CCR Issue 1.2024

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HOW FRANCE IS PREPARING FOR THE GREENEST OLYMPICS EVER

Issue 1, 2024 • www.ccr-mag.com

Jason Berry and Michael Reginbogin co-founders KNEAD

From Mexico with love How the latest MI VIDA is transforming DC’s Penn Quarter

Also inside:

Exclusive Inside:

Photography by Rey Lopez

Top 3 trends impacting construction in 2024 Official magazine of

Chain Store Maintenance’s Krystal Vasquez on mentor/ mentee relationships Our 2024 Architecture firm listing



CIRCLE NO. 1


Vol. 23, Issue 1, 2024

38 FEATURES 38

From Mexico with love How the latest MI VIDA is transforming DC’s Penn Quarter

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Down the road apiece Top 3 trends impacting construction in 2024

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


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Vol. 23, Issue 1, 2024

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INDUSTRY SEGMENTS

SPECIAL SECTIONS

58 Architecture/Design Firms

DEPARTMENTS 4 Editor’s Note 12 Industry News 126 Women in Construction 128 CCR Data 130 Ad Index 132 Publisher’s Note

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IT Co 19 ‘AI, AI, It’s off to work I go’ It’s here. It’s now. Here’s how to make it work for you.

Healthcare in Business 103 Doubling up Achieving ambitious growth plans at HCA Florida Gulf Coast Hospital

Commercial Facilities 79 Viva la Green How France is preparing for the greenest Olympics to date

Federal Construction 115 Keeping the light on Coastal New York project showcases importance of community collaboration

Hospitality 91 Where nature meets comfort How historic Ruby’s Inn is providing a luxury experience on the edge of Bryce Canyon

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


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T H E

L E A D E R

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C O N D E N S I N G CIRCLE NO. 3

T E C H N O L O G Y


EDITOR’S NOTE

by Michael J. Pallerino

Don't look now, but construction go BOOM > A $4-5 billion Hyundai/SK EV battery plant in Cartersville, Georgia. > A $5 billion assembly plant and battery factory from Rivian in Covington, Georgia. > A $3.5 billion Samsung SDI EV battery plant in New Carlisle, Indiana. > A $5.5 billion LG Energy Solution EV plant in Queen Creek, Arizona. > A $4.3 billion Hyundai/LG plant in Ellabell, Georgia.

Don't look now, but there is a manufacturing construction boom happening— and happening big. Since the passing of the $52 billion CHIPS and Science Act in August 2022, there are projects happening or about to happen in everything from chip fabrication and electric vehicle batteries, to consumer goods and cars. And when I say don't look now, I am talking from a perspective a little closer to home. Georgia's state government continues to support EV growth, including a recently announced 114,000-square-foot warehouse in Cumming, my hometown. The ABM Electrification Center, an EV training and testing operation building from ABM Industries, is part of a slew of projects heading to the Peach State. When initially passed, the CHIPS and Science Act promised to unlock hundreds of billions in private sector semiconductor investment across the country, including production essential to national defense and critical sectors. Now, with biotechnology and chip fabrication plants popping up across the country, they are the new rage. The aforementioned listings are merely a snapshot of what's in the pipeline for the commercial construction industry. As we head in 2024, we will continue to watch—and profile—the trends and challenges our industry faces. Here's to a great year.

Michael J. Pallerino is the editor of Commercial Construction & Renovation. You can reach him at 678.513.2397 or via email at mikep@ccr-mag.com.

We want to hear from you At Commercial Construction & Renovation, we’re always looking to showcase the best of what our industry is doing. If you have a project profile or a fresh perspective on how to keep our industry positively moving forward, shoot me an email at mikep@ccr-mag.com. We’d love to take a look.

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F&J PUBLICATIONS, LLC Commercial Construction & Renovation is published monthly by F&J Publications, LLC. The opinions expressed by authors and contributors to Commercial Construction & Renovation are not necessarily those of the editors or publisher. Commercial Construction & Renovation is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts, photographs or artwork. Articles/content appearing in Commercial Construction & Renovation cannot be reproduced in any way without the specific permission of the publisher or editor.

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CCR EDITORIAL BOARD ACADEMIA DR. MARK LEE LEVINE Professor Burns School/ Daniels College University of Denver

ADA BRAD GASKINS Principal The McIntosh Group

ARCHITECTS/ENGINEERS MICHAEL MAGEE Studio Leader Retail, Store Design Senior Associate Little FRED MARGULIES Director of Retail Architecture Onyx Creative STEVEN MCKAY Managing Principal, Global Design Leader DLR Group STEVEN R. OLSON, AIA President CESO, Inc.

JIM SHEUCHENKO President Property Management Advisors LLC

GARY RALL Vice President of Design and Development Holiday Inn Club Vacations

CHRIS VARNEY Principal, Executive Vice President Bureau Veritas

ROBERT RAUCH Chairman Brick Hospitality

STEPHEN HEKMAN Executive VP Kingsmen Retail Services US KEN DEMSKE Vice President Jones Lang LaSalle

GENERAL CONTRACTOR DAVID THOMPSON Vice President TCB Construction Group LLC. MATT SCHIMENTI President Schimenti Construction JOHN STALLMAN Marketing Manager Lakeview Construction JEFFREY D. MAHLER RCA Advisory Board Member

CONSULTANT GINA MARIE ROMEO Chief Heart Officer & Principal Consultant, Allied RDI

DEVELOPMENT/PROJECT MANAGEMENT KAY BARRETT NCIDQ, CDP Senior Vice President Cushman & Wakefield PAM GOODWIN Goodwin Advisors, LLC Goodwin Commercial The Pam Goodwin Show

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HEALTHCARE CLINTON “BROOKS” HERMAN, PMP Principal Facilities Project Manager, MD Anderson Cancer Center

HOSPITALITY JOHN COOPER Principal Executive Vice President Stormont Hospitality Group LLC SAMUEL D. BUCKINGHAM, RS AMS CMCA President of Construction Devco Development

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

JOE THOMAS Vice President Engineering Loews Hotels LU SACHARSKI Vice President of Operations and Project Management Interserv Hospitality ANDY BRIGGS, CHA Managing Principal A14 Capital Management

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY CRAIG WEBER Director of Business Prime Retail Services, US Prime 3 Retail Canada, Inc.

REAL ESTATE ROB ADKINS, LEED AP CDP Senior Tenant Coordinator, Retail Peterson Companies MEGAN HAGGERTY Founder Legacy Capital Investment MARIE ANTONETTE G. WAITE Founder and CEO Finest Women in Real Estate

RESTAURANTS RON BIDINOST Vice President of Construction Bubbakoo’s Burritos DAVID SHOTWELL The Wills Group Sr. Construction Manager RON VOLSKE Development Director Focus Brands

BOB WITKEN Senior Project Manager Fox Restaurant Concepts

RETAILERS AARON ANCELLO Facilities Asset Management Public Storage DEDRICK KIRKEM Facilities Manager Alice + Olivia

BOB MEZA Senior Construction Project Manager Target DAVID D. DILLON Director, Facility Standards Store Planning & Design Development Walgreens Company LAURA GROSS Retail Facilities Manager American Signature Furniture KELLY RADFORD VP Retail Construction and Development Ascend Wellness Holdings

PERMITTING VAUN PODLOGAR CEO, Owner, Founder State Permits, Inc.


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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

AroundtheIndustry GROCERS Publix Florida-based Publix is continuing to open stores beyond its home state, most recently purchasing land near Roanoke, Va., that will be the site of a Publix Super Markets store. The retailer also plans to open stores in the Virginia areas of Suffolk, Chesapeake, Carrollton and Virginia Beach, as well as a spot in Northern Kentucky. Sprouts Farmers Market Sprouts Farmers Market will open its third Pennsylvania store next year in York, which will be part of the retailer’s shift to smaller store formats of around 23,000 square feet. The company opened 10 new stores in its third quarter, expanding in markets including California and Texas. Wegmans Supermarket chain Wegmans plans to open six new stores on the East Coast, and seeks to further expand in the region. Trader Joe’s Trader Joe’s was ranked the food retailer with the best customer service on a list of the top 300 brands from consumer insights firm HundredX and Forbes. The grocery retailer ranked fifth overall after The UPS Store, Chick-fil-A, REI and USAA based on consumer feedback in areas including service speed, problem resolution and personal interaction. Amazon Fresh After shuttering stores earlier this year and putting a pause on expansion, Amazon plans to open more of its redesigned Amazon Fresh locations in 2024. Five locations have been selected, including three in Los Angeles. Ahold Delhaize Ahold Delhaize has updated its Climate Plan by outlining the goals it has set for reducing Scope 1, 2 and 3 emissions. The grocer said that it has made progress since its climate plan came out last year by refining its decarbonization levers with its GHG emission reductions, fine-tuning which categories feed into the reduction target for its supply chain and addressing challenges in meeting its reduction goals. Fairway Market Instacart and Fairway Market created a special aisle for Instacart shoppers that is stocked with frequently requested convenience items to expedite fulfillment for the Fairway Now service. The grocer said that the designated aisle will be especially helpful during peak in-store hours. The new service covers an unspecified number of “groceries and household essentials.

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Dom’s Kitchen & Market On the heels of its impending merger with Foxtrot Market, Dom’s plans to open a new store in Vernon Hills, Illinois in 2025. The store will be at the intersection of IL-21 and IL-60—Lake County’s two main thoroughfares—along the outer edge of the Hawthorn Mall. Like Dom’s urban stores, the Vernon Hills one will include grocery aisles, prepared meals and Dom’s coffee and wine bar, The Brew. The Giant Company/Ahold Delhaize The Ahold Delhaize banner’s Riverwalk store in Philadelphia is exploring ways to reduce shrink, improve dairy product merchandising and focus on value. The modification is among several initiatives at the store that reflect The Giant Company’s efforts to address pressing challenges, including theft as well as inflation and difficulty finding workers, that continue to command the grocery industry’s attention. Meijer Meijer plans to open a small-format supermarket in Cleveland in January, marking the first time the Midwestern supercenter operator has taken its neighborhood market concept outside its home state of Michigan. The 40,000-square-foot location, known as Fairfax Market, will carry goods including produce, fresh meat, deli items and baked goods.

RETAIL BJ’s Wholesale Club BJ’s Wholesale Club is expanding into Alabama, with a new club in Madison, located 15 miles west of Huntsville, bringing its state count to 20 and deepening its store penetration further west of its traditional Northeast presence. Perfect White Tee Made-in-the-USA T-shirt brand Perfect White Tee has opened its first standalone store, a 500-square-foot space in New York City. The brand sells its high-end T-shirts, tanks and hoodies at about 600 US boutiques, and plans are in the works for more branded stores in the future. Walmart Walmart is adding a North American 15-liter compressed natural gas engine to its fleet of vehicles as part of efforts to reach zero emissions by 2040. The truck will be one of five upcoming compressed engine vehicles, and its maiden voyage will take it from Indiana to California.


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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

AroundtheIndustry Glossier Glossier opened a 7,000-square-foot flagship in New York City’s SoHo neighborhood, the latest step in its restructuring, which includes focusing on Generation Z consumers, growing sales through Sephora and introducing a website. The store features the company’s signature pink aesthetic, product testing counters and decor inspired by the New York City subway system.

Argent Women’s workwear brand Argent is focusing on brick-and-mortar retail growth after downsizing during the pandemic, with the opening of a New York City store and plans to expand into additional markets. The brand, which also launched in nine Nordstrom stores this year, is finding that brick-and-mortar retail brings higher average sales than its online store.

Ulta Beauty A new layout at 44 Ulta Beauty stores is designed to make it easier for shoppers to navigate and discover new products, while upgraded displays of mass and prestige brands are aimed at improving the beauty shopping experience and driving sales growth.

HOSPITALITY

Levi Strauss Levi Strauss plans to open about 100 stores in Europe. The retailer added 115 company-operated stores and closed 41 last year. It had 832 company-operated stores across the Americas, Europe and Asia. Target Stores Target’s large-store format—which it introduced in Katy, Texas— will be the focus of the retailer’s expansion plans as it looks to add same-day fulfillment and embrace a stores-as-hubs strategy for online orders. The retailer also plans to open nine sortation centers early this year in cities, including Denver and Chicago. Walmart/Netflix Walmart will add dedicated Netflix Hubs at 2,400 of its brick-andmortar stores, building on a digital partnership the companies created last year. The in-store shops will feature music and merchandise from popular Netflix shows, including “Squid Game” and “Stranger Things,” along with Netflix streaming gift cards. Kohl’s Kohl’s will unveil a small-format store in Tacoma, Washington that will be a testing ground for new features that could roll out at existing stores and a potential prototype for new locations. The 35,000-square-foot store will feature flexible fixtures to make it easier and more efficient to change layouts and a merchandise mix tailored to local tastes. Aritzia Canadian fashion retailer Aritzia is in growth mode in the US, where it expects to grow to 150 locations by 2027 from 46 stores today. The Vancouver-based retailer, which also operates 67 stores in Canada, reported its first $1 billion sales year during the pandemic, fueled by demand from brand fans and a surge in online sales.

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Club Med Club Med is expanding into the US with a Utah property for its Exclusive Collection to open in 2025. It also is expanding its sustainability efforts by reducing its use of plastics, following green building practices and conserving energy. IHG Hotels & Resorts IHG Hotels & Resorts’ Hotel Indigo will expand from 135 to 200 by 2025. The premium boutique brand will open about 25% of its new properties in the Americas, including Colorado, Nebraska, New York and Oregon. Hyatt Hotels Hyatt Hotels has added a portfolio of 12 lifestyle hotels and 24 long-term management agreements over new properties to its roster through the acquisition of Dream Hotel Group. Hyatt will incorporate the Dream Hotels locations into its Boundless Collection, and the Unscripted Hotels and Chatwal brands will join Hyatt’s Independent Collection. Starwood Capital/AJ Capital Starwood Capital and AJ Capital have teamed up to launch what they call a “modern and affordable lifestyle lodging brand” under the banner of the Field & Stream outdoor activities retail chain. The partners plan to build a portfolio of 30 to 40 properties offering 4,000 guest rooms between now and 2030, targeting an average daily room rate of $191. Appellation Appellation is a new hotel brand created by Charlie Palmer, a James Beard Award-winning chef, and Christopher Hunsberger, former president of the Americas at Four Seasons Hotels & Resorts. Appellation now has four hotels, which the owners describe as “experiential luxury.” Wyndham Hotels & Resorts Wyndham Hotels & Resorts has changed business strategy, stepping away from property management to focus on franchising selectservice properties. The company is expanding its properties with 1,600 hotels in the pipeline and a new extended-stay brand, Echo, which will debut in Henrico County, Virginia.


Marriott International Marriott International is introducing a new extended-stay brand, Apartments by Marriott Bonvoy, for the work/leisure traveler. The units will have a full kitchen and laundry with a separate living room and bedroom.

The 250-seat eatery’s Mediterranean-influenced menu includes dishes such as shawarma-spiced skirt steak and the everything Jerusalem bagel, and the company has plans to open two other concepts in Florida.

Tao Group Hospitality Tao Group Hospitality will open a Tao Hotel in Orlando, Florida in 2025 as part of O-Town West mixed-use development, which will include a Tao Asian Bistro. This is the company’s first hotel, an expansion of its restaurant and nightlife brands, Hakkasan, Lavo, Marquee and Omnia.

Bolay Fresh Bold Kitchen Bowl concept Bolay Fresh Bold Kitchen opened its 24th unit and its first with a drive-thru in Tampa, Florida. The chain, co-created by Outback Steakhouse co-founder Tim Gannon and his son, Chris, plans to venture beyond Florida for the first time with new units in two Virginia markets.

Oetker Collection The Oetker Collection will transform the Chesterfield, an iconic 100-year-old boutique hotel in Palm Beach, Florida, which was sold this year to the Reuben Brothers, a British private equity and real estate firm. The Chesterfield, the Oetker Collection’s first US property, will return to its original name, the Vineta Hotel, when it reopens. Hilton Hotels The pandemic delayed the launch of Hilton’s new Tempo brand, but the first hotel is set to open in Times Square in New York City. The delay enabled the chain to fine tune the new wellness brand, which includes a Peloton bike and other health amenities in some rooms. Tommy Bahama The Miramonte Resort & Spa in Indian Wells, California will be renovated and rebranded as the first Tommy Bahama resort. The company has already expanded into the hospitality sector with the Tommy Bahama Restaurant and Marlin Bar businesses.

RESTAURANTS

Guy Fieri’s Kitchen & Bar The $22 million renovation and expansion of Harrah’s Council Bluffs in Iowa will include the addition of Guy Fieri’s Kitchen & Bar. Subway Subway sees global markets as a key area for future growth thanks to recent deals with international operators that will expand its presence in Turkey and Saudi Arabia. Wagamama Japanese-inspired restaurant chain Wagamama will expand into its fourth US market with the opening next month of its first unit in Tampa, Florida. The chain, which began in London, has six US units in Atlanta, Boston and New York City. Lettuce Entertain You Lettuce Entertain You opened its third location of Aba in Miami, marking the Chicago-based operator’s first foray into South Florida.

Wendy’s Incentive programs created by Wendy’s to encourage franchisees to open more units are gaining steam, including a program in which Wendy’s builds units in underserved areas and turns them over to franchisees. That program, called Build-to-Suit, is 70% committed, and two other incentive plans are also catching on with operators. Burger King Burger King has closed about 200 US units over the past year as part of the chain’s turnaround plan that includes shuttering weaker-performing stores. The “Reclaim the Flame” strategy also calls for the chain to spend $400 million on marketing efforts and restaurant remodels. El Pollo Loco El Pollo Loco is betting on a growing franchising program to fuel the chain’s ongoing efforts to expand to new markets and become a national brand. The chain is also investing in technology, including in-store kiosks and cash machines to drive in-store digital orders. In-N-Out In-N-Out Burger plans to enter the New Mexico market by 2027. The new restaurant, in Albuquerque, New Mexico, will be the first in the state. The new location will use the company distribution facility in Colorado Springs, Colorado to get its products to New Mexico. Papa Johns Papa Johns’ store count has returned to pre-pandemic levels, and plans call for up to 2,000 new locations to open over the next couple years. The goal is to ultimately become the third-biggest pizza chain in the US. KFC The KFC division of Yum Brands will acquire 218 KFC franchise locations in the UK and Ireland from operator EG Group for an undisclosed amount, with plans to open 500 more companyoperated restaurants over the next seven years. KFC currently has 1,040 locations in the market.

ISSUE 1, 2024 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

NEWS, NOTES & TRENDS...

