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Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 1


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From Your Publisher . . .

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elcome to our April issue...the issue where we focus on our outdoor gardening projects, our flower beds, and our herb and container gardening. We feel we have a variety of stories for delightful and informative reading this month. Organic gardeners Edie and Henry Clover have arrived in Natchez, Mississippi, to share their skills in healthier growing, harvesting, and eating. A couple of young garden enthusiasts who spend their time volunteering in their communities, Molly Cooper and Terri Morris are spearheading a community garden project for the MissLou in Vidalia, Louisiana. Phase I of this community garden is under way; and area folks have the opportunity to join this healthier living movement, claim that perfect spot, stake out a garden of their very own, plant their favorite veggies, and eagerly anticipate enjoying the fruits of their labors. Patricia Taylor shares her repertoire of the many ways to use your garden’s roses— from providing aesthetic beauty and soft fragrance in the home to making distilled rose water, rose-petal sandwiches, and rosary beads. Gary Bachman’s article this month explores the glory that supertunias

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can bring to your garden. He focuses on the supertunia named Mississippi Medallion winner for 2012—Vista Bubblegum. Be sure to check out this story. Our contributing columnists, Alma Womack, Ross McGehee, Mary Emrick, Jennie Guido, and Johnny Bowlin continue to amuse, delight, and intrigue us with their monthly musings; and when you view the Premier Events and Up & Coming for April, you will see how busy and exciting this month promises to be. Do not pass over the feature article about Natchez Festival of Music, a month-long event during May but with initial events in April, and make plans to come to Natchez for some of this festival’s outstanding musical performances. Coming up next month will be Ellis Nassour’s article that showcases the fascinating career of a colorful Natchezian who left town to follow the allure of “show business.” In addition, our May issue will focus on leisure living. I cannot conclude this note without a huge “thank you” to all who have stopped me and commented about how much they enjoy reading Bluffs & Bayous each month and learning about new people, places, and events. Moreover, your following us

online continues to be amazing. To realize that we connect and share a kindred spirit with so many is a humbling thought and an exciting challenge. We continue to try harder each month to convey to all of you the wonders of our life along and beyond the Mississippi.


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C o n t r i b u t o r s

Columnist Mary Emrick is the owner of Turning Pages Books & More in Natchez, Mississippi.

Jennie Guido is a graduate of Delta State University with a Bachelor’s Degree in Arts and Master’s Degree in English Education. She currently lives in the heart of the Delta in Cleveland, Mississippi, but she still calls Natchez home.

Columnist Alma Womack lives on Smithland Plantation on Black River, south of Jonesville, Louisiana. In addition to her duties as maitresse des maison, she is the keeper of the lawn, the lane and the pecan orchard at Smithland.

Columnist Dr. Gary R. Bachman is an assistant extension professor of horticulture at Mississippi State University’s Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi, Mississippi.

Patricia Taylor is a Doctor of Naturopathy and a Consultant Medical Herbalist, having studied at the University of Wales and Clayton, Alabama. She is a member of the National Institute of Medical Herbalists of Great Britain and a registered herbalist with the American Herbalists Guild. Taylor has a practice in her hometown in England, and she and her husband John split their year between there and their home in Natchez, Mississippi.

Columnist Ross McGehee, a lifelong resident of Natchez, Mississippi, owns a diversified and far-flung farm operation.

Johnny Bowlin serves as pastor at Meadville Baptist Church in Meadville, Mississippi. He has had editorials published in ESPN the Magazine, The Birmingham News, and The Desoto Times. He has also written two youth devotionals entitled The Real World and Teenagers God Uses and was a contributing writer for the New Orleans Zephyrs newsletter Bleacher Creature. A graduate of the University of Alabama at Birmingham and of New Orleans Baptist Seminary, he is married to Melinda, and they have one daughter.

publisher Cheryl Foggo Rinehart editors Jean Nosser Biglane Cheryl Foggo Rinehart graphic designers Jan Ratcliff Anita Schilling media coordinator Adam Blackwell staff photographers Van O’Gwin Elise D. Parker Cheryl Rinehart sales staff Susan Harris Cheryl Rinehart Donna Sessions JoAnna Sproles intern Marlee Price

Adam Blackwell

Jean Biglane

Van O’Gwin

Elise D. Parker

Marlee Price

Jan Ratcliff

Cheryl Rinehart

Anita Schilling

on the cover Organic gardeners Edie and Henry Clover are residing in Natchez, Mississippi, through the fall to teach members of the community the “how-to” of organic gardening. To read about their wealth of talent and information on organic gardening and related recipes, follow the story on pages 26 to 29. Cover photo by Van O’Gwin of Van’s Photography in Vidalia, Louisiana

Susan Harris

Donna Sessions

JoAnna Sproles

Bluffs & Bayous is published monthly to promote the greater Southern area of Louisiana and Mississippi in an informative and positive manner. We welcome contributions of articles and photos; however, they will be subject to editing and availability of space and subject matter. Photographs, comments, questions, subscription requests and ad placement inquiries are invited! Return envelopes and postage must accompany all materials submitted if a return is requested. No portion of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Bluffs & Bayous are those of the authors or columnists and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher, nor do they constitute an endorsement of products or services herein. We reserve the right to refuse any advertisement. Bluffs & Bayous strives to insure the accuracy of our magazine’s contents. However, should inaccuracies or omissions occur, we do not assume responsibility.

office

423 Main Street, Suite 7 | Natchez, MS 39120 601-442-6847 | fax 601-442-6842 info@bluffsbayous.com | editor@bluffsbayous.com sales@bluffsbayous.com www.bluffsbayous.com

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April 2012 FEATURES Supertunias — A Super Garden Hit............................................................. 23 Live a Happy, Healthy, Organic Gardening Life.................................... 26-29 A Community Garden: Growing Community in the Miss-Lou.............. 30-31 My Little Tome of Rose Treasures........................................................... 32-34 Natchez Festival of Music’s Twenty-second Season............................... 36-37 Honey Brake Lodge at Louisiana Delta Plantation............................... 48-51

FAVORITES

Live a Happy, Healthy, Organic Gardening Life pages 26 - 29

All Outdoors Getting Ahead......................................................................................... 14-15

Events April Premier Events................................................................................ 66-67 April Up & Coming!................................................................................. 68-75

From the Stacks Get Out, Get Down, and Get Dirty with No Worries................................. 10

Something Scrumptious Up Highway 61: Hey Joe’s, Cleveland, Mississippi................................. 18-19

Southern Sampler Sundry Thoughts on Easter Season........................................................ 56-57 Rickwood Conference Recap.................................................................. 64-65

THE Social Scene 2012 Lincoln County Distinguished Young Women Program..................... 9 Krewe of Ceres Charity Ball 2012........................................................... 12-13 A Tasting at Desert Plantation.................................................................... 17 Brookhaven Day at the State Capitol.................................................... 20-21 Natchez Regional Medical Center Benefit............................................. 42-43 Team Member Recognition Banquet.......................................................... 44 Hospice Heart Award................................................................................... 54 Brookhaven Camellia Society Show............................................................ 54 Lincoln County Republican Party’s Fiftieth Anniversary....................... 58-61 River Region Medical Center’s Tenth Anniversary..................................... 63 Klaus Eightieth Birthday Party............................................................... 76-78 Brookhaven/Lincoln County Legislative Breakfast..................................... 80 Walthall County Miss Hospitality 2012....................................................... 81 A Salute to Herb and Faye Wilkinson.................................................... 82-84 McComb Junior Auxiliary Ball................................................................ 86-87 Chamber After Hours at Brandon Hall.................................................. 88-89

Weddings Freeman and Anding Wedding.............................................................. 38-39 Wedding Shower for Sarah Wisner and Zack Calhoun......................... 40-41

My Little Tome of Rose Treasures pages 32 - 34

Honey Brake Lodge at Louisiana Delta Plantation pages 48 - 51 Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 7


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THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | 2012 Lincoln County Distinguished Young Woman Program

2012 Lincoln County Distinguished Young Woman Program

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The Lincoln County Distinguished Young Woman Program was held at Southwest Mississippi Community College in Summit, Mississippi, in mid-February. Seven eleventh-grade girls from Lincoln County competed for the title with Ellen Doty, a student at Brookhaven High School and daughter of Dr. Don Doty and Sally Doty, crowned the Distinguished Young Woman for 2012.

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Seth Rushing, Zach Smith, Matthew Evans, Bryce Smith, Gage Posey, and Parker Vinson Dorothy Crawford and Bryce Smith Back—Savannah Rushing, Walker Franck, Shelby Crosby, Sky Pruden; front—Colby Terrell, Rainie Welch, and Ali Grace Crosby Rayce Stewart, Parker Moak, Braden Bairfield, Bryce Smith, and Colby Terrell Shelby Crosby, Taylor Beasley, Alex Craig, Jessie Henning, Ellen Doty, and Carey Crozier

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From the Stacks review by Mary Emrick

Get Out, Get Down, and Get Dirty with No Worries Slow Gardening: a No-Stress Philosophy for All Senses and All Seasons by Felder Rushing

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elder Rushing’s newest book, Slow Gardening: a No-Stress Philosophy for All Senses and Seasons, encourages all gardeners to get out, get down, and get dirty—literally! And that is what many are doing in their yards and community gardens. As warm seasons approach, the thought of a vine ripe tomato makes the idea of gardening hard to resist. However, gardening can be very stressful when done in the traditional manner of

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pursuing weed-free, immaculate beds. More stress mounts when the hours spent in the garden compete with today’s busy schedules. Rushing’s book offers the solution for this stress. He has a plan for year-round gardening that will allow gardeners to enjoy and appreciate time spent in the garden. Slow Down! Don’t strive for the unobtainable, that “cosmetic perfection.” While offering suggestions about how to “get back to nature” and how to “become environmentally conservative” in your garden, Rushing fills the pages with proven science as well as practical tips. He does this using the wit and wisdom for which he is well known. Throughout Slow Gardening he shares personal stories, giving examples of what works and doesn’t work for him. Felder Rushing provides information for the novice gardener and the seasoned avid gardener, guiding each one to adopt the philosophy of Slow Gardening. Rushing’s gardening style engages the senses. A few of his tricks of the trade include a recipe for potting soil, pass-along plant lists for all climates, a guide for organizing a “plant swap,” tips for composting and techniques for the propagation of plants. His biggest desire in writing this book is to encourage gardeners to be individuals that express themselves through their gardening choices. Gardeners are encouraged to put aside the desire to please others. His message is, “The garden is yours; let it reflect your personality; let it be enjoyable

and free of stress.” This has always been Felder Rushing’s gardening philosophy. Slow Gardening: a No Stress Philosophy for All Senses and Seasons by Felder Rushing is a book with an abundance of slow gardening techniques and useful information. The book will give you the desire to relax while spending time in your garden. Felder Rushing is a tenth-generation hands-in-the-dirt American gardener who lives in Jackson, Mississippi. He has been a national director of the Garden Writers Association, member of the National Youth Gardening Committee, past president of several horticulture societies, and distinctly non-stuffy board member of the American Horticulture Society. He is a longtime garden columnist, popular lecturer nationwide, overseas host of a national Public Radio affiliate program, and the author or coauthor of sixteen books including the awardwinning Passalong Plants.


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THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | Krewe of Ceres Charity Ball 2012

Krewe of Ceres Charity Ball 2012 The Forty-fifth Krewe of Ceres Charity Ball with a British theme of A Royal Affair was held February 25 at the Lincoln Civic Center in Brookhaven, Mississippi. Mary Catherine McDonnieal was crowned the Queen and her King was Terry Reid, Director of the Brookhaven Recreation Department. Maids to the Queen were Leslie Anne Aker, Allison Gray Boyd, Margaret Carlisle Cupit, Ashley Elizabeth Dann, Meredith Alexander Jacobs, Amanda Katherine Moak, Olivia Day Oberschmidt, Whitney Elise Perkins, Anna Elizabeth Reid, and Ashton Brett Richardson. Escorts were Jacob Madison Baker, James Keith Ballard, Jr., Charles Roger Fearn, Zachary Witt Halliwell, Robert Joseph Ledet, Edward Sidney Moak, Jr., James Michael Patti, Clint Byrd Stewart, Patrick Covington Valentine, and Austin Price Watts. Aides included Samuel Salter Adcock, Gayten Land Johnson, Graham Patrick Kergosien, and Cory Reid Patterson.

