HERMAN, PMP Senior Facilities Project Manager UTHealth Science Center at Houston

RESTAURANTS RON BIDINOST Vice President of Construction at Bubbakoo’s Burritos

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HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Principal Executive Vice President at Stormont Hospitality Group LLC GARY RALL Vice President of Design and Development, Holiday Inn Club Vacations ROBERT RAUCH CEO RAR Hospitality Faculty Assoc., Arizona State University JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels RICK TAKACH Chairman Vesta Hospitality SAMUEL D. BUCKINGHAM, RS CMCA AMS President & Co-Founder Evergreen Financial Partners LLC PUNIT R. SHAH Chief Executive Officer of Liberty Group+ Part-Owner of Miami Marlins

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

HOSPITALITY

CONSULTANT

LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations and Project Management Interserv Hospitality

GINA NODA Founder Connect Source Consulting Group, LLC.

GENERAL CONTRACTOR

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS

MATT SCHIMENTI President Schimenti Construction JOHN STALLMAN Marketing Manager Lakeview Construction

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT NCIDQ, CDP Senior Vice President, Cushman & Wakefield PAM GOODWIN Goodwin Advisors, LLC Goodwin Commercial The Pam Goodwin Show MEGAN HAGGERTY Founder Legacy Capital Investment MIKE KRAUS Principal Kraus-Manning JOHN LAPINS Project Management Consultant, Greystar JIM SHEUCHENKO President Property Management Advisors LLC CHRIS VARNEY Principal, Executive Vice President EMG STEPHEN HEKMAN Executive VP Kingsmen Retail Services US KEN DEMSKE Vice President Jones Lang LaSalle BOB WITKEN Chief Operating Officer KCA Development MIKE KLEIN, AIA, NCARB Senior Architect Core States Group

NUNZIO DESANTIS, FAIA CEO & Founder of Nunzio Marc DeSantis Architects TOMMY LINSTROTH CEO at Green Badger, LLC JEFF ROARK Principal/Partner Little JEFFREY D. MAHLER Vice President L2M JIM STAPELTON Vice President Nelson FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Onyx Creative STEVEN MCKAY Managing Principal, Global Design Leader at DLR Group STEVE TURNER Director, GPD Group STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA President CESO, Inc.

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ACADEMIA DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver


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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

AroundtheIndustry Target Stores Target Stores plans to open 40 new small-format stores this year in urban areas and near college campuses, including schools in Michigan, Georgia and Wisconsin.

Walmart/Saladworks Walmart and Ghost Kitchen Brands are collaborating on a project that will bring 60 Saladworks kitchens into Walmart stores around the country. The partnership calls for a total of 90 new kitchens, including 30 planned for Canada, and some locations will offer sitdown dining while all will feature pickup and delivery options.

Dave & Buster’s Dave & Buster’s has unveiled plans to revitalize its restaurants this summer with an expanded menu, new games and an increased focus on virtual concepts, including the Wings Out chicken wing brand.

Buddy’s Michigan-based pizza chain Buddy’s, widely credited as the inventor of the Detroit-style pizza, is embarking on a national expansion plan.

Retail

Google Google will open its first standalone retail store, where customers will be able to try products before they buy them and access services including installation help. The store in New York City’s Chelsea neighborhood also will feature hands-on workshops. Amazon Amazon is reportedly eyeing brick and mortar stores as a way of selling home goods and electronics stored in the company’s warehouses. The stores could include pop-ups in malls as well as permanent outlets.

Restaurants

Chick-fil-A Chick-fil-A is teaming with Kiwibot to test semi-autonomous delivery robots in Santa Monica and some other Southern California cities. The robots are controlled remotely and the company is touting it as a less-expensive and more environmentally-conscious alternative to traditional third-party delivery services. Nathan’s Famous Nathan’s Famous is planning to expand through a partnership with Ghost Kitchen Brands, which operates multiple-brand pickup and delivery facilities. The deal includes 60 units planned for the US and 40 in Canada, many of which will be inside Walmart stores. Domino’s Domino’s sees potential for 8,000 US locations and nearly 5,200 international units. Kitchen United Kitchen United plans to open 16 ghost kitchen facilities this year, with expansion expected in existing markets, including Chicago and Pasadena, California, as well as new markets such as San Francisco and New York.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Wendy’s Existing franchisee Delight Restaurant Group has acquired 54 additional Wendy’s restaurants in the Raleigh, North Carolina metro area as part of the NPC International bankruptcy deal. Mozza Chef Nancy Silverton will open her first restaurant outside the US with the debut of Mozza Baja, located at Mexico’s Costa Palmas luxury resort. The restaurant will feature a wood-fired pizza oven. El Pollo Loco El Pollo Loco’s strategy for the next three years will focus on its LA Mex asset design, which the company describes as the meeting of Mexican traditions and the Los Angeles lifestyle. El Pollo Loco wants franchisees to lead the growth, with much of the expansion coming from existing markets. Taco Bell Taco Bell will debut its all-digital concept with the opening of a new unit in New York City’s Times Square, with a format designed to keep orders moving and avoid long lines in the busy spot. Customers will be able to place digital orders ahead of time or use on-site kiosks, which also will sell Taco Bell-branded merchandise.

Hospitality

Waldorf Astoria Rising 1,049 feet and 98 stories into the south Florida sky, the new Waldorf Astoria Miami will become Miami’s first supertall tower and the tallest tower south of Manhattan. Choice Hotels/Comfort Rise & Shine Choice Hotels International has scheduled a 2023 debut for its Comfort Rise & Shine prototype, focusing on compact space, innovative design and flexibility.


Crowne Plaza New and renovated Crowne Plaza hotels continue to emerge under a design initiated by IHG Hotels & Resorts in 2014. Atlanta; Toronto; Shanghai, China and Sydney, Australia are among expansion sites for the former Holiday Inn upscale brand that IHG acquired with Holiday Inn in 1999. Hyatt Regency The first Hyatt Regency to open in Las Vegas will replace the Rio AllSuite Hotel and Casino as Hyatt Hotels & Resorts reflags the home of the Penn & Teller magic show. A 1,501-room Hyatt Regency will take up one of the 2,510-key property’s two towers, with another full-service Hyatt expected to occupy the other. Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino A 150-foot hotel tower set to open in the fall will add 205 guest rooms to Wild Horse Pass Hotel & Casino on the Gila River Indian Community land near Chandler, Arizona. The $143 million construction project also will feature a bar and lounge with rooftop dining and 22,000 square feet of meeting space. AC Hotel A Marriott-branded hotel made its debut near the Sawgrass Mills mall in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. The AC Hotel Fort Lauderdale Sawgrass Mills/Sunrise features an eight-story, 174-room hotel with 2.27 million square feet of leasable space. A 174-room hotel has opened at Simon Property Group’s Sawgrass Mills mall in Sunrise, Florida. The Landing Groundbreaking was held for The Landing, a luxury boutique hotel at London’s Biggin Hill Airport, which will feature a full range of amenities along with its 56 rooms. A 2022 completion is scheduled for the property, which is geared toward flight crews and customers and employees of surrounding aerospace businesses. Legoland Hotel The Legoland New York Resort in Goshen, New York is scheduled to open this year. The 150-acre theme park will include a 250-room Legoland Hotel and more than 50 attractions, rides and shows across seven themed lands, such as the “Lego Factory Adventure Ride.” NH Hotel Group Spain-based NH Hotel Group gave New York City’s lodging industry a vote of confidence by unveiling its first US property, the upscale NH Collection New York Madison Avenue in a century-old building in Manhattan.

Marriott International Marriott International will add three new hotels to its portfolio of more than 30 properties in Saudi Arabia through a deal that features the world’s largest Aloft site. The agreement with Middle Eastern realty firm Al Saedan Group also includes the territory’s first Renaissance Hotel and a Courtyard by Marriott in the Holy City of Makkah, with all three hotels projected to open by 2025.

Grocery Amazon Amazon appears to have included its cashierless checkout technology in plans for a new full-size Amazon Fresh grocery store in Brookfield, Connecticut. The store will have gated entry and exit lanes located at the front of the store, which is a feature of Amazon’s “Just Walk Out” technology, as well as hardware that could be used for ceiling-mounted cameras and electronic shelving. In addition, it has confirmed plans to open four brickand-mortar grocery stores in Washington, DC; Franconia, Virginia; Chevy Chase, Maryland; and Warrington, Pennsylvania, which would be its first East Coast sites. It has not confirmed whether the new locations would fly its Fresh banner. Grocery Outlet California-based discount retailer Grocery Outlet is expanding toward the East Coast with stores in Pennsylvania. The grocer plans to open up to five new stores in the area this year. Save A Lot Fresh Encounter has opened the first of its remodeled Save A Lot stores in Florida and capped off the event with a $10,000 donation to a regional food bank. The openings come six months after Ohiobased Fresh Encounter dedicated $7 million to renovate 51 corporate-owned Save A Lot sites it acquired after the discount grocer’s decision to transition to a wholesale model. Meijer Meijer has opened three new supercenters in Indiana and Ohio that offer everything from organic food to general merchandise, including beauty care, pet products and women’s clothing. The 155,000-square-foot sites are designed to offer one-stop shopping and also feature delivery, pickup and a Shop & Scan option, which allows customers using a mobile app to scan items as they shop and avoid checkout lines. Whole Foods Market Whole Foods Market has begun to retrofit 100 of its 500 US stores to begin using a more efficient and environmentally friendly refrigerant called Solstice N40, developed by Honeywell.

ISSUE 6, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

It’s the little things 5 tips to prevent fire damage to your building

D

id you know there are around 100,000 fires in commercial properties every year that cost owners 2.4-plus billion dollars? Nobody ever thinks it'll happen to them, but it does. The most important thing you can do as a commercial building owner is to take action now. There are several critical ways to achieve prevention and preparedness, including these five tips:

By Russ Palmer

from your building that don’t need to be there. Some of these hazardous materials include candles, old or broken down machinery, improper storage, and more. Keeping your workspaces tidy and free of obstruction also makes it easier to safely access emergency equipment or exit routes.

No. 3 — Have emergency plans & procedures properly implemented

If a fire occurs, it is crucial to have proper safety plans and emergency procedures in place, including an evacuation plan. Using an Emergency Response Plan (ERP) can help you accurately map out your building’s evacuation routes, fire riser room locations, etc. In addition, set a plan in place for the aftermath, including who to call, how to assess damage, how to submit an insurance claim, etc.

No. 4 — Routinely ID & eliminate electrical hazards

No. 1 — P roperly maintain your fire safety equipment

Not only is it critical to have the correct fire and safety equipment strategically positioned throughout your property, but you must make sure they work. The last thing you want is to be stuck with a non-functional fire extinguisher in a rapidly spreading fire. Each piece of equipment, whether it’s a

Electrical hazards are one of the most common causes of fires in commercial settings. Overloaded outlets, overheating equipment or defective wiring are just a few things that pose a high risk and can be easily eliminated. Train your employees to keep an eye out for these things and get them repaired. A good example of one of these is the HVAC system. The area should be fully equipped with fire alarms and sprinklers so it can be caught and stopped as quickly as possible. sprinkler, fire extinguisher, fire alarm, etc., has its own timeframe for being tested and/ or replaced.

No. 2 — P ractice proper housekeeping

One of the easiest ways to prevent fires is to continuously keep all areas free from clutter, and to eliminate any fire hazardous items

No. 5 — Properly store flammable & hazardous materials One of the most important tips on your list is to properly store and dispose of fire hazardous materials. It is critical to establish a well-ventilated area in the building and workspaces to store flammable materials, including things like cleaning products. CCR

Russ Palmer is owner and founder of Titan Restoration in Mesa, Arizona.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

Get a leg up Study shows how digital tools drive improved project outcomes

T

o use software or not to use software... That is the question many of today's civil contractors are asking in the effort to improve their job outcomes. According to a new study, 39% say they currently don’t use field/project management software, while 66% don’t use model-based technology for their projects.

The report, "Going Digital: Modeling, Scheduling and Field/Project Management for Civil Construction SmartMarket Brief" by Dodge Data & Analytics and Bentley, explores this and offers ways to help make the tools even more effective in the future. Use of modeling tools is relatively low, and among those using them, only one automated

workflow, model-based quantity takeoff for estimating is widely employed. When reviewing several other workflows (such as simulations for RFP/business development communications or digital as-built handovers to owners), the study found that only about 30%-40% of the respondents actually using model-based technologies currently employ any of these other activities. But the contractors who use them consistently report a high level of value derived from them, and once deployed, they use these workflows on the majority of their projects as well. Other insights from the study include: > 61% report that they get high/very high value out of their projects data > While improved schedule performance is a top value driver, improved labor productivity, cost predictability/profitability and reduced costs are all notable project benefits named > 93% experience a medium or higher impact from these tools on the reduction of schedule delays; 34% claim high/very high impact > 65% believe that these tools reduce the risk of construction cost overruns For a copy of the full report, visit www.construction.com. CCR

They said it “The trends were coming before the pandemic. What COVID did is it accelerated at an unbelievable pace customer behaviors that were already evolving.” — Abigail Pringle, Wendy’s president for international and chief development officer, on the brand’s suite of design options for franchisees as it ramps up development

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“We’re building our own little village inside a giant garage.” — Indianapolis’ AMP chef and entrepreneur Craig Baker on how retrofitted shipping containers are playing a bigger role in food halls to differentiate individual eateries and create a unique sense of place

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

“If we’re going to hit all of our growth targets, we have to have a really healthy, robust franchise system.” — Blaze Pizza CFO Brad Reynolds on the brand’s goal to grow from 340 locations to more than 800 by 2025


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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

Up and down… Study says: Supply delays and staffing remain top industry concerns

T

he pandemic economy is affecting the construction industry in both positive and negative ways. The 2021 “Sterling Seacrest Pritchard Risk Sentiment Index of the Construction Industry,” asked almost 90 construction industry leaders to name the top challenges currently facing their businesses. On the positive side, construction professionals are seeing consistent profit margins and more business in their pipelines—but negatively report material costs and delays, as well as staffing challenges, presenting huge hurdles for the industry.

Sterling Seacrest Pritchard

2021 Construction Risk Sentiment Index Identify the top 3 risk issues for your company. 3.37%

COVID-19 Safety

6.74%

Safety Issues (Other than COVID-19)

52.81%

68.54% Yes

Material Costs & Delays

29.21%

Economic Issues

16.85%

Government Regulation

24.72%

Cash Flow/Financial

15.73%

Business Continuity/Succession Planning

3.37%

Cybersecurity

52.81%

31.46% No

Does your company have formal strategies in place to manage its risk?

IF YES... Is your strategy clearly documented?

Staffing/Enough Employees to Handle Projects

Which top issue is your company least prepared to deal with right now? 33.71%

Material Costs & Delays

28.09%

Economic Issues

Has your strategy been communicated to your employees, customers, etc.?

59.65% Yes

75.44% Yes

40.35% No

24.56% No

15.73%

Healthcare Costs

20.22%

Government Regulation

24.72%

Business Continuity/Succession Planning

14.61%

Cybersecurity

35.96%

Staffing/Enough Employees to Handle Projects

60.71%

11.24%

Poorly Trained Employees

14.29%

Too expensive

21.43%

Too time consuming

IF NO...

Where would you place your company’s exposure level for risk at this time? (1-10 scale, 10 is the highest).

Why doesn’t your company have a strategy in place to manage your risk?

3.57%

Never thought about it

We don’t have any risk issues

How does your pipeline of opportunities compare to last year?

4.92

4.91

4.99

4.43

4.41

5.15

2021

2019

2017

2016

Fall 2015

Feb 2015

How are your company’s annual revenues?

53.85%

Better

21.79%

Worse

24.36%

Same

How many employees does your company have? 15.73%

0-10

0-1 million

28.09%

11-30

17.98%

1-5 million

22.47%

31-50

15.73%

5-10 million

15.73%

51-100

38.20%

10-50 million

13.48%

20.22%

More than 500 million

7.87%

4.49%

*Graphs not drawn to scale

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

101-500 More than 500

sspins.com

By Joey Maxwell

The construction businesses surveyed were mostly mid-sized prime contractors with an annual revenue of more than $10 million. Survey participants were asked to choose three top risk issues for their company. Top concerns included: > Material costs and delays (52.8%) > Staffing (52.8%) > Economic issues (29.2%) > Cash Flow (24.7%) Businesses surveyed felt they were least prepared to handle the issues of material costs and delays and staffing. The industry is feeling the strain of increased costs for materials and delays in shipping. The fluctuation in costs has made it very difficult for companies to predict budgets and bid work. It has also made it difficult to stay on budget as material costs increase to record levels and shipping delays result in work slowdowns. Just over 50% of the companies surveyed have had to change the way they work to complete projects on time. Three-quarters of the companies surveyed reported the increased price of materials has negatively impacted their bottom line with 73% of survey participants experiencing project delays. There is good news on the job front. Almost 70% of those asked are seeing a rebound in available jobs and projects. However, finding qualified employees continues to be an ongoing issue for the industry as the skilled labor force has been decreasing for years. The survey did find more than half of the companies surveyed (60%) have increased employee compensation in the past year in an effort to recruit and retain skilled workers. In all, the Risk Sentiment Level in 2021 rose slightly from the last survey in 2019 to 4.92 from 4.91. Sterling Seacrest Pritchard launched its Risk Sentiment Index in 2015 to determine how prepared construction companies are to manage their risk. Risk levels


peaked in 2015 with a level of 5.15 (on a scale of 1-10). It dropped in 2016 (4.43) but jumped again in 2017 (4.99). This year’s risk sentiment seems to be in a good place especially after the many unexpected twists and turns of the past 18 months. As lumber prices decline and some materials are returning to normal shipping schedules, we hope the return to normalcy will allow companies to experience record growth and well managed risk. CCR Joey Maxwell is a partner with Sterling Seacrest Pritchard (www.sterling seacrest.com) in Atlanta. The firm is an expert in insurance and risk management. He can be reached at jmaxwell@sspins.com.

The numbers game

1,500 5,000 304

The number of Hut Lanes that Pizza Hut plans to open across the country in order to get into the drive-thru business. The windows are for previously ordered carryout pizzas. Customers either order by phone, or through the Pizza Hut app or website, or pull up to the window and get their order and leave.

The number of hotels in the construction pipeline for the first quarter of 2021, accounting for more than 620,000 rooms, according to Lodging Econometrics. The number is a slight year-over-year decrease from 2020. The numbers are expected to increase as more Americans get vaccinated and travel.

The amount, in billions, that the 500 largest chains generated in sales in 2020, down $27 billion from the year before, according to Technomic’s “Top 500 Chain Restaurant Report.” Despite that, the market share for the industry’s top 10 chains expanded significantly.

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ISSUE 6, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE

The Newest Normal

What's ahead for the current healthcare construction landscape By Pat Peterson

W

hile adhering to new COVID-19 protocols has been difficult for the construction industry, it has been significantly more taxing on the healthcare

sector, which is not only working to keep its essential workers safe, but also the public at large. The clients of McCarthy Building Companies’ Southern California division also fall into this category. The pandemic has impacted their day to day operations with immense swings in patient counts and interrupted their cash flow with hundreds of elective procedures canceled. In order to deliver quality healthcare to both COVID-19 and non-COVID-19 patients simultaneously, operational protocols have drastically shifted. As the healthcare industry plans for the uncertain future ahead, flexibility will be key. With more than 100 years of healthcare and

20

hospital construction experience, McCarthy knows that when it comes to building healthcare facilities, which are crucial in the fight against COVID-19, it is critical to work strategically and collaboratively with our healthcare clients and partners to overcome these unforeseen construction challenges and complete these essential projects safely and on time. One current healthcare project that McCarthy Southern California has been able to streamline and keep moving forward

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

throughout the pandemic is the Providence Tarzana Cedars Sinai Medical Center, which is dubbed a hospital of the future with unmatched patient care and technology. This project boasts new sustainable and energy efficient designs, including a five-story patient care tower with all private rooms and new state of the art specialty care units that put the focus on the patient and family. To keep the essential healthcare projects like Providence Tarzana streamlined, it has been essential to put our client’s operations first and deliberately rethink our planned approach when it comes to the day-to-day relationship between Hospital and Construction operations. A few successful measures implemented have been: > Creating new temporary construction access points into the facility to reach work areas while minimizing interactions between workers, patients and visitors


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PERSPECTIVE > Developing detailed work plans pre-coordinated with the facility allowing us to take advantage of time periods where patient census allows access into the facility > Increasing communication on expected construction costs to our clients to help them make responsible, timely decisions to keep essential projects and hospital operations adept to deliver care without any significant impact to either As hospitals and care centers adapt to the pandemic, there are a few forward looking predictions that will be vital as general contractors continue construction on these facilities amid this global health crisis. One practice is offsite production (prefabrication), which should continue to play a critical role during this pandemic and beyond. This approach moves what can be substantial portions of a project offsite and into a controlled, factory-like environment where it is easier to manage the potential health risk of employees while maintaining the schedule and commitment of essential building infrastructure to our healthcare clients and community. Contractors have long employed offsite production and prefabrication techniques for healthcare projects across the country, streamlining fabrication efficiencies, control quality and improving safety by reducing work activities on an active jobsite. As general contractors continue to adjust to this “New Normal,” the benefits of offsite production are even greater as it reduces the number of workers on the jobsite, thereby decreasing the possibility of infection and subsequently contact tracing. An offsite production strategy also benefits healthcare owners by increasing flexibility and providing greater certainty. Projects are more likely to be completed on-time and as specified with this method. Additionally, the construction often is faster because offsite production occurs in parallel with other activities on the jobsite. Healthcare providers have been integrating both short-term and long-term

strategies to mitigate the transmission of the current coronavirus and to be actively prepared for future outbreaks. Because COVID-19 can be transmitted by airborne droplets, modifying HVAC systems is a strategy that has been top of mind for healthcare projects. This includes modifying existing air filtration systems, UV or thermal sterilization techniques, systems that provide temporary isolation of supply and return air, and by designing flexible and temporary spaces that provide physical isolation and separation both indoors and outdoors, supported by necessary mechanical, electrical & plumbing systems.

with mobile power, medical gas systems in concert with wireless communications, records management, and instrumentation. It is anticipated that these simple and cost-effective preventative measures will become staples for all healthcare facilities in the future. As contractors continue to navigate through the pandemic and the current landscape of healthcare construction in this region, companies like McCarthy are cautiously optimistic as healthcare systems in Southern California still are looking to the future with new construction projects including, University of California

As general contractors continue to adjust to this “New Normal,” the benefits of offsite production are even greater as it reduces the number of workers on the jobsite, thereby decreasing the possibility of infection and subsequently contact tracing. Additionally, it is equally important to prevent contact transmission and many healthcare facilities have implemented touchless screening platforms to allow employees to self-assess before entering facilities. Healthcare providers also are using antimicrobial coatings in and around patient areas, with many facilities taking steps to reduce the need for movement in and out of patient rooms. To avoid compromising containment, healthcare workers remain in the hallway and communicate with patients and providers in their rooms via windows and audio systems. In areas where hospital space is at full capacity, providers are creating temporary spaces for screening, intake and ambulatory care that can be augmented

Irvine, Harbor-UCLA Medical Center, Hoag Hospital, Children’s Hospital of Orange County and Rady Children’s Hospital to name a few. But the main concern for our healthcare systems right now is focusing on the immediate crisis of the current surge, and fortunately, approved vaccines now are available for essential workers and should be widely available by the second or third quarter of 2021. While some parts of our industry may slow and expose shortcomings such as, lack of ICU beds and infrastructure, flexibility, innovation, collaboration and communication will be the key to successful healthcare designers and builders for the rest of 2021 and for years to come. CCR

Pat Peterson is Project Director at McCarthy Building Companies Inc.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


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INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE

New day dawning Survey examines industry’s take on building safety and productivity with technology By Linda Stueber For many business owners, the pandemic has emphasized the importance of leveraging technology to increase the success of their business. In fact, 92% of the construction owners surveyed say they’ve invested in technology within the past year to meet clients’ changing needs, while more than 80% say they did so to increase their operational efficiency or keep their business afloat. Further, 77% turned to robotics or automated technology to keep up with labor demand. This increased adoption of technology across the industry is not only helping construction owners clear hurdles their business faces; it’s also helping drive employee safety, increase workforce retention, attract prospective employees and lower their insurance liabilities.

Improving driver safety with telematics

and pragmatism by adapting their operations to navigate the

Vehicle telematics and dashcams are prime examples of easy-to-implement technology that can bring safety and operational benefits to construction business owners and their employees. Our survey showed just four in 10 construction owners are utilizing telematics, which is surprising given more than a quarter experienced fleet vehicle accidents in the last year and 77% say the safety of employees driving company vehicles is a top concern. Although vehicle telematics originally were designed for use in trucking, telematics capabilities and features have advanced to a point where it feels like these systems were built for the construction industry. Below are some examples of how telematics can be leveraged by construction business owners:

uncertain market conditions and bring optimism for the 2021

Tracking equipment location

T

he construction industry, like many others, has battled direct and collateral effects from COVID-19. As the pandemic took hold last year, seven in 10 construction

business owners were negatively affected, according to Nationwide’s recent “Agent Authority” survey. And while challenges remain in 2021, construction owners also have shown resilience

peak season. 24

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Many systems offer asset trackers that enable contractors to know the location of all


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INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE their equipment—not just vehicles—including powered and non-powered equipment like bulldozers, skid loaders, trailers and air compressors. The locations easily can be tracked through a single portal or smartphone app. Need to know when building supplies will arrive or where the closest grader is? Just check the app. With some systems, you can even share the whereabouts of a specific vehicle with individuals on a temporary basis, such as a backhoe operator, who can benefit from knowing the location of dump trucks bringing backfill to a site.

driver-facing and even side- or rear-facing cameras to provide clear evidence of what happened and more quickly resolve claims. Telematics-connected dashcam systems also provide a host of safety management-related services like tracking driving behaviors and coaching drivers.

Improving driving behaviors

Contractors can benefit greatly from enhanced safety features to improve the driving behaviors of their employees by monitoring a driver’s speed, hard braking, cornering and harsh acceleration. Products

Contractors can benefit greatly from enhanced safety features to improve the driving behaviors of their employees by monitoring a driver’s speed, hard braking, cornering and harsh acceleration. Monitoring vehicle conditions

Using telematics, drivers or shop personnel can be notified when maintenance is due based on tracked mileage or if an engine problem exists. Staff also can indicate when maintenance is completed, triggering the next cycle. This feature is particularly helpful when vehicles are taken home by employees and may not be inspected regularly or maintained since they are not seen by the shop as often.

