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From the Editor

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et another season of celebrating and “good times” is upon us. Mardi Gras is just a few short weeks away, but the preparations for this year’s activities have been underway for months now. Whether you love this typically Southern holiday for the plethora of beads, the seemingly endless parade schedules, or those divinely delectable King Cakes, Mardi Gras brings out the “fun side” of a normally boring Tuesday. However, after this day of indulgence known as Fat Tuesday, the Lenten season follows with another fresh start. Some of us, unfortunately enough, may have already given up on those New Year Resolutions and need an excuse to try again. Whether

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With the excitement of Mardi Gras upon us, be sure to read this month’s feature, which covers many of the artisans behind the costumes for this festive season on Page 50. Photo by Susan Margaret Barrett

you wanted to loosen those skinny jeans or try to save a buck or two, Lent offers forty days of fasting of any sort. Most years, I “give up” some type of food or beverage—sometimes fried or of the carbonated kind. Last year, I gave up bread of every type imaginable and found myself feigning over rolls a few short days into my Lenten promise. A few years back, I was traveling to Ireland during Lent; so I knew that whatever my promise was for that year would be tested time and time again. Instead of giving up something that particular year, I decided to better myself during Lent. I gave up negativity and practiced a little positive reinforcement. Let me tell you; when traveling, complaining comes

pretty natural. However, with the absence of those negative tendencies, I ended up having a blast in the “Land of the Gingers”. So, for this Mardi Gras season, enjoy yourself and indulge while you can. Thankfully, the season of Lent follows behind to offer a chance for a clean slate. Leave those “Negative Nancys” and “Negative Neds” behind on Fat Tuesday, and wake up to a positive life along and beyond the Mississippi.


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publisher Cheryl Foggo Rinehart m a n a g i n g e d i t o r consulting editor Jennie Guido Jean Nosser Biglane graphic designers Jan Ratcliff Anita Schilling media coordinator Adam Blackwell s t a ff p h o t o g r a p h e r s Van O’Gwin Elise D. Parker Cheryl Rinehart s a l e s s t a ff Tracey Farrell Lynn Janette Cheryl Rinehart Donna Sessions o ff i c e a s s i s t a n t Rachel Benoit contributors Dr. Gary R. Bachman Caroline Devereaux Robert Ferguson Lucien C. “Sam” Gwin Becky Junkin Alma Womack

Dr. Gary R. Bachman

Rachel Benoit

Adam Blackwell

Jean Biglane

Tracey Farrell

Jennie Guido

Lynn Janette

Van O’Gwin

Elise D. Parker

Jan Ratcliff

Cheryl Rinehart

Anita Schilling

Donna Sessions

Caroline Devereaux

Robert Ferguson

Lucien C. “Sam” Gwin

Becky Junkin

Alma Womack

Bluffs & Bayous is published monthly to promote the greater Southern area of Louisiana and Mississippi in an informative and positive manner. We welcome contributions of articles and photos; however, they will be subject to editing and availability of space and subject matter. Photographs, comments, questions, subscription requests and ad placement inquiries are invited! Return envelopes and postage must accompany all materials submitted if a return is requested. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Bluffs & Bayous are those of the authors or columnists and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products or services herein. We reserve the right to refuse any advertisement. Bluffs & Bayous strives to insure the accuracy of our magazine’s contents. However, should inaccuracies or omissions occur, we do not assume responsibility.

o ff i c e

423 Main Street, Suite 7 | Natchez, MS 39120 | 601-442-6847 | fax 601-442-6842 bluf fsmag@gmail.com | bbupandcoming@gmail.com media.bluf fsandbayous@gmail.com www.bluf fsbayous.com

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February 2014

feature

The Krewe of Natchez Indians’ 2014 King, Terry Woodside, was presented during the krewe’s recent ball.

Looking Behind the Bedecked Curtain.....pages 50-55

ON THE COVER At a recent brunch in honor of Natchez’s Mardi Gras Royalty at Heckler Hall, the home of Becky and Jerry Junkin, this festive bust was decorated to help greet guests. See related story on pages 50-55. Photo by Cheryl Rinehart.

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February 2014

fav o r i t e s Events February Premier Event........................................................................................... 58 February Up & Coming!...................................................................................... 58-62 Up & Coming Mardi Gras Events!....................................................................... 63-64

G’s Fare Friendly Finds for February.................................................................................14-21

Healthy Living Continuing Resolutions....................................................................................... 42-43

In the Garden Growing Epiphytes............................................................................................... 26-27 Avoid the Seven Deadly Sins of Gardening.........................................................30-31

Legal Notes Shirking Responsibilities..................................................................................... 38-39

Friendly Finds for February pages 14 - 21

Southern Sampler Fat Tuesday Excursions........................................................................................56-57

The Social Scene A Taste of the Trust..............................................................................................10-13 The Outlets at Vicksburg’s Shopping Extravaganza........................................... 24-25 Santa Claus Party................................................................................................ 28-29 Women’s Health Center Christmas Story........................................................... 34-36 Eat, Drink, and Be Scary.....................................................................................40-41 Healthy Parks Healthy People and Darryl Haley............................................... 46-47

The Wedding Scene Mary Haley Davis and David Lee Chaney, Jr. Wedding..................................... 44-45

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THE social SCENE Brookhaven, MS

A Taste of The Trust

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he annual “A Taste of The Trust� served a packed house of more than 350 people at The Crossing in downtown Brookhaven, Mississippi. A wide spectrum of cuisine was sampled and savored from more than twenty restaurants and caterers of the region. The combination of delicious food, a well supported silent auction, and splendid weather resulted in a successful charity fundraising tradition. The Trust was established in 1992 as a project to restore the Lampton Auditorium, the campus of Whitworth College, and downtown Brookhaven. The Trust strives to identify and support the preservation of history, culture, and the arts for the Brookhaven community. Photos by Bill Perkins

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Robin and Shannon Patterson with Helen and Johnny Lynch 2 Reggie Jones, Valerie Hall, and Dr. James Hall 3 Anna Guist and Janet Smith 4 Lindsey Robinson, Tracey Farrell, and Amy McDonald 5 Anna Smith and Betty Langston 6 Jason Snider and Glenda Hux 7 Ben Burns, Amy McDonald, and Kevin Smith 8 Bill Perkins and Ann Tillman 9 Anna Smith and Nic Belk 10 Brad Boerner and Leslie Douglas 11 Kellie Simmons and Kelsey Jordan

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THE social SCENE

Brookhaven, ms

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12 Sue Baker, Lindsey Robinson, Andrea Mabry, Tracey Farrell, Leslie Baker, and Emily Phillips 13 Chad Smith, Matt Fitzsimmons, and Chris Robinson 14 Mark and Anna Guist 15 Betty Langston, Sherrill Wallace, and Betty Ann Perkins 16 Devon Welch, Erin McCaffrey, and Lucy Holloway 17 Dot Cannon, Nic Belk, and Betty Langston

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THE social SCENE Brookhaven, MS

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18 Joyce Bedsole, Matt Fitzsimmons, and Debbie Smith 19 Larue Baker and Carla Snider 20 Mayor Joe Cox, Don Perkins, and Nic Belk 21 Nic and Betsy Belk with Jeremy Orr 22 Ryan Case, Dennis Valentine, and Bill Boerner 23 Lindsey Robinson, Kellie Simmons, and Amy McDonald 24 Stephanie Orr and Carla Snider

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THE social SCENE

Brookhaven, ms

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25 Tanya Bairfield, Heather Martin, and Ron Dunegan 26 Steve, Michelle, and Stephen Fitzsimmons 27 Robin and Kevin Laird 29 Wesley and LeWaire Waycaster

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The following soup recipe is from Karen Stubbs. This is her favorite for the end of summer and uses peppers from her garden.

