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In This Issue

Fishing and Nautical Knots .........................................................5 Boating Safety . ......................................................................... 9-11 First Aid ..................................................................................... 13-25 Aids to Navigation . ......................................................................27 Bridge openings.............................................................................29 Responsible Boating . ...................................................................31 Seas of Green............................................................................ 34-39 Green Boating Tips.................................................................. 41-43 Life Jackets................................................................................. 44-47 Child Safety.....................................................................................48 How to Boat Smart: Navigating Buoys ............................. 51-55 Hurricane Preparation Guide . ............................................ 57-59 Carbon Monoxide Safety.............................................................61 Boat Safety Checklist ..................................................................65 Index .......................................................................................... 67-68

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FISHING & NAUTICAL KNOTS

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Boating Safety ACCIDENT REPORTING Boat Operators involved in an accident must provide their name, address and;! Vessel registration to other involved parties, provide assistance and, in case of death or disappearance report the accident to law enforcement officials, Boat operators or owners must also make a written report of a boating accident to the Department of Boating and Waterways when: 1. A person dies 2. Personal Injury requiring medical treatment beyond first aid 3. Total vessel damage exceeding $500 4. Complete loss of the vessel 5. Disappearance of a person or persons from suspected Injury or death. This report must be made within 48 hours of the accident in cases involving disappearance, a death that occurs within 24 hours of the accident, or injury that requires medical attention beyond first aid. If you are unsure about how to report a boating accident, simply call the Coast Guard’s toll-free BOATING SAFETY Hotline at 1-800:368-5641 for information.

CAPSIZING If the boat is too large or heavy to right by yourself, do not attempt to swim away; STAY WITH THE BOAT and wait to be rescued. KEEP YOUR LIFE JACKET ON. If the boat is small and light enough to right, swim around the boat and grab or climb on the windward rail (the side of the boat sticking up in the air) to pull the hull back in the water. If your boat has a centerboard, pull down or stand on it to see-saw the boat upright. If it’s a sailboat, uncleat the sheets (lines) that hold the sails in place. If you don’t, the sails can fill with air as soon as the boat is righted and tip it over again.

MAN OVERBOARD If YOU fall overboard, your main concern is to stay afloat. If you are not wearing a life jacket and cannot grab a personal flotation device, try to catch air in your clothing for buoyancy. In cold water, don’t expend too much energy; tread water very slowly, or if wearing a life jacket, assume the huddled HELP. (Heat Escape lessening Posture) position to conserve body heat. Try to make your head and shoulders as visible as possible so rescuers can spot you. If SOMEONE ELSE falls overboard, immediately steer the vessel toward the side he fell off. Post a lookout. Throw the victim a life ring or other personal floatation device, plus a lifeline with a bowline loop at the end to slip over his body and under his arms. If available, throw out a manoverboard pole, a buoyed continued on page 11

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Boating Safety

continued from page 9

counterweighted pole with a highly visible flag on top to alert other boaters of the victim’s presence and to mark the spot for the rescue. boat. Stop the forward progress of the boat by taking the engine out of gear, or by luffing the sails on 11 non·-powered sailboat. Alter your course 90 degrees end prepare to come alongside the victim for rescue.

RESCUING A VICTIM WITH YOUR BOAT When coming alongside someone in the water to perform a rescue from your boat, if possible, pick the victim up on the windward (upwind) side of the boat (the approach suggested by the American Red Cross and the United States Yacht Racing Union). Put the engine in neutral as soon as you are next to the victim so there is no propeller turning which might cause serious injury. Put a sturdy swimmer’s ladder over the side and have at least one crew member put on a life jacket and prepare to help the victim. If the victim is unconscious or unable to climb the ladder or assist in his own rescue (which is especially difficult in rough seas), be may need to be hauled onboard by several crew members, either by a lifeline or by his clothing. An alternate rescue method suggested by the Coast Guard Is to have someone onboard stand on one end of a blanket or net. The opposite end should be placed under and then wrapped over the victim and pulled by the person overboard. By doing so you can roll the victim out of the water and onto the boat.

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First Aid SUPPLIES When available, generic medications are listed. Prescription medications and supplies are in bold. Always carry extra supplies of prescription medications and glasses or contact lenses that are normally prescribed for your passengers or crew. Remember to always check if someone has an allergy to a medication before administering it to them. All immunizations, both routine and for travelers, should be up to date for both children and adults, prior to leaving on an extended voyage. Check your supplies at least yearly and replace all materials past or approaching the expiration date printed on the package.

MEDICAL SEA CHEST Typical supply check list for a recreational vessel with 4 to 6 passengers for an extended cruise. ANESTHETIC • Lldocalne 1% (injection) SKIN PREPARATION • Isopropyl alcohol • Antibacterial cleanser • Hydrogen peroxide • Toinaftate powder and cream • Clotrimazole vaginal cream • Petroleum Jelly • Hydrocortisone 1% ointment • Sun screen and III’ balm • Silver sulfadiazine cream • Antibiotic ointment • Sterile saline for wound Irrigation • Zinc oxide ointment EARS/EYES/THROAT • Eye Irrigation solution • Sodium sulfacetamide eye antibiotic • Antibiotic ear solution or suspension • Temporary dental cement • Oil of cloves • ASTHMA AND ALLERGY WOUND CARE • Epinephrine (1:1000) for Injection • Asthma Inhaler (not epinephrine) • Diphenhydramine 25 mg capsules HEART • Nitroglycerin 0.3 or 0.4 mg tablets

• Nitroglycerin 2% ointment ANTI-MOTION SICKNESS • Meclizlne or Dimenhydrinate tablets • Scopolamine patches • Trlmethobenzamide, prochlorperazine, or promethazine suppositories DIGESTIVE SYSTEM • Antacids • Imodium liquid or tablets • Milk of magnesia • Suppositories with hydrocortisone PAIN Relievers • Acetaminophen Tablets and for Children • Aspirin • Ibuprofen ANTIBIOTICS • Amoxicillin 250 mg tablets and for children • Cephalexln 250 mg capsules • Erythromycin 250 mg tablets • TMP/Sulfa OS tablets and suspension MISC. MEDICATIONS • Instant glucose syrup SUPPLIES • Cotton tip applicators • Blood pressure cuff • Stethoscope • Bandage scissors • Splinter forceps

• • • • •

Syringes and needles Thermometers Pediatric rectal Adult oral or rectal Hypothermic

COMMON COLD • Pseudoephedrine 30 mg tablets • Gualfenesln DM cough syrup WOUND CARE • Assorted adhesive dressings • Elastic wraps • Sterile gauze pads • Sterile gauze rolls • Triangular bandages • Cloth and hypoallergenic tape • Eye patches • Wound closure strips • Suturing kit and suture SPLINTING MATERIAL • Neck (cervical hard collar) • Arm/wrist/hand • Finger • Leg/ankle/foot MISCELLANEOUS • Pocket mouth to mask breather • Sterile and non-sterile latex gloves • Sharps box· • Oxygen bottle, tubing and mask • Bladder catheter kit • Tongue blades continued on page 15

