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Issue 37

August 2017

NEWSL ETTER O F THE BRITISH MO TORCYCLE CHARITABLE TRUST


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Considering there hasn’t been a race at Surrey’s famous banked circuit since the worrying war-cloud month of August 1939, it is remarkable how strong the appeal of Brooklands remains. During WWII, and undoubtedly for all the right reasons, a large hangar was erected on the Finishing Straight, barely 50 yards from the Clubhouse…which has long been tastefully returned to ‘period’ condition. This huge hangar was, quite literally, a “blot on the landscape”; more importantly it was a block on the original course. Although latterly its mainly aircraft-related artefacts were thoroughly viewable it prevented historic vehicles [upon which modern-day Brooklands so thrives] from running on top of a particular section of the hallowed concrete. Cutting a long story short a considerable amount of money was duly raised, boosted by the National Lottery Fund, whereupon said hangar was carefully dismantled and re-erected alongside the straight to create the Aircraft Factory exhibit, next to the new Flight Shed. Over the last quarter century Goodwood [especially September’s annual Revival] is happily acknowledged as Brooklands’ spiritual successor. It was appropriate therefore that, on Saturday morning June 17th, Lord March cut-the-tape, simultaneously announcing the “liberation” of this long-unused stretch of track. During the 2day Meeting that ensued, dozens of cars and motorbikes – all with historic links to Brooklands -- were able to run around an anticlockwise “oval”, defined by a temporary positioning of straw bales. It was interesting to hear Brooklands director Allan Winn state how – during the re-construction process – that they had managed to preserve the original surface, and had virtually avoided laying any new concrete.

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The Earl of March cuts the ribbon (above) to re-open the Finishing Straight (below) while (inset) your scribe inspects the motorcycle display.

The small contingent of participating motorcycles, dating mainly 1930 thru 1939, included Sammy Miller [V4 AJS]. Amongst several other race version brands in action were Brough Superior [ridden by Howard Wilcox], Vincent-HRD {Bridge-Butler], two New Imperials [Larke, Williams], New Hudson [Morley], Scott [Heath], Norton [Thompson}, and a brace of R10 Ajays [Botting, Webber]. All in all it was another memorable milestone in Brooklands’ postwar story. The noise and the aroma, needless to say, were highly evocative! - Mike Jackson

Front page photograph: BMCT member Richard Duffin (1951 AJS 7R ‘Boy’s Racer’) gets smartly away from the start line during the motorcycle demonstration at the Flywheel Festival, held at Bicester Heritage in June.


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Stroud artist Kirsty Tallon kindly sent us a superb print of the BMCT’s Baughan 2 wheel drive Trials Outfit that is on display at The Museum in the Park in Stroud. Copies of the A4 size print are available from Kirsty at Broody Designs Limited, 135 Bath Road, Stroud GL5 3LL for £30, and she will also undertake commissions for original artwork of BMCT members’ personal motorcycles, cars and aircraft. Motorcycle commissions (A4 size) in black ink and watercolour paint are priced at £100 . Kirsty’s email is ket@broodydesigns.co.uk and her phone number is 07751 181076. If you contact her don’t forget to mention the BMCT, as a percentage of all sales will go to us as a charitable donation.

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A very attractive classic motorcycle has joined the National Motor Museum’s impressive collection of two-wheeled transportation. This new arrival is a 1953 BSA A10 Golden Flash in first-class condition, which has been generously donated to the museum by its long-term owner. Living up to its name, this Golden Flash looks stunning with its gold paintwork, but not all examples of this popular model were painted this colour; black paintwork was standard, while oddly the gold colour option was referred to as ‘beige’ in period BSA advertising.

A popular model following its 1950s launch, the Golden Flash produced 35bhp from its 646cc 2-cylinder engine, which was enough to propel a daring owner up to 100mph. Not all owners tested the performance limits of their motorcycles, however, with many preferring to fit practical sidecars to carry luggage or an extra passenger. This 1953 example is fitted with plungertype suspension to its rear wheel, with buyers also being able to specify a rigid frame as an alternative. Later versions used a revised set-up with swinging arm rear suspension. This Golden Flash now takes pride of place in The Motorcycle Story in the National Motor Museum.