Roasted Pepper Soup 3 large red or orange bell peppers (If you want it spicier, you can roast a few poblanos or jalapeños.) 1/2 white onion, chopped 2-3 cloves garlic 2 cups chicken stock (You can add more or less depending on the thickness you want.) Salt and pepper to taste Optional garnish (below) Wash and coat peppers with a thin coat of olive oil, and place on a grill or in the oven on broil. Turn until each side is blackened. Place roasted peppers in a paper bag (closed up) or covered bowl for about a half an hour. This loosens the skin so that it is easy to remove. In another pan, sauté the white onion and garlic. Remove the peppers from the bag or bowl; then skin and seed them. (Be careful not to rub your eyes! The insides of peppers, especially the seeds, can be very irritating if they get anywhere on your face.) Take the pepper meat and puree it in a blender or food processor. Add the sautéed onion and garlic, and process until smooth. Add chicken stock and combine. Place the mixture in your soup pot, and simmer the flavors together. Salt and pepper the soup to taste. Add more chicken stock if the mixture is too thick. (I like to serve hot or cold with some parsley and green onion for garnish and a dollop of sour cream or plain yogurt swirled on the top with a few croutons.)

Karen Stubbs got this recipe from Dr. Carl Passman. I can say it is wonderful since we have tried this at home.

Best Ever Crown Roast 7- to 8-pound crown roast 1 tablespoon peppercorns 1 clove garlic 1 bunch rosemary 1 bunch thyme Salt and pepper Olive oil Blend all the seasonings to a powder. Add olive oil to make paste. Coat roast with seasonings, and marinate at least for the day. Take roast out of the refrigerator, and let stand one hour at room temperature. Cook uncovered at 450 degrees for 20 minutes. Turn down to 350 degrees, and cook for 1½ to 1¾ hours or until internal temperature reaches 110 degrees. (We accidently got ours to 120 degrees. It was still tender and juicy, but it would have been better at 110 degrees.) Rest loosely for 20 minutes.

This recipe is from The Wild Strawberry Lodge’s Alaskan Seafood Recipes in Sitka, Alaska.

Broiled Salmon with Herbed Lemon Butter 1/4 teaspoon each dill weed, rosemary, 8 4-ounce salmon fillets and marjoram, crushed 1/4 cup butter, melted 1/4 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons lemon juice 1/8 teaspoon coarsely ground pepper 2 tablespoons parsley, chopped Line broiler pan with non-stick foil, and place salmon fillets on the well-greased rack. Combine remaining ingredients, and baste salmon with mixture. Broil four inches from heat allowing ten minutes of cooking time per inch of thickness or until salmon flakes easily with a fork. Do not turn salmon. Baste several times during broiling. Serves 8.

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These are some favorites from Kay Jinkins. I have tried some of these, and they are yummy!

Pecan Pie Bars 2 tablespoons butter, melted Filling: Crust: 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 3 eggs 2 cups all-purpose flour 1 2/3 cups pecans, chopped 1 cup light corn syrup 1/3 cup white sugar 1/2 cup white sugar 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup brown sugar 2/3 cup unsalted butter, cold Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a nine-inch by thirteen-inch baking dish with heavy foil, and spray with cooking spray. In a large bowl, stir together the flour, 1/3 cup sugar, and salt. Cut in 2/3 cup butter until mixture resembles coarse crumbs. You can use a pastry blender or just two knives. Sprinkle the mixture evenly over the prepared pan, and press in firmly. Bake for 20 minutes in the preheated oven. While the crust is baking, prepare the filling. In a large bowl, mix together the eggs, corn syrup, 1/2 cup white sugar, 1/2 cup brown sugar, 2 tablespoons margarine, and vanilla until smooth. Stir in the chopped pecans. Spread the filling evenly over the crust as soon as it comes out of the oven. Bake for 25 to 30 minutes in the preheated oven or until set. (I usually like things on the rare side and a little gooey; but you want these cooked all the way through, so make sure the middle is set.) If the top starts getting too browned, cover with aluminum foil. Allow to cool completely on a wire rack before slicing into bars with a sharp knife.

This yeast-rolls recipe is from the cookbook by Hattie Farrish, Aunt Hattie’s Home Cookin’, sponsored by The King’s Daughters and Sons of Natchez, Mississippi.

Aunt Hattie’s Rolls 1 cup boiling water 1 cup sugar 2 packages yeast 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 5 1/2 cups flour 2 eggs 1 cup cold water 1 cup shortening Mix sugar with shortening. Pour boiling water over this mixture. Mix yeast in cold water. Add eggs, yeast mixture, salt, and flour. Beat for 2 minutes. Place dough in greased bowl. Grease lightly on top, and cover tightly. Let stand overnight in the refrigerator. Remove dough from refrigerator and knead until elastic. Form in desired shapes, place in greased pan, and let rise for two hours. Brush with melted butter. Bake 375 degrees for 20 minutes.

The following recipes are from Deborah Martin. The Pyramid Potatoes recipe came from Heart and Soul, compiled by the Junior League of Memphis. The Fresh Mushroom Soup recipe came from Vintage Vicksburg Cookbook; and the Sour Cream Pound Cake recipe was Martin’s mother-in-law’s recipe.

Pyramid Potatoes 1 cup Cracker Barrel sharp cheddar 3 ounces cream cheese, softened​ 3-pound bag of red new potatoes cheese, grated​ 1 cup sour cream ​1/2 cup butter, softened 1/4 cup green onions, diced 1/2 cup Land O’Lakes fat-free cream ​1 clove garlic, minced Salt and pepper to taste Peel and cube potatoes. Cook potatoes in boiling water until tender and drain. Place in a large bowl with butter, salt, and pepper. Beat with electric mixer on low speed. Add cream, and beat until fluffy. Beat cream cheese, sour cream, and garlic into potato mixture. Stir in onion. Transfer to a two-quart, round casserole dish. Top with cheese. Bake at 350 degrees about 30 minutes or until bubbly.

Fresh Mushroom Soup 1 pound mushrooms ​1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/2 cup butter ​1 1/4 cups half and half 2 tablespoons flour 2 bunches green onions, finely chopped ​5 cups chicken broth 1 teaspoon salt Melt butter in large stock pot. Add the green onions, salt, and pepper. Cover and cook very slowly for ten minutes, being careful not to let onions brown. Remove from heat, and stir in flour. When smooth, add the chicken broth, which is preferably homemade. Return to heat, and stir until soup boils. Let simmer for ten minutes. Meanwhile, wash and dry mushrooms; set aside 1/4 pound. Coarsely chop remaining mushrooms, and add to soup. Place contents into a blender, and blend until nearly smooth. Return to pot, and add cream. Heat until hot, but do not boil. Before serving, add reserved 1/4 pound of mushrooms that have been thinly sliced. Serves 6.

