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From Your Publisher . . .

T

he months lately just seem to fly by. Before we wrap up one month of Bluffs’ publication, we begin plans and layout for the next issue. Wasn’t New Year’s just yesterday . . . and here it is March? In between, our February was a wet and unusually warm month, showing signs of early spring. As I write this, Mother Nature has opened her spring playbook a little early with a warm sunny day that has azalea blooms popping with shades of pink, white, and red. Oh, no.... please, not just yet....I really want to see spring burst forth all at once as flowers unfold in a million myriad colors, as trees transform from their skeletal brown to fans of lime or loden green, and as grass carpets come to life in glistening jades. Our Japanese Magnolia is one of the last of the winter-timers to bloom, and I’ve watched these classy ladies with their showy clusters of cream and fuchsia try to stretch their soirée of color through

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February and into March. The iris are making their way into the landscape, harbingers of our steadily approaching spring; and soon our landscape will be abloom with nature’s floral palate and our communities abuzz with spring pilgrimages, museum showings, St. Patrick’s Day shenanigans, musical performances, yard-and-garden seminars, and Easter events. Our Premier Events and Up & Coming calendar will keep you in touch with all these activities throughout central and southwest Mississippi and Southeast Louisiana. With warmer breezes blowing this month, our thoughts also turn to being fit for those outdoors activities awaiting us from springtime through summer and into fall. Caroline Devereaux’s article speaks to these thoughts with new health habits and how-to’s for transforming our lifestyles into healthier ones. Also on this health note, March is Colon Cancer Awareness month; and Meaghan McCallum, our office

assistant, promotes such awareness by clarifying the testing and prevention procedures necessary to check colon cancer. Springtime, as well as any time in the Deep South, is also socializing time with birthdays, weddings, balls, and anniversaries; and this month, in addition to our collage of Social Scenes, we spotlight a special dress-up tea party for three-year-old Halle Grace Janette. Enjoy the images of pretty little girls, dressed up in their mothers’ laces, pearls, furs, hats, and heels and seated around the dining table drinking tea and munching on sweets. We celebrate weddings and engagement parties this month as well; and, oh, yes, a favorite subject for most of us—food! G’s Fare brings two amazing Easter menus to consider as you make plans for this seasonal celebration at the end of March. Also in our “favorites” category are Alma Womack’s and Ross McGehee’s always entertaining and often humorous reflections on outdoor and farming life. Our horticultural articles this month focus on native azaleas, Robert Ferguson’s orchids, and next-month’s Biedenharn Museum’s Garden Seminar—all a prelude to our annual Garden Issue upcoming in April. For now…sit back, relax, open up your March Bluffs & Bayous, and enjoy the good news and good times of life along and beyond the Mississippi.


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C o n t r i b u t o r s Columnist Dr. Gary R. Bachman is an assistant extension professor of horticulture at Mississippi State University’s Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi, Mississippi.

Lucien C. “Sam” Gwin III, a native of Natchez, Mississippi, was admitted to the Mississippi Bar in 1981. Since then, he has been practicing at the law firm of Gwin, Lewis, Punches & Kelley, LLP, in Natchez. His practice includes general litigation, real estate law, divorce, contract disputes, eminent domain, products liability, personal injury, medical matters, and some estate work.

Caroline Devereaux is wife to Matt and mom to two daughters, Stella and Mary Tucker. She is a certified Pilates instructor and enjoys educating others on overall health and wellness. They reside north of the Big Easy in Covington, Louisiana.

Becky Junkin, mother of four, grandmother of soon-to-be six, is a lifelong Natchez resident and a retired elementary teacher of twenty four years. She is a certified Pilates instructior and owner of Pur Pilates Studio. She and her husband Jerry live and entertain in their antebellum home Heckler Hall.

Robert Ferguson, a resident of Jackson, Mississippi, for most of his life, received his degree in horticulture from Mississippi State University in 1973. Interested in orchids since the age of 13, he owned Ferguson Orchids from 1973 to 2002 where orchids were cloned, grown from seed, and sold. Ferguson is a Life member of The American Orchid Society, has garnered four American Orchid Society Awards for his orchids, and has won three American Orchid Society Exhibition Trophies for Best of Show.

Columnist Ross McGehee, a lifelong resident of Natchez, Mississippi, owns a diversified and far-flung farm operation.

Jennie Guido is a graduate of Delta State University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Arts and Master’s Degree in English Education. Having lived up Highway 61 in Cleveland, Mississippi, she recently has returned to Natchez, her hometown, to pursue her professional career.

Columnist Alma Womack lives on Smithland Plantation on Black River, south of Jonesville, Louisiana. In addition to her duties as maitresse des maison, she is the keeper of the lawn, the lane and the pecan orchard at Smithland.

on the cover Springtime calls our spirits to sashay down a garden path billowing with bright azaleas. See article on pages 36 to 37. Staff photo

publisher Cheryl Foggo Rinehart editors Jean Nosser Biglane Cheryl Foggo Rinehart graphic designers Jan Ratcliff Anita Schilling media coordinator Adam Blackwell staff photographers Van O’Gwin Elise D. Parker Jennifer Ratliff Cheryl Rinehart sales staff Cheryl Rinehart Donna Sessions JoAnna Sproles office assistant Meaghan McCallum

Adam Blackwell

Jean Biglane

Van O’Gwin

Elise D. Parker

Jan Ratcliff

Cheryl Rinehart

Anita Schilling

Jennifer Ratliff

Donna Sessions

JoAnna Sproles

Bluffs & Bayous is published monthly to promote the greater Southern area of Louisiana and Mississippi in an informative and positive manner. We welcome contributions of articles and photos; however, they will be subject to editing and availability of space and subject matter. Photographs, comments, questions, subscription requests and ad placement inquiries are invited! Return envelopes and postage must accompany all materials submitted if a return is requested. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Bluffs & Bayous are those of the authors or columnists and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products or services herein. We reserve the right to refuse any advertisement. Bluffs & Bayous strives to insure the accuracy of our magazine’s contents. However, should inaccuracies or omissions occur, we do not assume responsibility.

office

423 Main Street, Suite 7 | Natchez, MS 39120 601-442-6847 | fax 601-442-6842 bluffsmag@gmail.com bbupandcoming@gmail.com media.bluffsandbayous@gmail.com www.bluffsbayous.com

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March 2013 FEATURES Dress-up Tea Party for Halle Grace....................................................................... 54-55

FAVORITES All Outdoors Half a Bubble Off.................................................................................................. 10-11

Events March Premier Events........................................................................................... 56-57 March Up & Coming!............................................................................................ 58-67

Native Azaleas Add Charm to Landscape pages 36 - 37

From the Stacks Ten Families Take Natchez into the Twentieth Century.......................................... 26

G's Fare Easter Dining — Casual or Chic............................................................................ 16-19

In the Garden Native Azaleas Add Charm to Landscape............................................................ 36-37 Genetics as a Limiting Factor................................................................................ 44-45 Biedenharn Museum and Gardens’ Annual Garden Symposium....................... 48-49

Legal Notes Law Along the Mississippi.......................................................................................... 73

Southern Sampler Teacher Icon Donald Campbell............................................................................. 80-81

Something Scrumptious Uptown Grocery and Deli, Natchez, Mississippi.................................................. 28-29

To Your Health Physical Awareness Plan 2013.............................................................................. 40-41 Colon Cancer Awareness Month............................................................................... 52

THE social SCENE

Women’s Health Center Parade Appearance.........................................8-9 Annual Taste of the Trust....................................................................12-14 State Senator Melanie Sojourner Greets Officials and Constituents..... 22 Maddux Gilmer’s 2nd Birthday............................................................24-25 Reception for Retired Educators.............................................................. 27 Zsa Zsa’s Open House and Trunk Show...............................................34-35 Tacky Christmas Party...........................................................................38-39 BARL Annual Celebrity Dinner............................................................50-51 ASA Sans Souci Tour.................................................................................. 35 Students Serve as Senate Pages................................................................ 35 Girl Scouts View Snow Queen.................................................................. 35 John Taylor Retirement............................................................................. 46 KDMC Foundation’s PaLate.................................................................70-72 Brookhaven Day in Jackson...................................................................... 82 Shuffle to the Chefs.............................................................................74-78 Lucy Coleman Presented in Debutante Ball............................................ 78 Surprise Birthday Party Celebrates 50 Years............................................ 79

Uptown Grocery and Deli, Natchez, Mississippi pages 28 - 29

THE wedding SCENE

Hall and Brown Wedding....................................... 30-31 Bridal Tea for Kelsey Ann Jackson................................32

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THE social SCENE | McComb, MS | Women' s Health Center Parade Appearance

Women' s Health Center Parade Appearance The Women’s Health Center (WHC) of McComb, Mississippi, participated in the McComb Christmas Parade on December 2, 2012. This year’s theme was “12 Days of Christmas”; and the physicians and staff decorated signs and T-shirts that corresponded with a parody of the song lyrics, written for the occasion by Mrs. Fran Pedigo, one of the center’s employees.

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Dr. David Hubbs and Kate Slonaker Alyce Simpson, Kate Slonaker, and Mahaley Coker Colin Richardson, Dr. Kevin Richardson, and Brooke Richardson Jennifer Thornton, Dr. David Hubbs, and Kate Slonaker Kate Slonaker and SarahBeth Stevens Kori Amos, Dr. Louise Gombako-Amos, Kate Slonaker, and Gwen Seals

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Front—Kori Amos, Dr. Louise Gombako-Amos, and Dr. David Hubbs; back—Colin Richardson and Dr. Kevin Richardson Randy Slonaker, Bobby Nations, and Dr. David Hubbs Front—LaTia Williams, Rachel Frank, and Shanetrius Sparkman; middle—Dianna Johnson, Yolanda Thompson, Kesha Williams, Dr. Louise Gombako-Amos, Kori Amos, Shari Frank, Jennifer Thornton, Dr. David Hubbs, Kate Slonaker, Holly Dobbs, Gwen Seals, and Mahaley Coker; back—Colin Richardson, Dr. Kevin Richardson, and Brooke Richardson


Women' s Health Center Parade Appearance | McComb, MS | THE social SCENE

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Kori Amos, Mary Nations, SarahBeth Stevens, Dr. David Hubbs, and Tammy McMillion; back—Areionna Thompson, Colin Richardson, Brooke Richardson, Dr. Kevin Richardson, and Riley Frank Dr. Louise Gombako-Amos, Kesha Williams, Gwen Seals, Corey Amos, and Kori Amos Colin Richardson, Brooke Richardson, Dr. Kevin Richardson, and Kate Slonaker

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All Outdoors by Ross McGehee

Half a Bubble Off

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ne of the most interesting components of hunting is the characters that you can run into in the woods and around the camp. Running the gamut from genius to absolute fools, they can be anything from entertaining to frightening. Some spawn stories that endure for years, and Dorsey Harris was no exception at our camp. Very few around the camp knew what his name was, partly because of his nickname and partly because, when he introduced himself, no one could understand him! He wasn’t a member of the camp per se, but he belonged in other ways. He would march into the camp without knocking and stride into a room full of strangers, making his way to each one, insisting on being acknowledged, and introduce himself as “Harris.” As unintelligible as his speech was, if a guest called him “Harry,” that was plenty close enough. His nickname was “S” and everyone in the Pine Ridge community knew him. Shoot, you couldn’t get away from him! We met years ago when a new landowner from south Louisiana bought the property next door. For years, “S” had been the caretaker/overseer/resident-pest/snitch for the prior owner, so he kind of went with the property. I often suspected that the place was sold because getting rid of the property was easier than getting rid of S. The new owner had acres of pasture that was of little use to him for hunting, and he offered it to us for hay making so he wouldn’t have to mow it. It looked like a pretty good deal, so we took it on. The only ‘fly in the ointment’ was S. As it turned out, S had a habit of planting gardens willy-nilly; and rather than consolidate his efforts, he planted his okra in one field, his watermelons in another, his peas in yet another, and his sweet corn in

