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Bluffs & Bayous { July 2013 { Page 3


From Your Publisher . . .

J

uly always reminds me of feisty fireworks and cold, juicy watermelon as baseball is in full swing; the heat becomes more intense; and we find ways to keep ourselves occupied throughout the long, sunlit days. Many activities keep us busy—family outings, short jaunts to nearby events and extended vacations as well as mowing the lawn, watering the flower beds, weeding, picking the bounty from our gardens, and cooking those fresh vegetables we have either grown or purchased at local Farmer’s Markets. Here at Bluffs & Bayous our summers are times to play catch-up on paper work and research and to plan the remaining seasons. We do take time, though, to leave the office before dark and enjoy the twilight of each day before the sun sets. Our salute this month reflects art through historical reenactment. While it is impossible to tag all of the many events and groups that stage significant historical reenactments, we have captured a few through Meaghan McCallum’s experiences

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as she viewed soldiers marching through downtown Natchez, Mississippi, in midApril, and visited Carrie Lambert’s Finishing School in Natchez one Saturday in May. In addition, she recaps Vicksburg National Military Park’s Memorial Day commemoration, one of the park’s many events marking the 150th anniversary of the Vicksburg Campaign during the Civil War. She also details events surrounding St. Francisville, Louisiana’s annual re-enactment—The Day the War Stopped. In addition, we have several engagement celebrations and weddings to share with you this month along with baby showers, honor banquets, benefits, and activities from the Miss Mississippi Outstanding Teen Pageant. Our other contributors share reflections on their summer activities; and G’s recipes provide pleasure for the palate again this month. Upcoming this month is The Miss Mississippi Pageant to be held in Vicksburg, its traditional host city, from July 10 to 13. Be sure to keep up with the

spectrum of activities stemming from this pageant. Our hats off to Vicksburg for producing such an exciting and professionally orchestrated event! We have two new staff members this month—Tracey Ferrall from McComb, Mississippi, and Rachel Benoit from Natchez, Mississippi. We are thrilled to add them to the roster of our Bluffs & Bayous team. Tracey will be handling marketing and sales in the McComb area, and Rachel will be working as Office Assistant. Welcome aboard, Ladies! Finally, we remind all of our readers that we are more than just a magazine on paper: We are marketing and promoting our area through our interactive magazine online, through our website and Facebook pages, through Twitter and Pushlocal, and through our weekly email newsletter. Be sure to visit our website www.bluffsbayous.com and sign up for the weekly newsletter. Enjoy the month of July and all it has to offer in our life along and beyond the Mississippi!


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C o n t r i b u t o r s Columnist Dr. Gary R. Bachman is an assistant extension professor of horticulture at Mississippi State University’s Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi, Mississippi.

Meaghan McCallum recently moved to Natchez, Mississippi, from Homer, Alaska. She graduated from Homer High School last May; and after traveling in Australia for a few months she has settled here with her family to finish her gap year before starting college.

Elke Briuer is an award-winning artist and member of the Mississippi Art Colony, MSWS, MAG, and VAA. She lives in Vicksburg, Mississippi, paints in her home-based studio, and teaches art-related classes in the region.

Columnist Ross McGehee, a lifelong resident of Natchez, Mississippi, owns a diversified and far-flung farm operation.

Caroline Devereaux is wife to Matt and mom to two daughters, Stella and Mary Tucker. She is a certified Pilates instructor and enjoys educating others on overall health and wellness. They reside north of the Big Easy in Covington, Louisiana.

Columnist Alma Womack lives on Smithland Plantation on Black River, south of Jonesville, Louisiana. In addition to her duties as maitresse des maison, she is the keeper of the lawn, the lane and the pecan orchard at Smithland.

Jennie Guido is a graduate of Delta State University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Arts and Master’s Degree in English Education. Having lived up Highway 61 in Cleveland, Mississippi, she recently has returned to Natchez, her hometown, to pursue her professional career. Lucien C. “Sam” Gwin III, a native of Natchez, Mississippi, was admitted to the Mississippi Bar in 1981. Since then, he has been practicing at the law firm of Gwin, Lewis, Punches & Kelley, LLP, in Natchez. His practice includes general litigation, real estate law, divorce, contract disputes, eminent domain, products liability, personal injury, medical matters, and some estate work. Becky Junkin, mother of four, grandmother of soon-to-be six, is a lifelong Natchez resident and a retired elementary teacher of twenty four years. She is a certified Pilates instructior and owner of Pur Pilates Studio. She and her husband Jerry live and entertain in their antebellum home Heckler Hall.

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on the cover

Celebrating the War of 1812 Bicentennial Anniversary, professional reenactors orchestrated the march of General Andrew Jackson and the Tennessee Militia up the Natchez Trace. This scene captures the soldiers, striding through downtown Natchez, Mississippi, as crowds watched in awe. See the feature story on pages 48 to 52.

publisher Cheryl Foggo Rinehart editors Jean Nosser Biglane Cheryl Foggo Rinehart graphic designers Jan Ratcliff Anita Schilling media coordinator Adam Blackwell staff photographers Van O’Gwin Elise D. Parker Cheryl Rinehart sales staff Tracey Farrell Cheryl Rinehart Donna Sessions JoAnna Sproles office assistant Rachel Benoit

Adam Blackwell

Jean Biglane

Van O’Gwin

Elise D. Parker

Jan Ratcliff

Cheryl Rinehart

Anita Schilling

Donna Sessions

JoAnna Sproles

Bluffs & Bayous is published monthly to promote the greater Southern area of Louisiana and Mississippi in an informative and positive manner. We welcome contributions of articles and photos; however, they will be subject to editing and availability of space and subject matter. Photographs, comments, questions, subscription requests and ad placement inquiries are invited! Return envelopes and postage must accompany all materials submitted if a return is requested. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Bluffs & Bayous are those of the authors or columnists and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products or services herein. We reserve the right to refuse any advertisement. Bluffs & Bayous strives to insure the accuracy of our magazine’s contents. However, should inaccuracies or omissions occur, we do not assume responsibility.

office

423 Main Street, Suite 7 | Natchez, MS 39120 601-442-6847 | fax 601-442-6842 bluffsmag@gmail.com bbupandcoming@gmail.com media.bluffsandbayous@gmail.com www.bluffsbayous.com


July 2013 FEATURES Vicksburg Workshop: Introduction to Artist Trading Cards ............................46-47 The Art of Immersion in History ........................................................................48-52

FAVORITES All Outdoors Cow Sense ...........................................................................................................10-11

Events July Up & Coming! Premier Events.........................................................................59 July Up & Coming! .............................................................................................60-69

Vicksburg Workshop: Introduction to Artist Trading Cards pages 46 - 47

G's Fare A Boon for Bread-lovers ....................................................................................14-16

Healthy Living Pilates Exercises Fit for Everyone.......................................................................53-55

High Cotton A Weekend Away in Vicksburg, Mississippi ......................................................40-42

In the Garden Growing Basil for Beauty and Taste ..................................................................36-37

Legal Notes Squatter’s Rights......................................................................................................58

Southern Sampler Planting, Grand-parenting, Poultry, and Patriotism ........................................70-71

THE social SCENE

The Art of Immersion in History pages 48 - 52

Caring Women 2013 Awards Luncheon...................................................................9 NACHS Beach Party Benefit ...............................................................................12-13 MHS Class of 1981 Reunion ....................................................................................17 Miss Mississippi Outstanding Teen .........................................................................43 Miss Mississippi Outstanding Teen 2013 Benefit ..............................................44-45 Baby Shower for Meg Payment.........................................................................56-57

THE wedding SCENE

Perkins and Hollingsworth Engagement Party ................................................20-24 Engagement Celebration Honors Joanna David and Alex Harrelson .............26-29 Talbott and Davis Wedding ...............................................................................30-35

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THE social SCENE NATCHEZ, MS

Caring Women 2013 Awards Luncheon

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he annual Caring Women Luncheon, sponsored by Natchez Community Hospital and First Natchez Radio Group, was held May 9, 2013, at The Grand Hotel in Natchez, Mississippi. Six women were honored in the areas of Leadership, Perseverance, Mentor, Volunteer, Defender, and Promise. Guest Speaker for the event was Barbie Bassett, from Jackson, Mississippi, an author and motivational speaker as well as WLBT Meteorologist. Citizens throughout the community nominated over seventy-five women who best fit the characteristics of each category.

1 Eric Robinson, Karen Foley, Diane Kirby, Barbie Bassett, Carolyn Ridley, Erin Hicks, and Estelle M. Fleming 2 Renee Cornette and Juanita Wilson 3 Rachel Benoit, Jean Benoit, and Pepper Taylor 4 Marcella Herron and Belinda Hollis 5 Melanie and Brandie Hall 6 Maggie Ray and Dee Ray 7 RenĂŠ Adams and Sarah Beth Willard 8 Eric and Jenny Robinson 9 Leigh Anderson and Karen Foley 10 Barbie Bassett 11 Whitney Jackson, Jerilyn Banks, and Iris Miles 12 Diane Watson and Jane Vaughan

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All Outdoors by Ross McGehee

Cow Sense N

ot every occupation provides the daily challenges that ranching does. Pastoral scenes in magazines lead many to believe that one can just go out and scratch Ole Bossy between the ears and milk her in the pasture. And lest we forget, “All the ones with horns are bulls, right?” In reality, there is a lot of “stuff” to step in (after a while you don’t even notice any more) and plenty of wire cuts on hands from fixing fence to go along with the scenery. But the occasional cow wreck can provide comic relief on a hot day. I use the term “cow wreck” to describe any altercation with a bovine that results in a lesson imparted to either of the participants. Sometimes it can be a broken foot on a farm hand that didn’t get out of the way in time or a face full of mud and gravel from being tossed by a fool yearling. It can also be a cow that has just learned that aggressive behavior has consequences. Turns out, cows have poor long-term memory so they’re probably going to repeat what just happened some day but not in the next fifteen minutes. That applies to farm hands AND cows. One of the more memorable wrecks I ever saw happened in 1970 while we were working cattle for a neighbor. The neighbor had borrowed use of the extensive Page 10 { July 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous

corral facility that Mr. John Lum had off the Natchez Trace. Mr. Lum spent his entire life trading cattle and was well equipped to handle whatever passed through his possession. On this particular day, as we vaccinated cows, Mr. Lum handled the steel head gate, catching and restraining the animals for treatment. Things were rocking along fine until we had a cow that all but melted down in the chute. She was a fool to start with and did not cope with restraint or human presence well. After much bawling, slobbering, and slinging of debris with her tail, we got her through the process and released. She launched from the chute like she was on fire and, upon reaching the far side of the pen, spun around and glowered at Mr. Lum who was fully exposed to her. I suppose at the time Mr. Lum was well into his sixties if not seventies. He was way past the youthful agility that we enjoyed, but he had something far more important in a corral. He had “cow smarts.” He could look at a cow and know what she was going to do before SHE did! And he had already psy(cow)analyzed the haint that had just sailed past him. He appeared to pay her no attention as he processed a few more animals and had his back to her when she made her move. From forty feet away, she had discontinued pawing the ground and switched to a more mobile use of her hooves. She crossed the pen in a flash, bearing down on her target, head down and snorting! Mr. Lum was standing directly in front of the steel head gate and, as far as we could tell, was about to be flattened! He