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Sour Cream Pound Cake 1 cup butter, softened ​3 cups sugar 3 cups flour 1/4 teaspoon baking soda 6 eggs, separated, one at a time ​1 cup sour cream​ Grease and flour a Bundt or tube pan, and set aside. Sift the flour and baking soda, and set aside. Cream the butter and sugar in a large mixing bowl. Add the egg yolks one at a time beating well after each addition. Alternately, add the flour and sour cream beginning and ending with the flour. In another large mixing bowl, beat the egg whites until stiff peaks form. Fold the egg whites into the cake batter. Pour into the prepared cake pan. Bake at 300 to 315 degrees for 90 to 100 minutes or until a toothpick inserted comes out clean. Remove from oven, and let stand for ten minutes on a wire rack. Invert cake onto cake plate. Let cake cool completely.

Bread Pudding Dash of salt​ 1 1/2 cups sugar 2 tablespoons vanilla extract ​8 large eggs 1 tablespoon bourbon​ 1 loaf French bread​ 3 cups heavy cream Butter 9”x13” baking dish. Tear French bread into pieces, and put in baking dish. Whisk together eggs and sugar. Whisk in cream, vanilla, salt, and bourbon. Slowly pour mixture over bread, and press bread with spoon to absorb liquid. Cover and refrigerate at least one hour. Place dish into a larger pan. Pour hot water into larger pan, filling halfway up baking dish. Bake at 325 degrees for 45 minutes or until set. Cover with aluminum foil, and bake 15 more minutes. Remove from oven, and remove dish from water pan. Serve warm with bourbon sauce.

Bourbon Sauce 1 1/2 teaspoons cornstarch 1 cup heavy cream 2 tablespoons water ​3 tablespoons sugar 3 tablespoons bourbon​ In a small saucepan, bring the cream to a boil. Dissolve the cornstarch in the water, and whisk into the cream. Cook until slightly thickened about one minute. Remove from heat, and add the sugar and bourbon. Return to heat, and simmer over low heat for one minute.

Natalie’s Cookies 1 1/2 sticks butter or margarine, melted 2 cups light brown sugar 2 eggs 2 teaspoons vanilla extract 1 cup flour 1 cup (or more) chopped pecans Combine all ingredients and mix well. Pat dough into slightly greased and floured shallow pan and bake at 325 degrees for 35 minutes. Mixture will look uncooked after 35 minutes, but it is cooked. Allow to cool. Cut into squares, and sprinkle with or roll in powdered sugar.

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The following recipes are from Marty Seibert. The green beans recipe came from a tourist who stayed with her many years ago, and the cookies recipe came from Natalie Herold, a friend of her mother. The recipe for broccoli was featured in Southern Living several years ago.

Dixie’s Green Beans

Marinated Broccoli

8 ounces packaged, fresh green beans 6 green onions, chopped Sliced mushrooms White wine Garlic pepper to taste Cook beans in microwave following directions on package. If you use larger green beans, boil or steam them to cook. Briefly sautĂŠ green onions and mushrooms in butter. Add a splash of white wine. Fold in green beans, and sprinkle with garlic pepper. Toss to coat beans, and serve immediately.

2 bunches fresh broccoli, cut in bite-sized pieces 1/2 cup olive oil 1/2 cup tarragon vinegar 2/3 cup fresh parsley, chopped 2 cloves garlic, crushed 2 teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper Combine ingredients, and mix vigorously. Pour over broccoli in casserole dish. Marinate overnight, and turn broccoli to get all sides marinated. Becky Junkin, mother of four and grandmother of six, is a lifelong Natchez resident, a retired elementary teacher of twenty four years, and certified Pilates instructor.

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THE social SCENE vicksburg, MS

The Outlets at Vicksburg’s Shopping Extravaganza

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he Outlets at Vicksburg held its sixth annual Shopping Extravaganza on Saturday, September 28, 2013. The signature fundraiser event featured a catered Taste of Vicksburg lunch, wine tasting, complimentary salon and spa treatments, special discounts at stores, and entertainment. More than $13,000 was raised from this event and was donated to Junior Auxiliary of Vicksburg and HCC Vicksburg DECA Marketing students.

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Jackie Ponder, Nadia Andrews, Sara Nasif, Lauren Cappaert, Heather Kealhofer, Kristen Allred, Alainna O’Bannon, and Amy Rainer Lindsay Mixon, Carolyn Bradley, Bridget Hunt, Holly Porter, Laura Newman, and Maggie Nasif Alice Bell Beverly Williams, Annika Williams, Kaye Pickens, and Denisecia Wilson Laura Newman, Alainna O’Bannon, and Holly Porter Adrienne Sims, Amanda Thomas, and Ebony Martin

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THE social SCENE

vicksburg, MS

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Saralie Johnson and Amanda Smtih 8 Donna Boyd, Perry Boyd, Justin Harmon, and Jaime Ray 9 Darryl Quinn 10 Jackie Ponder and Nadia Andrews 11 Alainna O’Bannon and Heather Kealhofer

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in the garden

story and photos by Robert Ferguson

This species is shown growing in its natural state as an epiphytic plant. This particular plant has not been re-potted since 1995. A Cattleya orchid potted on one side of a pot will continue to grow in a line straight across the pot and over the side.

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Growing Epiphytes

rowing epiphytes can be very challenging for many people because orchid roots are different from roots of normal (terrestrial-soil-dwelling) plants. All plants require a gas exchange of nitrogen and carbon dioxide between the soil and the above-ground portion of the plant. Terrestrial plants possess root hairs that attach themselves to sand, organic matter, and clay particles in the soil zone. When watering these plants, air spaces are replaced with water. This solution contains nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium, which chemically bond with other elements like sulfur, zinc, boron, silicon, copper, iron, or molybdenum to form complex organic compounds that feed micro-organisms in the soil; these micro-organisms, in turn, feed plants through semi-permeable membranes. Unlike normal plants that grow in sand, clay, peat, or a soil that is a combination

of these media, orchids attach themselves upon a rough surface for growing, a surface like a tree, rock, or anything that provides perfect drainage; and orchids do not possess root hairs. Instead, a corky layer of tissue called velaman surrounds their roots. This tissue is composed of empty air cells that absorb water-containing organic compounds or fertilizers. As with many terrestrial plants, orchids that remain wet too long will grow poorly. This is one reason orchids do well when mounted on cork, cedar, terra cotta, or tree-fern slabs. Cedarslatted baskets and tree-fern pots also provide this perfect drainage. Also, orchids are not designed for repotting in the usual sense of the word. Pots are a convenience to hobbyists. Through many decades of cultivating orchids, growers have utilized many media to replicate the surfaces of the native

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environment. When initially obtaining orchids from producers, you should examine the quantity and health of the roots. When grown properly, these plants will continue to grow for decades. Their media (potting material) should provide support for many years without decomposing. Many people in Florida use a volcanic material that is inert (won’t decompose). The only disadvantage I have found is that this material is very heavy, so you have to provide very strong benches for your plants. Many people also grow their orchids on cork slabs, tree-fern slabs, terra-cotta slabs, cypress slabs, and cedar slabs that mimic growing in the wild and should last for many years. As an orchid outgrows its slab, another piece can be attached to the back; and there is no shock of being repotted. Of course, with this method, in-home growing of orchids is out of the question.


