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In This Issue

Safety Checklist ..............................................................................3 Boating Safety . ...............................................................................5 Docking Tips......................................................................................6 First Aid .............................................................................................9 Preventing Boat Theft.................................................................17 Eco-Friendly Boating....................................................................22 Pet Safety.........................................................................................27 Dogs And Life Jackets....................................................................37 Making your boat pet-friendly..................................................40 Aids to navigation.........................................................................43 Fire Safety........................................................................................44 Boat Ramps......................................................................................58 Life Jackets.......................................................................................60 flying Flags.....................................................................................64 RECOMMENDED BUSINESS DIRECTORY............................................66


Boat safety check list By using this checklist, or one fine-tuned by yourself, you’ll be sure that everything is on board and in good working order. Your passengers will appreciate knowing you’re concerned about boating safety. Float plan - let a friend or relative know when you’re leaving, where you’re going, when you expect to return, what to do if you don’t, and a description of your boat Registration certificate or documentation Personal Flotation Devices (wearable and throw able) - USCG approved, good condition, readily accessible, assigned and fitted Fire Extinguishers - right number, size, and class for boat; charged, not corroded, nozzle clear, bracketed, readily accessible

Sound-producing device - horn, whistle appropriate for boat Alternate propulsion - paddle or oar First Aid Kit • Tools, spare outboard prop and lock nut Compass Sunscreen Weather Radio

Visual Distress Signals - current dates on flares, proper number, batteries good if lights or EPIRB Anchors and Line - adequate anchor for bottom, adequate line for water depth Bilge device - bilge pump operable, alternative bailing device available Watch or clock - operable Bright flashlight or searchlight Navigation lights - tested and operable, spare bulbs Batteries - fully charged, encased in plastic boxes or terminals covered, securely fastened down

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Boating Safety ACCIDENT REPORTING

Boat Operators involved in an accident must provide their name, address and Vessel registration to other involved parties, provide assistance and, in case of death or disappearance report the accident to law enforcement officials, boat operators or owners must also make a written report of a boating accident to the Department of Boating and Waterways when: 1. A person dies 2. Personal injury requiring medical treatment beyond first aid 3. Total vessel damage exceeding $500 4. Complete loss of the vessel 5. Disappearance of a person or persons from suspected injury or death. This report must be made within 48 hours of the accident in cases involving disappearance, a death that occurs within 24 hours of the accident, or injury that requires medical attention beyond first aid. If you are unsure about how to report a boating accident, simply call the Coast Guard’s toll-free BOATING SAFETY Hotline at 1-800-368-5641 for information.

CAPSIZING

If the boat is too large or heavy to right by yourself, do not attempt to swim away; STAY WITH THE BOAT and wait to be rescued. KEEP YOUR LIFE JACKET ON. If the boat is small and light enough to right, swim around the boat and grab or climb on the windward rail (the side of the boat sticking up in the air) to pull the hull back in the water. If your boat has a centerboard, pull down or stand on it to see-saw the boat upright. If it’s a sailboat, uncleat the sheets (lines) that hold the sails in place. If you don’t, the sails can fill with air as soon as the boat is righted and tip it over again.

MAN OVERBOARD

If YOU fall overboard, your main concern is to stay afloat. If you are not wearing a life jacket and cannot grab a personal flotation device, try to catch air in your clothing for buoyancy. In cold water, don’t expend too much energy; tread water very slowly, or if wearing a life jacket, assume the huddled HELP. (Heat Escape Lessening Posture) position to conserve body heat. Try to make your head and shoulders as visible as possible so rescuers can spot you. If SOMEONE ELSE falls overboard, immediately steer the vessel toward the side he fell off. Post a lookout. Throw the victim a life ring or other personal floatation device, plus a lifeline with a bowline loop at the end to slip over his body and under his arms. If available, throw out a manoverboard pole, a buoyed counterweighted pole with a highly visible flag on top to alert other boaters of the victim’s presence and to mark the spot for the rescue. boat. Stop the forward progress of the boat by taking the engine out of gear, or by luffing the sails on a non-powered sailboat. Alter your course 90 degrees end prepare to come alongside the victim for rescue.

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Dock ing tips Docking Safely

Hope you don't think just because the left side of your boat is called the "Port Side" that you always should dock with that side toward the pier. There are several reasons why you should dock on one side or the other, but here is the most important: Almost always and almost without fail you should first determine the direction of the wind and/or current before deciding which side should go to the pier. Whichever is the strongest determines the direction into which your bow should be pointing. For example, if the wind is blowing lightly from left to right across the dock, but the current is roaring from right to left, you would want to approach with your bow into the current and dock to the port side. That is because the current is stronger than the wind. To determine which is strongest just park in idle off the dock and see which way the boat wants to go. If you see that the forces of wind and current push you from right to left across a dock, plan your approach from left to right, with your bow into the strongest force.

Getting Your Boat Off a Dock

Sounds easy enough, right? Just push until you are clear of the dock and off you go. But, if your boat is rather large, and there is a lot of wind or adverse current, it is not that easy.

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If the wind or current is moving parallel to the dock, this is a pretty easy scenario. Then you simply need to use a spring line and good fendering. The spring line should be used on the opposite end of the oncoming current or wind. For example, if your bow is into the wind/current, then you would put a spring line from your aft cleat and go forward on the dock. Just release the bow line and hit reverse a bit and the bow will swing out. Once clear, motor forward and retrieve your aft spring line. (Note, if there is no one on the dock to undue your mooring line, here is a good tip. Have a dock line that has a clean end – no knots, kinks or unravelings. Then for your spring secure the line to your cleat, around a piling or cleat on the dock and back to the original cleat. Once you have sprung the boat off the dock, untie the clean end and let it go. Then retrieve the line. The clean end will slide around the dock cleat and back to the boat) If the wind is perpendicular to the dock and blowing on to the dock, this is a much more difficult situation. You best bet is to spring your bow line. Use hard rudder in the direction that will kick your stern out and away from the dock. Once the stern is out far enough to clear, reverse rudder and engines and retrieve your bow spring line. article courtesy of American Boating Association

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First Aid RESCUE BREATHING

Life depends on oxygen rich blood reaching the brain. When a person is not spontaneously breathing, rescue breathing, previously called mouth-to-mouth resuscitation, is required. To assess if Rescue Breathing is needed: Look at the victim’s chest to see if it is rising and falling Listen near the victim’s mouth and nose for the sound of respiration Feel using your cheek, for air moving from the victim’s mouth and nose When breathing stops, whatever the cause, call for help and begin rescue breathing Steps to Begin Rescue Breathing: 1. Lay the victim on their back on a firm surface. (A firm surface is required if CPR must be initiated.) 2. The rescuer should place the heel of his/her hand closest to the victim’s head on the victim’s forehead to tilt the head back. While head tilt is important. over extending the neck may restrict the airway. In general, adults need the greatest angle of head tilt, children less, and infants the least. For victims with suspected neck injury, it is recommended to limit head tilt to a minimum while opening the airway by lifting the jaw and holding the chin. 3. Using the hand which is keeping the head extended, pinch the nostrils closed with the thumb and forefinger. continued on page 10