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another, and all were smack in the middle of their respective fields! That may sound like a good idea to some, but it is hard to farm around that. It’s a lot like icing a birthday cake that already has the candles on it. So Duke plowed up and smoothed the gardens in the off-season to streamline hay making. S was instructed by the new landowner that his gardens would be allowed in only certain areas. Everything was rocking along fine until Gary showed up with a hay cutter in June to find that all the hayfields had been plowed up once again and sported tomato stakes and bean poles! When S got caught up with whatever devilment he was perpetrating on others, he’d show up at our camp. He smoked roll-your-own Prince Albert cigarettes and had a pronounced limp which he blamed on a bad hip. He thought no one caught on; but if you paid attention, that limp would switch sides on him. He’d forget which hip was supposed to be bad and wobble on the wrong side! It got to be pretty amusing to call him on it; but he’d just say, “They BOTH hurts, man!” So he’d cripple around the camp, poking his nose into everybody’s business. He was a willing helper, in spite of his infirmities, real or imagined. On the occasion that we decided to replace bunk beds in the camp, S announced that he was the “champion bunk-bed builder of Pine Ridge.” Oh, well, since he put it like that, by all means, we decided to defer to his unequivocal expertise! Only thing

was, when we gathered the tools to assist him, he declared that only amateurs would use a measuring tape or level. “Man, you got to put that EYE on it! If you know what you doing, that eye is all you need.” He could not be convinced to proceed in any other fashion. So he built six bunk beds in about two hours, without the benefit of anything more technologically advanced than a claw hammer. Admittedly, those beds still stand after twenty years of camp abuse; but it takes three grown men to move one and about seven National Geographic magazines apiece to get them stable. S also showed up one afternoon at the camp and, after looking around the yard, decided that we needed a camp garden. Worst yet, he conscripted my two pre-teen offspring as his confederates. Granted, he brought his own tractor and tilled up about a half-acre. Then he made the prettiest rows you ever saw and was ready to plant. Seeds were produced, hoes distributed, and planting commenced. Sweet corn, peas, butterbeans, okra, squash—it was all there. The only problem was that S apparently had the most advanced state of dyslexia known to modern medicine. Why do you pull up a row to plant a seed? Soil warms faster on top of the row and rain won’t drown the young plants for starters. Where does S plant? Not on the row, but in the “middles.” It was so ludicrous that I took


pictures of it. He could not be convinced that this was a huge mistake. “Just let the old man show how to do it. The old man been doing this since before you was born.” [Cleaned up, loose translation.] But the kids were proud of their effort; and when the rain came and washed about three inches of mud on top of the seedlings, S announced that “Them seeds was weak.” On another occasion, S came by inquiring about the possibility of doing some coon hunting. Actually, the way he did it was to show up at the skinning shed one night and watch Boudreaux and Thibodeaux clean some deer. “Man, what you gonna do with them things, man? Eat ‘em? Them things ain’t no good to eat! Man, a coon will make a fool of THREE deers, man! Man, y’all needs to go coon hunting with me tonight and see what I’m talking about.” So I told S that he could certainly hunt any time that he wanted, but I was sure that my kids needed to go along. That very night, S showed up with his dog Mo-black and some other mutt. Also along were Andrew Woods (also known as “Nan”), Pig Woods, and their respective and respectable dogs. Two hours later we were hopelessly lost in the backwater along the Mississippi River and decided to build a fire for our guides to argue around and attempt to establish blame for our predicament. We kept adding wood to the blaze, hoping that a towboat would pass and give us some idea or direction since it was cloudy and we had no stars. The kids were having a ball. We’d gotten three coons and were lost in the swamp in the middle of the night with three guys named “S,” “Pig,” and “Nan.” Boudreaux and Tib were laughing at the three guides, and I was taking pictures. It was better than any trip I’ve ever taken. There’s a pretty good lesson in all that, actually several lessons: People are all quirky but unique. There’s humor to be found in the most frustrating situations. Some people aren’t receptive to anything more than what they already know. When people want to help, sometimes letting them do it their way is more important than doing it the right way. When you are lost, build a big fire, and everybody will forget about being lost. Dorsey Harris left this life this past fall. I hope God doesn’t mind having a garden in the middle of his hayfield. Bluffs & Bayous { March 2013 { Page 11


THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | Annual "Taste of the Trust"

Annual "Taste of the Trust" Brookhaven Trust’s “Taste of the Trust” was held in November 2012 at the Brookhaven, Mississippi Recreation Department. During the evening, guests dined on tasty fare from area restaurants and caterers while enjoying live music and a silent auction. Funds raised at the event are used to complete improvement projects in the area.

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Laura and Steven Murray, Stevie Fitzsimmons, and Emily and Jeff Phillips Bill Boerner and Betsy Belk Robin and Shannon Aker Front—Cassidy Robinson; back—Rita Robinson, Rachel Powell, and Emily Phillips Carl, Malisia, and Garrett Smith Mandy Dann and Betty Ann Perkins Leslie Baker and Emily Phillips

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Annual "Taste of the Trust" | Brookhaven, MS | THE social SCENE

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Angie Moore, Chava Narvaez, and Trinity Webb Sharon Ellis, Annie Picklesimer, and George Laird Mandy Dann, Claire Johnson, and Allison Dann Glenda Hux, Katie Nations, and Kelsey Jordan Lisa Reid, Cathy Bridge, and Kristi Bridge Margaret and Bob Weatherly Sherri Mathis and Merrie Boerner

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THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | Annual "Taste of the Trust"

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Anna Smith, Katie Baker, and Leslie Baker Marvin Curtis, Tyler Bridge, Damian Gatlin, and Kim Bridge

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Dr. Ryan and Nanci Case with Bill Perkins, Jr. Mandy Dann, Carla Snider, and Dauphine Magee Tanya Bairfield with Jason and Emily Childress Marvin Curtis, Malisia Smith, and Tyler Bridge Countess Thompson, Burnell Robinson, and Tedric Thompson Tanya Bairfield and Kimberly Goza

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G's Fare by Becky Junkin

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Easter Dining — Casual or Chic

very year at Easter, my four children, their spouses, and our grands arrive at Hechler Hall for the Great Easter Egg Hunt. Like most holidays, ours involves food or, more specifically, what we are going to eat next. Over the years we have developed several traditions: fish fry on Good Friday and a Crawfish Boil on Saturday with extended family included. The favorite, of course, is Easter dinner where, depending on the varying departure times, we either do it casual with long tables on the patio or more formal inside around the dining room table. They usually prefer the casual meal outside, but I have shared below a sample meal for each locale.

Easter Dinner on the Patio My son David is always in charge of the meat and directs his brothers-in-law in assisting. His meat of choice almost always is Boston Butt. His wife, Stacey, is from Decatur, Alabama, the home of Chris Lilly and his famous Big Bob’s BBQ. Below is a recipe David uses from Lilly’s cookbook Big Bob Gibson’s BBQ Book. David uses an 8-to-10 pound Boston Butt.

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Chris Lilly’s World Championship Pork Dry Rub: ½ tablespoon dark brown sugar 1 tablespoon granulated sugar 2 ¼ teaspoons garlic salt 2 ¼ teaspoons Kosher salt ½ tablespoon paprika 1 teaspoon chili powder 1/8 teaspoon dried oregano leaves 1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper 1/8 teaspoon ground cumin 1/8 teaspoon black pepper In a small bowl, combine dry-rub ingredients. Mix well and set aside. Injection: ¾ cup apple juice ½ cup water ½ cup sugar ¼ cup salt 2 tablespoons Worcestershire Sauce In a separate mixing bowl, combine all the injection ingredients and blend until


the sugar dissolves. Using a meat syringe, inject the meat evenly at 1-inch intervals from the top side, using the entire amount of the injection solution. Apply the dry rub to the meat in an even coating, patting so the rub adheres. Build a fire for indirect cooking by situating the coals on only one side of the grill, leaving the other side void. When the heat reaches 228 degrees, place the butt, skin side down, on the void side of the grill and close the lid. Cook for 7 to 10 hours, adding charcoal as needed during the cooking process to keep the cooker temperature at 225 degrees Fahrenheit. Two small wood chunks should be added every hour to increase the smoke flavor. When the meat has cooked for several hours, begin basting the butt with the Vinegar Sop Mop Sauce (recipe follows) every hour.

Vinegar Sop Mop Sauce 6 ½ cups distilled white vinegar ½ cup cayenne pepper 2 tablespoons salt 3 slices lemon In a large bowl, combine the ingredients and mix well. Make at least 24 hours prior to usage for best flavor. Store the sauce in a tightly covered jar for up to 2 weeks at room temperature. The butt should be done when the internal temperature of the meat reaches 195 degrees Fahrenheit. Remove the pork to a cutting board and let it rest for 30 minutes. Wearing insulated rubber gloves, pull the pork from the bone by hand, or you can use a fork and shred the meat.

Roasted New Potato Salad (from the Junior League of Atlanta Cookbook True Grits) 11 tablespoons olive oil 6 cloves of garlic, chopped 1 teaspoon salt ½ teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon dried thyme ½ teaspoon dried rosemary 2 ½ pounds small new potatoes cut into wedges 2 tablespoons white wine vinegar 2 teaspoons Dijon mustard Salt and pepper to taste ½ cup finely chopped green onion Fresh Parmesan cheese (optional) Combine 6 tablespoons of the olive oil, the garlic, 1 teaspoon salt, ½ teaspoon pepper, thyme, and rosemary in

a bowl and mix well. Add the new potatoes tossing to coat. Arrange in a greased baking pan. Bake at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for 55 minutes or until the new potatoes are brown and tender. Let stand until cool. Transfer

the new potatoes to a bowl. Scrape the pan drippings into a measuring cup. Add enough of the remaining olive oil to measure 6 tablespoons. Whisk the wine vinegar and Dijon mustard in a bowl until smooth. Add the olive oil mixture, whisking until blended. Pour over the new potatoes, tossing to coat. Season with salt and pepper to taste: sprinkle with the green onions. I grate fresh parmesan cheese over the warm potatoes. Serve at room temperature. Serves 6. I use this following recipe often for brunch or luncheon. Everyone seems to love it! It is from the Jackson Junior League cookbook Southern Sideboards.

Marinated Vegetable Platter ¼ cup wine vinegar ¼ cup salad oil ½ cup mayonnaise 1½ teaspoons prepared mustard ¼ teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon garlic powder 1 hard-cooked egg, sieved 4 tablespoons chopped chives 1 16-ounce can whole green beans 1 14-ounce can asparagus spears 1 24-ounce can artichoke hearts 1 15-ounce can small baby carrots Whisk together the vinegar and oil. Add mayonnaise, mustard, salt, and garlic powder; and continue to whisk. Fold in eggs and chives. Use vegetables listed or any other vegetables desired. Arrange Bluffs & Bayous { March 2013 { Page 17


drained vegetables separately in large Pyrex baking dish. Do NOT mix them. Pour marinade over vegetables and refrigerate. To serve, arrange vegetables on large crystal platter in a wheel fashion with artichoke hearts in the middle. I have been making the following dessert for years and have no idea where I got the recipe. You can use any combination of fruits, but my family prefers it this way:

Trifle 1 yellow cake cooled and cut into chunks 2 boxes of instant vanilla pudding (prepared) 1 pint Louisiana strawberries sliced (Combine with glaze.) 1 pint strawberry glaze 1 can crushed pineapple, well drained 1 can blueberry pie filling 2 bananas, sliced 1 large cool whip 1 kiwi, peeled and sliced In a trifle bowl layer the following: ½ cake ½ pudding

Strawberry glaze mixture Pineapple ½ carton cool whip Other ½ cake Other ½ pudding Blueberry filling Sliced bananas Cool whip Top with sliced kiwi. Refrigerate. To serve you will need a long spoon similar to a dressing spoon.

Easter Dinner in the Dining Room For the more formal dinner we bring the cooking and the meal inside.

Cornish Hens with Brown Rice Stuffing (from the Junior League of Jackson Cookbook Southern Sideboards) 1 cup uncooked brown rice 2½ cups chicken stock 1 small onion chopped ½ yellow bell pepper, chopped ½ cup dried apricots, chopped 8 tablespoons unsalted butter ½ cup slivered almonds, toasted 1 teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon dried thyme ¼ teaspoon dried marjoram 4 Cornish hens 4 slices of bacon Salt and pepper to taste Bring chicken stock to a boil, add rice, and cover. Reduce heat and cook for 40 minutes or until stock is absorbed. Set aside. Preheat oven to 325 degrees. Sauté onion, bell pepper, and apricots in butter. Mix with cooked rice, almonds, salt, thyme, and marjoram. Salt and pepper hens, inside and out. Stuff with rice mixture, and place a bacon slice on top of each hen. Bake uncovered at 325 degrees for 1½ to 2 hours, basting often with pan dripping. If not tender after 1½ hours, cover and steam for final 30 minutes. Serves 4. Page 18 { March 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous


Salad with Asparagus and Creamy Garlic Dressing (from the Jackson Junior League Cookbook Come On In) Creamy Garlic Dressing: 4 cloves garlic 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon ground black pepper ½ teaspoon dry mustard 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 large egg 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice ¼ cup balsamic vinegar ¼ cup extra virgin olive oil ½ cup vegetable oil Combine the ingredients and refrigerate until ready to assemble the salad. Salad: 3 heads salad greens, washed and dried 1 pound fresh asparagus, blanched, in 1½-inch pieces 1 medium zucchini, grated 3 red or yellow bell peppers, roasted, peeled, seeded, chopped ½ cup sunflower seeds, without hulls Combine ingredients and toss with dressing. Serves 16.

Green Bean Bundles (from the Junior League of Monroe Cookbook The Cotton Country Collection) 2 cans vertical-packed green beans (These are hard to find, so I use whole green beans.) ½ pound bacon Sauce: 3 tablespoons butter 3 tablespoons Tarragon vinegar ½ teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon paprika 1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped 1 teaspoon onion juice Drain beans, and divide into bunches of approximately 5 beans each. Cut 1 slice of bacon in half, wrap each half around a bundle of beans, and secure with a toothpick. Repeat for each bundle of beaus. Broil bunches on a rack until the bacon is cooked.