I have a wet wall set up in my greenhouse for orchids to be watered twice daily if they are not quite fully established. The watering is controlled by a time clock. First watering is 6:30 a.m. to 6:45 a.m. followed by a second watering at noon, allowing time for the plants to dry out but not the slab on which they are mounted. Most slabs are cork, have crevices, and are slower to dry. There are fans along with ridge and lower vents in the greenhouse to keep the air circulating to allow humid air to mix with drier air from the outside, thus lowering the inside humidity. Since micro-organisms such as fungi and bacteria THRIVE in moist, dark conditions, it is best for the orchids to dry before evening hours. Many times, I am asked about what happens when orchids get rained upon in the evening hours. My answer—“He allows them to get wet for He is the ‘Master Gardner’.” Wet walls provide humidity for the whole greenhouse and at the same time provide more humidity around the orchids mounted on the slabs. I know this can sound very confusing, but it is easily understood when you start visiting orchid-growing greenhouses and see the set-up for yourself. Robert Ferguson, interested in orchids since the age of 13, owned Ferguson Orchids from 1973 to 2002 where orchids were cloned, grown from seed, and sold.

This shows the inert potting material that is used by growers in Florida. It is a volcanic material that does not decompose, and it is very heavy.

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THE social SCENE natchez, MS

Santa Claus Party

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n Christmas Eve every year, members of The Santa Claus Committee take to the streets of Natchez, Mississippi, escorting “Santa Claus” throughout the town. Various stops along the way find eager guests awaiting Santa’s arrival, quarters from Santa, and inviting treats. Stella and Phillip Carby hosted one of th stops during this eighty-five year old Natchez holiday tradition.

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Stuart, John, Reese and Jamey Hudnell Marcie Adams with Lee and Walker Carby and Heather and Adeline Burget Blythe Roberts, Weesie Junkin, Stacy Junkin, Becky Junkin with Roland and Jordan Falls Madeline Jeansonne, Mary Beth Roundtree, Benny Jeansonne, and Chesney Coffee Lauren Callon, Becky Jex, Phebe Claire Winters, and Heather Callon Mayor Larry ‘Butch’ Brown, Bingo Starr, and Jean Luc Charboneau Kathryn Nutter, Charley Nutter, Jack Daly, and Dr. Ed Daly

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THE social SCENE

natchez, MS

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Steve Newman, Shelton Hand, and John Taylor 9 Noel Read and Kevin Whittington 10 Daniel, Hunter, and Meghan McCullum 11 Matthew Hall, Jordan Farmer, and Stuart Heflin

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12 Joe Miller with Wade and Wesley Heatherly 13 Dr. Blane Mire, Benny Jeansonne, and Bill Byrne 14 Cherish McCallum and Kathryn Nutter 15 Genny and Christie Harrison

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in the garden

story by Dr. Gary R. Bachman / photo by Kat Lawrence

Cold weather keeps gardeners indoors dreaming of the projects they want to take on in the spring. Keep plans real by avoiding seven common mistakes.

Avoid the Seven Deadly Sins of Gardening L

et’s face it; it does not take much effort for our gardening minds to wander down imaginary garden paths. Alfred Austin summed up the enjoyment we receive from gardening with “The glory of gardening: hands in the dirt, head in the sun, heart with nature. To nurture a garden is to feed not just the body but the soul.” So while you are kicked back in the warmth of the house, I want to remind you of some gardening sins—seven to be exact—to avoid. Do not panic; these are not real sins, and nothing bad is going to happen if you slip up from time to time.

neighbors, but you run the risk of having frost send you back to the garden center.

1. Cabin Fever Gardeners come down with cabin fever around the first warm weekend of the year. Garden centers offer over-the-counter remedies of beautiful blooming annuals as well as tomato and pepper plants. Do not give in to temptation! Wait until the last frost date, which varies from late March on the coast to late April in north Mississippi. Planting before this date may give you a jump on the

3. Not Dialing 411 After five months spent planning those new landscapes, you still have some questions. This is not the time to follow that independent streak most humans (to be honest, mostly men) have and try to figure it out yourself. Ask questions. Your neighbors, garden clubs, extension office, newspapers, and Saturday radio shows are great resources. Gardeners like to share their experiences, so ask.

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2. Gardening Fever Closely related to cabin fever is gardening fever, which is brought on by endless garden catalogs and landscape shows on television. By the time spring arrives, our heads are full of ideas we’ve spent months planning. Southern Gardening TV is worth watching as we do our best to relieve the symptoms of gardening fever but not feed them.


4. Planting and Not Repeating Consider planting in sequences and then repeating. For the vegetable garden, this means planting cool-season crops like carrots and salad greens in the spring followed by warm-season tomatoes, peppers, and okra in the summer. Finish the year with more cool-season plants like broccoli and cauliflower. Sequence in the flower garden with spring bulbs like tulips, daffodils, and crocus followed by summer annuals and later fall pansies, ornamental cabbage, and kale. 5. Remembering Whatever you do in the garden, write it down. Keep a pad of paper with your garden tools, use a calendar; take notes or photos with your phone; or, for the really ambitious gardener, create a garden blog. One method not used nearly enough in home gardens is simply to place plastic tags in the ground by each plant. Old Venetian blind slats work well for this. Cut them in pieces about six inches long, and use a permanent marker. Trust me; you won’t remember everything unless you write it down. 6. Fences Fences are a must for most vegetable and flower gardens. Wherever you live, there are varmints that want to share the garden. If you have a large garden and are willing to share, this might not be a problem. Rabbits and their ilk feed on our most prized—and usually most expensive— plants and enjoy the fruits of our labors. Building fences is the only reliable deterrent to save your salvias, and these structures can be an attractive element in the garden. A white picket fence is an active garden participant while a green wire fence seems to dissolve into the foliage. 7. Forgetting Gardening is Fun Our fast-paced lives need to reconnect with the natural world. Tending a garden brings peace and serenity. Although gardening is physical, a garden should not be a job in itself. Patience is rewarded, and you learn the ways of Mother Nature through trial and error. Worrying if a plant doesn’t survive is not going to bring it back to life. Simply take it as an opportunity to plant and learn about something else. Columnist Dr. Gary R. Bachman is an assistant extension professor of horticulture at Mississippi State University’s Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi, Mississippi.

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THE social SCENE mccomb, MS

Women’s Health Center Christmas Party

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he Women’s Health Center of McComb, Mississippi, held its annual Christmas party at Dixie Springs Café on December 13, 2013. The staff enjoyed a delicious dinner prepared by Dixie Spring Café and entertainment by Mrs. Cynthia Fuller.

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Nikki Hollishead, Shorty Sparkman, Kesha Williams, Kelly Bryant, and Shay Robertson Nikki Hollishead, Brittany Slonaker, Shorty Sparkman, and Shay Robertson Corey Amos and Dr. Louise Gombako Amos John Dixon and Brittany Slonaker Gwen Seals and Kate Slonaker Kate and Randy Slonaker Chris Richardson and Dr. Louise GombakoAmos Sarah Beth and Steven Pearson Dr. Louise Gombako-Amos and Ty Sanders Jamie and Desarie Roberts

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THE social SCENE

mccomb, MS

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11 Dr. La’Nasha Tanner, Ty Sanders, and Desarie Roberts 12 Shari and Jeff Frank 13 Veris and Gwen Seals 14 Brittany Slonaker and Jennifer Thornton 15 Dianna and Curtis Johnson 16 Melanie and Dr. David Hubbs 17 Tony and Tammy Fowler 18 Kate Slonaker and Corey Amos 19 Mary and Bobby Nations 20 Mahaley and Chad Coker 21 Kate Slonaker and Jennifer Thornton 22 Dr. David Hubbs, Cynthia Fuller, and Carl Fuller 23 Dr. Louise Gombako-Amos and Kate Slonaker

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THE social SCENE mccomb, MS

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Kate Slonaker and Tasha Bullock Fran and Steve Pedigo Yolanda and Michael Thompson Gwen Seals