never looked up. At the split second before impact, he just took a quick step to the side. The impact of the cow piling into the squeeze chute at full throttle shook the barn! How she didn’t break her neck I’ll never know; but after she got back to her feet and wobbled off all googly eyed, she apparently decided that waiting quietly in the corner was preferential to frontal assault. All Mr. Lum did was chuckle a little and catch the next cow. Much the same thing happened in the Union Church community years ago with different results and a memorable quote. The McCormick family was working cattle and had a cow with a bad disposition in the pen. Now, we all work cattle with varying outlooks on life; some can be dealt with because they raise a good calf and are only a little bit tough when confined. But this one was BAD—one of those, as Gary Edwards says, “Scaggy, bite-you-through-the-fence cows.” And after receiving repeated cautions from the patriarch of the family, from the relative safety of the top rail of the fence, one of the youngsters who were actually in the pen with the cow felt compelled to respond: “Daddy, I have a degree in Agriculture from Mississippi State University. I think I know how to handle a cow!” Minutes later he was pinned to the ground by the cow and screaming for help. The only help he got was from the top of the fence: “Show her your diploma, boy! Show her your diploma!” What brought all this on was an excerpt from a book about handling cattle in Florida


years ago. The stories of “Crackers” in the pine glades and swamps of Florida are interesting because we can relate to their tribulations, and the story that was sent to me came with an admonition about plagiarism. I had to laugh because we did the same thing last spring! Every year on or close to June 1, we pen all the cattle on each farm. The main purpose is to remove the bulls from the herd at the end of breeding season. We’ll also spray the cattle for insect control at that time, but the bulls are the primary motivation. You can’t, or are rarely able to, pen just the bulls without bringing in the whole herd. They are pretty hard-headed that way and will present the most frustrating conditions imaginable to thwart their capture. A bull is going to DO just about whatever he wants and GO just about wherever he wants because he is big enough to get away with it! Consider the most impenetrable briar patch that you’ve ever witnessed—ten feet tall and stickers an inch long. Just wade right on in to that and coax a ton of reluctant out of it! Or if he wants to fight, an open field is just as much trouble because there is nowhere to run and nothing to get behind! And if there are two or more bulls in the same pasture, the moment that you try to move them, they commence to fighting each other! Don’t get close; you’ll get hurt. So last spring we were penning cattle on the Parker Place and had everybody hemmed up in the catch pen except for one young bull that we’d missed somehow in the woods. All of our bulls are white so they’re pretty hard to miss, but they hide well in the gullies. So, we made one more lap around the pasture on the four-wheelers; and Ole 869 was located hiding behind a wax myrtle bush, lying down, chewing his cud. A swift kick got him to stand, and we collectively began to escort him to the pen a half mile away. We didn’t get very far. The three-acre pond that we had to pass was too much of a temptation, so Ole 869 hooked a right and waded in. I can’t really blame him. It was a hot day and the pond was cool but 869 refused to leave. The more we hollered, the deeper he went. We slung that old gloppy mud from the shore in his face. They REALLY don’t like that and will leave a pond so you’ll stop. It didn’t work. Thirty minutes dragged by and 869 was cooling off and we were getting pretty hot. So boots, cell phone, socks, and shirt came off, and 869 got company!

No, the pants stayed on because everybody has cameras on their cell phones, and there’s this thing called YouTube…. 869 didn’t quite know what to do. The pond trick had worked before, but there was a new wrinkle to the game—one of us. He tried to go further out into the pond but had to swim, and bulls aren’t very buoyant. He tried wading fast, but a human can wade faster! So he tried swimming again, but that didn’t go well because he suddenly had a passenger! If you hold on to a bull’s tail, he can’t catch you! With the whole crew holding their sides laughing, it took two laps around the pond, with a guy hanging on to 869’s fly swatter, to best this bull. I kind of wish we had gotten a video. 869 finally gave up the pond and charged out into the pasture, dragging his passenger behind him; and it was ten minutes to the corral and straight into the trailer with one heck of a story to tell his bull buddies in the off season! There are a lot of postholes and yellow-jackets between comical episodes on a cattle outfit. There are also plenty of hay bales and flat tires. But if you focus on the wrinkles, you won’t see the grins. And that’s no bull!

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THE social SCENE NATCHEZ, MS

NACHS Beach Party Benefit

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he Natchez-Adams County Humane Society (NACHS) hosted a Beach Party themed benefit May 4, 2013, in Natchez, Mississippi, at BriarVue, overlooking the Mississippi River Bridge. All proceeds benefitted NACHS facilities and animal care.

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1 Ilene Gill and Sherry Bartlett 2 Diane Hammers and Dotty Stubbs 3 G. G. Cleveland and Mike Tatum 4 Charlotte and Jim Franklin 5 Jack Kelly and Linda McFarlane 6 Elaine and John Harter 7 Ed Zuccaro and Fred Callon 8 Mike Thompson and Curtis Moroney 9 Bonnie Carter, Suzi Russ, and Agatha Weeks 10 Robert Dunn, Martha Currie, and Sonia Blaney

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THE social SCENE

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11 Stan McCearley, Steve Cook, Toby Williams, and Michael Boykin 12 Marie D’Antoni Gross and Sam D’Antoni 13 Ray Tuttle 14 Windall Weedin, Sue Goss, and Steve Cook 15 Martha Currie with Charlie and Sonia Blaney 16 Laura Newkirk, Windell Weedin, and Theresa Mullins 17 Jackie Passbach, Sharon Ogden, and Elise Ogden 18 Peggy Sandel, Marie D’Antoni Gross, and Tina D’Antoni 19 David and Betty Paradise with James Davis

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G’s Fare

by Becky Junkin

M

A Boon for Bread-lovers

an may not be able to live by bread alone, but I certainly could. Where most people like sugar and desserts, I love bread. When I was younger and did not work and only had four small children to look after, I made all of our bread. I made our sandwich bread, rolls, hamburger buns, hotdog buns, and all breakfast bread. It was wonderful; but unfortunately, we ate it as quickly as I could make it. After a short while, I quit but still made it on occasion. Years later, when I taught kindergarten, I made homemade bread and butter with my class when we were studying the letter B. If I could make it with twenty-five five-year-olds, you know it cannot be as difficult as people think. The most important thing is Page 14 { July 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous

to proof the yeast. Yeast is much like Goldilocks’ palate: everything has to be just right. Add the yeast to warm water (105-110 degrees) to which you have added about 1 teaspoon sugar (from recipe); and if it does begin to bubble up, you need to throw it out and try again. Also, when measuring flour, do not pack it into the dry measuring cup. Instead, spoon the flour into the dry measuring cup until it is over full. Then, use a table knife, running level across the top edge of the cup, to scrape off all of the extra flour. I usually have a paper towel under the cup when I do this and then use that flour to pour back into the cup when needed again or to flour the table for working the dough.


The next three recipes are some of my favorites; they come from the old Southern Sideboards, the first cookbook I used to make bread. This is a good bread to use as sandwich bread.

Honey Whole Wheat Bread 1 package dry yeast ¼ cup lukewarm water (105-110 degrees) 1½ cups hot water ¼ cup honey 2 tablespoons shortening (I use solid Crisco.) 1½ teaspoons salt 2½ cups whole wheat flour, divided 2 cups sifted flour, divided (Try to get unbleached flour.) Sprinkle yeast over lukewarm water to soften. In a large bowl, combine hot water with honey, shortening, and salt. Stir mixture until honey and shortening are melted. Let cool to lukewarm. Add yeast. Sift in 1½ cups whole wheat flour and 1 cup sifted white flour, and beat mixture until well combined. Add 1 cup each of white flour and whole wheat flour or enough to make moderately stiff dough. Turn dough out onto a well-floured board, and knead for about 10 minutes or until very smooth and elastic.

Transfer dough to a well-greased bowl; turn once; and let stand, covered, in a warm place away from drafts for about 1½ hours or until dough has doubled in bulk. Punch dough down, turn out onto a floured board, and form into a ball. Let dough stand covered for 10 minutes. Shape dough into a loaf and put in a well-greased loaf pan. Let dough stand, covered, until doubled in bulk (about 45 minutes). Bake loaf at 375 degrees for 40-45 minutes. Remove from pan, and cool on a wire rack.

Easie’s Refrigerator Rolls (This recipe also makes excellent dinner rolls: Follow the recipe below, but do not follow the Caramel Rolls recipe. Instead, roll out dough onto a floured board. Cut into rounds, using a cookie cutter or water glass; dip in melted butter; fold over; and place on cookie sheet. Cover and let rise 2½ hours. Bake at 400 degrees for 10-12 minutes. Makes about 60 rolls) 2 cups milk 1 teaspoon salt ½ cup sugar 1 heaping teaspoon baking powder ½ cup Crisco ½ teaspoon baking soda 1 package yeast Melted butter Flour Heat milk, sugar, and Crisco; and stir to melt Crisco. Cool to 105-110 degrees. Add 1 package yeast and stir to dissolve (about 5 minutes). Add enough flour to make a thin batter (about 2 cups flour). Cover and let stand in a warm place for 2 hours. Add salt, baking powder, soda, and enough flour to make dough not sticky, but the right consistency to knead (about 4 cups flour). Place dough in refrigerator, covered, overnight.

Caramel Rolls ½ cup butter, melted, divided 1/3 cup chopped pecans ½ to 1 cup brown sugar 1 recipe Easie’s Refrigerator Rolls Cream 4 tablespoons butter with the brown sugar. Spread over the bottom and sides of two 9-inch cake pans. Sprinkle with pecans. Divide dough into 2 parts, reserving 1 part in the refrigerator. Roll out other part into a rectangle about 8” x 15” and ¼ inch thick. Brush with 2 tablespoons butter; then roll up like a jelly roll. Cut into ½-inch segments and arrange over sugar-nut mixture. (I used a long piece of thread to cut rolls: Slide the thread under the roll; bring thread around roll and cross thread. Pull thread until you have a clean slide.) Brush tops with 2 tablespoons butter. Allow to rise until doubled in bulk. Bake at 400 degrees until brown (20-25 minutes). Immediately invert onto serving plate. Repeat recipe with remaining dough. Makes 30 caramel rolls

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These recipes are from the Farm Journal’s Homemade Pies, Cookies & Bread. One Christmas my husband and I decided we were going to give all of our friends and neighbors a loaf of his stuffed bread. Then we got the bright idea of making all of the French bread from scratch. We made over 15 loaves, and they were a huge hit. This was not a difficult task, for the bread does not have many ingredients.

French Bread 2 packages dry yeast 2½ cups warm water (105-110 degrees) 7¼ to 7¾ cups sifted all purpose flour 1 tablespoon salt Yellow cornmeal 1 egg white, slightly beaten 1 tablespoon cold water 1 tablespoon sugar if you like a sweeter bread (I only use 1 teaspoon to proof the yeast.)

The next recipe is very easy, and we use it for a breakfast bread. However, it also could be used as a dessert bar. It is very sweet since it uses a whole box of brown sugar. This recipe came from A Taste of the South.

Easy Breakfast Bread 4 eggs 1 box light brown sugar 2 cups self-rising flour 2 cups chopped pecans 1 teaspoon vanilla

Mix all of the ingredients together. Bake in a 9” x 13” pan at 325 degrees for 30 minutes or until done. Until next month, happy baking to all!! Page 16 { July 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous

Sprinkle yeast on warm water, and stir to dissolve (if using sugar add it here). Add 2 cups flour, and beat thoroughly. Stir in salt. Stir in 4½ cups flour, a cupful at a time; the dough will be stiff. Turn onto a lightly floured board, cover with a clean towel, and let rest 10 to 15 minutes. Knead 15 to 25 minutes until dough is smooth and very elastic, working in ¾ to 1¼ cups more flour. Do not underknead, for this is what gives it the characteristic of French Bread. Place in lightly greased bowl; turn dough over to grease top. Cover and let rise in a warm place free from drafts until doubled, about 1½ hours. Punch down; then let rise again until doubled, about 1 hour. Turn onto lightly floured board, divide in half, cover, and let rest 10 minutes. Roll each half in a 15” x 12” rectangle; the dough should be about ¼” thick. Starting with the long side, roll up tightly, sealing each turn well with the hands. Roll the ends between hands to taper them; and place diagonally, seam side down, on greased baking sheet sprinkled with cornmeal. Cut slits 1/8” deep and 2” apart on tops of loaves. Combine egg white and cold water. Brush on tops and sides of loaves. Cover with towel wrung from water, but do not let it touch the tread: prop it with water glasses turned upside down. Let rise in warm place until doubled, 1 to 1½ hours. This part is important! Place a large, shallow pan on the low rack of the oven, preheated to 375 degrees, and fill pan with boiling water. Put loaves on rack above the water, and bake for 20 minutes or until light brown. Brush tops and sides again with egg-white-water mixture. Bake 20 minutes longer or until loaves are a golden brown and sound hollow when tapped. Turn loaves out onto a wire rack and let cool. Makes 2 loaves


THE social SCENE MCCOMB, MS

MHS Class of 1981 Reunion

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embers of the McComb High School Class of 1981 gathered May 25, 2103, at the Ice House Courtyard in McComb, Mississippi, to celebrate their 50th birthdays. Classmates from as far away as New York, Virginia, and California made the trip for the birthday party.