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4. Lift the victim’s chin with your hand nearest the victim’s feet. (Not necessary to lift an infants jaw, although you may wish to support the chin while you are administering breaths.) 5. Take a deep breath. (For children and infants, reduce the amount of breath you administer. You are administering the right amount if you can see their chest rise fully when you exhale and breathe into them.) 6. Open your mouth wide and seal your lips around the victim’s mouth or around the mouth to mask breathing device. If you cannot get a good seal, close the mouth while keeping the head tilted and place your mouth over the nose of the victim to administer the breaths. 7. For infants and small children, you should seal your lips around the victims mouth and nose. 8. Give 2 slow breaths. Breathe into the victim until their chest gently rises. If the breath does not go in, or if the chest does not rise, re-tilt the head, make sure you are lifting the chin appropriately, and try again. 9. If water or vomit begins to come out of the mouth, turn the victim’s head or body to the side, sweep out the debris, re-position them on their back and continue. If a neck injury is suspected, always roll the victim keeping the neck and back in alignment 10. Check for a pulse. In adults, the carotid pulse in the neck just to the side of the midline is recommended. For infants, the brachial pulse located on the inside of the upper arm is recommended. Depress the area for 5-10 seconds using 2-3 fingers to feel for a pulse. (Do not use your thumb or you will feel your own pulse.) If a pulse is present, count the rate for 15 seconds and multiply that number by 4. Normal pulse ranges are listed below. Normal Pulse Ranges Adult.............................................................60-80 Children......................................................80-100 Infants to 2 year olds................................100-120

11. 12. If a pulse is present, continue rescue breathing by giving 1 slow breath every: 5 seconds for an adult or 3 seconds for a child or infant 13. Recheck pulse and breathing about every 1·2 minutes continued on page 13

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14. Continue rescue breathing as long as a pulse is present, but the person is not breathing. 15. If the pulse stops begin CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation).

CPR (Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation)

before beginning CPR, rescue breathing should have begun. Chest compressions are only necessary if a pulse is not present. • After two breaths are administered, begin chest compressions. • Locate the sternum by following the curve of the ribs to the midline of the chest. • Measure three finger breadths up from that point and place the heel of your right hand over the sternum. (For adults and children this Is in the middle 1/3 of the sternum. For infants, place fingertips of one hand on the lower 1/3 of the sternum or between the nipples.) • Place your left hand over the right. (For adults only. For children use only 1 hand.) • Apply pressure vertically down from the shoulder, keeping your elbows straight and using your body weight as compressing force. • Continue cardiac compressions and rescue breathing at the ratio of 15 cardiac compressions to 2 breaths. • Recheck for pulse and respirations every 1-2 minutes. • CPR should be discontinued when professional assistance arrives, the victim’s condition is improved. or the rescuer is exhausted and unable to continue. CPR should continue while further recommendations are obtained from a maritime physician consulting service. The rate, depth, and hand usage to give compressions are as follows: Victim Adult Child (1-8 yrs.) Infant (To 1 yr.)

Depth 1.5 . 2 inches 1 Inch 0.5 Inch

Rate/Minute 60 80 100

Hand Usage 2 hands 1 hand 2 fingers

CHOKING

Conscious Choking Victim: Assess if assistance is needed. Ask: Are you choking? Can you speak? As long as the victim can cough forcefully, stay nearby and encourage his coughing effort. If the victim’s cough becomes weak or they can no longer breath, give abdominal thrusts. Technique for Conscious Adults and Children In a Standing or Sitting Position: continued on page 14

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Stand behind the victim wrapping your arms around the victim’s waist. Make a fist with one hand placing the thumb side against the victim’s abdomen, just·above the naval. Grasp your fist with your other hand. Administer 5 forceful and rapid upward thrusts, Be careful to remove pressure completely between thrusts. You may not need to thrust as firmly on a child. Repeat until the object Is cleared or the victim becomes unconscious. Technique for Infants (Either Conscious or Unconscious) Cradle Infant face down over your forearm with the head pointed down toward the floor. Administer 5 blows on the back between the shoulders. Turn the infant over, while balancing him or her on your arm & administer 5 chest thrusts (compressions 1/2 inch deep In center of the breastbone) between the nipples. Lift the jaw and tongue to determine if the object causing the airway obstruction is present. If so, use your finger to carefully sweep it out. Be careful to not inadvertently push the object back down into the airway. Unconscious Choking Victim: Attempt rescue breathing as described in the previous section. If air will still not go in, place the heel of one hand against the middle of the abdomen just above the naval. Place the other hand over the hand on the abdomen and give forceful upward abdominal thrusts. Lift the jaw and tongue to check for the obstructing object. If seen, sweep it out with a finger. If you cannot see anything do not sweep. Tilt head back and attempt to give breaths again. Continue until breaths can be given. Once the object is removed, continue rescue breathing until the victim is spontaneously breathing. Monitor the victim closely. If the victim’s airway has been blocked for more than a minute, it is advisable to contact a medical consultation service immediately or an emergency medical service if in port.

NEAR· DROWNING

When lack of breathing is known to have been caused from near-drowning, it is helpful to place the victim’s body at an angle in which the head is slightly lower than the body. This facilitates drainage of water from the lungs & reduces the risk of re-inhaling these fluids. Be prepared for water to sputter or gush from the victim. Turn the victim’s head to one side so it does not enter the lungs. (Again, remember to roll the head & body in unison if a neck injury is suspected.) The victim may spontaneously begin breathing which may begin by coughing & gasping for breath. This is a good sign. If breathing does not spontaneously return, continue rescue breathing and/or CPR. It is advisable to contact a medical consultation service for further recommendations for care at sea, After resuscitation, watch a near drowning victim carefully for 24 hours. If near medical facilities, it is advisable to have the victim checked by a physician.

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Pr eventing Boat Theft

Across the nation, as recreational boating continues to gain popularity, more and more boats, trailers, equipment, electronics and personal items are stolen each year. Most of these crimes are committed by amateurs who, when tempted with an easy opportunity, can't resist the temptation. Remember the old adage that locks are just a means of keeping honest people honest. This certainly applies to boating. You would be surprised at how often, when strolling the fuel dock, you will find a boat that has pulled up for fuel or refreshments, just sitting there unattended with the keys in the ignition - or, worse yet, idling away. Even if the keys aren't present, you might see a handheld VHF radio or a pair of expensive binoculars just lying in the seat or on the dash. What can you do to make sure your boat stays in your possession? Read on for tips on security.

MARK IT:

Permanently mark or engrave your boat, your trailer, all your equipment, and electronics and personal items that you use regularly on your boat with your vessel's hull identification

number (HIN) and/or your driver's license number. Your boat, unless manufactured prior to 1972, will already have a HIN on the transom. Permanently mark your driver's license number in a location that is not readily accessible or noticeable. The same should apply to the trailer. Perhaps mark your boat's HIN and your DL number on the underside of the tongue or axle. As for your equipment, electronics and other items, use some method of permanently marking them as well. Be sure to keep a copy of your boat and trailer registrations at home in a safe place. It is also a good idea to take a hull rubbing of your HIN. Take a sheet of thin paper and tape it over your HIN number on the transom. Using a soft leaded pencil, rub back and forth across the number lightly until in shows up on the piece of paper.

RECORD IT:

Make a complete inventory of your boat, trailer and equipment. List all electronic gear, binoculars, outboard motors, PFDs, fishing equipment etc. by brand, model, and serial numbers if available. Also record your boat by make, model, registration and HIN number. Be sure to record the license number of your trailer. Keep this master inventory list at home and keep a copy for reference in a hidden place on your boat in case you find something missing.

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PHOTOGRAPH OR FILM IT:

Take pictures or videotape your boat, trailer and equipment from all angles. Keep copies at home in a safe place, perhaps alongside your insurance papers.