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legal notes

story by Lucien C. Gwin III

Shirking Responsibilities

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recently had a client call me about a very serious medical matter regarding a pacemaker. She has given me permission to discuss some aspects of her case although her name will remain anonymous. She had a pacemaker placed in her chest approximately four years ago. A pacemaker, for those unsure of its function, is a medical device that sends electrical stimulation to the heart to help keep a normal rhythm. All pacemakers are surgically placed in a patient’s chest and the device has very small coated wires (called leads) that are attached directly to the heart. The problem with my client’s pacemaker, the brand name of which also will remain anonymous, is that the wire leads are coated with a thin layer of silicone; and the silicone appears to be failing, causing the leads to detach from the heart. According to my client’s cardiologist, one lead now appears to be protruding into her lungs; however, he is not sure if damage is occurring at this time. I researched the possibility of such an occurrence, and it has happened in the past. Surgery is going to be her only option, and it will have certain risks due to the lung’s now being involved. After I was contacted, I also conducted some research on the Page 38 { February 2014 { Bluffs & Bayous

pacemakers; and the manufacturer and I learned that this particular model and brand of pacemaker has some major issues. It appears the manufacturer is very much aware of the silicone-covering deficiency and of the fact that leads are detaching from the patients’ hearts. There have been thirty alleged deaths from the problem. Actually, hundreds of cases exist in which the leads have detached; however, death has not occurred in all cases. There are over 79,000 of these pacemakers implanted in patients in the United States, and almost 250,000 implanted worldwide. Now, the kicker. Under federal law, the manufacturer of this device is absolutely immune from liability. Congress passed the Medical Device Amendment to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, an amendment which in short states that any approved class 3 medical device (A class 3 rating means there is a high risk to humans.) that was submitted to the Food and Drug Administration, prior to sale, is immune from liability in lawsuits. In 2008, the United States Supreme Court upheld the federal statute and found that FDA-approved, pre-market, class 3 medical devices are immune from all lawsuits. Congress felt that a device passing FDA approval had to be safe. A manufacturer of a class 3


device can only be liable if that manufacturer deviated from its approved formulas, plans, and specifications for its medical device. Proving such deviations is a herculean task for a lawyer. The manufacturers make the argument that they need protection from all liability in order to continue feasibly with research and development. However, prior to this law, medical companies were developing devices with liability and made fantastic profits. Just look at Johnson & Johnson. To assume a product is safe because a product meets FDA approval is a flawed assumption. In the last decade, there have been over 200 recalls of medical devices that had FDA approval. Remember, the FDA is the government. The arguments against the Medical Device Amendment are many. Shouldn’t a corporation be responsible and accountable for a product that is defective and can hurt and kill people? Would you want someone to be held responsible and accountable if he or she ran a red light and killed one of your family members? Under the Medical Device Amendment, human beings are now the guinea pigs. Without liability, manufacturers have no incentive to produce the safest product possible. They have no incentive to initiate a recall. The FDA can fine them, but this money goes into the government’s pocket and is not used to help the victims. Finally, do you know who picks up the healthcare tab for injured people when manufacturers are not liable? You do in the form of any combination of social security, disability, Medicaid, Medicare, and some private insurance policies. So is it really fair that these companies can shirk their responsibilities? My Take: America has in its conservative past been all about responsibility and accountability. In the case of my client and her pacemaker, why should her private insurance or our government dollars pay for the medical corrective procedures that will be required in the future? This law in essence is nothing more than another government bailout although it was disguised as a sound capitalistic measure. Shouldn’t we all be responsible for our own actions? Lucien C. “Sam” Gwin III was admitted to the Mississippi Bar in 1981 and has been practicing many aspects of the law at the firm of Gwin, Lewis, Punches & Kelley in Natchez, Mississippi, ever since.

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THE social SCENE Natchez, MS

Eat, Drink, and Be Scary

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he annual Eat, Drink, & Be Scary party was held Saturday, November 2, 2013, in Natchez, Mississippi, at the home of Sheila and Ingraham Thompson. Guests dressed in their best costumes for a night of fun. Ghosts for the party included Sheila and Ingraham Thompson, Lou Ellen and Guy Stout, Christy and Butch Stewart, Ashley and John Ward Junkin, Cara and Barnett Serio, and Shannon and Clay Bland.

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Braxton Hobdy, Abby Brown, Carol Hobdy, Tate Hobdy, Suzan Hogue, and Andrew Stubbs 2 Devereaux and Eugene Cates 3 Janna Junkin and Toby Williams 4 Darla and John Wilkinson 5 Don Vertse and Dwight Williams 6 Charlie and Noelle Speed 7 Martin and Mary Margaret Gilly 8 Courtney and Marc Taylor 9 Valerie and Matt Seal 10 Carol and Braxton Hobdy 11 Mattie Smith and Joe Smith

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THE social SCENE

natchez, MS

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Lou Ellen and Guy Stout Cheryl and Dr. Roderick Givens Carol Ann Riley and Brandy McBrode Cara and Barnett Serio Shelia Thompson, Kristie Stewart, Cara Serio, and Lou Ellen Stout 17 Lou Ellen Stout, Sheriff Chuck Mayfield, and Dr. Geoffry Flattman

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Healthy Living

story by Caroline Devereaux

Continuing Resolutions W

e are back again with another Wellness installment this month. I sincerely hope the holidays treated you as well as they treated my family—2013 was a year for the books. Now, we have moved on into the second month of the New Year and with it continue to ring in our resolutions. I discussed resolutions last year in my inaugural article. Statistically speaking, 45% of Americans usually make New Year’s resolutions. Of that 45%, only 8% are successful in achieving their resolutions. How depressing! Some of the top resolutions every year are losing weight, quitting smoking, and staying fit. Considering this, what have you resolved to achieve in 2014? We always hear about resolutions to improve your mental health and wellness, to be more eco-friendly, and to improve your physical health and wellness; but what about the resolution to improve your financial health and wellness? Now, I’m no Dave Ramsey by any stretch of the imagination; and my darling husband would agree. As a young adult, wife, and mother,

In 2014, I’m going to exercise more. In 2014, I’m going to meditate. And be nicer. In 2014, I’m going to eat better. And recycle. In 2014, I’m going to . . . . What are your goals and resolutions for this year?

I have learned that this saying rings true— “There is no handbook” in this thing called life. We do the best we can with what we’ve been given, and I prefer to share my experiences with others whether for a laugh or for a solemn and consoling, “Man, that stinks.” To quote John Maxwell, one of my favorites, in his book Failing Forward, “The essence of man is imperfection. Know that you’re going to make mistakes. The fellow who never makes a mistake takes his orders from one who does. Wake up and realize this: Failure is simply a price we pay to achieve success.” My husband and I have resolved to “fail forward” in everything we do. We embrace the mistakes that will undoubtedly come. Financially speaking, we can choose to continue making those mistakes and live our comfortable—yet somewhat irresponsible—lifestyle; or we can get out of our comfort zone and make sound, long-term, financial decisions. This isn’t easy. It doesn’t come natural; but as the saying of Booker T. Washington goes, “Nothing ever comes