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Amanda Moak, Jacob Baker, Ashley Dann, Austin Watts, Meredith Jacobs, Robert Ledet, Ashton Richardson, Clint Stewart, Maggie Cupit, Edward Moak, Queen Mary Catherine McDonnieal, King Terry Reid, Zach Halliwell, Olivia Oberschmidt, Patrick Valentine, Allison Boyd, Jay Ballard, James Michael Patti, Anna Reid, Charles Fearn, and Whitney Perkins Anjan Karmacharya and Dr. Lisa Karmacharya Billy Crozier and Tracy Crozier Sloane Smith and Josh Smith Bill Perkins, Jr., and Sherri Mathis Robin Patterson and Krewe Aide Cory Patterson Ashley Dann and Allison Dann

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Krewe of Ceres Charity Ball 2012 | Brookhaven, MS | THE social SCENE

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Graham Kergosien, Cory Patterson, Samuel Adcock, and Gayten Johnson Charlene Elliott, Amanda Warren, and Jim Elliott Carla Snider, Ellie Phillips, and Nancy Hoover Cathy McDonnieal, Catherine Batson, and Mary Catherine McDonnieal Angie Cox and Joe Cox

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All Outdoors | by Ross McGehee

“G

Getting Ahead

rand Daddy, why is that deer up there? Where is the rest of him? Did he die? Why did he die? Is that a daddy deer? Do mommy deer die, too? Why?” Four-year-old Catherine was full of questions, and I was not comfortable in being deficient in answering what I thought were compelling questions. They weren’t even my deer, and it wasn’t my wall! But the whole episode provoked a lot of thought. Actually, they were excellent questions. I suppose there are as many answers as there are specimens. No, people aren’t that smart. But there are lots of reasons to display the physical results of a hunting experience. There are reasons not to, also, in certain situations. And, boy, am I getting onto some thin ice here; but it bears discussion.

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Whether one is fascinated by taxidermy or revolted by it depends on one’s life experiences, obviously; but the subject can be interesting from an historical perspective just as much as from a scientific perspective. The moral perspective is the most incendiary in some circles, and we’ll try to stay as far away from morals as we can. That’s what I always say. Probably a good place to start would be a note of appreciation to taxidermists for putting up with the customers. Imagine being in a business where your sleep is interrupted by some jerk calling at eleven o’clock at night. Thanksgiving night. He’s got a deer that he’s just dragged from the

woods and wants to know how to skin it for “mounting.” It’s not rocket science. Then the next morning, he shows up with a deer that’s not even legal, shot to ribbons; and he wants the miraculous transformation by Christmas so he can put it in his man-cave to show up his brother-in-law. Forget the forty-three other heads that showed up last week. Then he complains about the fourhundred-dollar fee. Or the guy that got the Number 5 Red Stag in the world on a Texas hunt. He forgot that the hide was iced down in a cooler in the back of his Jeep. He FORGOT the #5 animal in the world! He “remembered” a week later when he slammed on the brakes at a Baton Rouge intersection, and the cooler tipped over, and the smell of the advanced decomposition rolled into the front seat with him. “What do you mean ‘It’s ruined’?” At that point, Catherine’s fourth question is very valid. Explaining all that to a child, without getting into the hunter-gatherer factor, the ego factor, or the redneck-deco factor, can get complex. Heck, explaining it (or justifying it) to adults that are unfamiliar with game management requires no small level of sensitivity. Literally, books have been written on the subject, and there is no need to attempt to do that much research to fill this small allocation of space. But in the purest sense, the main reason that one would put taxidermy on display is


an appreciation of the animal and the experience that is gained in its pursuit. Trust me; don’t ask someone how some deer head, largemouth bass, mallard drake, turkey tail feathers, jackalope, or coonskin came to grace his or her wall unless you’ve got some time to lose! The wind direction during the hunt, position of the blind, name and breeding of the dog, number of Hershey Bars in the left front pocket, bullet weight, color of the water, name of the place where the bait was bought, price of the gasoline (and gallons), and number of times that the turkey gobbled on the roost will be described in painful detail. And if space permits, a complete re-enactment of the experience will be performed with an accurate timeline! As nauseating as it is to endure that, multiplied by the number of specimens present in the room, at least it is good to know that the time spent outdoors was memorable. So is a root canal! There was a time when all that didn’t matter. The Whitetail Deer that stood as Number 2 in Louisiana for years was killed for meat. I have a picture of his antlers cast aside on the ground after the deer was cleaned for consumption. Someone else asked could he have the head and the hunter gave it away because he had no use for something inedible. The antlers are in a private collection now. The last time I saw them, the owner of the head had his name on the plaque. Hopefully, at some point the name of the man that actually killed the deer will be added. It’s only been seventy years. So much of the taxidermy that is seen now is, for lack of a better word, fake. If you catch a huge bass, who wants to skin that? Just call the folks, tell them what it weighed, and they’ll send you one, in plastic. Thus, many of the heads seen in sporting goods stores are reproductions. It is entirely possible to copy antlers and make multiple duplicate sets of any trophy. They are bought by folks who don’t want to take the time and expense of making a hunt but want to accentuate their décor and egos. It is even possible to find shed antlers and have them positioned on a deer head, extended or reconfigured to make them look even more impressive than nature ever could have done. What’s the wonder in that? And the Pronghorn Antelope that stood as Number 1 for years finally got x-rayed because it was so out of proportion to all the others. I recall that there were numerous

tiny brads nailing one set of horns over the other. Couldn’t be seen with the naked eye. If you’ve seen one eight-point deer head, you’ve seen them all. Except for the experience they provide the hunter individually, they are interchangeable. Show me something different. Show me a palmate antler, a turkey with a strange spur, an old Fox Squirrel with a white blaze face, or an almost snow-white skunk. I talked a friend into getting a porcupine mounted once. Show me something that nobody else has. I saw a pair of bobcats playing in the highway last year, right before one got run over. It wasn’t damaged, so I had Tucker Crisp mount it. I got a call from Mark Taunton about a huge otter that had been run over locally. We tried to save it, but it had gotten too hot before Mark picked it up so Tucker didn’t think we should chance it. I know it’s road kill, but who’s got one mounted, and when has anyone seen one in the wild? Same with a red fox that Gary Edwards called me about one morning. It is gorgeous; and, once again, who’s seen one up close? When he was four years old, my son, Will, had bad dreams about foxes getting him until he finally saw one and realized how small they actually are. So it’s worth something to me to preserve the critters for adults to enjoy and children to touch. There are several categories of people where dead animals are on display. The first admires them for their grace and contribution to the fullness of the outdoor experience. The second is not outdoors oriented at all and doesn’t even notice. I’ve seen people like that. Stay away from them, far away. The third thinks they are all right, but they are uncomfortable with being stared at by all the “cadavers.” Seriously, I can provide names. And, lastly, there are obviously those who disapprove of the reasons and methods by which the game came to be on display in the first place. Don’t talk with your mouth full! I learned that in sensitivity training! Still, maybe the next time a small child asks such probing questions as Catherine’s, I hope to be better prepared to provide an answer. Or steer his or her immediate interest to a Popsicle.

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THE social SCENE | St. Francisville, LA | A Tasting at Desert Plantation

A Tasting at Desert Plantation In January, to showcase its catering repertoire, Heirloom Cuisine hosted A Tasting at Desert Plantation in St. Francisville, Louisiana.

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7 David Bray, Julia Bray, and Kitty Bray Kenwood Kennon, Judy Busick, and Ricky Wilcox Amanda Adams, Bill Perkins, and Willia Perkins Randy Busick, Nolan Percy, and David Bray Trent Booty, Andy Wilson, and Alex Paul Trent Booty, Caryn Roland, Andy Wilson, Danielle Miller, and Alex Paul Trent Booty, Danielle Miller, Alex Paul, Andy Wilson, Caryn Roland, and Chef Jason Roland Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 17


Something Scrumptious story and photos by Jennie Guido

Up Highway 61

Hey Joe’s

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Cleveland, Mississippi

here is nothing I love more than a burger that is so juicy that it literally runs down your arms; and on a warm spring afternoon, that is what you will find at Hey Joe’s in Cleveland, Mississippi. Located on the corner of Highway 8 and Sharpe Avenue and one of the newest additions to the Warehouse District, this eatery is definitely one of a kind for the Delta. Asked why he opened Hey Joe’s, owner Justin Huerta explained, “I started Hey Joe’s because I love Cleveland. I wanted to do something that nobody has ever done here.” What makes this place so unique is how linked to the culture, music, and twentysomethings of Cleveland it is. From the front door and the racks of vinyl records for sale to the back porch where movie night is projected on a big screen, Hey Joe’s is a favorite hangout for many of the locals and even some from surrounding areas. Decorated with band posters and vintage signs, this old John Deere warehouse has been transformed into a place where

people can stop in for a drink on a sunny afternoon or grab a wonderfully delicious bite to eat with friends. “Good people equal a good time. We have a good time here,” said Huerta. On Wednesday nights, you can barely find an empty seat or vacant bar stool due to the massive crowds on hand for weekly trivia. Throughout the weekends, Huerta seeks out original bands and music to entertain the regulars. When we get a group together and head over to Hey Joe’s, I usually start the evening there by trying a new and interesting beer from the vast menu of drafts, domestics, and imports. From that point, an appetizer for our table is a must. However, it is always a struggle to choose just one. Whether it is the Chili Con Queso made with homemade chili or the Yummus Hummus that wins us over, within no time the platter is clean. When it comes to the main course, I have a nice little rotation of choices to pick from. One of my favorites is the slider-size burger on the menu. While I love the beef

with mustard, pickle, and an onion, the BBQ slider is some of the best pulled pork in the Delta. I also like to order the Fish Tacos when they are available as a special. Served with a side of the seasoned fries, which are fantastic when dipped in ranch dressing, these filet-and-slaw-filled tortillas are absolutely delectable.

Above—The entrance to Hey Joe’s inside the Warehouse District Below—Hey Joe’s ... on the corner of Highway 8 and Sharpe Avenue

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One of my new favorites is the Sound Garden Salad, which is a spring mix of lettuce topped with mushrooms, tomatoes, roasted red peppers, cucumbers, and feta cheese. This is a really nice, light option when we twenty-somethings are trying to watch our figures. However, you just can’t go wrong by ordering a burger. Whether the Joe Burger, an eight-and-a-half-ounce burger; the Lieutenant Dan, which is topped with two cheeses and sautéed onions on a ciabatta bun; or the epic Bobby Earl Wayne Kelly, a colossal two-patty concoction with bacon, cheese, and ham between two grilled cheese buns, there is definitely a burger option for any and everybody all along Highway 61. I always have a hard time deciding which of my favorites to order; however, Huerta says there are obvious favorite menu items for the regulars. Some include the Nirvana Burger, which is a cheeseand-bacon-filled patty topped with diced bacon, swiss cheese, grilled portabella mushrooms, lettuce, and chipotle mayo; the Gyro, a Greek-seasoned pita sandwich filled with lettuce, tomato, onions, feta cheese, and a special sauce; and the Macho Nachos, a fantastic appetizer of pulled pork over homemade chips with cheese and BBQ sauce. With his business being part of the thriving and growing Warehouse District, Huerta says, “The sky is the limit. Look for a new patio area in the near future at Hey Joe’s.” These exciting changes are always welcomed by those of us looking for something new to do on a Saturday night or a blue-skied afternoon. Over the summer, you will be seeing several restaurant spotlights a little closer to my Natchez home. With the weather turning warmer and tons of tourists heading into town, Natchez and the surrounding areas will have their grills hot, tables set, and hospitality brimming. However, if you find yourself on this end of Highway 61, stop by Hey Joe’s, grab a burger and a beer, and relax on the patio for a lazy afternoon in the Delta.

Top left—A wide variety of icecold beer is available. Top right—The Chicken Fajita Sandwich Above left—This rustic atmosphere is the perfect setting for a laid-back lunch. Above right—The Joe Burger Left—Hey Joe’s sells records and T-shirts.

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THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | Brookhaven Day at the State Capitol

Brookhaven Day at the State Capitol Brookhaven officials, business owners, and residents visited with state representatives and senators during the 2012 Brookhaven Day at the State Capitol in mid-February. The trip to the capitol to meet with state lawmakers is an annual tradition for Brookhaven. Refreshments, including an ice cream sundae and hot chocolate bar, were served to anyone stopping by to visit with Brookhaven.

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Robert Byrd and Shannon Aker Commissioner of Agriculture Cindy Hyde Smith and Quinn Jordan Lincoln County Teenage Republicans: Front—Hunter Foster, Carlianne Alderman, Rachel Gardner, and John Merritt Howard; middle—Lindy Berryhill, Betsy Berryhill, Susanna Ratcliff, Amy Wallace, Reneé Kakadia, and Cindy Moore; back—Jason Scafidel, Austin Smith, Sam Mooney, Corey Alderman, Brennan Laird, and Sam Ratcliff Brookhaven Lincoln County Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors Rhonda Brown, Vivian Strickland, Sheila Burd, Brenda Henderson, Pam Ayers, Cynthia Price, and Imogene Ryan

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Brookhaven Day at the State Capitol | Brookhaven, MS | THE social SCENE

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Kay Burton, Doug Boykin, Lucy Shell, and Kenny Goza Representative Becky Currie, Bill Sones, Senator Sally Doty, and Shannon Aker Brookhaven Mayor Les Bumgarner, Sally Doty, and Doug Boykin Lil Ann Pace, Dave Pace, and Dr. Ronnie Nettles

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In the Garden | story and pictures by Dr. Gary R. Bachman Top—Vista Bubblegum and Vista Silverberry are supertunias. Together, they create a stunning effect as a landscape bed planting. Bottom—Pretty Much Picasso is a unique supertunia. It has pink petals with a purplish throat and lime green flower edges that tend to blend into the foliage.