ARM IT:

Consider an alarm system. Selfcontained systems are inexpensive and can be purchased at most any electronics or marine store. Be sure to choose a system specifically designed for boating use. The damp and constantly moving marine environment puts demands on the alarm system, requiring special sensors and properly protected location. Systems not designed for marine use may malfunction or report false alarms. Be sure, if you have an enclosed cabin, to include a smoke detector in your alarm system.

Boats on trailers are easy crime targets if thieves can just hitch up and drive away. Here are several ways that you can help prevent that: 1. If possible, store the boat and trailer in a locked garage, secured boat storage facility or ministorage warehouse. 2. Keep the boat well inside your yard, preferably out of sight. 3. If possible, turn the trailer around so the it is nose-in rather than out. 4. In a carport or driveway, park a vehicle in front of the trailer, blocking easy removal. 5. For any type of outside storage, remove at least one wheel from the trailer. 6. Use a high-security chain and quality lock to secure the boat and trailer to a fixed object such as a tree or post. 7. No matter how you store your trailer, get a trailer hitch lock. 8. Some trailers are available that allow you to remove the forward part of the tongue which contains the hitch.

STORE IT:

SECURE IT:

Boats should be covered and secured as completely as possible. Ignition switches should be locked, and additional steps should be considered, such as installing a hidden "kill switch," adding a hidden fuel shut off, or removing motor parts such as the coil wire.

Obviously your best bet is to remove all equipment from your boat and store it in the garage or other secure area. Make sure you lock hatches and opening ports. If your boat doesn't have them, or they are broken, you can purchase hatch locks at any marine store. When possible, valuable and easily removed items should be secured below deck in a locked compartment. Lockers should be equipped with non-removable hasps and hinges and secured with padlocks. continued on page 20

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Lock outboard motors and fuel tanks to the boat. When your boat is left unattended, close the window curtains if you have them so people can not "window shop." If your boat is kept in the water at a dock, consider chaining it to the dock. Also, get to know your marina neighbors and form a marina watch group.

INSURE IT:

Insurance is an important part of any theft protection plan. Unfortunately, it's sometimes seen as a substitute for security precautions. True, insurance may replace stolen property and repair damage but there is usually a deductible that must be met and there are intangibles that insurance doesn't cover. Down time, inconvenience and aggravation normally aren't compensated. Finally, insurance companies don't like losses. Just one claim can result in increased rates and a loss history will probably result in cancellation. Even when no claims have been filed, using a facility with a poor crime history can result in prohibitively high premiums or denial of coverage.Be sure to take a boating safety course such as Nautical Know How's. You may save considerably on your insurance premiums.

dealers in stolen goods. By following the above suggestions you can reduce the risk of loss of your boat, trailer or equipment by theft. You should also exercise caution when buying a boat or running across a "good deal" on equipment. To avoid problems, match the HIN listed on the title and registration to the one on the boat. Inspect the HIN on the transom to be sure it has not been altered in any way. (Also, contact the manufacturer to see if a second, duplicate HIN was placed on the vessel or equipment in an inconspicuous place.) And, if you think that pair of $500.00 binoculars is a real bargain at only 25 bucks... well, remember the saying about things that seem too good to be true...  Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/stry/ preventboattheft#ixzz0u8Q5UXk5

REPORT IT:

What should you do if you are a victim of marine theft? Immediately report your loss to your local law enforcement agency, the United States Coast Guard if on federal waters, your insurance company and the marina or storage facility manager. When a loss occurs, the ability to positively identify property is crucial to its recovery and the the prosecution of thieves and

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E c o - F r i e n d ly B o a t i n g You love to be on the water, you love the marine environment, so why not make sure you do what’s necessary to keep it healthy and clean? Though you may not think your boat makes much of an impact, think of all the millions of vessels out there with you. Here are just a few tips.

TRASH and TOXINS

• Properly dispose of all waste and litter, including sewage.

 • Don’t throw any trash overboard, particularly fishing line and plastics, which take centuries to decompose and are deadly for marine life who get tangled in it or confuse it for food. Additionally, the ocean is contaminated with literal tons of microscopic plastic. For more information visit the Algalita Marine Research Foundation, an organization that has conducted research on plastic pollution in the marine environment.

 • According to the Ocean Conservancy, the biggest ocean and coastal pollution offenders, aka the “dirty dozen” are: 1) cigarette butts
 2) paper pieces
 3) plastic pieces
 4) styrofoam
 5) glass pieces
 6) plastic food bags
 7) plastic caps and lids 8) metal beverage cans
 9) plastic straws
 10) glass beverage bottles
 11) plastic beverage bottles
 12) styrofoam cups

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• As with SCUBA diving, take only pictures, leave only bubbles.

 • Reduce, Reuse, Recycle - take advantage of marinas that provide facilities for recycling oil, aluminum, glass, plastic, and antifreeze.

 • Keep reusable items such as plates, silverware, cups and glasses onboard to reduce waste.

 • Note for most trash items, it takes hundreds of years to biodegrade, aluminum cans, for example take 200-500 years to decompose.

 • Do not spill petroleum products or “top off” the tanks. A single quart of oil can create an oil slick as large as three football fields and remain in the area for up to two years.

 • Use as little detergent as possible for cleaning, and always use nonphosphate and non-toxic products. Don’t use toxic cleaners on your vessel. Use products like those from the commonly available Simple Green, Seaside Naturals, or TRAC Ecological Marine Products.

 • Don’t use toxic paint. There are environmentally friendly, yet durable marine anti-fouling paints available such as those manufactured by Ecological Coatings.

BOATING

Protect the shoreline from erosion and preserve aquatic vegetation:

 • Reduce throttle to “no wake” speed when close to shore.

 • Don’t operate in shallow water where you risk stirring up bottom sediment or destroying aquatic plants.



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• Avoid importing alien species by draining the bilge and cleaning the prop before leaving a waterway. 

SAVE FUEL • Slower speeds = less fuel
 • Reduce drag as much as possible
 • Avoid idling
 • Minimize the use of onboard generators
 • Know exactly where you’re going
 • Keep the hull clean
 • Keep the engine tuned

DON’T DRINK AND BOAT

Boating and drinking alchohol seem to go hand in hand. When you drink, physiological changes to your body can impair your ability to maintain your safety and the safety of others. 

 • Alcohol reduces inhibition and impairs good judgment. The more

relaxed you become, the less vigilant you will be about safety. You might even behave irresponsibly and put yourself or others at risk.

 • Alcohol erodes your sense of balance, increasing the risk of accidents on the boat of of falling into the water.

 • Your vision is negatively affected. Color and depth perception and peripheral vision deteriorate, creating the risk of striking other boats, swimmers, or marine life, particularly at night.

 • Your coordination is impaired, if you or another passenger were to fall into the water, your ability to float, grab a life ring or other flotation device, and ability to stay warm are all decreased.  