1 Front—Patti Foy Harrison, Yvonne Harmon Church, Debbie Fleming Mann, Melanie Manzo Fleming, Rhonda Temple Gilbert, Celeste Converse Chappell, and Floyd Barnes; second row—Gleanette Tobias Gayden, Kelly Hogan Adams, Dollie Ayers Cotton, Linnell Hill, Marchella Green Seals, Joan Floyd Walthall, Lynda Young, Marie Thompson Washington, Lawanna Barnes White, Sonja Green Jackson, Lillie Bell Todd, and Tina Adams Goldbaum; third row—Eugene Washington, Ava Szekely Bean, Judy Wallace Hurtado, Joyce Ruffin, Theresa Pezant Brumfield, Carol Fleming, Becky O’Quin Jackson, Sandy Peden Laster, Shari Blailock, Eddie Baker, Patrick Blackmon, Emma Brown Wheeler, Angela Dunaway, Janice Felder Elliby, Lisa Luckett Cain, Greg Chappell, Russell Bardwell, Jennifer Haynes Gatlin, Michael Jackson, Adwinna Isaac Harris, Denise Coney Landrew, Rosetta Coleman Barnes, Sandra Wells Carstafhnur, and Mark Seals; back—Bill Sheffield, Gary Johnson, Keith Gayden, Jimmy Lowe, Robbie Stewart, Jerry Crimiel, Dale Ricko Thompson, Angela Seals Fields, John Pigott, Mikel Ashley, Louie Tobias, and Scott McCray 2 Sandra and Jimmie Carstafhnur 3 Gleanette Tobias Gayden, Lynda Young, and Marie Thompson Washington 4 Carol Fleming, Sandy Peden Laster, Patty Foy Harrison, and Shari Blailock 5 Jeff and Kelly Adams 6 Carolyn and Eddie Baker, Russel Bardwell, and Gary Johnson 7 Yvonne and James Church 8 Janice Quinn, Rosetta Barnes, and Jennifer Hynes Gatlin 9 Robbie and Rhonda Stewart

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THE weddingSCENE BROOKHAVEN, MS

Perkins and Hollingsworth Engagement Party

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he engagement announcement party for Alison Perkins, daughter of Don and Theresia Perkins of Brookhaven, Mississippi, and Stephen Hollingsworth, son of Guy and Susan Hollingsworth of Natchez, Mississippi, was held at the home of Carlene Stribling in Brookhaven the evening of Saturday, May 25. Hosting the event were Martha Ann and Ralph Peeples, Carlene Stribling, Bette and Charles Dixon, Wanda and Keith Ballard, Merrie and Bill Boerner, Nell Ryan, Francis and Tom Brady, Dot Cannon, Celeste and Owen Carty, Angie and Joe Cox, Shirley Estes, Laura and Bruce Groth, Amy and Bill Jacobs, Pat Jacobs, Beth and Dave Langston, Betty Langston, Patti and Ed Moak, Doris and Robert Panzica, Raycene Reardon, Angela and Jimmy Smith, Meriam Smith, Sarah and Don Underwood, Amy and Dennis Valentine, Sandy and Stan Winborne, Phyllis Spearman, and Pat Noble. A brunch for the families was held at the home of Celeste and Owen Carty in Brookhaven the following morning. Photographs by Bill Perkins

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Stephen Hollingsworth and Alison Perkins Betsy Smith and Laura Groth Catherine and Les Bumgarner Bill Perkins and Susan Hollingsworth Celeste and Marcie Carty Chris Richardson and Linda Burner Dott Cannon and Betty Langston Dr. Donna Foster and Nancy Weeks Beth Ballard, Eddie and Sandra Burkes, and Betty Ann Perkins 10 Andy Kea, Kseniya Perkins, and Phil Sherrer

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THE weddingSCENE

BROOKHAVEN, MS

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Betty Ann and Don Perkins Dustin Cannon and Whitney Perkins Frank and Lori Perkins Brandy and Sophie Hollingsworth Guy Hollingsworth and Theresia Perkins Carole Bennett and Angela Naples Gwen and Barbara Davis Sarah and Don Underwood Shirley Piper, Raycene Reardon, Pat Noble, and Karen Sullivan 20 Andy Kea, Angela Smith, and Bill Perkins

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THE weddingSCENE BROOKHAVEN, MS

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Jeff Perkins and Deborah Smith Karen Behan and Bill Boerner Larry and Christi Mills Lisa and Mike Jarancik Beth Ballard, Marybeth Davis, and Barbara Davis Bill, Brittany, and Teresa Sones with Betty Langston Bruce and Laura Groth with Bill Perkins Helga Reed, Norma Hill, Dott Cannon, and Laura Groth Dustin Cannon, Whitney Perkins, and Betty Ann Perkins Jay and Kelly Perkins with Amy and Marty Cooley

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THE weddingSCENE

BROOKHAVEN, MS

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Marcie Carty and Alison Perkins Martha Ann Peeples and Carline Stribling Merrie and Bill Boerner Scott Hanson and Alex Hollingsworth Kseniya and Alison Perkins with Brandy Hollingsworth Liz Ratcliff, Cathy Swalm, and Jimmy Sistrunk Marcie Carty, Wanda Ballard, and Catherine Carty Pete Corkern, Kathy Behan, and Mary Dee Corkern Sherri Mathis, Laura Groth, and Patti Reynolds Shirley Estes, Brian Adkins, and Beverly Britt

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THE weddingSCENE BROOKHAVEN, MS

41 Sharon Hughes and Brenda Ratliff 42 Sue and James Minter 43 Sandra and Eddie Burkes, Celeste Carty, and Betty Ann Perkins 44 Shirley Piper, Francis Brady, and Raycene Reardon

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THE weddingSCENE NATCHEZ, MS

Engagement Celebration Honors Joanna David and Alex Harrelson

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engagement celebration, honoring Joanna David of Natchez, Mississippi, and Alex Harrelson of Tupelo, Mississippi, was held June 1, 2013, at the home of Karen and Eddie Foley in Natchez. Family and friends were invited for a casual evening of dining and visiting while enjoying entertainment by Drew David and Will Carter.

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Alex Harrelson and Joanna David Sarah Sturdivant, Joanna David, and Mary Sturdivant 3 James Young, Sharon Sturdivant, Jerry David, Alex Harrelson, Joanna David, Joanie David, Chip Sturdivant, and Drew David 4 Brent and Anne Gaude 5 Donna Lindley with Russell and Russ Butts 6 Nick Blain and Gary Blackwell 7 Shane McArthur with Mark, Patsy, and Caroline Coffey 8 Marty and Sandra Ellard 9 Front—Beth Richard, Joanie David, and Amanda Jeansonne; back—Kirby Richard, Joanna David, and Madeline Jeansonne 10 Front—Allen Richard, Jerry David, and Bennie Jeansonne; back—Kirby Richard, Joanna David, and Madeline Jeansonne

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THE weddingSCENE

NATCHEZ, MS

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11 Madison Watts and Sarah Garrity 12 Laura and Paul Burns with Joanna Bernard 13 Ray Sturdivant, AJ Mayers, and Chip Sturdivant 14 Mike and Jean Benoit 15 Allie, Kristy, Butch, and Sarah Grace Stewart 16 Front—Sandra Ellard, and Skeeter Hutchins; back—Lisa Dale Mayers, Karen Foley, Deborah Martin, Amanda Jeannsone, Paige Blackwell, Priscilla Dale, and Melody Darsey 17 Pat Biglane, Duke Edwards, Johnny Dale, Benny Jeansonne, and Gary Blackwell 18 Sarah Grace Stewart and Joanna David

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THE weddingSCENE NATCHEZ, MS

19 Russell Butts and Claire Cothren 20 Summer Bailey, Ginny Scarborough, and Megan Olivero 21 AJ and Lisa Dale Mayers 22 John Hudson, Joanna David, and Susan Hudson 23 Lee Martin, Hank and Sherry Brumfield, and Joanie David 24 Marty Ellard, Madison Watts, Caitlin Lofton, and Rachel Benoit

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THE weddingSCENE

NATCHEZ, MS

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Elizabeth and Matthew Hall, Braxton Fondren, and Geoffrey Martin Katherine Johnson, Joanna David, and Leigh Anderson Kirby and Beth Richard with Judy Heard Russ Butts, Susan Hudson, and Irvin Anderson Theresa Burns, Kevin Flowers, and Mike Rinehart Will Godfrey with Jodi and Chris Kelley Kevin Collier, Natalie Phillips, and Stephanie Butts Anne Elise Rinehart and Nick Blain

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Talbott and Davis Wedding May 18, 2012 | Nashville, Tennessee | Photographs by Bill Perkins

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tacy Michelle Talbott and John Wood Davis were married May 18, 2013, at Bellmont United Methodist Church in Nashville, Tennessee. The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Talbott, Jr., of Gallatin, Tennessee. She is the granddaughter of Dorothy Jean Miller of Gallatin; Steven K. Miller of Chattanooga, Tennessee; and Mrs. Charles McManus, also of Chattanooga, and the late Mr. Charles McManus.

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The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Omer Carroll Davis of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, formerly of Brookhaven, Mississippi. He is the grandson of Elsie Kathryn Davis of Brookhaven, formerly of Centerville, Mississippi, and the late Raymond Lloyd Davis. The bride’s wedding gown was Italian silk radzimir by J. Crew, and the lace bodice was designed and made by the bride’s sister, Shannon Talbott, of New York City, New York. Bridesmaids’ dresses were silk chiffon by J. Crew. The wedding planner and florist was Amos Gott, recently named Nashville’s Best Event and Wedding Planner and the 2013 Editor’s Pick by The Knot. The photographer was Ann Wade Parrish. Following the wedding ceremony, guests and wedding party enjoyed a reception held at the War Memorial. After dinner, the band Burning Las Vegas kept the dance floor on fire until midnight. Monell’s of Nashville catered the event with Dulce Desserts serving as the confectioners. On the eve of the wedding, the Grand Ball Room of the Hermitage Hotel in downtown Nashville was the setting for the rehearsal dinner. Nashville-based musician John Toomey and his trio entertained guests in the Grand Lobby during the cocktail hour that was followed by a seated dinner in the Ballroom. At the conclusion of the wedding events, the newlyweds honeymooned three weeks in Italy, first in Positano on the Amalfi Coast and then in Rome; and they are now at home in Nashville. The bride, a graduate of Gallatin High School, Hanover College, and the Nashville School of Law, is a litigation manager with Lifepoint Hospitals. The groom, a graduate of Episcopal High School in Baton Rouge and Vanderbilt University, works in health care private equity investments with Council Capital.