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Supertunias – A Super Garden Hit

s gardeners look forward to the spring planting season, many go in droves to the various garden shows and displays to see some of the newest and flashiest flowers on the market. Last month at the Gulf Coast Garden & Patio Show was no exception. Mississippi gardeners got the chance to see the new Mississippi Medallionwinning plants for 2012. This year’s flowering plant winner is Vista Bubblegum supertunia. The flowers are a clear, bright pink and have performed well in Mississippi gardens the past few years. Vista Bubblegum is a vigorous plant with a three-foot spread at maturity. It can grow up to two feet tall. When mass-planted in the landscape bed, it creates a pink

groundcover. Vista Bubblegum is also a good choice for containers and hanging baskets where the flowering branches and shoots can cascade over the edges. Vista Bubblegum is one in the group called supertunias. Several colors are available, and you should include these in your landscape bed planting as well. I especially like the stunning effect of the pink and silvery flowers when you combine Vista Bubblegum with Vista Silverberry. A supertunia that has grown well in my garden is Pretty Much Picasso. This plant has unique pink petals with a purplish throat. The edges of the flowers are lime green and tend to blend into the foliage, making it difficult to see where the flowers end and the foliage begins. Another benefit

is that all of the supertunias are butterfly and hummingbird magnets. Vista Bubblegum and the other supertunias are self-cleaning and do not need to be deadheaded. If the plants start to look a little tired, rejuvenate them by trimming them back about a third. Petunias can be grown in the ground, in containers, and in hanging baskets. Inground spacing is generally best when planted on 18-inch centers. This allows most petunias to form a lush, full mat full of flowers. Always plant the transplants at the original cell-pack or pot depth. Plant in the full sun for the best flowering and growth. Keep the soil or potting medium consistently moist. If you let the plants dry out and start to wilt, this shuts off the flowering for up to a couple weeks. Be especially careful when growing your supertunias in containers, as those in containers will dry out much faster than those in the ground. Early morning watering will help keep the soil moist. During the hottest temperatures, you may need to water containers and hanging baskets a second time in the afternoon. Supertunias are heavy feeders, so be sure to apply a controlled-release fertilizer at planting. For the best growth and flower production, feed these plants on a regular basis. I recommend using water-soluble fertilizer when you water the plants. When you’re shopping this spring, also keep on the lookout for Mississippi Medallion winners from past years. These are great plants to enjoy in your landscape and garden each year.

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Rec yc le

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LOTs OF NEW SPRING HOME DECOR

REPETITIONS C O N S I G N M E N T 107 S Railroad Ave

B O U T I Q U E

Brookhaven, MS

601.833.5050

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Live a Happy, Healthy, Organic Gardening Life

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Edith (Edie) and Henry Clover arrived in Natchez, Mississippi, in mid-January of this year through the WWOOF (World Wide Opportunities on Organic Farms) program. WWOOF links volunteers with organic farmers and helps people share more sustainable ways of living. These two ambassadors of healthy living already have made an impact on the community and have been encouraged to continue their mission of education, gardening, and sharing their knowledge and skills about growing and eating natural vegetables. The pair met in Berlin, Germany, three years ago through a similar program and share strong backgrounds in volunteerism. Edith from rural Georgia and Henry from Pennsylvania see their service to others as a way of life. The Clovers claim residence in rural Thailand where they work with organizations that support Burmese refugees. Natchez Growing is the latest undertaking of Henry and Edie Clover. Responding to a request from citizens of Natchez, the Clovers are helping connect and unite the community in the pursuit of happy, healthy living. Assisting in making a real change through educational outreach, community building, and hand-on activities, their goal is for the citizens of Adams County is to create a real change in their own homes and neighborhoods, making Natchez one of the most exciting local food economies in the state. “We just want to be able to do what we love and to share that excitement and those skills with others in this community,� explained Edie Clover. Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 27


The Clovers are guiding forces in this local movement as community members take matters into their own hands in understanding where food comes from; how to grow it themselves; how to cook and eat healthy, flavorful food; and how to minimize the amount of waste created on a daily basis. The Natchez Growers’ Alliance (NGA), a support group of Natchez Growers, is a coalition of individuals, families, and organizations in the area who are growing organic fruits, vegetables, herbs, and edible flowers on a small scale. The citizens in this network act as resources for each other, sharing knowledge and experience, connecting and collaborating, and bringing life to yards and windowsills throughout the county. There is also a Botanical Barter program which allows these growers to trade their excess produce for their neighbors’ lagniappe, a Kinder Garten Klub that offers special activities geared toward younger growers, and Over-TheMolehill events that remind us that gardens are timeless and never stop growing. The Clovers are happy to help start a garden or growing space for eager and interested gardeners. For more information, contact Edie for membership or assistance. One program that Natchez Growing offers is the Learn Program. Classes offered are Home Gardening 101, Container Gardening Workshop, Collaborative Consultation, Planting for Soil Repair Workshop, Vegetable Cooking Class, Fermentation Workshop, Vegan Baking Classes, and Readings on the River (www. natchezpoetry.blogspot.com) Feel free to visit their website www.natchezgrowing. blogspot.com for information about the content of these classes and workshops.

Upcoming Events April 7 - April 28: Vegetable Cooking Classes Saturdays, 10:00 am - 12:00 pm April 7: Home Gardening 101 1:00 - 4:00 pm April 8: Fermentation Workshop 2:00 - 3:30 pm April 21: Container Gardening Workshop with Natchez Clay 9:00 am - 1:30 pm Page 28 { April 2012 { Bluffs & Bayous

May 2: Home Gardening 101 1:00 - 4:00 pm

May 2: Home Gardening 101 3:00 - 5:30 pm

May 12: Fermentation Workshop 2:00 - 3:30 pm

June 8: From Tilling to Tasting, An Evening of Fine Dining (Fundraiser) 6:30 pm - until

May 15: Planting for Soil Repair 6:00 - 8:00 pm

June 16: Container Gardening Workshop with Natchez Clay 1:00 - 4:30 pm

May 19: Container Gardening Workshop with Natchez Clay For information 1:00 - 4:30 pm

and registration regarding classes, contact Edie at 857-998-1968 or edie.clover@gmail.com.


Edie and Henry’s Favorite Recipes Cabbage and White Bean Soup 1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil 1½ cups white beans (Great Northern/Navy/Lima), pre-cooked or canned, drained and rinsed ½ head of cabbage, sliced into ribbons 2 potatoes, diced 4 large cloves garlic, chopped ½ yellow onion, diced 5 cups vegetable broth *Grated Parmesan for topping, if desired Warm the oil in a large, heavy-bottomed pot over medium-high heat. Stir in the salt and potatoes. Cover and cook until they are slightly brown and a bit tender, stirring occasionally. Add the garlic and onion, and cook another minute or two. Adjust the seasoning with salt and pepper. Add the stock and beans, and bring to a simmer. Wilt in the cabbage, and cook an additional 5 minutes. Adjust the seasoning again. Serve warm, topped with Parmesan if desired. Herbed Olive Oil 2/3 cup extra virgin olive oil 1 teaspoon fennel seeds 1½ tablespoon of each: fresh rosemary, fresh basil, fresh thyme, chopped 2 cloves garlic, minced or pressed dash of salt pinch of black pepper In a small, heavy-bottomed saucepan, thoroughly combine all ingredients. Over low heat, bring the temperature of the oil to 100-150 degrees. Remove from heat and set aside to cool. Store in a clean, glass container. (We use old hot sauce bottles.) This oil is shelf-stable for up to 6 months. Use this oil to fry vegetables (especially potatoes!) or blend with balsamic vinegar and serve as an appetizer bread dip or salad dressing. For tasty croutons, toss bread cubes in this oil and spread over a baking sheet, baking at 425 degrees for 15-20 minutes (or until crispy).

Moroccan Mint Tea ¼ cup sugar 1 medium bunch of fresh mint (with extra for garnish) 1 cinnamon stick 2 servings of green tea (loose-leaf or bag) Combine all ingredients in a large teapot and cover with boiling water. Steep for 5-8 minutes, stirring often to blend flavors. Serve with mint sprigs as garnish.

Avocado Potato Salad 2 pounds soft potatoes (russet, golden, fingerling, etc), diced 2 large, ripe avocados 2 tablespoons fresh lime juice ½ teaspoon salt 1 small (plum) tomato, diced 1 red onion, finely diced ¼ cucumber, finely diced Dash of cayenne pepper (optional) Boil potatoes until easily pierced with a fork. Drain and set aside to cool. Pit and peel the avocados, and place in a food processor with the lime juice and salt. Puree until smooth, scraping sides of processor as needed. Add tomato and onion, and pulse until just incorporated (should still be a bit chunky). In a large mixing bowl, toss potatoes and cucumbers together. Add the avocado mixture, and stir to coat well. Salt to taste, and add cayenne if desired. Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 29


A COMMUNITY garden:

Growing

Community in the miss-lou

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community garden. Not a new idea, not a new concept, but here in Concordia Parish, Louisiana, a team of two women, one a master gardener and one a master marketing guru, are turning heads and shaking up a community who are, by the way, all on board to create a community garden. The City of Vidalia along with the Mayor Hyram Copeland fully supported the donation of 20 acres and provided the electricity and water to accommodate the gardens. This vision of Terri Morris and Molly Cooper is one that this dynamic duo has corralled a growing group of avid supporters to embrace and assist in all areas to bring actuality and visibility to their dream. Cooper has always wanted to have such an area for her hometown but never found the right team member to make it happen. “The benefits are obvious,” touted the energetic Cooper. “To improve the quality of life, stimulate community development, enhance social interaction, and produce nutritious food are just a few of them. Not to mention a garden can reduce the family food budget; preserve green space; create the opportunity for recreation; and provide exercise, therapy, and education for those who participate and those who benefit from the food access. One of the

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more exciting benefits is the opportunity for intergenerational and cross-cultural connections.” Some of the generous community members who have contributed to the community garden are Rhino Graphics for the banner marking the area for the garden, Camo Construction and Curtis Wrecker for donating trucks for hauling, and 2J Ranch for the crushed limestone and river silt for creating the parking area. In addition, 3 Rivers Co-op donated fertilizer, and Cecil Parker provided the first plowing of the land and guidance, and Buddy Miller’s advice for the development of a Farmer’s Market has given the concept a solid base to build on. Moreover, Nan Huff and Ashley Powell with the LSU Agricultural Department are on tap for future education classes in all areas of gardening, care, maintenance, and production for the community; and Tanner Gin is on board for gin trash. “Everyone has been so supportive and gracious and we thank them so much,” said Morris and Cooper. An interesting note to share concerns the meeting of Molly Cooper and Terri Morris. While still strangers to one another, both happened one day to be shopping at a

local antiques mall in downtown Natchez, Mississippi. They struck up a conversation with one another; and by the time the conversation ended, Cooper had found the person she needed to partner with in pursuing her idea for Concordia Parish— its community garden. Morris, originally from Vidalia, had moved back home. One of her passions is gardening, so the two have become fast friends as if the stars were aligned for the two to meet and begin this exciting venture. Those in the Miss-Lou area interested in participating in the community garden can contact Terri Morris at 318-548-4357 to sign up. The plots are distributed on a firstcome-first-served basis, so get your name on the list now. The soil has been tested, plowed, and fertilized; and soon the ground will be ready for planting. Each individual will fence in his or her plot, water faucets are placed every 50 feet, and there will be rules and guidelines to follow. The bonus, though, in this community gardening experience is the sense of ownership and pride along with healthy bounty for the table that those involved will realize. Come join Morris and Cooper! Bring your sun hats, sun screen, gloves, and boots! And enjoy playing in the dirt! For information, email vidaliagarden@yahoo.com.


Molly Cooper and Terri Morris stand at the new site for the Vidalia Community Garden.

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Left: Roses from Magnolia Hall rose Garden in Natchez, Mississippi Above: Patricia Taylor examines some of the fragrant roses in the rose garden. Opposite Page: Roses are renowned for their fragrance and medicinal properties.