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Mak e Batteries Last Longer What’s the best to take care of your vehicle and RV batteries? Keep them filled to the proper level with distilled water. Keep the fully charged. Avoid extreme heat and vibration. Keep the terminals tight and free of any corrosive build up. And, according to Ken Hardesty, add 1/2 to 2 ounces of their battery additive every year or two. Hardesty is the president of a company called Battery Equaliser, which is the exclusive North American patent holder of this product that has been developed and proven worldwide. Battery Equaliser mixes with the battery’s electrolyte solution to dissolve sulfation that coats the lead plates and causes internal resistance which lowers overall performance as a battery ages. It will also prevent new deposits from forming. The benefit, Hardesty says, is batteries will charge faster, hold a charge longer, and last up to three times loungers. Does it really work? Hardesty says the product is making good inroads with electors industrial forklift owners who value anything that can lengthen the life of those costly batteries. These users report treated batteries charge faster and provide longer run times. And, he recognizes that battery manufacturers generally don’t recommend the use of any additives. The reason, he believes, included the

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lack of product standards, meaning most any type of product could clan to improve battery performance without substantiation, and most importantly selling fewer batteries would affect the manufacturer’s bottom line. RV batteries that sit idle for a long periods are good candidates for Battery Equaliser, Hardesty says. As little as 1/2-ounces per cell for house batteries, added every year or two, can help batteries hold a charge longer and last years longer. Simply maintaining the liquid level alone every year can help maintain battery life; anything that Battery Equaliser could add would be a bonus. Everyone is looking for a way to do their part for our environment; here is a way to keep batteries out of the waste stream twice as long and it cost much less that a new battery. Johnson Outdoors, manufactures of Minn Kota electors trolling motors, has added Battery Equaliser to their product line and it is currently being sold in the fishing section of Wal-Marts nation wide. To leaner more, visit Battery Equaliser website www.batteryequliser.com

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Pet Safety In the last ten years, I think my wife and I have gone out on our boat only a handful of times without our dog. That’s a lot of hours on the water, with our beloved pooch. Over the years, we’ve hit some bumpy seas, some very very hot and humid weather, and some ideal weather. We’ve gone swimming in bays, coves and chop. We’ve been lucky, but we also plan rather well. Here are some tips that will make your day on the water safe and enjoyable for all the participants.

Drinking Water

First thing we do when getting underway is making sure we have enough water for the dog. Dogs perspire through panting, and while doing so, loose copious amounts of body fluids. It’s imperative to keep them hydrated. We bring our water in a sports bottle, with a sports cap. Our dog learned to drink from the sports cap probably around the same time she finished with her shots. We also carry a dog bowl, for her water. Quite often, she snubs her water, while on the boat. Remember, you know better, and as responsible pet owners, sometimes you need to force them to drink. It’s amazing what a little coaxing will do.

PFD’s

The slogan “Boat Smart - Boat Safe - Wear It!” used in the Safe Boating Campaign holds true for both humans

and pets. Not all dogs can swim! Not all dogs are great swimmers, and depending on where your boat is located, should fido fall overboard, he/she may not be able to reach you before he/she suffers from exhaustion or hypothermia. So, have your dog wear a Personal Flotation Device (PFD). Pet PFD’s are sold by all the major marine vendors. Now, don’t just buy the PFD, try it on the dog once and throw it in the hold! Practice donning the vest, as well as having your pet swim with the PFD! It’s a new experience for them, and unless they get used to it, you’ll have problems, should they ever really need to wear the PFD. The Boat/US Foundation did a study on pet PFD’s. Here’s the URL: http:// www.boatus.com/foundation/findings/ findingsdog.htm.

The New Pet

You’ve just gotten a new pet, and you want to take them boating. What a great idea! However, don’t assume your pet will a) like your boat and b) enjoy boating! Dogs and cats (especially) like firm, stable surfaces. A boat can be anything but stable. When you get a new pet, first thing you should do is acclimate them to the new environment, while the boat is tied up to its normal dock or mooring. Let the animal get used to its surroundings. Have continued on page 29

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them also wear their PFD awhile, during this time. This will get them acclimated not only to the boat, but the PFD. Next turn on your engines and see if the sounds associated with them disturbs the animal. My dog couldn’t care less about the sound of an engine, but thunder, a firecracker or any sudden loud noise, and she freaks out. Better to be safe than sorry, for both you and the well being of your pets. Take short trips at first, again to let your pet get acclimated to the pitch and roll of boating. Remember, if you can get seasick, so can your pets!

Sun & Heat

We all hope, when we go boating to have a warm sunny day. That’s fine for you, but special attention must be paid to your pets! Too much sun and heat will cause heat problems for the animal. Dogs and cats (as well as many other pets) can suffer the same types of heat emergencies humans can. They include, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and sun stroke. Make sure you have a shaded area on your boat that your pet can hide under. Hopefully there is air movement, to aid in cooling them down. Remember to make sure they drink, and I find wetting down their coats also helps them feel cooler -or it helps us feel that they feel cooler. continued on page 30

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Protect their pads. Dogs and cats absorb cold and heat through their pads, and you need to be aware that they don’t burn them on the hot fiberglass.

going to cruise, this would be the best bet. This way, you don’t have to find land every few hours so fido can relieve him/herself.

Doing their Business

On the other hand, you can always go ashore and let them do their business. Remember, pick up and properly dispose of the waste products left by your animals. The Marine Sanitation Environmental Laws, should be respected; even though this is not human waste - it still causes bacterial problems. In fact, if you go ashore, there may well be animal waste laws in effect!

As you find after a couple hours on the boat that you need to use the head, so will your animal. You have a few options, depending on the type of pet you have. Cats - place their litter box at the lowest level of your boats, and make sure its level. This should induce them to use their litter box. Also, by making sort of a castle with pillows, at the same point (lowest level), should you get into rough seas, kitty may feel more secure. Dogs - you can train your dog to do his/her business in a specific spot. Its hard work, but it can be done. If you’re

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Boating with the family pet is a great way to enjoy this wonderful sport. By taking a few extra steps, you can insure a fun, safe time for all.

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Dogs and Life Jack ets 1. You wear a life vest and so should your dog. There are personal floatation devices (PFD) especially for dogs. Get one. Make sure the PFD fits properly. It should have a strap across the back to help pull the dog onto the boat if he falls in the water. 2. The first time, the dog may not want to wear it. Once he gets used to boating, he'll associate the life jacket with an outing and look forward to it. 3. Have him swim around in a shallow area with the PFD on so he gets used to that situation. 4. Getting into the boat from the dock can be safer for your dog with a dog boat ramp. If the dog is small and easily handed into the boat, then you may not need a dog ramp. Another helpful item is a dog boat ladder. This is intended for use out in the water. 5. Some dogs are water lovers. Make sure your lab or golden retriever or standard poodle understands that there's boat time and there's water time. Don't encourage them to leap into the water from the boat one time, then try to keep them from doing it in the middle of the lake or ocean. 6. Have a practice rescue drill so you'll know what's involved in pulling your dog into the boat from the water. 7. Get the dog gradually adjusted to the boat. Get in it with the dog first on dry land, then at the dock. Start the engine, and give your pet a chance to adjust to the sound. 8. Bring water for the dog. You don't want them drinking out of lakes and rivers. There could be possible contamination from dripped gasoline or harmful bacteria. 9. Watch out for slippery decks as the dogs paws have trouble getting traction on fiberglass. Some owners put a rug (with rubber backing) down for their pet to rest on. It's a good idea, as the surfaces in the boat can get uncomfortably hot for an animal. Read more: How to Keep a Dog Safe in a Boat | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5177365_keep-dog-safe boat.html#ixzz130UAK9AU