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First Aid continued from page 13

RESCUE BREATHING Life depends on oxygen rich blood reaching the brain. When a person Is not spontaneously breathing, Rescue Breathing, previously called mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, Is required. To assess if Rescue Breathing is needed: Look at the victim’s chest to see if it Is rising and failing Listen near the victim’s mouth and nose for the sound of respiration Feel using your cheek, for air moving from the victim’s mouth and nose WHEN BREATHING STOPS, WHATEVER THE CAUSE, CALL FOR HELP AND BEGIN RESCUE BREATHING Steps to Begin Rescue Breathing: 1. Lay the victim on their back on a firm surface. (A firm surface Is required If CPR must be initiated.) 2. The rescuer should place the heel of his/her hand closest to the victim’s head on the victim’s forehead to tilt the head back. While head tilt is important. over extending the neck may restrict the airway. In general, adults need the greatest angle of head tilt, children less, and infants the least. For victims with suspected neck Injury, It Is recommended to limit head tilt to a minimum while opening the airway by lifting the Jaw and holding the chin. 3. Using the hand which Is keeping the head extended, pinch the nostrils closed with the thumb and forefinger. 4. Lift the victim’s chin with your hand nearest the victim’s feet. (Not necessary to lift an infants Jaw, although you may wish to support the chin while you are administering breaths.) 5. Take a deep breath. (For children and infants, reduce the amount of breath you administer. You are administering the right amount if you can see their chest rise fully when you exhale and breathe into them.) 6. Open your mouth wide and seal your lips around the victim’s mouth or around the mouth to mask breathing device. If you cannot get a good seal, close the mouth while keeping the head’ tilted and place your mouth over the nose of the victim to administer the breaths. continued on page 17

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First Aid

continued from page 15

For Infants and small children, you should seal your lips around the victims mouth and nose. 7. Give 2 slow breaths. Breathe Into the victim until their chest gently rises. If the breath does not go in, or if the chest does not rise, re-tilt the head, make sure you are lifting the chin appropriately, and try again. 8. If water or vomit begins to come out of the mouth, turn the victim’s head or body to the side, sweep out the debris, re-position them on their back and continue. If a neck Injury Is suspected, always roll the victim keeping the neck and back in alignment 9. Check for a pulse. In adults, the carotid pulse In the neck Just to the side of the midline is recommended. For Infants, the brachial pulse located on the Inside of the upper arm is recommended. Depress the area for 5-10 seconds using 2-3 fingers to feel for a pulse. (Do not use your thumb or you will feel your own pulse.) If a pulse is present, count the rate for 15 seconds and multiply that number by 4. Normal pulse ranges are listed below. Normal Pulse Ranges Adult........................................................ 60-80 Children.................................................. 80-100 Infants to 2 year olds........................... 100-120 10. If a pulse is present, continue rescue breathing by giving 1 slow breath every: 5 seconds for an adult 3 seconds for a child or Infant 11. Recheck pulse and breathing about every 1·2 minutes 12. Continue rescue breathing as long as a pulse is present, but the person Is not breathing. 13. If the pulse stops begin CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation).

continued on page 19

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First Aid continued from page 17

CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation) before beginning CPR, rescue breathing should have begun. Chest compressions are only necessary if a pulse is not present. • After two breaths are administered, begin chest compressions. • Locate the sternum by following the curve of the ribs to the midline of the chest. • Measure three finger breadths up from that point and place the heel of your right hand over the sternum. (For adults and children this Is in the middle 1/3 of the sternum. For Infants, place fingertips of one hand on the lower 1/3 of the sternum or between the nipples.) • Place your left hand over the right. (For adults only. For children use only 1 hand.) • Apply pressure vertically down from the shoulder, keeping your elbows straight and using your body weight as compressing force. • Continue cardiac compressions and rescue breathing at the ratio of 15 cardiac compressions to 2 breaths. • Recheck for pulse and respirations every 1·2 minutes. • CPR should be discontinued when professional assistance arrives, the victim’s condition is improved. or the rescuer is exhausted and unable to continue. CPR should continue while further recommendations are obtained from a maritime physician consulting service. The rate, depth, and hand usage to give compressions are as follows: Victim Adult Child (1-8 yrs.) Infant (To 1 yr.)

Depth 1.5 . 2 inches 1 Inch 0.5 Inch

Rate/Minute 60 80 100

Hand Usage 2 hands 1 hand 2 fingers

CHOKING Conscious Choking Victim: Assess If assistance Is needed. Ask: Are you choking? Can you speak? As long as the victim can cough forcefully, stay nearby and encourage his coughing effort. If the victim’s cough becomes weak or they can no longer breath, give abdominal thrusts. Technique for Conscious Adults and Children In a Standing or Sitting Position: Stand behind the victim wrapping your arms around the victim’s waist. Make a fist with one hand placing the thumb side against the victim’s abdomen, just·above the naval. Grasp your fist with your other hand. Administer 5 forceful and rapid upward thrusts, Se careful to remove pressure completely between thrusts. You may not need to thrust as firmly on a child. Repeat until the object Is cleared or the victim becomes unconscious. continued on page 21

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First Aid continued from page 19

Technique for Infants (Either Conscious or Unconscious) Cradle Infant face down over your forearm with the head pointed down toward the floor. Administer 5 blows on the back between the shoulders. Turn the Infant over, while balancing him or her on your arm & administer 5 chest thrusts (compressions 1/2 inch deep In center of the breastbone) between the nipples. Lift the jaw and tongue to determine If the object causing the airway obstruction is present. If so, use your finger to carefully sweep it out. Be careful not inadvertently push the object back down into the airway. Unconscious Choking Victim: Attempt rescue breathing as described in the previous section. If air will still not go in, place the heel of one hand against the middle of the abdomen just above the naval. Place the other hand over the hand on the abdomen and give forceful upward abdominal thrusts. Lift the Jaw and tongue to check for the obstructing object. If seen, sweep It out with a finger. If you cannot see anything do not sweep. Tilt head back and attempt to give breaths again. Continue until breaths can be given. Once the object is removed, continue rescue breathing until the victim is spontaneously breathing. Monitor the victim closely. If the victim’s airway has been blocked for more than a minute, It Is advisable to contact a medical consultation service immediately or an emergency medical service if in port.

NEAR· DROWNING When lack of breathing is known to have been caused from near-drowning, It Is helpful to place the victim’s body at an angle in which the head is slightly lower than the body. This facilitates drainage of water from the lungs & reduces the risk of re-inhaling these fluids. Be prepared for water to sputter or gush from the victim. Turn the victim’s head to one side so it does not enter the lungs. (Again, remember to roll the head & body in unison if a neck Injury is suspected.) The victim may spontaneously begin breathing which may begin by coughing & gasping for breath. This is a good sign. If breathing does not spontaneously return, continue rescue breathing and/or CPR. It is advisable to contact a medical consultation service for further recommendations for care at sea, After resuscitation, watch a near drowning victim carefully for 24 hours. If near medical facilities, it is advisable to have the victim checked by a physician.