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THE weddingSCENE NASHVILLE, TENNSSEE

TALBOTT AND DAVIS REHEARSAL

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Christine and Robert Sutton John Davis, Rick Kane, and Paul Delong Marybeth Davis and Mimi Frengs Kathleen Simcoe, Katie Davis, Shelby Talbott, and Katie Koban 5 Richard Foster, Omer Davis, Sarah Davis North, and Page Ogden 6 Shannon, Summer, Stacy, and Shelby Talbott 7 Vaughn Nossaman, Omer Davis, Dorie Deats, Reade Nossaman 8 Cooper Baker, Addie Sherwood, Dough and Reily Fields, Sara Renwick, and Matt Vernon 9 Betty Ann Perkins, Elizabeth Scott, Mary Lauren Scott, and Sarah Davis North 10 Elsie Kathryn Davis, Pamela Napier, Gray and Robyn Napier, and Amy Morrill

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THE weddingSCENE

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

TALBOTT AND DAVIS REHEARSAL

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Addie Sherwood and Bill Perkins Ann Talbott and Natalie Talbott Denny North and Betty Ann Perkins John Davis and Stacy Talbott

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THE weddingSCENE NASHVILLE, TENNSSEE

TALBOTT AND DAVIS REHEARSAL

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Omer Davis and Charlie Talbott Robert Sutton and Greg Scott Omer and Marybeth Davis Linda and Page Ogden with Betty Ann Perkins Elsie Kathryn Davis, Betty Ann Perkins, and Julie Wallace Davis Pamela Napier, Elsie Kathryn Davis, and Betty Ann Perkins Richard and Barry Foster with Carolyn Wickstrom and Bill Wright Page and Linda Ogden with Omer Davis

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THE weddingSCENE

NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE

TALBOTT AND DAVIS RECEPTION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

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Lisa Wolf, Margaret Sauer, and Elizabeth Surgener Shelby Talbott and Tyler Graves Betty Ann Perkins and John Robinson Reily and Doug Fields Matt Toney, Sarah Davis North, and Michael Kern Katie Koban with Amos Gott and Stacy Davis Marybeth Davis and Mimi Scofield Page Ogden and Greg Scott John Robinson, Marybeth Davis, Matt Toney, Colin Toney, Michael Kern, and Chris Conner 10 Stacy Talbott Davis and Michelle Talbott 11 Omer Davis, Greg Eaton, Robert Sutton, and Greg Scott 12 Patrick Sledz, Bill Perkins, Robert Sutton, and John Boston

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Left—The lettuce-leaf basil has large ruffled leaves that add a new twist to the standard sandwich.

In the Garden

Story and Photographs by Dr. Gary R. Bachman

Growing Basil for Beauty and Taste f there is one herb my wife and I love to grow more than the rest, it has to be basil. There is nothing better for the hot months because it is gorgeous in the landscape and delicious in fresh summer meals. Many of the gardeners I have talked to think we have taken basil growing to the extreme. A couple of years ago after seeing row upon row of basil varieties grown at the South Mississippi Branch Experiment Station in Poplarville, my wife and I actually grew 30 different basils in our home garden. You can’t imagine all the different aromas; cinnamon, licorice, lemon, and lime scents were released when we touched the plants. For the beginning gardener, common or sweet Italian basil is most likely the basil of choice. It’s versatile in the kitchen and nonthreatening for the novice. However, after getting some experience with the

The Dark Opal basil has a variable, mottled appearance that means no two plants look the same.

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plant, the adventurous gardener can take advantage of the wide range of leaf sizes; textures; and, believe it or not, flowers. When we get into the summer months, I start to miss having fresh, garden lettuce

for hamburgers and sandwiches; but we found a nice and delicious alternative. One of my absolute favorite basils is the lettuce-leaf variety, which has ruffled leaves that are as big as my hand. A single leaf adds a new twist to the standard sandwich. Compared to other garden herbs, basil is a tough customer. As a testament to this fact, Purple Ruffles was named a Mississippi Medallion winner. Its deep purple leaves are very fragrant; and it can be used as a fresh garnish, added as baby greens for color in salads or processed into red basil pesto. Dark Opal is a beautiful selection that has a variable mottled appearance; no two plants are the same. One of my favorite purple varieties is Amethyst. The bright purple leaves resemble the broad, flat leaves of common basil and have the same taste. It is a great ingredient for basil mojitos, turning the drinks a pretty amethyst color. Thai basil varieties like Queenette and Cardinal have beautiful, bright green foliage that contrasts with their dark purple stems. These Thai varieties have delicious and exotic cinnamon and licorice flavors and aromas. A tip for growing basil for kitchen use is to deadhead faded flowers. Basil flowers are easy to spot because they form elongated stems. Deadheading keeps the plants


The Siam Queen basil makes good, long-lasting cut flowers when collected just as the white flowers begin to emerge.

producing tasty leaves instead of using the energy for seed production. However, Siam Queen basil has beautiful flowers that begin as tight purple bunches. They make good cut flowers when collected just as the white flowers begin to emerge. The flowers will open in the vase and stay fresh for at least a week. Basil thrives when grown in raised beds planted in well-drained soil, but the roots need consistent moisture. Water deeply each week, and use a good-quality mulch to help conserve soil moisture and keep the soil cooler. Growing basil in containers is a superb option when you have limited space. Place containers on the porch or patio to keep them near your outdoor living areas and handy for summer recipes. Patio is a perfect basil selection to grow in containers on small porches or patios. Compared to the standard sweet Italian, the leaves of Patio are tiny. To save your summer basil harvest for use in the winter months, combine your extra basil with olive oil in a food processor. Place about 1/2 cup of the mixture in a freezer bag, press out flat and store in the freezer. This doesn’t take up much room and provides an easy way to make any recipe extra special later in the year.

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High Cotton

Story & Photographs by Jennie Guido

A Weekend Away in Vicksburg, Mississippi S

ummer is finally here, and sometimes the only cure for the summertime blues is a weekend away from it all. Luckily, just right up Highway 61, Vicksburg, Mississippi, is home to many good eats and some fabulous shopping to help fill your long and hot July days! Of course, every weekend away needs the perfect bed-andbreakfast to call home for a couple of days. Cedar Grove Mansion is just that place to sit back and enjoy breathtaking views of the

rolling Mississippi River while being only a few short minutes from the hustle and bustle of downtown Vicksburg. Built by John Alexander Klein in 1852 for his bride, Miss Elizabeth Day, Cedar Grove was almost completely furnished by the many treasures found overseas during their one-year European honeymoon. From the gasoliers to the marble fireplaces, all of Cedar Grove is a treat for visitors to explore and enjoy. As the inn’s website explains, “All guests to our inn are encouraged to enjoy an early evening complimentary glass of house wine, a chocolate and sherry turndown service performed nightly and [. . .] a home-style country breakfast followed by a tour of our unique historical mansion.” For a weekend get-away, Cedar Grove Mansion is the perfect place to lay your head at the end of a busy shopping-filled and adventurous day! To start that shopping adventure, visit Zsa Zsa’s Gifts, located along Interstate 20 on the Frontage Road. Opened in 1996 by mother-and-daughter team Sheila Simmons and Nicole Gilmer, Zsa Zsa’s has many gift ideas and mementos that you can take home with you after your long weekend. With items like Seda France Candles and all things Tervis, you can find something for just about anyone no matter the age or taste. When it comes to their select brands, Gilmer explained, “We strive to carry a variety of gifts from Mississippi companies. Our state has many talented people who do beautiful work. A personal favorite we carry is Art by Susan, but our community’s favorites are Fingerprint Pottery and Ronaldo Designer Jewelry.” Gilmer told me that Zsa Zsa’s is always trying new merchandise in the store. By attending several markets across the country each year, they are able to keep up with the times and their customers’ trending year round.

Zsa Zsa’s has numerous selections, including Seda France candles and scents, for that someone needing a little happy.

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Top—Add a pop of color to your home with a selection from Willingham’s. Bottom—Enjoy Catfish Vicksburg at Lillian’s.

Back downtown, Washington Street has many attractions to keep you occupied on this weekend adventure. Our first stop on this redbricked road is Willingham’s—a gift shop extravaganza with something new and interesting around every corner. Barbara Willingham opened her doors in 1996, offering mostly home and garden décor. However, most importantly, Willingham explained, “I loved talking to all the different people from all walks of life. Lots of our customers will come back year after year, and we are able to catch up with them in their busy lives.” Today, Willingham’s has grown into a place to find not only home and garden décor but also all kinds of handmade jewelry and even gorgeous linen clothing from brands such as Pure Knits and Matchpoint Linens. However, Willingham’s bestselling item is none other than Peter’s Pottery out of Mound Bayou, Mississippi. “Peter’s is our number one seller, and we love the Woods family. They are a Christian family, a joy to do business with; and their pottery is gorgeous!” Willingham told me. With lunchtime quickly approaching on your day’s shopping spree, right across the street from Willingham’s is the newly opened Italian restaurant—Lillian’s. Having a menu full of delectable treats, Lillian’s branches out from traditional Italian cuisine and creates dishes to tempt even the most refined taste buds. The décor of Lillian’s offers a fine-dining experience with white tablecloths and intimate, candle-lit table settings. However, for a lunch-time stop, this restaurant’s scrumptious aromas drift out its front doors, tempting many tourists and hometowners passing by on busy Washington Street. One of the dishes that looks extremely yummy and is a ‘must’ for all trying Lillian’s for the first time is the Catfish Vicksburg. Fluffy white, fried catfish fillets nestled atop a heaping mound of angel hair pasta, topped with a warm and tasty hollandaise sauce and then complemented with a side of delicate asparagus—this dish is not to be missed! For something on a bit lighter side, Lillian’s menu lists specialty salad options and poboys. Lunch at Lillian’s is sure to give you the get up and go to have a fun-filled afternoon of visiting some of the museums in downtown Vicksburg.

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Right—The Old Depot Museum takes you back in time. Below left—Below deck of the Motor Vessel Mississippi IV, you can explore what dayto-day life would have been like aboard such boats while working the river. Below right—On the corner of Levee and Grove Streets, the Old Depot Museum is home to an array of historic artifacts and models. Bottom—Rusty’s Riverfront Grill is famous for its fresh seafood dinners.

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The first stop on our excursion through some of these many museums is the Old Depot Museum on Levee Street just below Washington Street along the river. Detailing the many trains and battleships of different eras as well as housing a scaled down version of the battlefields of Vicksburg during the Civil War, the Old Depot Museum has so much to interest the history buff. The battlefield itself is filled with lifelike terrain, soldiers, and even the battle weapons that would have been used during the war. Make sure to stop by the Old Depot Museum to learn a little more about some Mississippi history and see its expansive gift shop with tons of treasures to commemorate your stay in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Next on our samplings of Vicksburg’s museums is a new addition to this historical city—the Lower Mississippi River Museum. When I talked to Sherry Steele Jones, the director of the museum, she explained that it is “owned and operated by the U. S. Army Corp of Engineers Vicksburg District and officially opened in August 2012 after several years of planning and setbacks, which included the Great Flood of 2011.” The perfect place to take your children or even a larger group for an interesting historical visit, the Lower Mississippi River Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 9:00 A.M. until 5:00 P.M. During the summer months, the museum is also open on Sundays from 1:00 P.M. to 5:00 P.M. for an afternoon stroll along the riverboat docked next to the museum itself. The museum has no admission fee; and Jones said, “The only charge is that you pick up a bit of information about the Mississippi River that you did not know before touring.” Some of the spectacular things that you will come across during your tour are many pictures and diagrams of the different views of the river over the years and a 1,515-gallon aquarium stocked with native river fish. The perfect way to finish off your busy afternoon of touring and fact-finding along the river is a delectable dinner. Providing such a treat is Rusty’s Riverfront Grill, directly adjacent to the Lower Mississippi River Museum and home to some of the freshest catches on this side of the river. Rusty’s Riverfront Grill has been at this particular location since January of 2005 after a fire, just one month prior, forced the business to move from its original location. Owners Rusty and Stephanie Larsen explained that what makes Rusty’s so unique to the Vicksburg area is that “we specialize in fresh Gulf of Mexico seafood and hand-cut steaks. One of the best menu items is the Fried Green Tomatoes topped with hollandaise sauce and lump crab meat.” After a long day of shopping in and exploring historic Vicksburg, a laid back and relaxed evening at Rusty’s Riverfront Grill is the perfect end to such a unique weekend adventure. Next time you find yourself venturing North on Highway 61, make sure to spend a weekend in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Places like this unique town remind us that a respite from the humid and hot summer months need not be hours and hours away.