Combine sauce ingredients and simmer until hot. Pour over the cooked bean bundles and serve. Serves 8. This is a family favorite for all holidays and is requested. I would do this earlier in the day since it needs to cool for 2 hours. I have been known to set an alarm to put it in the refrigerator. Remember, it needs to chill for 8 hours. This is from the Junior League of Atlanta Cookbook True Grits

Chocolate White Chocolate Cheesecake The Crust: 2½ cups chocolate wafer crumbs ¼ cup sugar ½ cup melted unsalted butter Mix the cookie crumbs and sugar in a bowl, add the butter, and mix well. Press

over the bottom and side of an 11” springform pan. Chill in the refrigerator. The Filling: 40 ounces cream cheese, softened 1¼ cup sugar ¼ cup flour 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 5 eggs 2 egg yolks 8 ounces white chocolate, broken ¼ cup half-and-half Beat the cream cheese in a mixer bowl until light. Add the sugar, flour, and vanilla; beat at low speed until smooth. Beat in the eggs and egg yolks 1 at a time. Add the white chocolate; mix well. Stir in half-andhalf. Spoon into the prepared crust. Bake at 250 degrees for 1¼ to 1¾ hours or until set. Cool on a wire rack for 2 hours. Chill for 8 hours or longer. Glaze: ¼ cup light corn syrup 2 tablespoon butter or margarine 3 tablespoons water 1 1/3 cup semisweet chocolate chips Combine the corn syrup, butter, and water in a saucepan. Bring to a full boil over medium heat; remove from heat. Stir in the chocolate chips until melted. Whisk until desired consistency. Place the cheesecake on a serving plate; remove the side of the pan. Pour the glaze over the top and spread evenly. Garnish with white chocolate shavings.

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THE social SCENE | Jackson, MS

State Senator Melanie Sojourner Greets Officials and Constituents In early February 2013 during the Dixie National Rodeo in Jackson, Mississippi, Mississippi State Senator Melanie Sojourner of Natchez, Mississippi, visited with Mississippi’s Commissioner of Agriculture Cindy Hyde-Smith; Paige Nicholson, Miss Rodeo, of Lawrence, Mississippi; and Mike Mathis of Lufkin, Texas, Dixie National Rodeo and Pro Rodeo Cowboy Association Announcer of the Year. On February 7, 2013, Marie, Lamar, and Regan Clanton of Bude, Mississippi, chatted with Senator Sojourner at the Capitol while in town for the Dixie National. Also during the month, Senator Sojourner met with Sam Walsh, Director of Amite County Emergency Management and Fire Services, and his wife, Sharon Walsh, retired Circuit Clerk. 2 Page 22 { March 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous

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Lamar Clanton, Senator Melanie Sojourner, Regan Clanton, and Marie Clanton Senator Melanie Sojourner with Sharon and Sam Walsh Commissioner Cindy HydeSmith, Paige Nicholson, Senator Melanie Sojourner, and Mike Mathis

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THE social SCENE | Vicksburg, MS | Maddux Gilmer' s 2nd Birthday

Maddux Gilmer's 2nd Birthday A cowboy-themed party was held on November 21, 2012, for Maddux Gilmer’s second birthday at the Silver Creek Equestrian Club in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Maddux is the son of Nicole and Chris Gilmer of Vicksburg.

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Adam and Blake Caruthers Kathy Parrish and Violet Hagenah Amber Caruthers and Ruthie Smith Logan Stewart, Jenny Jabour, and Landan Stewart Darlene Lawrence, Dorothy Maddux, and Sheila Simmons Amanda, Michael, Neelie, and Ava Dale Ruthie Smith, Barbara Smith, and Jenny Jabour Maggie Taylor Williams and Dewayne Williams

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From the Stacks

Ten Families Take Natchez into the Twentieth Century Builders of a New South by Aaron Anderson

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uilders of a New South, a book by Aaron Anderson, tells the story of how ten Natchez families, between 1865 and 1914, became economic leaders and shaped the role of the Natchez District as it entered the twentieth century. Their accomplishments began with taking advantage of postwar fallout in Natchez by serving planters and black sharecroppers in the cotton-buying business as well as working in plantation supply. They used this success to become cotton plantation owners and local dignitaries. Anderson writes with accuracy, as Builders of a New South is filled with numerous local records and documents, showing the impact these families had on the Natchez District. The records indicate that they prospered because of their good business strategy, their relationship with both the black and white communities, and their use of favorable laws protecting them as creditors. All in all, this book explores the entrepreneurship that sprouted after the civil war and how it molded Natchez into the city it is today. Builders of a New South is the only book available that provides a deep history of the Natchez merchant class, local events, and individuals of that period. This book also provides the reader with a unique social history of late nineteenth century life in the American South, particularly by showing how this small regional city has ties

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to rural, agricultural, and urban life. Anderson was recently awarded the Mary Postlethwaite History Award, during the Natchez Historical Foundation annual meeting, held January 25, 2013. Aaron D. Anderson is an assistant professor at Alcorn State University in Lorman, Mississippi. His work has appeared in the Companion to American Military History, Journal of Economic History, Journal of Mississippi History, and the Tennessee Historical Quarterly.


Reception for Retired Educators | Brookhaven, MS | THE social SCENE

Reception for Retired Educators Retired educators from the Brookhaven School District were treated to a holiday reception at Lipsey School in Brookhaven, Mississippi. Former teachers, administrators, and staff members attended the event that is held annually to honor educators for their years of service.

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Jackie Poole, Karen Sullivan, Sandra Meacham, John Ogden, and Johnny Waller Jean Phillips, Gwen Case, Nell Cooley, and Pam Fearn Linda Kergosien, Jane Kees, and Jan Franklin Connie Brinson, Linda Willis, and Johnette Holloway Connie Boyd, Vicky Wallace, Kathleen Hedgepeth, and Teena Morgan Dr. Lisa Karmacharya, Avi Collins, and Glenda Hart Sonya Foster, Jean Phillips, and Phyllis Spearman Ethel Richardson and Viola Winborne

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Something Scrumptious by Jennie Guido

Uptown Grocery and Deli Natchez, Mississippi

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ith the hustle and bustle of spring just around the corner this month, planning ahead for a week of meals for you and your family can be quite the daunting task. Thankfully, Natchez has many fabulous choices for take-out that you can splurge on throughout the week; but sometimes, you just want a good home-cooked meal with a yummy, piping-hot casserole to act as a little comfort food at the end of a busy day. Uptown Grocery and Deli in Natchez, Mississippi, has a wide selection of such homemade casseroles, chicken salads, soups, and even a few sides and appetizers for you to take home and enjoy with your family. Dickie and Richie Walcott purchased the deli a little over five years ago and have worked hard to transform this local treat into a bustling business. “When we first purchased Uptown Grocery and Deli, all we had was three kinds of chicken salad and pizza. We have built from that a wonderful menu for our deli, which serves our customers all day,” Richie explained.

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She tells me that what they have tried to accomplish with the additions to the menu is that locals think of more than just chicken salad when they come in Uptown Grocery. With a burger added to the menu of casseroles, sides, breads, and sweets, Uptown is quickly becoming the “jack of all trades” for the downtown area. When I asked Richie about the atmosphere of the deli, she explained that what

2 1. An extensive selection of gourmet groceries 2. Vegetarian Pizza 3. Cheese, cheese, and more cheese! 4. Uptown Chicken Salad on a croissant with a side of potato salad

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5. Uptown Up Dog with Uncle Ray’s Chips 6. Pimento Cheese Sandwich with a side of fresh fruit 7. Chicken-Salad-Trio Plate

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she thinks brings people back time after time is how “customers really enjoy coming to eat and visiting with everyone.” Each time I have been in Uptown during the lunch rush, I can always bank on seeing those I know and often someone I have not seen in a while. It is a lively, convenient stop on your way back into downtown or out for a quick lunch break. Richie also told me all about the local favorites on Uptown’s menu: “Our deli menu is pretty extensive. It includes sliced meat, fresh salads, muffulettas, and stacked sandwiches. The best-selling stacked sandwich is our Reuben—the best in town. Also, we have been told our muffuletta is the best north of New Orleans!” As for the owners’ favorites, Dickie’s is a toss-up between the Old-Fashion Meatloaf Po-boy and the Turkey, Bacon, and Provolone Sandwich on wheat berry bread. Richie is pretty partial to the Uptown Top Dog, which is a new addition to their ever growing menu. An Uptown aficionado, I have never been unhappy with a choice I have made at Uptown Grocery and Deli whether I only have time to run in for a pint of chicken salad or can take a minute to peruse the eclectic and enticing menu. With four (yes, FOUR) different chicken salads to choose from, I think that my favorite it the Uptown Chicken Salad. It is filled with grapes, apples and pecans, for I love when every bite of chicken salad bursts with a new flavor of hidden fruits tucked inside. This chicken salad is straight-from-the-container good—no bread or crackers needed. I don’t want anything coming between my taste buds and this perfect concoction of chicken, fruit, and crunch! My second favorite item on the menu is the Vegetarian Pizza. With artichokes, tomatoes, olives, onions, peppers, mushrooms, and spinach, all baked onto its crisp and crunchy crust, this dish erases all thought of how good hot pepperoni tastes.

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As for the future of Uptown Grocery and Deli, Richie says that they plan to open on Sundays during March and April to accommodate the many tourists in town for Spring Pilgrimage. “That is a busy time of year,” she explained; and we want to test the possibility of doing this permanently.” With Dickie, the “cruise director” of Natchez, at the helm, Uptown Grocery continues to be the perfect stop for locals, frequent visitors, and tourists new to Natchez. You’ll want to become a regular at Uptown Grocery and Deli, selecting your favorites from its enticing menu and raiding its coolers and freezers to stock your fridge for the upcoming hectic happenings of Spring. Serving Uptown’s homemade casseroles, salads, cheese balls, cakes, and pastries, along with specialty grocery items, cheeses, fresh seafood, deli cuts, and steaks, you are sure to have one happy family and many happy visitors with full little bellies!

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9 8. A touch of NOLA in this Muffuletta 8. Uptown’s raucous Reuben 10. Now that’s a chocolate cake!

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Dr. Jason Reid Brown and Madeleine Street Hall

Hall and Brown Wedding August 18, 2012 | Brookhaven, Mississippi | Lonnie Kees Photography

Madeleine Street Hall Madeleine Street Hall and Dr. Jason Reid Brown

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adeleine Street Hall and Dr. Jason Reid Brown were united in Holy Matrimony on August 18, 2012, at St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church in Brookhaven, Mississippi. The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. James Emory Hall of Brookhaven, and the granddaughter of the late Mrs. Fulton Mills and the late Jewel Campbell of Brookhaven and of the late Dr. and Mrs. Donald Street Hall of Vicksburg, Mississippi.

Sam Hall, Dr. James Hall, Mrs. Valerie Hall, Madeleine Street Hall, Dr. Jason Reid Brown, and Valerie Hall

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The groom is the son of Dr. and Mrs. William Henry Cooke of Starkville, Mississippi, and the late Mr. Ben Brown of Jackson, Mississippi. He is the grandson of Mary Ann Bowen of Oxford, Mississippi, and the late Mr. Buddy Bowen, and of the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Brown of Jackson Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a strapless, mermaid-style, white silk taffeta gown from a Designer’s Private Collection. She carried a bouquet of roses and wore a veil of Brussels lace, an heirloom from her great grandmother, the late Mrs. Hugh V. Hall of Brookhaven. Valerie Hall, sister of the bride, served as maid of honor. The bridesmaids included Campbell Engle, Kristen Hinton, Casey McGraw, Anna Moss, Rachel Mullenger, Megan Poore, Meghan Powell, and Carter Thomas. William Henry Cooke served as best man. Groomsmen were Cliff Bates, Doug Hindman, Todd Jeffreys, Benjamin Brown, Brennan O’Brien, Clarence Chapman, Scott Bates, and Stanton Toler. Altar servers were Daniel Panzica, Samantha Junkin, and Hannah Junkin; and Eucharistic ministers were Sue Junkin, Mike Smith, Cindy Smith, Richard Smith, and Claudia Smith. Musicians were Amanda Mangrum, harpist; Steve Russell, organist; Bill Phillips, soloist; and the Choir of St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church. After the Nuptial Mass guests were invited to a reception at the Parish Hall of the church where they danced to the music of the Tru Class band of New Orleans, Louisiana. The caterer was Julie Levanway of Fresh from the Flame of Brookhaven. Prior to the wedding, announcement parties had honored the couple in Brookhaven at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Dixon and in Jackson at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Steve Hindman. The rehearsal dinner was held at Dixie Springs Café, a party for out-of-town guests was given on the day of the wedding at the home of Mrs. John Behan, and a brunch was held at the home of Dr. and Mrs. Joe Moak the morning after the wedding. After a honeymoon in Maui, the couple is at home in Ridgeland, Mississippi. The bride is an employee benefits producer with the Fisher Brown Bottrell Insurance division of Trustmark and the groom is a dentist at Reservoir Dental Group and Yazoo City Dental Clinic. Bluffs & Bayous { March 2013 { Page 31


THE weddingSCENE | Brookhaven, MS | Bridal Tea for Kelsey Ann Jackson

Bridal Tea for Kelsey Ann Jackson A Bridal Tea honoring Kelsey Ann Jackson of Brookhaven, Mississippi, was held on October 21, 2012, in the Brookhaven home of Rhonda White. Hostesses for the event were Paula Rushing, Danita Hobbs, Amy LaBeth, Carla Snider, Dauphine Magee, Sally Lampton, and Rhonda White. The daughter of Jennifer and Teddy Jackson of Brookhaven, the honoree thereafter married Mac Beassie of Brookhaven, the son of Marcia SmithBeassie and Mike Beassie, all of Brookhaven.