Determining who’s at fault

Now considered a best practice for managing fleet risks, dashcams can provide valuable video evidence to help with documenting accidents and determining liability. Dashcams can offer forward-facing,

like Nationwide’s Vantage 360 Telematics program even offer gamification features, which allow drivers to see their own safety scores, review how they did on each trip and compare their performance to co-workers. The survey found drivers often improve their own driving behaviors when they can monitor themselves and face the peer pressure of others seeing their scores. These are just a sample of the benefits construction business owners may see when they use vehicle telematics. Some companies use construction-specialized loss control experts to regularly work with contractors to help them safely manage their fleets and most effectively use technology, like telematics, to mitigate risks and increase profitability.

Technology as a recruiting tool

Many construction business owners also are using technologies such as cloud computing, Internet of Things (IoT) devices, wearable tracking devices, 3D printing, robotics or drones in their operations. While business owners strongly believe these technologies improve worker safety and efficiency, they also are confident they help to create a more attractive work environment for employees. Eighty-five percent or more of the owners surveyed say these technologies improve workplace culture, increase employee satisfaction and better attract existing and prospective employees to their businesses. Another 84% believe they create new job opportunities with their company. For many years, the construction industry has faced challenges associated with a workforce shortage and high demand for skilled tradespeople. With an aging workforce, it is critical for construction companies to effectively recruit younger workers and understand what motivates them. Young workers often are tech-savvy and seek innovative technology in their jobs. With some of the most impressive technology available, the construction industry has a great opportunity to use it as an incentive.

Protecting through change

As business ramps back up, and technology’s role in construction grows, it is imperative for business owners to work with their insurance agent to ensure they have the proper protection for new and changing exposures. Insurance agents can offer valuable advice on business and protection needs, including often unseen exposures such as cyber threats—a growing concern for construction firms both in-office and on jobsites—and they also can help businesses understand the potential business benefits of technologies like telematics. Construction agents are more than just insurance advisors, they are trusted business advisors, so be sure to keep them in your plans as business evolves. CCR

Linda Stueber is Senior VP of Nationwide’s Middle Market Commercial Lines team for Property and Casualty. Stueber leads the General Industry, Construction and Specialty Care Service practice teams from an underwriting and business development standpoint. She joined Nationwide in April 2017 as the VP of Construction Underwriting, having more than 30 years of experience in the commercial property and casualty industry, the last 20 years as a construction industry specialist.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


CIRCLE NO. 15


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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


Attitude matters How citzenM is reshaping how the industry thinks about hotels Interview by Michael J.Pallerino

L

ike any groundbreaking new brand, citizenM started as an idea to disrupt the status quo. So, when it came to

the hospitality sector, the Netherland-based hotelier had to think outside the proverbial hotel box, i.e., not delivering an experience that your father wants, so to speak.

What it delivered was a luxury hybrid hotel model aimed at giving modern travelers what they want—affordable luxury. citizenM (the M of which stands for Mobile) is designed around travelers who value a luxury hotel experience in central city locations, but at prices they can afford. The kind of hotel where you can sleep, work, relax and play. By being a brand that is not afraid of doing things differently, citizenM created a hotel concept for the new millenium—one that pushes boundaries to pull its guests into the mix. To get in the know, we sat down with Ernest Lee, Managing Director, Americas, at citizenM, to get his thoughts on how the brand— and the hospitality market—is shaping up in today's new landscape.

Give us a snapshot of the citizenM brand

citizenM was launched in 2008 with the goal of disrupting the traditional hotel industry. From the start, our philosophy has been "affordable luxury for the people.” Our aim is to create hotels for the modern traveler, giving them everything they need and nothing they don’t. In practice, this means central locations in the world’s most exciting cities, but at an affordable price. As a brand, we’re dedicated to design, art, technology and comfort, and we give guests everything they expect from a high-end hotel.

ISSUE 6, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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ATTITUDE MATTERS What type of consumer are you targeting?

Our core consumer is a particular type of traveler—the mobile citizen—and we actually named our brand after this customer profile (the ‘M’ in citizenM stands for “mobile”). Mobile citizens travel frequently, for work and also for pleasure, or some combination of the two, and they value a luxury hotel experience in a central city location at an affordable price. Every decision we make is based around these travels and their ever-evolving appreciation of luxury and value. To that end, over the past year, we’ve also introduced some new products that respond to how we believe these customers will travel and live post-pandemic. For example, our corporate subscription program offers an opportunity for distributed “teams ”of mobile citizens whose companies have adopted remote or hybrid work policies. This service creates a single place for guests to stay, play and meet when they travel for work.

30

How does your hotel design cater to today's consumer?

Our hotels are designed as more than just places to sleep—they also offer somewhere to work, relax and play. All citizenM properties place an emphasis on comfortable, well-designed and highly functional space, from our art-filled living rooms full of Vitra furniture, to our societyM meeting rooms and cloudM rooftop bars. These are really flexible environments that can serve a wide range of consumer needs over the course of any day, especially now that remote and hybrid work are popular. As a result, more internal company travel and desire for “third” places, which are here to stay. It will be crucial for hotels

to fill a number of different roles, from restaurant, to office and meeting space, and post-work hangout. Our design approach means we are able to cover this wide range of uses and needs under one roof, which is really valuable for our guests.

Walk us through your hotel design. It is impossible to walk into citizenM and confuse it with any other hotel. This is by design, and it is a direct response to what our customers want and need from a hospitality environment. citizenM hotels are planned and designed to maximize everything that frequent travelers need (such XL king-size beds, spacious living rooms and personable service) and to minimize everything this

Travel is changing, and it will look different than it did pre-pandemic. This is especially true for business travel. What’s different, though, also can be better.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


ES T

2010

CIRCLE NO.16


ATTITUDE MATTERS cohort does not need or want (front desks and elaborate check-in, concierge services and ironing boards in every room). Guest experience is really the key driver of design. Every citizenM hotel has a signature living room filled with locally commissioned art, hundreds of books, designated workspaces and comfortable couches. By focusing on a streamlined guest experience—such as app-based check-in—we’re able to recapture usable floor area and give it back to our customers in the form of food services, lounge areas, and work spaces. Our guest rooms are another expression of our brand values, because they offer exactly what customers need: an XL king-size bed with high-quality linen, a powerful rain shower, superfast free Wi-Fi,

and the ability to control lighting, HVAC and entertainment through the app. We also take a similarly focused approach to the exterior of our hotels, many of which feature unique public artworks that can serve as an asset and point of excitement for the surrounding community.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

We approach construction and design like a retail company, which means we view ourselves in the product business, not the project business. Our strategy focuses on pursuing standardized design with scalable processes that enable our rollout. We can adjust these for the nuances of particular local markets, but our goal is to be faster, better, and more cost-effective with every effort.

To that end, we take full control of our product and stakeholder chain. We bring every discipline under one roof as a fully integrated developer, investor and owner-operator, which allows us to consolidate decision-making and more effectively balance cost and quality. We also capitalize on technology as a core of our construction and design strategy. For example, since the very beginnings of citizenM, we have adopted modular construction (where possible) as a key part of our building practices, which gives us both speed and quality control. We’re excited to be opening a new modular hotel in Los Angeles this year, after opening a modular property in Seattle last summer.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

The biggest issues today are inflation, inflation, inflation. The impact of labor shortages, materials price increases, supply chain bottlenecks, all exacerbated by COVID has significant impacts in just about every market we are active in around the world. Sustainability also is a crucial issue that will influence construction, particularly being able to design to a level meeting even more ambitious ESG goals while balancing a healthy rollout space.

Talk about sustainability.

citizenM has always been an advocate for sustainable practices, from adaptive reuse and modular construction where possible, to highly efficient operational strategies that minimize waste and energy consumption. We also undertake a constant assessment of our footprint, which is not to be overlooked because in order to improve, we need to know where we stand on an objective basis. Now, we’re accelerating our commitment to environmental, social and governance (ESG) activities. Our ESG vision is to influence positive change in a world where we are simply guests; our strategy focuses on operating and building healthier, greener hotels, doing the right thing for our people and communities, and engaging our guests with transparent information about our activities.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


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ATTITUDE MATTERS

Two of our key priorities include third-party sustainability benchmarking and future-proofing of all hotels. In 2020, for example, we achieved a 25% year-overyear jump in our brand’s Global Real Estate Sustainability Benchmark ranking. We also received green building certifications for our newest US hotels in Boston, Washington DC and Seattle. In terms of construction and operations, we focus on smart, sustainable design strategies and by optimizing energy use in every hotel, we're able to meet our own stringent environmental goals.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

We see a lot of opportunities to meet the needs of an evolving market in creative ways, and we’re excited to serve new types of travelers. Already our new products have received a lot of interest from digital nomads, as well as commercial real estate leaders and corporate travel managers, so we see strong demand for these services. When you look at the various demographic and geographic shifts that are accelerating nationwide, this makes sense.

34

For example, more corporate employees are engaging in remote and hybrid work, and more people also are launching entrepreneurial ventures and entering the “creator economy.” So what we’re seeing— and real estate analysts, economists, and other academics back this up—is decentralization and dispersion not just in terms of where people live, but also in terms of the way companies are organized. Our position is that this new remote-hybrid environment is actually quite beneficial for us as a hotel company, because we can offer corporate subscriptions and other consumer products that directly serve this market, and we’re well placed geographically to capitalize on it.

What have been some of the adjustments you have made over the past year (with everything happening)?

We had a busy 2020. In addition to opening two US hotels during the pandemic, in Seattle and Washington, DC, and completing numerous deals for new projects, we also worked hard to even further improve our business model. Our perspective was “let’s come out of this period with a better

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

product and give guests more.” This was a good time to accelerate certain strategic investments, including in technology—both in our back-end infrastructure and also new consumer-facing products. In terms of specific products, we launched app-based, fully contactless operations across all of our worldwide hotels. We also created business-focused initiatives that creatively monetized underused space and cater to evolving consumer needs. Corporate subscription by citizenM, for example, incentivizes guest loyalty with transferable stays that offer access to guest rooms and meeting space in any of citizenM’s hotels worldwide, both for individuals and employers.

Are you optimistic about what you’re seeing out there?

Yes. This is an opportunity for innovative, well-capitalized companies to take advantage of serious shifts in how consumers will approach the market post-pandemic. Travel is changing, and it will look different than it did pre-pandemic. This is especially true for business travel. What’s different, though, also can be better. For creative, agile, and


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ATTITUDE MATTERS forward-thinking hotel brands there certainly is cause for optimism. Business travel, for example, will still be important, but we’ll see new use cases. More people will combine work trips with leisure trips, a so-called “bleisure” travel that may lead to longer hotel stays. As corporate workers become more dispersed, there will likely be an increase in business travel when those workers all converge on headquarters for in-person strategizing and meetings. Hotel brands like citizenM, with an active project pipeline, strong capitalization and a nuanced understanding of core customer needs, will be able to innovate and find success.

How do you select your locations?

Our site selection process is fairly simple: We look at the world’s best cities—both well-established and on the rise—and locations where culture and commerce intersect. We look for prime sites that put our guests within walking distance of important attractions, and we always seek to establish ourselves in neighborhoods where we can become an integral part of the community itself. Our hotels are assets for the local community as well as for our guests.

We see a lot of opportunities to meet the needs of an evolving market in creative ways, and we’re excited to serve new types of travelers.

What is your growth plan?

We plan to continue our global rollout as a fully integrated owner-operator in key gateway cities. It’s a vigorous growth strategy, and we’re preparing to open two additional West Coast hotels, citizenM Los Angeles Downtown and citizenM San Francisco Union Square, along with two properties in Miami and a second property in Washington DC. citizenM also has additional hotels in development in Chicago, Seattle, Austin, Menlo Park and several other North American cities. We’re looking at strategically located metropolitan regions in a wide geographic range, and some of our main targets are Nashville, Denver, San Diego, Atlanta and Dallas. Internationally, citizenM is launching a new hotel on the ChampsÉlysées in Paris later this year. We’re also targeting Berlin and Frankfurt in Germany, Rome in Italy, as well as several other strategic cities and countries. CCR

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


CIRCLE NO. 19


How to Make Your Advertising in CCR… By Jim Nowakowski, President Accountability Information Management, Inc. We do a lot of advertising research. And today, there’s a lot of confusing information about what advertising is and isn’t. The Readership Circles chart on the right will help you cut through this confusion. Because today, an “ad” is just part of the equation: readers get information digitally. They go through Google to find you (over 4-billion searches each day), so your ad investment in CCR is just part of the equation. This article explains how to maximize that investment. Content is the Key Your ad appears in the print and digital version of the media outlet. The publisher of CCR, David Corson, invests most of his time and money building his “overall audience” for your ad (you can see his audience in this auditing tool: http://intrln.com/ccr) But he also has his website to handle the audience he can’t control: the Google audience. Therefore, you can help maximize your investment by sending in your company information for CCR's website. The more content you have on the internet, the more chances you have of being found and purchased. Simple, huh? Your Product is Really Information No matter what product or service you are selling, your real product is information. Thus, you are in an information war competing for the attention of buyers with not just your competitors, but with everyone on the internet. The more content you have that’s yours, the more opportunities for them to see you and go through the readership circles. Why We Know This AIM places a tracking code on CCR’s website and each month monitors visitors. Then, because you advertise, you receive 10 “dossiers” seen on the right on companies who have consumed data – companies that represent high-valued ACCOUNTABILITY WEBSITE AUDIT targets because their need is NOW for what you are selling.

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CCR-MAG.COM

David Corson has us audit this activity. You receive this audit if you advertise, and it represents a rich field of leads for you. Call David Corson 678.765.6550 today to find out more details! Or, call us and we’ll help you understand the powerful information at your disposal.

Always Trusted Information Accountability Information Management, Inc. 553 N. North Court, Suite 160 Palatine, Illinois 60067 847-358-8558 www.a-i-m.com

IMPORTANT. This audit covers the above website for the period of September, 2020. It was conducted by allowing Accountability Information Management, Inc. (AIM) by placing a proprietary Code on the website to provide deeper analytics from the thousands of monthly visitors to the website to the publisher (i.e., the companies utilizing the website). AIM is in the business of auditing and verifying data. For information, contact: AIM, 553 N. North Court, Suite 160, Palatine, Illinois 60067. PUBLISHER’S STATEMENT. Commercial Construction & Renovation, CCR-MAG.COM, is a community of leading commercial construction professionals within the retail, restaurant, hospitality, health care, federal, multifamily and other commercial sectors. The website content spans the design, construction and facilities operations of major commercial construction segments to meet the information needs of today’s high level executives. Visitors will find information relevant to the collaborative management process required to complete projects on time and on budget, and to efficiently manage these facilities. PRIVACY. F&J Publications, LLC discloses the information we collect on this website and how it is used. This report is based on visitors to CCR-MAG.COM. Specifically, the information in this report is aggregated to provide our advertisers information on website usage. F&J Publications always reserves the right to release information about visitors, including non-personal information. NUMBER OF COMPANIES

XXX

This is the number of companies that the Code identifies. This number is the monthly universe of companies that can be identified from the thousands of visitors to this website.

NUMBER OF TIMES THESE

X,XXX

This is the number of times these companies visited the website. The average per company is 1.41.

PAGE VIEWS BY

X,XXX

This is the number of page views that these companies viewed on the website. The average pages viewed by a company this month is 2.04.

SEARCH TERMS USED BY

XX

This is the number of identifiable different search terms these companies used to arrive on the website. The search terms, for example, were put into a browser which delivered results. Among the results was a page on this website. For example, while many people find it by typing in “commercial construction and renovation” or “CCR” in a search engine like Google or Bing, other terms deliver specific pages from this website based on what users type into the search engine. These searches account for less than 5% of the total search terms used. The top ten (listed) account for 48% of the identified total (not counting CCR itself).

INDUSTRIES

XX

This is the number of companies that the Code is able to classify. It represents 5% of the total companies that visited this website, and is supplied for reference only. See UNDERSTANDING THE DATA.

FIRST PAGE VIEWED

X,XXX

The Code keeps track of the first page viewed by the companies, and is the same number of times the companies came to the website. The chart Key First Pages Viewed lists the top ten landing pages from this grouping (excluding CCR-MAG.com itself, which is among the top, but not more than 12%).

SEPTEMBER 2020

SEARCH TERMS USED TO REACH US • “Christopher Bushnell” AND Social Security • gary falco architecture • hi macs color TERRAZZO LUNA • inverter eon model el3 10 watt pricing • metal work very essential tools • mulehide jts1 colors • penncolor uv dispersions • permeable pavement concerns • rampart yellow wallcovering • silicone molds KEY FIRST PAGES VIEWED (other than CCR-MAG.com) • 7-essential-tools-for-your-metalworkingprojects • what-is-soil-reinforcement-and-how-is-it-done • 8-important-safety-measures-forconstruction-sites • new-menards-store-in-paducah-ky • construction-procurement-101 • conversations-with-bennett-van-wert-dwm • conversation-withbobby-darnell-cmc • american-dream-mall-in-nj-to-reopen-onoctober-1 • cny-group-names-new-vp-of-people-andculture • the-impact-of-building-materials-inconstruction COUNTRY BREAKDOWN OF COMPANIES United States India Pakistan Canada United Kingdom Other (64 countries)

XX% X% X% X% X% XX%

UNDERSTANDING THE DATA This report is provided to you from the publisher to help you understand the creation, distribution and consumption of information on the digital highways. The companies that are provided to you in this report have visited CCR-MA G.COM and consumed information. Knowing the name of the company gives you a “heads up” to pursue for your sales efforts. If you need to explore additional ideas, including ways to utilize this information, please contact the publisher or AIM directly. In addition to the INDUSTRY/COMPANY listings, you will see a list of companies that are not categorized by Code into industries. These are sometimes more valuable and should be considered carefully for your sales efforts. Finally, often a company will utilize a general channel (like Comcast), which does not provide the individual company’s IP. These visitors are often just as valuable in terms of “what” they consume on our website. We would happy to help you pursue this type of analysis. CCR7002.1


...Pay Dividends. The magazine or newsletter or website has a specific number of possibilities - the overall audience. You must factor that into ROI.

No matter where you place your message, this is the pattern of what we call the “Readership Chain.” And the weakest link in the chain will break it. That’s why you need as much content as you can on the Internet. People, your buyers, get distracted easily. Your messages must be compelling.

Some convert into readers of your message.

Not all people will "see" what you are selling. You must know some of these basics.

Some also raise the hand and ask for information.

Accountability Tools from CCR The audience audit tool (on the left) enables you to see CCR’s audience for yourself. The Company Dossier tool on the right highlights 10 companies who have consumed CCR content that month for your marketing purposes. Advertising in CCR gets you these dossiers. And there’s much more. Below are the highlights from the prior month for your review. Imagine being able to see who is consuming content like this, and then putting them in your marketing sights!

ACCOUNTABILITY WEBSITE AUDIT Each month advertisers receive powerful information to help them market their products and services. Here is a taste. 98,819 pages were consumed by over 2,000 companies. Among them: • • • • • •

Architectural firms like HDR Inc. and Smithgroup Universities like Illinois Wesleyan, Yale or University of Massachusetts Energy companies like BP America or Schlumberger Financial companies like American Express, Mckinsey & Company and Wells Fargo Materials companies like USG Corp and Carlisle Industrial companies like Aecom, Eaton and General Dynamics

And thousands more like CBRE, Texas Instruments, Goodyear, St. Lukes Episcopal Hospital. All these companies have projects going on – projects you can access to sell your products and services. Call the publisher, David Corson for a complete details. 678.765.6550. Or email him at: davidc@ccr-mag.com. CIRCLE NO. 20


The revival continues Construction executives discuss life in the New Normal 40

W

hile nobody is officially using the term “post-pandemic life,” signs of activity in a world that was racked by the COVID-19 virus abound. Professionals particpating in the Commercial Construction & Renovation monthly podcast roundtable agree that new, more encouraging days are ahead. The monthly podcasts, hosted by CCR Publisher David Corson and Editor Michael J. Pallerino, include a diverse set of commercial construction professionals representing the vendor and end-user sides of the business. The June discussion centered on a return to normalcy, even though the industry still faces issues like labor and supply shortages. Following is an edited look at the June discussion.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


ANDY BRIGGS Solara Hospitality

BARRY GREIVE Target Corp

JASON KAPKA Tinker Federal Credit Union

TIM RICH Houchens

BARRY SCHWARTZ FloorMax USA

SHAWN WALCHEF Cali BBQ Media

ISSUE 6, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

41


THE REVIVAL CONTINUES CCR: Tell us a little about yourself. Shawn Walchef, Cali BBQ Media: I know it raises eyebrows whenever I say I am with Cali BBQ Media, which is why I say it. We’re a single-unit barbecue restaurant that has been in business for 13 years in San Diego. We’ve done more than $25 million in sales from that single location. We failed multiple times in the beginning. We picked a terrible location, according to industry experts. We opened in 2008, which was a terrible time due to difficult low-margin business standards. But in 13 years, we’ve learned from the school of hard knocks how to use the smartphone and the internet to brand ourselves; to get our message out there; to use podcasting, YouTube videos, social media, Instagram, TikTok, you name it.

San Diego County that will all be serviced by our master smokehouse. The kitchens are 200 square feet and can be built out for less than $75,000. To open another full-service restaurant sports bar with 60 employees would cost $1.5 to $2 million. Now we’re adding micro-locations—the spoke-and-wheel. Barry Schwartz, FloorMax USA: We’re actually a pretty unique company. We’re national flooring contractors, as opposed to one of those national facility companies you see at trade shows that do lighting, plumbing, etc. That’s not what we do. All we do is flooring, repairs, replacements, installations across the country. We are based out of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. I co-founded the company

We plan to open up 10 more ghost kitchens in San Diego County that will all be serviced by our master smokehouse. The kitchens are 200 square feet and can be built out for less than $75,000. — Shawn Walchef, Cali BBQ Media

What we do is literally teach other small business owners and entrepreneurs how to embrace the power of digital storytelling. For example, I have a weekly podcast called “Digital Hospitality,” but we are in the barbecue business. We’re building the Amazon Prime of Barbecue. We’re converting our existing 5,700 square foot restaurant and sports bar into a master smokehouse. We’re going to have 10 Ole Hickory Pits. So, where people used to dine, I’m hiring architects and designers to remove seating from the restaurant. Literally, these people have been doing business for decades and they’ve said no restaurant owner or restaurant group has ever asked them to remove seating to add revenue. We’re adding ghost kitchens. We’ve already opened one in downtown San Diego that is staffed with one person. We plan to open up 10 more ghost kitchens in

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about 10 years ago. Today, we service about 3,500 stores a year, everything from new replacements to repairs, all types of flooring. We have another division called SAR Floor, which is on the manufacturing end. Tim Rich, Houchens: We’ve been around for a little over 103 years. I’ve been here for about 15 years. My role is real estate, new construction, maintenance and a few other departments. We have about 18,000 employees who stretch from the western part of New York to the panhandle of Florida and Arkansas with grocery stores, restaurants, convenience stores and hardware stores. Plus, we own 17 other companies. My role is what we call the food group—restaurants, groceries and hardware stores. I oversee all of the stores for my respective departments—about 500 of them. We own a few shopping centers, but not

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

many—10 to 12. The majority of our stores are leases, in which I play a tenant role. Barry Greive, Target Corp.: I’m the building regulatory and strategy lead. When you envision Target, you think of Target stores. But there’s a lot more than that. We have approximately 1,900 stores in 50 states, but we also manage about 2,400 buildings. We own most of our properties. On average, we’re building about 30 to 40 new locations a year—most are the smaller format. They could be 8,000 to 50,000 square feet. We are starting to lease those, which are going into more large cities and college campuses. With that, we have about 2,400 buildings in our portfolio—high-rise buildings, 2 million square foot distribution centers. I think we’re up to about 45 different distribution centers across the country and 1,900 stores. I’m a former building inspector/building official. I help make sure there is consistent code application throughout all Target properties. If there are challenges during design, construction or during the life cycle of a building, I get involved, and advise or resolve as needed. I am in the properties department, so I work intimately with our project managers and owner site representatives who oversee construction projects. I also work closely with our interior designers, and architects and engineers. I get involved with our designs. We have internal architects and internal engineers who do our specifications. This year, we’re remodeling about 140 different locations. Next year, we’re looking at 200-plus. So, with the 30 new locations, we’re pretty busy. We have small projects going all the time. For example, we’re adding Ulta Beauty areas to approximately 100 of our locations this year. We also have a new partnership with Disney. So there’s always different initiatives. Andy Briggs, Solara Hospitality: We own. We operate. We develop. Then we eventually sell the hotels we have. I’m based in Columbia, South Carolina. My partner, Clancy Cipkala, and I have been doing this for 30-plus years together. We are at a point where we are just doing hotels within a two hour radius of Columbia.