Miss Mississippi Outstanding Teen

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he Miss Mississippi Outstanding Teen Pageant is dedicated to the support of education, promotion of community service, and development of self-confidence. Anne Elizabeth Buys, Miss Riverland and the daughter of Mark and Judy Buys of Vicksburg, Mississippi, was recently crowned Miss Mississippi Outstanding Teen 2013. Anne Elizabeth is a senior at Porter’s Chapel Academy in Vicksburg and will represent her state in the Miss America Outstanding Teen Pageant in Orlando, Florida, in August. The first runner-up in the pageant was Macy Elizabeth Mitchell, Miss Southern Magnolia; second runnerup was Brooke Bullock, Miss Leaf River Valley; third runner-up was Alivia Paden Roberts, Miss Tupelo; and fourth runner-up was Lydia Myers, Miss North Central. Visit www.missmississippipageant.com for more information.

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THE social SCENE VICKSBURG, MS

Miss Mississippi Outstanding Teen 2013 Benefit

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ontestants of the Miss Mississippi Outstanding Teen Pageant participated in a benefit for Children’s Miracle Network at the Pizza Inn in Vicksburg, Mississippi, on May 27, 2013. The contestants raised money for the organization by serving as entertaining waitstaff for diners.

1 Macy Mitchell, Katie Beth Simmons, Allison Nichols, Katelyn Perry, Vivian O’Neal, Skylar Bunch, Mary Randall Ivy, and Reagan Norwood 2 Christi, Thomas, Lauren, and Jay Kilroy 3 Dante Sanders, Da’Swala Powers, and Teresa Fields Robert 4 Gwen Edris, Lynn McGee, Jeannie Simmons, and Earl Edris 5 Front—Anne Elizabeth Buys, Molly May, and Brooklyn Mooney; back—C. J. Williams, Katie-Noelle Steed, Katelyn Corinne McNeese, Tyler Roberson, Anna Peoples, and Alivia Paden Roberts 6 Jessica and Suzanne Decell with Coralee and Lewis Decell 7 Marissa and Misty Jabour with Addison, Sara, and Landry Leach

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THE social SCENE

VICKSBURG, MS

8 Lance and Abigail Foley 9 Mark, Booth, Reed, Talbot, and Judy Buys 10 Front—Carol Coker, Layla Taylor, C. J. Williams, Anne Elizabeth Buys, and Alivia Paden Roberts; back—Amber Claire Huddleston, Tallie Johnston, Tyler Roberson, Katie-Noelle Steed, Anna Peoples, Molly May, Katelyn Corinne McNeese, and Brooklyn Mooney 11 Winky Freeman and Molly May 12 Jaynie Fedell, Skylar Bunch, and Katie Beth Simmons 13 Jeannie and Katie Beth Simmons with Lisa and Mary Randall Ivy 14 Lindsey Blackledge Kidder, and David Blackledge 15 Molly May and Debbie Freeman 16 Tammy and Benny Wells

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Vicksburg Workshop: Introduction to Artist Trading Cards by Elke Briuer

In January 2013, the Vicksburg Art Association in Vicksburg, Mississippi, sponsored a workshop for attendees to learn about Artist Trading Cards, to get the hands-on opportunity to create 10 cards, and to trade some cards if interest and time allowed. Topics were “negative space trees,” “textured background pears,” and “Valentine’s Day collages.” Artist Trading Cards (ATCs) are the treasures of a world-wide movement that began in 1997 in Switzerland. At that time, M. Vanci Stirnemann, Cat Schick, and Guido Dietrich showed 1,200 original art cards at a bookstore with the idea that the cards would be traded, not sold, similar to the way other collectors’ trading cards are exchanged. These artists’ miniature, original

Isabel Adams, Chelsie Williams, Jaime Oldenburg, Judy Pennington, Myrna Turnipseed, Katrina Arrington, and Jette Williams

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works were advertised as only “for trade” with ATCs either brought to the store or created at the event. Participating artists liked the idea, and the movement spread. Canada, America, and Australia seem to be the leaders in web presence and clubs in major cities. Books, videos, magazines, and social media online are full of information about ATCs and new developments for creating and trading. Like other collectible cards, the size of ATCs must be 2.5 inches by 3.5 inches with blanks readily available in a variety of media at art supply and craft stores. Artists should sign their work on the front. The back of the card should include the title of

the artwork, information on contacting the artist, and the word “original” on a one-ofa-kind ATC. Since the art cards are meant to be traded with other artists, you have opportunities to own a miniature by your favorite artists and friends. For storage, the trading cards fit into the Sports Trading Cards paraphernalia that are specifically created for ATCs. Among ATC trading clubs or online groups, “editions” are one-of-a-kind cards by various artists on a single theme. A “series” consists of one artist’s several original cards on a single theme or in a particular style. If cards are worked as a limited series, the artist can identify each piece by numbering, such as “Pears” 3 of 10. It is an artist’s choice to trade with fellow artists and have a collection. Some artists, however, sell cards on EBAY and


Still smiling at the end of a fun-filled day are ATC artists Myrna Turnipseed, Jaime Oldenburg, Katrina Arrington, Isabel Adams, Chelsie Williams, Tammy Smith, and Jette Williams

other places. These items are not ATCs. They are called ACEOs (Art Cards, Editions & Originals). Once an artist hears about ATCs, the idea of such small works of art can be mind boggling. Creating a small painting, however, is an interesting way to exercise design principles and color theory as well as techniques and applications. A card can actually serve as a sketch for a larger painting, as a warm-up exercise, or simply as a future ATC card to be traded or ACEO to be sold. Fortunately, ATCs come in a wide variety from collage to drawings, oil, watercolor, and art prints to art in any media on any medium that can be created in the 2.5-inch by 3.5-inch dimension. For more information and trade opportunities regarding ATCs, visit the original site at www.artist-trading-cards.ch/. At this site under the Gallery link, you can sample

ATCs from all over the world. Other sites are www.atcquarterly.com (no longer active, but still worth seeing); www.atcsforall. com (a site for those crafting and journaling as well as for others); www.IllustratedATCs. com (To use this site, you have to submit artwork and must be juried into the group.), and www.youratcstore.com. At one point, www.CitraSolv.com had a call for ATCs and placed them on their Artists web site. Clubs put photos of editions online as well. You can also search the web and social media for specific details. Whether you operate online or in person, you can decline a trade if you feel that the other piece is not up to your standards; and you are always entitled to know if you are getting an original or a print. There are special rules about prints! Clubs post those rules which vary somewhat among different groups.

Left—Chelsie Williams selected her favorites to show off in the clothesline. Bottom left and right— Myrna Turnipseed’s Samplers

Jams

A video on “You Tube” explained some ATC Games. One is called “Jams.” In this game, one person creates three cards with only background on the front and contact information on the back of the card as #1. The next player receives the cards and adds artwork on all three, puts full address on the back in place #2, and sends it to the third player. That person finishes the card with enhancements, adds full address #3, and then mails two cards to player #1 and keeps one. Player #1 keeps one card and sends the other card to player #2. To keep the game going, any of the players may add three more cards with background only and send them along with the first set of cards. New people can be added, or the chain continues to go around and around.

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The Art of

Immersion in History by Meaghan McCallum

You haven’t truly experienced history until you’ve experienced it by stepping back in time to historic places and historic reenactments. Filled with opportunities to step back in time and vicariously experience how our ancestors lived, locales in the Bluffs & Bayous area create a whole new perspective on life and foster a deeper appreciation for the places that cradle our history. Events in Natchez, Mississippi, such as General Andrew Jackson’s military parade and places like the Natchez Finishing School; the interpretation of history during The Day the War Stopped in St. Francisville, Louisiana; and Vicksburg, Mississippi’s commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War Campaign and Siege of Vicksburg are among the many samplings to savor from the well of our area’s rich history. We all learn about history in school, but you get the chance to experience it fully when visiting a historic locale like Natchez. This past April 12 was a beautiful day in Natchez, “The Little Easy.” With the sun shining, it was a warm afternoon filled with the overwhelming sense of possibility, a feeling that Fridays often bring. With Saturday on the horizon, anticipation of the weekend was thick in the air. However, what citizens and visitors in Natchez did not expect was a metronome of marching feet echoing off the buildings of downtown Natchez. Accompanied by a rolling drum beat, a line, two-men wide, emerged from Underthe-Hill and promenaded up the town’s main streets. The parade of men that Friday was a group of reenactors representing the Tennessee Militia led by General Andrew Jackson. This particular weekend marked the bicentennial Page 48 { July 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous


of The War of 1812 and, more specifically, General Jackson’s march up the Natchez Trace Parkway. Robert Pearson, the branch director of Historic Jefferson College, six miles north of Natchez, along with Finley Hootsell, a local living history enthusiast, were instrumental in orchestrating the military parade and the livinghistory demonstration that occurred the next morning on the grounds of Historic Jefferson College in Washington, Mississippi. The Friday parade was just the start of a weeklong commemoration. The reenactors were camped in Natchez for two days to correspond with the living history event that was planned for the same weekend. Friday evening, Andrew Jackson, portrayed by Grant Hardin, marched his troops, accompanied by Natchez Mayor Butch Brown, from Natchez Under-the-Hill up to the Eola Guest House and Prentiss Club where they were greeted by an array of people also in period dress. Here, the night culminated with a feast before the troops were dismissed to their camp. The next morning at 9:00 a.m., over 50 craftsmen, traders, and Native Americans congregated to display their various wares and techniques. The public also observed the reenactors authentically replicating camp life of the early 1800s. After their weekend stint in Natchez, these reenactors continued their march up the parkway and onward towards Nashville, Tennessee. Immersed in the aura of this weekend event, I was amazed how a simple parade could provide such a bold taste of history. Watching an austere, dignified General Jackson lead his troops as if 1812 had come alive was, at the least, a chilling experience. That the city of Natchez, a place many call home, was a resting point for one of the greatest men in our nation’s history is a powerful reality that too few appreciate, a sentiment echoed by Natchez historians. People like Finley Hootsell and his family spend time, money, and energy trying to spread the wealth of the past. “Many people are unaware of how much history took place here,” said Hootsell. “This was the original ‘melting pot.’” Hootsell, like many others, appreciates the community support for both the parade and living-history demonstration but would love to see even more local involvement. No shortage of opportunities, though, exists for natives and visitors in and around Natchez, Vicksburg, and St. Francisville to explore local history. Recently, in particular, Carrie Golden Lambert and Esther Carpenter hosted the Natchez Finishing School, transforming The Elms, Carpenter’s antebellum home, into a finishing school straight out of 1899. These hosts are aware that in these modern times, the art of conversion is becoming lost. Bluffs & Bayous { July 2013 { Page 49