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to one, that is worth having, except as a result of hard work.” I reflect on the last year when we wanted to “get out of debt.” We failed miserably at a budget (perhaps multiple times); we brushed ourselves off and started fresh; and we are stronger for it. As I said, 2013 ended up being a challenging but definitely rewarding year. Back to our resolutions. Of course, mental and physical health and wellness are important. Those are my passion and my livelihood—helping guide others to comprehensive wellness. Financial wellbeing, however, should be equally as important for many people. In these tough economic times, it’s important that we keep a close eye on our finances. Because, as we all know, the economy does not discriminate. All of us, no matter who we are, are susceptible to financial hardships. Not many of us have a financial “Plan B.” Shaky finances can lead to stress, which, in turn, affects mental and physical health. Perhaps in 2014 our resolutions should be centered on personal health and wellness. Think of “personal” wellness as the seat of a stool. Physical wellness,


environmental wellness, and financial wellness are the three legs to the stool. If you don’t have one, the stool falls. For me and my family, we will continue in our journey to financial freedom in 2014; and I say “continue” because we are a work in progress. We are writing/erasing/whiting out our own “handbook” every day. Here are a couple of steps we began to take last year and continue to follow: Create a monthly/weekly budget “A budget is telling your money where to go instead of wondering where it went.” These are the words of Dave Ramsey, noted debt-reduction guru and penny-pincher. I was not a big fan of this, nor was I very good at it; but remember, I’m a work in progress. Use cash rather than credit/debit cards In early 2013, we started using cash as an exclusive means of making everyday purchases rather than our credit and/or debit cards. That was huge for us! Some statistics show that the average consumer spends up to 30% more when using plastic rather than cash. In other words, if you go have a nice dinner with your significant other and pay with cash, you may spend $100.00. With plastic, that number, statistically speaking, would likely be around $130.00. That extra money adds up over the course of a month. So, to combat this, we made the shift to using cash for our everyday purchases; and it helped immensely. In fact, the results were significant. We were able to stick to our monthly budget and monitor our expenses closely; and that meant saving extra money each month. In short, switching to cash only helped my family meet our financial goals in 2013 and then some. We plan to keep that up in 2014, and I can’t wait to see the results. Setting goals is a big step in and of itself. Sticking to them, however, is the key; and in 2014, it is my hope that you can set your own resolutions and carry them through. Hopefully, the steps that I’ve mentioned above that my family took in 2013 will somehow help you set your goals and see them through. I wish you all a happy and prosperous 2014—health and wellness mentally, physically, AND financially. Cheers! Caroline Devereaux is wife to Matt; mom to two daughters, Stella and Mary Tucker; and a certified Pilates instructor residing north of the Big Easy in Covington, Louisiana.

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THE social SCENE vicksburg, MS

Healthy Parks Healthy People and Darryl Haley

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s part of the Healthy Parks Healthy People US Initiative of the National Park Service, Vicksburg National Military Park in Vicksburg, Mississippi, hosted a fitness walk on November 15, 2013, promoting fitness and healthy eating centered on former NFL player and Ironman triathlete, Darryl Haley. Haley currently hosts a radio segment and blog called “Fitness Friday� and is visiting many national parks to spread the health initiative. Darryl and his wife, Judy, visited with several Master Gardeners to tour the demonstration heritage garden, a community and park resource that showcases what the Vicksburg climate can grow year round. Photos by MiHyang Faulks, Virginia DuBowy, and Anita Schilling

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Jeff Riggs, Darryl Haley, Charles Selmon, and Mike Madell Linda Akers and Fancy Darryl and Judy Haley Virginia DuBowy and Keith Schumann Elizabeth Joyner and Linda Fondren Judy Haley and Bess Averett

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THE social SCENE

vicksburg, MS

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Virginia DuBowy, Dana Klimas, Judy Pennington, Darryl Haley, and Anita Schilling Elizabeth Joyner, Mike Madell, and MiHyang Faulks Darryl Haley, Linda Fondren, Charles Selmon, and Mike Madell

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Marie Prater of the Krewe of Indians in Natchez, Mississippi, showcases the fine detailed handwork of seamstress Jessie Davis.

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Looking Behind the Bedecked Curtain Story by Jennie Guido Photos by Cheryl Rinehart, Jennie Guido, and Bill Beane Photography

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ardi Gras certainly can bring out the best in people. Whether it is seeing those happy grins from children watching festive floats roll by or enjoying a cold winter’s night at Natchez’s one-andonly Call Out Ball, the season of “Good Times” creates fanfare and memories for all. One aspect of Mardi Gras that usually gets little recognition is the artistry of the holiday. Those brightly bedecked floats and lavishly dressed party-goers don’t just appear out of thin air. It takes the time and effort of many to create such a royal season in the South. In Natchez, Mississippi, Jessie Davis, Sandra Stokes, and Nan Garrison devote many hours to making sure each duke, duchess, and royal is dressed to perfection and every float and backdrop is glittered; and in New Orleans, Louisiana, Laron Nelson creates just about every type of costume you can imagine with magnificent ease and an impeccable eye for detail.

Jessie Davis works with the Mardi Gras krewes in Natchez as a seamstress for their festive Mardi Gras fanfare and costumes. Davis explains that she has developed the costumes for members of the Janus, Phoenix, and Alpheus krewes in the past and now works with the Krewe of the Indians when it comes to designing their costumes. Davis learned to sew from her grandmother. “My grandmother was a seamstress for H. F. Byrne, and she would make me clothes as well. I listened when she told me how she made things, watched her at the sewing machine, and eventually picked up these skills myself,” Davis recalled. After taking sewing while in junior high and high school, Davis went on to obtain a degree in Fashion Design in Chicago, Illinois. Once the parades are over in late winter, Davis and each Mardi Gras krewe begin work on the next year’s event. “The members of the royalty usually come to me in April. I like to get a head start and help create the designs. Bluffs & Bayous { February 2014 { Page 51


of several Mardi Gras royals and of many dukes and duchesses as well as on floats for the parades and decorations for the Call Out Ball. Garrison explained, “I remember several costumes I worked or painted on over the years. One was for Dr. Blaine Mire when he was Garth Brooks; I painted his shirt to look like it had flames burning and, of course, added glitter to it. Another was for Stratton Hall, and she was Mary Poppins. I painted her umbrella handle to look like a parrot. I have worked on several trains and costumes for queens and kings such as Darby Short and Sherry and Chuck Bearden.” Over the years, Garrison has seen the Krewe of Phoenix transform from renting already decorated floats to making floats themselves with special twists and decorations to fit each theme and royalty member. “Todd Bertolet, Kelvin Fleming, and Bill Russell were instrumental in making the floats,” Garrison said. “They researched how to do it, actually acquired cotton trailers, and built the beds and floats on them. Then, they were covered with canvas stretched really tight, and we painted them.” Garrison, who has painted all of her life, believes that her talent developed once the building of the floats began. “We taught ourselves by learning what worked and what did not,” she recalled. As far as decorating for the many balls associated with Mardi Gras in Natchez, Garrison has been a part of too many to remember. “The first time I really remember doing a good bit of work with the krewe,” she explained, “was the year that ‘Vintage Television’ was the theme. I was in charge of the Grand Ball that year. However, the next year, I became Call Out Ball Chairman; and it has continued from there. Most of the time, the decorations for the Call Out Ball and even the Grand Ball can be used later for a float decoration.” Thinking of those who worked along with her, Garrison added, “I have had so much help over the years bringing these themes to life. Susan Plauche, Sherry Bearden, and Betty Lou Nettles spent more time at my house during Mardi Gras than they did at their own homes.” Concluding her reflections about her Mardi Gras experience, Garrison commented, “I could not begin to list what I have done. I have built ships, grand pianos, giant stick horses, magical trees, fireplaces, and chimneys.” Garrison’s involvement in Mardi Gras is evidence of what it takes in time, effort, and occasional trial and error to let the good times roll.