My Little Tome of

Rose

Treasures

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by Patricia Taylor


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hilst digging through a musty, second-hand book shop in a converted chapel near the coast in East Anglia, I came across a tiny book which contained some recipes using roses (Recipes for Roses, Jan Barnes). This little book is a collection of wonderful old recipes that come originally from the still rooms of homes in England from the sixteenth century to the Victorian era, some of which I thought would be fun to share with you. For thousands of years, the rose has served as a symbol of love, war, and secrets. Cleopatra apparently covered her floors knee deep with rose petals when she invited Antony to visit in the hope that the romantic powers of the roses’ perfume would help her gain his affection, and we all know where that led. As for war, during the Middle Ages in England, the Royal Houses of York and Lancaster fought for the right to the throne. The Royal House of York chose the white rose as its emblem, and the opposing Royal House of Lancaster chose the red rose. The ensuing conflict that raged between them is still known as the Wars of the Roses, and the rose is still the emblem of England today. It is also a symbol of secrets; and in years gone by, people were bribed with roses to keep these confidences. If a rose were hung over a table, it meant that all that was said and heard was to be a kept secret. The expression sub rosa, literally “under the rose,” means “in greatest confidence.” It is thought that this is why the plaster decoration in the centre of a ceiling, often around the lights, is known as a rose in England because the main table for eating or discussion would often be placed under a light hanging from the ceiling. Also for centuries, the rose has been renowned for its fragrance and medicinal properties. A peculiar connection exists between perfume and the reoccurrence of memories. We all have a favourite perfume that rockets us back to a happier time or place or evokes memories that we thought long forgotten. For me the rose is my trigger to childhood memories especially those of my grandmother, and just picking up this little book sent me whirling back to granny and her garden. I can see us now as we step out of her French doors into her garden. The summer heat is overwhelming, and it wraps itself around us; the sky, that glorious blue that only an English summer day can produce. I am wearing her old straw hat, and she has given me her large trugg to carry whilst she brings her secateurs taken from the drawer in the laundry room. As we make our way to her garden of roses, the air is heavy with their perfume; and I think this has to be my most favourite place in the world. I can still hear her saying, “Their perfume lifts the spirits and calms the heart.” And I ask her, “Do all roses have a lovely smell?” “Not all,” she says, “but I will only have the smelly ones in my garden; what is the point of all that beauty without the glory?” We spend our afternoon cutting blooms for vases indoors and trimming off the blown roses, the petals of which she keeps for drying. Even today, although I love all roses, for me those with a perfume are extra special. Included in my little book was a recipe that I remember making with my grandmother, using some of the rose petals we had dried on drying racks in the shade at the back of the house: Dry one pound of rose petals in the shade, or in a warm place inside; to this add cloves, caraway seeds, and allspice of each one ounce; pound in a mortar or grind in a mill dried salt, a quarter of a pound. Mix all together, and put the compound into little silk bags. We would use linen bags and then hang them in our closets or lay them in the linen drawers for their perfume. As they faded we would add a little rose oil to refresh them.

There are many recipes for potpourri; but to me roses are a must as the base, which is why I liked this next recipe so much: To a basin of dried, scented rose petals, add a handful of dried marjoram, lemon thyme, rosemary, and lavender flowers that have all been well dried, the rind of one lemon, and one orange dried and then powdered. Also, add six dried bay leaves, half an ounce of bruised cloves, a teaspoon of allspice, half an ounce of cinnamon, and a good pinch of sandalwood (It works just as well without this item.). Gather and dry the flowers and leaves all through the summer, adding any others one likes, but keeping the proportion of a basin of rose petals to a large handful of all the other ingredients put together. Store in a jar with a lid, but the jar need not be airtight. If like me, you have problems growing lavender in Natchez, try adding a few drops of lavender oil to the storage jar. Mix well together and stir occasionally. When summer has gone, place the potpourri in large bowls around your rooms, the smell is heavenly. Apart from its uses in perfumes and cosmetics, the rose can be traced back through centuries as a medicine. Herbalists often used them to treat bronchial infections, coughs, colds, influenza, chest complaints, nervous conditions, and lethargy, as well as to make creams and lotions for the skin. The Briar or Dog Rose, rosa canina, produces beautiful hips in the fall that are full of vitamin C and make a wonderful syrup that flavours drinks or serves as a base for cough syrup. The hips also make wonderful jams and jellies. Balmoral is the Scottish home of our monarch Queen Elizabeth; but during Queen Victoria’s reign, rose petal sandwiches were often served at tea time at this Scottish retreat. Tea time was an invention of Anna Russell the Duchess of Bedford (1783 –1857) and a great friend of Queen Victoria. Dinner, being served late, around 8:00 p.m. in middle and upper class households of the day, the Duchess would become hungry; so at around 4:00 p.m., she would drink Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 33


tea and eat little cakes and sandwiches to fill the gap. She would invite her friends to join her, and the tea-time meal quickly became an established part of everyday life and spread to most households. Even today, it is still an accepted custom which many follow. To make rose petal sandwiches, thinly cut your bread and remove the crusts and cut into small squares or triangles and butter the squares with warmed butter so as not to tear the bread. Select only crimson or other sweet smelling rose petals, and remove the white points found at the base of the petal. These can be sour to the taste. Given the pollution we all experience today, unless you can be absolutely sure of your source, I would be inclined first to gently wash the petals in a little cold running water and then lay them in a single layer on a piece of kitchen paper, gently patting dry, before using in your sandwiches. Arrange the rose petals on the slices of bread so that they can be seen to slightly overlap and hang a little over the edges of the bread squares. Top with a second piece of buttered bread. Try them and let me know how they taste. Let me get back to my little book of rose treasures. A great many recipes call for distilled rose water which, unless one has the proper equipment, is difficult to acquire. However my little book does offer other recipes that would be fun to try, especially An Excellent Water for the Head and for the Memory which appears to use up blown roses and other herbs that are probably past their best. Anyway here goes as it is written, I just love all this old English. When roses are blown, take a quart of good aquavitae in a glass with a narrow neck. When the roses are half blown, take a second handful and put them into the glass; and when the marjoram bloweth, take a handful of their buds, chop them small and put them into the glass. Take also cloves, nutmegs, cinnamon, mace, cardamom, of these an ounce and a half; bruise all these grossly and put them in the glass; and when the lavender and rosemary are blown, add a handful of these flowers also; shake them well together and stop it close; let it stand ten days in a hot sun: it must be used by anointing the temples and nostrils. (Recipe for Roses. Jan Barnes, Copper Beech Publishing, Sussex, England) Now this sounds like fun. Aquavitae of course is not readily available on the supermarket shelves these days, but aquavitae is an archaic name for a concentrated aqueous solution of ethanol. The term was widely used during the Middle Ages and was typically prepared by distilling wine. It was sometimes called spirits of wine in English texts, another name for brandy. The Scottish equivalent Page 34 { April 2012 { Bluffs & Bayous

of the water of life is uisge-beatha or usquebaugh, which is whisky, and is a distillation of grain rather than wine, so probably not what would be used here. Once made, how many of us, I wonder, would not be able to resist the temptation just to taste a little before we applied it to our temples for our memory? Amongst my favourites in this wonderful little book is a recipe for making rosary beads. What a lovely gift this would make to a special friend. As an approximate guide, one large rose will make about six average-size beads. The darker the rose petals, the darker the rosary beads will be. Gather the roses on a dry day, and chop the petals very finely. Put them in a saucepan, barely cover them with water, and heat for about an hour, but do not let the mixture boil. Repeat this process for three days, adding more water if necessary. It is important never to let the mixture boil, but each day warm it to a moderate heat. Make the beads by working the pulp with the fingers into balls. When thoroughly well worked and fairly dry, press onto a bodkin (large sewing needle) to make the holes in the centre of the beads. Until they are perfectly dry the beads have to be moved frequently on the bodkin or they will be difficult to remove without breaking them. One could make use of modern-day equipment, and place the cooked and strained rose petals in a blender. Keep the strained water so that a little can be added to the mixture if it becomes too dry, not too much, though; the mixture needs to be the consistency of clay. If desired, a mortar and pestle can be used instead of a blender to turn the rose petals into a pulp. Apparently, if you want a really dark bead, this can be achieved by cooking them in a rusty pan. The size of the bodkin can be altered depending upon the type of material you use to thread your beads. A very thin knitting needle will also work well and can be laid on top of cans of equal height with the beads suspended between them. This would give easy access for turning the drying beads regularly to prevent their sticking to the needle. Held for a few moments in a warm hand, these beads give out a pleasing fragrance; but a nice touch is to wipe the dried beads with a soft cloth that is moistened with a couple of drops of rose oil. The rose oil will give the beads a stronger rose scent and a shiny sheen. I hope you have enjoyed my random jottings; but before I go, let me just remind you of that old saying: Occasionally, we all need to take time out to “stop and smell the roses.�


Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 35


Natchez Festival of Music’s Twenty-second Season

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he Natchez Festival of Music is pleased to announce its Twentysecond Season and to invite you to enjoy and support its outstanding musical events. Organized in 1990, the Natchez Opera Festival, Inc., a 501(c)(3) corporation, has conducted a music festival during the month of May in Natchez, Mississippi, each year since 1991. In order to reflect the diversity of its presentations, since 2003 the Festival has functioned under the promotional name of the Natchez Festival of Music. Page 36 { April 2012 { Bluffs & Bayous

The mission of the Natchez Festival of Music is to enlighten and enrich the lives of the citizens of the greater Mississippi/ Louisiana region and neighboring areas by producing operas, operettas, Broadway musicals, jazz, recitals, and special concerts, and by providing educational outreach programs in music and the performing arts. Its vision is to be a driving force for cultural activity that attracts people from around the world to Natchez and Mississippi. The Festival has become the primary venue for high-quality, performing arts in southwest Mississippi and the neighboring

region of Louisiana, an area underserved in the arts. For each of the past twentyone years, the Festival has brought to Natchez as many as fifty highly trained, professional musicians, selected through auditions in New York and Natchez for their outstanding talent and personalities. The high quality of these artists, who are from all parts of the United States and other countries, is reflected in the reputation of the Festival for excellence and in the many special awards and recognitions which it has received. The Natchez Festival of Music serves the entire population in the area. The children’s opera is presented free to all kindergarten through sixth-grade students in the immediate Natchez area and is then presented to similar groups in surrounding areas, including Jefferson, Franklin, Walthall, Lincoln, Pike, and Wilkinson Counties in Mississippi and Concordia and Tensas Parishes in Louisiana. At least eighteen productions are available to the entire population throughout the year; approximately twenty or more presentations comprise an outreach program to nursing homes, neighboring communities, civic groups, churches, and others; and a number of performances and events are free. In 2001, Alcorn State University became a major sponsor of the Festival, thus creating a long-term relationship to transform the arts in southwest Mississippi. With the supported performances by the Alcorn Concert Choir and music students; master classes at Alcorn State University; inclusion of minority musical presentations, Broadway shows, and operas; and many free opportunities to enjoy the performances, the Festival has a strong commitment to addressing the entire population of the area and to being an inclusive and positive force for the cultural enrichment of the area. In March 2011, Dr. Jay Dean became the Artistic Director for the Festival. For over twenty-three years he has been in charge of the University of Southern Mississippi Symphony Orchestra and has brought some of the world’s most important international musical stars to Mississippi. Also serving as Artistic Director of Mississippi Opera and as Founding Artistic Director of Festival South, Dean brings a wealth of talent, knowledge, and connections to the Natchez Festival of Music. With his leadership, the Festival continues to expand its sphere of influence to a wider part of Mississippi


and the South and to positively impact the quality of life in the area. The Festival has received the Governor’s Award of Excellence in the Arts in Opera and Music Education, has been listed as one of the Top Twenty Events in the Southeastern United States,

has been recognized for artistic excellence in Opera News, and has received national acclaim and recognition because of its high degree of excellence. View the exciting month of Magnificent Music in May on their website to select your performances, workshops and social

venues. Visit Natchez, Mississippi, and enjoy performances in some of the South’s most stately antebellum properties. Enjoy the delightful bed-and-breakfast venues, shopping, dining and entertainment that this historic town on the Mighty Mississippi has to offer.