As human beings, communication is one of our greatest gifts; and the intimacy of eye contact and verbal articulation is unparalleled in effective verbal communication. So that these endowments from nature not be lost, the goal of the Natchez Finishing School was to take participants through the veil of time into an era when etiquette, manners, and appropriate behavior were so highly valued. Once there, “students” learned about history and elocution while enjoying each other’s company. Generally, the term school has a negative connotation, but there was nothing negative about the Natchez Finishing School. The experience Lambert created was one of sheer enjoyment and re-enacting at its finest. She cultivates thought, good conversation, and gratitude for personal connections. Lambert, the daughter of well-known artist Rolland Golden, was born and raised in New Orleans’ French Quarter. She comes from a long line of artists stretching back to 1678. Art, especially fiber art, has been passed down through her family and provides Carrie with a unique way of connecting with her ancestors. Along with being a successful fiber artist, Carrie has a deep love of history. From an early age, she learned from her father a powerful respect for the past. Currently, she is composing a novel based on historic Natchez. Through research for this book, she discovered that antebellum Stanton Hall, for a short time, housed a women’s college. Thus, the idea for the Natchez Finishing School was born. On up the river in Vicksburg, Mississippi, the Vicksburg National Military Park was established by Congress in 1899 to commemorate the campaign, siege, and defense of Vicksburg as well as to preserve the history of battles and operations that were conducted on the grounds where the troops fought. Through 2015, the nation will be observing the 150th Anniversary of the Civil War. Throughout May and Memorial Day Weekend, the Vicksburg National Military Park sponsored programs commemorating the Sesquicentennial of the Campaign and Siege of Vicksburg. There were a series of open-air concerts held with the U. S. Navy Band, 41st U. S. Army Band, Mississippi Symphony Orchestra, and The Jackson Mass Community Choir. Soldiers through the Ages was presented near the USS Cairo and Vicksburg National Cemetery. Ranger-led walks and talks highlighted significant events during the Vicksburg campaign; and at numerous locations along the siege lines, Civil War reenactors told stories about the soldiers who fought and died for their respective causes. The Iowa Memorial, recently restored by the State of Iowa, was rededicated; and Iowa Governor Terry Branstad was present to assist with the rededication of the monument. Twenty-eight Northern and Confederate states were involved in the Vicksburg Campaign; and every day in May, a wreath was placed on a different state memorial with a proclamation read in tribute to the fallen. With cannons firing, historically clad actors filled the battlefield park, Page 50 { July 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous


breathing new life into history by creating scenes of historic action for audiences to understand and appreciate the depth of historic significance this area holds. On July 3, the Vicksburg National Military Park will honor the anniversary of Vicksburg’s surrender by placing thousands of illuminations throughout the park, lighting each state monument; and each monument will have a luminary placed to represent each casualty that state and its people suffered. On July 4, a fireworks display will be staged at the riverfront in downtown Vicksburg, an event that only recently has been initiated. Down 61 South and into Louisiana, each June the folks in West Feliciana Parish pay homage to Civil War soldiers in an event titled The Day the War Stopped, an annual reenactment of a unique time in history. On June 12, 1863, at the Siege of Port Hudson, Union Troops were fighting over control of traffic on the Mississippi River. Lieutenant Commander John E. Hart, the federal commander of the USS Albatross, died due to complications with what perhaps was delirium from yellow fever.

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Wanting to bury their commander, officers from the Albatross sent a boat with a flag of truce to inquire if there were any Masons in the town; for Hart was a Mason. They were told of a Masonic Lodge in town, and soon the request for burial was granted. Officers of the USS Albatross climbed the hill from the river with Hart’s body; and with other significant people involved, they processed to Grace Episcopal Church where Episcopal and Masonic services were held. Commander Hart was buried in a Masonic burial lot with both Northern and Confederate armies paying respect. Following the burial and the return of Hart’s officers to their ship, the war resumed. During this annual reenactment, locals and visitors alike can ponder the significance of this short episode, realizing how even during acts of war, where brother is pitted against brother, there is true understanding of human beings’ need to respect one another. That moment of respect thrived in this small instance of declaring a truce in order to give this man a Masonic burial. Every day in our area of the South is unique; each is a new step into an ever-changing future. Today, the sun might be streaming through the trees, lighting up the leaves, and embracing every single blade of grass. Tomorrow, the clouds could be billowing overhead, firing down vicious lightening, heaving merciless waves of rain, and breathing angry gusts of wind. One constant we have, though, is our past. History lives all around us and, most importantly, within us. Because our history is so vital a part of us, we have a duty to preserve it through learning about it and fostering an appreciation for it. It’s as easy as taking a class, attending a re-enactment, or simply reading a book. However you choose to delve into the stories of yesterday, there is one thing each of us must do: Step outside on a quiet, sunlit day and listen—the soil, rocks, trees, and bricks of this area have a whole lot to say.

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Healthy Living

by Caroline Devereaux

Pilates Exercises Fit for Everyone H

appy July, everyone! I’m still receiving wonderful comments and questions from last month’s Healthy Living article, “Metabolism, Weight Gain, and Why What Household Products You Use MATTERS,” regarding the missing link to comprehensive health. I’ve so enjoyed getting to chat with many readers who are curious about improving their health and how to do so affordably. If you have yet to reach out to me with questions, continue to feel free to email me at caroshull@gmail.com. I promised you more information on exercise and fitness this month, which is exactly why I’ve brought my dear friend and Pilates studio owner Rachel Lanzas to the drawing board for some excellent fundamental Pilates exercises appropriate for all ages and levels. Rachel Lanzas is a graduate of Louisiana State University in Information Sciences and Auditing. After the birth of her first child, she discovered group Pilates Mat classes at a local gym and was amazed at how the method helped her shed baby weight and supported her during her second pregnancy and throughout delivery and recovery. She pursued her Comprehensive Pilates Certification through BASI Pilates and purchased a small turnkey studio in 2007. Passionate about spreading the wonders of Pilates, fitness, and wellness, she has grown Pilates Bodies into a full-service fitness studio offering over 45 classes and private sessions weekly. She currently

lives in Abita Springs, Louisiana, with her studio nearby in downtown Covington, Louisiana. First, let’s chat a little bit about Pilates principles in case you are new to the concept. Pilates focuses on the core postural muscles, which help keep the body balanced and are essential to providing support for the spine. In particular, Pilates exercises teach awareness of breath and alignment of the spine and aim to strengthen deep torso muscles. The Pilates Method is not just exercise; it is a series of very precise, controlled movements that fully engage the body and mind. These movements are performed on the mat and on equipment which is designed to support and guide the body through its ultimate transformation. However, in this article, we’ll just discuss traditional Pilates mat exercises. Pilates conditions the body from head to toe with a no-to-low impact approach suitable for all ages and abilities. It requires patience and practice, but results will follow. Rachel Lanzas explains, “This program is designed for overall core strength. Our core muscles are those which provide support to our torso, mainly our abdominals, back, and seat. A strong core can help alleviate back pain, correct postural issues, and give you vitality! You will need a mat and possibly a small, rolled-up towel. Aim to perform this routine 3 times per week, doing 10-15 repetitions of each exercise. Modifications are given for each exercise.” Bluffs & Bayous { July 2013 { Page 53


RACHEL’S FAVORITE FUNDAMENTALS

a

b

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1. Single Leg Stretch Target Zone: Abs Setup: (a) Lying on your back, begin with your knees bent and your feet on the mat. Hands will rest behind the head, cradling and supporting the head and neck. Action: (b) Inhale to slightly nod chin towards the chest, draw the shoulders down, and exhale to curl the chest off the mat. (c) Bring each leg, one at a time, into a table position. (d) On an inhale, stretch one leg at a high diagonal; then exhale to change legs, letting them pass one another. Things to be aware of: Keep chin slightly nodded and shoulders away from your ears. Maintain a small space in the small of your back throughout. Keep your core drawn in—think of balancing a martini glass on your belly. Modifications: (e) For neck issues, keep your chest flat on the mat, and extend your legs on a higher diagonal stretch. For lower back issues, extend your legs on higher diagonal and/or stretch one leg, and then pull it in before changing to the other leg. For shoulder issues, cross your arms over your chest, or extend your arms alongside your waist. Advancement: Stretch your legs out on a lower diagonal to engage your core even more. 2. Side Lifts Target Zone: Side of waist and lower back Setup: (f) Lie along your side with your bottom arm stretched under your head for support. Your top hand rests on the mat just in front of the ribs. Legs will extend out, just forward of your torso. Action: (g) Inhale to draw your navel in towards your spine, and hover both legs just above the mat. Exhale to lift both legs as one unit up an inch; then inhale to lower them down an inch. Things to be aware of: Do not let your belly “pop out” or your shoulders/neck hike up as your legs rise. Think of squeezing a sponge between your navel and your spine and drawing the tops of your shoulder down just before you lift your legs. Keep your waist off the mat, and think of the opposite of how it feels lying in bed on your side! This will keep you from collapsing in your core and spine while lying on your side. Modifications: (h) For shoulder issues, place a rolled-up towel underneath your head instead of your arm. For lower back issues, lift your top leg first; then let your bottom leg follow to meet it; then allow both to come down together. Advancement: Place top arm along the top side of the body.

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h


RACHEL’S FAVORITE FUNDAMENTALS 3. Leg Circles Target Area: Inner and outer thighs Setup: Same as previous Side Lifts exercise, except you begin with your heels squeezed together and your toes turned out in a traditional “Pilates V” position. Action: (i) Inhale to slowly lift the top leg, making the shape of the top curve of a circle the size of a tennis ball; exhale to click your heels together at the center bottom of the circle. Circle 10 times before changing direction for your outer thighs. (j) Next, fold your top leg so that your knee faces the ceiling and your foot is on the mat, a little forward of the bottom leg. Prepare by inhaling; then exhale to hover your bottom leg off the mat. Repeat the same tennis-ball-size circles with your inhale, and exhale 10 times in each direction for inner thigh work. Things to look for: Hips and pelvis remain steady and do not roll back and front. Keep your navel drawn towards the spine and the bottom waist lifted off the mat. Neck is relaxed. Modifications: For shoulder issues, use your rolled-up towel under your head instead of your arm. If there is any knee pain in the lower leg circle, bring your working leg more forward of your torso. Advancements: Make your circles larger and move more slowly.

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4. Prone Extensions Target Zone: Upper and lower back Setup: Lie on your mat, facing down, with your head resting on stacked hands and your forearms resting on the mat. Legs will be lined up hip distance apart. Action: (k) Inhale to draw your navel in towards your spine and your shoulders down towards your seat, relaxing the neck. Exhale and gently lift your chest away from the mat, gluing your hands to your forehead so that your forearms come with you. Inhale to lower the chest down to the mat. (l) After repeating 10 times, rest the upper body, and repeat by exhaling to lift the legs off the mat and inhaling to lower the legs back down. Things to be aware of: When lifting your upper body, keep your legs heavy, stomach hollowed away from your mat, chin slightly tucked, and your shoulders down. When lifting your lower body, keep your shoulders down, your neck relaxed, and your stomach hollowed out. Modifications: (m) For neck issues, keep your forearms on your mat as you lift your chest. (n) For lower back issues, lift only one leg at a time. Advancements: After you exhale and lift the chest and arms off the mat, continue the movement by reaching your arms long out to the side in a “T” position and then squeeze them back alongside your body and/or pull legs all the way together. Inhale to lower the body back down to the mat.

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Baby Shower for Meg Payment On June 1, 2013, at the home of Sandra and Eddie Burkes in Natchez, Mississippi, friends and family were invited to a baby shower for Meg O’Beirne Payment of Ocean Springs, Mississippi. Since the gender will not be revealed until Baby Payment makes his or her appearance, luncheon tables lining the living area space were decorated with pink and blue ribbons, julep cups filled with blue and pink hydrangeas, and napkin rings with blue and pink flowers. A seated lunch was served followed by Pokey O’Beirne with daughter Meg Payment

Sandra Burkes Page 56 { July 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous

the unwrapping of gifts.

Guests enjoyed mimosas, flavored tea, and fresh shrimp salad topped off with lemon pie for dessert.