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Kelsey Ann Jackson and Jennifer Jackson Carla Snider and Shirley Estes Paula Rushing, Danita Hobbs, Amy LaBeth, Kelsey Ann Jackson, Carla Snider, Dauphine Magee, Sally Lampton, and Rhonda White Patsy Jackson, Clara Jackson, Rhonda White, and Dauphine Magee Danita Hobbs and Sally Lampton Jimmie Sistrunk, Dott Cannon, and Shirley Piper Kelsey Ann Jackson and Whitney Brooke Watts

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THE social SCENE | Vicksburg, MS | Zsa Zsa' s Open House and Trunk Show

Zsa Zsa' s Open House and Trunk Show During November of the 2012 holiday season, Zsa Zsa’s in Vicksburg, Mississippi, welcomed its patrons to a Christmas Open House and Ronaldo Trunk Show. Gift items as well as delectable treats enticed the many who attended this select event.

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Courtney Landers, Sue Ross, Deborah Hauptman, and Miyo Heggins Billie Clay, Brandy Mullen, and Amber Caruthers Cori Clay and Cynthia Keyes Sheila Simmons and Lesleigh Wall Renee Lee and Chasity Wright Sawyer Grace and Angela McCain Sheila Simmons Lindsay Cornell and Cindy Martin-Nez Whitney Simmons and Jennifer Sandiford Lesleigh Wall and Taylor Sikes

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Zsa Zsa' s Open House and Trunk Show | Vicksburg, MS | THE social SCENE

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Johnna Coccaro, Martha Amborn, and Abi Lewis Brandy Mullen, Billie Clay, and Ginger Yarbrough

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ASA Sans Souci Tour Members of the ASA Sans Souci, a part of the Albemarle Spouses’ Association, took a private tour of David and Cammie Norwood’s West Feliciana, Louisiana, home on October 17, 2012. They enjoyed learning the interesting history of the house and listening to David Norwood share the home’s unique stories and lore.

Girl Scouts View Snow Queen Members of Girl Scout Troop 5108 in Brookhaven, Mississippi, recently traveled to Jackson, Mississippi, to see Ballet Magnificat’s Snow Queen. The ninth-grade girls have been together in the troop since second grade, and now all attend Brookhaven High School.

Left to right: Diane Lynch, Sans Souci Co-president; Debbie Gatto, Sans Souci Co-president; Cammie Norwood; David Norwood; Debbie Sanders, ASA President; and Kim East, ASA Secretary

Students Serve as Senate Pages

Madeline Gonzales, Hannah Pounds, Carly Barker, Abby Bozeman, Jamie Sproles, Carlye Waldon, Emily Mezzanares, and Sarah Doty

Several ninth-grade students from Brookhaven High School in Brookhaven, Mississippi, spent the week of January 14 through 18, 2013, working as Mississippi Senate pages under the supervision of Senator Sally Doty.

Mississippi State Treasurer Tate Reeves, Katherine Shell, Jamie Sproles, Caryle Waldon, Sarah Doty, and Senator Sally Doty

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In the Garden story and photos by Gary R. Bachman

Native Azaleas Add Charm to Landscapes

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any Mississippians are anticipating the first signs of the spring show put on in our landscapes by the popular, but non-native Southern Indica azaleas. These shrubs hide behind their evergreen foliage, waiting to dazzle us with color. So many of our Southern gardens boast these non-native azaleas, but we don’t see the native varieties as much in Mississippi landscapes because some garAbove—Piedmont deners consider native azaleas hard to grow. or honeysuckle Several species of native azaleas thrive in the azaleas are fragrant flowers primarily Southeast. They may not be as showy as their found in shades of evergreen cousins, but native azaleas are pink and rose with stunning in their own right. white accents. All native azaleas are deciduous and are in the genus Rhododendron. The 15 species of native azaleas have bloom times from late March through summer. There are two early-blooming azaleas native to Mississippi. Rhododendron canescens is commonly called piedmont azalea or honeysuckle azalea. Flowers are primarily shades of pink and rose with white accents. Driving across the Florida Panhandle this past weekend, I saw some great-looking honeysuckle azalea growing at a rest stop. As an added treat, these flowers are very fragrant and are pleasant on an early-morning garden stroll. Rhododendron austrinum or Florida flame azalea has a range of colors that includes yellow, orange, and fiery red. What makes these early-blooming native azaleas really interesting is the sequence the flower buds go through before blooming. The first sign that something special is about to occur comes when the flower buds swell from tight little clusters. These buds are a combination of flower and foliage, and they swell until they appear about to burst. The flowers bloom on nearly naked stems. The flower buds on the outside of the cluster open first, followed by those in the middle. Flowers can be up to one-and-a Page 36 { March 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous


half inches across, but it is the stamens and pistils that add charm and interest. These structures extend out of the flower, giving it a delicate texture. Growing native azaleas in containers can cause problems if you decide later to transplant the azalea into the ground. The root system of these plants is very fine and delicate and can actually stick to the inside of the container. Removing the plant from the container can damage these fine roots and make replanting unsuccessful. Native azaleas grown in containers can be removed, but it must be done carefully. Before attempting to remove the plant, soak the entire

container in a bucket of water. Once you have taken the container off, never cut or slice the root system as we do with many other landscape plants. The damage may be irreversible. When you have the plant out of the container, choose a landscape location that has filtered sunlight. Native azaleas thrive along the edges of woodlands, so be sure to plant yours in this type of location. Planting natives in the correct places goes a long way toward ensuring you’ll have early spring flowering from the native azaleas in your garden or landscape.

Native azaleas are easier to grow than many gardeners realize. Their blooms are colorful but small, so they are often overlooked. Florida flame azalea is another native azalea that comes in a range of colors from yellow to orange and fiery red. (Photo by MSU Extension Service/Gary Bachman)

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THE social SCENE | Natchez, MS | Tacky Christmas Party

Tacky Christmas Party Shannon and Zack Jex hosted a holiday gathering in December 2012 to celebrate the Christmas season. The event was held in the suites above Bowie’s Tavern in downtown Natchez, Mississippi, and guests in crazy Christmas garb brought gifts to be distributed to underprivileged children in the Natchez community. Photos by Phyllis Lee-Ray

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Tate Hobdy and Tim Givens Zach Jex and Jessica Matthews Ben Long and Curtis Moroney Scott and Laura McLemore Shannon Jex, Laura McLemore, Laura Tillman, and Becky Jex Sam Kirby, Matthew and Elizabeth Hall, Will Carter, and Alex Middleton

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Britton Hinson, Whitney Roberts, and Gab Wagoner Becky Jex, Renee Davis, and Matthew Hall


Tacky Christmas Party | Natchez, MS | THE social SCENE

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Becky and Kellen Jex, Laura Usnik, and Ben Long Haley and Elliot Meng Elizabeth Hall and Caroline James Ariel Gardner and Phyllis Lee-Ray Rob Greer and Laura Tillman Phyllis Lee-Ray and Curtis Moroney Chase and Hope Brown Hyde Carby and Tim Givens Hannah and Marcus Mason

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To Your Health by Caroline Devereaux

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Physical Wellness Plan 2013

ello again! As a born-and-bred Natchezian and former team member of Bluffs & Bayous, I am happy to join the B & B family once again! My husband of 5 years and I have two daughters, Stella (2½ years) and Mary Tucker (13 months), and reside in Covington, Louisiana, a suburb of New Orleans. I am a certified Pilates instructor/personal trainer and health and wellness coach; and I enjoy helping others stay fit through the practice of Pilates, achieve optimal overall health, and understand balanced nutrition. I look forward to interacting with our readers in the coming year. It’s been two months since we celebrated the New Year with our goals and resolutions, many revolving around weight loss and healthier living. Have you stuck to your New Year’s resolutions? My husband and I have made a concrete list of resolutions for our family after we learned that we have a 95% greater chance of reaching those goals if we WRITE THEM DOWN. As a professional procrastinator, I like—scratch that—NEED concrete lists and goals to hold myself accountable. As a Pilates instructor, I just wrapped up training a group of clients in a New Year’s Weight Loss Challenge and the first step for them was to set up their notebooks and write down their goals. See the trend? In the coming months and over the next few articles, I will discuss how my family is resolving to achieve physical wellness, financial wellness, home environmental wellness, and personal wellness as our goals in 2013. I’m excited to share with you our strategy, progress, struggles, and ultimate outcome! This year will undoubtedly be transformative for my family—and I hope for yours as well.

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Physical wellness is something we all struggle with at some point in our lives. As a wife and mother of two beautiful girls, I am increasingly cognizant of my health and the overall health of my family. With a busy schedule (which we all have), maintaining your physical health is often difficult, but it is no less critical to your personal wellbeing and that of your children and significant other. We all strive to be there for our kids and significant other, don’t we? Of course we do, and that is one of the reasons why Matt (my handsome husband) and I have set out this year to get our health in check. So, what’s our plan in 2013 to achieve physical wellness? First, we have committed ourselves to eating a more organic, healthy diet. More specifically, we have converted to a Paleo lifestyle in our household. You may be wondering, “What exactly is a ‘Paleo diet?’” Believe me I had the same thoughts when we embarked on this journey. Remember the New Year’s Weight Loss Challenge I mentioned earlier? Part of the program my pilates students were given was to change their diet to a strictly Paleo diet. As an instructor, I try to be a good example to my students when it comes to health and wellness. So, I figured if my Weight Loss Challenge students can do Paleo, then so can I. And let me tell you, it works! Disclaimer: I am not a Paleo expert by any stretch of the imagination. But, I’ve done a considerable amount of reading on the subject, and I believe I have a pretty thorough understanding of what it means to change your diet from conventional to Paleo. That being said, let me give you the Cliffs Notes on the Paleo diet.


The Paleolithic Diet (“Paleo”) is a nutritional plan based on a diet of wild plants and animals that humans presumably consumed during the Paleolithic era. That era was a period of about 2.5 million years which ended around 10,000 years ago with the development of agriculture and grain-based diets. It is based on the premise that modern humans are genetically adapted to the diet of their Paleolithic ancestors and that human genetics haven’t changed since the dawn of agriculture. Therefore an ideal diet for human health and well-being is one that resembles this ancestral diet. In other words, we were hunter-gatherers before we were farmers; and, genetically speaking, our bodies are adapted to the hunter diet rather than the agricultural one. Because of this adaptation, a more traditional Paleo diet promotes better health and prevents diseases. Paleo focuses on commonly available foods, such as fish, grass-fed meats, eggs, vegetables, fruits, and nuts. It specifically excludes grains, legumes, dairy products, potatoes, refined sugar, and processed oils. In our house we only cook organic, grassfed meat, paired with vegetables and fruits, and we use coconut oil or olive oil to cook with, rather than canola / vegetable oil or butter. Although we love the food and re­ cipes that we’ve encountered thus far, the transition was not that easy. We live in the South and love our fried foods. We had to cut that out. We also eliminated the “comfort foods” from our diet, such as pasta, rice, and potatoes. That was also difficult since many of the recipes we grew up with incorporated those foods as side dishes (i.e. red beans and rice). I know this is a lot to take in for those unfamiliar with the Paleo lifestyle—it was for us in the beginning. However, since incorporating it into our daily lives, we’ve really become accustomed to and comfortable with the Paleo diet. Also, my husband and I are definitely noticing some changes in our weight, energy, and overall well-being, which is something I think we all could use. And at the end of the day, the food really tastes great! We’ve learned in the short time that we’ve been practicing Paleo that you don’t have to sacrifice taste for nutrition, unlike some diets out there. For an easy primer on Paleo, I would recommend the Everyday Paleo Family Cookbook by Sarah Fragoso—my family uses it daily. The recipes are simple and the food tastes great. I believe that Paleo is doing wonders for my family’s health. Even with this new

diet, though, my husband and I have also committed ourselves in 2013 to exercising consistently each week. For me, that was the easy part since I’m a Pilates instructor and teach roughly 10 to 12 classes per week. While I don’t necessarily get a workout each time I instruct, I incorporate my workout either before or after my class so I can’t make an excuse for not working out. For Matt, incorporating exercise into his daily regiment was a little more challenging. Despite this, he’s been able to factor a pretty intense workout (p90x) into his schedule, and it’s really starting to show. Since late summer 2012, he’s dropped probably 35 pounds and actually weighs less than he did his senior year in high school—I couldn’t be happier for him! This is how my family will achieve Physical Wellness in 2013. What are your goals as the New Year draws to the end of its first quarter? Are you starting or continuing a new diet? Maybe a new workout program? For us, the key to keeping our resolutions will be consistency with our Paleo diet and with exercise. I wish you good luck in persisting with your New Year’s resolutions, and it is my hope that 2013 will be your best year yet!