SPECIAL MARITIME MEDICAL CONSIDERATIONS Hypothermia Hypothermia results from the loss of body heat. Chances of developing hypothermia on deck are decreased by staying out of the wind. keeping dry. wearing layers of continued on page 25

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No need for a marine technician. Our Barnacle Buster™ and Port-O-Flush Jr.™ can easily be used to flush out all internal parts of sea water cooled systems like main engines, generators and air conditioning. With minimal dismantling needed, Barnacle Buster™ is faster and more economical than any other mechanical option, and is safe to use, non toxic and biodegradable. Port-O-Flush Jr.™

For product information, contact your supplier or phone us directly at 954.987.2722 Visit our TECH DATA page online at www.trac-online.com for more information and detailed instructions.

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First Aid continued from page 21

wool or synthetic clothing such as polypropylene, keeping active but not to the point at perspiration, and by not consuming alcoholic beverages. In the water, activity and maintaining the Heat Escape Lessening Posture (HELP) with the head out of the water, arms curled around the personal floatation device, legs crossed, bent at the knees and drawn up to the chest will help maintain body heat. Huddling with others in the water will slow heat loss as well. Early symptoms of hypothermia Include: shivering. muscle stiffness. And lethargy which progresses to muscle rigidity, slow heart rate, confusion and later, loss of consciousness. Once the victim is removed from the water their Airway, Breathing, and Circulation (ABC) should be assessed. If neither pulse or respiration is present, CPR should begin immediately (refer to rescue breathing and CPR, sections on p. 11). Medical consultation should be Obtained to guide continued resuscitative efforts and for ail unconscious victims of hypothermia. Victims should be brought into the vessel cabin while rescue breathing or CPR Is continued. wet cloth”, removed. and their body wrapped in dry blankets. The only reliable method of determining their core body temperature Is with a rectal hypothermic thermometer pieced approximately one Inch (2 cm) Into the rectum. Since rewarming with a core temperature below 90.5 F (32 C) is extremely difficult and risky. medical consultation is recommended, if a thermometer is unavailable and they are alert. or If the rectal core temperature is above 90.5 F actively warming them by skin to skin contact with another crew member. wrapping both Individuals In blankets, administering sips of warm liquid. and encouraging the victim to gently exercise is reasonable. Medical consultation for further recommendations is appropriate.

LIFE EXPECTANCY IN WATER 4hr 3hr

Lethal

100% expectancy of death

2hr

Marginal

50% expectancy of unconsciousness which will probably result in drowning

1hr 0hr

Safe Zone 30°

40°

50°

60°

70° continued on page 41

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A i d s t o n av i g a t i o n Lateral System (Federal) The waters of the United States are marked for safe navigation by the lateral system of buoyage. This system employs II simple arrangement of colors, shapes, numbers and light characteristics to show the side on which II buoy should be passed when proceeding in a given direction. The characteristics are determined by the position of the buoy with respect to the navigable channels as the channels are entered from seaward. The expression “red right returning” has long been used by the .seafarer as a reminder that the red buoys are passed on the starboard (right) side when proceeding from the open sea into port (upstream). Likewise, green buoys are passed on the post (left) side, Conversely, when proceeding toward the sea or leaving port, red buoys are passed on the port side end green buoys on the starboard side. Red buoys are always even-numbered. Green buoys are odd-numbered. Red and white vertically stripped buoys mark the center of the channel.

MOORING TO BUOYS Tying up or hanging on to any navigation buoy (except a mooring buoy) or beacon is prohibited.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION In recent years, modification to certain aids to navigation located on coastal and Inland waters have been completed. These changes apply to aids used In both the lateral and state waterway marking systems. See charts that follow: • Port-hand buoys are painted green, with green fixed or flashing lights. • Starboard-hand buoys are painted red, with red fixed or flashing lights. • Safe water buoys, also called mldchannel or fairway buoys, and approach buoys are painted with red and white vertical stripes, with flashing lights. • Preferred channel, or junction buoys, are painted with red end green horizontal bands, with flashing lights. • Special marks (traffic separation, anchorage areas, dredging, fish net areas, etc.) are painted yellow. If lighted, the light may be fixed or flashing.

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Miami Area Bridge openings Location Bridge

FT

Opening Schedule

Fort Lauderdale

S.R. 816, Oakland Park Blvd.

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Opens on the quarter hour and threequarter hour.

Fort Lauderdale

Sunrise Blvd. (S.R. 838)

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The draw shall open on the hour and half-hour. On the first weekend in May, the draw need not open from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, and, on the first Saturday in May, the draw need not open from 9:45 p.m. to 10:45 p.m.

Fort Lauderdale

Las Olas Blvd.

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The draw shall open on the quarter hour and three-quarter hour. On the first weekend in May, the draw need not open from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday, and, on the first Saturday in May, the draw need not open from 9:45 p.m. to 10:45 p.m.

Fort Lauderdale

Brooks Memorial, (S.E. 17th St.)

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(This is a fixed bridge)

Dania

Dania Beach Blvd.

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Opens on the hour and half-hour.

Hollywood Beach

Sheridan Ave.

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Opens on the quarter hour and threequarter hour.

Hollywood Beach

S.R. 820, Hollywood Blvd.

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Opens on the hour and half-hour.

Hallandale

Hallandale Beach Blvd. (S.R. 824)

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Opens on the quarter hour and threequarter hour.

Sunny Isles

S.R. 826, N.E. 163rd

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No openings Monday thru Friday, 7 am to 6 pm and 10 am to 6 pm Saturday, Sunday and Federal holidays on quarter and three quarter hour.

Bay Harbor

Broad Causeway

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No openings 8 am to 6 pm except on quarter and three quarter hour.

Miami

79th St. J.F.K. Causeway

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No regulations, opens on demand.

Miami

36th St. Julia Tuttle Causeway

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(This is a fixed bridge)

Miami

Venetian Causeway 12 (West Span)

The draw shall open on signal, except from 7 am to 7 pm, Monday thru Friday, except Federal holidays, the bridge need only open on the hour and half-hour.

Miami

Dodge Island Causeway

Draw is open except for trains.