Natchez Festival of Music Upcoming Events 2012

Sunday-Saturday The Romantic Music of Natchez April 8-14 Outstanding Festival Singers and Instrumentalists Trinity Episcopal Church, 305 South Commerce Street 8:00 p.m.; $15

Saturday The Sound of the Mighty Calliope May 12 A Family Fun Concert Burnley Cook Memorial Park, Corner of Main and South Rankin Streets 3:00 p.m.; free

April 16-27 The Three Little Pigs Children’s opera presented free to schools in Natchez and the surrounding areas for grades K-6, with music by Mozart

Saturday Dancing in the Park May 12 Natchez High Show Choir and Robert Lewis Middle School Choir Memorial Park, Corner of Main and South Rankin Streets 4:00 p.m.; free

Saturday Swingin’ Blues: An Evening with the One O’clock Lab Band May 5 World Famous University of North Texas One O’clock Lab Band Margaret Martin Performing Arts Center, 64 Homochitto Street 7:00 p.m.; $20 Sunday A Hungarian Rhapsody May 6 Featuring Jonathan Levin as Franz Liszt Trinity Episcopal Church, 305 South Commerce Street 4:00 p.m.; $15 Friday A Night of Romance in the Salon May 11 Julia Mortyakova Waverly Plantation, 790 Highway 61 South 7:00 p.m.; $15

Saturday The Mikado by Gilbert and Sullivan May 12 Natchez Festival of Music Opera Margaret Martin Performing Arts Center, 64 Homochitto Street 7:00 p.m.; $25 Sunday The Glorious Sound of Brass May 13 Music for Trumpet and Organ Jason Bergman and Vincent Bache Trinity Episcopal Church, 305 South Commerce Street 4:00 p.m.; $15 Friday The Voice of a Nightingale: An Evening with Jenny Lind May 18 Kristin Vogel, soprano Stanton Hall, 401 High Street 7:00 p.m.; $15

Saturday A Portrait of Elegance: Orchestral Music of Mozart and Haydn May 19 Natchez Festival of Music Chamber Orchestra Margaret Martin Performing Arts Center, 64 Homochitto Street 7:00 p.m.; $20 Sunday A Musical Wine Tasting May 20 Kimberly Houser, Harpist Lansdowne Plantation, 17 Marshall Road 4:00 p.m.; $30 Friday Night and Day: An Evening with Cole Porter May 25 Maryann Kyle and James Martin The Towers, 801 Myrtle Avenue 7:00 p.m.; $100 Saturday Don Giovanni by Mozart May 26 Natchez Festival of Music Opera Margaret Martin Performing Arts Center, 64 Homochitto Street 7:00 p.m.; $25 Saturday Final Festival Gala May 26 Linden, 1 Linden Place 10:00 - Midnight; $20 For tickets and other information, check www.natchezfestivalofmusic.com or phone 601-446-8280. Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 37


Wedding Party: Paula Bedson, Wesley Givens, Amy Anding, Jamison Anding, Victoria Anding, Raegan Anding, Garret Anding, Patrick Hall, Keelie Hall, Charles Anding, and Alexandria Rose

Freeman and Anding Wedding

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On December 10, 2011, Raegan Michele Freeman and Garret Paxton Anding were united in marriage at Brandon Hall Plantation near Natchez, Mississippi, with Brother Thomas Tapley of McNeely Road Church of God in Natchez officiating. The bride is the daughter of Terry and Renee Freeman of Baton Rouge, Louisiana. She is the granddaughter of the late Harry Terry, the late Shirley Terry Skinner, and William Skinner all of Natchez, and Flavius and the late Adelaide Holder Freeman, also of Natchez. The groom is the son of Charles and Denise Anding of Natchez and the grandson of David and Barbara Holland and George and Willie Mae Anding, all of Natchez. The ceremony was in the home’s main hall. The bride, given in marriage by her father, wore a full ball gown in ivory Regal Satin that featured a heavily beaded sweetheart neckline and strapless bodice with beaded Basque waistline. The full skirt was accented with embroidered, beaded pickups and draped into a semi-cathedral train. Her two-tier illusion veil was edged with silk ribbon and accented with pearls and Swarovski crystals; and she carried a bouquet of mini calla lilies and white and red roses, wrapped in pearls and featuring a blue bracelet made of charms from her grandmother’s employment at South Central Bell. Alexandria Rose of Baton Rouge served as the maid of honor; and bridesmaids were Paula Bedson of Bogue Chitto, Mississippi; Keelie Hall of Vidalia, Louisiana; and Amy Anding of Laurel, Mississippi. The bridesmaids all wore platinum chiffon gowns with a rushed bodice, featuring a strapless sweetheart Charles Anding, Victoria neckline and pleated, full-length Anding, Garret Anding, and skirt. The maid of honor’s dress was Denise Anding accented with a red ribbon at the waist.


Top left—Cake topper Top right—Victoria Anding Middle—Denise Anding, Raegan and Garret Anding, and Renee Freeman Bottom—Renee Freeman, Raegan Anding, and Terry Freeman

The attendants carried bouquets of white roses with red berries. Victoria Anding, flower girl and daughter of the groom, wore a floor-length satin dress with organza overlay and red satin trim and carried a pomander of white flowers. Charles Anding, father of the groom, served as best man. Groomsmen were Wesley Givens of Natchez, Patrick Hall of Vidalia, and Jamison Anding of Laurel. Glenn Hall and Wesley Mohon served as ushers. Following the ceremony was a reception at Brandon Hall’s new Crystal Ballroom. The three-tiered wedding cake, crafted by Edna’s Cake Creations of Natchez, featured white scrollwork piping and black ribbons with red roses between the tiers and was topped with a cursive A. Displayed with the cake were the bride’s parents’ and grandparents’ cake toppers. The groom’s cake, designed and crafted by Angela France of Natchez, featured three motorcycles and the Harley Davidson logo with the bride’s and groom’s names and the date. Guests were invited to participate in an old-fashioned photo booth with props and costumes provided by Mississippi Photo Booths. The pictures were added to a scrapbook filled with best wishes from the guests. Flowers for the ceremony were provided by Natchez florists Ja’Nel’s and the Flower Station. Elizabeth Renee Portraits captured lasting memories of the couple’s journey through their engagement and into marriage. The wedding was planned by the bride and her mother with special assistance from Debbie Garcia of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Vincent Milligan of Baton Rouge; and wedding director Rachel Garber of Brandon Hall Plantation. The couple departed the reception through the two-tiered garden while wedding guests showered them with bubbles. After a honeymoon trip to Disney World, Mr. and Mrs. Anding now reside in Vidalia.  Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 39


THE social SCENE | Natchez, MS | Wedding Shower for Sarah Wisner and Zack Calhoun

Wedding Shower for Sarah Wisner and Zack Calhoun Family and friends gathered February 4, 2012, to celebrate the engagement of Sarah Wisner and Zack Calhoun at a MardiGras-themed couples shower. Attendants of the bride-to-be hosted the event that was held at historic Brandon Hall in Natchez, Mississippi. Guests enjoyed Mardi Gras music and New Orleans-themed hors d’oeuvres. The honorees will be married on April 28 in Natchez.

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Sarah Wisner and Zack Calhoun Caroline Edwards, Whitney Dollar, and Brittany Laird Mandy Wisner, Sarah Wisner, and Glenn Wisner Phillip Edit, Patrick Vogt, and Chris Rasco Rachel Garber, Whitney Dollar, Caroline Edwards, Brittany Laird, Sarah Wisner, Emily Stevens, Mattie Geoghegan, Mary Beth Aubic, and Elizabeth Wisner Brittany Laird, Gene Laird, Abby Laird, and Laura Laird Front—Mattie Geoghegan, Emily Stevens, Brittany Laird, and Abby Laird; back—Caroline Edwards

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Wedding Shower for Sarah Wisner and Zack Calhoun | Natchez, MS | THE social SCENE

10 Zack Calhoun, Daniel Gasquet, 11

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and Joseph Davis Sarah Wisner, Lauren Lucas, Carla Jenkins, and Bettye Jenkins

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THE social SCENE | Natchez, MS | Natchez Regional Medical Center Benefit

Natchez Regional Medical Center Benefit The Healthcare Foundation of Natchez Regional Medical Center and The Castle Restaurant at Dunleith Plantation held Dining A La Heart on Tuesday, February 28. A three-course, heart-healthy dinner was served, followed by a live auction featuring Natchez’s own Rusty Jenkins as auctioneer. All proceeds benefited the Renovation Project for the ICU/CCU Waiting Area at NRMC.

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4 Frances Cothren, Tim Sessions, and Agnes Holloway Brad and Sherri LeMay Margaret Perkins, Rene Adams, and Marie Perkins Agnes Holloway and Marie Perkins Brad LeMay, Kay Ketchings, and John Holyoak

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Natchez Regional Medical Center Benefit | Natchez, MS | THE social SCENE

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Michael, Mary, Joey, and Louis Gunning Kathy and Rawdon Blankenstein with John Holyoak Margaret Green, Barrett Nobile, and Lindsay and Will Devening Kathy Killelea Sizemore, Patty Killelea Willard, and Katherine Killelea

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THE social SCENE | Vicksburg, MS | Team Member Recognition Banquet

Team Member Recognition Banquet On February 13, Ameristar Casino Hotel Vicksburg in Vicksburg, Mississippi, announced the following team award winners during the company’s annual Team Member Recognition Banquet held in the Bottleneck Blues Bar: Mary Moffett, Team Member of the Year; Steven Jones, Part-time Team Member of the Year; Kelvin Mays, Team Leader of the Year; Michael Martin and Jessie Gathrite, Team Member of the Year finalists; and Leon Pugh, Craig H. Neilsen Award nominee. Team members were entertained during the event by their colleagues who posed as actors from various classic sitcoms like Sanford and Son, I Love Lucy, and The Andy Griffith Show.

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Annie Jenkins and Lori Burke Chef James Shields and Chef Stan Taylor Cheryl Roland (Lucy) and Chef Louis Herrera (Ricky Ricardo) Larry Hodges and Mary Moffett Stewart Sasser (Andy Griffith) and William White (Barney Fife) Wandell James and Mary Moffett Laura Wilson, Quinton Mims, and Paul Burke Derek Adams, Dean Miniacci, Bryan Curtis, and Michael House

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KDMC Prostatectomy Full Page magazine revised Final for Pub.indd 1

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Honey Brake Lodge at Louisiana Delta Plantation

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t was a breezy February day when Alma Womack and I drove out to Honey Brake Lodge, located on the 40,000-acre Louisiana Delta Plantation and nestled on the banks of Larto Lake in Catahoula Parish, Louisiana. Alma had sent an email several months back saying this place was worth the trip over and certainly one to consider for a story to share with the Bluffs & Bayous readers. So we set the date; and what a warm, breezy, and partly cloudy kind of day it was—perfect day for a lodge outing. As we drove over, Alma briefed me about Louisiana Delta Plantation and its history.

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In September 2005, M. J. Farms purchased 28,000-plus acres of land that was part of Louisiana Delta Plantation, the largest rowcropped farm in the United States, consisting of nearly 100,000 acres. The original farm was cleared from southern forests in the mid-1960s by the Morrison family, who were headquartered in Nebraska. In 1995, the farm was broken up and began to be sold off. In 1997, an investment group in Chicago, Illinois, bought the north portion of the farm, more than 45,000 acres. The purchase of the 28,000-plus acres by M. J. Farms from the Chicago Group included 25,000 Farm Security Association (FSA) acres, office headquarters, shop and fenced yard area, superintendent’s residence, drier and elevator, 10 equipment sheds, 19 center pivots, and 6,400 acres of precision leveled land along with 130 water wells and many drainage and water-control structures. Also with this purchase, came the use of the name Louisiana Delta Plantation as well as the expert and enthusiastic staff that manage

the farming and maintenance operations. M. J Farms has a vision of making Louisiana Delta Plantation a model farm over the next few years. Louisiana Delta Plantation is located approximately 15 miles south of Jonesville, Louisiana, on Highway 124, 30 miles northeast of Alexandria, Louisiana, and 30 miles west of Natchez, Mississippi. It is adjacent to one of the largest Wildlife Management Areas (WMA) in the South, the Dewey Wills WMA that is adjacent to Catahoula Lake, famous for its duck hunting. It is also adjacent to Larto Lake on the south side, a beautiful and secluded hunting and recreation area. The southern border of the farm is the Diversion Canal connecting Catahoula Lake and the Black River. Just to the east is the Black River, which joins the Red River and eventually flows into the Mississippi River and Atchafalaya River via the Old River Control Structure. As its website attests, Honey Brake offers the avid outdoorsman a unique array of

Top—Honey Brake Lodge owners and staff: Drew Keeth; Paul Ferrell; Jared Mophett; Ron Johnson, owner; Sandy Spann; and Michael Johnson, owner

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outdoor recreational opportunities all on one property. From world-class waterfowl hunting, and big game and predator hunting to fishing, sporting clays, and eco tours for the bird watching enthusiast, Honey Brake has it all. With professional hunting and fishing guides, accredited retrievers, and state-of-the-art equipment, you are sure to have a once-in-alifetime experience there. Honey Brake’s main lodge, a 13,000-squarefoot area that is four floors high, is a site to behold. Owners and brothers Ron Johnson and Mike Johnson have made this lodge a majestic site, towering over the Red Oaks and Cypress trees on the banks of scenic Larto Lake. With two executive suites on the upper floors, stateof-the-art kitchen, dining room, and “The Grand Room” that features a centerpiece fireplace, luxury and elegance abound. The ground floor houses an outdoor kitchen with fireplace, lockers, and an impressive entrance way. The library there treats readers to both educational and entertaining information with an emphasis on nature and the outdoors. Throughout the lodge, Page 50 { April 2012 { Bluffs & Bayous

art work abounds with sculptures, fowl carvings, paintings, and prints, all complementing the landscape of the area. Furnishings at the lodge include many one-of-a-kind and antique pieces, and a spiral staircase with a handmade custom banister highlights the unique craftsmanship of this getaway. Honey Brake lodging consist of three elevated 1,800 square-foot, duplex cabins. Each duplex will sleep three guests comfortably and has a custom tile shower, flat panel TV with satellite channels, a back porch to enjoy the view of Larto Lake and the surrounding wooded area, and an elevated walkway connecting to the main lodge. WI-FI is available in each cabin as well. Paul Ferrell, resident Lodge Manager, proudly gave us the tour of quarters that are far more enticing than your typical hunting lodge. Honey Brake General Manager Drew Keeth also heads the hunting and fishing activities at the lodge, assisted by hunting guide Jared Mophett, the voice of the weekly television show “The Honey Brake Experience”; and Sandy Spann as the camp’s cook keeps visitors coming back


again and again for her ‘best-of-camp cuisine.’ All these congenial staff members reflect what must be the inherent mission of the Johnson brothers’ Honey Brake— an over-the-top experience with all the conveniences, pleasures, and opportunities to accompany it. This camping lodge haven will soon offer a shop for hunting equipment rental, meeting facility and accommodations for social venues, including family reunions, weddings, corporate meetings, and family holiday gatherings in addition to the lodge’s popular guided hunting and fishing expeditions. For more information about Honey Brake visit www.honeybrake.com for photographs and the latest update on activities there. And take its advice: Some things in life you just have to experience for yourself…come join us for the Honey Brake Experience!