Joanna Brumfield, Emily Maxwell, Meg Payment, Teresa Burns, Valerie Seal, and Lisa McKnight

Noreen Bozeman, Bridgit Hlavac, Kathleen O’Beirne, Pokey O’Beirne, Meg Payment, Mary Williams, Margaret Williams, Virginia O’Beirne, and Patsy Rogers

Lisa McKnight and Valerie Seal

Kathleen O’Beirne, Pokey O’Beirne, and Meg Payment

Valerie Seal, Meg Payment, and Joanna Brumfield

Kathleen O’Beirne, Valerie Seal, Meg Payment, Joanna Brumfield, and Sandra Burkes Bluffs & Bayous { July 2013 { Page 57


Legal Notes

by Sam Gwin III

Squatter’s Rights A

few weeks ago, I was working in my horse pasture, repairing a fallen fence post, when my nextdoor neighbor, Ken Tighlman, walked over to me. My fence lies within inches of the boundary line between our properties. Ken then said that, while an engineering student in college, he was told that, if a fence was in place for more than seven years, it then, by law, became a property line if it was an approximation to the boundaries between properties. I said to him that I had never heard of such a law but that I thought he was probably referring to the doctrine of adverse possession, which is loosely defined as someone possessing another’s property for more than ten years thereby assuming ownership of the same. The Mississippi Court of Appeals just last year gave a detailed analysis of what it would take for someone possessing another’s land to prove that he is now the owner of property through the doctrine of adverse possession. In the case of Massey vs. Lambert (Miss 2012), the Court cited the Mississippi code which statutorily defines

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adverse possession. The Court cited MCA Section 15-1-13 (1) which states: “One who seeks to acquire property by adverse possession must demonstrate the following six essential elements by clear and convincing evidence: The property must be under claim of ownership; Actual or hostile; Open, notorious, and visible; Continuous and uninterrupted for a period of ten years; Exclusive; and Peaceful.” The Court further defined clear and convincing evidence as “… evidence so clear, direct and weighty, and convincing as to enable the fact-finder (the Judge) to come to a clear conviction, without hesitancy, of the truth of the precise facts of the case.” For one to adversely possess another’s property, he must prove all six of the elements described in MCA Section 15-113 (1). Let’s start with the period of time—ten years of uninterrupted use. This clause is, of course, very easy to understand.

Next, there must be a claim of ownership. This is accomplished in a number of possible ways: one can advise verbally or in writing to his or her neighbor that he owns a certain piece of property; one can post the land; one may point to a deed he has for the property even though the deed later shows to be defective. One may also fence property; pay taxes; make improvements; cut timber; have the property surveyed, marked, and painted; run livestock on it; grant oil and gas leases, etc. All of the conduct cited above must be such that it puts everyone on notice either actually or constructively that the possessor is claiming ownership. These are all factors which also go to the element of open and obvious ownership. Next, the possessor must demonstrate actual and hostile, yet peaceful, possession at the same time. This seems like a contradiction; but the Court has said that this means said adverse possession is in essence, “Effective control over a definite area of land, evidenced by things visible to the eye or perceptible to the senses.” In other words, the evidence must show that the real owner saw or should have seen this possession going on and took no action, thus making it peaceful possession at the same time. Finally the possessor must demonstrate exclusivity over the property. Our Court has said that this means, “Exclusive possession is an intention to possess and hold land to the exclusion of, and in opposition to, all claims of all others, and the claimants conduct must afford an unequivocal indication that he is exercising dominion as sole owner.” Any time that the possessor asks the real owner for permission to use certain property in any certain way (ingress and egress, for example) then the possessor has in all probability just eliminated any right to claim the property by adverse possession. My Take: To avoid a claim of adverse possession against your land or property, you should be vigilant in the following ways: know your property lines (by survey if need be); keep up your fences; inspect your property often for trespassing; always maintain and affirm your ownership to others; pay your taxes; have a clear understanding with neighbors, especially new neighbors, of where the lines are; and assert your rights vigorously at all times.


PREMIER EVENTS up

& coming! JULY

July 6 Lake St. John’s Annual Flotilla Ferriday, Louisiana Get your boats ready because Lake St. John’s Annual Flotilla is just around the corner on July 6. Registration at Spokane Resort begins at 9:00 a.m. and ends at 12:00 p.m. For all boats, registration is $10; and there will be T-shirts, posters, and much more to purchase. The flotilla line-up will begin behind the sheriff’s boat at William Coleman’s house. Throughout the day from among those registering boats, names will be drawn to receive prizes; there might even be some cash prizes! The drawings will begin at noon. Radio station 107.1 will be on hand at Spokane Resort to cover the event. The Blessing of the Fleet will begin as soon as the first boat passes the Steckler pier. The pier after the Steckler pier will be the judges’ pier, and winners will be announced and prizes given later that evening. For an exciting finale to the day’s celebration, stick around for the 9:00 p.m. fireworks show on the backside of the lake near Corbetts. Don’t miss this day of fun and friends at Lake St. John! For any questions, contact Donna Maroon at 318-481-0182 or donnamaroon@aol.com or Gay Guercio at sguerico@bellsouth.net. July 10 - 13 Miss Mississippi Pageant Vicksburg, Mississippi Attend or tune in for this year’s annual Miss Mississippi Pageant July 10-13 at the Vicksburg Convention Center. Beginning at 8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, July 10, winners of individual pageants from around the state will compete for the prestigious title of Miss Mississippi 2013 and the opportunity to compete in the Miss America Pageant. Music, dance, pageantry, and special guest appearances will entertain and delight audiences as the Miss Mississippi Corporation brings the spotlight, both live and via television, to this historic river city and to the entire State of Mississippi and its smart, talented, and lovely young women. Miss Mississippi Corporation is a non-profit organization, and all proceeds from its events and products fund the scholarships to participants in the pageant program. Miss America Corporation is the leading scholarship provider for women in the country, and for years the Miss Mississippi Corporation has led the nation in the amount of scholarships granted. On July 8 at 7:00 p.m., the Miss Mississippi Parade will caravan through downtown Vicksburg on Washington Street with all 35 contestants in convertibles. On July 11, downtown merchants will host the event’s annual Autograph Party. All are invited to come shop, greet the contestants, and acquire autographs from these stellar Miss Mississippi competitors. Tickets for the evening preliminary and crowning competitions are as follows: Wednesday and Thursday $30.00 each, Friday $40.00, Saturday $50.00, or all nights $125.00. To purchase tickets or for more information, call 601.638.6746 or visit www.missmississippipageant.com.

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JULY up

& coming!

Through July 19 Summer Reading Program Concordia Parish Library Vidalia, LA 408 Texas Street 318.336.5043 www.concordia.lib.la.us Through July 20 Mississippi Art Colony Juried Spring Show Mary C. O’Keefe Cultural Center Ocean Springs, MS Monday - Saturday 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Free Admission 1600 Government Street 228.818.2878; Fax 228.818.2886 info@themaryc.org; www.themaryc.org Through July 21 Les Miserables Baton Rouge Little Theatre Baton Rouge, LA 7155 Florida Boulevard 7:30 p.m. $29; Students $16 www.brlt.org Through July 27 Vicksburg Farmer’s Market Vicksburg, MS Corner Jackson & Washington Streets Wed. 4 - 7 p.m. / Sat. 8 - 11 a.m. 601.801.3513 www.vicksburgfarmersmarket.org Through July 30 Living History Vicksburg National Military Park Vicksburg, MS Tim Kavanaugh 9 a.m. / $8 per vehicle 601.636.0583 tim_kavanugh@nps.gov; www.nps.gov Through July 31 “Lincoln” the Constitution and the Civil War Vicksburg National Military Park Vicksburg, MS 3201 Clay Street 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. 601.636-0583 www.nps.gov/vick

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up & coming! JULY Through August 4 “Shadow and Light” New Orleans Museum of Art New Orleans, LA 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park 504.658.4100 www.noma.org Through August 25 “The Story in Pictures” New Orleans Museum of Art New Orleans, LA 1 Collins Diboll Circle, City Park 504.658.4100 www.noma.org Through September 8 Annie Laurie Swaim Hearin Memorial Exhibition Series Mississippi Museum of Art Jackson, MS 601.960.1515 www.msmuseumart.com Through October McComb Farmer’s Market McComb, MS Depot Garage/ Railroad Boulevard Every Thursday 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Through November 1 George Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art Biloxi, MS Tues. - Sat. / 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Barbara Johnson Ross 228.374.5547 www.curatorofcollections@geogeohr.org Through Dec. 17 Following the Light—France to Mississippi Paintings by Frank Janca Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art Biloxi, MS 386 Beach Boulevard Tues. - Sat. / 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. 228.374.5547 www.georgeohr.org

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JULY up

& coming!

July 3 - 20 Vicksburg Theatre Guild: Gold in the Hills Parkside Playhouse Vicksburg, MS 101 Iowa Boulevard Fridays & Saturdays only / 7:30 p.m. $10 Adults / $5 Children - Ages 12 and under www.vicksburgtheatreguild.com July 4 “Atchafalaya Lagniappe” Featuring Gene Seneca Iberville Museum Plaquemine, LA 57735 Main Street Museum Hours / Noon - 6 p.m. Event Activities / 3 p.m. - 6 p.m. Free Admission 225.687.7197 ibervillemuseum@yahoo.com July 4 Independence Day Fireworks Celebration Vicksburg, MS Historic Washington Street 7 p.m. 601.634.4527 www.downtownvicksburg.org July 4 Independence Day Fireworks Celebration Mississippi River Natchez, MS Broadway Street Dusk July 4 - 7 65th Annual Mississippi Deep Sea Fishing Rodeo Jones Park Gulfport, MS Highway 90, Barksdale Pavilion 12 p.m. Richie Valdez 228.863.2713 www.deepseafishingrodeo.com July 5 - 6 “Mr. Sipp” Vicksburg Blues Concert Series Bottleneck Blues Bar Vicksburg, MS Shirley B. Waring 601.634.6179 ShirleyWaring@VicksburgHeritage.com www.VicksburgHeritage.com

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up & coming! JULY July 6 Lake St. John Annual Flotilla Spokane Pier Lake St. John Ferriday, Louisiana 9 a.m. - Noon / Boat Registration $10 per boat (any size) 2 p.m. / Blessing of the Fleet at Steckler Pier Gay Guercio sguercio@bellsouth.net July 8 Miss Mississippi Parade Washington Street Vicksburg, MS Historic Washington Street 7 p.m. 601.634.4527 www.downtownvicksburg.org July 8 - 12 Alexandria Museum of Art Kids Camp Alexandria Museum of Art Alexandria, LA 933 Second Street 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. / Ages 6-9 1 - 4 p.m. / Ages 10-14 Members $75 / Non-Members $100 Jason Gray 318.443.3458 www.themuseum.org July 8 - 12 Extinction Distinction Hattiesburg Zoo Hattiesburg, MS 107 South 17th Avenue 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. / Ages 5-7 $150 / Register online. Krissy Hamilton 601.545.4576 KHamilton@hattiesburg.org; www.zoohattiesburg.com July 8 - 12 Creative Craft Camp The Mississippi Craft Center Ridgeland, MS 950 Rice Road 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. / Ages 5-8 $175 / Register online. Jennifer Jones or Sheri Cox 601-856-754 info@mscrafts.org; education@mscrafts.org; sheri@mscrafts.org

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JULY up

& coming!