Beyond brick and mortar Sachse Construction partners with leading Detroit artists for charity

The numbers game

200

The percent that prices have risen compared to pre-pandemic prices, according to The Family Vacation Guide survey of US-based hotel rooms. Honolulu and New York City had the highest rate increases, with 252% and 226% respectively.

55 F

or Sachse Construction, community transcends brick and mortar. That's why the Detroit-based general contractor recently partnered with local artists Eric “El Cappy” Lowry, Mike Han and Phillip Simpson for a charity fundraiser. To help Motor City not-for-profit youth organizations, the two teams created "Hard Hats for Detroit." Each artist designed a one-of-a-kind hard hat representing their unique interpretation of the spirit of Detroit to build a brighter future for the next generation.

As part of the fund raising, an online auction allowed bidders to select a specific artist’s work and, in-turn, support the partner organization’s mission. Proceeds from each artwork will benefit the Downtown Boxing Gym, Junior Achievement of Southeastern Michigan and The Konnection. Sachse Construction CEO Todd Sachse says the company has embraced a long-standing commitment to youth programming in Detroit. “We’re excited to partner with these talented artists to support students through the power of art.”

The percentage of restaurant operators surveyed expect traffic to grow in 2024, with two-thirds expressing optimism for the future of the industry, according to a survey by TD Bank. In addition, 50% say they’re investing in technology to drive efficiencies.

17,000

The number of workers the construction sector added in December, according to a Associated General Contractors of America report. The report also shows that wages are raising at a faster clip than other industries.

They said it... “Customers continue to find exceptional value in our products, and we are focused on finding more ways to serve them through our growing and highly productive retail footprint, product innovation, and broader holistic vision care services.”

“It’s really important to make people feel appreciated, recognized, heard and empowered. All of these things create a really powerful culture and environment that cultivates positivity and really brings out the best in everyone individually and collectively.”

— Neil Blumenthal, co-founder and co-CEO of Warby Parker, on the brand’s goal of a bigger future for physical stores

— Harris Teeter President Tammy DeBoer on the what makes a great work culture

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

“Landlords are starting to get smart and almost recession-proofing themselves by including tenants that people are going to need, no matter what.” — International Council of Shopping Centers researcher Stephanie Cegielski on how malls and strip centers are mixing brands and experiences to thrive


CIRCLE NO. 10


Would you like to be a guest or sponsor? An interview podcast that talks to guests that will have business titles in design, construction, facilities, real estate, procurement, development, etc. in retail, restaurants, hospitality, healthcare, federal, multi-family, shopping center owners, developers, cannabis, mixed-use along with the A/E/C sectors plus vendor service suppliers & mfcs who’s products and services are specified, recommend and purchased by enduser brands to build and maintain their facilities in the Commercial Construction Building industry.

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CORNER

‘AI, AI, It’s off to work I go’

It’s here. It’s now. Here’s how to make it work for you.


IT CORNER

‘AI, AI, It’s off to work I go’

It’s here. It’s now. Here’s how to make it work for you. By Jon Armour

A

I is here. It’s now. You’re living in it. We are solidly on the cusp of an Isaac Asimov storyline of robotic chaos. We tend to want to characterize the future based on these notions, but is it realistic? Or are our fears playing into the imaginative prose of some long dead science fiction writers? I say both. History proves we tend to live out our human imaginative creation and engineering concepts and ideas. That was the thrust of the industrial revolution, and now so, for the technological revolution and evolution of AI. Robotic interactions, machine learning and a quest to make things easier, more efficiently and cheaper than ever before are the thrust of the economy going forward. To eliminate mistakes and improve quality seems to be as important as ever and a “mantra” since the 1950s. Sounds scary? Or do we have nothing to fear? AI is simply the implementation of new technology that will over time, replace and displace workers across the globe. Is that a bad thing? It depends on what you do for a career or what type of job you have. It means shifting huge chunks of the workforce out of repetitive and time-consuming tasks to new positions over-seeing and developing the software and machines that can do the same work. But what happens if workers in these positions don’t have the aptitude or the desire to go from a mindless task to complicated programming and management of computer machines? They get left out. Future production and manufacturing workers will need to adapt or get out of the way. A whole new world of learning will be undertaken to provide skills and educate these people for more technical purposes. It is much like the advent of the computer itself. Older workers were resistant to using them, they wanted to stay “old school.” Attitudes were, “I’m not learning that, it’s too complicated.” Young work forces were intrigued by them. These types of transitions are not uncommon as this scenario has played out across the

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

diverse range of all technological innovations down through history. It’s scary for some but others embrace the change. AI will phase out large portions of workers who will leave the job market either through attrition to other careers and jobs, retirement, or frustration. Certain workers will be forced to retrain or retire. AI will eliminate entire classes of workers. Low-income jobs in fast food, production and manufacturing will lose millions of jobs to automation and robotic re-tooling. AI will literally create “human waste”. People who are


With less and less workers available to plan, analyze and implement solid farming practices via tools that measure plant moisture, historical temperatures, and soil conditions; AI can absorb these tasks and make efficient and cost saving recommendations as to the appropriate crop management practices needed to obtain optimum yields. AI also aids in real time monitoring, efficient harvesting, and lower production costs. Using real time information and machine learning to create algorithms that look at historical data and make recommendations, creates an efficiency that the mere human hand cannot easily replicate in the winks of the eye that an AI data harvesting platform can do. Microsoft Bard and Open AI’s ChatGPT are the two major AI platforms to date that assist in using these algorithms to compile data across the available Web knowledge database to spit back solutions and dialog to the users’ queries. This machine learning can be pointed to just about any subject matter and the results are amazing but also sometimes slightly inaccurate. In agriculture the results of such AI queries can be helpful, as it is dealing with static and known data extracted from farm reports, weather conditions, soil composites and other reliably taken data. With other fields of work, not fields of corn, you could end up with a “word salad” of data that doesn’t make much sense or is entirely thought out by the machine with more logic than Lieutenant Spock of the USS Enterprise.

Are you talking to me?

untrained for anything but flipping burgers. We could see a further separation of the classes. The rich will get richer, and the poor will get poorer.

The world’s oldest profession

Let’s start with the world’s oldest profession. Get your head out of the gutter; I’m talking about agriculture. While the Japanese seem to have perfected the art of robotic adult oriented companionship, agricultural purposes lend themselves well to automation.

Therein lies the problem. Asking a machine interface to simulate an emotional response or to demonstrate an empathetic position might get you offended. As it draws its data from the world of online knowledge about these subjects, AI can only assess the information from a logical or intuitive state, without conscience reasoning you will likely get a well put together temper, or a raging out of control emotion and even perhaps an overly soft or polite dialog but with demeaning tact. That’s why Ai in customer service irritates more people than helps. Eighty-six percent of humans prefer a human experience versus a BOT Chat line or robotic query. Ai has not yet mastered complex emotions or the art of tackling unique issues of a customer raging about their phone bill. It prefers to disengage callers from its system rather than find an appropriate response to the customer. AI has been programmed with standard responses and common statements, all of which the customer has heard over and over before, and then they will likely start pushing that “0” on the keypad to get a real person. Most companies are utilizing a hybrid of AI and human interface to deal with “out of the norm” customer issues. Utilizing a blended format of AI and human interface aide’s businesses in controlling the number of service calls they process and helps cull out the easier issues to focus on the “issue driven” customer. AI is getting fancier as it develops throughout the world. As a person calling into a customer service platform, going forward you might expect to hear the dialect of the area you are calling mimicked by the AI source. Imagine on a call to a business in Texas and you hear, “Howdy, what can I do for you,” or in Alabama, “Hi sweetie pie, may I help you?”

ISSUE 1, 2024 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

21


IT CORNER

‘AI, AI, IT’S OFF TO WORK I GO’

In New York, you hear, “You got a problem?” or in California, “Dude?” Whatever the response AI will be tailored more and more to suit the nature and character of a company, person, or even regional diversity.

mom and pop establishments will always compete, but again the big guys are forcing them out as well.

Can I get fries with that?

We continue to ask, what will humans do? These worker displacements seem cruel and as if society intends to have robots do everything. Not the case. As said previously, AI will take over parts of industries but will also create jobs. It boils down to a “shift”. Kind of like the Beyonce song, “to the left, to the left…” or a cake walk where you move around the circle and sit when the music stops. Then you can have your cake and eat it too. Workers are going to need to be flexible and want to embrace these shifts and changes in technology and production. They will need to jump to the left or move to the right and seek out the training necessary to stay viable in the ever-changing employment market.

Another segment of industry that will be hit hard by AI technology is the fast food and hospitality services sector. Already reeling from the pandemic decimation of workers, the hospitality industry will see AI filling more roles of “chief cook and bottle washer.” Several fast-food chains are implementing automated order entry kiosks, robotic hamburger flipping, product assembly and automated drink fill stations among other production and machine learning enhancements. As if COVID wasn’t enough, pressures to increase minimum wage in some states have forced businesses to rethink those positions into automated and even self-help roles.

The Human Element

Using real time information and machine learning to create algorithms that look at historical data and make recommendations, creates an efficiency that the mere human hand cannot easily replicate in the winks of the eye that an AI data harvesting platform can do. Gone will be the days of asking to see a manager to scream about your messed up burger. Whatever you told the AI assisted ordering station will be what you get. Machines will figure out how to resolve your issues, whether it be replacing a meal, giving credit, or taking your feedback. But wait, the machines are also logging your actions, responses and learning your behavior. All in the interest of “improved training.” For AI not you. So, what will happen to the class of workers that used to take orders? These jobs were historically filled by high schoolers but more increasingly immigrants from underdeveloped countries that have made their way here to experience the “American Dream.” These positions were never meant to be careers and the pressure of the industry to pay higher wages for them is scorching fast-foods bottom line. The trend is to source them into AI and robotic methods of reducing costs and improving accuracy and efficiency. Former burger flippers and order takers will need to disperse to other jobs or retrain to develop aptitudes for programming, operating, and repairing their replacements. It will be rough on some but a boon for workers that are willing to go along with the change. So, if you see a great and long career working at McDonald’s flipping burgers and dumping the fry basket, you better start rethinking your career. These jobs will be losing ground. Of course,

AI will not entirely discount the “human experience.” Humans need each other, they need to have empathetic interactions and experience facial and body expressions, a simple smile. We were designed for fellowship and gathering, helping, and giving. What I see happening now is the AI learning curve. When developers see that going all AI in certain situations is not prudent and devalues human interaction to the point of loneliness and isolation, they will start to intermix the human experience back into these scenarios to develop a rounded “logical” use of AI. There are certainly situations where AI makes total sense. And there are situations where it does not and cannot be forced because humans push back. People are valuable in society and need one another. We will not let ourselves subscribe to an artificially created existence because reality is always right here in the moment of life, right in front of us. So, shut down your TV and your PC, tell your Rhumba to get you a drink from the fridge. You haven’t seen anything yet, as they say in Texas, “…hold on to my beer.” AI did not write this article An ending note, it is anticipated that future media news stories will be 95% written by AI. But AI did not have any place in this article. It is composed entirely of human fingers. I must admit, Microsoft Word Auto-correct features were on. So, if you find any spelling or punctuation errors, blame AI for that.

Contributing author Jon Armour has 35 years of combined experience across the construction, real estate, and IT Infrastructure industry. He is a Certified Project Management Professional (PMP), Certified Construction Manager, IT Infrastructure Program Manager, and a published author of a popular Western genre book. He resides in Magnolia, Texas

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


CIRCLE NO. 12


Eyeing the road Ahead RCA webinar culls insights from top industry leaders on retail's future ULTA Beauty. Kohl's. Bath & Body Works. Those were the brands on hand to take a deep dive into retail's future during the most recent webinar hosted by the Retail Contractors Association (RCA) and moderated by Brad Sanders, member of the RCA Advisory Board and Chief Development Officer at bartaco. The Zoom-based webinar—"What Are Your Retail Expectations For 2024?"—was open to current RCA members, retailers, developers, landlords and RCA sponsors on Jan. 18. Coordinated by the RCA Professional Development Committee, the discussion aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of current consumer trends and the general market conditions in the retail sector. The event was not only an opportunity for industry professionals to gain valuable insights, but also a platform for discussing strategies for sourcing, analyzing, and selecting general contractors for various retail projects. Among the panelists were Lisa Smola-Hollo, Director of Construction & Remodels, Growth and Development at ULTA Beauty; Jason L. Kraus, Director of Property Development – Construction Services at

Kohl’s; and Justin Lesch, Brand Development Manager at Bath & Body Works. Their diverse backgrounds and roles offered a multifaceted view of the industry, highlighting different approaches to managing retail growth and development in the current economic climate. The webinar is an opportunity for industry leaders to provide guidance to RCA members and other attendees, equipping them with the knowledge to make informed decisions in their respective roles within the retail sector. As the retail landscape continues to evolve, events like this webinar are crucial for professionals looking to stay ahead of the curve. The RCA, through such initiatives, continues to foster a community of learning and collaboration, essential for navigating the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead in the retail industry. If interested in finding out more about this webinar or becoming an RCA member, contact Carol Montoya at carol@retailcontractors.org.

RCA announces regional events for 2024. These events bring together RCA members, sponsors, benefit providers, and other supporters. There is no fee to attend these events, but we ask that you register to confirm your spot. Details are being finalized, but registration is open for some events. Registration for tour events is limited to 30 people, with a cap of two people per company. These restrictions may be lifted as the event nears if additional space is available. For additional information, please contact Carol Montoya at carol@retailconstractors.org or visit www.retailcontractors.org.

24

RCA 2024 city schedule: ` April 11, Charlotte NC, NASCAR Hall of Fame Tour ` May 8, Chicago, IL, AIA Boat Tour ` June TBD, Los Angeles, Peterson Automotive Museum Tour ` July 25, Grand Rapids, MI, Hosted by Wolverine Construction ` August 26, Orlando, FL, during ICSC Florida ` September TBD, Philadelphia, PA, Hosted by Connor Construction ` October TBD, Houston, TX (Hosted by Triad Retail Construction and Warwick Construction) ` December 3, Phoenix, AZ, during ICSC Centerbuild at the JW Marriott Desert Ridge

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


IS YOUR SUPERINTENDENT CERTIFIED?

Being a retail superintendent requires a unique set of skills different from other market segments. While all construction superintendents have responsibilities for schedule, productivity, safety, and quality on the project site, the challenges and constraints of the retail environment mean that a special training focus is needed. Superintendents must learn how to think like a retailer and a contractor throughout these projects. RCA’s Retail Superintendent Training Program addresses this need. Certified Retail Superintendents have:

Ask your GC if

• At least three years of experience in retail construction

they have a

• Completed OSHA 30-hour certification

Certified Retail Superintendent

• Completed RCA's two-day workshop, which includes in-depth training on retail-focused customer service

on your project.

• Passed the Certified Retail Superintendent exam

CIRCLE NO. 13

Learn more about the program & view a list of participating companies: retailcontractors.org/superintendent-training-program Toll Free: 800-847-5085 | Phone: 703-683-5637 | retailcontractors.org


INDUSTRY NEWS

EDUCATION

Welcome to Student Insider A division of Commercial Construction & Renovation

While construction and technical skills are the primary focus for the next generation of workers, ConstructEDU Student Insider (CEDU) is designed to supplement their education by providing content that dives into the business of the commercial construction industry.

Student Insider

The bi-monthly newsletter covers areas such as emerging technologies, regulatory issues and other factors shaping the diverse industry’s future. CEDU also features insights and profiles from industry thought leaders on the trends and Achallenges affecting the marketplace. division of Commercial Construction & Renovation Delivered at no charge, we not only encourage you to make CEDU a part of your educational consumption, but also to share it with your peers.  To learn more, visit https://ccr-mag.com/construct-edu-landing-page

EDUCATION

Architecture among highest-paying industries for graduates In today’s ever unpredictable job market, you never know where the best jobs are—until you do. According to QR code generator QRFY, one of the highest-paying sectors for graduates is architecture, which clocked in at No. 9 on the Top 10. Graduates pursuing this field can earn a median salary of $70,000, which is above the average percentage of employees with an advanced degree. Read more here https://finance.yahoo.com/news/highest-paying-degree-america-field-130000252.html?guccounter=1&guce_referrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8&guce_referrer_sig=AQAAAA5202iRi6kjCYqQYIMY68RNQc0bQwdsAwrFfcdgN3DvVDf1tTOSW4YMbYJIWJb7ueatMjvov-jiqqEQ0Y5rVZKJH8nU9ciLWsWV1PMgz5xYrw7K-3O9gzetsQ43TRmetIzKWAKhFdAA6zO-0UEKsGPJYsUlC7ETl6KcYloONabW

RETAIL

The Roofing Alliance names finalists for annual student competition And the winner is... To find out who wins the ultimate prize for the 10th Anniversary Construction Management Student Competition by The Roofing Alliance, you’ll need to wait until Feb. 7. That’s when the group announces the top five teams who earned the coveted invitation to the International Roofing Expo, where they will get to present their proposals before a panel of esteemed judges. Read more here https://roofingmagazine.com/the-roofing-alliance-announcesfinalists-for-its-construction-management-student-competition

Nike unveiling new retail experience with Rise stores Nike has opened its first Rise store in the US at Miami’s Aventura Mall, after debuting the new format in London and Seoul, South Korea. The retailer expects to roll out in more US markets, which will feature a digital storytelling platform called Sport Pulse, a dedicated space for consumers to design their own products and a variety of online-to-offline services.

Uniqlo is looking to accelerate US, Canada expansion plans Uniqlo expects to open upward of 20 new stores in the US and Canada this spring as part of its plan to grow to 200 North American locations by 2027. The retailer, which opened its first North American location in 2005, has slated nine debuts for spring 2024, including Massachusetts, New York, Rhode Island and Washington in the US; and Calgary, Ottawa and Toronto in Canada.

Read more here https://footwearnews.com/business/retail/nike-rise-aventura-store-opening-details-1203370609/

Read more here https://www.retailtouchpoints.com/features/news-briefs/uniqlos-2024-plans20-new-stores-in-north-america#:~:text=Uniqlo%20will%20open%20 more%20than,North%20American%20locations%20by%202027

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


Student Insider A division of Commercial Construction & Renovation

A new bi-monthly newsletter that covers... Areas such as emerging technologies, regulatory issues and other factors shaping the diverse industry’s future. ConstructEDU also features insights and profiles from industry thought leaders on the trends and challenges affecting the marketplace.