Hear What People Are Saying! Letter to Bluffs’ and to Ellis Nassour, Contributing Writer: We have copies of the article about Klondyke that appears in the March 2012 Bluffs & Bayous, and the response has been incredible. People who have lived in Vicksburg their whole lives but have never made it to the Klondyke are dropping by to sample our wares. The Washington Post article was nice, but it is the Bluffs & Bayous article that is driving them in. The locals who have read the article in Bluffs all comment on what a great article it is and how they didn’t realize several of the historic facts you expressed. They also didn’t realize the Klondyke has grown into the business it is now. This coverage has been an incredible blessing for us due to your skill with words. Bluffs has given us permission to use the article for marketing our restaurant. Our plan is to take the pdf of it to the printer and have them format it so we can add a map and address information to place in tourist racks around town. We wouldn’t feel comfortable doing that, Ellis, without your blessing as well. Of course we will credit you, your brother, and Bluffs as the source in all of the inserts. Tourists are looking for history and a unique southern experience. The picture you’ve painted of the Klondyke fits that need rather nicely. If need be, we will come to NY to personally cook up some chicken for you! David and Rhonda Day Klondyke Owners

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THE social SCENE | Natchez, MS

THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS

Chaplain Wayne Spencer—or “Pastor” as he is known to many—received the first annual Camellia Hospice of the Miss Lou Hospice Heart Award. He is a man who is never too busy to lend a helping hand or a listening ear. Along with his fellow team members at Camellia Hospice, he has touched many patients and their families through his dedication to his ministry and his commitment to serve. Pastor Spencer and his wife Cheryl live in Natchez where he retired from Parkway Baptist Church. He serves as Chaplain for both the Natchez and Camellia Hospice offices.

The Annual Camellia Society Show held its yearly gathering February 4 and 5 at the Brookhaven, Mississippi, Recreation Department. It was the largest show so far with over 2,500 blooms entered. Last year, the show featured half that number of blooms, probably due to a mild winter. Entries were brought from Texas to the east coast.

Hospice Heart Award Brookhaven Camellia Society Show

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Southern Sampler

A

written by Alma M. Womack

Sundry Thoughts on Easter Season

pril is one of my favorite months. The arrival of spring with all its intense color and fragrances in the plant world make it a month hard to ignore—so much beauty around us, so many pleasing activities outside to make us thankful to have survived another winter. April is overload month when it comes to setting out the new annuals and perennials, and it is a month of great optimism. Birthdays have taught me to plan a little better with all those beautiful spring

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bedding plants, for they all need care throughout their growing season. After last year’s horrendous drought and heat, I am a bit leery about planting lots of extras this year. But, I tell myself, this is a different year, and all those blooming plants at Badge’s Nursery up the road will be calling my name before much longer. Planning is the key. Easter is April 8 this year; and though the rabbits and eggs and chocolates have tried to dominate the holiday for us, we

Christians know that the Easter holiday, celebrating the resurrection of Christ, is the most sacred on our yearly calendar. I don’t remember if I’ve ever done a column for Bluffs and Bayous on the reason for rabbits and eggs in our Christian celebration or not, but I have written on this before, trying to explain the connection. The early church fathers incorporated pagan celebrations with Christian celebratory occasions to win over the populace to the new religion, back in the


day. They had learned that the old religion’s being mixed in with Christianity made it more palatable to the masses and much more likely to be accepted without a fuss. Oestre was a goddess of spring and rebirth, eggs were a symbol of fertility and life, and Christ’s resurrection was Christianity’s own celebration of eternal life. So these early church fathers thought why not combine the three if it meant that people, having some of their old ways tagging along, would begin to better understand the importance of the resurrection. Now, understand this, all you theologians and historians out there who may scoff at my humble words: this is just a synopsis in laymen’s terms of what happened. There are very enlightening, learned works on the early pagan religions and their introductions to and confrontations with Christianity. If a person is interested, he can look up these articles and books and become more educated about the beginnings of Christianity as it spread westward across Europe. Two non-religious traditions in the South about Easter are embedded in my mind, and no amount of modernity can change them. One is the rule about white shoes and white dresses: under no circumstance can a person wear a white dress (except a bride) or white shoes before Easter Sunday. It is not done. Period. Anyone who breaks the rule is lacking in training in social mores and will be looked upon as a heathen. I did not make this rule, but it was placed in my head at any early age. No white shoes before Easter meant no white shoes. I have no idea why it was so taboo, but it definitely was. Notice I am typing “was” because the masses break this rule all the time now; and when I see them walking around in white shoes before Easter, I know that they did not have a mama and grandmothers like mine. The other not-before-Easter tradition concerned going barefoot. As little children, we longed for the day when we could shuck our shoes and run in the grass as barefoot as our pagan ancestors did (the ones who believed in Oestre and eggs, etc.). But you didn’t dare take those shoes off before Easter, or you would catch pneumonia or something equally potentially fatal. Even if Easter was in March and the wind chill put the temperature in the 40s, we were going to go barefoot that afternoon, just because it was safe and legal to do so.

I can remember Mama warning us on warm spring, pre-Easter days, not to take off those shoes; and if we did, she would know. We would get out of her range, take our shoes and socks off, play in the abundant clover, and then re-cover our feet before going home. Our little-children minds did not realize that she wasn’t relying on distance vision, but on evidence presented up close. When bath time came, three barefoot children would have green stained feet, a dead giveaway to our disobedience. To keep us from catching pneumonia, we would have to drink some dreadful dose of something that almost made it not worth going barefoot again when we got a chance. None of us ever got pneumonia for our disobedience, but the lectures and medicine were almost as bad. This barefoot rule must not be in effect anymore, either, for I have seen barefoot people in town before Easter is even thought of. I figured that they must have been making a rebellious statement of some sort to go barefoot on the germy, nasty streets of town. You know, the “look

at me I am such an unconventional rebel” sort. While I might go barefoot in my house before getting out for the day, I don’t go barefoot outside at all, either before or after Easter, with one exception. A patch of clover is still irresistible. That cool, green, lovely plant just feels so good against bare skin that it’s hard to ignore even now, decades after being put on a going-barefoot schedule by Mama and Mimi. A blessed Easter to all of our readers. As you thank God for your blessings, remember to pray for our young soldiers in distant lands, who protect our freedoms with their very lives. And please pray for our country, too, as it continues to face major problems of joblessness, run-away spending, energy, health care, and national defense along with ineffective leadership in dealing with these problems. May God protect us from our own.

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THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | Lincoln County Republican Party' s Fiftieth Anniversary

Lincoln County Republican Party's Fiftieth Anniversary Mr. Jimmy Moreton of Brookhaven, Mississippi, was honored during the Fiftieth Anniversary of the Lincoln County Republican Party in Brookhaven. Moreton was instrumental in establishing the organization in Lincoln County. The celebration was held at the home of Kathy Behan in mid-January. Special guests were Congressman Gregg Harper and his wife Sidney.

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Betty Ann Perkins and Margaret Ann Perkins Bill Boerner and Gerald Williams Carlianne Alderman and Lizzie Mooney Jim Elliott and Mike Smith Constance Cowart and Beverly Britt Cindy Moore and Bill Sones Holly Gardner and Clint Gardner John Roberts and Brad Boerner Carlene Stribling, Floy Mathis, and Doris Panzica Josh Smith, Don Perkins, and Dennis Valentine

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THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | Lincoln County Republican Party' s Fiftieth Anniversary

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Martha Ann Peeples and Carlene Stribling 15 Mayor Les Bumgarner and Kathy Behan 17 Merrie Boerner and Betty Ann Perkins 18 Mignon McKennon and Jim McKennon 19 Peter Swalm and Sha Walker 20 Richard and Claudia Smith 21 Russ Hightower and Chester Burnam 22 Alison Becker Green, Karen Braden, and Betty Dixon 23 Kathy Moreton St. John, Jimmy Moreton, and Senator Sally Doty 24 Tara Lacey, Carole Bennett, and Mimi Zeini 25 Mimi Zeini, Tara Lacey, Diane Newman, and Tiffany Furr

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Currie, Johnny Perkins, and Margaret Ann Perkins 27 Bruce Currie, Representative Becky Currie, Theresia Perkins, and Don Perkins 28 Karen Braden, Dr. Nic Belk, and Ansley Braden 29 Diane Newman, Dudley Lampton, and John Roberts 30 Helen Lynch, Johnny Lynch, and Pat Jacobs 31 Shirley Estes, Melinda Said, and Mike Said 32 Sidney Harper, Congressman Gregg Harper, and Dave Pace 33 Carol Burgess, Johanna Blair, and Suzanne Sharpe

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THE social SCENE | Vicksburg, MS | River Region Medical Center' s Tenth Anniversary

River Region Medical Center' s Tenth Anniversary The Vicksburg-Warren County Chamber of Commerce held its Business After Hours February 9, 2012, at River Region Medical Center in Vicksburg, Mississippi. The event honored River Region Medical Center on its Tenth Anniversary.

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Southern Sampler

written by Johnny Bowlin

Rickwood Conference Recap “The one constant through all the years, Ray, has been baseball. America has rolled by like an army of steamrollers. It’s been erased like a blackboard, rebuilt, and erased again. But baseball has marked the time. This field, this game, is a part of our past, Ray. It reminds us of all that once was good, and it could be again. Ohhhhhhhh, people will come, Ray. People will most definitely come.”—James Earl Jones as Terrence Mann in the movie Field of Dreams

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I

love baseball. It has been a passion of mine since childhood. I grew up watching the Cubs on WGN and the Braves on WTBS as cable was coming into our lives. I started pulling for the Cleveland Indians (I know—64 years since the last title.) as a teenager. I love the sport not for the action on the field but for the history of the game. I am a self-professed history nerd so baseball with its history has been a natural marriage.

A place that’s unsurpassed in reflecting the history of this great game is in my hometown of Birmingham, Alabama, at Rickwood Field. I grew up going to Rickwood as a child. Rickwood Field was built 1910 and is the oldest baseball stadium in the country. Its history reads like a trip to Cooperstown. Baseball legends such as Shoeless Joe Jackson with the New Orleans Pelicans played there. Bath Ruth played there when the Yankees played exhibition games on their way back to New York after spring training in Florida. Willie Mays grew up near the park and played there as a teenager for the Black Birmingham Barons. A young and cocky Dizzy Dean, pitching for the Houston Buffalos, faced 43-yearold grandfather Ray Caldwell for the home standing Barons in the Dixie Series. The most famous player I saw play there was the great Bo Jackson who came with the Memphis Chicks on his way to starting his career in Kansas City. The Barons played there last as the full-time tenant in 1987 and then moved to Hoover, Alabama. In those days after the Barons left, the fate of the old park looked bleak until a group of concerned citizens formed the Friends of Rickwood. These guys have performed a labor of love for over 20 years to keep the park alive with funds and blood, sweat, and tears. The grand old park today hosts high school and college games; and this year, the Barons host the Seventeenth Annual Rickwood Classic, usually played at the