CIRCLE NO. 21


THE REVIVAL CONTINUES We’ve developed more than 30 hotels, but we do them one at a time. We pick out everything. I sit there and go over all of the flooring and look at plumbing fixtures. We do things now. We don’t wait. CCR: Tell us a little about what’s on your to-do list. Solara Hospitality Briggs’: We’ve been building a hotel right in the middle of all this craziness. That’s what we do. We own and operate six hotels—the majority of them are Marriott branded. We also own two Residence Inns, two TownPlaces, a Courtyard and a Sleep Inn near Charleston, South Carolina. We typically go with Marriott-branded hotels. Right now in our pipeline, we’re looking at three hotels over the next five years.

and Joanna, and Chip Gaines. It’s starting to happen more and more. Walmart has been doing it, too. Cali BBQ Media’s Walchef: I’m curious. I saw that Walmart is getting into the ghost kitchen game. I know a lot of the McDonald’s haven’t renewed their leases there. That said, I know Target has a different philosophy, especially since you’re looking at smaller footprints. It’s happening more in the San Diego area. I love what Target’s doing. Can you tell us a little bit about the grocery and the food side of the business? Where do you see that going? Target’s Greive: If you talk about a normal Target store on eight acres in a cornfield in

We have about 18,000 employees who stretch from the western part of New York to the panhandle of Florida and Arkansas with grocery stores, restaurants, convenience stores and hardware stores. In total, we own 17 other companies. — Tim Rich, Houchens

Target’s Greive: We’re renovating a lot of different stores right now. As I mentioned, we’re looking at 140, with 200 on the slate for next year. The projects vary from $200,000 to over $5 million. We’re also building out 30 plus new locations, many of those in large cities. For example, we used to have nine stores in New York City. Now, we’re getting close to 25, including multiple ones on Long Island. We have some in Connecticut, too. We’re now in all 50 states. The last holdout was Vermont, and we built one there last year. CCR: Talk a little about the relationships you’re building with Ulta and Disney. Target’s Greive: That’s a great question. We also have partnerships with Magnolia

44

Kansas, we’re seeing those food offerings for grocery expanding. But you used to have a Pizza Hut in there, and a Starbucks. The food offerings in stores is ever evolving. In the urban areas you’re seeing more grab-and-go food—things like pre-packaged sandwiches. That’s a huge opportunity for those locations, so I don’t see that slowing down. I see it expanding, actually. CCR: Back to the to-do lists: What are some of the things you have going on right now? Houchens Rich: We’re doing about eight to 12 new Ace Hardwares each year. We design and construct about three to four Crossroads Markets each year. Think of it like a 10,000 square foot neighborhood market that also has fuel and a small QSR inside.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Just recently, we opened what we call a Crossroads Express. It’s about a 6,000 square foot convenience store focused on health. So, instead of the ghost kitchen, at this location, we have what we call a deli prep room. It’s where they cut fruit onsite and cook. They’ll do rotisserie chicken. We created a window into that deli prep area, which gives it a very clean look. I like the ghost kitchen idea from a financial standpoint, but this is more where customers can see the food being prepared onsite, which is normally labeled a gas station or convenience store. It gives them a more healthy feel. As we keep watching the numbers, I’m sure I’ll be asked to find more sites like this one. And then we’ll go to market and find more and more of those. Cali BBQ Media’s Walchef: We’re in the process of securing a long-term lease at our existing location. Hopefully, that will allow me to put those 10 smokers in our existing dining room. I already have three: one that has been delivered, two that are being built and one that is getting shipped. I’m working on our second ghost kitchen location close to San Diego State. They’re building another extension of the campus and a smaller 35,000-seat stadium where the Chargers’ stadium used to be. So they’re looking for food partners. I’m working on a potential partnership agreement, but I’m more interested in being the primary barbecue partner for the entire campus. So, if anybody wants barbecue on any part of campus, whether it’s basketball, football, faculty or students, we’d be their source. CCR: When you look at the past year or so, what are some of the lessons you’ve learned? FloorMax’s Schwartz: For me, I was a little concerned because I’m from the old school. I like the handshake. I have the fun job of bringing samples and taking people to lunch. So not being able to travel took some getting used to—having to learn the technological part of meeting people was concerning. But I’ve been impressed with the quality. My 12 year old usually helped me with the technology side. But I’ve been managing to have very good meetings. I thought it might be hard to relate to people, but it was not.


I was recently on a virtual trade show conversation with a person from Walgreens for 25 minutes. I almost forgot I was online. It’s becoming very natural. That’s how I feel. We’ve been pretty busy. We have some accounts that have had a rough time. Before the pandemic, I was going for chains that I would call were Amazon proof. The biggest one I have found is a chain called DaVita Dialysis Center. No drone is coming down to clean your blood. So they must have locations. Healthcare has been a good industry for us, especially with COVID. Our installers have to go through the testing and procedures. And while business is down, we have been working through the pandemic pretty well. Another industry that I found doing well is distribution centers. I have done about three Walgreens distribution centers, where we’re doing the diamond plate steel flooring. I think that will be a big growth opportunity for us in the future, as opposed to just our standard regular retail chain stores. CCR: Tell us a little about your story. How did you get started in the industry? Target’s Greive: I grew up in Minnesota, a town called Lake City, in the beautiful river valley of the Mississippi. I grew up fishing and hunting—a lot of outdoor activities. When I graduated high school, I didn’t know what I wanted to do, so I joined the United States Marine Corps. I spent four years there. When I got out, I started my own little renovation construction company renovating and flipping homes before it was popular. I had a realtor tell me there was a need for inspectors, so I went to school and got a certificate in building inspection technology. Believe it or not, there are classes for becoming an inspector. I had a job before I graduated—and that was just with a certificate, not a college degree. I worked for the State of Minnesota doing code administration. My work consisted of traveling around the state and evaluating building inspection departments. What it really taught me was how various jurisdictions operate, and knowing where to find information was probably the biggest lessons learned. I came to work for Target over 11 years ago. I’ve been doing the same thing since

Day 1. That’s making sure there is consistent application of the codes from beginning to maintaining our properties. I help with the designs of our properties and with any construction issues like flooring. Take slip and falls—I help our legal team in that area. I am involved in all the code aspects, whether it’s fire, building, electrical, plumbing or mechanical. One of the newer ones is energy efficiency and green codes—solar panels, windmills and electric vehicle charging stations. There’s a lot of aspects that Target has challenged me. Before coming to Target, I thought I was a really knowledgeable code person. The job has really stretched my knowledge and opened up my eyes to the many different parts of the country and their different requirements.

California, a very affluent part of San Diego. At age 13, I started washing dishes and bussing tables at our family restaurant. My grandfather was a doctor who invested in real estate after his medical career. He developed different properties in San Diego—single-family residential condominium complexes, as well as a restaurant facility and assisted-care facility. He thought it would be a good idea to take over the restaurant business even though he had no business being in the restaurant business. And he wanted his children and grandkids to work in the business. That is the old Bulgarian way. So, at age 13, instead of playing sports and going to the beach and hanging out with my friends on the weekends, I’d

We’re renovating a lot of different stores right now. As I mentioned, we’re looking at 140, with 200 on the slate for next year. The projects vary from $200,000 to $5 million. — Barry Greive, Target Corp.

It takes a long time to get stuff through the permitting process. We get permits for over a hundred small projects that must be completed by the end of the year and we’re struggling with that. About eight years ago, I was challenged to go back to school and get my college degree. So I did it while working full-time. I now have a business administration degree. I don’t know if it’s helped me, but maybe I’m a little more well-rounded. When I was in the Marines, I was an A-4 jet mechanic—a plane captain for the same plane that was used in the movie “Top Gun.” I was the person you see standing on a ship or on the ground giving flight direction to the planes. Cali BBQ Media’s Walchef: I never met my father. I was raised by my Bulgarian grandfather and Japanese grandmother. I was raised in a very privileged, white immigrant privileged household in La Jolla,

drive out about 20 miles east of La Jolla to a very eclectic part of town to bus tables and wash dishes. After I got rejected by all three law schools in San Diego (I wanted to be a sports attorney or sports entertainment attorney) it turned out that the same location where I was bussing tables and washing dishes became available after we sold the property. It was a restaurant as well as an assisted-care facility. I helped my grandfather sell it. I was the trustee of his estate as he started to age, and we had an opportunity to take over an existing breakfast business and turn it into a sports entertainment destination. We got to activate a full Type 47 liquor license. Me and one of my best friends from college decided it was a great idea in 2008 at the height of the economic recession to get involved in a restaurant in a difficult location. We were laughed at for the location we picked. It was very difficult.

ISSUE 6, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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THE REVIVAL CONTINUES We opened with 18 employees, did $300,000 in sales the first year and failed miserably for multiple years. So we decided to do barbecue. That became our point of differentiation. We did it because of our love of giving back to the community. We wanted to help some underprivileged youth get involved with sports. One of the ideas was to put on an amateur barbecue contest, which I knew nothing about. After hitting the internet, I found the names of three different people involved in professional barbecue. One of them, Gene Goycochea, said he’d help put on our amateur event since we were doing it for kids to raise money. It was successful. He said that if we ever wanted to open a barbecue restaurant he would teach us how. Thirteen years later and we’ve done more than $25 million in sales. But more importantly, we have a barbecue media company. Every week, I interview people who are playing the game within the game.

time I was done, I had been working in hotels since I was 19. I’ve been doing this as an owner for about 12 years. I started out as a banquet waiter—schlepping plates and things like that. My partner gave me an opportunity to help operate all of our hotels. We own and operate them. I have a 38-inch screen where I can see all the front desks of our hotels. We’re grinding it out trying to make it all happen. Houchens Rich: I currently live in the Bowling Green, Kentucky area. I grew up in rural Kentucky where my dad was a construction worker and mom ran a country restaurant she owned. I come from humble beginnings. I went to the University of Kentucky. I ended up on the five-year plan, where after graduating, I went to work for Conrail in the Northeast. I worked on the railroad for 10 years, managing bridge projects and railroad projects. I lived in

We’ve been pretty busy. Healthcare has been a good industry for us, especially with COVID. Our installers have to go through the testing and procedures. — Barry Schwartz, FloorMax USA

Every business is a media business. Every business is an e-commerce business. It’s our job to figure out the digital side and the real-life side—how do we actually implement and make it easier on our customers digitally. The pandemic has only accelerated what we’ve seen in the hospitality business before—ordering online, having a mobile-first website, understanding that technology. If you can figure that out, you will win. For us, it’s all thanks to digital. Solara Hospitality Briggs’: I am from Asheville, North Carolina. I’m a Southern boy who didn’t grow up with anything. We were backwoods rednecks who farmed. I actually was a baseball player. I played at the University of Tennessee. I played there a year and actually did real college. By the

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Columbus, Ohio, Philadelphia, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and Indianapolis. Finally, I ended up back in Kentucky, where I worked for a design-build general contractor as a project manager. I spent 10 years there. One of the projects I had was at Tinker Air Force Base. The best project I had was in Lemoore, California—a Naval air station that had an F-18 fleet. I’ve built several buildings on that base. I never got to ride in one; I was impressed with the F-18s. I’ve been here at Houchens for 15 years. I enjoy what I do. I have three children and three grandchildren. Of my three kids, my oldest daughter lives in different places around the world. She currently lives in Chicago. My second, my son, is in the Air Force. He is a weapons instructor. He works at a firing range, where he instructs Air

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Force recruits coming through on how to shoot—what to do right, what not to do. My youngest son will be a senior at the University of Alabama. He is going for an aerospace engineering degree. He’ll be the first rocket scientist from our area. FloorMax’s Schwartz: I grew up in the flooring business. My father would talk about being an inspector. My company started as a carpet inspector for manufacturers. We started in the residential sector. For example, if you had a problem with your carpet or someone saw something they didn’t like in the carpet, they’d contact the manufacturer. The manufacturer would contact Carpet Technical Services—the name of our company: CTS Flooring. We’d determine whether your carpet was a manufacturer defect or not. We started doing more commercial project inspections. Waldenbooks was one of our first clients. And then the light went on. My father said, “Why don’t we sell flooring?” There was more money than just doing inspections and everyone was asking for our recommendation. That’s how it started. We entered into installations because we had to be experts in determining if the problems were installation-related. When I graduated from college, I wasn’t sure what I was going to do. I graduated with a degree in business and economics. I saw my brother doing really well in the family business and living down in Brooklyn Heights, a really nice part of New York. So I told my dad I wanted to be involved. Sales was the only option. My dad was a very encouraging kind of guy. So I went out and got involved with a company with a headhunter—learning about sales. My dad ended up retiring and moving to Santa Fe, New Mexico—like a scene from the movie “City Slickers” with Billy Crystal. There was this Jewish guy from New York living in Santa Fe. He had a cowboy hat and he was riding horses. My son is not going to be in the business. He’s in the film industry, working on digital production, which is popular now. He just finished working on a Mark Wahlberg film in the Boston area. He works on projects all over. My daughter works in film as well. She was on the COVID team—a Netflix project called “Don’t Look Up” with Meryl Streep, Leo DiCaprio and Jonah Hill. Their budget was $30 million. CCR


It’s the networking that matters

APRIL 29 & 30

Your sponsorship affords you the opportunity to: • Build personal and professional relationships with key decision makers from some of the industry’ most high profile companies. • Gain insights into key issues and trends that will influence your business in the years ahead. • Put yourself in a category-exclusive, one-on-one experience that’s without equal in our industry.

APRIL 1 & 2

(VIRTUAL EVENTS) CCR-MAG.COM

Become part of a program that helps forge strong relationships with high-level decision makers CIRCLE NO. 22


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING

Report spotlights industry’s leading general contractors

T

he commercial construction industry revolves around the work today’s general contractors do. To help you get a beat on the who’s who of today’s leading GMs, our annual report highlights the leaders in the retail, restaurant, hospitality, healthcare (and other) sectors. In addition, the report provides the contact information and contact person for each firm. If you didn’t make the list, contact Publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com.

48

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

RESTAURANT

Lendlease.................................................... $1,100,665,809.00 Swinerton.................................................... $690,163,000.00 The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $585,000,000.00 James McHugh Construction Co.................. $230,347,006.00 Jacobsen Construction Company................. $67,000,000.00 Wolverine Building Group............................. $64,700,000.00 Whitestone Construction.............................. $50,000,000.00 Otto Construction......................................... $30,000,000.00 William A. Randolph, Inc............................... $25,000,000.00 Venture Construction Group of Florida, Inc.... $20,000,000.00

HEALTHCARE

HOSPITALITY

Swinerton.................................................... $396,589,000.00 The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $273,000,000.00 Lendlease.................................................... $136,850,181.00 First Finish, LLC........................................... $100,000,000.00 EBCO General Contractor, Ltd....................... $79,865,000.00 James McHugh Construction Co.................. $60,031,406.00 Integrated Construction................................ $60,000,000.00 William A. Randolph, Inc............................... $50,000,000.00 IDC Construction LLC................................... $28,000,000.00 Sorensen Gross........................................... $27,000,000.00

Embree Construction Group, Inc................... $51,000,000.00 Gray West Construction Inc.......................... $33,740,000.00 Knoebel Construction, Inc............................. $28,000,000.00 Wolverine Building Group............................. $16,400,000.00 Schimenti Construction Company................ $16,000,000.00 Prairie Contractors, Inc................................. $13,200,000.00 The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $12,000,000.00 Hirsch Construction Corp............................. $10,000,000.00 S.L. Hayden Construction Inc....................... $10,000,000.00 Whitestone Construction.............................. $10,000,000.00 The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $1,179,000,000.00 Swinerton.................................................... $489,435,000.00 Lendlease.................................................... $186,306,164.00 Jacobsen Construction Company................. $80,000,000.00 DonahueFavret Contractors, Inc................... $60,000,000.00 S.M. Wilson & Co......................................... $30,564,535.00 Harmon Construction, Inc............................. $25,000,000.00 Venture Construction Group of Florida, Inc.... $20,000,000.00 Whitestone Construction.............................. $20,000,000.00 Poettker Construction Company................... $16,000,000.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

RETAIL

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company.... $404,000,000.00 Schimenti Construction Company................ $185,000,000.00 Gray West Construction Inc.......................... $89,640,000.00 Embree Construction Group, Inc................... $82,500,000.00 William A. Randolph, Inc............................... $75,000,000.00 MYCON General Contractors, Inc.................. $71,000,000.00 Warwick Construction, Inc............................ $58,337,936.00 Swinerton.................................................... $53,040,000.00 Bogart Construction, Inc............................... $52,000,000.00 BrandPoint Services..................................... $50,000,000.00

MULTI-HOUSING

Top Ten Totals

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company..... $8,718,000,000.00 Swinerton.................................................. $5,046,876,000.00 Lendlease.................................................. $2,472,249,380.00 Gray West Construction Inc........................ $1,749,803,547.00 Jacobsen Construction Company............... $629,000,000.00 James McHugh Construction Co................ $324,650,364.00 Schimenti Construction Company.............. $282,000,000.00 MYCON General Contractors, Inc................ $214,000,000.00 Poettker Construction Company................. $206,000,000.00 Wolverine Building Group........................... $183,800,000.00


3 MG, PSC BrandPoint Services Manuel Ray, Owner P.O. Box 9023772 San Juan, PR 00902-3772 (787) 979-9973 www.3mg-pr.com mray@3mg-pr.com Year Established: 2018 Number of Employees: 24 Retail: $273,000.00 Hospitality: $1,200,000.00 Restaurant: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Cannabis: N/A Craft Brew: N/A Mixed-Use: N/A Shopping Centers: N/A Other: $289,000.00 Total: $896,000.00 Completed Commercial Projects by 12/31/20: 3 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Dept. Store

Beam Team Construction Tim Hill, VP 1350 Bluegrass Lakes Pkwy. Alpharetta, GA 30004 (630) 816-0631 www.thebeamteam.com timhill@thebeamteam.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: 600 Retail: $45,000,000.00 Restaurants: $20,000,000.00 Hospitality: $20,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $85,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 8,000 Square Footage: Retail: 120,000 Hospitality: 10,000 Restaurants: 10,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 10,000 Total: 150,000 Specialize In: Groceries, Drug Stores, Hotels, Restaurants

Bogart Construction, Inc. Danny Stone, Vice President 9980 Irvine Center Dr., #200 Irvine, CA 92618 (949) 453-1400, Fax: (949) 453-1414 www.bogartconstruction.com dstone@bogartconstruction.com Year Established: 1991, No. of Employees: 60 Retail: $52,000,000.00 Restaurants: $3,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $55,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 56 Square Footage: Retail: 450,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 20,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 470,000 Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Entertainment, Grocery, Office

Dave Knoche, Executive VP, Sales 820 Adams Ave., Suite 130 Trooper, PA 19403 (800) 905-4342 Fax: (484) 392-7520 www.brandpointservices.com dknoche@brandpointservices.com Year Established: 2004 No. of Employees: 75 Retail: $50,000,000.00 Restaurants: $1,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $4,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $55,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 25,000+ Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Big-Box/ Department, Grocery, Drug Stores, Shopping Centers, Specialty Stores

Capitol Construction Services Lauren Kriner, VP of Business Development 11051 Village Square Ln. Fishers, IN 46038 (317) 574-5488, Fax: (317) 574-5482 www.capitolconstruct.com lkriner@capitolconstruct.com Year Established: 1998 No. of Employees: 150 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $110,604,376.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 570 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 11,115,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Craft Brewery, Office, Auto Dealerships

Central Roofing Company Kathy Ziprik, PR Representative 4550 Main St., NE Minneapolis, MN 55421 (763) 562-0660 www.centralroofing.com Info@centralroofing.com Year Established: 1929 No. of Employees: 200+ Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 50+ Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, Churches/ Religious Facilities, Hospitals, Historical Renovation

ISSUE 6, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

49


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Chain Store Maintenance, Inc. John Catanese, VP 81 Union St. Attleboro, MA 02703 (800) 888-1675 www.chainstore.com john@chainstore.com Year Established: 1991 No. of Employees: 55 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: >60,000 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: > 12,000,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Cannabis, Craft Brewery, Financial

Commonwealth Building, Inc. Chris Fontaine, President & CEO 265 Willard St. Quincy, MA 02169 (617) 770-0050 Fax: (617) 472-4734 www.combuild.com cfontaine@combuild.com Year Established: 1979 No. of Employees: 33 Retail: $13,100,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $4,900,000.00 Total: $18,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 30 Square Footage: Retail: 255,708 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 35,448 Total: 291,156 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Cannabis, MultiFamily, Craft Brewery, Special Projects and Maintenance Divisions

Construction Advantage, Inc. Mike Rothholtz, President 1112 Hibbard Rd. Wilmette, IL 60091 (847) 853-9300 www.constructadvantage@sbcglobal.net Year Established: 1998 No. of Employees: 3 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants

50

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Construction One, Inc.

William A Moberger, President 101 E Town St. Columbus, OH 43215 (614) 235-0057 Fax: (614) 237-6769 www.constructionone.com wmoberger@constructionone.com Year Established: 1980 No. of Employees: 74 Retail: $32,000,000.00 Restaurants: $8,000,000.00 Hospitality: $1,000,000.00 Healthcare: $2,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $2,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $3,000,000.00 Total: $48,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 102 Square Footage: Retail: 78,000 Hospitality: 25,000 Restaurants: 46,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 20,000 Multi-Family: 11,000 Other: 14,000 Total: 194,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Cannabis, Multi-Family, Craft Brewery

Core States Group

Bryan Grabon, Director of Construction Programs 3039 Premiere Pkwy., Suite 700 Duluth, GA 30097 (770) 242-9550 www.core-states.com jarfsten@core-states.com Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 248 Retail: $6,658,588.00 Restaurants: $592,901.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $12,943,469.00 Total: $20,194,958.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 472 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Cannabis, Fueling, Distributed Generation (Solar, Battery Storage, Combined Heat and Storage, Electric Vehicle Charging, Hydrogen Fueling, Fuel Cell)

CS Hudson Inc.

Brittany Peavy, Client Development Manager 700 Veterans Memorial Hwy. Hauppauge, NY 11788 (631) 260-1976 www.cs-hudson.com bpeavy@cs-hudson.com Year Established: 2017 No. of Employees: 60 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Cannabis, Multi-Family


CIRCLE NO. 23


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING DeJager Construction Inc Daniel DeJager, President 75 60th St. SW Wyoming, MI 49548 (616) 530-0060 Fax: (616) 530-8619 www.dejagerconstruction.com dj1@dejagerci.com Year Established: 1970 No. of Employees: 30 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $13,100,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 32 Square Footage: Retail: 533,291 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 533,291 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Big Box

Desco Professional Builders, Inc Robert Anderson, President 290 Somers Rd. Ellington, CT 06029 (860) 870-7070 Fax: (860) 870-1074 www.descopro.com builders@descopro.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 57 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Cannabis, Craft Brewery

The Dewitt-Tilton Group Baleigh S Kelly, Office Manager & Accounting Clerk 119 Canal St., Suite 106 Pooler, GA 31322 (912) 777-3404 Fax: (912) 777-3505 www.dewitttiltongroup.com baleigh@dewitttiltongroup.com Year Established: 2014 No. of Employees: 5 Retail: $2,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $8,000,000.00 Total: $10,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 5 Square Footage: Retail: 30,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 40,000 Total: 70,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, GC for Industrial & Commercial

52

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

DLP Construction Company, Inc.

Lynn Kaden, Dir, Business Development 5935 Shiloh Rd. E., Suite 100 Alpharetta, GA 30005 (770) 887-3573 Fax: (770) 887-2357 www.dlpconstruction.com lkaden@dlpconstruction.com Year Established: 1996 No. of Employees: 31 Retail: $34,896,062.00 Restaurants: $3,695,544.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $38,591,606.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 65,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 30,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants

DonahueFavret Contractors, Inc.

Bryan Hodnett, Vice President of Business Development 3030 E Causeway Approach Mandeville, LA 70448 (985) 626-4431 Fax: (985) 626-3572 www.donahuefavret.com dfcinfo@donahuefavret.com Year Established: 1979 No. of Employees: 55 Retail: $5,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $8,000,000.00 Healthcare: $60,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $13,000,000.00 Total: $86,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 15 Square Footage: Retail: 7,380 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 246,787 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 96,510 Total: 350,677 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, Commercial Offices, Tenant Improvements, Faith-Based

EBCO General Contractor, LTD.

John Egger, President 804 E 1st St. Cameron, TX 76520 (254) 697-8516 Fax: (254) 697-8656 www.ebcogc.com john.egger@ebcogc.com Year Established: N/A No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $20,523,000.00 Restaurants: $9,066,000.00 Hospitality: $79,865,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $4,546,000.00 Total: $114,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 24 Square Footage: Retail: 29,596 Hospitality: 218,431 Restaurants: 25,743 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 45,732 Total: 319,502 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, MultiFamily, Warehouse and Industrial, Auto Repair


CIRCLE NO. 24


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Embree Construction Group, Inc.

Agnes Yates, Graphics Manager 4747 Williams Dr. Georgetown, TX 78626 (512) 819-4700 www.embreegroup.com ayates@embreegroup.com Year Established: 1979 No. of Employees: 203 Retail: $82,500,000.00 Restaurants: $51,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $6,500,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $140,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 213 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Storage, Banking/Finance, C Store, Fuel Stations, Automotive

FCP Services

James Loukusa, CEO 3185 Terminal Dr. Eagan, MN 55121 (651) 789-0790 www.fcpservices.com jloukusa@fcpservices.com Year Established: 1990 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/19: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Healthcare, Casinos, Government, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Hotels, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family

First Finish, LLC

Jason Stock, LEED AP, Vice President of Business Development 6240 Old Dobbin Ln., Suite 190 Columbia, MD 21045 (410) 290-6450 Fax: (410) 290-6451 www.firstfinish.com jstock@firstfinish.net Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 62 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $100,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $5,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $105,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 20 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 630,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: 100,000 Other: N/A Total: 730,000 Specialize In: Hospitality, Restaurants, Mixed-Use

54

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc.

Matthew Frank, Director of Business Development 31269 Bradley Rd. North Olmsted, OH 44070 (440) 716-4000 Fax: (440) 716-4010 www.fortneyweygandt.com mfrank@fortneyweygandt.com Year Established: 1978 No. of Employees: 90 Retail: $21,500,000.00 Restaurants: $3,500,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $13,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $28,700,000.00 Total: $66,700,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 114 Square Footage: Retail: 271,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 36,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 267,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 532,000 Total: 1,106,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, MixedUse, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, Senior Living

Gray West Construction Inc.

Eric Berg, Chief Operating Officer, West Region 421 E Cerritos Ave. Anaheim, CA 92805 (714) 491-1317 Fax: (714) 333-9700 www.gray.com eberg@gray.com Year Established: 1960 No. of Employees: 1,554 Retail: $89,640,000.00 Restaurants: $33,740,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $8,800,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $1,617,623,547.00 Total: $1,749,803,547.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 247 Square Footage: Retail: 747,500 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 98,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 24,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 3,900,000 Total: 4,745,000 Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Cannabis, Entertainment and Theme Park

Harmon Construction, Inc.

Ardell Mitchell, Vice President 621 S State St. North Vernon, IN 47265 (812) 346-2048 Fax: (812) 346-2054 www.harmonconstruction.com ardell.mitchell@harmonconstruction.com Year Established: 1955 No. of Employees: 90 Retail: $3,000,000.00 Restaurants: $3,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $25,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $4,000,000.00 Other: $20,000,000.00 Total: $55,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 90 Square Footage: Retail: 5,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 20,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 187,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 110,000 Total: 322,000 Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Industrial, Sports, Federal/Gov’t Self Perform


Open 24/7 When you contact us anytime, we have a Chain Store representative (never an answering service) available to expedite your service request.

Day + Night Trades The CSM team is available to provide H.E.L.P. (Handyman, Electrical, Locksmith, Plumbing) Trades for standard or EMERGENCY facilities calls spanning the USA, Canada and Puerto Rico, and Guam.