Above—Jessie Davis works tirelessly on all aspects of the costumes for Mardi Gras in her workspace Left— Krewe of Natchez Indians Royal Court, Shuwanda Ford wears another one of Jessie Davis’ creations made its debut during this year’s Mardi Gras season.

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Down in the “Big Easy,” Laron Nelson of Opulent Designs creates breathtaking pieces, ranging from mantles fit for a royal to costumes unlike anything you can possibly imagine. For the past seven years, Nelson has worked closely with the Krewes of Phoenix and Janus in Natchez along with several different krewes in New Orleans. “I began my work with Mardi Gras when a friend in the Krewe of Zulu came to me needing help with a costume,” Nelson remembered about his first involvement with the holiday. “After that, I learned how to sew and create the collars or mantles.” Nelson said that most krewe members come to him needing wire work done for their costume. “Wire work,” he explained, “is the portion of the collar behind the fabric and feathers. What people don’t realize is that there could be up to 200 feet of wire holding the piece in its form.” With help from many friends and family members, Nelson begins working in fast-forward mode on these opulent costumes in the fall to prepare for the upcoming Mardi Gras season. “The members of the krewes come to me with some sort of idea in mind, and I sketch out what I come up with for them to review,” Nelson said. “Once the busy part of Mardi Gras season starts, I will work on costumes up until the final day of Mardi Gras in New Orleans.” Indeed, many master artists and artisans work year round to create the mystique and majesty of Mardi Gras. As they say all over the South during this festive holiday season—Laissez les bons temps rouler!

Above—Laron Nelson of Opulent Designs in New Orleans works throughout the year creating the many pieces of costumes for Mardi Gras in Louisiana and here in Natchez, too. Right— Taking a closer look, the wirework behind the mantels and collars takes time, effort, and skill.

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Above—The creations that come from Laron Nelson are extremely detailed and flamboyant. Left—Representing the Krewe of Phoenix as Rosalie XXXII, Cheryl Rinehart’s mantle was designed and constructed by Laron Nelson of Opulent Designs in New Orleans, Louisiana; and her gown and train were made by Sandra Stokes of San-Jay’s in Natchez, Mississippi.

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SOUTHERN SAMPLER

story by Alma M. Womack

Old allegoric illustration of Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday) during Carnival celebrations in Paris. Original, by Belin, Le Chevalier and Paulin, published on L’Illustration, Journal Universel, Paris, 1860

Fat Tuesday Excursions

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ardi Gras was a term in an eighth-grade History of Louisiana textbook when I was a child. Protestants did not celebrate Mardi Gras here in east central Louisiana. Not once. Not ever. It wasn’t our holiday, and we were unconcerned about it. We vaguely knew that the holiday existed because people would go to New Orleans for the spectacle of Mardi Gras, but they were few and far between in our world. We had a few Catholic students in our schools then—as now. The most notable thing about Mardi Gras was not the day itself but Ash Wednesday when the Catholic students would come to school with a dot of ashes on their foreheads. This was very alien looking to us Protestants, and we never really got into the meaning of it all. Basketball was our religion in February, and getting ready for the playoffs was our goal. Ashes were not part of that scene. Attitudes began to change about Mardi Gras in this area in the 1980s. I remember Dale Campbell Brown and some of her friends getting together on a horse-drawn wagon decorated for Mardi Gras and riding through the streets of Natchez. From that singular event, Page 56 { February 2014 { Bluffs & Bayous

the modern Mardi Gras parades of Natchez developed; and other small local towns began having parades at their schools and a few community-sponsored parades or events. The “krewes” began to form, and soon Mardi Gras was a big celebration in the Miss-Lou area and in Protestant central Louisiana. Celebrating Mardi Gras became the thing to do even when many of the participants had no idea as to the true meaning of the occasion. To them, it was like Halloween—a chance to wear masks, ride on floats, and go to parties. There was no follow up Ash Wednesday with days of Lent. It was just a fun time in a dreary month of winter. I have to admit that I have never been to a New Orleans Mardi Gras celebration. One reason is that I detest large crowds of any kind, and two is that celebrating Mardi Gras was just not part of my world. However, there is one Catahoula parade of the last decade or so that I do try to attend every year. That would be the official Mardi Gras parade at Larto—a very family-oriented, kid-oriented affair. The parade is not very large, but it makes up for its lack of size in enthusiasm amongst the participants and the onlookers.


My little grandsons can enjoy the sport of gathering beads without having to worry about being stepped on or outmaneuvered by some bead-hungry adult. We know many of the float riders, and it is always fun to wave at a local farmer dressed up like a pirate. We have drinks and snacks for the little ones, and we usually park in front of friend Janice Smith’s camp where there is plenty of room for the little boys to play football or chase. She always has drinks and pots of chili and gumbo for those dropping by, and it is a happy couple of hours for all of us. It takes longer to drive to Larto from Smithland than it takes for the parade to run its route, but we don’t watch the clock. It’s time to go when the boys are tired, and it’s good that we’re close to home and their nap spots. This Larto Mardi Gras parade is a good example of local people taking time to provide entertainment for their families and for the surrounding community even if many still do not grasp the true meaning of the day. On another note, one about a different excursion, I had a dreadful decision to make in December of 2013. My faithful Ford Excursion reached its tenth birthday; and even though it was still in good running condition, it had long depreciated out on the equipment list. There was enough profit in my farm account that I would have to either buy some type of new equipment or pay higher taxes to the IRS. The second option is never an option, so I had to consider replacing my beloved tank of a truck. For the last three years, Buster had badgered me to get rid of the Excursion; but I saw no real reason to replace something that worked and was paid for. Since we lost Buster in July, Jorie took up the cry to get rid of that old truck while it was still worth a little bit. Option number two from CPA Sim Mosby of Silas Simmons finally convinced me to trade for a new farm truck. Heath Whittington at Natchez Ford met with me before Christmas to figure out just exactly what I needed and what I could afford. We spent a couple of hours going over needs, wants, etc., in a new truck. Then I looked at what was on their lot. I narrowed it down to three, but I had to come home to think about it for a bit. This kind of purchase only happens to me every decade or so, and I admit to not being a compulsive decision maker. With a little goading from Jorie, the right truck was selected, purchased, and brought home two days later.

The new Ford is amazingly comfortable and easy to drive and park; and it runs on gasoline. My old Excursion was a diesel— not the smoothest ride—and a nightmare to park in the city. Buster always called it comparable to a stage coach without horses; and after driving the new truck for a bit, it’s fairly easy to see where he was coming from. Still, when it came time to drive away from the dealership and see, sitting out front, my old Excursion with my NRA stickers on it, I felt like I had abandoned an old friend for a shiny new ride. It is beyond dumb to anthropomorphize a piece of equipment, but people like me do it all the time. If I ever have to trade in my John Deere mowing tractor, it might be time for counseling. So, for February, Happy Mardi Gras season, Happy Valentine’s Day, Happy Heart Month, and Happy Birthday to George Washington (whose like we could surely use in Washington, D.C., in this year of our Lord 2014). Columnist Alma Womack lives on Smithland Plantation on Black River, south of Jonesville, Louisiana. In addition to her duties as maitresse des maison, she is the keeper of the lawn, the lane and the pecan orchard at Smithland.