Motoring Picture Library/National Motor Museum


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The Black Country Living Museum have announced that they have been awarded £9.8million from the National Lottery towards their £21.7m project BCLM: Forging Ahead, giving them an opportunity to save more landmark community and commercial buildings from demolition and rebuild them at the Museum. This will see the creation of: new learning facilities; a new visitor centre and car park; and several 1940s-1960s historic developments which would see the Museum expand by up to a third. All of these developments will represent what it was like to live and work in the Black Country in the 1940s-60s, and they will preserve an important period of our history for generations to come. A second-round application to the HLF will be submitted in October 2018 to unlock further funding, with a view to completing the project in 2022.

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Volunteers from the Brooklands Museum were on hand with a selection of motorcycles for the third running of the revived Chateau Impney Hill Climb. A sprint course in the grounds of the spectacular hotel near Droitwich was a fixture in the motor sport calendar in the nineteen fifties and sixties, organised by the Hagley and district Light Car Club. The Chateau Impney Speed Trials not only attracted some of the most sought-after racing cars and drivers of the era, but also thousands of spectators who would line the hotel’s drive. In its heyday, its popularity meant organisers often had to limit the number of entrants, turning away would-be competitors. Changes of ownership of the hotel spelt the end for competitive motorsport in the grounds, but in 2015, the speed trials were relaunched as the Chateau Impney Hill Climb by the enthusiastic new owners, the Spollon family – almost 60 years since motorsport first came to the Chateau. The inaugural event was praised by competitors and spectators alike, with particular acclaim going to the new course. Double the length of the original track yet still rooted within the stunning grounds of the unique and historic Chateau Impney, the RAC MSA-approved Hill Climb course proved challenging for even the most experienced competitors. Although the course has not yet been approved for competition use by the ACU, the organisers wished to let the public see and hear some racing motorcycles take to the course, so two lunchtime demonstrations were arranged for a wide variety of bikes, the majority from the Brooklands Museum displays.

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The 69th VMCC Banbury Run was a first for the BMCT. For the first time we entered a machine in the event, which is for motorcycles made prior to 1931. Our entry was the 1928 Humber 350 Overhead Camshaft Sports which we have been recommissioning for quite some time. In the hands of our trustee Nick Jeffery it completed the course with just a brief stoppage caused by fuel vapourisation (it was a blisteringly hot day). Nick reports that it is a very nice machine to ride, although its sliding gear gearbox takes some getting used to.

Nick Jeffery with the BMCT’s Humber 350 OCS

BMCT member John Summers (1903 Kerry)

Banbury Run stalwart Pete Burrows on his Royal Ruby

Andrew Eason sets a cracking pace on his Norton CS1

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In June we attended Flywheel Festival, a charming two-day event held at Bicester Heritage, a preserved WW2 aerodrome in Oxfordshire which is now home to 30 specialist businesses in the historic motoring field. Throughout the weekend there were demonstration s of vintage and classic vehicles, with club exhibits and flying displays featuring aircraft dating back to World War 1. Well worth a visit in 2018.


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Jean Nougier harboured ambitions take on the “Big Boys” on the Grand Prix circuit but it must be remembered that the Garage was the sole source of family income for Jean and Henri. They had no independent financial means and worked normal hours at the Garage, returning in the evenings and at weekends to prepare the race bikes. Against this background, it is remarkable that Jean managed to build the Nougier Four. Initially built in 1953 as a 350cc (that never ran in public) Jean squared the Bore and Stroke to 54mm and created his transverse 500cc 4 cylinder engine.