Experienced Contractors A key component of qualifying our contractors are experience in their trade and experience working in an active, operational environment.

Services: • Handyman • Backflow • Pest Control

• Electrical • Locksmith • Plumbing • Pest Control • Restaurant • Special Projects • Backflow Prevention • Fire Extinguisher Program

Contact us anytime, we have customized our systems to accommodate your emergency and standard facilities needs.

www.chainstore.com

CIRCLE NO. 25

Live Customer Service Reps 24/7/365 800-888-1675


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Healy Construction Services, Inc.

Integrated Construction

Hirsch Construction Corp.

Jacobsen Construction Company

James T. Healy, Vice President 14000 S Keeler Ave. Crestwood, IL 60418 (708) 396-0440 Fax: (708) 396-0412 www.healyconstrutionservices.com jth@healyconstructionservices.com Year Established: 1988 No. of Employees: 30 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Cannabis, Bog Box, PEMB Services, Design Build, Grocery Adam Hirsch, President 222 Rosewood Dr. Danvers, MA 01923 (978) 762-8744 Fax: (978) 762-8455 www.hirschcorp.com info@hirschcorp.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: 40 Retail: $40,000,000.00 Restaurants: $10,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $50,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 40 Square Footage: Retail: 120,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 20,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 140,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Shopping Malls, Cannabis

IDC Construction LLC

Gary Williams, Owner 1000 Churchill Ct. Woodstock, GA 30188 (678) 213-1110 Fax: (678) 213-1109 www.idcconstruction.com gwilliams@idcconstruction.com Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 25 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $28,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $28,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 8 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Hospitality

Immel Construction

Paul Martzke, President 1820 Radisson St. Green Bay, WI 54302 (920) 468-8208 Fax: (920) 468-7160 www.immelconstruction.com paulma@immelconstruction.com Year Established: 1961 No. of Employees: 110 Retail: $27,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $38,000,000.00 Total: $65,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 114 Square Footage: Retail: 1,870,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 1,870,000 Specialize In: Retail

56

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Justin Beebe, President 14827 Mandarin Road Jacksonville, FL 32223 (904) 356-6715 www.integratedfl.com jbeebe@inteconst.com Year Established: 2007 No. of Employees: 40 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $60,000,000.00 Healthcare: $15,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $10,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $85,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 7 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 375,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 110,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 485,000 Specialize In: Hospitality, Healthcare, Multi-Family

Ben Lockhart, Corporate Communications Manager 5181 W Amelia Earhart Dr. Salt Lake City, UT (801) 973-0500 www.jacobsenconstruction.com blockhart@jbuild.com Year Established: 1922 No. of Employees: 600 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $4,200,000.00 Healthcare: $80,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $67,000,000.00 Federal: $38,900,000.00 Other: $438,900,000.00 Total: $629,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 38 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: 127,000 Healthcare: 1,005,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 2,602,130 Total: 3,734,130 Specialize In: Hospitality, Healthcare, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family

James McHugh Construction Co.

John Sheridan, Executive Vice President 1737 S Michigan Ave. Chicago, IL 60616 (312) 986-8000 Fax: (312) 431-8518 www.mchugh.com jsheridan@mchugh.com Year Established: 1897 No. of Employees: 187 Retail: N/A Restaurants: $5,302,549.00 Hospitality: $60,031,406.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $230,347,006.00 Federal: N/A Other: $28,969,403.00 Total: $324,650,364.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 37 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 490,885 Restaurants: 25,337 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: 2,800,000 Other: 1,400,000 Total: 4,742,460 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Multi-Family, Sports & Entertainment


WE BUILD

SMART FAST RIGHT

NATIONAL GENERAL CONTRACTOR Retail | Restaurant | Office | Medical | Shopping Center

941-907-0010

www.recrawford.com CIRCLE NO. 26


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Knoebel Construction, Inc.

Lendlease

Bryon Muir, Director of Business Development 18333 Wings Corporate Dr. Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 326-4100 Fax: (636) 326-4101 www.knoebelconstruction.com bmuir@knoebelcon.com Year Established: 1981 No. of Employees: 80+ Retail: $41,000,000.00 Restaurants: $28,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $8,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $77,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 84 Square Footage: Retail: 760,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 121,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 46,000 Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 927,000 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Grocery, Automotive

Mike Fratianni, Managing Director, Construction 200 Park Ave. New York, NY 10166 (212) 592-6800 Fax: (212) 592-6988 www.lendlease.com americas@lendlease.com Year Established: 1917 No. of Employees: 1,200 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $136,850,181.00 Healthcare: $186,306,164.00 Multi-Family: $1,100,655,809.00 Federal: N/A Other: $1,048,427,226.00 Total: $2,472,249,380.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 31 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 804,185 Multi-Family: 3,836,293 Other: 1,996,787 Total: 6,637,265 Specialize In: Hospitality, Healthcare, Mixed-Use, Education, Multi-Family

Lakeview Construction

Suzette Novak, Sales & Marketing 100 Commonwealth Dr. Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 766-5122 Fax: (724) 741-0335 www.marxocontractors.com snovak@marcocontractors.com Year Established: 1978 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $35,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 70 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 700,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use

John Stallman, Marketing Manager 10505 Corporate Dr. Pleasant Prairie, WI 53158 (262) 857-3336 Fax: (262) 857-3424 www.lvconstruction.com john@lvconstruction.com Year Established: 1993 No. of Employees: 95 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $65,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 650 Square Footage: Retail: 18,000,000 Hospitality: 1,000,000 Restaurants: 1,000,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 20,000,000 Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis

Laser Facility Management Joe Fairley, Director 110 Commerce Rd. Boynton Beach, FL 33426 (561) 466-1621 www.laserfacility.com joseph@laserfacility.com Year Established: 2018 No. of Employees: 35 Retail: $5,000,000.00 Restaurants: $500,000.00 Hospitality: $2,000,000.00 Healthcare: $500,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $8,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 170 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 500,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants

58

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Marco Contractors, Inc.

MYCON General Contractors, Inc.

Jenifer Batchelder, Marketing Director 17311 Dallas Pkwy., Suite 300 Dallas, TX 75248 (972) 529-2444 Fax: (972) 232-2868 www.mycon.com jbatchelder@mycon.com Year Established: 1987 No. of Employees: 140 Retail: $71,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $11,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $11,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $121,000,000.00 Total: $214,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 36 Square Footage: Retail: 3,500,000 Hospitality: 72,385 Restaurants: N/A Federal: 26,000 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: 500,000 Other: 345,217 Total: 5,000,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Mixed-Use, Multi-Family, Industrial


CIRCLE NO. 27


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING NCI

National Contractors Inc.

Michael Dudley, Vice President NATIONAL CONTRACTORS 2500 Orchard Ln. I N C O R P O R A T E D Excelsior, MN 55331 (952) 881-6123 Fax: (952) 881-6321 www.ncigc.copm mdudley@ncigc.com Year Established: 1990 No. of Employees: 27 Retail: $15,000,000.00 Restaurants: $1,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $1,200,000.00 Other: N/A Total: $17,200,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 23 Square Footage: Retail: 117,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 2,750 Federal: 7,300 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 119,823 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Cannabis

N-STORE Services Kevin Zigrang, Director of Business Development 160 Chesterfield Industrial Blvd. Chesterfield, MO 63005 (636) 778-0448 Fax: (636) 778-0449 www.nstoreservices.com kevin@gnhservices.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: 69 Retail: $26,875,000 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $525,000 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $27,400,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 179 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 507,000 Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls

Optimal Contracting Bret Hoovler, President 7140 Sumption Dr. New Albany, OH 43054 (614) 800-2541 www.optimalcontracting.com bret@optimalcontracting.com Year Established: 2019 No. of Employees: 1 Retail: $1,252,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $1,252,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 45 Square Footage: Retail: 145,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 145,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Cannabis

60

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Otto Construction

Angel Naranjo, Marketing Manager 1717 2nd St. Sacramento, CA 95811 (916) 503-6197 Fax: (916) 441-6138 www.ottoconstruction.com anaranjo@ottoconstruction.com Year Established: 1947 No. of Employees: 150 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $5,100,000.00 Multi-Family: $30,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $145,000,000.00 Total: $180,100,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 10 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 6,000 Multi-Family: 116,500 Other: 6,000 Total: 270,000 Specialize In: Healthcare, Education, Multi-Family, Senior Living, Parking Structures, Community Centers, Office Buildings, Recreation Facilities, Historic Renovations

Poettker Construction Company

Kevin Poettker, Director of Business Development 400 S Germantown Rd. Breese, IL 62230 (618) 526-7213 Fax: (618) 526-7654 www.poettkerconstruction.com dbergmann@poettkerconstruction.com Year Established: 1980 No. of Employees: 183 Retail: $40,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $16,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $54,000,000.00 Other: $96,000,000.00 Total: $206,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: 3,660,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: 400,000 Healthcare: 112,800 Multi-Family: N/A Other: 2,062,500 Total: 6,235,300 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Mixed-Use, Education, Multi-Family, Commercial & Corporate (Office), Federal Government, Industrial & Manufacturing, Distribution & Warehouse, Recreation, Utility & Infrastructure

Prairie Contractors, Inc.

Pete Hegarty, President 9318 Gulfstream Rd., Unit C Frankfort, IL 60423 (815) 469-1904 Fax: (815) 469-5436 www.prairiecontractors.com notifications@prairie-us.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 22 Retail: $3,000,000.00 Restaurants: $13,200,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $16,200,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 40 Square Footage: Retail: 20,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 60,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 80,000 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants


FOR OVER 15 YEARS

CONSISTENT, HIGH-QUALITY IMAGE FROM STORE-TO-STORE NATIONWIDE UHC is a certified Women’s Business Enterprise through the WBE National Council

uhccorp.com • 866-931-0118 • info@uhccorp.com

CIRCLE NO. 28

Retail | Restaurant | Hospitality | Grocery | Financial | Automotive


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Prime Retail Services, Inc.

Donald Bloom, President 3617 Southland Drive Flowery Branch, GA 30542 (866)504-3511 Fax: (866) 584-3605 www.primeretailservices.com dbloom@primeretailservices.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 575 Retail: $32,000,000.00 Restaurants: $2,000,000.00 Hospitality: $500,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $34,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 870 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use

R.E. Crawford Construction, LLC

Susan Courter, Director of Business Development 6650 Professional Pkwy. W, #100 Sarasota, FL 34240 (941) 907-0010 Fax: (941) 907-0030 www.recrawford.com scourter@recrawford.com Year Established: 2005 No. of Employees: 45 Retail: $18,000,000.00 Restaurants: $2,500,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $3,500,000.00 Other: $1,000,000.00 Total: $25,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 42 Square Footage: Retail: 243,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 12,500 Federal: 31,000 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 5,000 Total: 291,500 Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Shopping Malls, Auto-Service, Fitness, Municipal/Government, Financial, C-Store

Rectenwald Brothers Construction, Inc.

Jerry Rectenwald, VP of Business Development 16 Leonberg Rd. Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (724) 772-8282 Fax: (724) 772-8281 www.rectenwald.com • info@rectenwald.com Year Established: 1984 No. of Employees: 45 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Entertainment

Rockerz Inc.

Robert Smith, Director of Business Development/Nat’l Acct 100 Commonwealth Dr. Warrendale, PA 15086 (724) 612-6520 www.rockerzinc.com • rsmith@rockerzinc.com Year Established: 2004 No. of Employees: 40 Retail: $8,400,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $8,400,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 253 Square Footage: Retail: 4,100,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 4,100,000 Specialize In: N/A

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

RT Stevens Const. Inc

Troy Stevens, President 420 McKinley, 111-313 Corona, CA 92879 (951) 280-9361 Fax: (951) 549-9360 www.rtstevens.com tstevens@rtstevens.com Year Established: 1988 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $5,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $750,000.00 Total: $5,750,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Cannabis, Office and Tenet Improvement

SAJO Inc.

Rocco Raco, Director of Marketing & Development 1320 Graham Blvd. Montreal QC H3P 3C8 Canada (514) 385-0333 www.sajo.com ª rocco@sajo.com Year Established: 1977 No. of Employees: 170 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis

Schimenti Construction Company

Meredith Mayer, Director, Marketing 575 Lexington Ave., 18th Floor New York, NY 10022 (212) 246-9100 www.schimenti.com mmayer@schimenti.com Year Established: 1994 No. of Employees: 250 Retail: $185,000,000.00 Restaurants: $16,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $81,000,000.00 Total: $282,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 52 Square Footage: Retail: 1,600,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 35,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 110,000 Total: 1,745,000 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Light Industrial, Commercial Real Estate & Development

Scott Contracting

Johnny Wilkins, Director of Business Development 702 Old Peachtree Rd., NW, Suite 100 Suwanee, GA 30024 (770) 274-0534 www.scott-contracting.com johnny.wilkins@scott-contracting.com Year Established: 2003 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $12,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $30,000,000.00 Total: $42,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Healthcare, Office, Industrial


CIRCLE NO. 29


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Shames Construction

Carolyn Shames, President/CEO 5826 Brisa St. Livermore, CA94550 (925) 606-3000 Fax: (925) 606-3003 www.shames.com • cshames@shames.com Year Established: 1987, No. of Employees: 55 Retail: $70,847,336.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $70,847,336.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 31 Square Footage: Retail: 3,500,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 3,500,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Groceries, Drug Stores, Specialty Stores, Shopping Centers, Restaurants

S.L. Hayden Construction Inc.

Stevie Hayden, Co-Owner 3015 S I35 W Burleson, TX 76028 (817) 783-7900 • Fax: (817) 783-7902 www.slhaydenconstruction.com • stevie@hcichicago.com Year Established: 2011 No. of Employees: 10 Retail: $4,000,000.00 Restaurants: $10,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $14,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 20 Square Footage: Retail: 6,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 30,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 36,000 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Shopping Malls, Facility Maintenance

S.M. Wilson & Co.

Amy Berg, President 2185 Hampton Ave. St. Louis, MO 63139 (314) 645-9595 • Fax: (314) 645-170 www.smwilson.com • amy.berg@smwilson.com Year Established: 1921 No. of Employees: 102 Retail: $14,823,336.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $30,564,535.00 Multi-Family: $6,459,456.00 Federal: N/A Other: $36,590,830 Total: $88,438,157.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 23 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Mixed-Use, Education, Multi-Family, Industrial, Senior Care, Commercial, Public Agency, Special Projects

Solex Contracting Inc.

Jerry Allen, President 42146 Remington Ave. Temecula, CA 92590 (951) 308-1706 Fax: (951) 308-1856 www.solexcontracting.com jerry@solexcontracting.com Year Established: 2005 No. of Employees: 95 Retail: $30,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $10,000,000.00 Total: $40,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 150 Square Footage: Retail: 450,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 150,000 Total: 600,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Specialty Stores, Restaurants, Tower Erection/Telecommunications CONTRACTING INC.

64

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Sorensen Gross

Rabih Zahnan, President 8001 Forbes Pl., Suite 315 Springfield, VA 22151 (571) 313-0395 • Fax: (571) 313-0399 www.sorensengross.com • rzahnan@sgcompany.com Year Established: 1925 No. of Employees: 65 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $27,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: $12,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $26,000,000.00 Total: $65,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 11 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: 78,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: 30,000 Other: 62,000 Total: 170,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Mixed-Use, Education, Multi-Family, Public Works, Governmental/Municipal, Cultural/Non-Profit, Transportation, Law Enforcement/Public Safety

Swinerton

Cheyeene Tahbaz, Corporate Communications Director 200 N Main St. Santa Ana, CA 92701 (213) 700-9493 www.swinerton.com • ctahhbaz@swinerton.com Year Established: 1888 No. of Employees: 4,650 Retail: $53,040,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $396,589,000.00 Healthcare: $489,435,000.00 Multi-Family: $690,163,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $3,417,649,000.00 Total: $5,046,876,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 1,253 Square Footage: Retail: 16,620,000 Hospitality: 124,272,000 Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: 153,365,000 MultiFamily: 216,264,000 Other: 1,070,930,000 Total: 1,581,451,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, Craft Brewery, Affordable Housing, Aviation, Civic/Public, Interiors/Special Projects, Life Science, Industrial, Mass Timber, Mission Critical, Parking Structures, Renewable Energy

Taylor Bros. Construction Co., Inc.

Jeff Chandler, Vice President 4555 Middle Rd. Columbus, IN 47203 (812) 379-9547 Fax: (812) 372-4759 www.tbcci.com • jeff.chandler@tbcci.com Year Established: 1933 No. of Employees: 200 Retail: $50,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $2,000,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: $1,000,000.00 Other: $27,000,000.00 Total: $80,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 300 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Healthcare, Casinos, Industrial

TDS Construction, Inc.

CBC1260195

Christi Bock, CEO 4239 63rd St. W Bradenton, FL 34209 (941) 795-6100 • Fax: (941) 795-6101 www.tdsconstruction.com inbox@tdsconstruction.com Year Established: 1987 No. of Employees: 70 Retail: $41,500,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $41,500,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 49 Square Footage: Retail: 2,622,985 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 2,622,985 Specialize In: Retail


WE’RE PROUD TO WORK FOR OVER A QUARTER OF THE NATION’S LARGEST COMPANIES Whether it’s big box, mall based specialty, inline strip, full line department, value retailer or a fuel station, Brandpoint has the single or multiple trades to deliver cost effective solutions. When you choose BrandPoint Services, you won’t need to manage multiple suppliers for your construction needs. Our construction projects range from small-box remodels to ground-up construction. Turnkey construction management Contractor and vendor prequalification Contractor selection

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HVAC Installations

Coordinate owner-furnished materials and equipment

Sprinkler Installations

New Store Build-Outs

Safety program management

Permitted Remodeling

Framing & Drywall Carpentry and more

BrandPoint Services can be a resource within your already established real estate and construction team to fill a geographic or workload void, or act as your sole, “in-house” real estate and construction department using our experienced team of construction professionals.

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WE ARE LICENSED IN ALL 50 STATES CIRCLE NO. 30

BrandPointServices.com CONSTRUCTION - MAINTENANCE - SPECIAL PROJECTS


SPECIAL REPORT

GENERAL CONTRACTING Timberwolff Construction, Inc. Mike Wolff, President 1659 W Arrow Rte. Upland, CA 91786 (909) 949-0380 www.timberwolff.com mike@timberwolff.com Year Established: 1989 No. of Employees: 50 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $30,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 125 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 450,000 Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Office TI’s, Veterinary Offices

TRICON Construction

Rich Carlucci, Vice President 3433 Marshall Ln. Bensalem, PA 19020 (267) 223-1060 Fax: (215) 633-8363 www.tricon-construction.com r.carlucci@tricon-construction.com Retail: $7,000,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $7,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 50 Square Footage: Retail: 555,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: 555,000 Specialize In: Big-Box/Department, Drug Stores, Casinos, Specialty Stores

Tri-North Builders, Inc. Thomas Thayer, CEO & President 2625 Research Park Dr. Fitchburg, WI 53711 (608) 271-8717 Fax: (608) 271-3354 www.tri-north.com tthayer@tri-north.com Year Established: 1981 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $38,000,000.00 Restaurants: $4,000,000.00 Hospitality: $22,000,000.00 Healthcare: $14,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $16,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $28,000,000.00 Total: $122,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 106 Square Footage: Retail: 147,000 Hospitality: 87,000 Restaurants: 9,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 36,000 Multi-Family: 101,000 Other: N/A Total: 380,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family

66

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

UHC Construction Services

Leslie Burton, Director of Business Development 154 E Aurora Rd., #155 Northfield, OH 44067 (216) 544-7588 www.uhccorp.com • lburton@uhccorp.com Year Established: 2006 No. of Employees: N/A Retail: $27,000,000.00 Restaurants: $3,200,000.00 Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: $5,400,000.00 Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: $2,400,000.00 Total: $38,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 421 Square Footage: Retail: 4,250,000 Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: 850,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: 580,200 Total: 5,680,200 Specialize In: Retail, Healthcare, Restaurants, Financial/Banking, Office Space

Venture Construction Group of Florida, Inc.

Stephen Shanton, CEO & President 301 Yamato Rd., Suite 1240 Boca Raton, FL 33431 (866) 459-8351 www.vcgfl.com • shanton_steve@vcgfl.com Year Established: 1998 No. of Employees: 100 Retail: $20,000,000.00 Restaurants: $5,000,000.00 Hospitality: $10,000,000.00 Healthcare: $20,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $20,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $75,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 15 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, Craft Brewery

Warwick Construction, Inc.

Walt Watzinger, Vice President 365 FM 1959 Houston, TX 77034 (832) 448-5802 Fax: (832) 448-3000 www.warwickconstruction.com walt@warwickconstruction.com Year Established: 1999 No. of Employees: 75 Retail: $58,337,936 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $58,337,936.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 79 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

Weekes Construction, Inc

Hunter Weekes, VP 237 Rhett St. Greenville, SC 29601 (864) 233-0061 www.weekesconstruction.com hweekes@weekesconstruction.com Year Established: 1946 No. of Employees: 45 Retail: $45,000.00 Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $45,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail Based in Greenville, SC

864-233-0061

www.weekesconstruction.com


Westwood Contractors, Inc.

Angelica Palacios, Director of Marketing 951 W 7th St. Fort Worth, TX 76102 (817) 877-3800 www.westwoodcontractors.com excellence@westwoodcontractors.com Year Established: 1983 No. of Employees: 26 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 35 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Shopping Malls, Office Spaces, Industrial (Fulfillment/Distribution/Warehouse)

Whitestone Construction

Dale Haupt, Vice President Business Development 640 East SR 434, Suite 2000 Longwood, FL 32750 (407) 725-7744 www.whitestonecg.com dhaupt@whitestonecg.com Year Established: 2010 No. of Employees: 45 Retail: $10,000,000.00 Restaurants: $10,000,000.00 Hospitality: $10,000,000.00 Healthcare: $20,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $50,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $50,000,000.00 Total: $150,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: N/A Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Mixed-Use, Multi-Family, Industrial, Sr. Living

The Whiting-Turner Contracting Company

Tony Messina, Vice President 2 Enterprise Dr., Suite 504 Shelton, CT 06484 (203) 789-8700 www.whiting-turner.com anthony.messina@whiting-turner.com Year Established: 1909 No. of Employees: 4,300 Retail: $404,000,000.00 Restaurants: $12,000,000.00 Hospitality: $273,000,000.00 Healthcare: $1,179,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $585,000,000.00 Federal: $340,000,000.00 Other: $5,925,000,000.00 Total: $8,718,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 400+ Square Footage: Retail: 6,412,698 Hospitality: 4,014,705 Restaurants: 67,415 Federal: 2,446,043 Healthcare: 24,061,224 Multi-Family: 39,000,000 Other: N/A Total: 76,002,085 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Cannabis, Multi-Family, Craft Brewery, E-Commerce, Data Centers, Warehouse & Distribution, Theme Parks, Sports Venues

William A Randolph, Inc Eric Handley, C.O.O. 820 Lakeside Dr. Gurnee, IL 60031 (847) 856-0123 Fax: (847) 856-0696 www.warandolph.com eric.handley@warandolph.com Year Established: 1957 No. of Employees: 85 Retail: $75,000,000.00 Restaurants: $10,000,000.00 Hospitality: $50,000,000.00 Healthcare: $10,000,000.00 Multi-Family: $25,000,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $5,000,000.00 Total: $175,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 75 Square Footage: Retail: 2,500,000 Hospitality: 500,000 Restaurants: 15,000 Federal: N/A Healthcare: 20,000 Multi-Family: 250,000 Other: 151,000 Total: 3,300,000 Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Multi-Family, Industrial

Wolverine Building Group Michael Houseman, Director of Sales 4045 Barden Dr. SE Grand Rapids, MI 49512 (616) 949-3360 Fax: (616) 949-6211 www.wolvgroup.com info@wolvgroup.com Year Established: 1939 No. of Employees: 146 Retail: $13,700,000.00 Restaurants: $16,400,000.00 Hospitality: $18,500,000.00 Healthcare: $7,200,000.00 Multi-Family: $64,700,000.00 Federal: N/A Other: $63,300,000.00 Total: $183,800,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 87 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Mixed-Use, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, Big Box/Department Stores, Grocery Stores, Hotels

Zerr Enterprises, Inc. Mike Zerr, President 1545 S Acoma St. (303) 758-7776 Fax: (303) 758-7770 www.zerrenterprises.com zerr@zerrenterprises.com Year Established: 1998 No. of Employees: 16 Retail: N/A Restaurants: N/A Hospitality: $7,000,000.00 Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Federal: N/A Other: N/A Total: $7,000,000.00 Completed Projects as of 12/31/20: 5 Square Footage: Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Federal: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Family: N/A Other: N/A Total: N/A Specialize In: Retail

ISSUE 6, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

67


Even Better,

Together. Timberwolff Construction Inc., A Gray Company, Becomes Part of Gray West to Bolster the Commercial Market. Since being purchased by Gray in 2014, Timberwolff has been a valuable part of the Gray family. Now, Timberwolff officially becomes part of Gray West. The full integration allows Gray to provide one cohesive resource for commercial customers throughout the country. Rob Christianson Vice President, Commercial rchristianson@gray.com Mobile: 714.412.4476

2nd CC&R Top Contractor in Retail

14th OCBJ Top Tenant Improvement Contractors

9th CC&R Top Contractor in Healthcare

22nd OCBJ Top Commercial Construction

O F F I C E

LO CAT I O N S

Birmingham, AL Phoenix, AZ Anaheim, CA Sacramento, CA Upland, CA Larkspur, CO Atlanta, GA Chicago, IL Lexington, KY (HQ) Louisville, KY Ramsey, MN

St. Louis, MO Charlotte, NC Cincinnati, OH Portland, OR Columbia, SC Issaquah, WA Edmonton, AB, Canada Dublin, Ireland Tokyo, Japan Basel, Switzerland


CIRCLE NO. 31


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING

Annual report highlights industry’s leading lighting manufacturers

I

f you’re looking for the industry’s leading lighting manufacturers, our annual listing is just a click away. Our annual Lighting Manufacturers report spotlights the leaders in the retail, restaurant, hospitality, healthcare (and other) sectors. In addition, the report provides the contact information and contact person for each firm. If you didn’t make the list, contact Publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com. 90+ Lighting

Darcy Johnson, Sales Manager 1094 Cudahy Pl., Suite 212 San Diego, CA 92110 (619) 340-1203 www.90pluslighting.com • contact@90pluslighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family, Commercial/Residential Applications

Above All Lighting Inc.