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Responsible boating The responsible boater does not drink and operate a boat However, if your do drink while Boating, one important tip to remember is that time is the only way to sober up. Remedies such as black coffee, splashing cold water on your face, or fresh air have no effect on blood alcohol levels. Some ways to minimize the effects of alcohol include: • Eat before and while drinking. • Do not drink alcohol if you are on medication. • Use moderation. The more you drink, the longer it takes to sober up. • Remember that stress factors and fatigue lower your tolerance to alcohol. The best advice is let someone who is sober operate the boat. For your safety and the safety of others, designate a sober operator. Even passengers increase their risk of accident if they drink alcohol. The Department of Boating and Waterways’ 199.3 Accident Report found that in 66% of all alcohol- related fatalities, the victims fell overboard and drowned. In 41% of all alcohol-related fatalities, intoxicated passengers were the victims of. or contributed to, the accidents. These findings contradict the “designated driver” concept, which is now popular in some boating safety literature. The idea of designating a sober operator has its roots in automobile safety. where the possibility of drowning is not a factor, and may impart a false sense of safety if applied to boating. Persons drinking alcohol on a vessel and falling overboard face the further danger of hypothermia, a condition in which the body loses heat faster than it can produce it, causing a dangerous lowering of body temperature. Death can result if the body temperature drops too low. Alcohol greatly increases the effects of hypothermia, including disorientation, hyperventilation, involuntary taking of water into the lungs. heart attack and numbness, resulting in the loss of the ability to self-rescue. Boating and Waterways recommends that neither boat operators nor passengers drink alcoholic beverages while boating.

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Seas of Green by Jason Y. Wood

Technology is moving yachting in more environmentally friendly directions. Here’s where it is going, and some easy ways you can hop on board early.

Yacht technology is on the move, from super-efficient propulsion systems to squeakyclean electricity, from slippery sections that glide through the water to lightweight hulls built without a drop more resin than they need. Things are moving so quickly that a boat's lines are now sometimes drawn with open spaces where the enginerooms, fuel tanks, even battery banks, will go. The philosophy seems to be: "leave those for as long as you can, and see what will be available to fill the space and the needs." The bottom line is that boats may begin to function differently than

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they ever have before. the evolution of yacht design is taking a sharp turn toward efficiency—of propulsion systems, of hulls moving through the water, of electrical appliances and lights on board—and what's around the bend may affect how we use our boats and how they respond to the conditions we find at sea. Silent Running As with many developments and trends throughout yachting's history, custom design adds a distinctive voice to the conversation. Some designers do their best work when presented with a very specific challenge.

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So when a particular client approached Stephens Waring White Yacht Design (www.swwyachtdesign.com) in Brooklin, Maine, with a special challenge, yacht designer and partner Bob Stephens and his colleagues jumped at the chance.

"Their house is right on one of the most beautiful, unspoiled stretches of water I have ever seen. And they've been very accustomed to enjoying that water in various manual-powered craft: They have a peapod that they like to row and sea kayaks and also a nice daysailer. They were interested in expanding the range that they could cover with a boat, and so a powerboat made sense. So they were looking for a boat that would be low impact in the resources it would consume during its life and also low impact in the noise area. They're very, very keen on reducing its noise footprint." The boat took on an interesting new dimension as the designers began to review possible engines and propulsion systems. "We designed it based on a powerplant that was rumored to be coming

out," Stephens says. "And we now in fact have the powerplant in hand at [builders] French & Webb—so that's good!" The propulsion system is a hybrid drive, a 110-horsepower Steyr diesel with a motor-generator bolted to its aft end that also works as the starter motor for the engine. To get the silent running the clients wanted, the boat will have a bank of batteries to store the power generated by running with the diesel. "There's been a lot of development in Lithium-ion batteries since we designed the boat, and it's quite likely we will use them." says Stephens. "But we haven't been able to fully realize the advantage of those batteries because we designed the boat around the heavier lead-acid batteries." Interestingly, the Lithium-ion batteries allow systems to access more of the power they hold, so the system can have smaller capacity than it would need with lead-acid, yet improved performance. Upfront costs for a Lithium-ion bank are considerably higher—roughly six times the expected cost of the lead-acid batteries—but they will be easier to use over the life of the boat and will end up costing about a quarter as much as the leadacid batteries, which need regular replacement. But hybrids and batteries are not revolutionizing travel on the water as some would say they are on the roadway. "It's very difficult to continued on page 36

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make a tremendous impact as far as being green," says Stephens. "The savings that hybrid cars realize, for example, aren't really there in a boat because it just operates in a very different environment than a car. A car is constantly accelerating and decelerating. A boat is really a steady-state operation, so you can sort of predict your energy needs and they don't change much—there's no opportunity for regaining energy through regenerative braking or coasting down hills or anything like that. It just doesn't happen. So as far as saving resources there are two ways that this boat does that and the first is the low-resistance hull which I think is a really important point."

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The slippery hull owes some of its attributes to successful designs from William Atkin from the 1920s and '30s, right down to the small tunnel in the stern. "Even without the hybrid package, the boat would be a very efficient boat to operate with a small diesel," says Stephens. "And it would be very easy on fuel and so would reduce impact on the environment that way. And it does have a limited number of solar panels on the canopy. In Maine in the summertime [the solar array] will offer enough power to recharge the boat from a fully discharged state—with batteries at 50-percent capacity—in about five days or so. So it's not like the solar panels are going to keep the boat charged and you can run the boat without any diesel fuel.

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But they are there to help." This is how design evolves. The technologies at hand—or those that will soon be at hand—are combined in such a way to optimize certain attributes, in this case, one client's appreciation for the sound of water on a hull. From the Ground Up David Marlow, chairman of Marlow Yachts (www.marlowyachts.com), has some definite ideas about what it means to be green. As with seemingly everything he does, his standards are quite high. And his green initiatives extend to—or more accurately, began with—the construction of his factory campus in Chi Hu, China, where his boats are built. "Our policies have been, since the first shovel touched ground, to protect the environment by proactive movements to that end," says Marlow. "Before we began construction at the oceanfront property we bought, we removed 24 inches of topsoil, so that we could then cover the entire premises with crushed granite and pea gravel to act as a filter for all water on site, from washwater to rainfall. The perimeter of the property is surrounded by a hand-cut granite wall, extending six feet below grade to provide an impermeable wall should the unthinkable ever happen—a chemical or oil spill on site." The water reserved by this system is used to water vegetable gardens and fruit orchards that help to feed the 600-plus workers there. In addition, the company has begun a plantation to grow trees, including teak and mahogany, to mitigate its use of hardwoods in yacht production.

"Our yachts are a part and parcel of our environmental policies, with continuous research to lower resistance, [and] improve engineandhull-combination efficiency while reducing our carbon footprint," says Marlow. "In 2009, we introduced our solar-powered hardtop that produces enough free electricity each day to power 100 percent of the onboard appliances and entertainment systems, excepting air conditioning for any location south of Jacksonville, Florida." Marlow Yachts uses its proprietary Full Stack Infusion construction method, in which an entire hull is laminated in one shot with precisely measured modified epoxy resin. This process protects workers from exposure to dangerous chemical emissions from the process, while eliminating the waste created by multiple infusions and secondary laminating. According to Marlow, the construction results in less hull flex, which reduces the impact of forces that can cause delamination and makes the boats last longer— keeping the resources that went into them from ending up in a landfill, and preventing the owner from needing a replacement, at least until it's time to upgrade. continued on page 38

