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Imagined Designed Crafted




COMMENT The famous designer Paul Rand was quoted as saying “design can be art. Design can be aesthetics. Design is so simple, that is why it is so complicated”. Living in a world filled with design we believe this quote to be exceptionally true. So many things are designed poorly, either aesthetically or simply just not taking the end user into consideration. With this in mind, we have spent months curating the fourth issue of texture magazine, trying to find design across disciplines which we feel highlight the essence of good design. This issue features photography, fashion design and even a feature on some incredible bridal wear. We have once again tried to push the boundaries with regards to layout, content and flow in order to produce a publication which, not only inspires, but also finds a permanent home on a bookshelf along with other great design books. The art of print has seen a severe decline in recent years due to digital, yet there is nothing more sensory than paging through a physical publication or book. The smell of crisp paper, together with the excitement of what lies on the following page cannot be matched. Whilst content can be captured on digital platforms, the full aesthetics of paging through a book cannot. We hope you enjoy this sensory experience. Texture magazine is available online as an interactive digital publication as well as a physical print version, which is available to read in our Johannesburg showroom as well as in our new Cape Town showroom. The blu_line team.


060 - 065 NAKAMURA KAZUNOBU DESIGN Tokyo, Japan

INDEX 008 - 015 ANSHUKA Subtraction in interior space

018 - 025 THROUGH THE LENS Nicolas Ruel Photographer 026 - 035 CAPE TOWN SHOWROOM New blu_line flagship

046 - 051 YING GAO Fashioning the intangible

052 - 059 SHANXIAO SALES PAVILION Chongqing

036 - 045 CHARLIE WEST Lemay + Escobar Architecture & ODA Team up


066 - 073 MIELE 20 Years from now, your Miele will still impress you.

074 - 081 ROLLS-ROYCE King of the night exhibition

082 - 089 FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION Tuscan Transformation

090 - 099 NEW COLLECTION INSPIRES blu_line

100 - 105 LUXURY BRIDAL WEAR Kleinfeld is the largest luxury bridal retailer in the world

106 - 111 CHEMIN DES CARRIÈRES Rosheim, France

112 - 123 IN THE DETAIL Various curated designs


The ultimate goal of doing subtraction in interior space is to highlight the presentation of the product .

ANSHUKA

Nanshan Road is familiar to people in Hangzhou, and thoughts of the phoenix tree are always associated with feelings of peace. The fast pace of modern urban life makes it easy for people to ignore many of the small, pleasant things around them. The designer hopes that ANSHUKA can create a space where people are willing to slow down and take the time to experience the feeling of life for a while, even if it is just to enjoy a cup of afternoon tea or a dessert

When designer Leo HU talked about the inspiration for ANSHUKA, he mentioned that, when he was walking on Nanshan Road, the leaves of the phoenix trees were dancing on both sides. It felt very good and quiet to walk in their shadow, and it caused him to think about how to present the building in such an environment.



ANSHUKA


When the customers sit down to enjoy their dessert, they may find that all the designs may be casual. While they sit next to the phoenix trees seeing the light and shadow change, they may watch people passing by and see the sunlight through the skylight casts on the plants.


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Through The Lens


Nicolas Ruel is a professional photographer specializing in architecture and culture. His first exhibition, Inox, took place in 2005 and featured a collection of large-format prints on stainless steel plates. This type of presentation became his signature and inspired other series, including Elements, Carnival, and 8 seconds.

NICOLAS RUEL PHOTOGRAPHER


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NICOLAS RUEL PHOTOGRAPHER


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NICOLAS RUEL PHOTOGRAPHER


CAPE TOWN SHOWROOM NOW OPEN

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000 - 010 blu_line is intent on creating spaces of dramatic interest with detailing accentuated through the use of natural materials.

000 - 020 Kitchen architecture is the pursuit of spaces which are dynamic in nature whilst ever evolving.


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The new Cape Town showroom boasts just under 500sqm of authentic luxury, with each kitchen space carefully considered and curated to offer an unsurpassed experience for a niche clientele. Bespoke concepts and exclusive materials run through the showroom with wardrobes by blu_line continuing the experience. The new Cape Town showroom ensures the continued growth and development of the blu_line brand locally and abroad.

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CAPE TOWN SHOWROOM the hudson, 30 hudson street, de waterkant

blu-line.co.za

021 201 1296 info@blu-line.co.za

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L E M AY + E S C O B A R A R C H I T E C T U R E & O D A T E A M U P O N C H A R L I E W E S T


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With a judicious separation into two distinct buildings creating an elegant courtyard, the design weaves in the steely characteristics of the neighbourhood’s past, combined with the luxury and modernism of present-day Hell’s Kitchen. The brick façade integrates with the surrounding buildings, while articulation of the façade introduces a distinguishing sculptural element of depth and style.

Charlie West – Manhattan’s only new ground-up construction residential development in Hell’s Kitchen – is now complete. The striking 16-story condominium building, with exterior design by ODA Architects and interiors by the renowned Andres Escobar of Lemay + Escobar Architecture DPC, creates an urban oasis at 505 W. 43rd Street.


Upon arrival at Charlie West, the dramatic double-height, hotel-style lobby draws one into the industrial chic-designed interior space, that dually serves as a curated library and a private residential lounge, anchored by a grand fireplace. The welcoming area is framed by its distinctive diagonal beams, a structural necessity the designers maximized and made into a defining feature.