Ying Su, Marketing Manager 1501 Industrial Way N. Toms River, NJ 08755 (866) 222-8866 www.abovealllighting.com • marketing@abovealllighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Track Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal

Acclaim Lighting

Patrick Nadjarians, Marketing Manager 6122 S Eastern Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90040 (323) 317-9800 Fax: (323) 832-9142 www.acclaimlighting.com • sales@acclaimlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Large Structures Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Shopping Malls

AERIN

513 W Jones St (Martin Luther King Jr.) Savannah, GA 31401 (877) 762-2323 www.circalighting.com • customerservice@circalighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Multi-Family

70

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

American Lighting Alyssa Stone, National Sales Manager 11775 E 45th Ave. Denver, CO 80239 (303) 923-1175 www.americanlighting.com astone@americanlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Whole Home Smart Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family, Seasonal Lighting, Tape Light

ANP Lighting Ron Foster, Owner 9044 Del Mar Ave. Montclair, CA 92555 (909) 239-3855 www.anplighting.com rpfoster@anplighting.com Lighting Product Type: Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family

Barron Lighting Group

Megan Zelko, Marketing Communications Manager 7885 N Glen Harbor Blvd. Glendale, AZ 85307 (800) 533-3948 www.barronltg.com • megan.zelko@barronltg.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Horticultural Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family, Federal, Horticultural Lighting


CIRCLE NO. 32


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING CED David Van Laeys, Sales Manager 22785 Savi Ranch Pkwy. Yorba Linda, CA 92887 (951) 551-5611 www.cednationalaccounts.com vanlaeys@cednationalaccounts.com Lighting Product Type: Highbay Lighting, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family, Federal

Controlled Power Company Suzanne Hooley, Marketing Director 1955 Stephenson Hwy. Troy, MI 48083 (800) 521-4792 www.controlledpwr.com shooley@controlledpwr.com Lighting Product Type: Emergency Lighting Inverters, Egress Lighting Solutions Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

D & P Custom Lights & Wiring Systems, Inc. Neil Aportadera, VP Sales & Marketing 900 63rd Ave. N Nashville, TN 37209 (615) 350-7800 Fax: (615) 350-8310 www.dandpcustomlights.com info@dandpcustomlights.com Lighting Product Type: Checkout Lights, Counter Signal Lights, LED Lighted Signs Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls

DMF Lighting Contact Name, Director of Marketing 1118 E 223rd St. Carson, CA 90745 (310)265-3925 www.dmflighting.com rpolinovsky@dmflighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family, Residential

72

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

EarthTronics, Inc.

Kevin Youngquist, Executive Vice President 755 E Ellis Rd. Norton Shores, MI 49441 (231) 332-1188 Fax: (231) 726-5029 www.earthtronics.com contact@earthtronics.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Commercial

EOS Light

Kevin Krohner, CEO 350 Crenshaw Blvd., Suite A104 Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 616-5070 www.eoslight.com info@eoslight.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, LED Backlighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew

Foscarini

Paola Slongo, Customer Care Manager 20 Greene St. New York, NY 10013 (212) 247-2218 www.foscarini.com p.slongo@foscarini.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, Federal

Fulham Co., Inc.

Chris Veira, Director of Distribution Sales 12705 S Van Ness Ave. Hawthorne, CA 90250 (323) 779-2980 Fax: (323) 754-9060 www.fulham.com cveira@fulham.com Lighting Product Type: Egress Lighting, Replacement LED Drivers and Fluorescent Ballasts Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family


M+D LIGHTING COLLECTION DECORATIVE PENDANT LUMINAIRES 5 Styles in 4 Sizes | Glare-free Illumination | Low-profile Ceiling Canopy | Made in America

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Made in U.S.A. | A family owned business CIRCLE NO. 33


SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING GE Current, a Daintree Company

James Benson, Sr. Director, Strategic Marketing, Communications and Intelligent Environments 1975 Noble Rd. Cleveland, OH 44112 (216) 266-8789 www.gecurrent.com • james.benson@gecurrent.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Lighting Controls Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Street & Roadway, Signage

Genesis Lighting Solutions

Doug Head, EVP 700 Parker Square, Suite 205 Flower Mound, TX 75048 (469) 322-1900 www.making-light.com • doug@making-light.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

Glint Lighting

Andrew Kim, COO 1520 Gilbreth Rd. Burlingame, CA 94010 (650) 646-4192 www.glintlighting.com • info@glintlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family, Museums/Galleries

Global Lighting & Controls

Ward Christensen, Principal 1315 Olive Ln. La Canada, CA 91011 (323) 574-8579 www.globallightingcontrols.com ward@globallightingcontrols.com Lighting Product Type: All Types Markets Served: All Markets

Griplock Systems

Beau Pillet, Marketing Manager 1029 Cindy Ln. Carpinteria, CA 93013 (805) 566-0064 www.griplocksystems.com sales@griplocksystems.com Lighting Product Type: Cable Suspension Systems for Architectural Lighting, Industrial Highbays, and Track Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls

74

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

HanleyLED

Michael Kerber, Director of LED Development 11745 Sappington Barracks Rd. Sunset Hills, MO 63127 (800) 542-9941 Fax: (800) 760-5575 www.hanleyledsolutions.com information@hanleyledsolutions.com Lighting Product Type: LED Linear Outdoor, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, We specialize in cabinet & channel letter solutions Markets Served: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Malls

hollis+morris

Adrianne Straatsma, Marketing and Operations Director 501 Alliance Ave., Suite 102 Toronto, ON M6N 2J1 Canada (647) 970-9716 www.hollisandmorris.com • adrianne@hollis-morris.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Wall Sconces Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, Federal

IdentiCom Sign Solutions

John G. DiNunzio, President 24657 Halsted Road Farmington Hills, MI 48335 (248) 344-9590 Fax: (248) 946-4198 www.identicomsigns.com info@identicomsigns.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family, Federal

JESCO Lighting Group, LLC

Paulin Tham, Executive Vice President 15 Harbor Park Dr. Port Washington, NY 11050 (800) 527-7796 Fax: (855) 265-6768 www.jescolighting.com info@jescolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family


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In addition to our industry-leading 5 and 10-year product warranties, all SloanLED Lighting Systems products are protected by our Performance+ Service Warranty. In the event of a product failure, email service@sloanled.com and our team will replace or repair the item on-site!

888.747.4533 • SloanLED.com CIRCLE NO. 34

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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING LIDO Lighting

Bill Pierro Jr., LC, President 400 Oser Ave., Bldg. 100 Hauppauge, NY 11788 (631) 595-2000 Fax: (631) 595-7010 www.lidolighting.com billpierro@lidolighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Germ Killing Lighting, Clean Air Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family, Federal

Lightheaded Lighting Ltd.

Steve Dewar, VP Business Development 1150-572 Nicola Pl. Port Coquitlam, BC Canada V3B OK4 (604) 464-5644 Fax: (604) 464-0888 www.lightheadedlighting.com info@lightheadedlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Recessed Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family

LTF

Sam Marc, Sales Manager 11966 Oak Creek Pkwy. Huntley, IL 60142 (847) 498-5832 www.ltftechnology.com Sales@ltftechnology.com Lighting Product Type: Light Bulbs, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants

LUXX Light Technology Inc.

Andreas Weyer, Managing Partner 4425 S Kansas Ave. St. Francis, WI 53235 (414) 810-3077 www.luxx.com • info@luxx.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Commercial Lighting, LED Light Panels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Shopping Malls, Commercial

76

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Modular Lighting Instruments by MLI NA Corporation

John Yriberri, North America Market Leader P.O. Box 1927 Altoona, PA 16603 (800) 674-9691 www.supermodular.us • welcome.us@supermodular.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Wall Sconces, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Residential

Niche Lighting Technologies

Adam Karbaf, CEO 436 Valdez Ave. Half Moon Bay, CA 94019 (615) 210-7921 www.nichelightingtech.com • akarbaf@nichelightingtech.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, UV Lighting Solutions, Signage Lighting Solutions, Agricultural Lighting Solutions, Aquarium Lighting Solutions, Circadian Rhythm Lighting Solutions Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew

Original BTC

Laura Montanus, Showroom Manager 56 Greene St. New York, NY, 10012 (646) 759-9007 www.originalbtc.com • lauram@originalbtc.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Task Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Restaurants, Multi-Family

PLC Multipoint

Joe Briscoe, Division Manager 3101 111th St. SW Everett, WA 98204 (425) 353-7552 www.plcmultipoint.com • jbriscoe@plcmultipoint.com Lighting Product Type: Controls, Daylighting, Photosensors, Tunnels Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Federal, OEM, Tunnels and Bridges

Prizm Lighting

Jon Krams, National Sales Manager 11775 E 45th Ave. Denver, CO, 80239 (888) 297-0484 www.prizmlighting.com jon@prizmlighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Wall Washers, DMX Control, Tape Light Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family


Personalized and Connected Buildings Xicato Lighting and Smart Controls Xicato’s Bluetooth® wireless controls integrate with a range of luminaires and building management systems. Our smart controls have the ability to sense occupancy, light levels, temperature and humidity while gathering relevant data. This intelligence saves energy, reduces maintenance and operational costs resulting in a more productive, healthier and comfortable environment.

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SPECIAL REPORT

LIGHTING Sentry Electric LLC

Michael Shatzkin, Director of Mktg & Bus. Development 185 Buffalo Ave. Freeport, NY 11520 (516) 379-4660 Fax: (516) 378-0624 www.SentryLighting.com info@SentryLighting.com Lighting Product Type: Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family, Federal, Municipalities

Signtex Lighting INC.

Katie Larrimore, Marketing Specialist 220 VFW Ave. Grasonville, MD 21638 (410) 827-8300 Fax: (410) 827-8866 www.signtexinc.com • marketing@signtexinc.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/ Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Emergency Lighting Markets Served: All

SloanLED

Jeremy Baker, Director of Marketing 5725 Olivas Park Dr. Ventura, CA 93003 (805) 676-3200 www.sloanled.com • info@sloanled.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Signage Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Multi-Family, Petroleum, C-Store, Grocery

Solatube International, Inc.

Iris Hoag, Com. Marketing Manager 2210 Oak Ridge Dr. Vista, CA 92081 (760) 597-4411 www.solatube.com/commercial • ihoag@solatube.com Lighting Product Type: Tubular Daylighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Cannabis, Education, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Federal, Education, Sports Facilities, Industrial/Ware Housing, Etc.

78

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Specialty Lighting

Teresa Carpenter, Marketing 4203 Fallston Rd. Fallston, NC 28042 (704) 538-6522 Fax: (704) 538-0909 www.specialtylighting.com tcarpenter@specialtylighting.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Light Bulbs, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, Highbay Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Commercial Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Shopping Malls, Craft Brew, Multi-Family, Federal, Retrofit

UltraLights

Gabby Quach, Marketing Manager and Project Coordinator 320 S Plumer Ave. Tucson, AZ 85719 (520) 623-9829 www.ultralightslighting.com chris@ultralightslighting.com Lighting Product Type: Close to Ceiling Fixtures, LED Linear Indoor, Task Lighting, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Pendant Lighting, Custom Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Corporate, Education, Shopping Malls, Commercial, Multi-Family, Federal, Commercial Hospitality, Residential

US Architectural Ltg. & Sun Valley Ltg.

Tim Scharnagle, Vice President of Sales 660 W Ave. O Palmdale, CA 93551 (800) 877-6537 Fax: (661) 233-2001 www.usaltg.com tims@usaltg.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, Close to Ceiling Fixtures, Solid State Lighting Fixtures, LED Linear Outdoor, Wall Sconces, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting, Security Lighting, Landscape Lighting, Commercial Lighting, Bollards, Pier Mounts, Poles & Shafts, Decorative Arms, Bases, Flood Lighting, Step & Low Level and In-Grade Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Shopping Malls, Federal, Automotive, Parks & Rec and Residential

Xicato

April Mitchell, VP, Marketing 102 Cooper Ct. Los Gatos, CA 95032 (866) 223-8395 www.xicato.com info@xicato.com Lighting Product Type: Accent Lighting, LED Linear Indoor, LED Linear Outdoor, Recessed Lighting, Track Lighting, Task Lighting, Shelving Lighting, Exterior/Outdoor Lighting Markets Served: Retail, Hospitality, Healthcare, Restaurants, Education, Multi-Family


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SmallScale, Big City Houston's The Gordy theaters add intimacy and variety to cultural landscape By Thomas Renner

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n square mileage and population, Houston is one of the largest cities in the

United States, stretching across 669 square miles and including 2.3-plus million people. Intimate is not a term most people would use in discussing the nation’s fourth-largest metropolis. All of which makes a new performance venue, The Gordy, a remarkable task in its design intent, architecture and construction.

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The Gordy, a $35 million, three-stage theater in Houston, is the newest addition to the city’s cultural scene.

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SMALL-SCALE, BIG CITY The $35 million project combines three theaters into one 66,850 square foot campus. The venue is home to Stages, a 43-year-old producer of performing arts that brings a wide range of shows to area residents. Stages’ leadership worked with architects and construction teams to design The Gordy, and the overarching theme they sought was intimacy. “The core concept was about community, how the community interacts, how the community comes together, how the community can see each other, and how close can they be to the action and to each other,’’ says Kenn McLaughlin, Artistic Director for Stages. McLaughlin says those considerations were key, as they are the core values for Stages. What patrons say they love about the theatre is “intimacy,” being close to the artists and to their fellow audience members was the most important factor above all other things.

Houston is unique in that there is also a market for smaller sites that allow patrons to connect with performers in ways that are impossible at larger theatres. Even more unusual, The Gordy was created in a former 40,000 square foot storage facility for the city’s Museum of Fine Arts. Architects from Gensler and Charcoalblue, an international theatre and acoustics design consultancy, met with McLaughlin’s team to design the structure. They added 26,850 square feet, most of

which is a parking garage. The building also includes a pedestrian plaza, two rehearsal spaces, dressing rooms, costume room, scene shop and office space. The building is named after philanthropists Russell and Glenda Gordy, who donated $5 million to the project. “We work on multiple theater projects throughout the world,’’ says Bruno Cardenas, a theater and acoustic consultant with Charcoalblue. “Everyone was at the table in the design process. They were present; they cared and we were able to work with them. It was a good, collaborative process.”

Setting the stage

Besides intimacy, the objective for Stages in designing The Gordy was to create a community gathering space while also offering flexibility for performances. Stages offers an eclectic mix of programs, from populist musicals to progressive world premieres and pretty much everything in between.

Acoustical smoke vents limit noise intrusion from exterior sources while also providing important safety measures to help firefighters bring a blaze under control.

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SMALL-SCALE, BIG CITY

The project includes seven acoustical smoke vents manufactured by BILCO.

“We spent a lot of time researching and designing the envelope of the performance space. With the acoustical hatches, you will not hear rain, you won’t hear traffic.” — Bruno Cardenas, Theater & Acoustic Consultant, Charcoalblue

Sterling Stage at The Gordy is the most traditional theatre of the three performance spaces. The 251-seat venue is a three-quarters thrust design with four rows on the main floor and two rows on the second level. The rows are pitched higher than traditional rows so audiences can see the full torso and above for everyone in the space. “The space is remarkably flexible and acoustically magnificent,’’ McLaughlin says. “Our patrons are going to love the ease of entry and the nearness of the actors. While the scale feels large, the intimacy is amplified in a host of ways so it feels very theatrical and very intimate all at once.” Smith Stage is shaped like an arena with 220 seats. The stage is raised 18 inches, so the first row of seats is below stage level. The theatre, which is designed to be more industrial, essentially is a black stone box with a theatre inside the box, like an engine inside a container. It is more playful and surprising. The colors and finishes are cooler, theatrical and industrial, with lots of exposed cable runs, metal and infrastructure. Levit Stage provides the most versatility of the three venues. With a maximum seating capacity of 125, the stage is a traditional black box that offers 18 configurations. It includes acoustic drapes and removable risers and seats. “It was built to house longrun populist material and provides the most flexibility,’’ McLaughlin says.

Diverse performances, steady revenue

The Gordy will be home to Stages, a long-time producer of performances in Houston featuring locally-based artists.

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The divergent performance spaces allow Stages to offer a wide range of programming and for audiences to connect with performers. The group produces more than 430 performances annually, and draws approximately 75,000 visitors each season. Just as important, Stages schedules longrun productions that generate continuous revenue streams and creates sustaining work for artists. “This has been a highly successful strategy for Stages in the past, but even with two theatres, we often shut down hit shows to move our schedule forward,’’ McLaughlin says. “In this model, we won’t have to do that. We also have much more of an opportunity for community partnerships and bring


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SMALL-SCALE, BIG CITY in and support other community partners and organizations.”

Sound separation

With three stages in one venue, Charcoalblue worked with Gensler and the rest of the design team extensively to create acoustic isolation during simultaneous performances. Cardenas says sound separation was an important part of the design process. “The Sterling Stage and the Smith Stage were designed to be used at the same time. The big aspect in designing them was to make sure they were well isolated from each other and adjacent spaces. It also was challenging because they are flexible spaces to be used for drama, spoken word shows, and musicals. We considered the room’s acoustic design to ensure people can understand what is happening on the stages.” Among the products that help enhance the theater’s acoustics are smoke vents manufactured by The BILCO Company. Seven acoustical smoke vents—two are 4-feet x 7-feet, 6-inches, and the others are 4-feet x 6-feet—limit noise intrusion from the exterior and carry STC and OITC sound ratings. The acoustical smoke vents are widely used in concert halls, theaters and other interior applications that require limiting noise from the outside. They also include the standard smoke vent properties that help firefighters bring a fire under control by removing smoke, heat and gases from a burning building. “We spent a lot of time researching and designing the envelope of the performance space,’’ Cardenas says. “With the acoustical hatches, you will not hear rain, you won’t hear traffic. With a regular smoke hatch, you will hear sirens and other external noises. It’s not the noisiest sight, but you don’t want exterior noise to become an issue.”

Tight-knit community

Houston might be a sprawling, densely-populated metropolis, but every large city has community melting pots that reach citizens with different dynamics and interests. One of those is The Gordy, which offers the artistic community and audiences a gathering place where they can cement their cultural bonds.

Besides intimacy, the objective for Stages in designing The Gordy was to create a community gathering space while also offering flexibility for performances. McLaughlin says the building is designed entirely around the concept of community. “The lobby is a hub for the community. The theatres surround the lobby on three sides. The art wraps around the community and the building infrastructure. The art-making functions surround the theaters. It is an onion, all leading to the center—the community gathering place.” Community-focused theater seems incongruous for a city the size of Houston. There are much larger venues in the city where audiences can enjoy well-known off-Broadway shows and big-time concerts. Houston is unique in that there is also a market for smaller sites that allow patrons to connect with performers in ways that are impossible at larger theatres. That approach

has worked for Stages for more than four decades. The Gordy allows them to develop even more, and deeper, connections. “There is a remarkable sense of civic pride here, more than any city I have ever lived,’’ McLaughlin says. “We get the benefit of serving as the arts anchor in our neighborhood. We are at one of the best intersections of varied communities in the city. And when you get to us, you discover more surprises inside. Three different theaters, eclectic programs and variety and flexibility. We really reflect our community, inside and out.” CCR View the project video: https://app.box.com/s/ h07x4hrfi33weysrqiqqas815l038i8h

Going inside The Gordy The project — A $35 million renovation of a former storage warehouse. The space includes about 66,850 square feet and a new addition. One facility, three venues — Three stages can seat up to 606 guests. The Sterling Stage has 251 seats with handmade velvet seats. The Lester and Sue Smith Stage has 220 seats, and the versatile Rochelle and Max Levit Stage has 125 seats. Acoustical concerns — With the potential of three shows performing simultaneously, acoustical performance concerned architects. They specified seven acoustical smoke vents from BILCO to limit noise from external sources. The vents also help firefighters bring a blaze under control by removing smoke, heat and gases from a burning building. The entry — There is no back door to The Gordy. Performers and guests all arrive through a 4,000 square-foot, two-story arrival area.

Thomas Renner writes on building, construction, engineering and other trade industry topics for publications throughout the United States.

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www.nationalsignteam.com CIRCLE NO. 39


Do Well and Do Good Why giving back matters— and why it is something your company should practice By Gary Ellis

T

here is an instructive and inspiring phrase that I believe should serve as a guide for important business decisions: “Do well and do good at the same time.” What does it

mean to do good and what distinguishes it from the goal to do well? For builders, I believe doing good requires establishing a “why?” for the work we do and organizing guiding principles based on the answer to that question.

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DO WELL AND DO GOOD I believe most of us in the construction industry intuitively understand that the work we do truly, deeply matters. At Jacobsen Construction Company in Salt Lake City, where I recently began serving as CEO, we refer to this idea as the “noble purpose” of our work. Yet, it also is worthwhile to move beyond our day-to-day intuition and take a longer view of the underlying reasons that— upon closer examination—truly explain why the work of the construction industry holds the meaning and importance that it does.

Doing Good

Since assuming the role in January, my short time as CEO has taught me more clearly that building enduring communities is the ultimate “why?” behind the work we do. As builders, we ultimately are in business to support each client’s vision of what is possible in their organization— and in the enduring communities they create and bring together—by using our specific expertise to construct exceptional structures.

The economic crisis that enveloped the world in 2020 challenged all of us in the construction industry to find nimble ways to do well. It is in those structures where life happens—where people come to be together, to learn, to worship, to recreate, to heal, to build their careers and to do good in the world. While every building we construct ought to hold intrinsic beauty and inspiration for all occupants, everything we create also is vitally a means to an end—a functional tool that furthers the underlying dreams and aspirations of our client. To me and my Jacobsen colleagues, this naturally means finding clients whose values align with ours is an important part of creating meaning in our work. It also means that each client must feel that we

are truly partnered with them in focusing on their larger, underlying goals made possible by the construction project, and using those larger goals as a guiding light for all project decisions. If a client did not feel that their big picture organizational objectives were our ultimate guide, then that would mean we lost sight of the true purpose of our work. I also believe that to do good contains another layer of meaning in the construction industry: It means creating opportunities for success, prosperity and fulfillment for our employees and trade partners. A career in construction can be remarkably rewarding, with opportunities to use a wide range of organizational and people skills to work on an unthinkably diverse array of projects and, in some of the most exciting places in America and throughout the world. A construction career also unquestionably opens the door to financial prosperity, opportunities for advancement, and the stability of benefits such as health and dental insurance, employee assistance programs, and even employee ownership at some companies, including Jacobsen. Creating avenues of financial opportunity for people throughout our industry is a thrilling way to do good.

Doing Well

Of course, to do well and to do good in the construction industry are interdependent principles. Without a way to sustain a profitable business model, all the good we want to do would be out of reach. So, we must understand that to do well is intimately connected to the rest of the goals we have for ourselves as builders. Using my educational training as an accountant, I have spent much of my 20-year career at Jacobsen focusing on the do well half of the equation—and directly supporting all those who do good for our clients—by ensuring our

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DO WELL AND DO GOOD business model could sustain our company’s financial stability and keep it thriving. Eventually, this led me to serve in the CFO role for six years. This role helped to broaden my horizons and helped me better understand how our company’s secure financial standing opened up a whole world of possibilities for finding and completing meaningful and challenging work for world-class clients, and empowered us to give back to our communities through impactful philanthropic giving. And since being named Jacobsen’s president in June 2020—and then president and CEO starting in January 2021—I have had the humbling opportunity to learn even more about the synergy and virtuous cycle between achieving our noble purpose as builders and strengthening our profitability. This learning experience has been made possible by the dedicated company leaders I get a chance to work with every day, who offer a diverse set of perspectives, and are responsible for putting into motion our strategy of achieving financial success and making a lasting difference in our communities in the process. The economic crisis that enveloped the world in 2020 challenged all of us in the construction industry to find nimble ways to do well. Certainly, no construction market in the country was exempt from delayed, canceled or reduced projects, nor the pandemic-era difficulty of staffing all jobsites with appropriate levels of manpower while also keeping those jobsites safe from the coronavirus. Despite this uniquely unpredictable economic crisis, our industry has largely come roaring back over the past several months and has been a big contributor to the American economy’s resilience in the face of the pandemic. Even still, as the floodgate of demand for projects has opened, the pricing of some raw materials such as lumber has proven to be severe. And labor shortages continue to strain contractors large and small.

While every building we construct ought to hold intrinsic beauty and inspiration for all occupants, everything we create also is vitally a means to an end. It is during unpredictable eras like this when it is especially important to fall back on time-tested practices that can keep a general contractor steady amid volatile changes in market conditions. These include expert monitoring of shifting market factors impacting material pricing and delays, transparency and realistic communication with clients about how delayed or highcost materials might affect project costs and schedules, deep research of material alternatives that provide cost and schedule savings without compromising overall quality, and continual communication with subcontractors about their availability and adjusting sequencing of projects as needed to ensure steady progress at each jobsite.

These are demanding practices that require heavy institutional investment, but all are underpinned by the successful principles of hard-earned market expertise and a company culture of honesty, openness and thorough communication. I know firsthand that these common-sense and stabilizing financial strategies that lead a company to do well—when paired with a united sense of noble purpose and meaning in our work that inspire us to do good—will lead to invigorated employees; eager trade partners; and clients whose trust has been earned and whose dreams have been realized, leading them to come back again and again with the invitation to help them make the world a better place. CR

Gary Ellis joined Jacobsen Construction Company in 2000. An accountant by trade, Ellis quickly rose through the ranks of the company to serve as CFO for six years. He also has previously served the company as Executive VP of Business Development. Ellis is a trusted leader and relationship builder at Jacobsen known for his innovative strategic planning for the long-term strategic growth of the company. As part of Jacobsen’s long-planned leadership succession strategy, Ellis was named company president in June 2020, and named president and CEO in January 2021.

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Advertorial Content

Transcending T time with natural slate

he Palisades Field House and surrounding playgrounds were designated as historic landmarks and added to the D.C. Inventory of Historic Sites in 2016. History offered two epic periods of note. The first pertains to the site’s long periods of prehistoric occupation by Native Americans from approximately 8000 BC to 1700 AD. The second dates from the establishment/development of the Palisades Playground for recreational use beginning in 1922... and subsequent design and construction of a field house and park completed between 1935 -1936.