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"We treat [our workers] as the valuable assets they are, and do not allow them to expose themselves to danger in chemicals, unsafe practices, or defective tools and equipment," Marlow explains. "They respond by building the highest-technology yachts on earth, equal in engineering, finish, and materials with the world's finest." Marlow Yachts is also tweaking its designs to be more efficient. "On the hull design front, we have reduced the beam water line of all our yachts by approximately five percent, giving up approximately one half knot of top speed for a higher cruise speed and 10-percent reduction in fuel burn at cruise," says Marlow. "This was also assisted by a slight change in prismatic coefficient to provide a more slippery section and overall view to passing water." And since that water passes the hull more easily, the yacht uses less fuel and gains more range, and the carbon footprint of all aboard continues to shrink. Let It Shine "Once you go out on the DSe at six knots without any noise, you'll understand what you've been missing, and what you're missing is the noise," says Reuben Trane, president of Island Pilot (www.islandpilot.com). "Noise is called noise pollution." What Trane is talking about is what the sailors among us have known for a long time—the sound of the sea is part of the experience. And he gets that too, but he wants to have the amenities of a powerboat. That's where his DSe hybrid, a catamaran cruiser with diesel

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and electric propulsion and a huge array of solar panels, comes into play. "Now you have hybrid, the whole idea of this solar-powered boat is that you can get on the anchor and never run the diesel generator," says Trane. "You're living the pure life like a sailor, but you're in the lap of luxury like the worst stinkpotter out there. You've got air conditioning, you've got color satellite TV, refrigeration, ice cubes, microwave. You're living a very high quality of life, but without a generator banging away somewhere in the basement of the boat." Trane combines the latest technologies into one vessel to dial up the efficiency and make things work on finite power resources. And he's thought about where electricity, and the other resources that go into the boat come from. "Sucking power off the grid: That's not in and of itself a bad thing, unless that grid power is coming from a coalfired plant someplace, or an oil-fired plant," says Trane. "If it's coming from an atomic plant, or if it's coming from hydroelectric or a wind farm or a solar farm, that's one thing, because they're all renewables. But if it's coming from coal or oil or natural gas, and you can't control that when you plug in at the marina, you don't know where the power is coming from. We're going to replace all the rainforest woods in the boat with bamboo, which is essentially a weed. It's all in greening of the product. As much as we can control on the product we will. Obviously if you put a flatscreen TV there's going to be lead and stuff like that in there. Or the

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[navigational electronics]: You can't control what goes in that. But we can choose the wood." Trane can't just think about getting cool technology into his boats, he's also got to look at the marketplace. "We're not scientists, we're in the boat business," he says. "And we have to make a product that's going to sell at the end of the day." That said, Trane's hybrid has taught him a thing or two about power management, and where those lessons can be applied. "We're looking at taking some of our power-management systems and backing them into our monohulls," Trane says. "Where we would be able to put a little bit of solar up on

the flybridge bimini. Imagine a nice 45-foot luxury yacht being able to sit on the hook amongst a bunch of sailboaters and not run a generator all night. But it takes a serious effort in energy management, which means a lot of very expensive batteries, with an expensive battery-management system with very high-tech, high-output inverters, and efficiency at the end of the appliances—the air conditioning, cooking, refrigeration. But if you do all that with a holistic approach, you can end up with a normal boat that can be green on the anchor." And as an ancient Asian proverb says, even the longest journey begins with a single step. From Yachting magazine, June 2009

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Green Boating TiPs Looking for ways to be more eco-friendly when you're out on the water? Following are tips and information that will help you minimize your impact on the environment while maximizing the efficiency and performance of your boat.

Choose Green Products: Look for the EPA-certified “Design for the Environment” DfE label, which assures you that the product has minimal environmental impact and is safer for the person using it. Benefit: Safer products. Reduce water pollution.

Use The Right Prop: Use a prop with the right pitch so your engine reaches its designed wideopen-throttle RPM. An adjustable-pitch propellerallows you to dial in the optimum pitch angle in single degrees. Modular props, let you swap props while keeping the same hub. Benefit: Reduce fuel consumption, improve performance.

Don’t Push Water: Install and use trim tabs or hydrofoils. Most planing powerboats can improve hole-shot acceleration or reduce fuel consumption with properly adjusted trim tabs and hydrofoils. Keeping on a plane at lower engine RPMs can extend your range and reduce your time on passages. Benefit: Improve boat performance & save gas.

Keep The Bilge Clean: Avoid the accidental discharge of oily water by using a sorbent in each bilge area. Consider a bioremediation product designed to convert hydrocarbons into safe compounds Benefit: Safer products. Reduce water pollution continued on page 43

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Green Boating TiPs continued from page 41

Retire That 2-Stroke Outboard: Although it may be possible to get a few more years out of your old-technology outboard, you’ll be much happier with the reduced noise, fumes, fuel consumption, and pollution of a modern injected fourstroke outboard. For an even quieter ride, try an electric outboard. Benefit: Save gas and reduce water pollution.

Recycle your Lead-Acid Batteries: 12V batteries are among the most recycled products in the world. Benefit: Save money and conserve resources. *Amount varies by state.

Prevent Fuel Spills: Use or install a device to prevent overboard discharges from your tank vent. Benefit: Save gas and reduce water pollution 8. Use an autopilot: Modern autopilots can steer better than most helmspersons— and they don’t have a limited attention span. Benefit: Reduce fuel consumption

Recycle Your Monofilament Fishing Line: If your harbor doesn’t have a recycling location, see the website fishinglinerecycling.org.

Eat Responsibly Harvested Seafood: Choose sustainable seafood at a restaurants or grocery stores to ensure that the fish stocks are plentiful for your children and for generations to come.

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Life Jacket

Boaters enjoy the feel of sun and spray. So it’s tempting to boat without wearing a life jacket – especially on nice days. But modern life jackets are available in a wide variety of shapes, colors, and sizes. Many are thin and flexible. Some are built right into fishing vests or hunter coats. Others are inflatable — as compact as a scarf or fanny pack until they hit water, when they automatically fill with air.

• To meet U.S. Coast Guard requirements, a boat must have a U.S. Coast Guard-approved Type I, II, III, or V life jacket for each person aboard. Boats 16 feet and over must have at least one Type IV throwable device as well.

There’s no excuse not to wear a life jacket on the water!

• Adult-sized life jackets will not work for children. Special life jackets are available. To work correctly, a life jacket must be worn, fit snugly, and not allow the child’s chin or ears to slip through. • Life jackets should be tested for wear and buoyancy at least once

How to Choose the Right Life Jacket • Certain life jackets are designed to keep your head above water and help you remain in a position which permits proper breathing.

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• All states have regulations regarding life jacket wear by children.

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each year. Waterlogged, faded, or leaky jackets should be discarded. • Life jackets must be properly stowed. • A life jacket — especially a snugfitting flotation coat or deck-suit style — can help you survive in cold water. How Do Life Jackets Save Lives? • When capsized in rough water. • When sinking in unexpectedly heavy sea conditions. • When thrown from the boat as a result of a collision. • When injured by rocks or submerged objects. • When unconscious from carbon monoxide fumes. • When tossed into freezing water. • When thrown off balance while fishing. • When unable to swim because of heavy or waterlogged clothing. All recreational boats must carry one wearable lifejacket (Type I, II, III or Type V lifejacket) for each person aboard. A Type V lifejacket provides performance of either a Type I, II, or III lifejacket (as marked on its label) and must be used according to the label requirements.