Topics Î Business Side Of Construction Î Emerging Technologies Î Navigating Regulatory Challenges Î Industry Insights And Thought Leaders Î Knowledge For Everyone, Everywhere

Make ConstructEDU a part of your educational consumption, but also to share it with your peers.  To learn more, visit https://ccr-mag.com/construct-edu-landing-page

CIRCLE NO. 14


INDUSTRY NEWS

EVENTS

Honoring the best Attendees converge on the Liberty View in Philadelphia for ‘2023 SARA National Design Awards Gala’

I

f you’re going to honor designers of some of the best projects in the country, you won’t find a better place than the Liberty View in Philadelphia. Located in the heart of Philadelphia’s Historic District, the 1,800-square-foot wraparound terrace with unparalleled views of Independence Mall played host to this year’s “2023 SARA National Design Awards Gala.” The annual award’s competition, presented by SARA National, dolled out 86 awards honoring exceptional achievements in architectural design. More than 185 attendees packed the sold-out event in October to honor the architects, as well as special awards given to Michael Pilko (RHJ Associates P.C.), Rodger Lippman (Benjamin Moore), Mitchell Abramowitz (Mitchell Abramowitz) and Neil Drew. In addition, Kevin Regalado, Director of Architecture, JACOBS, received the SARA National Fellowship award. The event was sponsored by Benjamin Moore, Brickworks, Glen-Gery, Solatube, Kingspan, Bardsley Law, Martarano Engineering, Magnusson Architecture and Planning PC, Quality General Construction, H.M. Hughes Co., and Chester and Associates. For more information about the SARA National awards, visit www.sara-national.org.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


Steeped in brilliance Find out how to be a part of the SARA National Experience

T

he projects. The designs. The brilliance. As we step into 2024, SARA National again is embarking on another year of spotlighting creativity and innovation. And we want you to come along for the ride. With a full slate of award competitions, including our “2024 SARA National Awards” celebration in New York, Oct. 26, we are ready to put our architects front and center. It is not just about the awards. The SARA National Experience is about sliding into an immersive experience where creativity becomes the star of the show. So, get ready, collect your projects and join in on the fun. For more information on SARA National events and awards competitions, visit www.sara-national.org.

Our 2024 schedule: ` SARA California Design Awards (Close Feb. 22) ` SARA New York Design Awards Submissions (Open Feb. 1) ` SARA California Design Awards Gala and Dinner, Palm Springs, California (April 6) ` SARA New York Design Awards (Close April 5) ` SARA Pennsylvania Scholarship Golf Outing (May 21) ` SARA New York Design Awards and Gala (June 11) ` SARA National Awards (Close Aug. 15) ` SARA National Design Awards Gala @ the TWA Hotel, New York (Oct. 26)

ISSUE 1, 2024 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE

More than altruistic Using ESG data to ask new questions in commercial construction

E

By Tommy Linstroth

SG—the shorthand for various Environmental, Social and Governance initiatives that strive to evaluate an organization’s sustainability and ethical impact—originated as a tool for investors but has spread across various sectors, including commercial construc-

tion and development. The emphasis is undoubtedly warranted. The built environment is responsible for 40% of energy and process-related CO2 emissions, 50% of extracted materials, 30% of water consumption, and 35% of landfill waste. And the built environment’s longterm impact–today’s buildings will affect communities for generations to come– makes it an especially high-stakes sector for tracking and improving ESG metrics.

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However, monitoring ESG isn’t just an altruistic endeavor. At its core, ESG is a business strategy with clear bottom-line benefits from enhancing brand reputation, attracting and retaining employees, increasing innovation, and more all while helping understand and improve their stance on these three areas. Companies in the design and commercial construction sector are now frequently

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

asked about their ESG metrics, especially by large corporations or government agencies required to assess ESG impacts before awarding contracts. And new regulations mandating sustainability efforts, including tracking carbon emissions and climate impact, from California and the EU are expected soon. Gathering ESG stats alone won’t create long-term business or external benefits;


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INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE

to do so, the data must be used to inform change. Specifically, ESG metrics can prompt probing questions that lead to new processes, automation, use cases and efficiencies that create positive outcomes. Here are three questions commercial construction companies can address now and in the years to come that will help create results:

ESG Question 1: What can I directly control?

For investors, builders and contractors, effective ESG outcomes are contingent on action, not just insights. Start by identifying what you can directly control. This might include your corporate policies, vehicle fleet, staff, offices and anything else your company owns or manages. For the commercial construction sector, the controllable pieces often include:

Environmental

> Office energy and water consumption > Corporate fleet fuel consumption and emissions > Office waste and recycling efforts > Social > Corporate employee diversity > Hiring a local workforce > Corporate philanthropic spend > Governance > Dedicated sustainability/green team > Employee satisfaction > Code of conduct/ethics While not every metric will be meaningful to your company, ESG data allows you to identify custom recommendations that apply to something as small as a department or as wide as an entire region. After developing a baseline of current impacts, begin setting achievable improvement goals. These might be six- or 12-month outlooks but the key is consistent progress. Setting goals too high initially could risk the whole project, while small early wins can pave the way for bigger successes. As you

reach early goals, then look toward more ambitious targets.

ESG Question 2: How can I continuously improve?

Simply put, ESG goals are never met. The goalposts are always moving, pressing the commercial construction sector to become more efficient and effective over time. This is both good for business and good for the environment. After you've established a rhythm in handling the more straightforward data points and venturing into the more complex areas, it's time to challenge your organization. To achieve impactful results, set stretch goals and targets beyond the current capabilities and expectations of your organization.

This includes setting transparent expectations, including integrating specific contract clauses or offering guidelines. Despite the challenges of indirect control in these zones, it's crucial to monitor alignment through feedback, audits or specialized ESG software to ensure goals are being met. To be sure, exerting influence is often a multi-year process that requires gradual evolution and continual intentionality.

The Benefits of Effective ESG Implementation

In an era increasingly defined by sustainability and ethical considerations, effective ESG implementation goes beyond just being a checkbox for the commercial construction sector.

A robust ESG framework doesn’t just ensure compliance; it sets organizations apart, carving a niche to stand out from the competition. By setting aspirable objectives, you push your company to innovate, be creative, and break out of complacency. Such goals, driven by the insights gleaned from ESG data, can lead to breakthrough performance improvements and elevate your company's reputation in sustainability and governance.

Where can I exert influence?

After addressing areas directly under your company's control, expand your reach. Identify areas where you can exert influence and have the ability to track and implement changes easily, such as subcontractor activities. Navigating these influence zones requires companies to leverage relationships, fostering strong partnerships and clear communication to align stakeholders with ESG objectives.

It offers tangible and intangible benefits, from boosting employee morale to unlocking new market opportunities. As contractors face an evolving landscape where sustainability questionnaires become table stakes to win bids, not investing in ESG strategies risks sidelining business growth and future operational potential. A robust ESG framework doesn't just ensure compliance; it sets organizations apart, carving a niche to stand out from the competition. Data isn’t the final destination of the ESG movement. It is the starting point for change, and it should prompt the commercial construction sector to ask essential questions that propel real change in their organization and throughout the built environment. CCR

Tommy Linstroth is founder and CEO of Green Badger, a leading SaaS provider simplifying sustainability and ESG in the built industry. https://getgreenbadger.com

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


COOPER’S HAWK TROY, MI

HELPING BUILD NATIONAL BRANDS

GENERAL CONTRACTOR · CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT · DESIGN BUILD

CIRCLE NO. 16

616-949-3360 · WOLVGROUP.COM


INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE

Taking it to the threats How Leopardo Construction tackled its cybersecurity issues

A

By Paul Rentzelos

t the turn of the century, Leopardo Construction managed cyber security internally, but as threats multiplied and evolved, Paul recognized that more strategic investment in security was needed. Leopardo, founded in 1977, is an ENR Top 400 commercial

contractor based in Chicago. With market expertise in healthcare, residential, municipal, retail and hospitality, it has completed award-winning projects all over the country for some of the world’s most recognized brands. The team, which has worked in more than 30 states, has regional offices in California, Florida and Ohio. 34

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


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INDUSTRY NEWS

PERSPECTIVE

Like every other company in the world, Leopardo has had to adapt its ways of working to mitigate evolving cyber threats. Decades of experience and an outstanding reputation is not enough to protect a company from cyber attack. To help, it identified its biggest concerns and came up with a plan to overcome them.

Threats from all directions

Effective cybersecurity today is about being responsive to new threats and proactive in terms of identifying and mitigating vulnerabilities before they can be exploited. A simple antivirus and a strong firewall used to be all Leopardo needed to prevent incidents, but that is no longer true. Today, the threats are coming from multiple directions. Firewalls have advanced to a point where perimeter threats aren’t the biggest source of anxiety. Today, the most common attack vectors include email, web browsing, and social engineering. Although we train and simulate phishing attacks continuously, end users are the largest target, and they are directly singled out by attackers. These changing tactics by threat actors mean that constant reinvestment and

adaptation in security is needed. Cybersecurity is an evolving discipline and constant research and development is essential as the threats change.

Client interest in cybersecurity

Historically, Leopardo’s security posture was never discussed as part of bidding for and winning work. The impact of a security incident used to be much more contained than it is today, so partner organizations were rarely invested in another company’s security capabilities. Across the last 20 years, the effect on a construction company's ability to do work based on a security issue has gone from non-existent to problematic. Now, we get substantial interest and expectations around our cyber security policies and procedures. Our clients certainly want to understand that cyber security is not an afterthought for us. Engaging with a company that has shoddy cybersecurity or has been compromised by cyber attack can be risky. Understandably, companies looking to work with Leopardo wanted to be confident that their security practices were robust and modern.

Across the last 20 years, the effect on a construction company’s ability to do work based on a security issue has gone from non-existent to problematic.

Investing in security to protect against future attack tactics

Leopardo’s plans for future improvements include developing its Endpoint Detection and Response capabilities to understand not only who is trying to connect to their network, but also which device is being used to make that connection. We should be able to have a list of authenticated people but also a list of authenticated devices that are allowed on the network. That’s currently in the works. This development would mean that we could limit the number of ways attackers could access the environment, making it a lot harder for them to establish a foothold. This kind of forward thinking—the kind that sees investment in security as a need, not a nice-to-have—is the best way of protecting against future threats.

Outsourcing cybersecurity

The nature of the threats facing Leopardo, as well as the practical limitations on internal security teams, meant he decided to hire a Managed Security Service Provider. In 2015, Leopardo engaged DefendEdge. We wanted to keep our internal team lean and maximise the return on investment for cybersecurity. We wanted to bring in experts in the same way we would bring in an expert to do plumbing in a construction project. We were looking for a partner to help develop policies and drive change, and we wanted to build an ongoing relationship with them. DefendEdge has a long-standing relationship with WithSecure. To enable better security outcomes for Leopardo, DefendEdge recommended upgrading the company’s entire antivirus process using WithSecure and adopting WithSecure’s Elements solution. In the end, we were happy to adopt Elements, as the solution includes vulnerability management capabilities, endpoint protection (EPP), and endpoint detection and response (EDR) functionality. Elements EPP provides prevention as the first line of defence, while Elements EDR detects successful attacks on your organization and guides you to the correct response. CCR

Paul Rentzelos has led the IT team at Leopardo Construction for 25 years, overseeing the evolution of Leopardo’s security ecosystem.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


Does your project have what it takes? today's commercial construction industry, the Being the Insuccessful new builds and renovated projects are the ones with every part of the team working in unison to best takes a deliver on time, under or on budget and in sync. From to engineering, to building and management, team effort. design, the best projects feature the best teams.

That's why Commercial Construction & Renovation is looking for your team. Our seventh annual “CCR Project Profile Awards ” will recognize the best-of-the-best construction projects from the top down with awards for New Construction Project and Renovation Project. To help select these special projects, we’re building a special committee from our Editorial Advisory Board to pour through the nominations. After they select the projects, we'll identify winners in the following sectors:

• Retail • Restaurant • Hospitality • Federal

• Healthcare • Shopping Center • Multi-housing

• Office • Cannabis • Craft Brew

So, how do you get your project nominated? Here’s what you need to give us:

Project title: __________________________________________ Location:_____________________________________________ Designer: ____________________________________________ Contractor: ___________________________________________

Deadline to submit form: March 1, 2024

Subcontractors: _______________________________________ Number of square feet: __________________________________ Year started: __________________________________________ New or Renovation: _____________________________________ Completion date: _______________________________________ Why this project should be nominated? _______________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________

> Submit all images for award entries to: https://spaces.hightail.com/uplink/BOC

CIRCLE NO. 18

Send your nominations forms to David Corson, publisher, at davidc@ccr-mag.com.


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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


From Mexico with love How the latest MI VIDA is transforming DC’s Penn Quarter

T

hree decades into his storied culinary career, Roberto Santibañez continues to impress and surprise. The latest

venture for the acclaimed chef is the third location for MI VIDA, which many call the evolution of his culinary journey. The new location in the Penn Quarter neighborhood of Washington, DC, translates the brand’s expression of Mexican culture with a menu rooted in the history and tradition of Mexico’s vibrant and evolving cuisine. MI VIDA Penn Quarter offers iconic brand moments throughout that tie the experience back to the other locations, while curating a distinct sense of place by adapting the MI VIDA concept to the building’s existing architecture.

ISSUE 1, 2024 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

39


FROM MEXICO WITH LOVE

KNEAD

Just a few steps away from the Capital One Arena and the National Portrait Gallery, MI VIDA activates the lively street corner with plentiful outdoor seating to accommodate 56 guests. The design is the work of KNEAD Hospitality + Design and //3877, which worked together to create engaging moments for diners around every corner, including a dramatic up-lit corridor to navigate guests throughout the space. The design experiments with materiality throughout the restaurant, incorporating unique textures and shapes to complement the vibrant MI VIDA color palette. To get a peek at MI VIDA’s new Penn Quarter location, we sat down with KNEAD co-founder and Principal Jason Berry and Associate Pioneer at //3877 Meghan Scott.

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Give us a snapshot of the restaurant brand?

KNEAD’s Jason Berry: KNEAD Hospitality + Design is an award-winning Washington, DC-based multi-concept/multi-unit family of restaurants providing HOSPITALITY + DESIGN under one roof. Founded in 2015, KNEAD has quickly expanded with 10 concepts, and 20 locations to date, and more than 1,000 teammates. KNEAD’s evolution has been dedicated to continually creating new opportunities for its team and community, becoming one of the most forward-thinking, influential and continually evolving hospitality groups in the US. Their unique restaurants offer a variety of experiences, from elevated casual dining showcasing cuisines spanning Mexican,

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

Southern, French, American and Steak, to fast-casual featuring bakeries, burgers, taco and pizza concepts. KNEAD has become a leader in restaurant design, concept development and operations, celebrating the philosophy that our guests “eat with their eyes.”

What type of consumer are you targeting?

KNEAD’s Jason Berry: We aim to target a wide range of consumers by offering a diverse array of concepts and price points at our locations. Our goal is to be as inclusive as possible and appeal to different customer preferences and needs. Whether you’re looking for a fast casual restaurant like Kneadza Pizza, casual dining at Mi Vida, or


We don’t strive to be bigger. We strive to deliver the best quality and service in the industry. Our specialized project management teams are highly effective in maintaining affordable budgets, meeting tight deadlines, and delivering quality construction turnovers on time, every time. From coast to coast, Alaska to Puerto Rico, Hunter Building Corporation has you completely covered on your next construction project! We offer a multitude of services nationwide ranging from tenant improvements, buildouts, remodels, ground-up construction, and project management. Hunter Building Corporation takes pride in the fact that many of our clients have been repeat customers for many years.

14609 Kimberley Lane • Houston, TX, 77079 281-377-6550 • Fax: 281-752-8600 info@hunterbuilding.com CIRCLE NO. 19

Retail Construction • Restaurants • Hospitality • Office Spaces • Medical


FROM MEXICO WITH LOVE

KNEAD

a modern steakhouse feel at our waterfront steakhouse, The Grill, we have something for everyone.

How does the design of restaurants cater to what today’s consumers are looking for?

//3877’s Meghan Scott: Being the third location of MI VIDA, Penn Quarter offers iconic brand moments throughout that tie the experience back to the other locations, while curating a distinct sense of place by adapting the restaurant concept to the building’s existing architecture. The space translates the brand’s expression of Mexican culture with a menu rooted in the history and tradition of Mexico’s vibrant and evolving cuisine––elements that create the genuine, immersive atmosphere guests are seeking today.

The space translates the brand’s expression of Mexican culture with a menu rooted in the history and tradition of Mexico’s vibrant and evolving cuisine––elements that create the genuine, immersive atmosphere guests are seeking today. — Meghan Scott, Associate Pioneer, //3877

Walk us through how and why the restaurants are designed the way they are?

//3877’s Scott: Just a few steps away from the Capital One Arena and the National Portrait Gallery, MI VIDA activates the lively street corner with plentiful outdoor seating to accommodate 56 guests. Moving indoors, the dynamic interior provides 300 seats and accentuates the captivating views of the surrounding neighborhood. The moment guests walk through the door, they are met with MI VIDA’s iconic and distinctive brand elements, such as the Tree of Life. In collaboration with KNEAD Hospitality + Design, our team aimed to maximize space and draw in patrons from the bustling street corner while keeping open sightlines and clear paths for the servers, resulting in a lively yet efficient space.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


WATER BASED

CUSTOM COLORS LOW VOC MULTIPLE APPLICATION METHODS

NEVERFADECOATINGS.com CIRCLE NO. 20


FROM MEXICO WITH LOVE

KNEAD

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

KNEAD’s Berry: We use recyclables for all takeout and doggie back packaging. We offer straws on request and do not provide utensils unless requested.

In today’s complicated landscape, what type of opportunities do you see moving ahead? KNEAD’s Berry: We see the opportunity to grow beyond DC, and are currently looking at potential projects all across the East Coast.

Are you optimistic about what you are seeing out there? KNEAD’s Berry: Yes, Landlords are coming to realize that restaurants are expensive to build and operate with thin margins. Without deals that make sense

44

Creating a “must-visit” restaurant environment is about delivering a memorable and consistent experience that resonates with customers on multiple levels. — Jason Berry, Co-founder/Principal, KNEAD Hospitality + Design

structurally, good operators will be waiting on the sidelines.

What’s the secret to creating a “must visit” restaurant environment in today’s competitive landscape?

KNEAD’s Berry: Creating a “must-visit” restaurant environment is about delivering a memorable and consistent experience that resonates with customers on multiple levels. It’s also about staying attuned to changing trends

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

and adapting to meet the evolving needs and expectations of our target audience. Guests ultimately need to feel that their time is valued as well as their wallet. If a guest enters a restaurant and doesn’t feel the space, service, food and beverage warrant their time and money, they simply won’t return. It’s important more than ever that restaurants respect and address all of the ways they can impact the guest experience. It’s not just food and/or service anymore. It’s a holistic experience.