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In the Garden story and photos by Robert Ferguson same genetically. Of course, it would take a few decades to learn about DNA. Genetics is the initial “limiting factor.” Orchids have the same kind of material (Cytoplasm) that is required of pansies, petunias and zinnias. These plants are termed herbaceous annuals. Orchids are tropical to semi-tropical herbaceous perennials. For years, people breeding orchids were using any and all qualities of orchid flowers to produce seed. During this time, some people realized that they weren’t all EQUAL in quality. Some grew faster, had more flowers per stem, bloomed more than once each year, and had flowers that were brighter and lasted longer than others. In the meantime, they were breeding A x B = C and most of the seed didn’t germinate. Not only were they not equal genetically, but the different genera also required different light conditions, humidity, and moisture. By moisture I mean growing on the dry or wet side. Some orchids grow better in colder conditions and others in warmer conditions. Some orchids only grow roots in specific seasons and disturbing them before or afterwards can mean certain “DEATH” for those orchids. Fertilizer is another “limiting factor.” Although plants do manufacture their own food, raw materials are needed in the form of fertilizer. These raw materials are sold as organic compounds or synthetic chemical fertilizers in various formulations in garden centers and chain stores. Most people are familiar with the letters on fertilizer sacks such as N-P-K (Nitrogen, Phosphate, and Potassium). These are the primary elements required to keep a plant in good health. Some fertilizers also include minor elements like calcium, copper, zinc, manganese, magnesium, sulfur, silicon, molybdenum, iron, and boron. Many books are written on just minor elements and symptoms of deficiencies.

Genetics as a Limiting Factor

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he orchid family is so diverse that everyone that has the desire to learn and grow orchids can furnish the proper growing conditions. These conditions are termed “limiting factors.” Environment isn’t just sitting an orchid out on the patio table and allowing it to grow,

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and all orchids aren’t created “EQUAL” genetically. That also applies to most all plants. Many years ago in merry ole England, the rich were importing these orchids from around the world. After they had stopped killing them and started growing them, they realized orchids weren’t the


Water quality is also a “limiting factor.” Water may contain elements that cause it to be acid or alkaline. When pH levels are out of balance, some elements won’t be in soluble form to be absorbed by plants. Then, adjustments with additives that are either acid or alkaline by nature should be used to bring the water back to 6.4 to 7.0 pH (neutral). Heat, cold, and air movement as a “limiting factor” is easily controlled by using fans or heaters or by hanging the plant outside under a shade tree or placing it in the home. However, remember, orchids may severely burn in DIRECT SUN. When they are hung in a shade tree, as the sun moves, the dappled shade can become DIRECT BURNING SUN. I have emphasized this twice now. Sunburn can DESTROY a plant in just minutes, and the sun doesn’t care how much it cost. Being that orchids are shade-dwelling epiphytes, which require filtered light, an east or southeast window offers the best exposure. Most plants only require 6 hours of light daily as they manufacture their food during this time and utilize it in the darkness. I could turn off all the fans in my greenhouse at night and actually hear my orchids growing. The sound is the leaves and pseudo-bulbs pushing through thin, protective sheaths. In the home, humidity is low purposely to make conditions better for humans. Orchids, however, for the most part, originate in tropical parts of the world where the humidity is mostly 50% or higher. Humidity in the home can be created by filling an aluminum dish with gravel and then filling the dish with water to within one-half inch of the top of the gravel. This half inch will evaporate water around the orchid sitting on the gravel and can raise the humidity appreciably. Keeping all these “limiting factors” balanced can be quite a task until you have been growing orchids for a few years. As I said, orchids are quite diverse and many will fit into a few categories that require the same growing conditions. There is an imaginary line that many people use to measure percent of success. The closer you can get to this line and keep consistent quality of growth and flowering means the closer you are to accomplishing awardquality success. This is why I put genetics as the initial “limiting factor.” If the plant does not bear the genes for producing high quality, no amount of perfect growing conditions will produce award quality. Bluffs & Bayous { March 2013 { Page 45


THE social SCENE | Ferriday, LA | John Taylor Retirement

John Taylor Retirement On Friday, January 4, 2013, Concordia Bank hosted a celebration honoring John Taylor for 42 years of dedicated service to the bank. Taylor began working at Concordia Bank on February 1, 1971, and retired on December 31, 2012. As a Senior Vice President and Branch Manager of the Ferriday, Louisiana, branch bank, he put great emphasis on customer service and treated bank employees as family. Taylor and his wife, Amanda, who is director of the Concordia Parish Library, have been married 36 years and first met at the drive-through window at the Ferriday branch bank where he was a teller and she, his customer.

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Irene Hinson, Cathy Hinson, John Taylor, Genna Hopkins, and Mellisa Beard Diane and William Saul Jackie Young and Judith Bingham Jean Miller and Mickey Ratcliff Jerry Stalling and Patricia Anderson Brent Gore and Gwen Robin Joey Martin, John Taylor, and Pat Biglane

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In the Garden

Biedenharn Museum and Gardens’ Annual Garden Symposium

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ach spring, the Biedenharn Museum and Gardens in Monroe, Louisiana, holds its annual Garden Symposium. According to Museum Executive Director Ralph Calhoun, this year’s signature event, the 23rd Annual Garden Symposium, is expanding to a two-day venue, April 12-13, that will be souped up for the 2013 edition with some interesting changes: “In the past, we have always had a single floral designer for our final session. This year, we are having a panel of floral designers in an interesting new format.” In a scene reminiscent of TV’s Chopped, the Biedenharn Museum and Gardens’ Symposium will feature a panel of floral designers, including Gregory Hudgins of Monroe and Mary Lessley of Natchez, Mississippi, who, using similar materials, will be challenged to fashion original designs in five categories. As the creations are in progress, the designers will explain the thought process behind their work while being interviewed by Dr. Neil Odenwald, Master of Ceremonies. One of the featured floral designers is Natchez, Mississippi, designer Mary Lessley, who is a distinctive talent in this field as well as a Wedding Consultant and Planner. Her work that reflects her love for God’s beautiful flowers, as well as her clients’ unique personalities and tastes, has contributed to her reputation of creating impressive floral arrangements for over 25 years. Mrs. Lessley works out of her Natchez home. Page 48 { March 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous


Calhoun also explained other changes in the Sympo­ sium format: “We are moving the Symposium from our traditional Tuesday to Friday, April 12; and we will follow up with a public plant sale Saturday, April 13, from 8:30 to 1:00 in ELsong Gardens.” Dr. Neil Odenwald, who inaugurated the Symposium in 1980 and has participated in every one since then, says “We are expanding and improving the Symposium with the addition of the plant sale. This will be a unique opportunity to purchase plants, many which are offspring from the Biedenharn’s collection. For example, there is a six-foot Lady Finger Palm that will be available. This unusual plant is rarely seen for sale at that size.” Calhoun expects hundreds of plant lovers to shop to their hearts’ content at the Biedenharn’s first annual public plant sale. This event will feature a variety of unique and hard-to-find specimens, including plants that have come from within the walls of ELsong gardens. Gardening books, specialty clippers and sheers also will be available, along with some raffle items. Friday’s Symposium will bring over a hundred avid gardeners from throughout the region to the Biedenharn for the event’s two featured speakers. Dr. Jeff Kuehny in his presentation, “Gardening that Nourishes the Body, Mind and Spirit,” will discuss a host of ornamentals, fruits, and vegetables that can be combined to create outdoor garden spaces that will flourish in the South. These edible garden spaces provide aesthetic value, a source of food for both humans and animals, and nourishment for your spirit. Most vegetables can be planted with annual ornamental seasonal color changes while most woody fruits become part of the foundation plantings of the edible landscape. Kuehny will take a closer look at how to establish an edible landscape with a variety of both ornamental and edible plants and how to combine them to either create or fit into various landscape designs. Among the many plants to be discussed are citrus fruits, grapes, tomatoes, eggplant, cabbage, and cauliflower. Kuehny grew up on a farm in northern Oklahoma where he loved being outdoors and developed a passion for

growing plants. He pursued this interest at Oklahoma State University, earning a B.S.; North Carolina State University, earning an M.S.; Clemson University, earning a Ph.D.; and Cornell University, working as a Postdoctoral Researcher. He has lived in the Deep South for almost 20 years as a Professor of Horticulture at Louisiana State University. He has taught diverse classes in horticulture, and his research programs have included new plant introductions and sustainable landscape management. More recently, he has been working on the implementation of the Burden master plan, creating the Burden Botanical Gardens. These gardens highlight herbaceous annuals, gingers, roses, vegetables, and ornamental and native trees and shrubs combined with the historic gardens of Steele Burden and programs of research and education, all in one location. Kuehny lives at Sialia, his small farm in Clinton, Louisiana, where he tries to maintain a balance between the plants in his gardens and a menagerie of animals. Heidi Sheesley will speak about “Time Tested Treasures for Sophisticated Southern Spaces,” a unique presentation unlike any plant “lecture” you’ve ever attended. Her descriptions are spot on, and her enthusiasm about the various plants is contagious. If you don’t want at least one of every plant she talks about, you’re just not listening! She will discuss hard-to-find plants, rediscovered heirlooms, and many other rare and underused “treasures” that she has trialed and had success with at Treesearch Farms. Sheesley is the owner of Treesearch Farms, Inc., a wholesale grower

specializing in unique plants that do well in Houston, Texas, and along the Texas Gulf Coast. Treesearch Farms grows a wide variety of trees including shade trees and fruit and citrus trees. Also grown here are native plants, hummingbird and butterfly plants, perennials, gingers, and grasses. If it’s out of the ordinary, Treesearch probably grows it. Sheesley started Treesearch Farms in 1983, when she decided to turn her love of plants into a commercial venture, and has since changed the landscape of Houston gardening. Many of the plants that Kuehny and Sheesley discuss will be available for purchase at the Symposium’s Saturday plant sale that is free and open to the public. Registration for the Symposium is $60 per person. For more information call the Biedenharn Museum and Gardens 318-3875281 or email director@bmuseum.org.

Bluffs & Bayous { March 2013 { Page 49


THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | BARL Annual Celebrity Dinner

BARL Annual Celebrity Dinner The Brookhaven Animal Rescue League (BARL) in Brookhaven, Mississippi, holds its annual Celebrity Dinner each fall at the Lincoln Civic Center. Live and silent auctions take place during the evening, and local “celebrities” wait tables during the meal. This year, the evening included special guest Deuce McAllister, a former running back for the New Orleans Saints.

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Front—Renee Kakadia, Audrianna Bozeman, Jessica Reed, and Taylor Sanford; middle— Sarah Terrell, Carlianne Alderman, and Anna Gardner; back—Deuce McAllister and Carey Crozier Sloane and Sara Rodgers Smith Lu Becker and Deuce McAllister Becky Currie, Deuce McAllister, and Bruce Currie Katherine Shell, Carly Barker, Sarah Doty, Abby Bozeman, and Hannah Pounds

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BARL Annual Celebrity Dinner | Brookhaven, MS | THE social SCENE

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Becky Currie (Wicked Witch) and Cindy Moore (Snow White) Deuce McAllister and Shirley Estes Desiree Smith

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To Your Health by Meaghan McCallum

Colon Cancer Awareness Month

C

olon cancer is the second-largest cause of death in the United States, and March is set aside as National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. This type of cancer is life threatening, but 90% curable if caught early on. This statistic is the reason why people age 50 and over should be screened. “Unfortunately, the rate for colon cancer is extremely high in Mississippi, as it compares to the other regions of the country,” explained Dr. Vonda ReevesDarby, a Gastroenterologist and Assistant Professor of Medicine at the University of Mississippi Medical Center School of Medicine. “Colon cancer is deadly; that’s why it’s so important to get the word out that a colonoscopy at the right age can be life saving.” She further explained, “A person in the early stages of colon cancer may

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have no symptoms; that is why it is crucial to get screened even if you aren’t having any problems.” The importance of getting screened cannot be overstated. Colon cancer affects both men and women, and the risk increases with age. If everyone over the age of 50 had regular screening, at least 60% of colorectal-cancer-related deaths could be avoided. However, these findings don’t mean that if you’re under 50 you aren’t susceptible. While the risk factor increases with age, it’s important that people of all ages should familiarize themselves with the signs and symptoms of colon cancer. Also, other factors could increase your chances of getting this disease: bloody stools or iron deficiency anemia, a family history of cancer or polyps in the colon, and Inflammatory Bowel Disease such

as Ulcerative Colitis or Crohn’s Disease. If you have any of these you should be screened regularly. If you’re over 50, in honor of Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month get screened, and you just might save your own life. Moreover, all of us should make these resolutions for great health in 2013: Encourage your loved ones to get a physical checkup. Often, during a general checkup, the primary care physician will discuss the need for colorectal cancer screening. Serve up healthy food. Encourage healthy eating in your entire family. Exercise together. Exercise reduces the risk of many types of cancer, and it provides the perfect time to talk about the importance of screening. Encourage loved ones to quit smoking and/or cut back on alcohol use. Explain that you care and are concerned about their increased risk for colorectal cancer. Nag, Nag, Nag. If you are persistent, eventually your loved one will respond to these health-wise prompts! Get screened yourself. Your loved ones want you around for many more years to come.