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In 2014 the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation requested community input for the modernization of the existing field house and park. Ultimately, the Washington D.C. based design-build team of MCN Build and cox graae + spack architects was contracted to modernize and improve the existing field house structure and the adjacent park. Archeologists had long determined that the areas along the Potomac River (including that now known as the Palisades Playground) were and are recognized as sites of Native American settlement stretching from 8000 BC to 1700 AD. Located on a bluff overlooking the Potomac River and bounded by two stream ravines, artifacts including stone axes and hoes, pottery fragments, stone projectile points and knives, beads, ornaments and other types of artifacts were collected in early investigations, many currently curated by the Smithsonian Institution Museum of Natural History. Designed by the National Park Service in the 30’s, the original field house is a true example of the Colonial Revival style, popular in American architecture at the time. It included an auditorium/gym with game rooms for children, offices, restrooms, a small kitchen and more. In 2016, efforts to bring improvements and new facilities to the Palisades community were initiated. As part of a design-build team headed by MCN Build, cox graae + spack architects designed and administered construction for a modernized Palisades Community Recreation Center. The project scope included a modernization and restoration of the 6,500 square foot existing Field House and a 7,000 square foot addition. Specific program spaces were to include a multi-purpose room, flexible rooms for classes, meetings, and community functions, a gymnasium for indoor basketball with striping for other activities, a fitness room and other spaces tailored to serve both teens and seniors. According to Don Gregory, AIA, Principal at cox graae + spack architects, “In many ways, this project transcended time. Our marching orders were to work on an historic site dating back thousands of years, with the centerpiece being a building which was 85 years old. Our client was not just

the District of Columbia... but also, many local community organizations and members with whom we connected via a structured community outreach program. Needless to say, we had many masters. Our collective goal was to update the facility, but in doing so, exhibit the past, present and future. After much deliberation, we were able to come up with a program that was accepted by all.”

The original field house.

No major construction needed to be done on the initial older building, as Gregory stated “it had great original bones. However, we did replace deteriorated windows and doors... and restore and replace lost interior finishes utilizing original design drawings as a guide.” He went on to explain that there was only one place for the new addition to be built... and that was not at the current building’s front. Rather, it was on the side closest to the river, where those who were inside could see across the Potomac River to Virginia and vice versa. “We envisioned glass walls on all sides facing the river offering exceptional views. Yet we wanted the proposed addition to blend in with the understated features of the original building... and clearly, we did not want the end result to be described as a ‘glass box.’” “So,” continued Gregory, “We considered various materials that would be

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TRANSCENDING TIME WITH NATURAL SLATE complementary with all that glass. One restrictive D.C. preservation mandate, which was much appreciated, was that we were not to ‘mimic the original building’s form and cladding materials. The addition had to exhibit a clear separation between what was original and what was new.’” To make a longer story shorter, that’s when a natural slate CupaClad® rainscreen system was considered and shortly thereafter, specified. “We evaluated and promoted the use of natural slate for the project for its beauty, timelessness and longevity. CupaClad® natural slate was well received and approved for use in our several public presentations to D.C. Historic Preservation Agencies. We also carefully considered how the grey/charcoal-colored, horizontally placed slate units were to look and be installed. Our team managed the design and installation of the slate units, not unlike typical masonry corner-to-corner installations, where only full or half-length units were to be installed. In layman’s terms, this translated into corner conditions where no ‘fill-in’ material was needed as the slate units wrap the corner conditions seamlessly. There was no doubt in our minds that by following this dimensionally rigorous, but sensible approach, CupaClad® rainscreen would work out.” stated Gregory. CupaClad® is a natural slate rainscreen cladding system providing a range of cladding solutions, from traditional to contemporary, offering architects and specifiers a wide choice, suited for any individual design. Highest quality, durable CupaClad® slates are installed using

a new and efficient installation system, painstakingly crafted by Cupa Pizarras, the world’s leading source of top-quality slate surfacing materials for construction. It should be mentioned that CupaClad® systems are quick and easy to install by any facade contractor. Once installed, the slate is safely set-in place. Because with natural

Don Gregory, AIA

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slate there is no color fading… it stands up to any climatic change, and no maintenance therefore is ever needed. “We really enjoyed working with the CupaClad® product and the CupaClad® people,” concluded Gregory. “We have another project utilizing CupaClad® on the boards and plan on specifying it for future projects.” One of these autumn days, you may find yourself in Northeast Virginia, leisurely driving along the George Washington Parkway. Looking eastward and admiring the seasonal foliage, you see beautiful combinations of red, brown and yellow. If you look another second or two (driving safely, of course...) you might also have a quick view through the leaves of an exquisite building consisting of glass window walls and a stately greyish, charcoal-colored stone façade that nicely complements the leaves. Get used to seeing it. That view was designed to continue looking good while lasting essentially forever. CCR


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Issue 4, 2021

Invest. Innovate. Build. How Suffolk continues to change the commercial construction game

Tony Rango, President Suffolk West Region


The Linden

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Interview by Michael J. Pallerino

Invest. Innovate. Build. How Suffolk continues to change the commercial construction game

A

fter the announcement was made about Suffolk’s new brand identity initiative two years ago, Chairman

and CEO John Fish said, “Commitment to forward progress and innovation, especially in a world of constant change and disruption, is absolutely critical for success. We’re thinking differently and finding new ways to add value and deliver on our promise to clients.”

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Stella and Bluewater

As one of the industry’s most innovative contractors, Suffolk remains committed to giving its customers what they need, when they want it. Under the tenets of its diversification strategy, Suffolk set its focus on leveraging its core competency of construction and expanding into additional service lines to create a fully integrated platform—one that adds value for clients across the entire building lifecycle. Today, the strategy continues to focus on expanding services beyond its core construction capabilities into vertical service lines, positioning it as an end-to-end business capable of delivering on its value proposition: “Invest. Innovate. Build.” Suffolk’s knowledge of every project phase, proven constructability expertise and

Across the country, Suffolk has established a stronghold between both the private and public sectors through our ability to combine the design and built components of the job to provide cost certainty and time efficiency to our clients. integration across adjacent vertical service lines continues to unlock synergies in each step of the construction process, delivering faster, better outcomes for clients. We sat down with Tony Rango, President of Suffolk West Region, to get his insights on the contractor’s focus in the growing multi-family housing market.

Give us a snapshot of today’s multifamily market from your perspective?

1500 Granville

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Suffolk works as a contractor for two kinds of multi-family homes: affordable housing and private, developer-based projects. In California, there are a few issues in constructing multi-family homes, including a general shortage of affordable housing availability in the state and a drop in private projects due to the COVID-19 pandemic.


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But despite the pandemic slowing projects on the West Coast in the last year, Suffolk has still been afforded several projects throughout the region, including San Francisco, Los Angeles and San Diego.

What trends are defining the space?

A few trends are greatly impacting the multi-family housing space. First, the affordable housing market continues to grow. There is incredible demand throughout the region for reliable, affordable housing; however, construction costs still remain high in areas like Los Angeles and San Francisco, which is severely impacting supply. Second, there is a growing need for cost-efficient housing builds in lower cost spaces. In our current market, construction costs still are very high, which makes it difficult for developers to bring rent down in these areas.

What’s likely to happen next?

The private developer space was booming before the pandemic, and we can expect this industry will continue to grow following COVID-19. Moving forward, contractors will have to find ways to minimize project costs from beginning to end. For example, we’re seeing a growing interest in modular construction, where units are being shipped from off-site rather than being hand-built onsite. This minimizes costs once the project is underway while helping contractors who are looking for ways to streamline the process.

Take us through Suffolk’s construction and design strategy.

Park 5th

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The Suffolk strategy is designed to meet client needs as costs are increasing and demand is rising. Our company has started doing both design and construction to bring down costs for our clients, while providing accurate cost estimates at the start of the project and sharing finished designs earlier. This project delivery method is known as “design-build” and is a practice that benefits both the public and private sectors as markets return to pre-pandemic levels.


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For example, design-build has become a popular and highly-successful construction method in the higher-education sector.

Tell us about some of the multifamily housing projects Suffolk is involved in on the West Coast.

On the West Coast, we have several projects either completed or in progress, with over 500 units in construction and around 500 in pre-construction. In San Francisco, we recently completed 200 Linden, a 97-unit condominium building in South San Francisco that includes 78 market-rate and 19 affordable units. In Oakland, we’re working on 1900 Broadway, which has 452 residential units, plus 50,000 square feet of commercial space and 6,700 square feet of ground-floor retail. We’re working on 4469 Ohio St. in the North Park neighborhood of San Diego, and in Los Angeles, we’re using modular to construct an affordable housing project called 6th and San Julian. While there was a small slowdown due to COVID-19, Suffolk is one of the biggest affordable housing contracting companies in California.

and steel prices have significantly spiked, making it incredibly difficult to manage costs. We’re addressing this through our combination of construction and design, to increase both speed and efficiency, as well as investments in new technologies. The other key issue is a talent shortage that’s straining the entire industry. That’s why Suffolk has prioritized expanding our recruiting base and making a point of diversifying our workforce. Women consist of about 30% of Suffolk’s employee base, compared with 10-12% for the industry as a whole. We also are actively working to diversify our workforce through our Diversity and Inclusion team, which is broadening opportunities for people of color through recruitment at high schools, colleges and HBCUs.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

Tony Rango, Suffolk West Region Describe a typical day.

Most mornings, I wake up thinking about how to retain and attract top talent to Suffolk, because our team is what really drives us forward. I also strive to ensure the best client experience, working with clients throughout the entire construction process to ensure we’re meeting their every need.

What’s the most rewarding part of your job?

While the building is the product, I’m in this business because of the people. I love watching young Suffolk recruits rise through the company and succeed. Mentorship is a hugely rewarding part of my job. I actually tell some folks that I hope they have my job someday.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you?

A client once said, “Don’t tell me my problems; help me solve my problems.” While some companies only point out a project’s issues, Suffolk is focused on providing solutions to those challenges.

How do you like to spend your down time?

I love spending time with my family, cooking (seafood and pasta are my favorites), traveling and exercising—especially boxing. Once COVID-19 restrictions are lifted, I hope to visit Greece and Portugal.

There are two key issues: The price of commodities and a talent shortage. Lumber

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Our national presence makes Suffolk incredibly unique among other brands in the industry. Instead of working in only one region, our national team from all pockets of the country can work together to meet client needs and share learnings from projects happening elsewhere. We also make decisions quickly and invest in technology in ways others in the field don’t. For example, we use OpenSpace—a next-generation 360 photo documentation software—to enhance our collaboration with partners, enabling us to mitigate mistakes and keep projects on track. We like to work smarter and faster for our clients.

One on one with...

What type of opportunities do you see moving ahead in multi-family housing?

There is an abundance of opportunity in the private sector, which will continue to pick up as the pandemic winds down. Across the country, Suffolk has established a stronghold between both the private and public sectors through our ability to combine the design and built components of the job to provide cost certainty and time efficiency to our clients. We’re also seeing more technology startups dedicated to solving industry challenges across the construction ecosystem and working with several of them through Suffolk Capital’s technology arm, Suffolk Technology.

Tell us what makes Suffolk so unique?

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INSIDE THIS ISSUE: New Advisory Board Member............pg 2 President’s Message........................pg 3

Member Directory..........................pg 4-5 Annual Conference 2021...................pg 7

SUMMER EDITION • 2021

Investing in Tomorrow RCA Awards Scholarships to Tomorrow’s Construction Leaders Every year, RCA awards scholarships to top students in Construction Management and Construction Sciences programs at universities throughout the United States. Funded by our members, this national scholarship program helps students to achieve their goals and prosper within their selected field. In the 2021 scholarship cycle, RCA worked with eight schools with strong construction management programs and asked each to select their top candidates for consideration. Applicants must be rising juniors or seniors, with a declared construction major. The scholarship committee, comprised of Board members and Advisory Board members, reviewed and scored the resumes and personal statements of the applicants. One student from each school was selected to receive a $3,000 scholarship to be used for the fall 2021 semester. You can get to know our scholarship recipients through their own words, with excerpts from their personal statements below. Chandler Allen, Brigham Young University (Senior, Construction and Facilities Management, Minor: Business Management) “The Retail Contractor Scholarship will enable me to accomplish my goal to improve the construction industry. I will promote careers in the construction trades by informing high school students about possible trade schools. Promoting trade work will solve the industrywide labor shortage and improve the quality of work within the construction industry. My goal while attending Brigham Young University isn’t to learn about construction. My goal is to become a construction manager. My goal is to become a community leader. My goal is to become a teacher, providing career and trade education. My goal is to become more honest, trustworthy, and resolute. By starting my own company, I can provide more construction jobs, lead with integrity in the construction industry, and lobby for policies made by the government that impact the commercial construction industry. With the RCA Scholarship, I will become an industry leader.” Jacqueline Badal, California Polytechnic State University (Junior, Construction Management) “The Construction Management program allowed me to begin to understand the different facets of the construction industry, the incredible opportunity for women entering into construction, and most importantly has allowed me to build relationships with incredible people, peers, and industry personnel that will forever impact my life. After I graduate, my ideal career is to work for a general contractor in commercial construction. I would love to start out as a project engineer and eventually become a project manager. I look forward to being involved in the company that I work for and to helping make a difference in the workplace. Another one of my passions is my interest in sustainability. I plan on declaring my minor in sustainability. Working through problems regarding efficient construction,

waste mitigation, water conservation, and energy efficiency are all important aspects of helping to create a planet that is healthy and plentiful for generations to come. It is important that the general contractor I work for is heavily invested in sustainability and constantly modifying their construction with the planet in mind.” Aidan Coll, Pratt Institute (Senior, Construction Management, Minor: Interior Design) “I selected the construction management program because it will allow me to graduate with a full understanding of the progression of a modern construction project as well as the ability to use my knowledge to make a positive impact on the world. I intend to work for a construction company that focuses on building affordable housing and successful community spaces. Once I have made enough money to pay off my education, I will start developing my own projects that will help me move into the specialty of sustainable construction and disaster relief. In my opinion, the sustainable building specialty will become replaced by affordable building projects all over the world as the externalities of wasteful buildings begin to get priced into the housing market and government regulation begins to catch up with reality. I intend to be on the forefront of that transition.” Keller Cox, Texas A&M (Senior, Construction Science, Minor: Business Management, Minor: Leadership in Design and Construction) “I would argue that there is not a better academic program in the nation than Texas A&M’s Construction Science Department. For me, it is the people that make it such a unique and special program. When I go to class or visit with a professor, I want to make sure that I am having that same positive impact on my peers as well as the other staff members and professors. Being a member of the Corps of Cadets means that I am required to wear a uniform to class every day. This makes me remember that I must hold myself to a higher standard. On top of all of that, I get the privilege of serving as the Head Yell Leader at Texas A&M University. As an ambassador of Texas A&M, I must be on guard about what I am saying, how I am acting, and how I am representing Texas A&M at all times.” Fulton Garner, Clemson University (Senior, Construction Science and Management, Minor: Business Administration) “I am one of three junior Construction Science and Management majors in the Honors College. I have been a member of one of Clemson’s Construction Competition teams. These teams compete in national competitions with other schools in bidding a construction project. Our team won first place in the Fall 2020 Virtual Commercial Construction Competition and are planning to win again in the ASC Commercial Concrete Competition. Additionally, I started a construction club, Firm Foundation. The club is (Continued on page 6 )

RCA’s mission is to promote professionalism and integrity in retail construction through industry leadership in education, information exchange, and jobsite safety.


NEWSLETTER

New Advisory Board Member RCA’s Advisory Board is comprised of representatives from retail markets, including specialty, big box, department stores, developers, architecture/engineer, and restaurant retailers. Advisory Board members are appointed by the President and serve three-year terms. During that time, they actively assist the RCA Board of Directors in identifying key industry issues and formulating policies and programs designed to positively impact those issues. Meet RCA’s newest Advisory Board member. John Polzer is a Partner at Duane Morris in Dallas/Fort Worth. Duane Morris’ construction team is consistently recognized as a national leader in the industry by Chambers, U.S. News & World Report Best

Lawyers/Best Law Firms, and Law 360, among many other national, regional, and local awards and rankings. John’s practice areas include construction, commercial litigation, and real estate. He has worked with RCA member companies including Westwood Contractors, Elder-Jones, and Shrader-Martinez. John has represented numerous clients in asset purchase litigation and represented an international food company in class action litigation in California. He has represented an exploration & production (E&P) company in title litigation involving over 200 parties and a global technology company in an antitrust suit filed by a major airline. His experience also includes representing an international oil and gas producer in shareholder litigation filed after the announcement of a merger. John received his law degree from the University of Houston Law Center and was an

editor of the Houston Business and Tax Law Journal. He is admitted to the following bars: State of Texas, U.S. District Court for the Northern, Eastern, Western, and Southern Districts of Texas, 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, U.S. District Court – New Mexico, and U.S. Supreme Court. He is an adjunct professor at Texas Christian University, teaching an undergraduate Courts class and a Legal Procedure class for the Master’s program. John’s accolades include being named to the Texas Super Lawyers by Texas Monthly magazine in 2020 and being selected as a 40 Under 40 honoree by the Fort Worth Business Press in 2012. His community service includes volunteering at the YMCA and serving on the Chancellor’s Centurions for the University of Texas System. John currently resides in Dallas with his wife, daughter, and twin boys. When not working, John enjoys coaching his kids’ sports teams and spending time agonizing over Longhorn football.

It’s the networking that matters (VIRTUAL EVENTS) DATES: TBD CCR-MAG.COM Become part of a program that helps forge strong relationships with high-level decision makers 2

SUMMER EDITION • 2021


ADVISORY BOARD

President’s Message Ray Catlin, President, Threecore, LLC

Isyol Cabrera - Focus Brands

Jason Miller - JCPenney Company

Mike Clancy - FMI

Jeff Montang - JLM Retail

Randy Danielson - Shakopee

John Polzer - Duane Morris

Mdewankaton Sioux Community

Jason Kraus - Kohl’s Jeffrey D. Mahler, AIA - L2M, Inc.

As our world continues to reopen from the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic, I believe we should pause to remember the past year and contemplate what we experienced, what we learned, and how we best move forward. Many times over the past year, we have discussed the negative impacts of the pandemic on our lives and in our world. Without question, there have been devastating and very Ray Catlin consequential negative impacts. Lives have been lost and businesses turned upside down. Our industry has always, and I imagine always will, faced serious and significant headwinds. The COVID-19 pandemic was no different. I would offer that we take a moment to reflect upon the positive effects that surfaced from this hardship. Our industry has long been ripe for major disruption. Disruption certainly occurred, and as we adjusted, some significant positive outcomes emerged. We quickly learned that we could function and operate remotely. We relied upon technology like never before. We found ways to be present for meetings without being face-to-face. The positive impact on our environment has been studied and reported as being truly a miracle. We benefited from savings created in our operating budgets by utilizing technology like Zoom and Microsoft Teams as well as improving efficiency in the use of our time. I sincerely believe we as an industry became more united, valuing our relationships with our teams and counterparts in ways that are remarkable and lasting. The collaboration and unity that resulted as we tackled a problem that none of us had ever faced before was inspiring and encouraging. We learned to be nimble and adjust to new protocols and requirements. The respect and support we received for our workers and industry as a whole was profound. Amidst the challenges that lie ahead, let us take these lessons with us and stand in the truth that as we move forward, we do so together. The best outcomes always include collaboration and respect for each other. Lastly, I would be remiss if I did not acknowledge the leadership exhibited by Steve Bachman, our immediate past president. I am confident that Steve never imagined his term of presidency would include a national lock down where travel all but stopped and our businesses were shaken. Steve rose to the challenge and led the RCA as a whole and many of us personally. Thank you, Steve, for leading by example and for your servant’s heart.

Let’s take a moment to reflect upon the positive effects that surfaced from this hardship.

Steven R. Olson, AIA - CESO, Inc. Brad Sanders - CBRE | Skye Group

COMMITTEE CHAIRS LEGISLATIVE/REGULATORY

SAFETY

MEMBER BENEFITS

SCHOLARSHIP

Andy Bohon legislative@retailcontractors.org

David Martin memberbenefits@retailcontractors.org

MEMBERSHIP

Hunter Weekes membership@retailcontractors.org

RECRUITMENT

Jay Dorsey recruitment@retailcontractors.org

Eric Berg safety@retailcontractors.org Mike McBride Justin Elder scholarship@retailcontractors.org

SPONSORSHIP

Justin Elder sponsorship@retailcontractors.org

TRAINING

Eric Berg Carolyn Shames training@retailcontractors.org

OFFICERS President Ray Catlin

Secretary/Treasurer Justin Elder

Vice President Eric Handley

Immediate Past President Steve Bachman

Threecore LLC

Elder-Jones, Inc.

William A. Randolph, Inc.

Retail Construction Services, Inc.

BOARD OF DIRECTORS 2023 Steve Bachman

2024 David Martin

2022 Eric Berg

2022 Carolyn Shames

2024 David Brown

2024 Mike Sullivan

2022 Ray Catlin

2024 Hunter Weekes

2024 Jay Dorsey

2023 Rick Winkel

2023 Justin Elder

2023 Andy Bohon

Retail Construction Services, Inc. Gray

H.J. Martin & Son, Inc. Shames Construction

Tri-North Builders

Sullivan Construction Company

Threecore LLC

Weekes Construction, Inc.

Triad Retail Construction, Inc. Elder-Jones, Inc.

Winkel Construction, Inc. Westwood Contractors

2022 Eric Handley

William A. Randolph, Inc.

PAST PRESIDENTS David Weekes 1990-1992 W. L. Winkel 1993 Robert D. Benda 1994 John S. Elder 1995 Ronald M. Martinez 1996 Jack E. Sims 1997 Michael H. Ratner 1998 Barry Shames 1999 Win Johnson 2000 Dean Olivieri 2001 Thomas Eckinger 2002

James Healy 2003 Robert D. Benda 2004-2006 K. Eugene Colley 2006-2008 Matthew Schimenti 2008-2012 Art Rectenwald 2012-2014 Mike Wolff 2014-2016 Robert Moore 2016-2017 Brad Bogart 2017-2018 Rick Winkel 2018-2019 Steve Bachman 2019-2021

PS – If you have any feedback or ideas for the organization, please contact me at ray.catlin@threecorellc.com. SUMMER EDITION • 2021

3


NEWSLETTER

RCA Membership

RCA members must meet and maintain a series of qualifications and are approved by the Board of Directors for membership. They have been in the retail construction business as general contractors for at least five years; agree to comply with the Association’s Code of Ethics and Bylaws; are properly insured and bonded; are licensed in the states in which they do business; and have submitted letters of recommendation.

COMPANY CONTACT Acme Enterprises, Inc. Jeff Lomber Atlas Building Group Brian Boettler Bogart Construction, Inc. Brad Bogart Buildrite Construction Corp. Bryan Alexander Commercial Contractors, Inc. Kenneth Sharkey Commonwealth Building, Inc. Frank Trainor Construction One, Inc. Bill Moberger David A. Nice Builders Brian Bacon De Jager Construction, Inc. Dan De Jager Desco Professional Builders, Inc. Bob Anderson Diamond Contractors Lori Perry E.C. Provini, Co., Inc. Joseph Lembo Eckinger Construction Company Philip Eckinger EDC Christopher Johnson ELAN General Contracting Inc. Adrian Johnson Elder-Jones, Inc. Justin Elder Encore Construction, Inc. Joe McCafferty Engineered Structures, Inc. Mike Magill Fortney & Weygandt, Inc. Greg Freeh Fred Olivieri Construction Company Dean Olivieri Frontier Building Corp. Andrew Goggin Fulcrum Construction, LLC Willy Rosner Go Green Construction, Inc. Anthony Winkco Gray Robert Moore H.J. Martin & Son, Inc. David Martin Hardesty & Associates Scott Hardesty Harmon Construction, Inc. William Harmon Healy Construction Services, Inc. James Healy Howard Immel Inc. Pete Smits International Contractors, Inc. Bruce Bronge JAG Building Group Matt Allen James Agresta Carpentry Inc. James Agresta Kerricook Construction, Inc. Ann Smith Lakeview Construction, Inc. Kent Moon Management Resources Systems, Inc. Doug Marion Marco Contractors, Inc. Martin Smith Market Contractors Kerry Lobbestael National Building Contractors William Corcoran National Contractors, Inc. Michael Dudley Pinnacle Commercial Development, Inc. Dennis Rome Prime Retail Services, Inc. Donald Bloom PWI Construction, Inc. Jeff Price R.E. Crawford Construction LLC Jeffrey T. Smith Rectenwald Brothers Construction, Inc. Art Rectenwald Retail Construction Services, Inc. Stephen Bachman Retail Contractors of Puerto Rico Sean Pfent Rockford Construction Co. Thomas McGovern Russco, Inc. Matthew Pichette Sachse Construction and Development Corp. Jeff Katkowsky Scheiner Commercial Group, Inc. Joe Scheiner Schimenti Construction Company, Inc. Matthew Schimenti Shames Construction Co., Ltd. Carolyn Shames Singleton Construction, LLC Denise Doczy-Delong

PHONE STATE EMAIL MEMBER SINCE 810-499-7127 MI jlomber@acme-enterprises.com 2009 636-368-5234 MO bboettler@abgbuilds.com 2017 949-453-1400 CA brad@bogartconstruction.com 2008 770-971-0787 GA bryan@buildriteconstruction.com 2013 616-842-4540 MI ken.t.sharkey@teamcci.net 1990 617-770-0050 MA frankt@combuild.com 1992 614-235-0057 OH wmoberger@constructionone.com 2015 757-566-3032 VA bbacon@davidnicebuilders.com 2011 616-530-0060 MI dandj@dejagerconstruction.com 1990 860-870-7070 CT banderson@descopro.com 1995 816-650-9200 MO loriperry@diamondcontractors.org 2015 732-739-8884 NJ jlembo@eprovini.com 1992 330-453-2566 OH phil@eckinger.com 1994 804-897-0900 VA cjohnson@edcweb.com 1998 619-284-4174 CA ajohnson@elangc.com 2010 952-345-6069 MN justin@elderjones.com 1990 410-573-5050 MD joe@encoreconstruction.net 2018 208-362-3040 ID mikemagill@esiconstruction.com 2016 440-716-4000 OH gfreeh@fortneyweygandt.com 2013 330-494-1007 OH dean@fredolivieri.com 1992 305-692-9992 FL agoggin@fdllc.com 2018 770-612-8005 GA wrosner@fulcrumconstruction.com 2014 412-367-5870 PA anthony@ggc-pgh.com 2017 714-491-1317 CA ramoore@gray.com 2005 920-494-3461 WI david@hjmartin.com 2016 949-723-2230 CA scott@hardestyassociates.com 2020 812-346-2048 IN bill.harmon@harmonconstruction.com 2017 708-396-0440 IL jhealy@healyconstructionservices.com 1996 920-468-8208 WI psmits@immel-builds.com 2018 630-834-8043 IL bbronge@iciinc.com 1995 239-540-2700 FL matta@jagbuilding.com 2019 201-498-1477 NJ jim.agresta@jacarpentryinc.com 2013 440-647-4200 OH ann@kerricook.com 2012 262-857-3336 WI kent@lvconstruction.com 1998 336-861-1960 NC dmarion@mrs1977.com 1992 724-741-0300 PA marty@marcocontractors.com 1994 503-255-0977 OR kerryl@marketcontractors.com 2019 651-288-1900 MN bill@nbcconstruction.us 2013 952-881-6123 MN mdudley@ncigc.com 2018 732-528-0080 NJ dennis@pinnaclecommercial.us 2012 866-504-3511 GA dbloom@primeretailservices.com 2014 480-461-0777 AZ price@pwiconstruction.com 2003 941-907-0010 FL jeffs@recrawford.com 2011 724-772-8282 PA art@rectenwald.com 1996 651-704-9000 MN sbachman@retailconstruction.com 1998 586-725-4400 MI spfent@rcofusa.com 1996 616-285-6933 MI info@rockfordconstruction.com 2014 508-674-5280 MA mattp@russcoinc.com 1995 248-647-4200 MI jkatkowsky@sachseconstruction.com 2009 719-487-1600 CO joe@scheinercg.com 2012 914-244-9100 NY mschimenti@schimenti.com 1994 925-606-3000 CA cshames@shames.com 1994 740-756-7331 OH denisedelong@singletoncontruction.net 2012 (Continued on page 5)

4

SUMMER EDITION • 2021


Solex Contracting Sullivan Construction Company Taylor Brothers Construction Company, Inc. TDS Construction, Inc. Thomas-Grace Construction, Inc. Threecore, LLC Tom Rectenwald Construction, Inc. Trainor Commercial Construction, Inc. Travisano Construction, LLC Tri-North Builders, Inc. Triad Retail Construction Warwick Construction, Inc. WDS Construction Weekes Construction, Inc. Westwood Contractors, Inc. William A. Randolph, Inc. Winkel Construction, Inc. Wolverine Building Group Woods Construction, Inc. Vogel Plumbing, Inc.