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C h o o s i n g a T r av e l C r a t e for Land and Air Transport It is important to choose a crate that is not only safe and secure but also comfortable for your furry companion as it is after all, its home away from home. Travel crates or kennels should: • provide adequate ventilation • be large enough for the animal to stand, turn around, sit erect, and lie down in a natural position • be used as a bed at home for at least a week before a trip • fasten securely • have a solid and leak-proof bottom. The Traveling Pet Our pets are our companions at home and more often than not, away from. A successful excursion away from home with a pet requires advanced planning and preparation in order to make the trip a tail-wagging success. Assemble a “pet travel kit” for your pet once and then all you need to do before each trip is add new food, water, litter items, medications and items specific to the trip. Store your pet travel items in a sturdy, easy to carry container such as a duffle bag or plastic container with cover. Pet travel kit packing list: Everyday Necessities • Drinking water • Food stored in a waterproof container • Travel bowls • Manual can opener for canned food • Medications stored in a waterproof container • Litter pan with scoop and bags • Harness or sturdy, comfortable carrier (don’t forget the pee pads in case you pet has accidents) to ensure safe, escape-free transport Identification • Collar • Up-to-date identification tag with home information • Up-to-date registration tag • Up-to-date rabies tag • Vacation tag that has information on where you can be reached while away from home In Case of Emergency (all items should be stored in a waterproof container) • Feeding schedules • Medical conditions • Special needs • Veterinarian contact information at home • Veterinarian contact information at your destination away from home • Current photo (in case your pet should get lost) Safety • First aid kit • Pet first aid book • Lifejacket when traveling on a boat Creature Comforts • Pet bed • Blanket • Toys • Treats

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M a k i n g Y o u r b o a t p e t - f r i e n d ly

Splash!­ Make sure you have a good supply of towels, especially for longer trips. Some dogs enjoy dips in the water [source: Drummond]. If your dog is used to snuggling up next to you at bedtime, this can make for a chilly -not to mention fragrant -- evening.­ Just as you pet-proofed your house and garage, you’ll need to pet-proof your boat. Assume that your pet can -- and will -- get into trouble. You can’t foresee everything, but you can train yourself to look at your boat as a cat or dog might. What smells interesting? What has fascinating moving parts? What looks or smells like food? Where’s a good place to hide? You’ll need to install a litterbox for your cat. Attach it firmly, and use shock cord to keep it secure. Make sure to use clumping litter; the non-clumping kind can create big messes in choppy waters. However, you should keep the clumping litter well away from the bilge pump, which can get clogged [source: Drummond]. For short trips, you may not need to have a bathroom area for your dog. It’s a good idea to have one on longer trips, however. You can use newspapers, or you can invest in a dog toilet. This is typically a small patch of synthetic grass attached to an absorbent, anti-microbial base [source: Animal Planet]. Your dog can sniff around just as it would on a walk. Needless to say, unless you want the phrase “poop deck” to take on a new, literal meaning, you’ll still need to have a large supply of plastic baggies handy, as you would on a walk. Everyone on board will thank you. You’ll also need to make your pet boat-friendly. Give your pet a chance to get used to the boat. Weeks before the planned trip, start making visits to the boat -- either in the dock or on the trailer. Take a tour of the boat with your pet carefully leashed or harnessed. Let your pet sniff around, explore and get used to being on the water. As you’re getting your pets acclimated to the boat, you can also help them get used to their PFDs.

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A i d s t o n av ig a t i o n Lateral System (Federal)

The waters of the United States are marked for safe navigation by the lateral system of buoyage. This system employs the simple arrangement of colors, shapes, numbers and light characteristics to show the side on which the buoy should be passed when proceeding in a given direction. The characteristics are determined by the position of the buoy with respect to the navigable channels as the channels are entered from seaward. The expression “red right returning” has long been used by the seafarer as a reminder that the red buoys are passed on the starboard (right) side when proceeding from the open sea into port (upstream). Likewise, green buoys are passed on the post (left) side, Conversely, when proceeding toward the sea or leaving port, red buoys are passed on the port side end green buoys on the starboard side. Red buoys are always even-numbered. Green buoys are odd-numbered. Red and white vertically stripped buoys mark the center of the channel.

• Port-hand buoys are painted green, with green fixed or flashing lights. • Starboard-hand buoys are painted red, with red fixed or flashing lights. • Safe water buoys, also called mldchannel or fairway buoys, and approach buoys are painted with red and white vertical stripes, with flashing lights. • Preferred channel, or junction buoys, are painted with red end green horizontal bands, with flashing lights. • Special marks (traffic separation, anchorage areas, dredging, fish net areas, etc.) are painted yellow. If lighted, the light may be fixed or flashing.

MOORING TO BUOYS

Tying up or hanging on to any navigation buoy (except a mooring buoy) or beacon is prohibited.

AIDS TO NAVIGATION

In recent years, modification to certain aids to navigation located on coastal and Inland waters have been completed. These changes apply to aids used in both the lateral and state waterway marking systems. See charts that follow:

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Fir e Safety Portable Fire Extinguishers are rated as follows:

Fire Extinguishers are classified by letters and numbers according to the class and size fire they can put out. The letter, (A, B, C, or D) indicates the class of fire. The number is a measure of the capacity of the extinguisher - the larger the number, the greater the capacity of extinguishing material to put out a fire Class A - Fires in ordinary combustibles, e.g. wood, cloth, paper, rubber and many plastics. (These are materials that burn easily, account for many boat fires, and can be extinguished with water.)

Class B – Fires in flammable liquids, combustible liquids, petroleum greases, tars, oils, oil-based paints, solvents, lacquers, alcohols, and flammable gases Class C – Fires that involve energized, electrical equipment Class D – Fires in combustible metals Class K – Fires in cooking appliances that involve combustible cooking media (vegetable or animal oils and fats)

Make sure your equipment is in working order when you need it!

EXECUTIVE FIRE PROTECTION, INC. Fire Suppression Is Our Obsession Complete Fire Extinguishing & Suppression Systems For Your Boat & Engine Room

Service & Installation of Engine Room Fixed Fire Systems & Fire Extinguishers

24 Hour Emergency Service

562.429.5211

www.ExecutiveFireProtection.com www.ExecutiveFireProtection.com


BOATING FIRE EXTINGUISHERS

Coast Guard minimum requirements are exactly that: the absolute minimum. The National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) has issued extinguisher recommendations that go beyond the Coast Guards. Open boats under 16ft with fiberglass or metal hulls and a light load of flammable Class A materials Open boats under 15ft Boats 16ft to, but not including 26 ft Open boats 16ft to, but not including 26 ft Boats 26ft to, but not including40 ft

Boats 40ft to, but not including 65 ft Boats equal to and greater than 65ft in length Portable fire extinguishers shall be mounted with a marine bracket specified on the extinguisher and located near the means of egress and be readily accessible to the compartment they are intended to serve. All required portable fire extinguishers located in accommodation spaces shall have Class A capability and at least one extinguisher shall be located at each occupied level. It shall not be necessary to travel more than half the length of the vessel or 33 ft, whichever is less, to reach an extinguisher.

1 x 5BC portable fire extinguisher located at the steering position 1 x 1A10BC portable fire extinguisher located at the steering position 2 x 1A10BC portable fire extinguishers located at the steering position and galley, when onboard, or cockpit 2 x 1A10BC located at the steering position and galley or cockpit 3 x 1A10BC located outside engine compartment, steering position, and near galley or passenger cockpit 4 x 1A10BC located outside engine compartment, steering position, crew quarters, and galley, when onboard, or cockpit Consult your local coast guard or fire extinguisher specialist Portable fire extinguishers shall be US Coast Guard approved, meet the requirements of, and be inspected and maintained in accordance with NFPA10.

FIre Extinguisher Operation

During emergencies most people operate an extinguisher for the first time. Inexperience in extinguishing fires often leads to less effective use of extinguishers which is why more than the required number of extinguishers on most vessels is often recommended.