end of May, as a turn-back-the-clock day game with retro uniforms. I joined the Friends in 2006 and learned about the Southern Association Baseball Conference that existed from 1901-1961 with teams such as the Atlanta Crackers, Little Rock Travelers (now the Arkansas Travelers), Birmingham Barons (still in existence), New Orleans Pelicans, Chattanooga Lookouts (still in existence), Nashville Vols, Mobile Bears (now the Baybears), Knoxville Smokies (now the Tennessee Smokies), Macon Peaches, Montgomery Rebels, Selma Christians (yes, the real nickname), Shreveport Sports (still in existence), and Memphis Chicks. I had the privilege on March 3 of attending the Ninth Annual Southern Association Baseball Conference. This year’s theme was Southern Association Ballparks. Gracie and I left Friday morning, March 2, from downtown Meadville, Mississippi, to make the trip. Let me make a quick recommendation for a really satisfying meal if you are in metro Birmingham. Go visit a Milo’s Hamburger, a famous eatery in Birmingham with one of the most unique burgers you will ever try. We stop there twice in two days when we’re in town. I hope my physician here in Meadville missed that line, but the food is great. I transport their pies across state lines for Mrs. Bowlin. Saturday morning was beautiful, crisp morning after a night of thunderstorms. It is always a thrill to visit Rickwood and the Friends of Rickwood do a fantastic job of making you feel at home. There is such a great spirit of fellowship among the conference attendees. Folks come from Nashville, New Orleans, Atlanta, Knoxville, and Mobile for this conference. The keynote speakers do an amazing job of presenting their information using power point along with physical displays. My favorite presentation was that of Skip Nipper from Nashville, Tennessee, who showed a rare color film from 1942 of the Nashville Vols playing a doubleheader against the New York Yankees. It was incredible footage with Joltin’ Joe back to life. The most touching presentation came from Dan Creed of Chattanooga, Tennessee, as he discussed “Chattanooga’s Engel Stadium: Heyday to No Play.” You could tell the deep concern that Creed has for the current condition of the stadium. It

may well face a wrecking ball in the future, and we would lose an historical treasure. Another fun aspect of the conference is the appearance of retired Southern Association players who speak at lunch. It is fun to see these guys light up when talking about their playing days at Rickwood Field and in minor league baseball. Wishing time would stand still as it speeds by, I think the quickest day in my year comes at the Rickwood conference. Already, I am looking forward to next year’s meeting. If you are interested in Rickwood, visit www.rickwood.com. If you want a great book on Rickwood’s history, check out Allen Barra’s Rickwood Field: A Century in America’s Oldest Ballpark. Some other websites of interest related to the Southern Association are Derby Gisclair’s www.neworleansbaseball.com and www. southernassociationbaseball.com, Skip Nipper’s website is www.sulphurdell.com, and www.engelfoundation.com.

SOUTHWES T MISSISSIPPI COMMUNITY COLLEGE PRESENTS

THE SPRING STAGE BA N D S H OW DIRECTED BY SHELTON WHITTINGTON

April 12, 13, 14 at 7:00 pm Hurst Auditorium Friday, April 13 matinee performance at 2:00 pm

in the Fine Arts Building

SOUTHWEST MISSISSIPPI COMMUNITY COLLEGE SUMMIT, MS Southwest Mississippi Community College does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, sex, religion, or disability in its programs, activities or employment practices. The following persons have been designated to handle inquiries and grievances regarding the non-discrimination policies: Freya Biggers, ADA and OCR Coordinator, SMCC, 601-276-3885; Bill Ashley, Vice President of Student Affairs, 601-276-3717, College Drive, Summit, MS 39666.

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APRIL up

& coming! Premier Events April 17 - 19 Garden Clubs of Mississippi State Convention Vicksburg, Mississippi Vicksburg, Mississippi, will host the eighty-third Annual State Convention of the Garden Clubs of Mississippi, Inc., from April 17 to April 19. Wednesday’s schedule will begin at 9:00 a.m. with a business meeting, followed by an Awards Luncheon and afternoon tours of Bazinsky House, Linden Plantation & Gardens, the Downtown Rose Garden, Audubon Garden, and Riverfront Murals & Art Park. The evening will end with a Flower Show Awards Dinner and Program by the Mississippi Flower Show Judges Council. Thursday’s agenda will include interesting programs such as “Conservation of the Bottomland Hardwood Forest Habitats of the Lower Mississippi River Alluvial Valley” and “Landscape Design and Maintenance in a Historic City.” Vicksburg has been named Mississippi’s Number One Day Trip and is the perfect spot for for convention-goers to enjoy the town’s unique shops and museums. For more information, visit www.msclubs.esiteasp.com/ mississippi/welcome.nxg

April 22 Serenade in the Cemetery Natchez City Cemetery Natchez, Mississippi The first annual Serenade in the Cemetery will take place Sunday, April 22, from 1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. in the beautiful Natchez City Cemetery. Stroll through the meticulously landscaped grounds of this centuries-old cemetery and listen to the fascinating and often tragic tales of some its most colorful “residents.” Enjoy the music of Father Walton and the Funky Friars, the Last Band Standing, and Sylvia Johns-Ritchie while sampling complimentary refreshments. Admire the spectacular flower arrangements of internationally known designer John Grady Burns, who will be on hand to autograph his best-selling floral design books. Be sure to take home one of our newly released cemetery driving/walking tour CDs and a “Serenade” T-shirt—and don’t forget to place an order for a fresh evergreen wreath to be placed at your family gravesite during the Christmas holidays. Shuttle service will be provided from the Natchez Little Theater parking lot at 319 Linton Avenue; limited parking will be available at the cemetery (2 Cemetery Road). Tickets are $15 each. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit the Natchez Visitor Center, 640 South Canal Street, or call 800-647-6724 or 601-446-6345. April 28 Symphony of Home & Garden Tours Natchez Garden Club Natchez, Mississippi Once again, the Natchez Garden Club presents its annual Symphony of Home & Garden Tours. This elegant tour affords a glimpse through front doors and into private gardens in beautiful Natchez, Mississippi. This year’s tour will feature more contemporary venues than the mansions and grounds toured in the past. With both a morning and an afternoon tour of unique locales, this event offers something for everyone in the family. The morning tour from 9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. will feature Sunset View Cottage, Rosehill Cottage, and The Depot Condos. Creative Exteriors will offer a landscape display in the courtyard of The Canal Street Depot during the morning tour. Lunch awaits tour participants on the galleries and within the main-floor rooms of Magnolia Hall and will be served from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The afternoon tour from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. includes the home of Bob and Fay Weatherly in Woodhaven Subdivision, as well as the homes of Dick Thompson and Evelyn Fairbanks, Tom and Ginger Schwager, and Richard and Katie Grace Edgin, all located in the Beau Pré Country Club area. An all-inclusive experience, this life-styles tour takes you from seeing a modern golf course to the last grand antebellum mansion built in Natchez. Tour tickets are available for individuals or groups through the Natchez Garden Club office, 215 South Pearl Street, 601-443-9065, ntzgardenclub@bellsouth.net, www.natchezgardenclub.com or through Natchez Pilgrimage Tours, 601-446-6631, 640 South Canal Street, www.natchezpilgrimage.com Page 66 { April 2012 { Bluffs & Bayous


Premier Events up

& coming! APRIL

April 28 Annual Party for Preservation: An Evening at The Cedars Natchez Garden Club Natchez, Mississippi The Annual Party for Preservation, sponsored by The Natchez Garden Club, is scheduled this year in conjunction with The Symphony of Home & Garden Tours on Saturday, April 28. Following the day-long tour, the Annual Party for Preservation will be held from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. at The Cedars, the home of David and Betty Paradise located on River Road in Church Hill, Mississippi. Sponsors, guests, and the public are invited to attend this benefit for the non-profit Preservation Society of Ellicott Hill, whose purpose is to assist The Natchez Garden Club in the preservation of their properties. The Party for Preservation serves as an annual benefit for the sole purpose of restoring the club’s properties, including antebellum Magnolia Hall, which recently kicked off its capital campaign for restoration. Guests at this dress-casual cocktail party will enjoy musical entertainment by Alvin Shelby and The Divas, a new jazzy musical group for entertaining all ages, along with the amenities of a cash bar and heavy hors d’oeuvres. The setting is one of the area’s most remarkable gardens, the perfect setting for such an entertaining evening. Guests will be able to stroll throughout the manicured grounds as they view the sun’s slow descent in the west. Join us for this extraordinary evening—bask in the beautiful countryside, enjoy the intriguing music and delectable food, and preserve one of Natchez’s historic grandams, Magnolia Hall. Tickets at $50.00 each are available in advance or at the door. Sponsorships are available for businesses or individuals: Platinum $1,000, Gold $750, Silver $500, Bronze $250. For sponsorships and tickets, contact The Natchez Garden Club office 601-443-9065, ntzgardenclub@bellsouth.net or Chairperson Cheryl Rinehart, cherylrinehart25@gmail.com. For tickets only, contact Natchez Pilgrimage Tours 601-446-6631, www.natchezpilgrimage.com, 640 South Canal Street in the Natchez Visitors Center by the river. May 1 - 4 2012 Southern Region Master Gardener Conference Natchez, Mississippi The Mississippi Master Gardener Association and Mississippi State University Extension Service will host the 2012 Southern Region Master Gardener Conference May 1 through 4 in historic Natchez, Mississippi. The conference combines presentations and workshops and will be held at the Natchez Convention Center in downtown Natchez. Day one includes registration, bus excursions to private and public gardens, and time to explore Natchez. The next two days include a program packed with keynote presentations, workshops, walking tours, gardening forums, and a silent auction. Keynote speakers feature Gestalt Gardener Felder Rushing; landscape architect Rick Griffin; and horticultural experts and innovators Dave Shanklin; Stanley wise, Jr.; Nicholas Staddon; and Robert “Buddy” Lee. The conference has a registration fee of $205 that may be paid online by April 15. For more information, visit www.msucares.com/srmg. May 2 - 3 Gardeners Expo Natchez, Mississippi The Gardeners Expo set for May 2 and May 3 will provide two days of unique gardening activities and opportunities. From 11:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. each day at the Natchez Community Center at 215 Franklin Street, gardeners from the novice to the avid to the expert will gather to share their gardening experiences, dilemmas, and expertise. Boutique shopping will be hosted by approximately thirty-five vendors from across the South, selling unique and exotic garden-related merchandise. In addition, Mississippi State University Extension Service specialists will be on hand throughout the event to answer gardening and landscaping questions as well as conduct soil sample analyses. So bring your soil sample, weeds, plants, and bugs to get professional solutions to your gardening problems. Admission is free. Contact Kelly Parks, Event Chairperson, 601-431-1422, for additional information.

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APRIL up

& coming!

Through April 27 “Edward Johnson Searcy: Civil Rights Pioneer” West Baton Rouge Museum Baton Rouge, LA 225-336-2422 www.wbrmuseum.org Through April 15 Southern Exposure Natchez Little Theatre Natchez, MS 8:00 pm; $15 www.natcheztheatre.org Through April 14 Southern Road to Freedom Holy Family Catholic Church Natchez, MS Tues/Thurs/Sat 8:00 pm; $15 www.natchezpilgrimage.com

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Through April 7 Historic Natchez Tableaux Natchez City Auditorium Natchez, MS Mon/Wed/Fri/Sat 8:00 pm www.visitNatchez.com

April 3 - 5 Spring Arts Blast Baton Rouge, LA 8:00 am - 3:00 pm 225-344-8558 www.artsbr.org

April 1 - 30 2012 Tapestry Historic Vicksburg Homes Vicksburg, MS 11:00 am Tickets: $30 - 3 presentations $15 - 1 presentation 601-636-9421 www.vicksburg.org

April 5 The Middle Archaic in East Central Louisiana Grand Village of the Natchez Indians Natchez, MS 6:30 pm; free admission 601-446-6502

April 3 Advanced Sushi Workshop Southern Cultural Heritage Foundation Vicksburg, MS 5:30 - 7:30 pm Space limited; reservations required 601-631-2997 info@southernculture.org


up & coming! APRIL April 7 Baton Rouge Arts Market Main Street Market Baton Rouge, LA 8:00 am - 12:00 pm 225-344-8558 www.artsbr.org

April 7 Breakfast with the Easter Bunny Jackson Zoo Jackson, MS 7:00 am - 9:00 am Admission charged 601-352-2580 www.jacksonzoo.org April 7 Straight No Chaser Baton Rouge River Center Baton Rouge, LA 8:00 pm - 11:00 pm Admission charged 225-389-4940 www.ticketmaster.com April 7 A Mississippi Homecoming Duling Hall Jackson, MS Cocktails 7:30 pm; show 9:00 pm $12 advance; $15 at door www.ardenland.net April 7 Sunpie and the Louisiana Sunspots Concert Vicksburg, MS 8:00 pm; $25 601-636-8313

Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 69


APRIL up

& coming!