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O

h, what fun! To dress up in hats, furs, heels, pearls, and gloves! Such was the event for Halle Grace Jannett of Natchez, Mississippi, who turned 4 years old and entertained her friends on January 26, 2013, at the Natchez home

of her grandparents Eileen and John Ball. Guests were greeted at the front door by picture-snapping paparazzi and then entered the house amidst the sounds of giggling girls, oohing and aahing at their friends’ party attire. From sparkly hair bows and feathers on hats to pearls and laces and stylish pumps, each guest was decked out in “dress-up” to enjoy the special tea-party marking Halle Grace’s birthday. Ready for tea time at the dining-room table, china teacups and place settings nestled among silver flatware and linen napkins atop a linen tablecloth.

Dress-up Tea Party

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for Halle Grace

T

he teapot birthday cake was a collage of cupcakes, served to guests following the traditional birthday tune along with sweet treats of cookies, chocolate hearts, tea

sandwiches, and strawberry punch tea. The girls made door hangers and received framed pictures of themselves in their tea-time attire as favors from Halle Grace. What a delightful day to be 4 and dress up like 34. The clattering of heels on hardwood floors, the clinking of tea cups in saucers, the giggles and grins of little ladies at play…all special, memorymaking moments of turning 4 years old.

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March up

& coming! Premier EVENTS

March 1 - 3 & 8 - 10 Always...Patsy Cline Vicksburg Theatre Guild Vicksburg, Mississippi The Vicksburg Theatre Guild, 101 Iowa Avenue, brings back its very popular 2009 production of Ted Swindley’s musical tribute Always...Patsy Cline. Such an encore occasion is very rare for the Vicksburg Theatre Guild and is a testament to the strong material and appeal of the show. The performance details the real-life story of a friendship Cline developed with Houston, Texas, housewife and fan Louise Seger in 1961. Seger became an ardent fan of the legendary country singer in 1957 when Cline performed on The Arthur Godfrey Show. Later, when Cline went to Houston for a show at a local honey tonk in 1961, Seger and her friends arrived about an hour and a half early; and by coincidence, they met Cline before her show. Seger thought Cline was simply being nice by exchanging addresses the next morning; however soon after she left, Seger received her March 15 - 17 42nd Annual Audubon Pilgrimage St. Francisville, Louisiana For over four decades the West Feliciana Historical Society has sponsored St. Francisville’s Annual Audubon Pilgrimage and thrown open the doors of significant historic structures to commemorate artistnaturalist John James Audubon’s stay in this Louisiana town as he painted a number of his famous bird folios and tutored young Eliza Pirrie of Oakley. Features of the 2013 Audubon Pilgrimage include one historic townhouse (Evergreenzine) and three country plantations (Wakefield, Beechwood, and

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fist letter from Cline. The two continued a close pen-pal relationship until Cline’s tragic death in a plane crash in 1963. Humor is liberally sprinkled throughout the show, combined with some touching moments. Seger’s character is quite fun as she shares her story of their friendship, interspersed with Cline’s singing her most memorable tunes. The musical is co-directed by Glenda Arredondo and Jim Shirley, and Arredondo will return as Patsy Cline with co-star Shirley Stuart as Louise Seger. Arrendondo will be accompanied by a live band as well as a male quartet as backup for eleven of Cline’s songs. The production of Always...Patsy Cline is a fundraiser for the Vicksburg Theater Guild, the oldest chartered community theatre in Mississippi. All Friday and Saturday performances are at 7:30 p.m., and all Sunday performances are at 2:00 p.m. Tickets vary in price, ranging from $5 to

$12, and are available at the Box Office one hour before curtain time. No reservations required. Tickets may also be purchased at http://vicksburgtheatreguild.com. For more information, call 601-6360471, or visit http://vicksburgtheatreguild.com.

Catalpa), plus Rosedown and Audubon State Historic Sites, Afton Villa Gardens, three nineteenth-century churches and the Rural Homestead with lively demonstrations of the rustic skills of daily pioneer life. The town’s early Market Hall, c. 1819, hosts the popular antiques show and sale, while Temple Sinai showcases the works of several Louisiana artists. Tour houses are open 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. This year’s carefully selected features vividly illustrate how many early families were closely related by blood or marriage, thus intertwining their heritage and homes in the fascinating fabric of Feliciana history. Martha Barrow Turnbull of Rosedown Plantation had a daughter named Sarah, who

would marry the son of Oakley’s Eliza Pirrie, whose first husband was Martha’s brother and whose second husband was the Reverend William R. Bowman of Grace Church. Wakefield Plantation and Beechwood were both part of early settler Alexander Stirling’s immense land-grant holdings; and Stirling is buried in the Beechwood cemetery beside his wife Ann Alston, her sister Lucretia Alston Pirrie of Oakley, and Lucretia’s daughter Eliza Pirrie. Catalpa Plantation was the home of Willie Fort, who was so taken with Eliza’s beautiful Bowman granddaughters that he married not one but two of them.


Premier EVENTS up The Historic District around Royal Street is filled during pilgrimage days with the happy sounds of costumed children, singing and dancing the Maypole; in the evening as candles flicker and fireflies flit among the ancient moss-draped live oaks, there is no place more inviting for a leisurely stroll. Friday evening features old-time Hymn Singing at the United Methodist Church (6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.), Graveyard Tours at Grace Episcopal cemetery (Last March 9 - April 9 Natchez Spring Pilgrimage Natchez, Mississippi Twenty-nine antebellum mansions, most of them private residences, open their doors to visitors during the four-week Natchez Spring Pilgrimage in Natchez, Mississippi.Your guides are costumed family, friends, and descendants of the original owners, whose stories are as real as the bricks and mortar in their hearths. Each house is unique with eighteenth- and nineteenth-century furnishings, porcelain, silver, clothing, tools, documents, and diaries. Morning tours run from 9:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and afternoon tours are from 1:30 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Several tours are offered, each having a different set of homes open for viewing. On the four-day rotating schedule, each day includes two tours, a morning and an afternoon tour of three homes. The Purple tour runs on March 9, 13, 17, 21, 25, 29 and April 2 and 6 during the morning tour period. This tour includes Magnolia Hall (1858), Shields Town House (1860), and Airlie (1790). The Green Tour also runs on this day but during the afternoon sessions. This tour includes Elgin

tour begins at 8:30 p.m.), and a wine and cheese reception at Bishop Jackson Hall (7:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m.), featuring a casual style show of the pilgrimage’s exquisitely detailed 1820s costumes, nationally recognized for their authenticity. Light Up The Night, the Saturday evening soiree, features live music, dancing, dinner, and drinks beginning at 7:00 p.m. For tickets and tour information, contact West Feliciana Historical Society, Box 338,

(1792-1840-1855), Richmond (1784-18321860), and Twin Oaks (1832). The Orange Tour—Hawthorne (1814), Routhland (1817), and Linden (1800)—runs during the mornings on March 10, 14, 18, 22, 26, 30 and April 3 and 7. The Peach Tour runs during the afternoon and includes The Burn (1832), The Elms (1804), and Hope Farm (1775-1789). On March 11, 15, 19, 23, 27, and April 4 and 8, the morning Pink Tour is composed of Auburn (1812), Governor Holmes House (1794), and Elms Court (1837-1840). The Blue Tour runs in the afternoon and includes Green Leaves (1838), Oakland (1838), and Lansdowne (1853). The last two tours are held on March 12, 16, 20, 24, 28, and April 1, 5, and 9. The morning Yellow Tour shows only two houses—The House on Ellicot Hill (1798) and The Towers (1798-1826-1858). The afternoon Red Tour consists of Greenlea (1855), Texada (1792), and Selma Plantation (1811). All three-hour tours are $30 per person for adults and $18 for youth (6 to 18 years). Three-house tours plus Longwood, Rosalie, or Stanton Hall are $42 per adult and $26 for youth. Evenings during the Natchez Spring Pilgrimage offer performances of the Historic Natchez Tableaux, a brilliant and entertaining depiction of the Antebellum Era through song, dance, and historical dialogue, all embellished with period costumes, music, songs, and dance. The Tableaux is presented Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays at 8:00

& coming! March

St. Francisville, LA 70775; 225-635-6330 or225-635-4224; www.audubonpilgrimage.info; or st@audubonpilgrimage.info. Tickets can be purchased at the Historical Society Museum on Ferdinand Street. For information on St. Francisville overnight accommodations, shops, restaurants, and recreation in the Tunica Hills, visit www. stfrancisville.us, www.stfrancisville.net, or www.stfrancisvillefestivals.com.

p.m. at the Natchez City Auditorium. Tickets are available online and are $15 for adults and $7 for children 12 years and younger. Presented on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, and Sundays at 7:30 p.m., Southern Exposure, a light-hearted parody of the Natchez Spring Pilgrimage, depicts the town of Natchez during the Pilgrimage in the 1950s. It is thoroughly entertaining and humorous. Tickets are available online for $15. Also for evening entertainment, the Holy Family Catholic Church Gospel Choir presents Southern Road to Freedom, a stirring tribute to the struggle and victory of the African American experience in Natchez from the Colonial Period to present day. Performances are staged every Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday during Spring Pilgrimage. Tickets are $15. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit www.natchezpilgrimage.com or call 601-446-6631. Bluffs & Bayous { March 2013 { Page 57


March up

& coming!

Through March 10 Mahalia, a Gospel Musical New Stage Theatre Jackson, MS 1100 Carlisle Street $28 / Adults; $22 / Students & Seniors 601-948-3531 www.visitjackson.com www.newstagetheatre.com Through March 24 Color in Freedom: Journey along the Underground Railroad West Baton Rouge Museum Port Allen, LA 845 North Jefferson Avenue 225-336-2422 www.westbatonrougemuseum.com Through March 31 C3: Creativity, Conversation, Community Mississippi Museum of Art Jackson, MS 380 South Lamar Street Free / 601-960-1515 cpeaster@msmuseumart.org www.msmuseumart.org Through April 7 Pieces of the Past: Civil Rights in Jackson Old Capitol Museum Jackson, MS 100 South State Street Free Tues. - Sat. / 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sun. / 1 - 4 p.m. 601-576-6934 www.visitjackson.com www.mdah.state.ms.us Page 58 { March 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous


up & coming! March Through May 12 Rainforest Adventure Mississippi Museum of Natural Science Jackson, MS 2148 Riverside Drive Prices vary. Mon. - Fri. / 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sat. / 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sun. / 1 - 5 p.m. 601-576-6000 www.visitjackson.com / www.mdwfp.com Through June 1 Lydia Thompson: Roots, Connections, and Pathways Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art Biloxi, MS 386 Beach Boulevard Tues. - Sat. / 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Barbara Johnson Ross / 228-374-5547 curatorofcollections@geogeohr.org

Through June 1 Terry Tjader: Ingrained in Wood Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art Biloxi, MS 386 Beach Boulevard Tues. - Sat. / 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Barbara Johnson Ross / 228-374-5547 curatorofcollections@geogeohr.org Through June 8 Dusti Bongé: Revisiting the Legacy Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art Biloxi, MS 386 Beach Boulevard Tues. - Sat. / 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Barbara Johnson Ross / 228-374-5547 curatorofcollections@georgeohr.org Through November 1 George Ohr: Selections from Gulf Coast Collections Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art Biloxi, MS Tues. - Sat. / 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Barbara Johnson Ross / 228-374-5547 curatorofcollections@geogeohr.org

March 1 Elixir of Love Opera Louisianne Baton Rouge, LA 275 South River Road 7:30 p.m. / Prices vary. 225-377-2029 louisianatravel.com www.operalouisiane.com March 1 Too Sweet Productions Blues Concert Vicksburg City Auditorium Vicksburg, MS 901 Monroe Street 8 p.m. / $30 At door; $25 Advance 601-630-2929 / 866-822-6338 www.vicksburgevents.com www.visitvicksburg.com

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March up

& coming!