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INTRODUCING

THE ROC BARRIER™

The World’s Fastest First Response Oil Containment System With the innovative technology of the ROC Barrier™, for the first time ever, we can contain oil spills rapidly before they threaten our global water supply and destroy thousands of marine life and wild life. • Deployed from the back of a watercraft at speeds in excess of 30 miles per hour • Faster than conventional booms • An environmental and economic breakthrough • Extremely compact and easy to use • Multi-purpose response system • Works to rapidly contain all hydrocarbon spills on the water • Sorbent barrier/boom 9x9x22 inches in size and weighs only 9 pounds • Can be carried on board any size watercraft • Great for hull protection while at dock in marinas Use Code Boat Safe at Checkout for 10% off

For more information call 1-800-808-1927 Or visit www.murrenhil.com

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T h e B u rg e r A d v a n t a g e

Y o u r V i s i o n Y o u r Wa y Y o u r Y a c h t Burger Boat Company has a long and proud tradition of constructing the finest custom yachts in America for discerning yachting enthusiasts around the world. A lot has changed over the many years Burger has been in business, but some things have remained the same: Burger continues to exhibit the skills and the passion to bring your vision to reality. While each yacht built at Burger’s shipyard shares the same quality craftsmanship, reliability and technology, no two yachts are the same. Owners of Burger-built yachts choose every detail to create their very own custom Burger like no other yacht on the water. Each new yacht shares Burger’s attention to detail, yet all have very different personalities born from their owner’s dreams. Burger artisans are dedicated to providing exquisite craftsmanship that reflects a personal style, while seamlessly integrating state-of-the art technology. To assure each custom yacht meets the customer’s expectations, the Burger team works closely with every customer as the yacht evolves. Utilizing its modern shipyard and joiner facilities, Burger and its craftsmen are capable of building and delivering custom-designed yachts to 200 feet (60m). As any Burger yacht owner will attest, Burger’s reputation for quality and reliability is undeniable. From authentic replicas of the golden age of yachting to sporty enclosed-bridge motoryachts and wheelchair-accessible contemporary vessels, Burger can customize your yacht

to reflect your dreams. Imagine no restrictions to your ideas. Imagine no boundaries to your destinations. Discover the advantages of building your yacht with Burger. Burger also specializes in refit, repair and maintenance. The Burger shipyard is a full-service facility located in Manitowoc, Wisconsin on the western shore of Lake Michigan. Services include: General Service • Bottom paint • Topside paint • Varnish • Joinery • Mechanical • Electrical • Hydraulic • HVAC • Propulsion systems • Audio/video, interior design and fit-out Haul-Out and Winter Storage • 500 metric ton MARINE TRAVELIFT® • Outside storage • Inside storage (pending space availability) • Deep water seawall that accommodates vessels to 200 ft. (61m) • Single and 3-phase power Vessel Refit • Engineering, design and project management • Modifications and extensions to both aluminum and steel vessels • Aluminum and steel (mild and stainless) fabrication • Repower; including propulsion control systems • Custom interiors • Bimini tops/awnings

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Burger employees demonstrate the company’s core values: integrity, honesty and commitment. As a result, every Burger yacht reflects the passion of the employees and the loyalty they have for each customer. Burger is committed to providing dependable service, from new construction to repair. This commitment is achieved by its staff of full time employees, through exceptional design and engineering, reliable and fully tested systems, proper materials and proven installation methods. Burger Boat Company designs and builds custom yachts, in aluminum and/or steel, ranging in sizes to 200’ (60m) and also provides, refit, repair and maintenance service. Since 1863 Burger has been recognized internationally for design, quality construction, seaworthiness, reliability and is the most respected custom yacht builder in America. Sales offices are located at Burger’s headquarters in Manitowoc, Wisconsin; Fort Lauderdale, Florida; and Monaco to serve clients from around the world.


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History of

harbor custom canvas Harbor Custom Canvas has been a leader in the marine canvas industry, serving the Long Beach and Los Angeles harbor area, for more than 90 years. Established in 1916, Harbor Custom Canvas was the first ship’s chandlery and sailmaking loft in the Los Angeles harbor. Today, the company designs and manufactures a full line of custom canvas products, including dodgers, enclosures, and covers, for all makes of yachts and marine vessels. The specialty at Harbor Custom Canvas is the fabrication of the finest custom dodgers and enclosures available. On sailboats, a dodger contributes immensely to the comfort of the helmsman and crew. On powerboats, tops and enclosures offer maximum protection from sun and weather; keep the boat clean and dry; and protect bright work, interior fabrics, passengers, and investment. Harbor Custom Canvas clients are individual boat owners, corporations, and government agencies that include BP, Marine Spill Response Corporation, the California Department of Fish and Game, the Port of Long Beach, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department, and several City of Long Beach departments. Dan Loggans, owner of Harbor Custom Canvas since 2005, comes from an entrepreneurial family background. As the eldest of six children, Dan helped with, and subsequently ran, his father’s building maintenance business while continuing his education at Cypress Community College. Due to his love of boating, Dan then turned to the marine canvas industry, where he had more freedom to express himself artistically and to expand his business skills. Hired on at Harbor Custom Canvas in 1983, Dan has spent the last 27 years mastering the art of canvas covers and enclosures. He is considered one of the best marine canvas fabricators in Southern California, and, he has won several awards from the Marine Fabricators Association and the Industrial Fabrics Association International. Dan has the unique ability to clearly interpret a customer’s desires, and then to succinctly explain the product and design option that best fits the customer’s needs. Dan is an active participant in the Southern California Marine Association, the Industrial Fabrics Association International, the Marine Fabricators Association, the Newport Beach Chamber of Commerce, and the Long Beach Chamber of Commerce. He is resolved to be known as a person who runs a successful company, who is an honest and trustworthy member of the community, and who puts his customers and employees ahead of himself. In business, Dan is most proud of Harbor Custom Canvas’s reputation in the yachting community. As well, Dan is especially pleased with the smooth transition he orchestrated between the previous owners and himself that enabled him to retain all staff and to maintain all of the company’s established vendor and customer relationships. Dan is easily spotted on the docks by his trademark working attire: shorts, floppy sun hat, and Hawaiian shirts.

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Los Angeles Launch Ramp Information Name

Lanes

Cost

Washdown

Hoist Only

$10-20, depending on size of boat

Yes

3

$5

Yes

7

$20 per day summer

Yes

7

$10

No

4

$8

Yes

AVILA BEACH Port San Luis Pier Portside Marine CHANNEL ISLANDS Channel Islands Harbor DANA POINT Dana Point Harbor - Dana Point HUNTINGTON HARBOR Sunset Aquatic Ramp LONG BEACH Alamitos Bay Launch (Davies) Claremont Launch Ramp

$10/day

Davies Launch Ramp

$10/day

Granada Launch Ramp

$10/day

Marine Stadium

4

$10/day

Yes

South Shore Launch Ramp (Across from Queen Mary)

4

$10

Yes

4

$15

No

10

$5

Yes

LOS ANGELES Cabrillo Beach Los Angeles MARINA DEL REY Marina Del Rey Harbor

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Phone

Directions/Addresses

(805) 595-7214

From Hwy. 101 exit Avila Beach Rd. to the marina

(805) 382-3007

Victoria Dr. South of Channel Islands Blvd.

(949) 496-6177

From I-5 exit PCH-Camino Las Ramblas. Turn Left on Dana Point Harbor Dr. and follow signs to the boat launch.

(714) 846-0179

From LA take 405 fwy South exit Edinger West to the ramp. (dead-ends at the ramp)

(562) 570-3215

From PCH, take 2nd street west to Marina drive, then right.