The frame was built by Jean and, after some Whatever the case, Norton took their experimentation, the front forks used were interest no further and the engine was never those of a modified Norton Roadholder type. developed to its full potential. It appeared at a couple of races and even won a Hill One of the most interesting “what could Climb in 1957, piloted by Pierre Collignon. have been” moments for British fans came in In addition to the 4 cylinder, Jean continued 1954. There is only anecdotal evidence but to improve his 175cc racer and this in conversations, Jean Nougier had spoken continued to win National events throughout about a visit to him by Joe Craig, from the the 1950s. There were also successes in the Norton Racing Department. Craig was keen 250cc and 350cc classes. to buy the whole Nougier 4 project, with Jean taking the initial engine and his In the early 1960s, Jean developed a very drawings to England for further develop- competitive 50cc DOHC before switching to ment. Different conclusions have been 2 strokes with a modified Maico in the same class. In 1969/70 Jean developed an air The brothers were good friends with Pierre cooled 125cc, single cylinder, 2 stroke Maico Collignon (1907 – 2000). A fellow enthusiast before developing a water cooled variant for and racer – he won the 250cc Class at the 1970/72. Bol D’Or in 1952 on a Moto Guzzi – Collignon owned a foundry at Grenoble. Collignon’s In 1972 Jean developed an air cooled, twin foundry cast many parts for Jean, often using cylinder 250cc with factory modified Maico wooden patterns that Jean had produced cylinders and an in-house cylinder head. The himself at Saint Andiol. bike was a success with Andre Kaci winning the French National 250cc Class ahead of, amongst others, Patrick Pons on a Yamaha. I N S I D E S T O R Y H E A D LThisI was N Ethe fifth and last French title that offered but it appears that the AMC Board Nougier bikes won to add to the four 125cc were reluctant to accept outside help and World Records set back in 1938. were financially strapped to boot. In Jean had kept most of their bikes and, after addition, Jean was not sure about the his death the family arranged for the viability of such an extended absence from collection to go to the Motorcycle Museum the family garage. in Marseille, part of which is shown below.

The engine was full of innovative ideas; Jean took the camshaft drive from between the middle cylinders and routed it up behind them to the pair of one piece camshafts. This helped him to make the engine more compact than the competition – it is said that the Nougier was 12 cms narrower than the Gilera and lighter. Reductions in weight and space were achieved in other areas. Although fed by 4 carburettors, the middle pair had a shared float chamber as can be seen below. The engine was cast by Pierre Collignon with 2 blocks of 2 aluminium cylinders, canted forward to improve air flow and thereby the cooling. The cylinders had a tendency to go ovoid and were replaced by individual steel cylinders inspired by the Citroen 2CV.

Bike 57 - Nougier 175cc (version 8) from 1957. Bike 53 - Nougier 500cc 4 Cylinder. Bike 8 - Nougier Maico 125cc. Bike 69 - Nougier 250cc 1972.

For those interested in reading more about the fascinating Nougier brothers, track down a copy of ‘Motos Nougier 1932-1972’ by Francois-Marie Dumas. French text but extensively illustrated.

The Marseille Motorcycle Museum is at: 18 Traverse Saint-Paul, 13013 Marseille, France. Tel: +33 (0) 491 02 29 55


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We’re pleased to report we have been successful in acquiring a lovely example of a Norman B4 250 Sports which is now on display at the Dover Transport Museum, our newest affiliated museum. The museum were keen to get hold of a B4 to add to their Norman display, and when a suitable bike came up at the recent Bonhams Stafford sale the BMCT were lucky enough to be the winning bidder. The Norman company were successful in business in Ashford, Kent for many years. They were originally enamellers and platers who turned to bicycle and then motorcycle manufacture in the nineteen thirties. Preferring two-stroke power, Norman employed engines from British Anzani and Villiers in their range of lightweight motorcycles. The B4 Sports of 1961 was an attractive machine in the Café Racer style, and with its Italianate looks was lusted after by many a sixteen-year-old at the time, but faced stiff competition from the likes of the Greeves Sports Twin. But Norman could also claim competition success, with a B3 Sport finishing second in the gruelling Thruxton 500 Mile race of 1959. Contemporary magazine reports speak of a ’distinctive yowl’ and brisk performance from the tuned 249cc Villiers 2T engine, and the sturdy frame and front fork designed my Norman in conjunction with Armstrong helped to give secure handling. The firm was bought by Raleigh in the early 1960s and production moved to Nottingham from Ashford. But it wasn’t long before Raleigh called time on motorcycle manufacturing, and another British make faded away.