Any boat 16ft and longer (except canoes and kayaks) must also carry one throwable lifejacket (Type IV lifejacket). Lifejackets must be • Coast Guard approved • in good and serviceable condition • the appropriate size for the intended user. Accessibility • Wearable lifejackets must be readily accessible. • You must be able to put them on in a reasonable amount of time in an emergency (vessel sinking, on fire, etc.). • They should not be stowed in plastic bags, in locked or closed compartments or have other gear stowed on top of them. • The best lifejacket is the one you will wear. • Though not required, a lifejacket should be worn at all times when the vessel is underway. A wearable lifejacket can save your life, but only if you wear it. • Throwable devices must be immediately available for use. Inflatable Lifejackets • Inflatable lifejackets may be more comfortable to wear.

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continued on page 46

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continued from page 45

• The best lifejacket is the one you will wear. • Inflatable lifejackets require the user to pay careful attention to the condition of the device. • Inflatable lifejackets must have a full cylinder and all status indicators on the inflator must be green, or the device is NOT serviceable, and does NOT satisfy the requirement to carry lifejackets. • Coast Guard Approved Inflatable lifejacket’s are authorized for use on recreational boats by person at least 16 years of age. Child Lifejacket Requirements Some states require that children wear lifejackets

• applies to children of specific ages • applies to certain sizes of boats • applies to specific boating operations Check with your state boating safety officials. Child lifejacket approvals are based on the child’s weight. Check the “User Weight” on the label, or the approval statement that will read something like “Approved for use on recreational boats and uninspected commercial vessels not carrying passengers for hire, by persons weighing __ lbs”. They can be marked “less than 30”, “30 to 50”, “less than 50”, or “50 to 90”. Lifejacket requirements for certain boating activities under state laws The Coast Guard recommends and many states require wearing lifejackets: • For water skiing and other towed activities (use a lifejacket marked for water skiing). • While operating personal watercraft (PWC) (use a lifejacket marked for water skiing or PWC use). • During white water boating activities. • While sailboarding (under Federal law, sailboards are not “boats”). Check with your state boating safety officials. Federal law does not require lifejackets on racing shells, rowing sculls, racing canoes, and racing kayaks; state laws

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vary. Check with your state boating safety officials. If you are boating in an area under the jurisdiction of the Army Corps of Engineers, or a federal, state, or local park authority, other rules may apply. Lifejacket Flotation There are three basic kinds of lifejacket flotation in the five types of lifejackets with the following characteristics: Inherently Buoyant (primarily Foam) • Adult, Youth, Child, and Infant sizes • For swimmers & non-swimmers • Wearable & throwable styles • Some designed for water sports Minimum Buoyancy Wearable Size

Adult

Type

Inherent Buoyancy (Foam)

I

22 lb.

II & III 15.5 lb V

15.5 to 22 lb.

II & III 11 lb Youth Child and Infant

V

11 to 15.5 lb.

II

7 lb.

Throwable: Cushion Ring Buoy

Inflatable • The most compact • Sizes only for adults • Only recommended for swimmers • Wearable styles only • Some with the best in-water performance Minimum Buoyancy Wearable Type Size

Adult

34 lb

III

22.5 lb.

V

22.5 to 34 lb.

Minimum Buoyancy Wearable Size

Adult

20 lb. 16.5 & 32 lb.

I & II

Hybrid (Foam & Inflation) • Reliable • Adult, Youth, and Child sizes • For swimmers & non-swimmers • Wearable styles only • Some designed for water sports

Youth

IV

Inherent Buoyancy

Child

Type

Inherent Buoyancy

Inflated Total Buoyancy

II & III

10 lb

7.5 lb.

V

22 lb.

22 lb.

II & III

9 lb

7.5 lb.

V

15 lb.

15 lb.

II

7 lb.

12 lb.

article and photo provided by U.S. Coast Guard

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Child Safety U.S. Coast Guard Reminds Parents To Make Their Kids Wear Life Jackets “It is the parent’s responsibility to keep their children safe when on the water and insisting on wearing life jackets is one of the best ways to do that,” said the Coast Guard’s Director of Operations Policy, Rear Admiral J.W. Underwood “Just like you make your kids wear bike helmets, make them wear life jackets.” Many adults believe themselves capable of diving into the water to rescue a child who falls overboard. This is a dangerous misconception. Adults may not notice a child falling overboard right away. Children who fall in may not surface immediately. It can be difficult to locate a child in the water—especially when the vessel is in motion. Life jackets could prevent approximately two-thirds of all boating-related drownings of children ages 14 and under. In fact, in most states, children under 13 must wear life jackets. It’s the law. According to the National SAFE KIDS Campaign, drowning remains second only to motor vehicle accidents as the leading cause of unintentional injury-related death among children ages 1 to 14. Furthermore, children are much more likely to practice safe habits when they experience similar behavior by parents and caregivers. “We have done research that indicates children whose parents wear life jackets around water are more likely

to wear one themselves,” says Jen Medearis Costello, program manager at the National SAFE KIDS Campaign. “Therefore we recommend that parents not only actively supervise their children around water, but also demonstrate safe behavior—including wearing life jackets.” The Coast Guard and National SAFE KIDS Campaign strongly recommend adults always wear life jackets as well – not only to keep themselves safe, but to demonstrate safe behavior for their children. The U.S. Coast Guard is asking all boat owners and operators to help reduce fatalities, injuries, property damage, and healthcare costs related to recreational boating accidents by taking personal responsibility for their own safety and the safety of their passengers. Essential steps include always wearing a life jacket and requiring passengers to do the same; never boating under the influence; completing a boating safety course; and getting a free vessel safety check annually from local U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary or United States Power Squadrons® vessel examiners. The U.S. Coast Guard reminds all boaters, “You’re in Command. Boat Responsibly!” For more information on boating responsibly, go to www.USCGboating. org or the U.S. Coast Guard Infoline – 1-800-368-5647. artcile courtesy of The U.S. Coast Guard

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HOW TO BOAT SMART: N AV I G A T I O N B U O Y S Buoys and markers are the "traffic signals" that guide vessel operators safely along some waterways. They also identify dangerous or controlled areas and give directions and information. As a recreational boat or PWC operator, you will need to know the lateral navigation markers and non-lateral markers of the U.S. Aids to Navigation System.

LATERAL MARKERS These navigation aids mark the edges of safe water areas; for example, directing travel within a channel. The markers use a combination of colors and numbers, which may appear on either buoys or permanently placed markers.

Colors and Numbers The colors and numbers have the same meaning regardless of the kind of buoy or marker on which they appear.