(562) 570-8636

5300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach. San launch for small sail vessels. Located at Claremont and Ocean Blvd.

(562) 570-8636

6201 E. 2nd Street, Long Beach. Located under the Davies Bridge at 2nd Street and Marina Dr. Open 24 hrs.

(562) 570-8636

S. Granada Ave, Long Beach. Sand launch for small boats. Open year-round, 8 a.m. to dusk.

(562)570-3203

5255 Paoli Way, Long Beach. Open year-round, 8 a.m. to dusk

(562) 570-8636

590 Queensway Drive, Long Beach. Open 24 hrs.

(310) 548-2645

From LA, take hwy 110 south to Gaffey St. turn left to 22nd St. turn left. Turn right on Pacific and then left on 37th St. follow to the ramp.

(310) 305-9545

Located on Fiji Wy., South end of M.D.R.

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Life Jack ets

Boaters enjoy the feel of sun and spray. So it’s tempting to boat without wearing a life jacket – especially on nice days. But modern life jackets are available in a wide variety of shapes, colors, and sizes. Many are thin and flexible. Some are built right into fishing vests or hunter coats. Others are inflatable — as compact as a scarf or fanny pack until they hit water, when they automatically fill with air. There’s no excuse not to wear a life jacket on the water!

How to Choose the Right Life Jacket

• Certain life jackets are designed to keep your head above water and help you remain in a position which permits proper breathing.

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• To meet U.S. Coast Guard requirements, a boat must have a U.S. Coast Guard-approved Type I, II, III, or V life jacket for each person aboard. Boats 16 feet and over must have at least one Type IV throwable device as well. • All states have regulations regarding life jacket wear by children. • Adult-sized life jackets will not work for children. Special life jackets are available. To work correctly, a life jacket must be worn, fit snugly, and not allow the child’s chin or ears to slip through. • Life jackets should be tested for wear and buoyancy at least once

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each year. Waterlogged, faded, or leaky jackets should be discarded. • Life jackets must be properly stowed. • A life jacket — especially a snugfitting flotation coat or deck-suit style — can help you survive in cold water.

How Do Life Jackets Save Lives?

• When capsized in rough water. • When sinking in unexpectedly heavy sea conditions. • When thrown from the boat as a result of a collision. • When injured by rocks or submerged objects. • When unconscious from carbon monoxide fumes. • When tossed into freezing water. • When thrown off balance while fishing. • When unable to swim because of heavy or waterlogged clothing.

All recreational boats must carry one wearable lifejacket (Type I, II, III or Type V lifejacket) for each person aboard. A Type V lifejacket provides performance of either a Type I, II, or

III lifejacket (as marked on its label) and must be used according to the label requirements. Any boat 16ft and longer (except canoes and kayaks) must also carry one throwable lifejacket (Type IV lifejacket).

Lifejackets must be

• Coast Guard approved • in good and serviceable condition • the appropriate size for the intended user.

Accessibility

• Wearable lifejackets must be readily accessible. • You must be able to put them on in a reasonable amount of time in an emergency (vessel sinking, on fire, etc.). • They should not be stowed in plastic bags, in locked or closed compartments or have other gear stowed on top of them. • The best lifejacket is the one you will wear. • Though not required, a lifejacket should be worn at all times when the vessel is underway. A wearable lifejacket can save your life, but only if you wear it. • Throwable devices must be immediately available for use. continued on page 62

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continued from page 61

Inflatable Lifejackets

• Inflatable lifejackets may be more comfortable to wear. • The best lifejacket is the one you will wear. • Inflatable lifejackets require the user to pay careful attention to the condition of the device. • Inflatable lifejackets must have a full cylinder and all status indicators on the inflator must be green, or the device is NOT serviceable, and does NOT satisfy the requirement to carry lifejackets. • Coast Guard Approved Inflatable lifejacket’s are authorized for use on recreational boats by person at least 16 years of age.

Child Lifejacket Requirements

Some states require that children wear lifejackets • applies to children of specific ages • applies to certain sizes of boats • applies to specific boating operations Check with your state boating safety officials. Child lifejacket approvals are based on the child’s weight. Check the “User Weight” on the label, or the approval statement that will read something like “Approved for use on recreational boats and uninspected commercial vessels not carrying passengers for hire, by persons weighing __ lbs”. They can be marked “less than 30”, “30 to 50”, “less than 50”, or “50 to 90”. Lifejacket requirements for certain boating activities under state laws The Coast Guard recommends and all states require lifejackets: • For water skiing and other towed activities (use a lifejacket marked for water skiing). • While operating personal watercraft (PWC) (use a lifejacket marked for water skiing or PWC use). • During white water boating activities. • While sailboarding (under Federal law, sailboards are not “boats”). Federal law does not require lifejackets on racing shells, rowing sculls, racing canoes, and racing kayaks; state laws

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vary. Check with your state boating safety officials. If you are boating in an area under the jurisdiction of the Army Corps of Engineers, or a federal, state, or local park authority, other rules may apply. Lifejacket Flotation There are three basic kinds of lifejacket flotation in the five types of lifejackets with the following characteristics: Inherently Buoyant (primarily foam) • Adult, Youth, Child, and Infant sizes • For swimmers & non-swimmers • Wearable & throwable styles • Some designed for water sports

Youth

Adult

Inherent Buoyancy 34 lb

III

22.5 lb.

V

22.5 to 34 lb.

II & III V

15.5 lb

Minimum Buoyancy

II & III V

11 lb

15.5 to 22 lb.

11 to 15.5 lb.

Child II and Infant Throwable:

7 lb.

Cushion

20 lb.

Ring Buoy

Wearable Type Size I & II

Inherent Buoyancy (Foam) 22 lb.

Type I

Adult

Minimum Buoyancy

Hybrid (Foam & Inflation) • Reliable • Adult, Youth, and Child sizes • For swimmers & non-swimmers • Wearable styles only • Some designed for water sports

Minimum Buoyancy Wearable Size

Inflatable • The most compact • Sizes only for adults • Only recommended for swimmers • Wearable styles only • Some with the best in-water performance

IV

Wearable Size

Adult

Youth

Child

Type

Inherent Buoyancy

Inflated Total Buoyancy

II & III

10 lb

7.5 lb.

V

22 lb.

22 lb.

II & III

9 lb

7.5 lb.

V

15 lb.

15 lb.

II

7 lb.

12 lb.