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Welcome to the following new members and supporters of our cause: Clive Denton-Roberts, GOSPORT Andrew Pack, WOKING Judy Pack, WOKING Paul Skeet, WALLINGTON David Vaughan, MITCHAM Jennifer Kelly, SOUTHAMPTON Malcolm Harrison, LANCING Peter Dooley, NUNEATON Linda Dooley, NUNEATON Carey Wilson, LONDON Chris Rod, WEYMOUTH Kevin Mills, ASHTEAD Tim White, BRACKLEY Gillian Borrington, BRACKLEY Nicholas Robin, COLEFORD Julian Marsh, WALTON ON THAMES N. Lockyer, BRIDGWATER J. Heigham, BRIDGWATER John Hulme, ANDOVER Eileen Hulme, ANDOVER Jacqueline Ward, MAIDENHEAD Jonathan Smith, WATERLOOVILLE Michael Wilson, CHELMSFORD Ian Youdan, SALISBURY Philip Butler, BANBURY Alan Butler, BANBURY Martin Pratt, ASHFORD

Derek Bennett, SWINDON Stephen Marshall, EASTBOURNE André Dunn, STOKE-SUB-HAMDON Matthew Hardy, TAMWORTH John Wyatt, HORNCHURCH Jeanne Wyatt, HORNCHURCH Richard Paris, SURBITON Rhys Griffiths, FORDINGBRIDGE Vanessa Joyner, CHRISTCHURCH Paul Knight, RICHMOND Graham Renaut, NEWBURY Shirley Renaut, NEWBURY Philip Boxall, HAYLING ISLAND Sarah Boxall, HAYLING ISLAND George Boxall, HAYLING ISLAND Ray Walker, FAREHAM Barbara Walker, FAREHAM Mark Edwards, YEOVIL Les Martin, NEW ROMNEY David Weller, CHATHAM Wendy Howes, CHRISTCHURCH Patrick Anthony, MITCHAM Gerri Chandler, WEST DRAYTON Chris Pay, SEVENOAKS Duncan Soudan, FAREHAM William Gillam, TEMPLECOMBE Debbie Gillam, TEMPLECOMBE

Nigel Treloar, SUTTON Peter Waygood, POOLE Robert Ross, SOUTHAMPTON Wednesday Batchelor, WYMONDHAN Anthony Keil, SOUTHAMPTON Michael Larking, SITTINGBOURNE Linda Larking, SITTINGBOURNE Phillip Plant, MANCHESTER Christopher Waite, SOUTHAMPTON Carol Waite, SOUTHAMPTON Aaron Nicol, SOUTHAMPTON Terence Marsh, BOURNEMOUTH Michael Hunka, READING Kevin Knight, HITCHIN Colin Legg, BLANDFORD FORUM Robert Presslee, DORCHESTER Andy Sharp, YEOVIL Lynda Sharp, YEOVIL Peter Ramsbottom, WALTON ON THAMES John Center, OXFORD Wendy Eldridge, PETWORTH William Adams, BOURNEMOUTH Simon Allen, HORLEY Nigel Terry, DOVER Michael Lant, NEWTON ABBOT Neil Paterson, GLASGOW


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T H E B R I T I S H M OTO R C Y C L E C H A R I TA B L E T RU S T Registered in England No. 01445196 Registered Charity No. 509420 Registerered Office Holly Cottage Main Street Bishampton Pershore WR10 2NH UK Life President Trevor F. Wellings Trustees I N Walden OBE (Chairman) P J Wellings T P V Barnes J F R Handley M Jackson J N Jeffery J E Kidson M Penn