March 1 Bach Cantata The Church of the Holy Trinity Vicksburg, MS 900 South Street Free / 12:05 p.m. $10 / Gumbo Lunch 601-636-0542 March 1 Calling All Craftsmen Ridgeland, MS 950 Rice Road 5 p.m. Tomeka / 601-856-7546 Nancy Perkins / 601-856-7546 mscraftcenter@gmail.com www.mscrafts.org

March 1 Mr. Sipp & Kin Folk Ameristar Bottleneck Blues Bar Vicksburg, MS 4116 South Washington Street 8 p.m. - Midnight 601-638-1000 www.ameristar.com March 1 - 3 Gulf Coast Garden and Patio Show MS Coast Coliseum & Convention Center Biloxi, MS 2350 Beach Boulevard 12 & under / Free; Adults / $6 Fri. / 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.; Sat. / 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sun. / 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Haley Barrett / haleymsnla@aol.com / 601-919-8111 www.msnla.org / info@msnla.org

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up & coming! March March 1 - 11 Ray Turner: Population Alexandria Museum of Art Alexandria, LA 933 Second Street Tues. - Fri. / 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sat. / 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Prices vary. 318-433-3458 / themuseum.org March 2 34th Annual Run Thru History Run Vicksburg National Military Park Vicksburg, MS 8:30 a.m. 10K Run / 5K Walk / 1-Mile Fun Run Register / www.runthruhistory.org 601-638-1071

March 7 Hit the Bricks Vicksburg, MS Historic Washington Street 5:30 - 8:00 p.m. 601-634-4527 www.visitvicksburg.com www.downtownvicksburg.org

March 8 Holy Trinity Conservatory of Fine Arts The Church of the Holy Trinity Vicksburg, MS 900 South Street Free / 12:05 p.m. $10 / Gumbo Lunch 601-636-0542

March 8 Sam Joyner / Larry Garner Ameristar Bottleneck Blues Bar Vicksburg, MS 4116 S Washington Street 8 p.m. - 12 a.m. 601-638-1000 www.ameristar.com

March 8 - April 9 Southern Exposure Natchez Little Theatre Natchez, MS 319 Linton Avenue March 8 / 7 p.m. / $10 7:30 p.m. / $15 2:00 p.m. / Sun. 601-442-2233 natchez@bellsouth.net www.natchezlittletheatre.org www.visitnatchez.org

March 5 “What Mississippi Can Teach Us� Ford Academic Center Jackson, MS 7 p.m. / $10 Office of Continuing Education 601-974-1130 www.visitjackson.com March 6 Jesse Cook Manship Theatre Baton Rouge, LA 100 Lafayette Street 7:30 p.m. / $35 Manshiptheatre.org / louisianatravel.com

March 8 Marc Broussard plus The Dirty Dozen Brass Band Manship Theatre Baton Rouge, LA 100 Lafayette Street 7:30 p.m. / $55 Louisianatravel.com / manshiptheatre.org

March 9 Zoo Day Jackson Zoo Jackson, MS 2918 West Capitol Street 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. www.visitjackson.com

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March up

& coming!

March 9 Art on the Bluff Gazebo on the Bluff Natchez, MS 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. murrayy@bellsouth.net / 601-238-8325 March 9 Second Saturday Downtown Natchez Natchez, MS 6 - 8 p.m. murrayy@bellsouth.net / 601-238-8325 March 9 44th Annual Jazz Festival Loyola University New Orleans, LA 6363 St. Charles Avenue 4:30 p.m. $10 / General $5 / Students, Faculty, Staff Tickets / montage.loyno.edu 504-865-2074 / 504-861-5882 March 9 EXPLORE! Mississippi Historic Jefferson College Washington, MS 16 Old North Street Ages 6 - 10 10:00 - 11:30 a.m. $10 / Pre-payment Registration required Kay McNeil / 601-442-2901 kmcneil@mdah.state.ms.us March 10 Skippyjon Jones Manship Theatre Baton Rouge, LA 100 Lafayette Street 2 p.m. / $15 866-451-2787 Louisianatravel.com www.manshiptheatre.org March 10 Home Tour in Lower Garden District New Orleans, LA 1226 Camp Street $25 / Advance; $30 / Day-of 504-581-1367 Louisianatravel.com www.springfiesta.com

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up & coming! March March 10 Le Parfait Jour -The Perfect Day Hemingbough St. Francisville, LA $5 / Time - TBA Christi / 337-224-0700 Billie / 337-652-4101 christi_wws@att.net www.theweddingmarket.com March 14 Act III of The Sleeping Beauty River Center Theater for the Performing Arts Baton Rouge, LA 7:30 p.m. / Prices vary. Nicole Naquin or Leigh Phillips / 225-766-8379 nicole@batonrougeballet.org leigh@batonroughballet.org March 15 Celtic Odyssey The Church of the Holy Trinity Vicksburg, MS 900 South Street Free / 12:05 p.m. $10 / Gumbo Lunch 601-636-0542 March 15 David Dunavent & Evol Love Ameristar Bottleneck Blues Bar Vicksburg, MS 4116 South Washington Street 8 p.m. - Midnight 601-638-1000 www.ameristar.com March 15 - 17 Ladies Civil War Academy Historic Jefferson College Washington, MS Toni Avance / 601-442-2901 tavance@cableone.net March 15 - 17 Jackson Garden & Patio Show MS Trade Mart Jackson, MS 1200 Mississippi Street 12 & under / Free; Adults / $6 Fri. / 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.; Sat. / 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Sun. / 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Haley Barrett / haleymsnla@aol.com / 601-919-8111 www.msnla.org / info@msnla.org Bluffs & Bayous { March 2013 { Page 63


March up

& coming!

March 16 “Light Up the Night” St. Francisville, LA 7 p.m. / $40 www.audubonpilgrimage.info March 16 Mal’s St. Patty’s Day Parade Jackson, MS Downtown 601-948-0888 www.visitjackson.com malsstpaddysparade.com

March 17 St. Patrick’s Day Parade Natchez, MS Main Street 6:30 p.m. www.visitnatchez.org March 17 5th Annual “No Such Thing as Impossible” Bike Ride West Feliciana Sports Park St. Francisville, LA 8 a.m. www.wheelstosucceed.org wheels_to_succeed@yahoo.com March 17 Garden Tour McComb, MS 8150 McComb-Holmesville Road 1 - 4 p.m. pikeinfo.com March 17 28th Annual Shenanigan’s Parade Gulfport, MS Downtown 2 p.m. Lois West / 228-863-0907 Vicki O’Miller / 228-209-3627 www.quotams.com www.facebook.com/quota.mississippi Page 64 { March 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous


up & coming! March March 18 - 31 Annual Azalea Festival Pike Country Chamber of Commerce McComb, MS 112 North Railroad Boulevard 601-684-2291 pikeinfo.com

March 22 Alcorn University Men’s Choir The Church of the Holy Trinity Vicksburg, MS 900 South Street Free / 12:05 p.m. $10 / Gumbo Lunch 601-636-0542

March 20 - 23 8th Annual Veterans of the MS Civil Rights Movement Conference Tougaloo College Jackson, MS 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. www.visitjackson.com March 21 Festival of Flowers Pike County National Bank’s Community Room McComb, MS 350 Rawls Drive 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tina Brumfield / 601-551-5180

March 22 Grady Champion Ameristar Bottleneck Blues Bar Vicksburg, MS 4116 S Washington Street 8 p.m. - Midnight 601-638-1000 www.ameristar.com

March 23 2nd Annual Ironwood Run McComb Depot Pavillion McComb, MS 10K & 5K Walk/Run 7 - 7:45 a.m. / Registration $20 / 8 a.m. Meredith Singley / 601-248-7958 pikeinfo.com

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March up

& coming! March 23 Mississippi Metropolitan Ballet 20th Anniversary Spring Gala Jackson Academy Performing Arts Center Jackson, MS 7 pm. / $15 / $20 601-853-4508 www.msmetroballet.com www.visitjackson.com

March 23 Color Me Rad Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium Jackson, MS 2531 North State Street $45 - $50 / Registration 9:00 a.m. / 9:20 / 9:40 / 10:00 www.colormerad.com www.visitjackson.com March 23 Biography and Our Town West Feliciana High School Auditorium St. Francisville, LA 8604 U.S. 61 Adults / $10; Students / $5 225-635-6162 Virginia Smith / smithdouglasa@bellsouth.net

March 23 The Sweet Potato Queens Zippity Doo Dah Parade Jackson, MS $5 / Raffle 7 p.m. www.sweetpotatoqueens.com

March 23 - 24 25th Annual Natchez PowWow Grand Village of the Natchez Indians Natchez, MS 400 Jefferson Davis Boulevard Dr. Chuck Borum / 601-442-0200 cborum@hotmail.com www.natchezpowwow.com March 23 - September 8 Old Masters to Monet Mississippi Museum of Art Jackson, MS 380 South Lamar Street All day / Prices vary 601-960-1515 www.msmuseumart.org March 23 - June 22 Symbols of Faith, Home, and Beyond Mississippi Museum of Art Jackson, MS 380 South Lamar Street All day / Prices vary. 601-960-1515 www.msmuseumart.org March 26 Baking with Jay Southern Culture Heritage Foundation Vicksburg, MS 1302 Adams Street 5:30 - 7:00 p.m. $30 / Members; $35 / Non-members Reservation required 601-631-2997 info@southernculture.org www.southerculture.org www.visitvicksburg.com

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up & coming! March April 6 Medicinal Plants Historic Jefferson College Washington, MS 16 Old North Street / Free info@historicjeffersoncollege.com 601-442-2901

March 29 Benny Turner & Real Blues Ameristar Bottleneck Blues Bar Vicksburg, MS 4116 South Washington Street 8 p.m. - Midnight 601-638-1000 www.ameristar.com March 30 EXPLORE! Mississippi – Candlewicking Historic Jefferson College Washington, MS 16 Old North Street 13+ / $15 / Pre-registration required Toni Avance / 601-442-2901 tavance@mdah.state.ms.us

April 12 - 13 Pioneer Living History Encampment 1813 General Andrew Jackson Camp Historic Jefferson College Washington, MS Fri. / 1 - 5 p.m.; Sat. / 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sun. / 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. 12+ / $5 / Sat. only

Be sure to confirm details of the events should changes have occurred since events were submitted.

April 5 April in Paris Gala Mississippi Museum of Art Jackson, MS 380 South Lamar Street / 8 p.m. $100 / Reservations; $150 / VIP 601-960-1515 www.msmuseumart.org msmuseumofart.gala@gmail.com

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THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | KDMC Foundation' s PaLate

KDMC Foundation' s PaLate King’s Daughters Medical Center Foundation hosted a new event called the PaLate in January 2013 at the Lincoln Civic Center in Brookhaven, Mississippi. The evening featured artist Wyatt Waters and Chef Robert St. John. While guests dined on an Italian dinner created by St. John, he walked them through a cooking demonstration. At the same time, Waters painted a watercolor from start to finish. The artwork was then auctioned at the end of the evening. Almost 250 guests attended the event.

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Front—Wyatt Waters and Robert St. John; back—Nancy and Alvin Hoover Quinn Jordan, Kathy Smith, and Marianna Knight Dr. Michael and Anna Peavey with Bill and Kathy Phillips Cecil and Velma Estess with Karen Sullivan Pat Smith, Jimmie Sistrunk, Pam Reid, and Susie Patrick

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Shirley Estes with Sarah and Stan Foster Dora Cameron, Alvin Hoover, and Merida Johnson

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KDMC Foundation' s PaLate | Brookhaven, MS | THE social SCENE

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Harriet Profitt and Robert St. John Martha Wilbert Bates, Dustin Walker, and Melinda McBride David Culpepper, Wyatt Waters, and Johnny Rainer Katie Nations, Amy Baker, Katie Baker, and Erin Smith

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THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | KDMC Foundation' s PaLate

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13 Pat Jacobs, Dott Cannon, Norma Hill, and Robert Byrd Nancy and Dr. Jeffrey Boyd with Dauphine and Phil Magee Dr. Bill and Carrie Sones with Bill Sones, Sr. Dr. Donna Foster with Bobbie Faye and Coney Lea Carla Snider and Betsy Smith Theresia and Don Perkins

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Legal Notes by Lucien C. “Sam” Gwin III

Law Along the Mississippi Jackpot Justice (Really?)

In 2004, our legislature passed what has come to be known as tort reform and placed caps on the amount of money that a jury could award injured people for injuries and damages. Prior to 2004, the United States Chamber of Commerce—which, ironically, is not a governmental agency at all but, instead, is the lobbying arm for several Fortune 500 companies—called Mississippi a “judicial hell hole.” Within the last year, the United States Chamber of Commerce has again declared Mississippi as one of the worst judicial environments in the country although this is based solely on the opinions of CEO’s of these companies and not on facts. With that being said, I thought it would be interesting to review other states and their jury awards as compared to some in Mississippi for 2012. Through a website called Verdict Search, I was able to find the top ten jury awards in the United States for the year 2012. Interestingly, no Mississippi verdict is to be found within this fraternity of “friendly” judicial environments. The top ten are as follows: $1,170,000,000.00............ Pennsylvania $1,049,000,000.00............ California $1,000,000,000.00............ Missouri $900,000,000.00.............. Florida $765,000,000.00.............. New York $716,000,000.00.............. California $200,000,000.00.............. Florida $194,000,000.00.............. Texas $178,000,000.00.............. Florida $177,000,000.00.............. Illinois As you can see from the above, the first top-six verdicts range from half a billion dollars to over a billion dollars, yet we have not heard one whimper out of the United States Chamber of Commerce. Most of these verdicts deal with personal injury, medical malpractice, and wrongful use of intellectual properties.