16.5 & 32 lb. article and photo provided by U.S. Coast Guard

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F l a g s & W h e r e t o f ly t h e m Flag

When Flown

Motorboat bow & stern staffs only

Motorboat bow/stern staffs and signal mast

Motorboat two masts

Sailing yacht one mast

Sailing yacht two mast

Sailing yacht more then two mast

U.S./ Yacht/ USPS Ensign

8:00 AM to sundown

Aft

Aft

Aft

After peak

Aftermost peak

Aftermost peak

Club burgee

8:00 AM to sundown

Bow

Bow

Foremast

At the truck

At the foremost truck

At the foremost truck

Private signal

8:00 AM to sundown

Not flown

masthead

Mainmast

When under way at the truck

At the aftermost truck

At the main truck

Flag officer’s flag

day and night

Not flown

In place of private signal

In place of private signal

Instead of burgee at truck

Instead of private signal

Instead of private signal

U.S. Jack

At anchor on Sun. & holidays 8:00 AM to sundown

Not flown

Not flown

Bow or jack staff

Not flown

Jack staff

Jack staff

Absent flag

Daylight during absence of owner

Not flown

Starboard yardarm

Starboard main yardarm

Starboard spreader

Starboard main spreader

Starboard main spreader

Meal flag

Daylight during meal hours when at anchor

Not flown

Starboard yardarm

Starboard main yardarm

Starboard spreader

Starboard main spreader

Starboard main

Guest flag

Daylight when owner is absent but guests are on board

Not flown

Starboard yardarm

Starboard main yardarm

Starboard spreader

Starboard main spreader

Starboard main spreader

Bow pennant. Fish, Fun flag, Skin Diver flag

8:00AM to sundown

Bow

Port yardarm

Port forward yardarm

Port spreader

Foremost port spreader

Foremost port spreader

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Recommended yacht size flags POWERBOAT Length of Boat

Size of Private Signal & Club Signal

Size ofYacht Ensign

Under 20 feet

8” x 12”

12” x 18”

20 feet

10” x 15”

12” x 18”

25 feet

10” x 15”

16” x 24”

30 feet

12” x 18”

16” x 24”

35 feet

12” x 18”

24” x 26”

40 feet

14” x 21”

24” x 36”

45 feet

14” x 21”

24” x 36”

50 feet

16” x 24”

2 1/2’ x 4’

55 feet

16” x 24”

2 1/2’ x 4’

60 feet

20” x 30”

2 1/2’ x 4’

70 feet

20” x 30”

3’x 5’

80 feet

24” x 36”

3’x 5’

90 feet

24” x 36”

4’x 6’

100 feet

30” x 48”

4’x 6’

20 feet

10” x 15”

16” x 24”

25 feet

10” x 15”

16” x 24”

30 feet

12” x 18”

24” x 36”

35 feet

14” x 21”

24” x 36”

40 feet

14” x 21”

24” x 36”

45 feet

16” x 24”

2 1/2’ x 4’

50 feet

20” x 30”

2 1/2’ x 4’

60 feet

20” x 30”

2 1/2’ x 4’

70 feet

24” x 36”

3’x 5’

80 feet

24” x 36”

3’x 5’

90 feet

30” x 48”

4’x 6’

100 feet

30” x 48”

4’x 6’

SAILBOAT

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P r o d u c t & S e r v ic e D I R E C T O R Y Bags & Accessories Sailor Bags...................................................................................................................................... 56 Battery Maintenance Battery Equaliser............................................................................................................................. 25 Bird Control Nixalite of America Inc..................................................................................................................... 4 Boat-Yacht Transport West Coast Boat-Yacht Delivery & Maintenance........................................................................... 11 Boat Cleaners TR Industries - Sea Power................................................................................................................. 7 Boating Safety Pants Posture Pants LLC........................................................................................................................... 11 Boat Power Accessories Battery Equaliser............................................................................................................................. 25 Boat Wax TR Industries - Sea Power................................................................................................................. 7 Bottom Cleaning-Prop Service Pro-Tech............................................................................................................................................ 7 Child Safety Device Safety Turtle.................................................................................................................................... 30 Cleaning Products Nixalite of America Inc..................................................................................................................... 4 Custom Construction Nexxus Remodeling Inc......................................................................................Outside Back Cover Custom Dog Beds Max Comfort Inc............................................................................................................................. 48 Custom Linens Custom Quality Linens & On Board Design................................................................................... 52 Custom Marine Canvas Harbor Custom Canvas................................................................................................................... 55 Custom Marine Lighting Aplenglow Lights............................................................................................................................ 23 Custom Nautical Flags FlagandBanner.com......................................................................................................................... 67 Custom Pet-Yacht Accessories Yep Yup........................................................................................................................................... 28 Custom Yacht Builders Burger Boat..................................................................................................................................... 50 Dog Boarding Ladder DB LLC-BoatingDog.com.............................................................................................................. 33 Dog Safety Ladder DB LLC-BoatingDog.com.............................................................................................................. 33 Dog Toilets UGO Petcare LLC................................................................................................. Inside Back Cover Eco-Friendly Chemical Free Laundry Balls Mystic Wonders Inc......................................................................................................................... 21 Eco-Friendly Cleaners Green Scene Chicago...................................................................................................................... 20 Eco-Friendly Pets Pets Head To Tail............................................................................................................................. 29 Eco-Friendly Pet Waste Products Howell KDS-The Flushable Bag..................................................................................................... 26 Eco-Friendly Products Street Wise Green............................................................................................................................ 19 Green Monitors & Displays Green Marine LLC............................................................................................................................ 8 Kitchen & Baths Nexxus Remodeling Inc......................................................................................Outside Back Cover Luxury Pet Accessories ODH Enterprises (Official Dog House).......................................................................................... 57 Luxury Pet Supply ODH Enterprises (Official Dog House).......................................................................................... 57 Maintenance-Refit & Repair Burger Boat..................................................................................................................................... 50

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Marine Accessories Monkey Knuts................................................................................................................................. 15 Marine Fire Safety Executive Fire Protection................................................................................................................ 44 Marine Solar Accessories Alter Systems LLC.......................................................................................................................... 19 Mobility Veterinary Service Home Pet Doctor.com..................................................................................................................... 31 Nautical Flag Accessories FlagandBanner.com......................................................................................................................... 67 Online Pet Apparel Swanky Pooch Pawtique................................................................................................................. 21 Online Pet Boutique Swanky Pooch Pawtique................................................................................................................. 21 Online Pet Carriers Rain Shadow LLC - Pet Abbey.............................................................................Inside Front Cover Online Pet Products KB Co - HereKittyKitty.com........................................................................................................... 15 Online Pet Safety Products Rain Shadow LLC - Pet Abbey.............................................................................Inside Front Cover Personal Floatation Device Multi Banana Boat........................................................................................................................... 15 Personal Safety Falcon Safety Products...................................................................................................................... 2 Pet Accessories Doggie Carriers............................................................................................................................... 41 Pet Apparel & Accessories Pampered Dog Gifts........................................................................................................................ 12 Pet Apparel Bloomingtails Dog Boutique........................................................................................................... 43 Pet Products & Accessories 1 Cute Pooch................................................................................................................................... 52 Pet Ramps & Stairs Puppy Stairs..................................................................................................................................... 46 Pet Safety Accessories Pet Portables.................................................................................................................................... 57 Pet Safety Products & Accessories Village Pet Outfitters LLC............................................................................................................... 36 Pet Safety Products Pets Head To Tail............................................................................................................................. 29 Pet Safety Vests Bloomingtails Dog Boutique........................................................................................................... 43 Pampered Dog Gifts........................................................................................................................ 12 Pet Septic Products All Pet Solutions-Unique Distributors............................................................................................ 26 Pet Travel Accessories Pet Portables.................................................................................................................................... 57 Pet Travel Products Doggie Carriers............................................................................................................................... 41 Pet Waste Products UGO Petcare LLC................................................................................................. Inside Back Cover Wiz Dog LLC.................................................................................................................................. 62 Portable Pet Potty All Pet Solutions-Unique Distributors............................................................................................ 26 Portable Signal Devices, Marine Horns Falcon Safety Products...................................................................................................................... 2 Safety Apparel Posture Pants LLC........................................................................................................................... 11 Theft Prevention-Marine Safety & Security SeaKey Inc...................................................................................................................................... 42 Theft Prevention Q-Lok Inc........................................................................................................................................ 16 Waterproof Dog Beds Max Comfort Inc............................................................................................................................. 48 Waterproof Pet Beds & Accessories Pets2Bed.com.................................................................................................................................. 47

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