April 8 - 14 Romantic Music of Natchez Trinity Episcopal Church Natchez, MS 8:00 pm www.visitNatchez.com April 8 - 13 Baton Rouge Blues Week Baton Rouge, LA 5:00 pm - 10:00 pm Free admission 225-324-4440 www.batonrougebluesfestival.org April 12 - 14 19th Annual Cajun Jeep Jamboree St. Francisville, LA Erin Lara 530-333-4777, ext. 11 erin@jeepjam.com

April 13 Natchez Book Party & Lunch with W. Stuart Towns The Carriage House Restaurant Natchez, MS 11:30 am - 1:30 pm Lunch $20 info@c2cbooks.com 601-445-5752 April 13 Crossroads Film Festival Jackson, MS Times and locations vary. 601-510-9148 www.crossroadsfilmfestival.com April 13 Tommy Brumfield Cystic Fibrosis Charity Golf Tournament Fernwood, MS 8:00 am $500/team or $125/player 601-249-7900 annacasciola79@hotmail.com Page 70 { April 2012 { Bluffs & Bayous


up & coming! APRIL April 13 Spring Market Mississippi Trade Mart Jackson, MS 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Admission $8 1-day / $12 3-day Children 12 & under free www.themarketshows.com/ SpringMarketJackson

April 14 NatureFEST Mississippi Museum of Natural Science Jackson, MS Admission charged 601-576-6000 www.museum.mdwfp.com

April 14 A Day of Love: The Rosedown Wedding Rosedown Plantation St. Francisville, LA 1:00 pm 225-635-3110 www.lastateparks.com April 14 Baton Rouge Blues Festival North Boulevard Town Square Baton Rouge, LA 12:00 pm - 10:00 pm Free admission 225-324-4440 www.batonrougebluesfestival.org

April 15 Natalie Cole in Concert Baton Rouge River Center Baton Rouge, LA 7:00 pm - 9:00 pm 225-383-0500 www.brso.org

April 19 Spring Concert Baton Rouge Ballet Theatre Baton Rouge, LA Admission charged 225-766-8379 April 19 & 26 High Note Jam Art Garden at MS Museum of Art Jackson, MS 5:30 - 7:30 pm Free admission; cash bar www.msmuseumart.org 601-960-1515 April 20 Look and Learn with Hoot Mississippi Museum of Art Jackson, MS 10:30 am Ages 4 - 5 www.msmuseumart.org 601-960-1515

Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 71


APRIL up

& coming!

April 20 - 21 25th Annual Riverfest Downtown Vicksburg, MS Fri/Sat 7:00 pm - 12:00 am Sat 8:00 am - 4:00 pm www.riverfest.com April 21 Levi Weeks Day Auburn Antebellum Mansion Natchez, MS 9:00 am - 2:00 pm www.visitNatchez.com April 21 Warrior Dash Mississippi Off-Road Adventures Jackson, MS Registration $45 - $75 www.warriordash.com

The Symphony of Home & Garden Tours Lifestyles of Natchez From the Restored to the New April 28, 2012 Morning & Afternoon Tours Morning Tour 9:00 am - 11:30 am Lunch 11:30 am - 1:00 pm Afternoon Tour 1:00 pm - 4:00 Lunch Included $40 per person Landscape Design/Display by Gary Wills of Creative Exteriors at The Canal Street Depot

For Ticket & Tour Information Contact Natchez Pilgrimage Tours — 800-647-6742 or 601-446-6631 www.natchezpilgrimage.com Natchez Garden Club Office — 601-443-9065 ntzgardenclub@bellsouth.net www.natchezgardenclub.com

Attend Both Events for $80.00 per person Page 72 { April 2012 { Bluffs & Bayous

The Annual Party for Preservation

A Night at The Cedars with Alvin and The Divas April 28 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Hors d’oeuvres & Cash Bar • Music Self Guided Tour of Grounds $50.00 per person Party for Preservation Sponsorships

Sponsorships for Party for Preservation entitles sponosrs to the following:

$1.000.00 ............................ 8 tickets $750.00............................... 6 tickets $500.00............................... 4 tickets $250.00............................... 2 tickets Groups of 20 or more welcome


up & coming! APRIL April 21 Earth Day Celebration: Party for the Planet Jackson Zoo Jackson, MS 10:00 am - 2:00 pm 601-352-2580 www.jacksonzoo.org

April 26 High Note Jam Art Garden at MS Museum of Art Jackson, MS 5:30 - 7:30 pm Free admission; cash bar www.msmuseumart.org 601-960-1515

April 21 Lost Arts Saturdays St. Francisville, LA 11:00 am - 2:00 pm “Lost Art” of Kite Making 225-635-3110 www.lastateparks.com

April 26 Birds in Southeastern Indian Art and Archaeology Grand Village of the Natchez Indians 6:30 pm Free admission 601-446-6502 www.visitNatchez.com

April 21 - 22 Angola Prison Rodeo LA State Penitentiary Angola, LA 9:00 am - 5:00 pm Admission $10 225-655-2030 www.angolarodeo.com

April 27 - 29 Natchez Bluff Blues Festival Natchez, MS www.visitnatchez.com

April 28 BluzCruz Kayak & Canoe Race Vicksburg, MS www.bluzcruz.com April 28 Gathering on the Green Old Capitol Museum Jackson, MS 10:00 am - 2:00 pm Free admission 601-576-6920 www.mdah.state.ms.us/oldcap April 28 Ballet Mississippi: The Sleeping Beauty Thalia Mara Hall Jackson, MS 7:30 pm Admission $10 601-960-1560 www.balletms.com

April 22 Earth Day Baton Rouge, LA 12:00 pm - 8:00 pm 225-571-9591 www.earthdaybr.org April 22 Serenade in the Cemetery Natchez City Cemetery Natchez, MS 2:00 pm - 5:00 pm Tickets $15 @ Natchez Visitors Center 601-446-6345 April 22 Irish & American Folk Music Natchez Coffee Company Natchez, Mississippi 2:00 pm - 4:00 pm; $10 601-304-1415 April 26 Janis Ian Concert Duling Hall Jackson, MS 8:00 pm Ticket prices vary. www.janisian.com 800-745-3000 Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 73


APRIL up

& coming!

April 28 Gardens of Lawrence County Tour Monticello, MS 9:00 am - 3:00 pm $10 per person Groups 10 or more $9 per person 601-587-3007 April 28 Experience Poetry in Vicksburg Warren County Library Vicksburg, MS 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm www.mississippiwritersguild.com April 28 16th Annual Junior Auxiliary Shrimp Boil Duncan Park Canteen Natchez, MS 11:00 am - 2:00 pm; $12 601-695-1155 tcox07@ymail.com

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up & coming! APRIL April 28 Belles on Bikes Natchez, MS 8:30 am 601-304-0116 www.natchezbike.org April 28 - 29 Annual Lynch Street Heritage Festival Jackson, MS 601-352-6993 May 3 4th Annual Chocolate Affair Southern Cultural Heritage Foundation Vicksburg, MS 7:00 pm $25 members; $30 non-members 601-631-2997

Be sure to confirm details of the events should changes have occurred since events were submitted.

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THE social SCENE | Vicksburg, MS | Klaus Eightieth Birthday Party

Klaus Eightieth Birthday Party A surprise eightieth birthday party for Martha Ann Klaus was given by her children, David May and Martha Debra Strickland, at ROCA Restaurant in Vicksburg, Mississippi, on January 31, 2012. Flowers were given by the Klaus family and various friends.

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Martha Ann Klaus Martha Ann Klaus and David May Jennifer Lynne and Stephen McMillin, with Martha Ann Klaus Dinna Simmons, Meta Klaus, and Alice Knight Gene Allen, Raymond May, and Martha Ann Klaus Martha Ann Klaus and John Leigh Hyland Kyle Klaus, Lindsey Gilliland, Hunt Gilliland, Diane Klaus, Ken Klaus, Martha Ann Klaus, Meta Klaus, Gareth Lampkin, and Randy Lampkin Bette Graham, Gene and Peggy Allen, and Betty Bexley Martha Strickland, Martha Ann Klaus, David May, Laura Beth Lyons, and Michael Strickland

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Vicksburg, MS | THEsocial SCENE

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THE social SCENE | Vicksburg, MS | Klaus Eightieth Birthday Party

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Kori Strickland, Michael Strickland, and Samantha Strickland Martha Strickland, Martha Ann Klaus, and Michael Strickland Martha Strickland, Martha Ann Klaus, David May, and Michael Strickland Martha Strickland, with Bobbye Jo and Harold May Blanche Montesi, David May, and Syd Johnston Cindy, Joe, and Laura Beth Lyons Ronnie Andrews, Bobby Bailess, and Ken Klaus Sara Jane Ball with Cathy and Joe Johnston Blanche Montesi, Rebecca Campagna, Martha Ann Klaus, and Sara Jane Ball

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Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 79


THE social SCENE | Brookhaven, MS | Brookhaven/Lincoln County Legislative Breakfast

Brookhaven/ Lincoln County Legislative Breakfast The Lincoln County Chamber of Commerce Legislative Breakfast was held in early March at Poppa’s Restaurant in Brookhaven, Mississippi. Members of the business community and area residents attended to hear legislative updates from Senator Sally Doty and Representative Becky Currie. Popular topics were charter schools and the proposed immigration law. Attendees enjoyed mixing and mingling both before and after the breakfast.

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Judge Mike Taylor and Sheriff Steve Rushing David Culpepper, Kenny Goza, and Robert Byrd Mark Lewis and Bradley Smith Ken Dixon, Donnie Mitchell, and Cliff Brumfield Lori Carter, Senator Sally Doty, Homer Richardson, and Representative Becky Currie

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Walthall County Miss Hospitality 2012 | Tylertown, MS | THE social SCENE

Walthall County Miss Hospitality 2012 The Walthall County Miss Hospitality Program was held in mid-February at the historic Bilbo House in Tylertown, Mississippi. Five contestants competed for the title through an application and interview process. Katie Edwards was chosen Miss Hospitality 2012 and will represent Walthall County in the statewide program later this year.

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Beverly Harvey, Kim Lampton, Tracy Phillips, and Dianne Seal Committee members Melissa Dillon, Susan Bracey, Kaylan Bracey, Linzie Harrington, Macy Jenkinson, Rachel Galdino, and Alisa Leggett Contestants Shelby Lampton, Katie Edwards, Chancey Harvey, Lakyn Bergeron, and Alexis Phillips Carly Sanamo; 2011 Miss Hospitality, Kaitlyn Sanamo; and Carla Stringer

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THE social SCENE | Vicksburg, MS | A Salute to Herb and Faye Wilkinson

A Salute to Herb and Faye Wilkinson A cocktail reception was held in honor of YMCA CEO retiree Herb Wilkinson and his wife Faye Wilkinson at the home of Pete and Amy Stone during February in Vicksburg, Mississippi. Herb has served YMCA for forty-six years.

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Faye and Herb Wilkinson Patsy Humble and Fay Wilkinson Melodie and Steve Golding Ken Rector and Ronnie Andrews Leslie and Joel Horton Herb Wilkinson and Casey Custer Pat Pierce, Cherie Kilgo, Marilyn Moss, Amy Stone, and Leslie Horton Marilyn Moss, Kay Farrell, Pat Pierce, and Bob Moss

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A Salute to Herb and Faye Wilkinson | Vicksburg, MS | THE social SCENE

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Pete Stone, Herb Wilkinson, and Amy Stone Faye Wilkinson with Emily and Casey Custer Herb Jones, Sharon Andrews, and Mary Ruth Jones Ken Rector, Faye Wilkinson, Pete and Amy Stone, and Herb Wilkinson Bill Pierce, Steve Golding and Herb Jones Pete Stone, Eric Biedenharn, Bob Moss, and Herb Jones Fred and Kay Farrell, Herb and Faye Wilkinson, and John and Patti Duett

Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 83


THE social SCENE | Vicksburg, MS | A Salute to Herb and Faye Wilkinson

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16 Deanna Miller, Sharon Andrews, Peggy Teller, and Patti Duett

17 Emily and Casey Custer with Sharon and Ronnie Andrews

18 Don and Deanna Miller, Betsy and Al Gage, and Cherie and Larry Kilgo

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Bluffs & Bayous { April 2012 { Page 85


THE social SCENE | McComb, MS | McComb Junior Auxiliary Ball

McComb Junior Auxiliary Ball The Fiftieth Junior Auxiliary Azalea Ball was held on Saturday night, March 3. Gay Austin and Amom Parker were crowned queen and king for the 2012 ball.

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Susan Gibbs and Andrea Sanders Sara Jones and Key Smith Chad Lindsey, Scott Lindsey, and Chip Gibbs David and Delores Feldman

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THE social SCENE | Natchez, MS | Chamber After Hours at Brandon Hall

Chamber After Hours at Brandon Hall The Natchez-Adams County Chamber of Commerce After Hours event was held at antebellum Brandon Hall in Church Hill, just outside of Natchez, Mississippi, in the new reception room. Members enjoyed the tour of the new reception facilities and the event’s unique cuisine.

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Marcia McCullough, Dell Ross, Joann Herrington, Kitty and Julia Bray, and Carol and Smokye Joe Frank Tom Taylor, Butch Brown, and Sandy Taylor

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Chamber After Hours at Brandon Hall | Natchez, MS | THE social SCENE

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Sim Mosby, Tom Taylor, and Benny Jeansonne Chris Hinton, Rachel Garber, and Maxine and Bruce Brice Carol and Ralph LeMay Caryn Roland, Chuck Caldwell, and Kitty Bray Smokye Joe Frank and Debbie Hudson

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Bluffs & Bayous April 2012