The British Motorcycle Charitable Trust (BMCT) was originally formed in 1979 to facilitate the building of the National Motorcycle Museum at Bickenhill, near Solihull in the West Midlands, but since 1995 the BMCT has been an entirely separate organisation, a grant making Charity dedicated to the promotion of British motor cycle engineering heritage through a network of affiliated transport museums throughout the country. Membership is open to all, and allows free entry to all the museums in our affiliation scheme. Our funding comes from membership fees, bequests, donations and income from our investments. Please direct any enquiries to the secretary, Andy Bufton, at the Registered Office address on the left.

Our affiliated museums are: Black Country Living Museum, Dudley British Motor Museum, Gaydon Brooklands Museum, Weybridge Coventry Transport Museum Dover Transport Museum Gloucester Life Museum Haynes International Motor Museum Jet Age Museum, Gloucester London Motorcycle Museum Manx Museum, Isle of Man National Motor Museum, Beaulieu Sammy Miller Museum, New Milton Stroud Museum in the Park The Tank Museum, Bovington

Secretary Andy Bufton Tel: 01386 462524 Mob: 07754 880116 Email: info@bmct.org

www.bmct.org

Preserving the past...for the future DAT E S

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27th August The Sammy Miller Run, New Milton, Hants. Over 100 classic bikes and their riders will set off from the Sammy Miller Museum for a pleasant meander through the New Forest, with a stop for lunch en route. There’s a shorter route for the Veterans, first bike away is at 11 am, and the BMCT are again sponsoring the Finishers’ Awards. 16th-17th September Kop Hill Climb Revival, Princes Risborough, Bucks. The event was originally established in 1910 but due to a minor accident involving a spectator on the public road that formed the hill climb, the last competitive event was held on 28 March 1925. The RAC then banned all motorsport on public roads, making the Kop Hill Climb the last of its kind to be run on the public highways in the UK. Since 1999 Kop Hill has been the focus of an annual revival run as a non-competitive, charity event which attracts hundreds of classic, veteran and vintage car and motorcycle entries. 31st August - 2nd September Salon Privé, Blenheim Palace, Woodstock, Oxon. A Concours d'Elégance in the truest sense, Salon Privé is the most luxurious of garden parties set against the backdrop of ‘Britain’s Greatest Palace’, Blenheim Palace. Presenting the finest collection of supercars, hypercars and classic cars, along with a luxury retail village and exquisite cuisine, it is a truly unique experience. A select few motorcycles are invited to attend, and this year the BMCT will be exhibiting its Jones 250 Twin race bike in the Concours competition on Thursday and Friday. 14th-15th October Carole Nash Classic Motorcycle Mechanics Show, Stafford Showground Celebrating the growing popularity of emerging and modern classics from the 1960s, 70s and 80s, the Carole Nash Classic Motor cycle Mechanics Show has grown in popularity year after year and now regularly welcomes more than 30,000 enthusiasts through its doors. Taking place at the superb Staffordshire County Showground the event features over 900 traders, dealers and autojumble stands offering a wealth of parts and spares for every project. There’s a host of excellent club stands, exciting live action, the Bonhams autumn sale, classic off-road machines and special guest stars from iconic eras of motorcycling. 10th-12th November Lancaster Insurance Classic Motor Show, National Exhibition Centre, Birmingham The most diverse mix of marques will be showcased by 240 classic car and bike clubs from across the UK, displaying rare and loved classics that span more than 100 years. As well as a fantastic number of vehicles, you can also visit the UK’s biggest indoor Autojumble, a haven of parts and spares for anyone working on their car or bike, as well as 650 specialist exhibitors and traders, offering a mix of products and services.

Published by Matchless Management Services, Holly Cottage, Main Street, Bishampton, Pershore WR10 2NH

Issue 37  

Contents: Brooklands Museum, Black Country Living Museum, Art Print Offer, National Motor Museum, 69th Banbury Run, Flywheel Festival, Nougi...