Gerald Allen Amanda Sullivan Jeff Chandler Robert Baker Don Harvieux Ray Catlin Aaron Rectenwald John Taylor Peter J. Travisano David Brown Jay Dorsey Walt Watzinger Ben Westra Hunter Weekes Mike McBride Tony Riccardi Rick Winkel Michael Houseman John Bodary Brian Hogan

951-308-1706 954-484-3200 812-379-9547 941-795-6100 651-342-1298 972-800-2910 724-452-8801 415-259-0200 412-321-1234 608-204-7227 281-485-4700 832-448-7000 920-356-1255 864-233-0061 817-302-2050 847-856-0123 352-860-0500 616-949-3360 586-939-9991 517-528-8990

CA FL IN FL MN OH PA CA PA WI TX TX WI SC TX IL FL MI MI IL

jerry@solexcontracting.com amanda@buildwithsullivan.com Jeff.Chandler@TBCCI.com inbox@tdsconstruction.com don.harvieux@thomas-grace.com ray.catlin@threecorellc.com arectenwald@trcgc.net john.taylor@trainorconstruction.com pj@travisanocontruction.com dbrown@tri-north.com j.dorsey@triadrc.com walt@warwickconstruction.com bwestra@wdsconstruction.net hweekes@weekesconstruction.com mikem@westwoodcontractors.com tony.riccardi@warandolph.com rickw@winkel-construction.com mhouseman@wolvgroup.com jbodary@woodsconstruction.com bhogan@vogelplumbing.com

2015 2012 2014 1994 2012 2021 2010 2012 2015 2015 2013 2008 2019 1990 1990 2011 1990 2012 1996 2020

Visit retailcontractors.org to view the profile of each RCA member company. Click on “Find a Contractor” on the home page to search the member list. Please notify the RCA Office (800-847-5085 or info@retailcontractors.org) of any changes to your contact information.

SUMMER EDITION • 2021

5


NEWSLETTER (Continued from page 1) helping grow deeper relationships within our students. Being President of Firm Foundation has showed me that serving others is the best way to be a leader. My ideal career is to own my own commercial construction business. I would want to build corporate office buildings and shopping centers. My company would cultivate relationships with our clients and would have repeat work. My company would be able to refit offices or shopping centers when new leasing companies arrive. We would also do any maintenance work needed. Before I start this business, I want to continue to gain experience at my third commercial construction internship this summer, and work for a commercial contractor after graduation.”

After a semester of being a member I decided I wanted a bigger role in the club, so I became an officer. I am currently the activities director. Another club that I am involved in is the Construction Management Women’s Association. These organizations are involved in giving back to the community and helping students in need. I would love to become a PM for a commercial company. I believe being a woman in construction will help me thrive in the industry. I have developed a very good work ethic due to watching my parents work hard and getting the opportunity to gain real-world hands-on experience from a great mentor in the industry.”

Kinsey Koebele, Minnesota State University, Mankato (Junior, Construction Management, Minor: Business Administration, Minor: Communications) Kinsey received the Christian Elder Memorial Scholarship, named in memory of Christian Elder, who died in 2007 at the age of 38. Christian was a project manager with Elder-Jones, Inc., a charter member of the RCA, Christian’s father, and RCA past president.

Marcos Mendoza, University of Houston (Senior, Construction Management, Minor: Business Administration) “Without a doubt, my ideal career and ultimate goal is to be the owner of my own construction company. I have experienced and will experience being a labor worker, operator, driver, and superintendent. Right now, I am an assistant project manager and estimator. Ideally, my next step will be to become a project manager and to increase my knowledge. The complexity that comes with all these various positions allows one to learn something new every day. With all the knowledge from school and years of experience in construction, I give myself at least ten years after I graduate to start my own small construction company. From there, whether it remains a small company or turns into a major corporation, time and my dedication will tell—the sky is the limit.”

“I grew up watching both of my parents work in the construction industry for their entire careers, which sparked my interest in this career path at a very young age. My dad owns his own business building custom residential homes and my mom is an estimator at a commercial construction company. Once I got to college, I became a member of the Construction Management Student Association.

3M WINDOW FILM NATIONAL INSTALLERS

Aaron Ridder, Kansas State University (Senior, Construction Science and Management, Minor: Entrepreneurship) “Growing up on a farm on the plains of western Kansas gave me the best childhood I could have ever asked for. By the time I had reached high school, I had grown tired of the idea of living the farm life forever. I had to figure out what future career I would pursue to fulfill my curiosity and provide an avenue for the strong work ethic that had been instilled in me. Ideally, this career would keep me in the Midwest. I love this region of the United States and wouldn’t want to live anywhere else in the world. I see myself working for or owning an agricultural construction company that builds structures such as grain storage bins or agricultural buildings. I am proud of my roots and would love to continue to work with the agricultural community that I grew to love as a child.”

RCA’s scholarship program is made possible with the support of our members. We would like to thank the following RCA members for making a contribution to the Scholarship Fund in FY21 (May 2020-April 2021).

FREE Estimates

866-933-3456

$2,000 and above Shames Construction Company, Ltd. Taylor Bros. Construction Company, Inc. $1,500 Elder-Jones, Inc. Triad Retail Construction Inc.

$1,000 Bogart Construction, Inc. E.C. Provini Co., Inc. Eckinger Construction Company Solex Contracting $500 Scheiner Commercial Group

To make a contribution to the RCA Scholarship Fund, visit retailcontractors.org or contact the RCA office at info@retailcontractors.org. 6

SUMMER EDITION • 2021


Our 2021 Annual Conference will be held in National Harbor, MD (outside of Washington, DC) at the Gaylord National Resort, prior to SPECS. Hear from our featured speakers and connect with RCA members and retailers. Anirban Basu Chairman & CEO, Sage Policy Group, Inc.

Jay Papasan Bestselling author (The ONE Thing) & Vice President of Learning, Keller Williams Realty International

Carmen Ciricillo The Construction Comic

Visit retailcontractors.org for the agenda and to register. RCA members—your first registration is free.

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NEWSLETTER

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When art meets food

Inside the mastery behind Bennett’s American Cooking

A special supplement to: Rocco Laudizio founder and principal slick+designusa


Interview by Michael J. Pallerino

When art meets food Inside the mastery behind Bennett’s American Cooking

P

rime seafood. Steak. Sandwiches and salads. If you’re looking for the best place to do some good old American shared plates, Bennett’s American Cooking is the place for you. With freshly prepared and house made plates, Bennett’s is the latest offering from Bennett’s Hospitality Group.

The atmosphere, designed by international, full-service architectural design firm slick+designusa, features an expansive bar at the heart of the restaurant—providing an upscale, yet casual, dining experience. Bennett’s is the brainchild of Brian and Susan Bennett (Brian was a founding partner of the Paul Martin’s American Grill chain, which has locations in California, Texas and Arizona). With the style, form and function dictated by slick+designusa, designer for some of the world’s foremost commercial developments, Bennett’s will be a force to be reckoned with in the restaurant space. To get a snapshot of the artistry behind the design, we sat down with slick+designusa founder and Principal Rocco Laudizio, who is internationally recognized for his signature style and innovative vision.

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ISSUE 6, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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WHEN ART MEETS FOOD

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS

Give us a snapshot of the Bennett’s brand?

Bennett’s American Cooking is focused on serving fresh, local food. Prime seafood and steaks, sandwiches, salads and shareable plates. A wallet and health-conscious menu offering paleo, gluten free, keto, vegan, and heart healthy options.

What were some of the things that inspired the concept behind your design?

We were inspired by the honest approach to food and service and used that to propel a design that is as honest, straightforward, and approachable for the customers.

What type of look and feel were they going for?

The clients have a wide range of customers. We created a space great for a family meal, a romantic destination for date night or to celebrate a special occasion.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


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WHEN ART MEETS FOOD

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS What takeaway were you going for with the design? What do you want customers to remember?

We wanted to create a space that is inviting and not too pretentious while also being sophisticated. We want the customers to remember the great time they enjoyed in a unique environment.

How does the design of the restaurant cater to what today’s consumers are looking for?

Bennett’s American Kitchen is focused on fresh, local ingredients and with our design for the restaurant, we really wanted to set the stage for an amazing dining experience. That meant focusing on natural materials and an earthy palette to create a welcoming environment both sophisticated and timeless, yet as approachable as the ever-changing menu.

When possible, we prefer materials made to order which also cuts down on waste, opting to specify products made of recycled materials, as well products fabricated for longevity. Can you walk us through the how and why of your design?

We could not change the main footprint, so we worked with the concept from the previous restaurant which was inspired by “theater in the round.” The space is open-air but incorporates different zones, so even though there is separation, there is an overall feeling of continuity and togetherness. After the original design was approved and scheduled for construction, COVID forced us to follow new restricted guidelines. We needed to incorporate glass partitions and redesign the seating plans throughout the restaurant to accommodate new seating limits. Our original esthetics were not changed, only the way they were applied to accommodate the new restrictions created by COVID.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

Our strategy is simple, provide detailed, yet crystal clear drawings of all our design

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elements so any contractor can execute our vision. We also provide multiple 3D renderings of the entire space so the contractor can reference and visualize the space they build. Our desired option is to provide the millwork and built-in seating systems from our preferred vendors. This is done so we can provide the quality control necessary on these very important items.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

We have seen the costs and availability of building materials increasing by two to three times. This also includes all FF&E items,

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The main footprint of the restaurant had to be kept, so we worked with the concept from the previous restaurant, which was inspired by “theater in the round.”

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

which have delayed any construction schedule put into place.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

We strive to use materials locally sourced for each project. When possible, we prefer materials made to order which also cuts down on waste, opting to specify products made of recycled materials, as well products fabricated for longevity.

What’s the secret to creating a “must visit” restaurant environment in today’s competitive landscape?

When we design a restaurant and or hotel, the design will be current and timeless so


CIRCLE NO. 51


WHEN ART MEETS FOOD

COMMERCIAL KITCHENS it appeals to the masses and stays in style. High design, simplicity, functionality and a timeless vibe is our philosophy.

What motivates today’s consumer?

Locally sourced and organic ingredients in their food and beverages, which also translates into what they are expecting from the designed environment in which they consume these items.

Describe a typical day.

Meetings with clients, hand drawings and or sketches to pass on to my team, lots of espresso, renderings, material selections, conversations with teams on active job sites. Sometimes it can be an organized three-ring circus with these projects going on, but it always gets done.

Tell us what makes your brand so unique?

High design, simplicity, functionality and a timeless vibe is our design philosophy for buildings, hotels, yachts, restaurants, nightclubs and residential homes. CK

One-on-One with Rocco Laudizio, Principal slick+designusa What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Just hearing clients tell me, “Everyone came up to me and said the place looks amazing.” What was the best advice you ever received? Always stick to your design philosophy when working with clients and always measure twice and then cut once. How do you like to spend your down time? Yachting and car racing.

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What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? “You’re the best and I am so happy you helped me with my project” Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why. Consistency, organization and strength. What are you going to do once we get back to some sense of normalcy? Probably spend a few months in Spain to relax.


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June 2021 • Issue 5

Knock, Knock…

The Open Dør Dispensaries is helping turn cannabis enthusiasts into franchise owners—one license at a time

Kathryn Blackwell and Chelsea Mulligan co-founders The Open Dør


THE CANNABIS OPERATIONS

KNOCK, KNOCK…

Knock, Knock… The Open Dør Dispensaries is helping turn cannabis enthusiasts into franchise owners— one license at a time

T

he cannabis industry is a male dominated industry, so what else is new. It certainly didn’t deter The Open Dør Dispensaries co-founders Kathryn Blackwell and Chelsea Mulligan from jumping into the game. Both will fully admit that they didn’t intentionally set out to be a woman-owned company, their fortunes just drifted that way. Today, the female owned and operated company is a turnkey franchise dispensary model for cannabis industry enthusiasts who are new license owners, just submitted their licenses or are current dispensary owners. So, in an industry growing like few others, the duo is committed to helping dispensary license owners with every aspect of opening and maintaining their business— from architecture and design, compliance in their legalized state, employee education, and more. We sat down with Blackwell and Mulligan to get a feel for where they think the industry is heading.

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GIVE US A SNAPSHOT OF YOUR BRAND? The Open Dør Dispensaries is a national cannabis retail franchise offering license holders and industry stakeholders the opportunity to invest in a turnkey dispensary model in legal medical marijuana and adult-use markets. Headquartered in Scottsdale, Arizona, The Open Dør Dispensaries leadership team includes co-founder and CEO Kathryn Blackwell, co-founder and COO Chelsea Mulligan, and Strategic Real Estate Advisor Bryan McLaren. The Open Dør Dispensaries takes the complexity out of cannabis for dispensary license owners, operators and investors.

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Interview by Michael J. Pallerino

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THE CANNABIS OPERATIONS

KNOCK, KNOCK…

Through its comprehensive support offerings, the franchise brand provides a national solution for stakeholders to get to market faster, with ease and less financial overage. Our model provides expertise and guidance tailored to the industry’s nuanced regulatory landscape, covering zoning and real estate, state and municipal compliance, and retail operations.

WHAT TYPE OF CONSUMERS ARE YOU TARGETING? We are targeting dispensary license holders and investors who have an equity interest in a license to operate a dispensary. Essentially, we are creating less risk for an investor with our turnkey model because we help the operator get to market faster and with more efficiency. We also can help those that may not yet have a license, but are applying for one with our extensive compliance and licensing team. Our concept takes the complexity out of cannabis for franchise dispensary owners and customers.

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HOW DOES THE OVERALL DESIGN CATER TO WHAT TODAY’S CONSUMERS ARE LOOKING FOR? The Open Dør Dispensaries design was inspired by our own experiences as new cannabis dispensary customers. We saw a great need for cohesiveness of the sales team, education and overall customer service in many of the dispensaries we visited when legalization first came into play in the states we were in. We included many traditional retail elements into the design of The Open Dør Dispensaries. First, a focus on a welcoming environment and detailed merchandising. An investment in lit shelves for product display and sparkle lighting that is used in a classic retail environment to elevate the showcasing of the products. Creating a plan for the clear pathway and traffic flow of customers enriches the shopping experience. Having a streamlined checkout counter and a sophisticated Point of Sale technology allows customers to check out efficiently and quickly was also important.

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Lastly, having an efficient floor plan for the back room and a systematic order fulfillment process is a key element to smooth operations for a dispensary. With recreational cannabis becoming more prominent throughout the US, we wanted to cater to new customers who may not have a lot of education or experience on how dispensaries work by creating an inviting environment. Things that weren’t a focus in cannabis before, we are showcasing and perfecting because it is expected from new customers. When a franchisee joins us with their dispensary license in a state with legalized cannabis, they benefit from The Open Dør Dispensaries architectural plans and floor plan layouts, decor packages, access to technology platforms, training materials for staff, marketing programs and co-promotion campaigns with selected brands. We also provide franchisee support with its continued education, benchmark success metrics and on-site compliance guidance.


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THE CANNABIS OPERATIONS

KNOCK, KNOCK…

WHAT ADJUSTMENTS HAVE YOU MADE TO CATER TO TODAY’S SHOPPING LANDSCAPE? One of the most important pieces of our business plan is that we are dedicated to serving the customer. This is not just a friendly smile to us, but also creating an educational environment for our staff so that they are the best resource for customers who visit our locations. There are several areas within the shop that cater to this: Printed and digital product materials, staff members with extended education in and knowledge of cannabis, and dedicated team members who specialize in assisting new consumers to find the products best suited for their needs.

were extremely high because people were locked at home and had more recreational time for adult-use products.

WHAT TYPE OF AREAS DO YOU LOOK FOR WHEN SEEKING STORE LOCATIONS? As a dispensary, we are only of value in legalized states, however we are always keeping a pulse on soon to be legalized markets. It also depends on the type of legalization. For example, a state that has only legalized medical marijuana may not need to be in as high-traffic areas as adultuse markets would need to be to increase shoppers and visibility.

WHAT ADVICE CAN YOU OFFER OTHER BRANDS ON HOW TO DEAL WITH WHAT HAPPENED IN THE MARKETPLACE? Think ahead and be prepared for the next step in the industry for your market.

WHAT MAKES YOUR LOCATION ENGAGING TO TODAY’S CANNABIS CUSTOMER? Each section—flower, vapes, concentrates, etc.—will have education near it that is interactive. The living wall in the lobby area was designed both for a feel of nature but also to be “instagrammable” and engaging.

WAS YOUR OPERATION DEEMED ESSENTIAL DURING THE LOCKDOWN?

WHAT’S YOUR SHORT- AND LONG-TERM STRATEGIES?

WALK US THROUGH HOW AND WHY YOUR SHOP(S) IS DESIGNED THE WAY IT IS?

Yes, since many states have legalized medical marijuana, dispensaries were deemed essential during the pandemic in many of those states. From an investment standpoint, being a part of a business that is deemed as essential is always a positive outcome. During the pandemic, cannabis sales also

We have a roadmap for each state we are focused on for launches. But in cannabis, good entrepreneurs are always ready to pivot. So while we will always keep the same roadmap, we will add new paths and always be ready to add what is needed to best service our franchisees and clients.

The shop is designed to flow easily and also give each customer the ability to see everything. Our design strategy was to have lots of light, keep it classy, but welcoming with its tones and textures, as well as have some flexibility like the moving podiums and brand highlight area.

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CIRCLE NO. 55


THE CANNABIS OPERATIONS

GIVE US A RUNDOWN OF YOUR MARKET’S LAYOUT. Dispensaries must adhere to certain standards when it comes to the layout of the store. Customers are allowed into the first part of the store when there is enough capacity. They are in the lobby at this point where a receptionist can check their ID or medical marijuana card. The lobby has menu information, dispensary information and a waiting area. We differentiated our lobby with a larger footprint and a separate window for online order pick-up. When the customer is called into the main store area, they come in through one side that leads them through a sales process. It was important for the retail area

KNOCK, KNOCK…

to incorporate mainstream retail attributes into the design such as sparkle lighting, marketing ques in different areas, clean lines and not a lot of collateral that we have traditionally seen in dispensaries. Our goal with a minimalist look is to keep the conversation with the budtender or “salesperson” to create a relationship with the customer. This, in turn, lets the customer have a one on one experience to understand about different products and the chance for the budtender to upsell. Lastly, behind the scenes there is another layout specifically for the back storage room. This backroom has education and training areas and is laid out for utmost security.

WHAT’S THE BIGGEST ISSUE RELATED TO THE CONSTRUCTION SIDE OF THE BUSINESS? Our biggest hurdle is finding real estate zoned and landlords who will allow a cannabis dispensary to do business in the building. This is why The Open Dør Dispensaries strategically partnered with Zoned Properties, which is a leading real estate development firm for emerging and highly regulated industries, including regulated cannabis. The company is redefining the approach to commercial real estate investment through its integrated growth services.

TALK ABOUT SUSTAINABILITY.

With more states becoming legalized, creating a welcoming environment for someone who has not yet experienced cannabis products was first and foremost for us.

Implementing eco-friendly materials where possible, selecting energy efficient equipment, light fixtures and windows when possible.

WHAT TYPE OF OPPORTUNITIES DO YOU SEE MOVING AHEAD? Consumption lounges. With our extensive restaurant background, we would be very interested in creating an inviting and comfortable cannabis lounge and cafe. This is not yet available in all recreational and legalized states, but we are seeing this concept in California and Colorado.

WHAT TRENDS ARE YOU SEEING/EXPECTING? The Open Dør Dispensaries was very aware of trends in both the cannabis and mainstream retail industries, and we were able to incorporate some of these best practices into our plans. Some of the areas that we had focused on were incorporating technology and online ordering/delivery.

WHAT’S THE SECRET TO CREATING A “MUST VISIT” LOCATION IN TODAY’S COMPETITIVE LANDSCAPE? This was a part of why we decided to create The Open Dør Dispensaries. We knew there were missing opportunities from traditional dispensaries that maybe were a part of the

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THE CANNABIS OPERATIONS

KNOCK, KNOCK…

mix, but not necessarily mainstream. With more states becoming legalized, creating a welcoming environment for someone who has not yet experienced cannabis products was first and foremost for us. We also needed consistent and knowledgeable customer experience. Having convenience and options for our customers was also a focus area for our plans.

WHAT’S TODAY’S CONSUMER LOOKING FOR?

TELL US WHAT MAKES YOUR BRAND SO UNIQUE?

A solid, consistent experience with friendly employees and quality products. Customers are tired of having to drive around town to find the products that they need or want. By having a systematic approach and vetting the products that are in our dispensary, we help customers with all of these pain points.

We aren’t focused on just the big picture; we are focused on cultivating employees and creating a consistent and warm experience for our customers. Not letting ourselves get in the weeds, but be sure the day to day of each location is consistent, efficient and inviting.

ONE-ON-ONE WITH... Kathryn Blackwell and Chelsea Mulligan The Open Dør Dispensaries

Describe a typical day. What’s the biggest thing on your to-do list?

Kathryn: It is really important for me to begin my day by clearing my mind. I start each day with some sort of work out; I’m really loving the Peloton app right now and Barre workouts. Being a franchise that has opportunities in every state, I am adamant about reading market updates on legislation, cannabis news and retail news. It is our job to know all of the latest information that is happening in the industry so we can be the support system that’s so needed. We are constantly reviewing new vendors we think may be a fit for our dispensary. Most dispensaries only have to go through the brands that are in their own state, but as a national franchise, we are looking at all US brands that could potentially be incorporated into a new location. Throughout the day, I also have discussions with our corporate team and pro-

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spective franchisees that are looking for a partner to help them succeed. Chelsea: There is never a typical day in cannabis. For me, since I oversee compliance and operations, I am constantly seeing changes to regulations, trends, etc., that I have to begin incorporating into my SOPs and training manuals. Currently, I am heading up a dispensary opening for a license in Phoenix. For a new retail space there are always things that change on the to do list to accommodate.

What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Kathryn: Knowing that I am utilizing 30 years of experience in retail operations to provide a solution and assistance to help another entrepreneur be successful—all those past headaches were not wasted.

Chelsea: Watching employees flourish in a highly successful company. Sometimes you only see one or the other, so to have

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

high morale and achievements reached is always a plus. I also am always looking for that lightbulb moment when an employee realizes something they were good at. Also, watching them find their why is insanely satisfying and is one of my “whys.”

What was the best advice you ever received?

Kathryn: “If you can turn your passion into a profession—don’t let anything or anyone stop you.” Also, “If you can’t say, ‘Hell yes,’ to an idea, say, ‘Hell no.’” Chelsea: To always believe that I am a fearless and empathetic warrior. To believe in my strength, my knowledge and to trust my abilities, as they haven’t ever failed me.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? Kathryn: “This (The Open Dør Dispensaries franchise opportunity) is exactly what I’ve needed.”

Chelsea: Best compliment would be the client that dubbed me “The Dispensary Whisperer.” Best thing a client has said is when they stated being “Chelsea Compliant” was more stringent than being state compliant.

How do you like to spend your down time?

Kathryn: Down time has been limited lately, but when time allows, I like hiking in the Arizona foothills, cooking together with my kids and extended family, and supporting other women entrepreneurs. Chelsea: Down time is something that I have had to work at creating. That is something that I have found important and have also instilled in employees that work for me. One of my favorite things to do is just jump on the trampoline with my child. I also enjoy scootering to local restaurants with my husband. I honestly also love working on other projects I have in the fire.