Buoy and Marker Color and Number Descriptions Red Colors, Red Lights, and Even Numbers: These mark the edge of the channel on your starboard (right) side as you enter from the open sea or head upstream. Numbers usually will increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream. Green Colors, Green Lights, and Odd Numbers: These mark the edge of the channel on your port (left) side as you enter from the open sea or head upstream. Numbers usually will increase consecutively as you return from the open sea or head upstream. Red and Green Colors and/or Lights: These are placed at the junction of two channels to indicate the preferred (primary) channel when a channel splits. If green is on top, the preferred channel is to the right. If red is on top, the preferred channel is to the left. These also are sometimes referred to as "junction buoys."

Buoy Shape Descriptions Nun Buoys: These cone-shaped buoys are always marked with red markings and even numbers. They mark the edge of the channel on your starboard (right) side when entering from the open sea or heading upstream. continued on page 53

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HOW TO BOAT SMART: N AV I G A T I O N B U O Y S continued from page 51

Can Buoys: These cylindrical-shaped buoys are always marked with green markings and odd numbers. They mark the edge of the channel on your port (left) side when entering from the open sea or heading upstream.

Other Kinds of Buoys and Markers Lighted Buoys: These buoys use the lateral marker shapes, colors, and numbers discussed above. In addition, they have a matching colored light. Daymarks: These are permanently placed signs attached to structures, such as posts, in the water. Common daymarks are red triangles (equivalent to nuns) and green squares (equivalent to cans). These may be lighted also.

NON-LATERAL MARKERS Non-lateral markers are navigation aids that give information other than the edges of safe water areas. The most common are regulatory markers that are white and use orange markings and black lettering. These markers are found on lakes and rivers and are used to: Give Directions and Information. • Warn of hazards and obstructions. • Mark controlled areas. • Mark exclusion (closed) areas. • Descriptions of Non-Lateral Markers Information Squares provide information such as places to find food, supplies, and repairs; and they give directions, distances, and other nonregulatory information. Danger Area Diamonds warn of dangers such as rocks, shoals, construction, dams, or stumps. Always proceed with caution and keep a safe distance. Never assume that every hazard will be marked by a buoy.

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HOW TO BOAT SMART: N AV I G A T I O N B U O Y S Controlled Area Circles indicate a controlled area such as no wake, idle speed, speed limit, or ski zone. Exclusion Area Crossed diamonds indicate areas off-limits to all vessels such as swimming areas, dams, and spillways. Safe Water Marker These are white with red vertical stripes and indicate unobstructed water on all sides. They mark mid-channels or fairways and may be passed on either side. Inland Waters Obstruction Marker These are white with black vertical stripes and indicate an obstruction to navigation. You should not pass between these buoys and the nearest shore. Mooring Buoy These are white with a blue horizontal band. They usually are placed in marinas and other areas where vessels are allowed to anchor. These are the only buoys you may tie up to legally.

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HURRICANE PREPARATION GUIDE

Make plans early to harbor your boat There are lots of ways to protect your boat from a hurricane. Advice varies greatly, depending on the size of your vessel, availability of dock space, marina rules and local laws. That makes planning now for a hurricane all the more essential.

Safeguard your car “Comprehensive� auto coverage should protect your car from damage caused by a hurricane, including flood damage.

Emergency information to keep handy Here is a list of emergency phone numbers to keep handy in the event of a hurricane.

Shutters are first line of defense No matter how well-constructed, a house without shutters or hurricane glass is not a smart place to stay in a storm. Without protection, windows can be smashed by flying debris. And once the wind gets inside the house, it can quickly splinter or tear off the roof.

Make plans now to protect your family Your hurricane plan should be detailed and cover not just what to do now, but also what to do as the storm threatens and as it hits -- and what you should do afterward, when you could be on your own without help for weeks.

Protect your pets and animals To keep your pet safe in the event of a hurricane, your choices are to keep the pet with you at home, take it with you if you evacuate, leave it with a friend or board it at a kennel. continued on page 59

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HURRICANE PREPARATION GUIDE continued from page 57

Find the safest place in your home Finding a strong refuge in your home and keeping it stocked with the right supplies can mean the difference between life and death during a hurricane. Here's how to stay safe during a storm.

Go early if you plan to leave If you are absolutely determined to leave town before the hurricane comes, experts have two pieces of advice: 1. Don't do it. 2. If you still insist on leaving, do it early. Very early.

Go to shelters only if there is no place else A hurricane shelter should always be considered a last option, a place to go if you can't stay at home or with a relative or friend.

Finding shelter for your family Where will you go during a storm? It's a decision best made now, when you're calm, long before a storm hits. But in some cases, the choice may not be yours.

Talk to kids, but don't scare them Long before the season begins, parents should begin explaining to children what hurricanes are, the dangers they pose and the safety measures to take against them.

Plan for people with special needs A person with special needs is anyone who may need specialized help during or after a hurricane threat, either in or outside an evacuation zone. That can include anyone with a disability, serious illness, or the need for life-support equipment that requires electricity.

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C a r b o n M o n ox i d e You’re in command of your boating safety. Follow these simple steps to help keep carbon monoxide from poisoning you, your passengers, or those around others. • Know where and how CO may accumulate in and around your boat. • Maintain fresh air circulation throughout the boat at all times. Run exhaust blowers whenever the generator is operating. • Know where your engine and generator exhaust outlets are located and keep everyone away from these areas. • Never sit, teak surf, or hang on the

back deck or swim platform while the engines are running. Teak surfing is NEVER a safe activity. • Never enter areas under swim platforms where exhaust outlets are located unless the area has been properly ventilated. • Although CO can be present without the smell of exhaust fumes, if you smell exhaust fumes, CO is also present. Take immediate action to dissipate these fumes. • Treat symptoms of seasickness as possible CO poisoning. Get the person into fresh air immediately. Seek medical attention-unless you’re sure it’s not CO. • Install and maintain CO alarms inside your boat. Do not ignore any alarm. Replace alarms as recommended by the alarm manufacturer. • Get a Vessel Safety Check. A VSC is a free bow-to-stern safety examination.

artcile courtesy of The U.S. Coast Guard

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Boat safety checklist By using this checklist, or one fine-tuned by yourself, you’ll be sure that everything is on board and in good working order. Your passengers will appreciate knowing you’re concerned about boating safety. Float plan - let a friend or relative know when you’re leaving, where you’re going, when you expect to return, what to do if you don’t, and a description of your boat Registration certificate or documentation

Batteries - fully charged, encased in plastic boxes or terminals covered, securely fastened down Sound-producing device - horn, whistle appropriate for boat Alternate propulsion - paddle or oar

Personal Flotation Devices (wearable and throw able) - USCG approved, good condition, readily accessible, assigned and fitted

First Aid Kit • Tools, spare outboard prop and lock nut

Fire Extinguishers - right number, size, and class for boat; charged, not corroded, nozzle clear, bracketed, readily accessible