July 8 - 12 Vicksburg Multi-Cultural Arts Camp Southern Cultural Heritage Center Vicksburg, MS 1302 Adams Street 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. $50 / Ages 6-12 601.631.2997 info@southernculture.org; www.southerculture.com July 8 - 14 National Golf Association Pro Tour Beau PrĂŠ Country Club Natchez, MS Free Admission Nancy Hungerford 601.442.6858 hungerford@ntzchs.org; www.ntzchs.org July 8 - 19 Treasure Island Brookhaven Little Theatre Brookhaven, MS 1st - 7th Grades 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. Registration required www.haventheatre.org July 9 6th Annual Food and Wine Tasting Margaritaville Casino and Restaurant Biloxi, MS 150 6th Street 6 - 9 p.m. Beth Israel 228.539.1655 July 9 - 11 Civil War Adventure Camp Historic Jefferson College Washington, MS Clark Burkett 9 a.m - 12 p.m. / Ages 8-12 $35 / Pre-registration required July 9 - 12 Golf, Tennis, and Swim Camp Vicksburg Country Club Vicksburg, MS 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. Members $125 / Non-Members $155 601.636.8581 www.vicksburgcc.com

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up & coming! JULY July 10 - 13 Miss Mississippi Pageant Vicksburg Convention Center Vicksburg, MS 1600 Mulberry Street 8 p.m. $30 Wed. & Thurs. / $40 Fri. / $50 Sat. Ticket Package for all nights $125 601.638.6746 missmiss@wave2lan.com www.missmississippipageant.com July 10 - 13 64th Annual Choctaw Indian Fair Choctaw Indian Reservation Choctaw, MS 6 p.m. - 1 a.m. Adults $20 / Students $12 / Children 5 & under Free Natasha Willis 601.650.1765 www.choctawindianfair.com July 11 “The Fourth Louisiana at the Battle of Baton Rouge” West Baton Rouge Museum Port Allen, LA 845 North Jefferson Avenue Dr. Thomas Richey, speaker Noon lunchtime lecture Toni Brantley 225.336.2422, ext. 16 Brantley@wbmuseum.org July 12 - 13 Grass Roots Blues Festival Elliott Field Duck Hill, MS 6 - 10:00 p.m. Adults $20 / HS Students $13 /13 & under $1 Al White 662.565.2478 www.grassroots.com July 12 - 13 Vasti Jackson Vicksburg Blues Concert Series Bottleneck Blues Bar Vicksburg, MS Shirley B. Waring 601.634.6179, ShirleyWaring@VicksburgHeritage.com www.VicksburgHeritage.com

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JULY up

& coming!

July 13 Ice Cream Safari Jackson Zoo Jackson, MS 2918 West Capitol Street 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Carol Woodson 601.352.2500 www.jacksonzoo.org (tickets online) July 13 Art on the Bluff Natchez, MS Natchez Bluff 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Carolyn Weir 601.870.7717 skysetter@skysetter.com July 15 - 19 Extinction Distinction Hattiesburg Zoo Hattiesburg, MS 107 South 17th Avenue 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. / ages 8-10 $150 / Register online Krissy Hamilton 601.545.4576 KHamilton@hattiesburg.org www.hattiesburgzoo.org July 15 - 18 Ballet Mississippi Workshop Mississippi Arts Center Jackson, MS 201 East Pascagoula Street, Suite 106 Ages 6-9 / 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. $130 plus $25 registration fee Millie Clanton 601.960.156 mclanton@balletms.com www.balletms.com July 15 - 18 Youth Theatre Workshop Coral Room Theatre Vicksburg, MS 8 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. $100 per child Jack Burns 601.618.9349 iknowjack@email.com www.westsidetheatrefoundation.com July 15 - 19 MMB Princess Dance Camp 2013 Mississippi Metro Ballet Jackson, MS Ages 3-7 / $125 per student 601.853.4508 www.msmetroballet.com Page 66 { July 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous


up & coming! JULY July 15 - 19 Alexandria Museum of Art Kids Camp Alexandria Museum of Art Alexandria, LA 933 Second Street/ P.O Box 1028 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. / ages 6-9 1 - 4 p.m. / ages 10-14 Members $75 / Non-Members $100 Anne Reid 318.443.3458 www.themuseum.org

July 19 Jackson Rhythm and Blues Pre Festival Concert Mississippi Coliseum Jackson, MS 7 p.m. $45 & $60 Ticket Master & Mississippi Coliseum Box Office www.jacksonrhythmandbluesfestival.com

July 16 Vicksburg Flair Cooking Workshop Chef Tom Ramsey SCH Academy Building Vicksburg, MS 5:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. $30 SCHF members / $35 non-members (includes supplies) 601.631.2997; info@southernculture.org www.southernculture.org

July 19 - 20 35th Annual Mississippi Watermelon Festival Mize City Park Mize, MS 8 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Adults $7 / Children $5 Terresa Stewart 601.733.5647 www.mswatermelonfestival.com

July 16 - 19 Naturalist Camp Historic Jefferson College Washington, MS 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. / ages 9-12 $35 / Pre-registration required Clark Burkett 601.442.9201 info@historicjeffersoncollege.com

July 19 - 20 Dexter Allen Vicksburg Blues Concert Series Bottleneck Blues Bar Vicksburg, MS Shirley B. Waring 601.634.6179 ShirleyWaring@VicksburgHeritage.com www.VicksburgHeritage.com

July 20 10th Annual Standing Ovation Awards Gala Natchez Little Theatre Natchez, MS 6 p.m. / Tickets $15 601.442.2233 www.natchezlittletheatre.org July 20 Baton Rouge Irish Film Festival Shaw Center- Manship Theatre Baton Rouge, LA 100 Lafayette Street 12 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. John Kaufman 225.344.0334 jkaufman@manshiptheatre.org www.batonrougeirishfilmfestival.org July 21 - 27 Tara Wildlife Youth Archery Camp Tara Wildlife Vicksburg, MS 6791 Eagle Lake Shore Road Boys and girls / Ages 9-16 $600 per camper Mark Bowen 601.279.4267 www.tarawildlife.com

Bluffs & Bayous { July 2013 { Page 67


JULY up

& coming!

July 22 - 26 Creative Craft Camp The Mississippi Craft Center Ridgeland, MS 950 Rice Road 9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. / Ages 9-12 $175 / Register online. Jennifer Jones or Sheri Cox 601-856-7546 info@mscrafts.org; education@mscrafts.org sheri@mscrafts.org July 23 - 27 Nature Rangers Hattiesburg Zoo Hattiesburg, MS 107 South 17th Avenue 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. / Ages 11-13 $155 / Register online. Krissy Hamilton 601.545.4576 KHamilton@hattiesburg.org www.zoohattiesburg.com July 26 - 27 King Edward Vicksburg Blues Concert Series Bottleneck Blues Bar Vicksburg, MS Shirley B. Waring 601.634.6179 ShirleyWaring@VicksburgHeritage.com www.VicksburgHeritage.com July 26 - 28 The 13th Annual Natchez Food and Wine Festival Natchez Convention Center Natchez, MS 211 Main Street $50 Advance / $65 Door Rene Adams 601.442.4895 www.natchezfoodandwinefest.com July 27 Antiques Road Show Summer Tour Baton Rouge River Center Baton Rouge, LA 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. $200 / 225.767.4214 www.pbs.org/antiques July 27 Geometric Designs Historic Jefferson College Washington, MS 10 - 11:30 a.m. / $10 per student Kay McNeil 601.442.290 kmcneil@mdah.state.ms.us Page 68 { July 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous


up & coming! JULY July 27 The 3rd Annual Top of the Hops Beer Festival Jackson Convention Complex Jackson, MS 105 East Pascagoula Street 601.960.2321 www.topofthehopsbeerfest.com July 27 “Characters for a Cure� Character Breakfast First Baptist Church Vidalia, LA 100 North Hickory 10 a.m. / $15 Bettye Lindeman 318.336.5951

July 27 - 28 Little Miss and Mister Magnolia State Pageant Vicksburg City Auditorium Vicksburg, MS 901 Monroe Street Fri. 8:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m. Sat. 8:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. $20 per-person / Ages 0-11 601.630.2929 www.vicksburgevents.com

July 28 The Premier Bridal Summer Show Biloxi Civic Center Biloxi, MS 578 Howard Avenue 1 - 4 p.m. $20 per person Lynda Jungkind 601.957.105 www.thepremierbridalshow.com

Be sure to confirm details of the events should changes have occurred since events were submitted.

Bluffs & Bayous { July 2013 { Page 69


Southern Sampler by Alma M. Womack

There was a mishap when burning the wheat field across Grassy Lake on the last day of May. Somehow, some wheat straw got stuck on the axle of Buster’s Dodge Dakota, and the truck caught on fire. Buster doesn’t move quickly now but was able to pull the truck over to the turning row and get out before being engulfed in flames. Sammie Mills was on the back of the truck; and in the mad dash to the turning row, he fell, injuring his elbow and getting a burn on one arm. Clarence Duncan saw what was happening and ran over to help Sammie move Buster away from the truck before the gasoline tank exploded. For some reason...divine intervention, maybe...the truck did not explode, and no one was seriously injured. The Dodge was a total loss: Three tires burned or melted, one remained intact, and the cab of the truck was left a burned out shell. Amazing what can happen in such a short time. After burning wheat straw for decades, this is the first accident we’ve ever had; and it was a doozy. Let us hope it is the last time that kind of accident occurs. We had Liza and Drew stay with for a few days right after school was out, and it was a treat for all of us. To their great delight, Woodrow and Drew got to play and argue and swim and run wild for three days. Liza is always so good to help me out with the little boys; and Jorie always takes time with them as well so that I am not the only referee around. Now that little Jay is walking, he thinks he has to join the big boys, too; and that sometimes causes racket. Even though they are a handful and wear me out, I am so happy to have the little ones in my life. Just think, I’ve got three young minds to fill with stories of the great people who founded our nation, the brave pioneers who traveled ever westward across this great country, and the soldiers who have always answered the call of duty to preserve freedom.

Planting, Grand-Parenting, Poultry, and Patriotism T

his is how desperate I am for a story this month: I scrolled through all the saved stories from years past to see if there was one that could be re-submitted, and no one would remember reading it months ago. No luck, nothing caught my eye that might be dressed up in a July suit for 2013, so bear with me. The last few weeks have been really hectic here. Buster spent three weeks

Page 70 { July 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous

in the hospital in two different stretches and had to run the farm from his hospital bed. Luckily, we have a great crew, and they carried out all the instructions sent via the cell phone. Cotton is planted and growing nicely, and most of the wheat has been cut with soybeans planted right behind the wheat harvest. Thanks to a timely rain on the first of June, the beans are coming up.


Much to the chagrin of one of my daughters, I have already taught the little boys a lesson about swords. We have a toy one here that Liza got at a Scottish festival years ago, and it is a favorite plaything of the boys. I told them that our people’s swords were once used to kill Englishmen and Yankees, and now they are used against communists and jihadists. Well, it is true, and they need to know that we still have to fight for our freedom. Personally, I’d rather have a shotgun, but that’s another lesson for another day. Woodrow, Drew, and I are looking forward to getting some new chickens soon. Clarence Duncan is raising a flock of the little ones, and he has promised me upwards of a dozen for my own small flock. I made a deal with him: I’d help buy the grower if he would keep the chicks and raise them in his chicken yard, so that would be one less job for me. He agreed, and now we are waiting for that happy day when the new hens arrive. We already have red, yellow, black, and speckled chickens; and we are eager to see what the new ones will be. Woodrow has named just a few of the flock here now: One rooster is Rooster

Cogburn, and the other is General Randolph since he is the boss. The favorite hen is Whitetail, and the new whitetails are all named Margo since we can’t tell them apart. The yellow hens are all sweet, so we call them Sugar, and the black ones are mean, so they are Little Heifers. Individual names are not the thing with us. It’s just easier to use one name for each breed. The red hens are just Little Red Hens; they are low on the list of favorites. Sometimes it is scary to know that a five-year-old and I think alike. I hope that everyone in our reading area will have a safe and patriotic Fourth of July and that all will remember to be thankful for what that brave handful of men did long ago in 1776. They set in motion the beginnings of a nation that changed the history of the world; and despite the pitiful collection of politicians and bureaucrats in Washington, D. C., this is still the greatest country that ever existed for the common man. We should be ever thankful to live in this beautiful country; and we should remember that our freedom was purchased with the blood of patriots, past and present. Wave that flag and be proud to say, “I am an American.”

Bluffs & Bayous { July 2013 { Page 71


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Bluffs & Bayous July 2013  

The Official Social Events and News Guide for Central and South Mississippi and Southeast Louisiana.

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