CIRCLE NO. 21


FROM MEXICO WITH LOVE

KNEAD

What’s today’s consumer looking for in a restaurant?

KNEAD’s Berry: Today’s consumers are looking for a well-rounded dining experience that combines quality food, design and ambiance, health-conscious options, unique experiences, transparency, excellent service and social responsibility.

One-on-One with... KNEAD’s Jason Berry

Tell us what makes your brand so unique?

There is no typical day, In the restaurant business things are constantly changing, one day is never the same.

KNEAD’s Berry: We create the concept, design and menu. Culinary directors fine-tune the menu based on our vision. Rarely do hospitality firms offer all these services under one roof and rarely are all three spearheaded by the two founders. Their ability to read a space quickly—defining potential concept opportunity, “designability” and menu direction allows them to make quick decisions affording them some of the best real-estate in the market and the ability to convey that vision to prospective landlords. CCR

46

Describe a typical day.

What’s the biggest item on your to-do list right now? Planning and execution of a successful holiday season.

What was the best advice you ever received? The slow way is the fast way.

What’s the best thing a customer ever said to you? I want one of these in my hometown.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


Seamless All-In-One Solutions

A holistic design approach to creating memorable guest experiences and increasing brand loyalty. CIRCLE NO. 22

fishbeck.com info@fishbeck.com


IT’S THAT SIMPLE We’re a company with a fresh approach. We are highly skilled and passionate design and construction experts brought together and bonded by mutual trust and respect. Every member of the PMC team stands ready to deliver, regardless of location, complexity or challenge. We will bring your projects to market with a focus on quality, performance and speed. Professional Design and Project Management Services for the Retail, Restaurant, Hospitality, Entertainment and the Commercial Markets.

Better.

Faster. WWW.PMCONSORTIUM.COM

Smarter


WE’RE HERE FOR YOU Like any good winning team, a successful effort takes strong teamwork, coordination and clear responsibilities. A combination of artistic, technical, management skills all come into play. We have taken great care to assemble a team of experts who are perfectly suited to deliver these projects for you. We’re thrilled to go on this journey with you and promise to give your brand undivided attention and focus. What Can PMC build for you? CHRIS.LOVE@PMCONSORTIUM.COM 347.392.1188

TOM.DOUGHERTY@PMCONSORTIUM.COM 914.646.1437

WWW.PMCONSORTIUM.COM CIRCLE NO. 23


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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


Down the road apiece Top 3 trends impacting construction in 2024 By David DeSilva & Chris O’Hala

F

or those in the construction industry fluctuating labor shortages and supply chain delays can present business challenges.

It is important for construction company leaders to think proactively about how to address any potential factors impacting their operations in the future.

ISSUE 1, 2024 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

51


DOWN THE ROAD APIECE

TRENDS

Heading into 2024 labor shortages, supply chain and technology are among the top trends for construction industry leaders to be aware of and address.

Ongoing Labor Shortages

Construction is an industry that traditionally has a high labor turnover rate, which means companies need to hire more frequently. This only increases during labor shortages. The construction workforce is up against several factors, including an aging workforce and recruitment struggles. Additionally, there has been an increase in large construction projects in concentrated pockets across the country – many near each other. These projects require a massive number of workers, which causes a major drain to surrounding area contractors and projects that need workers.

They are not just pulling front line laborers and craft workers, but also superintendents, project managers, and safety management personnel. When that situation is combined with the aging workforce and a lack of early career entrants, it is the perfect climate for creating a challenging recruitment environment. The industry is seeing an increased need for professionals to enter the construction workforce as field engineers, superintendents, project managers, safety and quality managers, architects and engineers. Many people may still believe a career in construction is about getting out there with a shovel and performing manual labor. While there is certainly a labor component to the work, there are so many other opportunities in the industry. Recruiting younger generations will be vital in 2024 and beyond.

While the evolution of technology in construction has been slow, it is starting to make the industry safer, more cost-effective, and efficient.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

It is important for firms to expand their talent pool and think about how to attract younger people from all different backgrounds and locations. There has never been a better time to be in the construction industry because there is a huge push to have a good culture with a focus on safety, technology, and wellness. The decreased number of workers, paired with increased work hours, fatigue and lack of process knowledge, creates a greater chance for loss. To best protect a company from loss, ownership should start with a strong, proactive leadership team. Prioritize hiring, effective onboarding and continuous training as a means of promoting safety and quality efforts. When less experienced workers are coming in, training, mentorship and apprenticeship programs can ensure ongoing success. These are all risk mitigation techniques to prevent product issues and decrease workers compensation injuries. It is about accountability and proactiveness as leaders.

Increased Supply Chain Management

While the construction industry has been critically impacted by supply chain delays


CIRCLE NO. 24


DOWN THE ROAD APIECE

TRENDS

since 2020, there is hope on the horizon as professionals have seen the interruptions begin to stabilize. But there are still some bottlenecks with materials such as electrical equipment, which continues to reinforce the position that planning for construction projects well in advance is critical. The holdups and supply availability are also caused by turmoil overseas, which requires companies to stay vigilant on inventory availability. Supply chain management, timely procurement for deliveries and efficient warehouse management will be the key contributors to staying on schedule in the year ahead. Companies need to invest in staffing and tools to create supply chain plans at the project and company level.

back-up in case a primary supplier has capacity or logistical issues; or worstcase scenario, goes out of business. By diversifying relationships with vendors and contractors, businesses can help decrease the possibility that they will be left without materials mid-project.

Emerging Technology

While the evolution of technology in construction has been slow, it is starting to make the industry safer, more cost-effective, and efficient. New opportunities have emerged to help leaders find ways to include technology in their daily practice. For example, the shortage of labor has created higher levels of workmanship issues due to lack of capacity. This is a situation

Construction is an industry that traditionally has a high labor turnover rate, which means companies need to hire more frequently. This only increases during labor shortages. Business leaders cannot expect materials to be available when they need them. It is crucial to form new relationships and review new suppliers. Additionally, business leaders can explore purchasing programs that will help to lock in set pricing. Businesses should consider escalation clauses when contract planning. From the time a construction company signs a contract to when it puts the first shovel in the ground, pricing for materials can change. By adding escalation clauses, a construction company is protecting itself by securing an agreed cost range. It also is important to have multiple options in the supply chain to serve as a

where effective technology can be implemented to better protect job sites. Companies are investing heavily in imagery technology to monitor job sites more effectively. Since site managers cannot always be on the job, technology is a way to record what is happening and monitor various aspects of a project at one time. This helps encourage worker safety and site security. A safety manager can cover more ground with imagery technology in place, and instead of overseeing a single project, they might have capacity for multiple projects. Construction companies are also increasing the use of information tracking systems and dashboards. These systems

provide a centralized hub for all project stakeholders to obtain real-time access to project information like contracts, design and safety plans, and specifications. Additional popular technology that’s being deployed on construction sites include drones, wearables, site sensors, and robotics. Drones have been used to conduct site inspections in remote or hard to access areas, which allows construction companies to make 3D and topographical models and obtain high-resolution images of job sites. With construction wearables placed on workers or personal protective equipment, GPS tracking and biometrics can help mitigate accidents. Wearables can track slips and falls, while site sensors can help warn workers about potential hazards and make the jobsite safer. They can also track noise levels, dust saturation, temperature and the presence of hazardous substances. Repetitive tasks meanwhile can be executed by robots. This includes bricklaying and tying rebar. Automation saves workers’ time and allows them to focus on more complex tasks. Robotics is also a promising way to prevent injuries and fatigue on a construction team. Overall, there is a push to move the construction industry away from manual labor and toward technological methods.

Protecting Company Assets for The Long Term

As new methods are integrated to mitigate on-going labor and material shortages, leaders should be aware of the added risks they can create—and the solutions that exist to support companies. While every project is unique, each high-risk process should be carefully analyzed to help mitigate exposures. Partnering with an experienced insurance company can be beneficial and symbiotic to the structural mitigation efforts undertaken by contractors and subcontractors. CCR

David DeSilva is Head of Construction for The Hartford’s Middle and Large Commercial division. He is an experienced construction underwriter known for his exemplary relationships with brokers. His underwriting capabilities include workers’ compensation, general liability, and excess lines of coverage for contractors and subcontractors. Chris O’Hala is Head of Construction Risk Engineering at The Hartford.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


CIRCLE NO. 25


PROJECT MANAGEMENT

ADVERTORIAL

Top 10 Mistakes of a PM Estimator 1. U sing Market perception of a project to develop price and schedule. The mistake made is not checking this perception against reality of details in drawings, quantities of special items, trades necessary and associated General Condition Costs. 2. Use of concept prices to give client final prices for a Design/Build project. Often the mistake is made using a few key indicators for a project instead of using old projects that were fully detailed (from plans and spec’s). The use of the old project that was designed and specified serves as a check list of things that could be included in the Design Build Project. 3. The use of one page proposals that includes brief scopes and a one-line description of the price. The mistake often made is the omission of a paragraph that includes what is included, excluded and clarifying the price contents (and associated schedule). These inclusions and exclusions often protect both the PM/Estimator and the client and allows for further conversations to develop the “real scope needed”. 4. P M estimators often get in a hurry and send out proposals without peer review. This haste to produce sales will often open the door to confusion and need for clarification. 5. PM estimators may “reach for work outside their specialty”. In a rush to get more sales out, comes the temptation to bid/ price anything that shows up on

emotional intelligence) will be able to show the client why the client should use them, even if the quoted price is higher than the competition. Beware of always giving a high quote and getting a reputation for lowering the price during negotiating. Lowering the price, just to get the work, could yield in doing the project for free or losing money on the project.

the “bid board”. Staying in a familiar area of project experience limits the risk of finding “unknown issues”. Unknown issues are often unpriced and can cause a project to be completed at a financial loss. 6. Many PM Estimators have to get business into the company. When joining a new company, be sure to find an employer that has an existing list of customers that want repeat business. Cold calling businesses for work can limit your ability to meet your sales goals. 7. PM Estimators have the responsibility to talk to the clients and the suppliers/ subcontractors required to complete the project being proposed. Work with ethical and honest clients and suppliers’ / Sub contractors. Maintaining Payment terms (pay when you said you were going to pay) is one of the best ways of keeping you subs and suppliers happy. 8. PM Estimators that have good communication skills (including

9. PM Estimators need to know the markups associated with the market being bid. If the PM Estimator uses Commercial Markups on a Federal Project, the bid could be lost as the current Federal Mark ups are very low. Care should be taken when bidding Federal multi-year contracts with the same mark ups as the Lump Sum, Firm Fixed Price Contracts. Historically the Multi-Year Contracts (Operation and Maintenance) have lower mark ups than the Lump Sum Federal Contracts. 10. Understand the market place you are bidding within. Certain parts of the USA have Commercial Markets that yield a Win Ratio of one win per every five projects bid. Some Federal Sectors of the country yield a win ratio of one award in twenty opportunities bid. Then the cash flow issue of how soon projects are awarded (after bid) must be taken into account. Commercial jobs are historically funded and go from bid to award in 30-60 days. Federal Contracts usually take 90 to 120 days. And often the Federal awards are awarded but not granted permission to start the work.

If you have questions or desire added information, contact me at RalphBbuckles@gmail.com or phone 717-278-1143

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


Save TIME and MONEY

with Customized Cost Estimates

Providing cost estimates in-house can be time consuming and possibly perceived by your client as a conflict of interest. With over 35 years of experience, Eno Enterprises provides constructability analysis and recommendations for value engineering, all while developing your cost estimate.

Eno Enterprises can provide multi-phase cost estimate design packages for:  Federal  Municipal  Commercial  Land Development Projects

Limit conflicts with an experienced estimating team. Ralph Buckles, Chief Estimator (717) 278-1143 Ralphbbuckles@gmail.com

CIRCLE NO. 26


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Architecture firms take the spotlight in the first report of 2024

W

hen it comes to construction, architecture leads the way. To help you sort through some of the industry’s leading names, our annual listing highlights the firms serving the retail, restaurant, hospitality, healthcare (and other) sectors. If you didn’t make the list, contact Publisher David Corson at davidc@ccr-mag.com.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

HOSPITALITY

AO.............................................................$49,200,000.00 Stantec......................................................$27,952,938.00 Ankrom Moisan.........................................$15,992,598.00 Core States Group......................................$10,373,177.81 GreenebrgFarrow.......................................$9,200,000.00 NELSON Worldwide....................................$5,000,000.00 Rebel Design + Group................................$2,344,523.00 Luminaut...................................................$1,651,323.00 MBH Architects..........................................$1,539,954.00 Anderson Porter Design.............................$840,000.00

HEALTHCARE

RESTAURANT

WD Partners..............................................$17,800,000.00 Interplan....................................................$17,000,000.00 Chipman Design Architecture.....................$16,750,000.00 GreenebrgFarrow.......................................$16,700,000.00 Core States Group......................................$11,501,999.41 CPH Consulting, LLC..................................$11,015,110.00 GPD Group.................................................$10,000,000.00 Rebel Design + Group................................$7,549,990.00 Sargenti Architects....................................$7,000,000.00 NELSON Worldwide....................................$5,575,000.00

Rebel Design + Group................................$16,399,601.00 AO.............................................................$12,800,000.00 Stantec......................................................$12,453,338.00 GSB, Inc.....................................................$8,200,000.00 NELSON Worldwide....................................$7,500,000.00 //3877.......................................................$3,600,000.00 Ankrom Moisan.........................................$3,133,761.00 Chipman Design Architecture.....................$3,000,000.00 Luminaut...................................................$2,968,268.00 Flick Mars..................................................$2,814,783.00 Stantec......................................................$218,744,627.00 Little Diversified Architectural Consulting.......$23,707,650.00 NELSON Worldwide....................................$9,750,000.00 GPD Group.................................................$4,700,000.00 Ankrom Moisan.........................................$2,910,291.00 WD Partners..............................................$2,800,000.00 Fishbeck....................................................$1,830,000.00 Core States Group......................................$1,560,564.56 AO.............................................................$1,100,000.00 GreenebrgFarrow.......................................$509,000.00

TOTAL BILLINGS

RETAIL

NELSON Worldwide....................................$49,000,000.00 Core States Group......................................$41,238,908.16 AO.............................................................$39,100,000.00 WD Partners..............................................$39,000,000.00 MBH Architects..........................................$35,737,712.00 CESO, Inc...................................................$30,700,000.00 Sargenti Architects....................................$29,000,000.00 Little Diversified Architectural Consulting.......$27,167,990.00 CPH Consulting, LLC..................................$26,648,234.00 GreenebrgFarrow.......................................$24,200,000.00

MULTI-HOUSING

Top Ten Totals

Stantec......................................................$855,830,567.00 NELSON Worldwide....................................$157,200,000.00 Fishbeck....................................................$137,900,000.00 GPD Group.................................................$136,000,000.00 AO.............................................................$114,400,000.00 Little Diversified Architectural Consulting.......$114,271,260.00 CESO, Inc...................................................$89,000,000.00 Core States Group......................................$80,492,176.01 CPH Consulting, LLC..................................$74,100,000.00 GreenebrgFarrow.......................................$62,500,000.00


CIRCLE NO. 27


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

//3877

Annette Strain-Scott, Office Manager 3299 K Street NW, Suite 300 Washington, DC 20007 (202) 350-4244 Fax: (202) 350-4245 info@studio3877.com www.3877.design Year established: 2011, Number of employees: 37 Total Billings: $5,900,000.00, Retail: $50,000.00 Hospitality: $3,600,000.00, Restaurants: $2,600,000.00 Healthcare: $310,000.00, Multi-Housing: $400,000.00 Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: $250,000.00 Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 60 Specialize In: Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Office, Healthcare, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Craft Brewery Leading Clients: Centurion Restaurant Group, OTO Development, RLJ Lodging Trust, DiamondRock Hospitality, Knead Hospitality + Design

3MG, PSC

Manuel Ray, President 113 Mamey St. Urb. Milaville, San Juan PR 00926 (787) 375-5770 (787) 375-5770 mray@3mg-pr.com www.3mg-pr.com Year established: 2004, Number of employees: 18 Total Billings: $2,500,000.00, Retail: $375,000.00 Hospitality: $580,000.00, Restaurants: $276,000.00 Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $769,000.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 4 Specialize In: Retail, Hotel/Casinos, Office, Other: Waterfront & Piers Leading Clients: Hilton, Sonesta, Marriott, PR Government

Anderson Porter Design

Sarah Janowicz, Marketing Manager + Business Development 1972 Massachusetts Ave 4R Cambridge, MA 02140 (617) 354-2501 info@andersonporter.com www.andersonporter.com Year established: 1994, Number of employees: 15 Total Billings: $2,630,000.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: $840,000.00 Federal:, N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: $1,790,000.00, Other: N/A Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Cannabis, Office, Healthcare, Multi-FHousing, Craft Brewery Leading Clients: N/A

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

Ankrom Moisan

Yoandra Diaz, Communications Director 38 NW Davis St, #300 Portland, OR 97209 (503) 245-7100 ankrommoisan@upspringpr.com www.ankrommoisan.com Year established: 1983, Number of employees: 171 Total Billings: $31,525,301.00, Retail: $634,685.00 Hospitality: $3,133,761.00, Restaurants: N/A Healthcare: $2,910,291.00, Multi-Housing: $15,992,598.00 Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $8,853,966.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 633 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Other: Senior Communities, Affordable Housing Leading Clients: Sun Hill Real Estate, LLC., Trammel Crow Residential, Solterra, Pacific Eagle Holdings, Weidner Apartment Homes, Security Properties, Housing Authority of Yamhill County, Aegis Senior Living Communities, LLC., Baylands Development Inc., Related Northwest

AO

Rob Budetti, Managing Partner 144 N Orange Street Orange, CA 92866 (714) 639-9860 vickieo@aoarchitects.com www.aoarchitects.com Year established: 1974, Number of employees: 354 Total Billings: $114,400,000.00, Retail: $39,100,000.00 Hospitality: $12,800,000.00, Restaurants: $3,900,000.00 Healthcare: $1,100,000.00, Multi-Housing: $49,200,000.00 Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: $200,000.00 Cannabis: $200,000.00, Other: $7,900,000.00 Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Craft Brewery, Other: Science+Technology, Interior Design, Landscape Design, Mixed-Use, Parking, Senior Housing, Industrial, Data Centers, Modular, Sports & Recreation, Leading Clients: N/A

api(+)

Lisa Dwyer, Office Manager 2709 N Rocky Point Dr, Ste 201 Tampa, FL 33607-5562 (813) 281-9299 ldwyer@apiplus.com www.apiplus.com Year established: 1990, Number of employees: 20 Total Billings: $3,132,017.94, Retail: $1,783,043.30 Hospitality: $231,383.77, Restaurants: $728,184.06 Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $389,406.63, Completed Projects in 2023: 80 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Commercial Interiors, Other: Big Box Retail, Leading Clients: N/A


Your Partner for Projects of Any Scale From envisioning your dream project to rolling out a nationwide program, Core States Group offers exceptional depth of expertise, a uniquely integrated service model, and smarter, more seamless solutions. With more than two decades of expertise, we have a reputation for quality results our clients depend on.