As I write this article, I had access to the last six months of reported jury verdicts in Mississippi, as reported through the Mississippi Jury Verdict Reporter System (MJVR). These reports give you a pretty good take on what is really happening in Mississippi. First and most interestingly, is the fact that MJVR shows there were 27 medical malpractice cases tried in Mississippi in 2012. Of the 27 cases, Plaintiffs won only 3 cases, and the doctors or medical providers won 24. I think we can safely say that the judicial medical malpractice crisis is over in Mississippi. Next, the MJVR records that from July through December 2012 there were 67 cases actually tried in the state (although a few cases do not get reported). Of the 67 cases reported, 5 verdicts were in excess of one million dollars. The verdicts are as follows: July reported 12 verdicts: Plaintiffs (injured persons) won 5 of these cases, and the remaining 7 cases were for Defendants. The average of all verdicts based on the number of trials is $187,214.00. August reported 11 verdicts: Plaintiffs won 4 of these cases, and Defendants won 7. The average of all verdicts based on the number of trials is $212,250.00. September reported 10 verdicts: Plaintiffs won 7 verdicts, and Defendants won 3. The average of all verdicts based on the number of trials is $216,587.00. October reported 12 verdicts: Plaintiffs won 7 verdicts, and Defendants won 5. This

average is skewed due to a $36,000,000.00 verdict in Jasper County for a severely brain-damaged worker. (The probabilities are that this verdict will be reduced by our Mississippi Supreme Court when they apply the above stated caps). With this verdict included, the average dollar amount would be $5,194,000.00. However, if you remove this one verdict from the total, then the average jury award total drops to $32,500.00 for the remaining 11 verdicts. November reported 11 verdicts with Plaintiffs winning 8 of the 11. The average of all verdicts is $67,400.00. December reported 11 verdicts with the Plaintiffs winning 5 of these verdicts and the Defendants winning 6 verdicts. December also had a large verdict of $7,267,000.00, which interestingly was awarded by a federal judge in Meridian and not a jury. This verdict involved a medical malpractice case also with severe injuries. Without this verdict, the average award of the remaining verdicts is only $32,200.00. My Take: Occasions do occur when injuries are so severe that they warrant and justify sevenfigure verdicts. Overall, however, as shown with the averages of the last six months, no abuse of the judicial system is going on in Mississippi today. I would submit that maybe lawyers are not the “boogie-man” figures that some of us have been made out to be. Finally, when outsiders come in and want to castigate Mississippi’s judicial system, look at the facts and not the hype.

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THE social SCENE | McComb, MS | Shuffle to the Chefs

Shuffle to the Chefs The 2013 Shuffle to the Chefs annual fundraising event for St. Andrew’s Mission was held at the McComb Mill building in McComb, Mississippi, on January 24, 2013. It was a well-attended event with live music and plenty of open space for eating, socializing, and dancing. The wide-open floor of the mill was packed with local cooks and professional chefs; and attendees meandered from table to table, sampling chefs’ specials and traditional favorites. Many local businesses contributed cash donations and silent auction items to raise money for the nine local ministries supported by St. Andrew’s. Photos by JoAnna Sproles (pages 74-75) and Elise Parker (pages 76-78)

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Lucy Shell and Jim Hedges Donna and Darrell Smith Carleigh Engels, Patti Brabham, Ken Dixon, and Keith Starrett Melanie Whittaker, Catherine Sanders, Sam Sanders, and Brad Whittaker Jonathon Mitchell, Lawrence Giles, and Chip Gibbes Susan Gibbes and Prudence McGehee Carla and Tony Stringer with Pattie Bonner

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Shuffle to the Chefs | McComb, MS | THE social SCENE

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Photo by Elise Parker

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Anita Fenn and Sonya Moore Jeff and Robbin Daughdrill with Lydia Beebe Amy Gazzo, Susan Hedges, and Patsy Giles Parker Voss, Michael Guttuso, Dione Kinchen, and Mary Grace Moss

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THE social SCENE | McComb, MS | Shuffle to the Chefs

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Mitch and Sandra Bellipanni George Goza with Chip and Lynn Leggett Landon Ratliff, Stephen Pigott, and Kathy Gifford Gabe Gabler, Alton Travis, and Stewart and Kathy Robison Susy Sanders, Pattie Bonner, and Nancy Soyars John Dale Dumas, Deb and Wayne Vinson, Adan Diaz, Alejandro Ortiz, and Salvador Mendoza

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Shuffle to the Chefs | McComb, MS | THE social SCENE

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Stephanie Kilpatrick, Lindsey and Brice Belsom, and Christy and Paxton Lee Robbin Reed, Beulah Rogers, and Virginia Reed David and Sara Beth Williams with Alison and Howard Allred Sam Sanders and Michael Gattuso Chad Stewart and Lauren Holder Jeromy Spiers and Jamey Hewitt

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THE social SCENE | McComb, MS | Shuffle to the Chefs

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24 Scott and Beckie Nieman 25 Jennifer Wallace and Charlie Lewis

26 Gary Jones and Robbie Cox

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Marilyn Terrell, and Tina Gaskin Carl Butler and Emiko Faust

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Lucy Coleman Presented in Debutante Ball Members of the Delta Debutante Club, the oldest in Mississippi, gathered at the Greenville Golf and Country Club on December 29, 2012, for the seventieth annual Debutante Presentation and Ball. Among the debutantes presented was Lucy Jackson Coleman, the daughter of Mrs. Sara Pearson Crump of Nashville, Tennessee, and Mr. William Jackson Coleman of Rosedale, Mississippi, and Arlington, Virginia. Her grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. John Lafayette Pearson of Rosedale, Mississippi, and Mrs. Francis Gartell of Jackson, Mississippi, and the late Mr. William Segar Coleman. Miss Coleman attends the University of Mississippi.

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Surprise Birthday Party Celebrates 50 Years | Vicksburg, MS | THE social SCENE

Surprise Birthday Party Celebrates 50 Years Janet Gamble-Dorbeck was surprised on January 12, 2013, with a celebration honoring her 50th Birthday. The gathering, hosted by her family, was held at the home of Steve and Karen Mabry, the honoree’s sister and brotherin-law, in Vicksburg, Mississippi.

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Janet Gamble-Dorbeck and her father Gene Rogillio Jennifer Ratliff and Courtney Rogillio Jean Marie and Karen Mabry Janet Gamble-Dorbeck and Tod Dorbeck Paula Williams and Janet Gamble-Dorbeck Scott Rogillio and Janet Gamble-Dorbeck Lori Rogillio and Janet Gamble-Dorbeck Suzanne Hull, Lori Tzotzolas, Janet Gamble-Dorbeck, Denesha Curtis, and Dani Kay Thomas Allie Gamble, Janet Gamble-Dorbeck, and Dayton Gamble Karen Mabry, Scott Rogillio, Janet Gamble-Dorbeck, and David Rogillio

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Southern Sampler by Alma M. Womack

Teacher Icon Donald Campbell Left—Kathryn and Donald Campbell Below—Bobby Campbell, Kathryn Campbell, and Donald Campbell with presenter Kenneth Hedricks

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anuary 10, 2013, was a very special day in Monterey, Louisiana. The family of Mr. Donald Campbell held a community birthday party for their dad, a beloved former teacher at Monterey High School. Mr. Campbell was celebrating his 90th birthday, an occasion well worth a special party. Donald and Kathryn Campbell moved to the Monterey area on his birthday, January 21, 1956, when he took a position with the Monterey school as agriculture teacher. He taught many young boys until his retirement in 1980; and these men and their families turned out to honor one of the most loved, honored teachers ever to teach at Monterey High. A number of the folks at the party gave me some of their memories of Mr. Campbell and his wit from school days gone by. Mr. Jack Bairnsfather, a fellow teacher, said that on more than one occasion, he would be in Mr. Campbell’s room when Mr. Campbell would tell him that the boys were studying to be astronauts. When asked why, Mr. Campbell would respond that their heads were in the clouds Page 80 { March 2013 { Bluffs & Bayous

and outerspace; they certainly weren’t concentrating on the subject at hand. They must be planning to spend some time in the heavens. Everett Poole said that when Mr. Campbell would get a little aggravated with the boys, he’d call them hameheads. Several other guys confirmed that they, too, had heard this

term. When I asked what it meant, the universal answer was, “Ask Mr. Campbell!” Tommy Louis Crouch was high in his praise of his former teacher. Crouch said that Mr. Campbell not only taught the boys the basics of carpentry, electrical wiring, plumbing, etc., but also taught them morals and moral behavior, honesty, and patriotism. (This fact was emphasized by all his former students that I talked to.) He kept an orderly class, but it was still a fun class to take. One day, a young man in the class fell asleep. When Mr. Campbell woke him up and asked him what was wrong, another student told the class that this particular boy had gone coon hunting the night before and had killed such a big coon in the first half of the night that it took him the rest of the night to bring it in. I imagine everyone got a good laugh with Mr. Campbell laughing loudest of all. Hal Scott took the shop class that Mr. Donald taught; and when I asked him if he had a memory of the class he’d like to share, he said that his teacher told him, when looking over the bird house that he had labored over in shop class, that it was the worst


looking bird house he’d ever seen. Hal said Mr. Donald knew that he, Hal James, would never make his living in construction. There were so many people at the Monterey community center this past January10, and they were all there to honor a loved teacher and a beloved friend. Son, Bobby Campbell, and daughters, Elaine Johnson, Suzanne Wade, and Mary Lee Ferguson were on hand to help their parents greet their many, many friends and neighbors who came to visit the honoree and old friends from days of yore. Of course, there were many of the Campbell family there—the honoree and his wife, their children, spouses of their children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren. My Woodrow is one of the great grandchildren, and a special little boy to Mr. Donald and Ms. Kathryn, too. His dad, Aaron Wade, is their grandson, one of eight grandchildren, but the only one who lives nearby. I have known the Campbells since my daughter, Jorie, married Aaron, and I have never known finer people. Mrs. Kathryn is a beautiful, gracious, kind, and generous lady, whose like is disappearing from the earth. Mr. Donald is a true Southern gentleman, as well as being one of the most admired men in Concordia Parish. His life as a teacher has touched and influenced many people, and a goodly portion of them came to wish him ‘Happy Birthday’ and continued good fortune in his retirement. I am happy to say that I got to add my name to the list. A lovely, lovely day for two beloved icons of Monterey, Donald and Kathryn Campbell. To shift gears just a bit, I wanted to acknowledge the correspondence I have received in the last year from readers of Bluffs & Bayous. Most are short and kind; but every now and then I’ll get a letter from someone with an ax to grind, as the old folks say. One such letter came a couple of weeks ago from a person just fussing at me for something she had first written to me about years ago, something that she did not like in a column I had penned in 2003. I had honestly forgotten about that earlier letter, but the writer included the old letter in the recent one…to refresh my memory, I suppose. Even though the matter in question was written in 2003, I hate to tell Ms. Anonymous that I still feel the same. I do not like writers or magazines whose sole purpose seems to be to ridicule rural Southerners. It is a personal offense to me and mine, and I am not one to back down just because a person too cowardly

to sign his or her name thinks differently. People can think what they want—doesn’t bother me. But please rest assured that your disagreement will not sway me one whit. I was surprised to learn that I was the cause of school massacres in Colorado and Connecticut because I didn’t teach my great-grandchildren fairy tale history. Honestly, I don’t have any great-grandchildren; but if I did, I’d teach them that Francis Marion, John Singleton Mosby, Stonewall Jackson, and Nathan Bedford Forest were four of the greatest men in American history, and they were real as rain. I do welcome letters from readers, especially from those who sign their names and have return addresses. One lady from Illinois and I correspond on a fairly regular basis, all because she picked up a copy of Bluffs & Bayous on a trip to New Orleans, several years ago. It’s the ones who don’t sign their names that are missing out; they never get a good rebuttal to their accusations. However, I suspect that’s the aim all along. Happy March to all, month of kites and daffodils and Pilgrimages in our beautiful Southern towns; it’s a time to be thankful that we live where we do.

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Brookhaven Day in Jackson | Jackson, MS | THE social SCENE

Brookhaven Day in Jackson Brookhaven Day at the State Capitol building in Jackson, Mississippi, was held in late January 2013. Brookhaven residents, city and county officials, and members of the business community attended to meet and network with lawmakers. The Brookhaven Chamber of Commerce and their ambassadors hosted the event and served cupcakes.

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Phil Magee, Mike Jinks, Kenny Goza, and Stan Foster Robert Byrd, Quinn Jordan, and Alvin Hoover Suzanne Hirsch, Sheila Burd, Imogene Ryan, and Catherine Dickey JoAnna Sproles, Representative Becky Currie, and Karen Sullivan Page Nelson and Julie Wright Tillmon Bishop, Representative Becky Currie, and Bill Sones


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March 2013 Bluffs & Bayous  

The Official Social Events and News Guide for Central and South Mississippi and Southeast Louisiana

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