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INDUSTRY

WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION

Get S@#$ Done Our conversation with Karalynn Cromeens, The Cromeens Law Firm

G

rowing up, Karalynn Cromeens says one of the biggest lessons her family instilled in her was the premise that to succeed, you need to “Get S@#$ Done.” As part of the “Get S@#$ Done Tribe,” as she refers to the Cromeens family, Karalynn learned that hard work, perseverance and pride are the keys to success. As Owner and Managing Partner of the The Cromeens Law Firm, Karalynn and her firm are committed to sparking change in the ever-evolving commercial construction industry. Founded in 2006, the full-service construction and business law firm’s results-driven, cost-effective and personalized representation practice sets it apart from others in the industry. Amid the pandemic, Karalynn even found time to publish her first book, “Quit Getting Screwed, Understanding and Negotiating the Subcontract,” which quickly became an Amazon bestseller. In addition, she launched the “Quit Getting Screwed Podcast,” which offers free educational content to contractors nationwide. Educating contractors to look out for and understand dangerous contract terms has become her mission. And if that was not enough, Karalynn also created The Subcontractor Institute—an educational platform that teaches subcontractors everything they need to know about their subcontracts. We caught up to Karalynn to get her thoughts on today’s competitive construction landscape.

against you, so make sure you understand what you are signing. The other issue I am seeing deals with being paid on time, or at all. It is so crucial that you secure your right to payment with a lien or bond claim. Every state has its own set of rules for having a valid lien and or bond claim, so make sure you know what is required in your state and take the proper steps to protect the money you are owed.

Give us a snapshot of the construction market today? What are you seeing out there?

I think that story really starts with my family. We are people from what I like to call the “Get S@#$ Done Tribe.” We are the ones who build things with our hands and make things work. My dad’s side were farmers, and my mom’s side were contractors, so the whole family worked manual labor. One of my first jobs was at my uncle’s irrigation company. I saw first-hand what it took to keep these small family businesses in the construction industry going, and it was anything but easy.

As a construction law attorney, I have a unique perspective of the industry. Lately, I am seeing that now more than ever; you need to understand what you agree to do when you sign a contract. I have seen so many of my clients’ businesses damaged or destroyed by things they did not even realize were in their contracts when signing them. Whatever you sign in a contract will be used

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Then, when I was in law school, my husband and I started a material supply business from the ground up. I experienced the 10-hour days and the 60-hour weeks that it took to get that business started and make it successful. I also realized how much danger these family-owned businesses legally face daily. When I finished law school, I started my own law firm with the vision of helping these family-owned companies run better businesses and protect everything they have worked so hard for. When you call my office, we are here to help you. We guarantee 24-hour return phone calls, and we are going to give you all of your options in a way that you can understand and help you make the best decision for your company. I think my past gives me a unique insight into what these companies need. We help the Get S@#$ Done Tribe run better businesses.

What are some of the biggest changes you’ve seen in the industry over the past few years?

Karalynn Cromeens

How did you get started in the industry? What’s your story?

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

The contracts have gotten worse. I think attorneys just put in everything they think they can get away with, thinking there will be a negotiation of the terms, but there never is. When this happens, it leaves some hazardous provisions and clauses buried within the contracts that we see being signed in the construction industry today. I’ve also noticed owners and/or developers getting cheaper and cheaper, and trying to find ways to pay less and less for quality materials and skilled labor. They think they can get away with doing a lousy job building something because it won’t be their problem once it sells, which is not the case.

Name some of the opportunities available for women in construction?

In my opinion, women have been running the construction industry for years.


They’ve just been doing it from behind their husbands, fathers, uncles and brothers. Behind every good man in construction, there has always been a woman helping to run the show. Some of the biggest and most successful companies in the construction industry are male and female teams. In reality, women not only are helping run the businesses, but often they also are having the babies, raising the kids and taking care of the home. Women in the industry never have a job that simply ends at the office. I think many women can lose themselves in all these roles and that maybe some have forgotten that their dreams matter, too. Women can do everything in the industry that men can do, even if it means they have to work a little harder. Women can get the job done just as well, if not better.

What challenges remain?

There is an automatic presumption that women do not understand construction, including the craft, business and law aspects that doesn’t exist for men in the industry. The good thing is that such a presumption can be overcome when a woman is confident and informed in her industry.

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?

“Find the leverage.” Find your advantage in any given circumstance. I, personally, am in the business of resolving disputes in the fastest way possible, and the best way to do that is to find leverage. If you don’t have it or can’t find it, create it.

What’s the advice you would share with women just entering the industry?

Your goals matter. You are not just someone’s wife or mother; you are your own person, and what you want matters. Work hard, but ask for help when you need it. You don’t have to do it all on your own. Make what you want a priority.

when you can stop worrying or focusing on what is next and replace it with being here and now.

What’s the biggest lesson you learned from last year?

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list?

Maybe slowing down is not such a bad idea. Life is more enjoyable when you can be present where you are at. It’s even better

Expanding the Subcontractor Institute. My second book, “Quit Getting Stiffed” publishes this fall, and along with it will be some new

lien and collection updates for Subcontractor Institute at www.subcontractorinstitue.com.

The first thing you’re going to do when everything gets back to normal?

I kind of like the “New Normal,” but I do miss travel. I think a good trip with my family is in order. CCR

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June 2021

Hip. Cool. Repeat. How the Bellyard is helping redefine Atlanta’s Westside streetscape

Brendan Abraham, General Manager Bellyard


Hospitality in Commercial Construction

Interview by Michael J. Pallerino

Hip. Cool. Repeat. How the Bellyard is helping redefine Atlanta’s Westside streetscape

T

he Bellyard on Atlanta’s Westside can dazzle guests at every turn. For starters, the coolest new Midtown hotel on the block features 161 suites and guestrooms decked out with the latest and greatest in technological offerings.

in to their hotels. With Bellyard’s local touches and hybrid social, dining and work spaces throughout the property, our boutique hotel offers a haven to each guest.

You want cool? Check out the room numbers branded into the floor. Or, take a long look at the art from local designers displayed throughout the hotel, or custom furnishings, cowhide carpeting and that Japanese soaking tub tucked into a massive shower. The Bellyard West Midtown Atlanta, a Tribute Portfolio Hotel from Marriott, is the perfect complement to Midtown Atlanta’s swath of super hip, smart restaurants, and retail and office spaces. Once the home of cattle stockyards and myriad rail lines, Atlanta’s Westside is the latest “must be” place in the city’s growing legacy. To get an inside look at the Bellyard project, we sat down with GM Brendan Abraham and Alex Campbell, AIA, LEED AP, Regional Design Leader, Studio Leader, Director, at NELSON Worldwide.

Alex Campbell, NELSON Worldwide: Today’s guests are looking for exceptional experiences. Destinations that offer the comforts they desire and the unexpected touches that make connections with places and people memory worthy. Guests are looking for “more”—more than they can have at home, more than they have come to expect in the past from previous hospitality stays and brands need to deliver on that desire for “more” in new ways through service, amenities, and beyond.

Give us a snapshot of the Bellyard brand?

Brendan Abraham, Bellyard: The boutique hotel offers guests a lively atmosphere to stay, work, nourish, lounge and connect in Atlanta. Inspired by Atlanta’s progressive expansion to the west, Bellyard immerses guests in West Midtown’s rich history

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through industrial-cool, locally crafted design that nods to the stockyards and railroads. The bar and lounge, Drawbar, features craft cocktails made with locally sourced ingredients and fruit syrups that complement the Southern fresh menu.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

Bellyard’s Abraham: Bellyard welcomes business and leisure travelers; locals; young professionals; and creatives to relax in our contemporary yet home-like atmosphere.

What type of things are consumers looking for today?

Bellyard’s Abraham: As travel picks up, guests are looking for a clean, comfortable environment for their adventures. To create a welcoming experience, Bellyard implements Marriott International’s enhanced health and safety precautions, which include frequent cleaning with hospital-grade disinfectants, social distancing protocols, hand-sanitizing stations throughout the hotel, state-of-the-art cleaning technology and air purifying systems. Travelers also are seeking a memorable and personalized experience as they check

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Take us through the design strategy.

NELSON Worldwide’s Campbell: Our strategy is always to meet the design goals of our client by providing them with the best branded experience while being conscious of budget.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

Bellyard’s Abraham: COVID-19 caused delays and even halts to nearly all hotel projects since it hit as travel demand declined and work shortages for vendors and suppliers


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Hospitality in Commercial Construction

arose. Bellyard opened without delay, and our team looks forward to welcoming visitors from near and far to the hotel’s safe, modern and comfortable atmosphere. NELSON Worldwide’s Campbell: The availability of materials and cost is by far the biggest issue impacting construction right now. These conditions are creating a serious impact to our client’s budgets and schedules.

Walk us through the Bellyard design.

NELSON Worldwide’s Campbell: The project began by defining the hotel’s brand. Rooted in the rich history of West Midtown and The Interlock local touches and carefully curated brand moments created a space where guests feel comfortable in a unique boutique setting they can’t get at any other hotel in Atlanta. The wood and steel materials,

combined in a rich and sophisticated way, speak to the history in a subtle and up-todate approach extending branded touch points through the entire guest experience.

How does the design of the hotel cater to how today’s guests’ stay?

NELSON Worldwide’s Campbell: The Bellyard caters to today’s guests by offering amenities and a genuine localized experience. The hotel is designed to allow a truly authentic Atlanta experience. Inspired by the rich history of the West Midtown neighborhood, modern elegant touches nodding to the stockyards and railroads alongside furniture and fixtures curated by local artisans and designers created space for guests to not only enjoy the vibes of the hotel, but the surrounding neighborhood.

We are laser-focused on providing guests an inviting experience that exceeds expectations. — Brendan Abraham, Bellyard

All guest rooms provide a retreat for relaxation while the public spaces feature an array of engaging experiences, including a lobby bar, courtyard, exclusive restaurant and a signature rooftop terrace with a panoramic view of the Atlanta skyline. Dynamic seating and lounge areas also allow guests to feel comfortable for every occasion—eating, drinking with friends, working or relaxing.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

Bellyard’s Abraham: Bellyard has many sustainability measures within the four walls, including a full recycling program and LED lighting throughout the property with motion

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sensors to conserve energy. All thermostats also are equipped with motion sensors as well as a program called Telkonet, transforming guestrooms into smart rooms that automatically default to a set temperature following guest check out. Bellyard and Drawbar use all biodegradable paper products.

taking in picturesque views of the Atlanta skyline. The hotel’s approximately 7,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor event space serve as an ideal location for business and social events alike.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

Bellyard’s Abraham: It is positive news to see the hotel industry is recovering from the pandemic sooner than expected. We have seen strong weekend demand in the Atlanta market since opening, and we hope to welcome even more travelers, as well as corporate and group business, shortly as restrictions continue to be lifted.

Are you optimistic about what you see in the hotel/resort sector?

Bellyard’s Abraham: We envision Bellyard becoming a hotspot for both travelers and locals to enjoy the culinary excellence of Drawbar—the hotel’s cocktail-centric, American tavern-inspired eatery—while

N AT I O N W I D E OVER 40 YEARS OF PROVEN SUCCESS

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Hospitality in Commercial Construction

Why did you pick the location you did for your hotel?

Bellyard’s Abraham: As the only hotel in West Midtown Atlanta, Bellyard puts West Midtown on the map, bringing refreshed options within steps of local shops, booming entertainment venues and chef-driven restaurants.

What trends are you seeing?

Bellyard’s Abraham: Since opening reservations, we have seen an upward growth of bookings from travelers across the nation. We have already experienced high demand at Drawbar as guests are eager for a refreshed dining experience as restrictions lessen.

Describe a typical day.

Bellyard’s Abraham: My favorite part about managing a hotel is that every day is different, and each day provides its own set of challenges and successes. One of the first essential tasks to start my day is to check in with each department and make sure everyone is taken care of departmentally. From there, I immediately shift my focus to ensuring I am getting to know our guests.

Tell us what makes the Bellyard brand so unique?

Bellyard’s Abraham: Bellyard extends a distinctive experience filled with palpable

What’s the secret to creating a “must visit” hotel/resort in today’s competitive landscape?

Bellyard’s Abraham: We are laser-focused on providing guests an inviting experience that exceeds expectations. To fully immerse guests in the local culture, Bellyard offers room packages featuring offerings from nearby establishments such as Saint Germain French Bakery, Pour Taproom, Velvet Taco, Savannah Bee Company and East Fork. NELSON Worldwide’s Campbell: There is not a single secret, but the underlying thread to create a “must visit” destination is having something truly “one-of-a-kind.” Whether it be a unique service that goes above and beyond, an elevated offer that sets oneself from the competition or a branded partnership that creates a collaborative experience that cannot be replicated, this premise of one-of-a-kind is critical. This will create allure as well as fuel conversation and buzz to encourage additional visits.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list?

Bellyard’s Abraham: Our top priority is always to create meaningful connections with guests and provide a home-like, inspiring environment infused with the utmost hospitality for them to relax, socialize, work, eat and drink in Atlanta.

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individuality. The hotel is ingrained in the fabric of this vibrant city, tapping a variety of local partners to bring the destination to life—from design by NELSON Worldwide of Alpharetta, Georgia to authentic French pastries and coffee from Atlanta-based Saint Germain French Bakery and an extensive collection of local art with pieces from Tiny Doors Atlanta, Amy Parry Projects, Iron to Art, ART & Associates, Lauren Williams Art and Pierpoint LLC. From the moment they step into the lobby, guests become engrossed in the community of The Interlock and West Midtown.

One-on-One with... Brendan Abraham, GM, Bellyard

What’s the most rewarding part of your job? Being able to create meaningful connections with our guests and team members. I especially enjoy being able to change someone’s day or stay with my interactions.

What was the best advice you ever received? Success is not forever, and failure is not fatal.

What’s the best thing a client ever said to you? Over the years I’ve had many clients create meaningful experiences for me; however, my favorite part is hearing about how one of our team members went above and beyond. At the end of the day, when my team is taking care of the customer, I know that I have done my job successfully.

Name the three strongest traits any leader should have and why. Patience, charisma and organization.

What’s the true key to success for any manager? Be willing to come in every single day and do the jobs that others won’t.

How do you like to spend your down time? I love spending time with my family and discovering new spots within Atlanta.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021


VOL 6 • ISSUE 5, 2021

The Voice of Craft Brands

Saving grace How Vitamin Sea Brewing became a beacon of hope for Massachusetts’ craft lovers

Dino Funari co-founder Vitamin Sea Brewing LLC


The Voice of Craft Brands

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ISSUE 6, 2021

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Interview by Michael J. Pallerino

Saving grace How Vitamin Sea Brewing became a beacon of hope for Massachusetts’ craft lovers Just about one year before a pandemic changed the way everybody approached everything in their lives, Vitamin Sea Brewing opened its doors on Massachusetts’ South Shore in Weymouth. Long before those doors opened, local boys and founders Dino Funari, Joshua Sherman and Richard DiBona began building the legend of their craft.

Connecting with Vitamin Sea Brewing 30 Moore Road Weymouth, MA 781-803-2104 vitaminsea brewing.com Instagram: vitaminseabrewing Facebook: @Vitaminseabrewing Twitter: @Vitaminseabrew

Visit their retro cool taproom and you will notice an ice cooler high on a shelf—the same cooler where Funari kept his beer in at his house when he brewed it at home and gave it to friends, family and fellow craft enthusiasts. The cooler, it turns out, is just one of the many nuggets in the legend of Vitamin Sea. For the rest, Funari and company invite you to stop by and share in the stories. In a town that seems perfectly fit for the brewery life, Vitamin Sea fits right in, boasting a location that has a perfect proximity to all things Weymouth, i.e., restaurants, food, shopping, etc. As for the future, the Vitamin Sea Brewing team is just getting started. We sat down with Funari to get the latest on the brand and the year ahead for the craft beer market.

throughout the pandemic. We lost 40% of our business when we had to close our taproom. We more than made up for that with can sales.

Give us a snapshot of today’s craft spirits market.

From a craft beer perspective there’s going to be a flushing out of brands. Subpar products can’t be masked by flashy taprooms. You can get anyone to go to your place once—but quality products will keep them coming back.

Tell us a little about your brand.

Opened in February 2019, Vitamin Sea Brewing has its roots firmly planted on the South Shore of Massachusetts. Our taproom features 12 taps covering a wide range of styles—from IPAs to stouts and even cold brew coffee, as well as a wide range of merchandise, and great local cuisine from our many food vendor partners. We are excited to be a part of this great local craft beer scene and look forward to bringing you lots of delicious beer for many years to come.

What kind of conversations are you having with your customers today?

There’s definitely a lot of “thank you’s” being given after people stuck with us and supported us

What’s likely to happen next?

I think the future is combining restaurants with taprooms. Onsite food keeps customers from having to leave. Not just chicken fingers and French fries either, but curated, higher-end food items to pair with brand specific beer.

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Vitamin Sea Brewing LLC

What trends are defining the space?

The big beer hall style is still alive and well. Communal seating to spark conversation. Minimalistic decor gives a clean look

What’s your story from a brand perspective?

We built a brand years before we opened. We were home-brewers that utilized social media to give us global awareness. We were canning beers in my basement and giving them to friends to try. They would tell their friends and then they would tell their friends. I had this blue cooler in my front yard and we would leave cans in there for people to try. We would get calls saying, “Hey, I was told that if I left a four pack in your cooler, I could take a four pack of your beer in exchange.” We got our beer into the hands of so many different people this way. We couldn’t sell our beer, obviously, but this helped us get the name out there.

Walk us through your branding strategy.

Merch is absolutely huge for us—to the point that we’ve been accused of being just another T-shirt shop, which

is a story for another day. We take that as a compliment. If we can put a logo on it, we probably would. We have made friendships in different industries that have their own fandoms—television, professional sports and music. There’s a fine line between maintaining the cool factor and selling out.

What’s the biggest issue today related to the marketing/sales side of the craft beer business today?

When your project demands durability, Metropolitan Ceramics® has you covered. Metropolitan Ceramics durable & slip resisting product lines are engineered for the most

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There are so many breweries that don’t have their own identity. It’s very hard to differentiate one from the other. What makes a consumer want to buy your product?

What’s the secret to creating a branding story that consumers can buy into?

I’ve always felt like we were the underdogs, if you will. A group of folks who were brewing in a basement and made of the best of the opportunity that we were given. We weren’t “money” guys who were buying our way into something cool. Our beer is a passion project. Our heart and soul goes into every batch, as corny as that sounds. People have been rooting for us since the beginning.

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Vitamin Sea Brewing LLC

What’s the one thing every craft beer brand should do in the way of marketing?

Social media. Hands down. There are new breweries opening every day and nobody has even heard of them. There’s a reason Hollywood shows a movie trailer six months in advance of the premiere—it’s to get people excited and get them talking. Word of mouth is the best endorsement you can get—and it costs nothing.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

We’re far from being a mature company in our third year—especially post-pandemic. We’re trying to keep a pulse on consumer habits going forward. The way people buy beer now is different than it was six months ago. Will it be different six months from now? With this in mind, how do we adapt to the post-pandemic consumer? We are always looking at ways to bring people to us. An evolving menu is important. Collaborations with our breweries has its own draw. I’d say another taproom could be in our future.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list?

This hasn’t changed since day one—create the best possible product that we can and serve it in the best possible environment while giving the customer the best possible experience.

Sitting down with Dino Funari… What’s the most rewarding part of your job? We have created an environment that has fostered so many friendships. People are genuinely excited to come and see us and each other each week. We put a smile on people’s faces.

What was the best advice you ever received? Find a building with enough parking. You can never have enough.

What’s the best thing a customer ever said to you? You got me through the pandemic.

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Coming to visit you to buy beer and see everyone was the one thing that remained constant.

What’s your favorite brand story? I’ve always been very impressed with Patagonia and what they stand for. They have been true champions for the environment and I’m proud to be a customer of theirs. With a mission statement of: “Build the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, use business to inspire and implement solutions to the environmental crisis.” How can you not support them?


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PROJECTS

PROJECTS • CCD

Commercial Construction Data

F

ollowing is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of Commercial Construction Data, a product of Commercial Construction & Renovation. For more information, visit www.cdcnews.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

Chick-fil-A

Westlake, OH

$1,500,000.00

4,978

New Construction

Q3 2021

Speedway

Albany, NY

$600,000.00

4,600

New Construction

Q4 2021

Kingsdale Shopping Center

Upper Arlington, OH

$100,000,000.00

645,000

New Construction

Q1 2022

Stewart's Shop

Poughkeepsie, NY

$2,000,000.00

6,136

New Construction

Q4 2021

AutoZone #1155

Plainfield, NJ

$1,500,000.00

7,200

Addition

Q3 2021

Heartland Town Square Phase I

Islip, NY

$275,000,000.00

1,291,500

New Construction

Q4 2021

The Commons at Addison Road Metro

Capitol Heights, MD

$29,000,000.00

300,000

New Construction

Q4 2021

Delaware Avenue Mixed-Use Development

Albany, NY

$4,000,000.00

20,072

Renovation

Q3 2021

Mill Branch Crossing Hotel

Bowie, MD

$200,000,000.00

950,000

New Construction

Q2 2022

Carmas Lane Cottages Motel

Rehoboth Beach, DE

$2,000,000.00

15,100

Renovation

Q3 2021

DuFief Elementary School Addition Facility Upgrade

Gaithersburg, MD

$29,382,000.00

86,400

New Construction / Addition

Q1 2022

Wor-Wic Applied Technology Building

Salisbury, MD

$28,000,000.00

52,000

New Construction

Q3 2021

Pataskala Elementary School Renovation

Pataskala, OH

$11,180,463.00

62,830

Renovation

Q2 2022

Nassau County Family and Matrimonial Court Family Justice Center

Merrick, NY

$7,500,000.00

13,400

New Construction

Q3 2021

Administration Building 8th Floor Engineer's Office & Restrooms Renovation

Dayton, OH

$1,417,800.00

370

Renovation

Q3 2021

Harlem Hospital Public Health Lab

New York, NY

$400,000,000.00

230,000

New Construction

Q2 2022

Tri-County Animal Hospital Addition

Wayne, NJ

$500,000.00

1,900

Addition

Q3 2021

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE:

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY:

EDUCATION:

MUNICIPAL/COUNTY:

MEDICAL:

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CIRCLE NO. 63


AD INDEX

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

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3mg PSC

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53

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ADART/Gensis Lighting Solutions

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50

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38-39 20

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73

33

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79

36

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85

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Knoebel Construction, Inc.

93

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65 30

Laticrete

15 9

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135

Metropolitan Ceramics

152

CDO

27 15

Central Roofing Company

51

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55

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Chicago Faucets / Geberit Group

97

43

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60

McNichols

3 2

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105

46

NAC

23

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National Sign Team

87

39

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Assocation

35

18

Navien

5 3

Commerical Construction & Renovation Digital Buyers Guide

142

58

Commerical Construction & Renovation 2022 Retreats

47

22

Construct Connect

157

63

Construction One

25

14

Controlled Power Company

19

11

CS Hudson

63

29

D/13 Group

11

8

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83

37

East to West

121

49

Embree Construction

147

59

SloanLED

75 34

Emser Tile

139

57

The Blue Book Network

108

48

FloorMax USA

43

21

UHC Construction Services

61

28

Fortney & Weygandt, Inc.

107

47

Visual EFX Group

153

61

Frannexus

98 44

Westwood Contractors, Inc.

59

27

Georgia Printco

155

62

Window Film Depot

17

10

Glint Lighting

71

32

Wolverine Building Group

127

52

Goodwin Commercial

128

53

Xicato

77 35

68-69

31

ZipWall

21 12

Gray / Timberwold Construction, Inc.

158

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

Permit.com

133 54

Poma Retail Development, Inc

31

16

Prime Retail Services

91

41

Project Management Consortium (PMC)

33

17

R.E. Crawford Construction

57

26

Rockerz, Inc

7

4

SAR Floors

103

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Schimenti

8, CVR4

6, 65


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ISSUE 6, 2021 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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PUBLISHER

PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

Forty years on and ….

M

an time sure does fly. Forty years ago, at the end of May, I had just graduated from The Peddie School as a four year boarding student in Central New Jersey off Exit 8 on the turnpike. There were only 100 students in my senior class, with 500 of the school population made up of mostly boarding students and a small group of local day students. It was a very structured environment. Classes were 8 a.m.-3 p.m., sports in the afternoon, five days a week, sit down dinners in a jacket and tie, two-hour study hall in your room from 8 p.m-10 p.m., and lights out at 10:30. On Saturday morning, classes ran from 8 a.m. to noon, with sports in the afternoon. Twice a week, the entire school, including teachers and administrators, attended an hour-long meeting in the auditorium and an hour a week in the Chapel. If you missed class without a medical excuse, you were banished to Saturday night detention, which was a "no, no." You for sure did not want give up your Saturday night out on the town to sit in the penalty box like they do in hockey so making class on time was a must or suffer the consequences. Peddie was similar to a military school without the physical training aspect, but we

160

did get plenty of PT in the afternoon during sports. This very detailed daily schedule made me the person I am today. As a small private school going up against some of the largest public high schools in New Jersey on the athletic field, it was always like David vs Goliath. I continue that fighting spirit today as a small independent publisher, going up against some of the largest publishers in this business. Winning is the name of the game (losing is never an option). This life of doing business as an entrepreneur is not for the faint of heart, which is why I give credit to my prep school for teaching me that priceless positive attitude and true grit. This year was our 40th reunion, but due to COVID, there was no in-person reunion. It was done virtually via Zoom in June. Because of the many conflicts, not many classmates attended including myself,. So our class of 1981

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 6, 2021

decided to a re-do at the end of July. Looks like there will be a good turnout this time. Unfortunately, some of our classmates have passed away, some are MIA or AWOL, and others just cannot attend. It will be good to see my fellow classmates again and reminisce about all those memorable experiences. Being a four-year boarding student without getting kicked out for one reason or another is an achievement all unto itself. Receiving my Peddie diploma was right up there with my Bar Mitzvah, being Captain of the ice hockey team my senior year, passing my Taekwondo 1st degree Blackbelt test, graduating from the University of Denver, being a Dale Carnegie graduate and teacher assistant, among other milestones during my yearly trips around the sun. So, I am looking forward to my 40-year Zoom reunion and finishing the 2nd half of 2021 with a win. With that said, we hope to see your smiling faces in person, as we are bringing back our monthly CCRP events, which have been frozen since COVID hit last March 2020. But as they say, the show must go on—and it will in person. We wish all of you much success, good health and safe travels as we work to get back to our normal lives. As always, keep the faith. And a big "Ala Viva" to all you Peddie Alumni out there.


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From SoHo to Rodeo. We’ve expanded to the West Coast Bringing decades of experience building high profile retail and office environments for the world’s largest brands. We’re ready to build for you. Tom Fenton, Business Development Manager (914) 244-9100 x 322 / tfenton@schimenti.com

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