CIRCLE NO. 28


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Architectural Design Guild

Bureau Veritas

ArcVision Inc.

CESO, Inc.

BRR Architecture

Chipman Design Architecture

Sam Estes, Managing Principal 2710 Sutton Blvd. St. Louis, MO 63143 (314) 644-1234 sestes@adg-stl.com www.adg-stl.com Year established: 1981, Number of employees: 34 Total Billings: $8,500,000.00, Retail: $8,000,000.00 Hospitality: $300,000.00, Restaurants: $200,000.00 Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A Completed Projects in 2023: 275 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: Floor & Decor, PetSmart, Shoe Carnival, CVS, Jiffy Lube, Aaron’s Janine R Buettner, Dir. of Business Development 1950 Craig Rd., Suite #300 Saint Louis, MO 63146 (314) 415-2400 (309) 255-2863 Fax: (314) 415-2300 jbuettner@arcv.com www.arcv.com Year established: 1995, Number of employees: 100 Total Billings: N/A, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Cannabis, Office, Healthcare, Commercial Interiors Leading Clients: Boot Barn, Tesla, Torrid, Scooter’s Coffee Matt Henderson, Associate & Director of Business Development 8131 Metcalf Ave, #300 Overland Park, KS 66204 (913) 236-3383 matt.henderson@brrarch.com www.brrarch.com Year established: 1963, Number of employees: 300 Total Billings: N/A, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Office, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Other: Grocery Leading Clients: Multiple confidential retailers, Walmart, Sam’s Club, Whole Foods Market, WoodSpring Suites

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

Blake Brosa, Executive Vice President 17200 N. Perimeter Dr., Suite 103 Scottsdale, AZ 85255 (800) 733-0660 blake.brosa@bureauveritas.com www.bvport.com Year established: 1986, Number of employees: 800+ Total Billings: $8,000,000.00, Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Education, Federal Government Leading Clients: Best Buy, Walgreens, The Getty Foundation, Department of general Services Jessica Werkowitz, Director of Marketing and Communications 3601 Rigby Road, Suite 300 Dayton, OH 45342 (937) 401-3595 (937) 232-9719 werkowitz@cesoinc.com www.cesoinc.com Year established: 1987, Number of employees: 319 Total Billings: $89,000,000.00, Retail: $30,700,000.00 Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Multi-FHousing, Other: Industrial Leading Clients: Valvoline, Casey’s, Wash Equity Advisors, Burlington Stores, City BBQ

Tom Chisari, Director of Marketing and Business Development 1350 E Touhy, 1st East Des Plaines, IL 60018 (847) 298-6900 tchisari@chipman-design.com www.chipman-design.com Year established: 1979, Number of employees: 130 Total Billings: $26,700,000.00, Retail: $6,950,000.00 Hospitality: $3,000,000.00, Restaurants: $16,750,000.00 Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A Completed Projects in 2023: 560 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Education, Other: Senior Living, Sustainable Design, 3D Photo Accurate Drawings Leading Clients: Ulta Beauty, Chick-fil-A, Gap, Inc., Noodles and Co., Jollibee, Peet’s Coffee, Capital One, Fusion Education Group, Burlington, Senior Lifestyle Corp.


“Fisher Architecture is a collective of creative professionals who strive to produce purposeful and relative designs for our clients. Let us make your vision come to life.” - Keith Fisher, Principal

(410) 742-0238 fisherarchitecture.com 542 Riverside Dr. Salisbury, MD 21801

CIRCLE NO. 29


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Coast2Coast Survey Corporation

Tim West, Director, Multi-Site 7704 Basswood Drive Chattanooga, TN 37416 (423) 710-4714 twest@coast2coast.net www.coast2coast.net Year Established: 2000 No of Employees: 80+ Retail: N/A Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A Healthcare: N/A Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A Total Billings: Undisclosed Completed Projects in 2022: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Cannabis, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-Housing, Commercial Interiors, Craft Brewery Leading Clients: Ace Hardware, Quest Diagnostics, CVS, Castle Peak Holdings, Cortland Partners ATL, JLL, Little, O””Reilly Auto Parts, Remington Hotels, Veterinary Emergency Group, Benson Integrated Marketing Services

Core States Group

Kevin Behnke, Vice President 3237 Satellite Boulevard, Ste. 465 Duluth, GA 30096 (770) 242-9550 kbehnke@core-states.com www.core-states.com Year established: 1999, Number of employees: 501 Total Billings: $80,492,176.01, Retail: $41,238,908.16 Hospitality: $216,591.67, Restaurants: $11,501,999.41, Healthcare: $1,560,564.56, Multi-Housing: $10,373,177.81 Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $16,336,803.39, Completed Projects in 2023: 2,700 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-FHousing, Other: Corporate, Municipal, Education, Energy, Fueling Leading Clients: 7-Eleven, Best Buy, Chick-fil-A, Circle K, Electrify America, EVgo, Lidl, JPMorgan Chase, McDonald’s, Shell Recharge Solutions, Unison, Walmart

CPH Consulting, LLC

Nikhel Jindal, Chief Strategy and Success Officer 500 West Fulton Street Sanford, FL 32771 (407) 322-6841 njindal@cphcorp.com www.cphcorp.com Year established: 1981, Number of employees: 410 Total Billings: $74,100,000.00, Retail: $26,648,234.00 Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $11,015,110.00, Healthcare: N/A Multi-Housing: $265,599.00, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A, Other: $36,171,057.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 225 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors Leading Clients: Walmart, Chick-fil-A, Murphy USA, Panda Express, CVS, McDonald’s, Circle K, Kroger

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

CREATE Architecture Planning & Design, pllc

Frankie Campione Principal / CREATE-ive Director 45 West 34 Street, Penthouse New York, NY 10001 (212) 297-0880 (917) 324-7479 Fax: (212) 297-0899 FCampione@CREATEapd.com www.createworldwide.com Year established: 1996, Number of employees: 18 Total Billings: N/A, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A Completed Projects in 2023: 53 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Office, Education, Commercial Interiors Leading Clients: N/A

Fishbeck

Julie D’Avignon, Senior Communications Coordinator 1515 Arboretum Drive SE Grand Rapids, MI 49546 (616) 575-3824 jdavignon@fishbeck.com www.fishbeck.com Year established: 1956, Number of employees: 634 Total Billings: $137,900,000.00, Retail: $9,150,000.00 Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: $1,830,000.00 Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Office, Healthcare, Education Leading Clients: N/A

Fisher Architecture, LLC

Carissa Haraczka, Marketing Coordinator 542 Riverside Drive Salisbury, MD 21801 (410) 742-0238 characzka@fisherarchitecture.com www.fisherarchitecture.com Year established: 2009, Number of employees: 18 Total Billings: $3,000,000.00, Retail: $780,000.00 Hospitality: $680,000.00, Restaurants: $180,000.00 Healthcare: $110,000.00, Multi-Housing: $480,000.00 Federal: $50,000.00, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: $720,000.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 160 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Cannabis, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-FHousing, Federal Government, Commercial Interiors, Craft Brewery Leading Clients: Starbucks, Choice Hotels, Marriott, Hyatt, Sun Outdoors, KOA


CIRCLE NO. 30


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

FK Architecture

Ken Linehan, Managing Principal 2555 Temple Trail Winter Park, FL 32789 (407) 629-0595 marketing@fkcompanies.com www.fkcompanies.com Year established: 1963, Number of employees: 44 Total Billings: $12,400,000.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 28 Specialize In: Hotel/Casinos, Office, Multi-FHousing Leading Clients: N/A

Flick Mars

Jhonelle Henry, Director of Operations 10440 N Central Expy, Suite 1210 Dallas, TX 75231 (214) 653-1900 jhonelle@flickmars.com www.flickmars.com Year established: 2005, Number of employees: 25 Total Billings: $2,814,783.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $2,814,783.00, Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 7 Specialize In: Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos Leading Clients: White Lodging, AMS Hospitality, Woodbine Development

GPD Group

Steve Turner, National Leader Strategy & Growth, Multisite Programs 1801 Watermark Drive, Suite 210 Columbus, OH 43215 (614) 588-8081 steve.turner@gpdgroup.com www.gpdgroup.com Year established: 1961, Number of employees: 750+ Total Billings: $136,000,000.00, Retail: $17,000,000.00 Hospitality: $1,000,000.00, Restaurants: $10,000,000.00 Healthcare: $4,700,000.00, Multi-Housing: $700,000.00 Federal: $20,000,000.00, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: $82,600,000.00 Completed Projects in 2023: 2,000+ Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-FHousing, Federal Government, Commercial Interiors Leading Clients: RaceTrac, CVS, Starbucks, Taco Bell/YUM! Brands, PNC Bank, 7-Eleven, The Home Depot, JOANN Stores, Chipotle, Chick-fil-A, Bloomin’ Brands, Jason’s Deli, Five Guys, PetSuites, Maverick, Sheetz, Dollar General, Darden-Olive Garden.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

GreenebrgFarrow

Danielle Barr, Marketing Director 1230 Peachtree Street NE Atlanta, GA 02900 dbarr@greenbergfarrow.com www.greenebrgfarrow.com Year established: 1974, Number of employees: 267 Total Billings: $62,500,000.00, Retail: $24,200,000.00 Hospitality: $350,000.00, Restaurants: $16,700,000.00 Healthcare: $509,000.00, Multi-Housing: $9,200,000.00 Federal: $307,000.00, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: $11,234,000.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 1,970 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-FHousing, Other: Mixed-Use, Parks & Rec, Warehouses, Leading Clients: N/A

GSB, Inc.

Ronald G. Smith, AIA, NCARB, President 3555 NW 58th Street, Suite 700W Oklahoma City, OK 73112 (405) 848-9549 Fax: (405) 848-9783 gsb@gsb-inc.com www.gsb-inc.com Year established: 1979, Number of employees: 36 Total Billings: $10,808,000.00, Retail: $590,000.00 Hospitality: $8,200,000.00, Restaurants: $720,000.00 Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: $98,000.00, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $1,200,000.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 42 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Office, Education, Multi-FHousing, Federal Government, Commercial Interiors, Other: Entertainment Leading Clients: Autograph Hotels, Marriott, Toll Brothers

Hager Design International Inc.

Andrea Teresa Hauser, Marketing & Communications Manager 1847 West Broadway, Suite 306 Vancouver, British Columbia V6J 1Y6 (604) 683-7553 andreateresa@hagerinc.com www.hagerinc.com Year established: 1984, Number of employees: 14 Total Billings: $1,930,000.00, Retail: N/A Hospitality: $1,500,000.00, Restaurants: $300,000.00 Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: $400,000.00, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Multi-FHousing, Other: Senior Living Leading Clients: Sunray Group, Amica, Revera, Barings


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TOP 300

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CIRCLE NO. 31


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Hixson Architecture, Engineering, Interiors

Jencen Architecture

Mike Tragseiler, Director, Client Development 659 Van Meter Street Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 241-1230 Fax: (513) 241-1287 info@hixson-inc.com www.hixson-inc.com Year established: 1948, Number of employees: 140 Total Billings: $26,000,000.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $26,000,000.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 100+ Specialize In: Office Leading Clients: Abbott Nutrition, Tyson Foods, Conagra, Nestle, MolsonCoors, CVS Health

Juleen Russell, Principal Jencen Architecture 2850 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44115 (216) 781-0131 (216) 513-4542 Fax: (216) 781-0132 jrussell@jencen.com www.jencen.com Year established: 1971, Number of employees: 18 Total Billings: $1,073,400.00, Retail: $646,000.00 Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: $427,400.00 Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 73 Specialize In: Retail, Shopping Centers, Healthcare Leading Clients: Lids; Pure Hockey; Banter; Kay Jewelers; Zales; Jared; Johnston & Murphy; Journeys; Red, Wine & Brew; Seritage Growth Properties; Morgan Companies; MD Hyperbaric; CORA Physical Therapy; Restore Hyper Wellness; Precision Orthodontics, Refresh Dental

Hospitality Design Guild

KW Designs, llc

Katherine Cortese, Partner 10505 Royal Club Lane Dallas, TX 75229 (214) 975-0164 katherine@hdesignguild.com www.hdesignguild.com Year established: 2017, Number of employees: 7 Total Billings: $1,800,000.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Office, Commercial Interiors Leading Clients: N/A

Interplan

Rachel Reife, Business Development Manager 220 E Central Parkway, Suite 4000 Altamonte Springs, FL 32701 (407) 645-5008 (321) 246-4043 Fax: (407) 629-9124 rreife@interplanllc.com www.interplanllc.com Year established: 1972, Number of employees: 175 Total Billings: $28,000,000.00, Retail: $4,500,000.00 Hospitality: $80,000.00, Restaurants: $17,000,000.00 Healthcare: $143,000.00, Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: $63,000.00 Other: $7,000,000.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 1200 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Cannabis, Office, Healthcare, Education, Commercial Interiors, Other Leading Clients: N/A

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

Kyle Woudstra, President / Owner 831 W. Main St. Laurens, SC 29360 (843) 990-1923 (843) 990-1923 kwoudstra@kwdesigns.net www.kwdesignsllc.net Year established: 2020, Number of employees: 2 Total Billings: $300,000.00, Retail: $75,000.00 Hospitality: $100,000.00, Restaurants: $75,000.00 Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $50,000.00 Completed Projects in 2023: 30 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Craft Brewery, Other: Industrial, warehouse, manufacturing, renovation, historical adaptation, churches, renovation, master planning, agricultural, single family residential Leading Clients: Domino’s Pizza, 100% Chiropractic, Hilton

Lawrence Group

Rebecca DeZeeuw, Marketing Manager 319 N. 4th Street, Suite 1000 St. Louis, MO 63102 (314) 231-5700 reg@thelawrencegroup.com www.thelawrencegroup.com Year established: 1983, Number of employees: 122 Total Billings: $37,000,000.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 780 Specialize In: Retail, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Other: Senior Living Leading Clients: Panera Bread, Cushman & Wakefield, SSM Health, BJC, Edward Jones, Regal Cinemas, Stifel Financial Corporation, DHI Communities


housing lab + office retail restaurant hospitality

new york city san francisco bay denver mumbai bengaluru CIRCLE NO. 32

mbharch.com

MBH ARCHITECTS


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Little Diversified Architectural Consulting

Michael Magee, Retail Studio Principal 615 S College St, Ste 1600 Charlotte, NC 28202 lillian.parker@littleonline.com www.littleonline.com Year established: 1964, Number of employees: 453 Total Billings: $114,271,260.00, Retail: $27,167,990.00 Hospitality: Included in Retail, Restaurants: Included in Retail Healthcare: $23,707,650.00, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $63,395,620.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 1788 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Education, Commercial Interiors, Other: Big box department stores, grocery, drug stores, specialty stores, home improvement, urgent care, health and wellness, pet care Leading Clients: CVS Health, Truist Financial Corp, Tesla, United Healthcare Group, First Citizens Bank, H-Mart, Public Storage, Concentra Inc, CenterWell, Safeway, Chick-fil-A, Floor & Decor, Oxford Industries, Tailored Brands, Petco, Seafood City, Lowes, Pandora, Goodwill

Luminaut

Matt Erdman, CEO 1100 Sycamore St., Suite 200 Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 984-1070 hello@luminaut.com www.luminaut.com Year established: 1968, Number of employees: 63 Total Billings: $11,020,219.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: $2,968,268.00, Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A Multi-Housing: $1,651,323.00, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Office, Education, MultiFHousing, Commercial Interiors, Leading Clients: N/A

MatchLine Design Group Lesley H. Wyman, Principal/Partner 12720 Hillcrest Road, Suite 220 Dallas, TX 75230 (972) 707-0568 lesley@matchlinedesign.com www.matchlinedesign.com Year established: 2009, Number of employees: 8 Total Billings: $1,235,000.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 22 Specialize In: Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors Leading Clients: Hilton, Marriott, AWH Partners, O’Reilly Hospitality, Schulte, Newcrest Image, Phoenix Hospitality, Independent Hotels

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

MBH Architects

Raphael Zinman, PR Specialist 960 Atlantic Ave. Alameda CA 94501 (929) 356-8306 communications@mbharch.com www.mbharch.com Year established: 1989, Number of employees: 204 Total Billings: $42,805,097.00, Retail: $35,737,712.00 Hospitality: $5,753.00, Restaurants: $650,277.00 Healthcare: $3,954.00, Multi-Housing: $1,539,954.00 Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $4,867,446.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 1,856 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Cannabis, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Craft Brewery, Other: Laboratory, Leading Clients: Target , Levi’s , MBC Biolabs, Factory_OS

MCX Interior

R. Shane McNamara, Co-Founder and Managing Principle 11 Broadway, Suite 615 New York, NY 10004 (202) 215-8288 michelle.lim@mcxinterior.com • www.mcxinterior.com Year established: 2005, Number of employees: 70 Total Billings: $14,000,000.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality:, N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $14,000,000.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 25 Specialize In: Office, Leading Clients: USP, Volvo

MRP Design Group

Ken Dalton, President 3450 Acworth Due West Road Building 100, Suite 120 Kennesaw, GA 30144 (770) 917-9172 x104 kdalton@mrpdesign.com • www.mrpdesign.com Year established: 1989, Number of employees: 15 Total Billings: N/A, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A Completed Projects in 2023: 79, Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Office, Multi-FHousing, Leading Clients: Whataburger, Culver’s, Zaxby’s, Birdcall, Hilton, Prime Senior Living

NELSON Worldwide

Caroline Nelson, Senior Associate 901 Marquette Avenue S, Suite 2850 Minneapolis, MN 55402 cnelson@nelsonww.com • www.nelsonworldwide.com Year established: 1977, Number of employees: 625 Total Billings: $157,200,000.00, Retail: $49,000,000.00 Hospitality: $7,500,000.00, Restaurants: $5,575,000.00 Healthcare: $9,750,000.00, Multi-Housing: $5,000,000.00 Federal: $23,600,000.00, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: $56,600,000.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 7800 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-FHousing, Federal Government Leading Clients: Client partnerships across the NELSON network include Hilton, Macy’s, Comcast, Simon Property Group, Prologis, Yum! Brands, Boston Consulting Group, T-Mobile, Emory Healthcare, SAP Fieldglass, Unibail-Rodamco-Westfield, Kroger, Hyatt, Bayer, Target, and many more.