Sunscreen

Compass

Weather Radio

Visual Distress Signals - current dates on flares, proper number, batteries good if lights or EPIRB Anchors and Line - adequate anchor for bottom, adequate line for water depth Bilge device - bilge pump operable, alternative bailing device available Watch or clock - operable Bright flashlight or searchlight Navigation lights - tested and operable, spare bulbs

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INDEX Air Charter and Air Cargo Executive Air Link........................................................................................................................... 59 Air Conditioning and Marine Refrigeration A/C Atlantis Marine . ..................................................................................................................... 40 Anchors Suncoast Marine............................................................................................................................ 33 Artist and Muralist Art Explosion of South Florida ...................................................................................................... 46 Baits, Rigging and Swimming on Circle Hooks Barefoot Fishing ............................................................................................................................ 58 Bass Fishing Guide, Freshwaterand Everglades Guide Glades Basin . ................................................................................................................................ 16 Battery Sales and Accessories Battery Sales ................................................................................................................................. 23 Boat Apparel Online Boat Wear Online.com .................................................................................................................. 58 Boat Cleaners, Boating Green, Environmentally Fr iendly Tritan Marine................................................................................................................................. 20 Boat Documentation Saxton Documentation.................................................................................................................. 14 Boat Equipment, Accessories and Marine Electronics Boaters Marine Supply.com........................................................................................................... 23 Boat, Home and Car Insurance All American Insurance.................................................................................................................. 50 Boat Insurance Serrano Insurance Agency.............................................................................................................. 33 Boat Mat t resses, Mat t ress Toppers and Custom Sheets Portland Boat Mattress.................................................................................................................. 48 Boat and Motor Pa rts Replacement Boats Parts.com ...................................................................................................... 24 Cosmetic Surgery Cosmetic Surgery Institute of Miami . ........................................................................................... 65 Custom Embroidery, Boat Accessories Nautical Needles ........................................................................................................................... 61 Custom Power Centers, Power Modules, Fire Cabinets and Marine Enclosures Marina Power Company................................................................................................................ 43 Dive Shop Divers Den Miami . .......................................................................................................................... 4 Dock and Fishing Lights Fishing Lights etc............................................................................................................................ 16 Docking Assistance Equipment Landing Loop.................................................................................................................................. 63 Engines, Marine AC, Enviro Fr iendly Trac Ecological Marine Products.................................................................................................... 32 Fine, Marine and Wildlife Art Jason Mathias................................................................................................................................ 52 Fuel Filters, Fuel Monitors, Guages and Electronics Elwood Controls............................................................................................................................. 22 Gourmet Food and Provisions Gourmet at Your Door . ................................................................................................................. 42 Hurr icane Protection Fortress 5 .................................................................................................................................28, 30 Insurance: Marine, Residential, Auto Rick Gibbs Insurance ....................................................................................................................... 2 Jewelry, Skeletal Jewelry, Nautical Flags Mark Edwards Jewelry .................................................................................................................. 68 Landscpaing, Nursery and Landscape Design Rabelo Landscaping ...................................................................................................................... 38 Marina and Surface Coatings Central FL Superior Coatings.......................................................................................................... 54 Marine Accessories Unified Marine............................................................................................................................... 44

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INDEX Marine Electronics Langer Krell Marine Electronics..................................................................................................... 62 Northern Marine Electronics ........................................................................................................ 55 Riverfront Marine Electronics ....................................................................................................... 48 Marine Fiberglass Fab rication, Custom Fab rication DJ Mobile Fiberglass...................................................................................................................... 65 Marine Products SEI ................................................................................................................................................. 69 Marine Surveyor and Vessel Assessment Gale Force Surveys......................................................................................................................... 49 Mobile Marine Detail, Marine Electronics One Stop Marine............................................................................................................................ 59 Mooring Pest Shield Off Board.com................................................................................................................................ 23 Mooring Products Chafe Pro........................................................................................................................................ 26 Outdoor & Underwater Lighting, Energy Saving, Eco Fr iendly Aurora Outdoor Lighting........................................................................................................... 34-35 Personal Security and Identity Security Easy Flat Rate .............................................................................................................................4, 46 Pest and Bird Control No Birds.com.................................................................................................................................. 70 Pet Care, Pet Sitting Miami Pet Concierge...................................................................................................................... 61 Plastic Surgery, Skin Care, Weight Loss Take Shape Plastic Surgery............................................................................................................. 18 Power Assisted Fishing Reels Dolphin Electree............................................................................................................................ 12 Private Jet Charter, Cesna and Caribbean Charter Southern Sky Martin Air................................................................................................................. 38 Propeller Shafting & Marine Hardwa re S & S Propeller........................................................................................................................... 56-57 Protections Systems for Boats Marine Lightning Protection ......................................................................................................... 62 Residential and Commercial Roofing, both Metal and Tile Extreme Roofing.............................................................................................................................. 3 Safety Life Rafts Datrex.............................................................................................................................................. 8 Scuba Lessons, Divemaster, Scuba Charter Miami Scuba Ventures..................................................................................................................... 4 StormSafety Thunderbolt ................................................................................................................................. 6-7 Synthetic Turf, Artificial Grass for Putting Greens, Landscaping and Sports Easy Grass.net ............................................................................................................................... 64 Towing and Recovery Tow Boat U.S. Miami...................................................................................................................... 21 Towing and Salvage Biscayne Towing & Salvage............................................................................................................ 33 Wakeboard School and Lessons Gator Bait Wake Board School ...................................................................................................... 60 Water Skis, Wakeboards, Nautiques Boats Miami Nautiques International ..................................................................................................... 66 Wave Runner Rentals, Water Sports, Tour Bookings Barefoot Billys................................................................................................................................ 36 Wine, Gourmet Food Gift Baskets The Wine Shoppe & Gourmet........................................................................................................ 49 Yacht Interiors, Boat Covers Hermans Do It All Upholstery ....................................................................................................... 40 Yamaha Sales, Outboard Repair and Mobile Repair Erics Outboard Marine Service ..................................................................................................... 10 Yoga, Holistic Health Miami Life Center........................................................................................................................... 50

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Stop Bird Problems! Protecting your boat, and other outdoor assets, from annoying birds and pests can be simple and environmentally responsible!

NoBirds.com products offer solutions that are safe, easy to install, humane and chemical free! • • • • •

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Solar Powered Protected area up to 5' in diameter Eco-friendly Operates in fog and low-light conditions 24 hour battery-powered with rechargeable batteries and built-in charging system Will not hurt birds or animals Virtually invisible Will not scratch a boat's surfaces Lightweight, won't sag canvas tops Completely UV-resistant Simple installation Easily moved out of the way

Where to use NoBirds.com products • Boats, Piers • Docks • Decks • A/C Units • Solar P anels • Motor Homes • Patios • Roof Vents • Roof Tops • Satellite Dishes • Sky Lights • Billboards • Ledges • Balconies • New Lawns • Gardens • Chimneys • Trash Areas • Light Poles • Signs PO Box 1966 Ventura, CA 93002 Fax: 805-388-4663 info@nobirds.com

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Boatsafe USA Miami Edition