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up & coming! FEBRUARY February 3 Senior Adult Valentine’s Banquet Highlands Presbyterian Church Ridgeland, MS 1160 Highland Colony Parkway 5 - 6:30 pm $5 admission www.ridgelandms.org February 4 Music in the City Mississippi Museum of Art Jackson, MS 380 S. Lamar St. 5:15 pm (601)960-1515 / www.msmuseumart.org February 4 Ingle Wood Farm Harvest Market Alexandria, LA 6233 Old Baton Rouge Hwy 3 - 7 pm www.visitalexandria.org February 6 Downtown Gallery Crawl Downtown Monroe Monroe, LA DeSiard and Trenton St. 5 - 9 pm www.downtowngallerycrawl.com

February 8 4th Annual Top of the Hops Beer Festival Mississippi Coast Coliseum Biloxi, MS 2350 Beach Blvd. 4 pm (228)594-3700 / www.gulfcoast.org

February 8 Second Saturday Downtown Natchez Natchez, MS Main St. 6 - 8 pm www.visitnatchez.com

February 8 Mississippi Hearts Against AIDS Benefit Hal and Mal’s Jackson, MS 200 Commerce St. 10 am $40 admission www.visitjackson.com

February 8 African American Life Alexandria Art Museum Alexandria, LA 933 Second St. 10 am - 5 pm Adults $4 / Students, Seniors, and Military $3 (318)443-3458 / www.themuseum.org

February 8 Ignite the Night: Jazzin’ it up, N’awlins Style Mississippi Children’s Museum Jackson, MS 2145 Highland Dr. 7 - 10 pm (601)981-5469 www.mississippichildrensmuseum.com

February 8 47th Annual Krewe of Nereids Mardi Gras Ball Mississippi Coast Coliseum Biloxi, MS 2350 Beach Blvd. 9 pm Dianne Martin / (228)216-9911

February 6 - 12 Dixie National Livestock & Rodeo Mississippi Coliseum Jackson, MS 1207 Mississippi St. (601)961-4000 February 7 20th Annual Chili Festival Parks YMCA Vicksburg, MS 267 YMCA Place 11 am $6 Charlie McKinnie / (601)218-1754 February 7 Biloxi Blues Festival Mississippi Coast Coliseum Biloxi, MS 2350 Beach Blvd. 8 pm (228)594-3700 / www.gulfcoast.org

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FEBRUARY

up & coming!

February 9 Home Sweet Home Old Capitol Building Jackson, MS 100 State St. 1 - 4 pm $25 www.visitjackson.com February 9 Freedom Riders Film Forum West Baton Rouge Museum Baton Rouge, LA 845 North Jefferson Ave. 3 pm Toni Brantley / (225)336-2422 brantley@wbrmuseum.org February 9 Visiting Artist: Katrina Byrd Mississippi Children’s Museum Jackson, MS 2145 Highland Dr. 1:30 - 4 pm (601)981-5469 www.mississippichildrensmuseum.com

February 10 Cooking for Couples Southern Cultural Heritage Center Vicksburg, MS 1302 Adams St. 5:30 pm $50 members / $55 non members (601)631-2997 / info@southernculture.org www.southernculture.org February 12 River North Dance Chicago Manship Theatre Baton Rouge, LA 100 Lafayette St. 8 pm www.manshiptheatre.org

February 12 - 18 The Dixie National Quarter Horse Show Mississippi Fairgrounds Jackson, MS 1207 Mississippi St. Tommy Andrus / (662)207-9358 tommyandus@ymail.com February 13 USM Symphony Viennese Valentines Bennett Auditorium Hattiesburg, MS 118 College Dr. 7:30 pm (601)266-5418 / www.usm.edu February 13 Museum After Hours Mississippi Museum of Art Jackson, MS 380 S. Lamar St. 5:30 pm (601)960-1515 / www.msmuseumart.org February 13 Discover Series Mississippi Craft Center Ridgeland, MS 950 Rice Rd. 6 - 8:30 $35 admission (601)856-7546 / www.visitridgeland.com

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up & coming! FEBRUARY February 14 Valentine’s Day Gala & Auction The Bailey House Natchez, MS 400 South Commerce St. 7 pm $100 (601)446-6631 February 14 - 16 So Rare Antique Show & Sale Pineville High School Alexandria, LA 5600 Coliseum Blvd. Fri. & Sat. 10 am - 6 pm Sun. 11 am - 4 pm $7 admission (318)451-7529 / luneauj@bellsouth.net February 15 Afternoon Tea and Fashion Show LSU Rural Life Museum Baton Rouge, LA 4560 Essen Lane 2 - 4 pm $60 (225)765-2437 / www.rurallife.lsu.edu February 15 George Bell Jazz Night Manship Theatre Baton Rouge, LA 100 Lafayette St. 8 pm www.manshiptheatre.org February 15 Meet Mrs. Rosa Parks West Baton Rouge Museum Baton Rouge, LA 845 N. Jefferson Ave. Toni Brantley / (225)336-2422 brantley@wbrmuseum.org February 16 Million Dollar Quartet River Center Baton Rouge, LA 275 S. River Rd. 6 pm (225)389-3030 / www.brrivercenter.com

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FEBRUARY

up & coming! February 23 Man of La Mancha Vicksburg Theatre Guild Vicksburg, MS 101 Iowa Ave. 2 pm $12 adults / $10 seniors / $7 students (601)636-0471 www.vicksburgtheatreguild.com

February 20 Live Acoustic Concert Series Alexandria Museum of Arts Alexandria, LA
 6:30 - 8:30 pm Adults $4 / Students $3 Anne Reid / (318)443-3458 February 20-23 Natchez Literary & Cinema Festival Natchez Convention Center Natchez, MS 211 Main St. Times & prices vary (601)446-1289 / www.colin.edu/nlcc February 21 International Guitar Night Manship Theatre Baton Rouge, LA 100 Lafayette St. 7:30 pm www.manshiptheatre.org

February 26 Driving Miss Daisy Manship Theatre Baton Rouge, LA 100 Lafayette St. 7:30 pm www.manshiptheatre.org

February 21 Willie Nelson and Leon Russell Mississippi Coliseum Jackson, MS 1207 Mississippi St. 7:30 - 11 pm www.mdac.state.ms February 21 - 22 Southern Strings Dulcimer Festival William Carey University Vicksburg, MS 498 Tuscan Ave. 9 am www.misssippidulcimer.com February 22 3rd Annual Warren County Wildlife Extravaganza Convention Center Vicksburg, MS 1600 Mulberry St. 10 am -6 pm (601)630-2929 www.vicksburgccevents.com

February 27 Women of Ireland Bologna Performing Arts Center Cleveland, MS 7:30 pm (662)846-4625 / www.bolognapac.com February 28 Kids’ Mardi Gras Mask Making Workshop Southern Cultural Heritage Center Vicksburg, MS 1302 Adams St. 4 - 5 pm (601)631-2997 / www.southernculture.org March 1 Fossil Road Show Mississippi Museum of Natural Science Jackson, MS 2148 Riverside Dr. 10 am - 3 pm (601)345-7303 / www.museum.mdwfp.com

February 22 A Gathering of Writers and Readers Hemingbough Cultural Arts Center St. Francisville, LA 1010 Louisiana Hwy 965 9 - 5 pm (225)302-3524 / www.hemingbough.com Be sure to confirm details of the events should changes have occurred since events were submitted.

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Bluffs & Bayous February 2014  

The Official Social Events and News Guide for Central and South Mississippi and Southeast Louisiana.

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