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BUREAU VERITAS | BVNA.COM BLAKE BROSA, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT | BLAKE.BROSA@BUREAUVERITAS.COM | 800.733.0660 EXT. 4132 CIRCLE NO. 33


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

Onyx Creative, Inc.

Adam Beneke, Marketing Manager 25001 Emery Road, Ste 400 Cleveland, OH 44128 (216) 223-3200 abeneke@onyxcreative.com www.onyxcreative.com Year established: 1974, Number of employees: 160 Total Billings: $30,665,302.00, Retail: $16,587,022.00 Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $2,438,313.00, Healthcare: N/A Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Cannabis, Office, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors Leading Clients: Tractor Supply, BioLife, Burlington, Hannaford

PFI Displays, Inc.

Vincent Tricomi, Vice President 40 Industrial St Rittman, OH 04270 (330) 925-9015 vtricomi@pfidisplays.com www.pfidisplays.com Year established: 1970, Number of employees: 20 Total Billings: N/A, Retail: $3,500,000.00, Hospitality: $200,000.00 Restaurants: $150,000.00, Healthcare: $150,000.00 Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: $75,000.00, Cannabis: $100,000.00 Other: $2,500,000.00, Completed Projects in 2023: 50 Specialize In: Retail, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Education, Commercial Interiors Leading Clients: N/A

Rebel Design + Group

Douglas DeBoer, Founder, Owner, CEO 2554 Lincoln Blvd., Suite 725 Marina Del Rey, CA 90292 (800) 92-REBEL (857) 829-0925 douglas@rebeldesign.com www.rebeldesign.com Year established: 1985, Number of employees: 143 Total Billings: $31,222,988.00, Retail: $1,686,432.00 Hospitality: $16,399,601.00, Restaurants: $7,549,990.00 Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: $2,344,523.00, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: $2,009,887.00, Cannabis: $1,232,555.00 Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 29 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Cannabis, Office, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Craft Brewery, Other: Private Aircraft, Yachts, Cruise Ships, Entertainment Centers, Spas Leading Clients: Waldorf Astoria, Grupo Martinez-Hermanos, The Festival Group, Van Meter Development, Quiddiya, UAE, Hudson Development, LLC, Bristol Development Group, Oasis Group, Nassau

72

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

Reztark Design Studio, LLC

Jennifer Kelley, Director 601 Main Street, Suite 200 Cincinnati, OH 45202 (513) 765-5034 jkelley@reztark.com www.reztark.com Year established: 2006, Number of employees: 45 Total Billings: $10,000,000.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 117 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Office, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Craft Brewery, Other: Themed Environments Leading Clients: N/A

Sargenti Architects

Melanie Gifford, Sr. Director of Business Development 461 From Rd. Paramus, NJ 07652 (323) 775-2404 mgifford@sargarch.com www.sargarch.com Year established: 1998, Number of employees: 165 Total Billings: $36,000,000.00, Retail: $29,000,000.00 Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $7,000,000.00, Healthcare: N/A Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 1191 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Commercial Interiors Leading Clients: Target, Planet Fitness, Five Below, Sephora, Gap

Stantec

Kurt Karnatz, Vice President, Sector Leader, Commercial 233 South Wacker Dr., Ste. 5300 Chicago IL 60606 www.stantec.com mary.jepsen@stantec.com Year established: 1954, Number of employees: 28,000 Total Billings: $855,830,567, Retail: $17,537,966.00, Hospitality: $12,453,338.00, Restaurants: $1,454,699, Healthcare: $218,744,627, Multi-Housing: $27,952,938 Federal: $28,470,977, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A, Other: $577,687,000, Completed Projects in 2023: 6,528 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Education, Multi-FHousing, Federal Government, Commercial Interiors, Craft Brewery, Other: Mixed-Use Leading Clients: Walgreens, Walmart Canada, Safeway, JLL, Boston Properties, Microsoft, Great Wolf Resorts, Amazon, Cadillac Fairview, Aimco

Studio Rodrigo Buelvas

Jaime Tapias, Director of Operations 1501 Biscayne Blvd., #501 Miami, FL 33132 (912) 257-0585 jaime.t@rodrigobuelvas.com www.studiorodrigobuelvas.com Year established: 2020, Number of employees: 10 Total Billings: $850,000.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 3 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Hotel/Casinos, Office, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Leading Clients: N/A


ARCHITECTURE | ENGINEERING | INTERIOR DESIGN

onyxcreative.com CIRCLE NO. 34


SPECIAL REPORT

ARCHITECT/DESIGN FIRMS

TMG (Formerly The McIntosh Group)

Karen MacCannell, Chief Operating Officer 1850 S. Boulder Ave Tulsa, OK 74119 (918) 585-8555 (918) 638-8428 karen@tmgtransforms.com www.tmgtransforms.com Year established: 1998, Number of employees: 11 Total Billings: N/A, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: N/A Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A Completed Projects in 2023: 465 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers Leading Clients: O’Reilly Auto Parts, Wendy’s, Darden, Target

Tricarico Architecture and Design PC

John A. Czepiel, Vice President, Architecture 502 Valley Road, 2nd Floor Wayne, NJ 07470 (973) 692-0222 johncz@tricarico.com www.tricarico.com Year established: 1987, Number of employees: 45 Total Billings: $15,500,000.00, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 554 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Cannabis, Office, Commercial Interiors, Other: Fitness, Automotive, Veterinary Leading Clients: Ralph Lauren, Brunello Cucinelli, New Balance, Garage, Warby Parker and Tag Heuer

Trileaf Corporation

Doug Janette, Vice President and National Account Manager 1515 Des Peres Rd., 2nd Floor St. Louis, MO 63131 (314) 997-6111 d.janette@trileaf.com www.trileaf.com Year established: 1993, Number of employees: 240 Total Billings: $10,000,000.00, Retail: $7,500,000.00, Hospitality: $1,000,000.00, Restaurants: $250,000.00, Healthcare: $500,000.00, Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A, Other: $750,000.00 Completed Projects in 2023: 5000 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Office, Healthcare, Commercial Interiors Leading Clients: N/A

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Urban Architectural Group, P.A John R Urban, Principal 1242 Mann Drive, 200 Matthews, NC 28105 (704) 841-1899 (704) 841-1899 johnurban@urbanaia.com www.UrbanAIA.com Year established: 1998, Number of employees: 6 Total Billings: N/A, Retail: N/A, Hospitality: N/A Restaurants: N/A, Healthcare: N/A, Multi-Housing: N/A Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 62 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Shopping Centers, Office, Healthcare, Multi-FHousing, Commercial Interiors, Craft Brewery Leading Clients: New York Butcher Shoppe, Sam’s Xpress

Valerio Architects Alicia Zaayer, Project Manager 5858 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 200 Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 954-8996 (213) 606-3473 azaayer@valerioinc.com www.valerioinc.com Year established: 1994, Number of employees: 55 Total Billings: $13,000,000.00, Retail: $7,670,000.00 Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $5,330,000.00, Healthcare: N/A Multi-Housing:, N/A, Federal: N/A, Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A Cannabis: N/A, Other: N/A, Completed Projects in 2023: 225 Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Leading Clients: Cava, Starbucks, OTB (Marni, Jil Sander), Brunello Cucinelli, Gucci, Zegna, Bottega Veneta.

WD Partners Mary Rea, Sr. Administrativ Assistant 7007 Discovery Blvd Dublin, OH 43017 (614) 634-7323 mary.rea@wdpartners.com www.wdpartners.com Year established: 1968, Number of employees: N/A, Total Billings: $636,000.00, Retail: $39,000,000.00, Hospitality: N/A, Restaurants: $17,800,000.00, Healthcare: $2,800,000.00, Multi-Housing: N/A, Federal: N/A Craft Brewery/Distillery: N/A, Cannabis: N/A Other: $4,000,000.00, Completed Projects in 2023: N/A Specialize In: Retail, Restaurants, Healthcare Leading Clients: N/A


OUR GREATEST DESIGN... IS OUR REPUTATION

502 VALLEY ROAD / WAYNE, NJ 07470 / P 973-692-0222 / INFO@TRICARICO.COM / TRICARICO.COM

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Digital Buyers Guide Directory Get listed in our app that will connect you with our community. Listing will consist of: Company name

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To get listed contact: Mike Pallerino mpallerino@gmail.com CIRCLE NO. 37


Viva la Green How France is preparing for the greenest Olympics ever


VIVA LA GREEN

OLYMPICS

Viva la Green How France is preparing for the greenest Olympics ever By Olivier Vidal & Arthur Chretien

T

he world’s largest spectator event, the Olympics, have become an opportunity for host cities to showcase their culture and values to the rest of the world. With Paris hosting the 2024

Olympics, next year’s Games, organizers’ are promising to make this event both “spectacular and sustainable,” a goal that aligns with the city’s vision to become Europe’s greenest city by 2030.

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VIVA LA GREEN

OLYMPICS

The Paris 2024 Games will boast 100% renewable energy, sustainable food sourcing, and green transport for participants and spectators. To meet the goal of deeply reducing the Games’ carbon footprint, organizers are particularly mindful of any construction projects connected with this highly visible event. They have set bold goals, aiming to “halve the emissions arising in relation to the Games, while offsetting even more CO2 emissions than we will generate.” An early planning decision has proved to be monumental in terms of decarbonization—95% of its dedicated sites are pre-existing structures or temporary venues. As the French capital prepares to host events and house thousands of attendees, it is retrofitting several existing structures using innovative technology designed to undergird energy-wise initiatives.

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Converting existing buildings to smart environments will be key to making the 2024 Olympics and Paralympics the most sustainable ever. Converting existing buildings to smart environments will be key to making the 2024 Olympics and Paralympics the most sustainable ever. Retrofits avoid the heavy embodied carbon load of new construction, and also ensure that the city won’t be saddled with rarely used, or worse, abandoned buildings after the Games. Challenges abound when you are dealing with old, historic structures filled with archaic elements and emotional connotations. Construction retrofits in these buildings require a careful plan for upgrading systems

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

to optimal efficiency while preserving the grandeur and history within the walls. Smart technologies including advanced hardware controls, sensor networks, automation, and artificial intelligence are essential to improving older structures’ energy capabilities and can be integrated without disrupting buildings’ style or aesthetic. The 2024 Games, which take place over two weeks in the heart of summer heat, will likely include intensely hot weather, as record-breaking heat waves have become Europe’s new normal. Paris


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VIVA LA GREEN

OLYMPICS

is more vulnerable to summer heat waves than any other European city, which could compromise public safety during the Summer Olympics and Paralympics. A major retrofit initiative for these structures is improving their energy efficiency. Paris will need innovative solutions to ensure the venues allocate energy resources wisely while offering spectator and athlete comfort and safety. Even in historic buildings, the French are incorporating the latest technology to monitor energy use, track carbon emissions and react in real-time.

Solutions that can sense, think and act autonomously will ensure a smaller carbon footprint than Games past. And, by thinking about these solutions now, Paris is future-proofing the city and preserving its environment for generations to come.

Leading the way

The Games are the perfect opportunity for Paris to make their structures resilient to climate change, in a way that preserves the needs of residents and the city’s cultural

The organizers’ big-picture focus on innovation in construction and retrofitting the historic buildings to modern technological standards will benefit Paris’ residents long into the future.

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heritage. The Universeine (the Athletes’ Village) will be converted into residential housing, offices, schools and more following the Games. Repurposing construction into facilities that serve the city after the Games is another way Paris plans to keep carbon emissions low. Paris will be looking at ways to incorporate smart building technologies into the buildings used in the Games. By building in the tools now to measure carbon emissions and effortlessly manage energy efficiency, these structures will be ready to help the City meet its 2050 carbon neutrality target and keep Parisians comfortable during climate change-associated weather events. These efforts are especially important considering Paris’ population density, which is about twice as much as that of New York City. Automated temperature controls in the glass-roofed Grand Palais which will house fencing and taekwondo competitions


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VIVA LA GREEN

OLYMPICS

will be key to creating a sustainable, enjoyable and legacy-making Games. The 123-year-old Grand Palais, one of the most iconic structures involved in the Games, is being fully renovated to update its energy

systems. Athletes can perform at their peak whether competing on the court or in the pool, and spectators can be kept comfortable in large, energetic crowds, even during a potential heatwave.

The Aquatics Centre, one of the few new construction projects and composed of all bio-based materials, will provide all of its own energy needs through its solar rooftop. This project is one of the country’s largest urban solar arrays. To create these adaptive environments while modeling exemplary environmental strategies, organizers are integrating innovative solutions to modernize the energy usage of these retrofitted buildings. Balancing efficiency and lowering emissions with spectator comfort, athletic performance and for the longer horizon, residential and business use is at the forefront of these retrofits. To meet their long-term carbon reduction goals, the French are incorporating the latest technology to monitor energy use, track carbon emissions and react in real-time at most of the public-facing Olympics venues. Solutions that can sense, think, and act autonomously will ensure a smaller carbon footprint than Games past. And, by thinking about these solutions now, Paris is future-proofing the city and preserving its environment for generations to come. Over the past few decades, the Olympics’ environmental effects have become a point of contention. Excess use of the natural resources and degradation of the environment has resulted in problems that persist years after the games are over. But there is progress. A century after Paris created the globe’s first Olympic Village in 1924, they can be proud to announce that today’s Olympics are poised to be the world’s first event that puts sustainability first. The organizers’ big-picture focus on innovation in construction and retrofitting the historic buildings to modern technological standards will benefit Paris’ residents long into the future. CCR

Olivier Vidal serves as the Senior Director, Enterprise Sales at Acuity Brands, leading the sales globally for the entire Atrius portfolio across various verticals. With a career spanning over two decades, Olivier joined Acuity Brands in 2020 and has held a range of leadership roles in his career across account management, sales, product marketing, sales engineering in both travel and smart building industries. Arthur Chretien is Product Market Director, Distech Controls at Acuity Brands who has been developing innovative technological solutions since the beginning of his career. Arthur joined the Distech Controls team in 2015 as Product Manager and has overseen the development and market launch of a number of key products. Arthur now is in charge of the Product Portfolio for Europe.

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Where nature meets comfort How historic Ruby’s Inn is providing a luxury experience on the edge of Bryce Canyon

Brannon Morse (Kiva Energy), Karl Munford (Ruby’s Inn), Ron Harris (Ruby’s Inn), Lance Syrett (Ruby’s Inn), Jim Bunsey (PERC), Jeff Stewart (Blue Star Gas), Michael Prayoonvech (Rinnai)


Hospitality in Commercial Construction

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Ruby’s Inn

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


Where nature meets comfort How historic Ruby’s Inn is providing a luxury experience on the edge of Bryce Canyon

R

euben C. (Ruby) Syrett saw something nobody else had. So, in 1916, he packed his family up and brought them to the wilds of Southern Utah. Before long, the Syretts established a ranch near the present site of what now is Ruby’s Inn. As the story goes, a few weeks after Ruby’s arrival, another rancher told him about the canyon called Bryce. Intrigued, Ruby and his family made a Sunday visit to the canyon rim. The visit made an impression. In fact, they were so impressed by what they saw, they not only boasted of the beauty the canyon had, but they started to host visitors. By 1919 the Syretts received permission from the state to build a lodge, the “Tourist Rest”, near the brink of the canyon. In 1923, when Bryce Canyon became a National Monument, Ruby moved his “Tourist Rest” to where his ranch was and named it Ruby’s Inn. Ruby’s reputation grew along with the national monument, which grew into a National Park. Before long, Ruby’s Inn became a large business operation. What started with tent houses and a place to serve meals, paved the way for the modern facilities which today serve the tourists at Bryce Canyon, providing all the traveler needs to make a stay in the Bryce Canyon area a trip to remember.

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Hospitality in Commercial Construction

Ruby’s Inn

Today, the legacy rests in the hands of the children and grandchildren of Carl Syrett, Ruby’s son, relying on its historic roots and forward-thinking innovations to bring the world to the “Wonder of the West.” We sat down with Ron Harris, Health and Safety Manager, to get a peek into what the brand plans for 2024.

Give us a snapshot of your brand?

Ruby’s Inn is a ranch-style resort that’s the closest lodging to Bryce Canyon National Park in Utah. It has three hotels with over 700 rooms, an RV park, restaurants, a gas station, several stores, a business and conference center, and more. Our goal is to provide a premier hospitality service for our guests.

What type of consumer are you targeting?

Travelers. We’re several hours from any major cities or airports; people aren’t moving here. But people are interested in connecting with nature and seeing the canyon. So, we want to provide the best for anyone that spends a night at Ruby’s Inn.

Travelers are a little pickier than they used to be. They don’t want a roadside motel that’s just a place to put their head. They want a premiere experience with every place they stay.

How does the design of your hotels/resorts cater to what today’s consumers’ want?

Families are coming to us to create incredible memories while on vacation. It’s why our resort is more than just hotels—it’s a full experience with outdoor activities, restaurants with a show, and so much more. We’ve also seen more people are interested in glamping or connecting with nature, and our RV Park provides them with a great place to stay.

Walk us through how and why the hotels are designed the way they are?

Our hotels cater to a variety of tourist needs and budgets. We have the Best Western Plus Ruby’s Inn, Best Western Plus Bryce Canyon Grand Hotel, a budget motel, and the RV Park.

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Ron Harris (Ruby’s Inn)

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


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Hospitality in Commercial Construction

Ruby’s Inn

In one night, we could have 4,000 guests staying with us. Our hotels are designed so that no one feels like one of 4,000. We want them to feel like they are the most important one. That includes providing warm showers, heated pools, a spa, a grand fireplace, fresh laundry, and hot meals. We can provide those luxuries thanks to our propane systems that are designed to provide comfort.

Take us through your construction and design strategy.

We are 7,600 feet elevation on a plateau, so it gets cold up here. All of our buildings and the water are heated with propane. We chose propane many years ago because of its availability. We have a 30,000-gallon tank, 18,000-gallon tank and an underground distribution system. We’ve become incredibly energy efficient since using propane, and it’s saved us $6,000 a month.

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What’s the biggest issue today related to the construction side of the business?

The biggest challenge for us is how far away we are from contractors or subcontractors. The next big city is over two hours away. Construction crews don’t want to drive all the way out here if they have local work. Thankfully, we have our own general contractor here at Ruby’s Inn and Chief Engineer Karl Munford. While we haven’t done much construction for a few years, he and his team have helped us overcome the challenge of being in a rural area.

Talk about sustainability. What are you doing?

One of the reasons so many people stay with us is we have some of the clearest skies in the country. There’s no smog. We want to keep it that way. Our propane appliances help us with that goal. For example, several years ago we removed older model open-flame boiler

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

water heaters with storage tanks and replaced them with 175 highly efficient 199,000 Btu propane-powered tankless water heaters from Rinnai. The propane tankless systems reduce carbon emissions by up to 50% compared with electric storage tank systems.

What do you see as some of your biggest opportunities moving ahead?

We’re always interested in building another hotel. But that’s on the backburner right now because of the economy. From a sustainability standpoint, one of the biggest opportunities I’m learning about how we can become even more sustainable with renewable propane. We currently use 380,000 gallons of propane on our property every year and we’ve been able to keep our beautiful environment clean with it. If we can transition that to renewable propane,


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San Antonio, TX

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Photographer – Anna Migeon

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Hospitality in Commercial Construction

Ruby’s Inn

which is one of the least carbon-intensive energy sources available, we can push our sustainability even further.

Are you optimistic about what you see in the hotel/resort sector?

Definitely. Travel is different these days. People may want to pay to stay in a tent instead of a hotel with a shower. Our RV Park & Campground has done very well. I think things are good.

Why did you pick the locations you did for your hotels?

Ruby’s Inn began with Ruby and Minnie Syrett back in 1916 when they moved east. One day, they took a ride to the rim and looked out. Ruby said this was the most beautiful thing he’d ever seen, and people would come from all over to see the area. So, he set up a tourist rest. When Bryce Canyon became a national park, the government bought Ruby out, he moved out to where Ruby’s Inn is now, and gave the UDOT permission to build the state road through the property. The location was already picked, and the world grew up around it.

What’s your growth plan? What areas are you targeting?

Ruby’s Inn was always built on need. We needed hotel rooms, so we got a loan and built more. Now, we’re just watching to see what the needs are. Water is also a big issue up here, so getting more water to be able to grow is our number one plan.

What trends are you seeing?

We’re seeing more glamping and yurts, so we’re watching our RV park options. In the area, we’ve seen some new buildings that are a metal frame with an all-glass structure. We’re keeping an eye on that option.

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What’s the secret to creating a ‘must visit’ hotel/resort in today’s competitive landscape?

You have to let people know about you. Social media is big. We have someone who does that full time for us to keep up on reviews and provide fresh content. It’s a whole different way of marketing. We don’t have the AAA book or the Best Western Magazine, which used to be the travel bible.

What is today’s consumer looking for?

Travelers are a little pickier than they used to be. They don’t want a roadside motel that’s just a place to put their head. They want a premiere experience with every place they stay.

What’s the biggest thing on your to-do list right now?

Just keep up. We have some buildings that are aging and we’re remodeling to keep up with changing times. Plus, for me personally, I want to learn more about renewable propane and how we can keep growing our sustainability.

Tell us what makes your brand unique?

We’ve been here over 100 years. We have six generations of family in the business being born now. My wife is part of the fourth generation, the fifth generation is behind them with my daughter, and now they’re having kids.

One-on-One with Ruby’s Inn Ron Harris Describe a typical day. I’m the health and safety manager. My collateral duties are managing the propane bulkheads, distribution systems, etc. I get the propane into the building. My sister-in-law and I are also the directors of the human resource department. My primary responsibility is overseeing the safety committee and all the insurance. I also volunteer as an Advanced EMT with our county ambulance and I’m the local Fire Chief for Bryce Canyon City and Tropic. What was the best advice you ever received? The late former Phoenix Fire Chief Alan Brunacini once said, “Provide the best customer service to Mrs. Smith.” That pertains to everything that I do. Mrs. Smith could be anybody: an employee, family member, guest. Every day I think, “How do I make Mrs. Smith feel? That’s what she’s always going to remember.” What's the best thing a client ever said to you? “I will never forget this.” From saving someone’s life, being there during a crisis, or even just taking care of customers at the Inn. When they say, “We will never forget this experience,” I’m honored that they cherish the great experiences.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


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www.connectscg.com Let’s CONNECT Today!!! CIRCLE NO. 48


Doubling up Achieving ambitious growth plans at HCA Florida Gulf Coast Hospital


Doubling up Achieving ambitious growth plans at HCA Florida Gulf Coast Hospital By Josh Meadows

P

anama City’s HCA Florida Gulf Coast Hospital has responded to rapid population expansion in Bay County with swift, strategic growth. With advanced specialties in cardiac care, the community’s only pediatric ER and Level III NICU and PICU, and a wide range of services from cardiology and vascular care to orthopedics, the hospital recognizes its critical role in the community. One of the most ambitious aspects of Gulf Coast’s recent expansions was a $39 million project that vertically expanded not one, but two towers. The project’s first phase included a fourth and fifth-floor vertical addition to the north tower. The fourth floor features a new medical/surgical unit, and the fifth floor is home to a state-of-the-art inpatient rehabilitation facility. The team also added a third floor to the south tower, which houses a surgical intensive care unit. The entire project added approximately 67,000 square feet and 60 new beds, as well as a connector from the third floor of the main facility to the north tower.

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Hospital campuses are often tight on space, and ensuring new or expanded spaces are well-integrated with existing hospital units is important. These vertical expansions provided Gulf Coast with a growth option that addressed those needs and constraints, increasing their towers’ capacity without expanding their footprint or requiring additional land. “This project enabled Gulf Coast Hospital to strategically add space and critical services, and grow with this flourishing Bay County community,” says Jeff Wherry, Senior Project Manager and Florida healthcare leader with JE Dunn Construction.

Unique project requirements

Vertical expansions are often accompanied by unique requirements and challenges. “These complex projects require an advanced level of planning and sophistication to successfully navigate their distinctive nuances,” says Nick Paradossi, Senior Project Manager and Project Lead with JE Dunn.

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Special attention was given to the entire building well in advance of adding floors atop both towers. “We weren’t just adding stories to each tower,” Paradossi says. “We were also ensuring each building was equipped and extended to provide the strength and utilities necessary for the new floors.” Enabling work included assessing the existing structure and systems, and adequately upsizing various aspects of the facility as needed, such as structural supports, elevators, HVAC, electrical, pneumatic tubing and technology. The towers’ plumbing was also extended. During early investigations of the existing infrastructure, the team identified a strategic opportunity to install valves for isolating sections of the facility’s plumbing, limiting outages during critical system connections. This enhancement preemptively minimized potential impacts to patient care and other critical areas during construction.

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Accounting for environmental considerations

Some of the project’s challenges stemmed from the unique nature of this construction type, coupled with geographic considerations. Since the towers’ roofs were ultimately removed and replaced with a floor for the first level of each new expansion, the towers—full of patients, staff and visitors— could have been particularly vulnerable to external elements through most phases of the project. In a location with more than 60 inches of rainfall annually, Clyde Simpson, Senior Superintendent with JE Dunn, says the climate presents numerous weather-related challenges for any type of construction project, but especially for vertical expansions. Paradossi says JE Dunn repaired hurricane damage to the north tower in 2018, so it is personally familiar with this community, its climate, and weather-related vulnerabilities. Equipped with these

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

insights, the vertical expansions team successfully prevented environmental impacts to either tower from potential water intrusions, temperature fluctuations, humidity and thermal leakage.

Additional risk and complexity

Vertical expansions, in and of themselves, require a capacity for complexity and expertise beyond the already stringent standards necessary for construction in an active hospital. Tackling two at once further ups the ante on virtually every aspect of project planning, management and execution. “With a double vertical expansion, the potential implications for site logistics and safety are at least double that of a typical project,” Simpson says. “We worked diligently to minimize the impacts of construction— like cranes, deliveries, and onsite labor—to the campus, patients, staff and visitors as much as possible.”


CIRCLE NO. 50


One of the team’s success strategies was treating each vertical expansion as an individual project yet simultaneously maintaining a holistic, comprehensive focus on the entire job. The team managed separate schedules, budgets, reports, meetings, communications, safety, logistics and other plans for each tower. Yet, they also had strategies for continuously monitoring and managing anything that could impact both projects at the same time, such as labor, supplies and overlapping tasks. “We wanted both towers and their respective plans to receive the necessary focus and momentum, so we set the stage for this perspective with the team early in the project,” Paradossi says. “This collective mindset and management approach helped ensure the macro and micro levels of the project received proper attention from start to finish.”

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Prioritizing hospital operations

The team invested time during pre-construction to learn and better understand more about the hospital’s business operations, such as crucial service lines, patient and staff flow throughout the campus and facility, and patient demographics. “Understanding more about the hospital’s day-to-day business operations influenced countless aspects of our planning and played a significant role in proactively identifying and managing potential risks,” says Emily McCaw, Senior Project Engineer with JE Dunn. For example, the hospital’s elevators required work to extend to the new fourth and fifth-floor additions of the north tower. Initially, project plans accounted for jumping two elevator cars at a time. But thanks to safety planning during preconstruction, emergency preparedness simulations

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

revealed the staff elevator was not large enough to accommodate a hospital bed while the patient elevator was out of service. Since the elevators were necessary for transporting patients from labor and delivery to emergency surgery, this discovery, and the consequent adjustments the team made to construction plans, were particularly critical to maintaining patient care and hospital operations during the project. Similarly, with construction occurring above the north tower’s labor and delivery and neonatal intensive care units, special measures were taken to protect the hospital’s tiniest patients. “Safety, infection control, vibrations, and the patient experience were accounted for to the greatest extent possible in our phasing, logistics, safety and daily work plans, as well as team member orientations and training,” McCaw says. “The entire team


was laser-focused on minimizing impacts to new moms and their newborns.”

Best practice considerations

Essential best practices were instrumental to this ambitious project’s success. “Due to extensive facility and campus-wide implications, intricate phasing, multiple tower cranes and countless other impacts, highly effective communication and change management with all staff, patients and visitors were imperative,” Paradossi says. Organization-wide communications commenced well in advance of construction and were reiterated and updated regularly throughout the project. Since vertical expansions require comprehensive facility and campus-wide preplanning

and investigation, hospital and construction team leadership coordinated access to the entire facility early in the preconstruction phase. “The value of our early investigation, due diligence, and preconstruction planning cannot be overstated,” Simpson says. “Much of this project’s success and innovation stemmed from the time we invested in evaluating and studying the existing structures, assessing risks and planning well in advance of any construction.” The level of sophistication necessary for this unique project also warranted a diverse set of partners and experts. Experienced partners with a strong track record of safety, risk management, communications, change management, infection control, and schedule certainty were key. Likewise,

access to national experts in specific disciplines was also beneficial. “Our team included experts from several of our national centers of excellence, who leveraged their insights and experience from diverse projects across the country to inform our project plans and help mitigate risk,” Paradossi says. “For example, with the significant implications for preparing and upsizing both towers’ MEP (mechanical, electrical, and plumbing) systems, collaborating with our national MEP experts was a game-changer.” The project team also sought input from national experts on a range of topics, from logistics and safety to scheduling and prefabrication. “Pairing the local project team’s healthcare expertise and experience with national insights and perspectives was a winning combination,” Wherry says. “Curating the right combination of partners and team members capable of successfully leading a double-vertical expansion and navigating the project’s inherent complexity was a critical ingredient for this unique job.”

Realizing an ambitious vision

Realizing Gulf Coast’s ambitious vision has positioned the hospital to serve the growing needs of its community better. Prior to the towers’ expansions, patients had to seek some care outside of Bay County due to a shortage in the facility and the broader community. Paradossi says residents and visitors are benefitting from the expanded capacity and services afforded by this complex project. “These additional beds directly translate to more access and continuity for patients, families, and caregivers. Doubling down on these twin tower expansions has undoubtedly positioned Gulf Coast Hospital to elevate the level of care for the people in Bay County for years to come.”

Josh Meadows, VP and Project Executive at JE Dunn Construction, brings nearly 20 years of experience leading healthcare projects, from various specialty and large-scale greenfield hospitals to complex, multi-phased additions and renovations. He specializes in leveraging collaboration, innovation, and deep healthcare expertise to deliver innovation, quality, and speed to market for health systems across the country.

ISSUE 1, 2024 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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Size

Material

Type of Material

Layer 1

0.5

Wear layer

Use layer with PU protection

Layer 2

0.1

Vinyl

decorative film

Layer 3

0.7

Elastic PVC

Intermediate comfort layer

Layer 4

3.2

SPC

SPC composite body

Layer 5

1

IXPE

IXPE motherboard


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CIRCLE NO. 52


ALSO COVERING LOCAL, STATE & REGIONAL PROJECTS AND FACILITIES

Keeping the light on Coastal New York project showcases importance of community collaboration

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District team that worked on the Montauk Point Coastal Resiliency Project with Col. Alexander Young, Commander, New York District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Credit: USACE.


Keeping the light on

Coastal New York project showcases importance of community collaboration By JoAnne Castagna

I

n the 1970s, if you took a helicopter ride from New York City to the Montauk Point Lighthouse, which sits on the eastern tip of Long Island, you could have spotted a woman in her 60s crawling along the 65-foot cliff under the beacon, packing and shaping earth with her bare hands and her small garden hoe. Her name was Giorgina Reid, and she was desperately trying to stabilize the cliffs that had been eroding for years, putting the iconic and beloved historic lighthouse at risk from crumbling into the sea.

What possessed this textile designer from New York City to do this? She witnessed firsthand the devastating effects of erosion on something else she loved—her dream retirement home. A nor’easter carried away 18-feet of shoreline from her Long Island cottage into the sea. She was able to save her property by developing a terracing erosion control method and now she was using her technique to save the lighthouse. Just like Reid wanted to support the lighthouse, the community started to support her in her effort. This included the government, including the US Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, the press, celebrity singers and locals, including a self-proclaimed hippy who started working with Reid and ended up making protecting the lighthouse his career.

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COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


Col. Matthew Luzzatto, former commander, New York District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers visiting the project team during construction on the Montauk Point Coastal Resiliency Project. Credit: USACE.

ISSUE 1, 2024 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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Over the years, the community performed a series of projects that were not completely successful at fighting the erosion, but recently the Army Corps completed a coastal erosion project that strengthened the cliffs and will protect the lighthouse for generations to come. The effort has demonstrated that when people come together, they can preserve history and more importantly protect their future by strengthening its coasts from coastal flooding and sea level rise. The Montauk Point Lighthouse is located in Montauk Point, a hamlet in the Town of East Hampton, New York, on the eastern tip of Long Island, a peninsula that stretches out into the Atlantic Ocean. The 111-foot-tall octagonal beacon sits on Turtle Hill, which has cliffs that cascade into the ocean on the east and south sides of the structure. The lighthouse is white with a broad red ban sitting across its middle like a big belt, holding up its pants in the strong winds that come off the ocean. The lighthouse and its cliffs have weathered the elements since 1796, when it was built at the authorization of President George Washington. Its purpose was—and still is—to guide ships along the south shore of Long Island into the New York Harbor, using its 290,000-candle power light that flashes every 5 seconds. Today, the National Historic Landmark draws 100,000 visitors annually from around the world and to New Yorkers it’s become a well-known symbol of the state’s maritime history. Because the lighthouse sticks out into the ocean, its cliffs are continually battered by wind, waves and storms, causing extreme eroding over the years. When the lighthouse was constructed, it was 300 feet from the edge of the cliffs. More recently, due to erosion, it was less than 100 feet, putting the lighthouse at risk. Following is a brief history of the work done by the community to help save the lighthouse in the last century. For a more complete history of the Montauk Point Lighthouse, visit the sources listed at the end of this article.

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The eroded cliffs at the Montauk Point Lighthouse in 1968. Credit: USACE.

Because the lighthouse sticks out into the ocean, its cliffs are continually battered by wind, waves and storms, causing extreme eroding over the years. When the lighthouse was constructed, it was 300 feet from the edge of the cliffs.

Location map of the historic and iconic Montauk Point Lighthouse. Credit: USACE.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


CIRCLE NO. 53


The seawall around the base of Turtle Hill, around the Montauk Point Lighthouse was expanded using more than 60,000 tons of granite boulders. Credit: USACE.

Aerial image of the Montauk Point Coastal Resiliency Project. Credit: USACE.

Frank Verga, project manager, New York District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Right) with Greg Donohue, Montauk Point Lighthouse Director of Coastal Erosion at the ribbon cutting ceremony in the summer of 2023. Credit: USACE.

In the 1940s, the lighthouse was owned and operated by the US Coast Guard, who realized the structure was in jeopardy of crumbling into the sea when a 12-foot portion of the cliff eroded and fell off during a storm in 1944. The following year, the Army Corps took its first step to stop the erosion by installing a 840-foot-long stone seawall along the beach below the cliffs. In the early 1950s, several severe storms and hurricanes caused waves to wash over the seawall and collapse it. In 1969, the Coast Guard announced that the lighthouse would be replaced with an automated beacon by 1972 and that the old lighthouse tower would be preserved as an historic monument. A local newspaper editor, unhappy about this, ran stories about the plight of the lighthouse and created a contest to come up with ways to save it. Reid read these articles and joined him in a “Light-in” at the lighthouse parking lot where thousands protested. There was so much community support to save the lighthouse that the Coast Guard halted its

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plans and instead looked into ways to stop the erosion. Reid thought she could help them with her own terracing method. The technique was born when she was cleaning up debris from her damaged property that was located 50-feet from cliffs that overlooked the Long Island Sound in Rocky Point, Long Island. She noticed pieces of lumber and reeds along the beach with sand piled up behind them. The rubble gave her a simple, but effective idea for controlling cliff erosion. She gathered the debris and began to work on the cliff below her property. She terraced it by stuffing reeds behind the lumber and packing them tightly with sand. Support stakes held the lumber in place and the sand allowed growth of vegetation. The reeds prevented the sand from leaching out and the hollow stems provided organic matter and water retention for plantings. The cliff was stabilized so that land was not carried away as heavy rains washed down each terrace level. When she completed her home’s embankment, another major nor’easter blew

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

in and the cliff remained intact. She was so impressed that she patented her “Reed Trench Terracing” method and wrote a book about it. “So, this 4-foot 10 little dynamo named Giorgina Reid arrives at the lighthouse to speak with the Coast Guard to discuss how she can help restore their eroded cliffs using her method,” says lighthouse erosion specialist Greg Donohue. “I’m sure the Coast Guard engineers had a good chuckle in their lunchroom after meeting this sassy life force. But they realized that up till now nothing else has succeeded, so what did they have to lose? They told her that they’ll give her a pilot erosion control project, but they were unable to pay her, and she agreed.” On April 22, 1970, her husband drove her to the lighthouse because she didn’t have a license. She emerged from the car with a garden hoe and started digging into the embankment and wouldn’t stop for 16 years.” At the time, Donohue was a local landscaper and self-proclaimed “Hippie” who would soon volunteer to help Reid.


CIRCLE NO. 54


Several times a week, she would be out on the cliffs. Sometimes she was alone and sometimes with volunteers, like Donohue, who would often gather reeds for her to use. He said, “She would always be moving the project forward. She was a textile designer by trade, so she had an artful eye. She actually became a sculptress. She sculpted and sculpted and sculpted and dug as she graded the steep cliff into terraces. The daily assignment was to dig like a mole and climb like a goat.” During this time, the Coast Guard constructed a temporary sea wall to support Reid while she performed her work. It did last a while and eventually was blown out by a storm. Reid and her volunteers were successful at stabilizing the eastern cliff of Turtle Hill, but the south cliff proved to be challenging because it was almost a vertical slope, making it difficult to terrace. This didn’t stop her. She sculpted the cliff face by hand in order to create a proper angle for terracing. In the end the work was successful at controlling runoff and stabilizing the soil, even though Reid broke a leg in the process. Reid would eventually retire from doing the work, but her efforts were recognized by President Ronald Reagan who presented her with a proclamation and a letter of commendation in 1986.

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Hitting museum status

The following year, a museum was established inside the lighthouse by the Montauk Historical Society and a room was dedicated to her. Since the lighthouse was now a public museum, there was even more of a need to continue the erosion project and to find funding to do it. At the time, Donohue constructed his own sea wall in an attempt to stabilize the cliffs. He in collaboration with the Coast Guard, Montauk Historical Society, and the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, built the 1,300foot seawall made from 28,00 tons of stone. He said, “I’m proud to say that it’s still intact. The extra heavy metal stakes that I used to support the cliff 34 years ago, are still there, still functioning and supporting.” Donohue would eventually become the Montauk Point Lighthouse Director of Erosion Control. He also tried to garner funding, which included organizing events like clambakes, but it wasn’t enough. Then members of the Montauk Historical Society heard that the singer, Paul Simon, who lived not far from the lighthouse was practicing with his band in WestHampton for a Graceland International Tour. Donohue said, “They asked Paul if he could maybe sing a song for us. He ended up doing a show for

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

us with his band and raised $585,000 for our erosion project.” After this, two major storms in 1991 eroded the cliffs further stressing the need for more money and erosion control work. Not long after this, a miracle happened. At the time, he landscaped for a man that lived down the road from the lighthouse. This man was soon to become New York Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan’s son-in-law. When Moynihan heard about the lighthouse’s need for funding, he was able to get the ball rolling to provide funding to the Army Corps to eventually conduct a study of the area. When the Army Corps completed its study, it was determined that a rock seawall of about 28,000-tons could protect the lighthouse from erosion, so the Coast Guard engineers in collaboration with the Montauk Historical Society, and Parks Department constructed a 770-feet long seawall with the Army Corps’ consultation. The work proved to be successful, and the project was able to withstand several storms. In 1996, the Montauk Historical Society took ownership of the lighthouse property and expressed interest in continuing the Army Corps’ study to address long term needs of the erosion control project. Then Hurricane Sandy came to the New York region in October 2012. Sandy’s intense winds and storm surge created erosion all along the New York State shoreline, but thankfully there wasn’t tremendous damage to the cliffs at the lighthouse, but there was further weakening of the previous stonework. The Army Corps received funding and authority to restore this with the Hurricane Sandy Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 or “Sandy Bill.” The funding was used to start the Montauk Point Coastal Resiliency Project that further strengthened the stonework that surrounds the lighthouse from more frequent intense storms and sea level rise. “The reason this funding was so important is that there has never been an engineered plan to correctly stabilize these cliffs,” Donohue says. “We’ve always done this piecemeal, so it’s exciting that we now have a specific plan


CIRCLE NO. 55


to stabilize these cliffs to withstand even the most powerful storms and hurricanes.” This project was performed by the Army Corps in cooperation with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Montauk Historical Society, New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation, Town of East Hampton, and Army Corps Contractor, H&L Contracting of Hauppauge, New York. Frank Verga, project manager, New York District, US Army Corps of Engineers, who has worked on this project for 26 years, says the project is designed to shore up the beachfront surrounding the historic Montauk Point Lighthouse to protect it from future coastal storms. This work was recently completed and included expanding the stone seawall around the base of Turtle Hill. The wall was nearly doubled in width and breadth, using more than 60,000 tons of granite boulders to broaden the flanks of the wall, cutting Turtle Cove about in half, and forming a new seaward bulge at the face of the point with two flattened “benches” to allow foot traffic to cross the front of the seawall. “When the last stone was set, Frank sent an email to the team saying, ‘Everybody we really did a good thing here,’” Donohue says. While the Army Corps was performing this work the Montauk Historical Society was conducting a major renovation of the exterior of the lighthouse that included installing a new iron cap on the top of the tower to stop water leaking, restoring the joints between the sandstone blocks that make up the main section of the tower, and repainting the white tower and freshening up its red belt. A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held to celebrate the completion of the erosion control project and renovation. Donohue said, “During the ceremony Frank apologized

Giorgina Reid performing her work. Credit: Montauk Point Lighthouse Archive.

that the project took so long. I thought this was hilarious because the project just had to evolve in its own way, and it did. I told him, ‘Frank look, look down at the wall we built.’” “Georgina would be proud of this work,” Donohue says of Reid, who passed away in 2001. “It has been 53 years since she showed up with all of her chutzpah and sassiness, and said, ‘Get out of my way, boys. I’m here! Okay? I’m going to take over’

and she sure did. She planted a seed and then all these little good things happened. This project turned into an incredible testament to professionalism, to people listening to each other and communicating. Hats off to the Congress, the State legislature for funding, and all of the engineers and the Army Corps. Today, families are visiting this national historic landmark and fishermen are using the wall.”

Dr. JoAnne Castagna is a public affairs specialist and writer for the US Army Corps of Engineers, New York District. She can be reached at joanne.castagna@usace.army.mil. Footnote: Sources: “On Eagle’s Beak,” by Henry Osmers www.montaukhistoricalsociety.org

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CIRCLE NO. 28


INDUSTRY

WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION

The mantle of mentorship Tips for managing and optimizing mentor/mentee relationships

F

rom big picture career path counsel to help with job-specific tasks and strategies, mentorship is critical to success in every business sector. It’s a tool that every professional

should have in their toolbox—whether as mentor or as mentee.

Krystal Vasquez and John Catanese, Senior Vice President of Business Development, Chain Store Maintenance – an MCS Company.

As a mentor, it’s rewarding and uplifting to provide guidance in terms of what’s realistic and what’s not while, as a mentee, it can help with overcoming self-doubt to help you see the forest through the trees.

Finding the Right Mentor

When trying to identify the right person for you, look for someone whose experience aligns with your strengths as well as your weaknesses. The guidance you receive can be critical in terms of shining a light on what’s realistic and what’s not as your career progresses. Seeking out and finding the right mentor is important and I’ve found there are

126

three types of mentors who can help navigate a variety of career challenges while supporting and defining your career objectives: Natural mentors are the people in your life that you never officially asked to be a “mentor.” Perhaps they are a colleague, manager or friend. In my case, a personal friend who also is in the commercial construction and renovation industry, is always available for a check-in. She has helped me to better understand how to promote myself with humility and how to identify—and capitalize on—opportunities for growth. It is in her nature to be helpful and supportive.

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024

By Krystal Vasquez

Assigned mentors are matches that can be uncovered via networking and industry organizations based on career path, strengths and weaknesses and topics of interest. Find local chambers of commerce, trade groups and mentoring programs in your field or geographic location. I have been successful in finding mentors who have followed similar career paths and been paired with professionals who align with my strengths and weaknesses. Leaders within your company often are excellent resources for mentorship specific to your professional growth within your organization. I have worked with John Catanese, Senior VP at Chain Store Maintenance – an MCS Company, for 14 years and, directly or indirectly, his support has been invaluable in terms of his knowledge of the industry, his willingness to be a “coach” and his incredible commitment to supporting his team. He has always encouraged me to explore new roles within the company and spread my wings, making a concerted effort to introduce me to everyone in the room and sharing his expertise to further my growth. I aspire to do the same for others through my career. I have learned that the right mentor should be someone you respect for their work, their ethos, and/or their personality and someone with whom you are comfortable talking about both the good and the bad things happening along your career path. But, it’s up to you to identify committees, networking groups and professional organizations that can be useful to you as a mentor or mentee.

Maximizing Mentorship

One of the best ways to maximize this relationship is to always be respectful of your mentor’s time. Whether your mentor is a


peer, a manager, a friend, a school alumnus or a family member, it is important that you are committed to “doing the work.” You shouldn’t have to chase them down, but at the same time, you need to show that you are also committed to the relationship. But the only way to ensure a successful relationship is to put forth your concerns in a thoughtful way to ensure your mentor is prepared to work with you on the topic. Be prompt. Be prepared. Do the work. And, show up when you say you are going to show up. After all, it is a two-way street. Make sure to schedule regular meetings with your mentor and prepare for the meetings by sharing your questions and topics for discussion ahead of the meeting. Have a clear objective for the meeting to ensure you are using everyone’s time wisely. If you find yourself in a position where you always have to seek out the person’s time, they may not be the right mentor for you. I have learned that you won’t get anything you don’t ask for and that holds true for professional pursuits as well as a mentor/mentee relationship.

Being a Mentor

I credit my mentors for giving me the know-how to “give back” and help others along their career paths. My understanding of how to maximize the benefits of the mentor/mentee relationship is directly correlated to a combination of what I’ve learned from mentors and my own experience in the workplace. There was a time when I found it challenging to self-promote and it’s a common topic of discussion in the mentor/mentee relationship, one on which I’ve received guidance from many mentors. It is important to understand the nuance of advocating for yourself, especially when it comes to touting your accomplishments, without coming off as arrogant or bragging. And, it is an important skill that is learned over time but can

Chain Store Maintenance – an MCS Company team: (Left to right) Maryclaire McCarthy (Director of Operations), Krystal Vasquez, John Catanese, Laura Riendeau (Director of Accounts), Milissa Garrity (Director of Accounts).

I have learned that the right mentor should be someone you respect for their work, their ethos, and/or their personality and someone with whom you are comfortable talking about both the good and the bad things happening along your career path. be much easier to surmount with the sage advice of a trusted ally. In short, no one person knows all things and we often learn from our own mentors how to be a good mentor for others. By entering into a mentor/mentee relationship, we can better create solutions to the challenges we might face—whether specific to an industry or project or the all-too-common self-doubt that might creep into our

minds around the many moving parts along our career paths. From getting started in a particular sector or embracing the culture of a firm to maximizing growth opportunities throughout your career while supporting your own company and colleagues, mentorship is one of the most important tools every professional should have in their toolbox. CCR

Krystal Vasquez, CRFP, ProFM, is Director of Accounts for Chain Store Maintenance – an MCS Company. Vasques, who has been in the FM industry since 2009, specializes in relationship development, mentorship and solution building. You can reach her at krystal.vasquez@chainstore.com.

ISSUE 1, 2024 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

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PROJECTS

CCD

Commercial Construction Data The following is a brief report on new commercial construction projects. The information is presented as a service of ConstructConnect. For more information, visit projects.constructconnect.com. PROJECT NAME

CITY

PROJECT VALUE

McDonald's / Shelton

Shelton, CT

$1,000,000.00

Tolland Food Stop

Tolland, CT

$800,000.00

Taco Bell - Hogan Road / Bangor

Bangor, ME

$800,000.00

Raising Cane's / Framingham

Framingham, MA

Point Drive Car Dealership

SQ. FT.

CONSTRUCTION TYPE

START DATE

3,690

New Construction

Q3 2024

3,080

New Construction

Q2 2024

2,537

New Construction

Q2 2024

$600,000.00

3,331

New Construction

Q3 2024

Bedford, NH

$10,000,000.00

68,600

New Construction

Q2 2024

Commerce Drive Motorcycle and Scooter Dealership

Fairfield, CT

$400,000.00

9,614

Renovation

Q2 2024

Berlin Turnpike Cannabis Retailer

Newington, CT

$300,000.00

6,807

Renovation

Q3 2024

South Harbor Site

Lynn, MA

$450,000,000.00

1,100,000

New Construction

Q3 2024

Clock Shop Lofts

Burlington, VT

$200,000,000.00

110,000

New Construction

Q2 2024

Mission Hill Parcel 25

Boston, MA

$138,000,000.00

305,000

New Construction

Q1 2024

College Street Multi-Residential Development

New Haven, CT

$50,000,000.00

130,000

Remodeling

Q3 2024

Newport, RI

$38,000,000.00

113,563

New Construction

Q3 2024

RETAIL/RESTAURANTS/QUICK SERVE:

RETAIL/STORES/MALLS:

RESIDENTIAL/MIXED USE:

HOSPITALITY: Waites Wharf Hotel Development iPark Hotel

Wilton, CT

$30,000,000.00

300,000

New Construction

Q1 2024

Boylston Street Hotel

Boston, MA

$20,000,000.00

184,000

New Construction

Q1 2024

Hampton Inn / Redding

Ridgefield, CT

$18,000,000.00

46,222

New Construction

Q3 2024

Beta Technologies

South Burlington, VT

$65,000,000.00

482,400

New Construction

Q3 2024

New W.R. Peck Middle School

Holyoke, MA

$55,000,000.00

105,000

New Construction

Q3 2024

Hopkins School Addition

Hopkinton, MA

$49,000,000.00

27,000

Remodeling

Q4 2024

Colonel Ledyard School

Ledyard, CT

$10,000,000.00

33,000

New Construction

Q2 2024

Boston Inpatient Cancer Care Hospital

Boston, MA

$1,680,000,000.00

688,100

New Construction

Q3 2024

EDUCATION:

MEDICAL:

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Fair Haven Community Health Expansion

New Haven, CT

$25,000,000.00

33,500

New Construction

Q1 2024

Howard Center Mental Health Crisis Center

Burlington, VT

$10,000,000.00

51,000

New Construction

Q2 2024

HHC Plainfield Surgery Center

Plainfield, CT

$5,500,000.00

13,000

Renovation

Q3 2024

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


projects.constructconnect.com. projects.constructconnect.com.

ccsales@constructconnect.com CIRCLE NO. 57

ccsales@constructconnect.com


ADVERTISER INDEX

SERVICE TO OUR READERS

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

Advertiser Page Reader Service No.

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Jones Architectural Creations

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Alutec

83

39

Lakeview Construction, Inc

9

7

ArcVision

59

27

MBH arch

69

32

Authorized

76-77

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Mike Levin

8, 121

5, 54

AVP Coating

43

20

Modulex

109

50

Bradley

31

15

National Terrazzo & Mosaic Assocation

97

45

Bureau Veritas

71

33

Navien

5

3

Capacity Builders

119

53

Onyx Creative

73

34

CEI

55

25

Propane Education & Research Council

99

46

Commercial Construction Coffee Talk Podcast

18

11

Permit.com

17

10

Commercial Construction & Renovation Buyers Guide Directory

78

37

Poma Retail Development, Inc

88-89

42

Commercial Construction & Renovation Project Profile Awards 2024

Porcelanosa

112-113

51

37

18

PSCO Sign Group

87

41

Connect Source Consulting Group

102

48 Project Management Consortium (PMC)

48-49

23

Construct Connect

129

57

ConstructEDU

27

14

Prime-net

23

12

Construction One

13

9

Retail Contractors Association

25

13

Core States Group

61

28

Rockerz, Inc.

7

4

CPH Corp

67

31

Schimenti

8, CVR4

6, 59

Creative Edge

85

40

Secure Data

123

55

Eno Enterprises

57

26

Serigraphics

53

24

EquipmentShare

81

38

SignWave Elite

CVR 2-1

1

47, 63

22, 29

Thomas Consultants Inc.

100-101

47

Gensis Lighting Solutions

3

2

Tricarico Architecture and Design PC

75

35

GEO Week

107

49

Viking

114

52

Goodwin Commercial

125

56

Window Film Depot

CV3

58

Hunter Building Corp

41

19

Wolverine Building Group

33

16

Impact Security

11

8

ZipWall

35

17

Fishbeck

130

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


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ISSUE 1, 2024 — COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION

131


PUBLISHER’S PAGE

by David Corson

20 tips for being a better you in 2024 W

e are now one month into the New Year and many are busier than ever, as it is better to be busy than not. Last year, I spent my time getting an MBA for Online Digital Marketing. Many of the lessons learned have been implemented on our websites and in our marketing efforts. I also used them in my daily routine. Remember, every second counts, so you have to make the best of each one. I have been nurturing my online presence every day, looking at the lists of things that can help my daily routine. Through my research, I have found many things that can help improve myself and life in general. Check out the tips below, which you can apply to your daily routine. Hopefully they can help you live your life to the fullest and be happy:

20 things mentally strong people do: 1.

They move on. They don't waste time feeling sorry about themselves.

2.

They embrace change, they welcome challenges.

3.

They stay happy. They don't waste energy on things they cannot control.

4.

They are kind, fair and not scared to speak up.

5.

They are willing to take calculated risks.

6.

They celebrate other people's success. They don't resent that success.

7.

They don’t surround themselves with people who are negative.

8.

They don't seek attention.

9.

They are not concerned about being liked.

10. They can tell when others are full of it. 11. They are comfortable in their own skin. 12. They do what they say and say what they mean. 13. They don't need a lot of stuff. 14. They are not thin skinned. 15. They are not overly modest or boastful. 16. They are consistent. 17. They practice what they preach. 18. They stand up straight with shoulders back. 19. They tell the truth and never lie. 20. They assume the person you are listening to might know something they don't. If you haven't thought about any of these things, try them every day in 2024 and see what happens by the end of the year. I'm confident you will see a better you and so will your peers. I always say, the day you stop learning is the day you should go and do something else. We eagerly anticipate a vibrant year ahead with CCR, filled with engaging monthly receptions starting in April, alongside a series of delightful surprises we plan to unveil in due course. Here’s to embarking on safe journeys, maintaining good health, and having fun in all your endeavors. And, as always, “Keep the Faith.”

132

COMMERCIAL CONSTRUCTION & RENOVATION — ISSUE 1, 2024


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