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Escobar and his design team infused the neighbourhood’s DNA throughout Charlie West’s spacious amenities and successfully curated an industrial, yet modern and inviting interior design for the lounge, pool and gym, as well as the 120 residences, through the use of natural materials and opulent textures.


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"The interiors at Charlie West transport you to another place and exude a relaxed vibe, with a very sophisticated palate. From the moment you step into the lounge-like lobby, with its sumptuous natural materials and dark urban tones, and move on to the scenic pool with its serene spa-like feel, one could easily believe that they are in a boutique hotel in Miami, rather than a luxury condominium in Hell's Kitchen," says Escobar, Senior Partner and Design Principal at his eponymous firm. While original plans called for two stand-alone buildings, the ODA team was able to approach the design with an innovative perspective, creating one holistic living experience by way of a uniquely designed bike storage room. By integrating a connecting path between the buildings with a 44-foot-long glass enclosed bike room, ODA was able to centralize the amenities and create a more spacious environment for residents without doubling up on lobbies, mail rooms and elevator banks. “The bike room in the courtyard area between the two buildings acts as a connecting corridor, which allowed us to create one unifying development, rather than two separate towers,” said Christian Bailey, Principal at ODA. “By creatively working within the constraints of the zoning laws, we were able to maximize common areas and recreational spaces that knit the building together to allow for a more communal and connected lifestyle.” Reflecting the vibrancy of 43rd Street, residents can enjoy various amenities including an indoor pool with open-air access, the 6,000 square-foot landscaped private courtyard, a contemporary children’s playroom, a state-of-the-art fitness centre flooded with sunlight, and a translucent glass-enclosed “bike box” that reimagines typical bike storage as an innovative architectural centrepiece. LOCATION: New York, USA ARCHITECTS: ODA Architecture SURFACE AREA: ±20,210 SQ. FT BUDGET: USD $82 M NUMBER OF UNITS: 130


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FASHIONING THE INTANGIBLE: THE CONCEPTUAL CLOTHING OF YING GAO



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The intangible is a key component in both the creation and fabrication of Gao’s works. Elements that can’t be grasped, such as the air of a diaphanous fabric, are an integral part of the structure of her pieces. Other impalpable elements include work activated by a voice, a glance or a flash of light.


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"Absence often occurs at breakfast time - the tea-cup dropped, then spilled on the table, being one of its most common consequences. Absence lasts but a few seconds - its beginning and end are sudden. However, closed to outside impressions, the senses are awake. The return is as immediate as the departure. The suspended word or movement is picked up where it was left off, as conscious time automatically reconstructs itself, thus becoming continuous and free of any apparent interruption".

The project was inspired by the essay entitled "Esthétique de la disparition" (The aesthetic of disappearance), by Paul Virilio (1979).


I N P E O P L E ' S H A U N T I B U I LT M Y C O T ; OF WHEEL'S AND HOOF'S NOISE, I HEAR NOT. H O W C A N I T L E AV E O N M E N O T R A C E ? S E C L U D E D H E A RT M A K E S A S E C L U D E D P L A C E . I P I C K F E N C E - S I D E A S T E R S AT W I L L ; CAREFREE I SEE THE SOUTHERN HILL. THE MOUNTAIN AIR'S FRESH DAY AND NIGHT; TOGETHER BIRDS GO HOM E IN FLIGHT. W H AT R E V E L AT I O N AT T H I S V I E W ? WO RD S F A I L M E I F I T R Y T O T E L L Y O U . YUANMING TAO

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S H A N X I A O S A L E S PAV I L I O N , C H O N G Q I N G




Chongqing is a poetic land with half of the city consisting of areas of mountains and trees which stretch for thousands of miles. The project is situated in Nanshan, Chongqing. Nanshan, located on the south bank of the Yangtze River in Chongqing, has a wealth of tourist attractions including natural scenery, cultural landscape and specialities. In recent years, Nanshan has successively developed some commercial buildings with cultural connotations such as bookstores and guest houses. These buildings are simple in design and distinctive in shape, which has made Nanshan gradually become a synonym for elegance and conservatism. As such its artistic conception corresponds to Tao's poetry.

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Therefore, we refine the traditional architectural culture and natural landscape of Nanshan as the main tempo, and use modern technical language and artistic creative techniques to transform it into our architectural language, so that visitors can experience the artistic concept of “hidden in nature”. The entire project has two parts, the sales office and the commercial part. The sales office, although small in scale is exquisite and delicate. It is naturally engraved and hidden in nature, thus highlighting the concept of “seclusion”. The facade uses the perforated plate as a louvre for protection from the sun, and the shape of the louvre is inspired by the cloud of Nanshan. The perforated leaves float around the curtain wall, resembling a long scroll landscape painting, whose variations show the shape of the clouds and fog which stretch throughout Nanshan. The glass curtain walls with gradual mist and perforated louvres are integrated so that the whole building appears to be floating in the clouds. At the same time, there are spraying devices which will create fog around the building every day. It makes the natural fog become another layer of the facade of the building, creating a wonderland of Nanshan. The building is not only an architectural creation but a cultural experience.

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For a long time, the Japanese have been piling up colours from ancient times to express sacred things. Also, piling up paper with square silhouettes has been used as a way of representing sacred depth. The designer created a space which transforms the atmosphere by the changing of various colours with the squares "piling up" as a motif. Panels flying in the air put the focus on the dancer, while covering the space above the stage. The panels also depict the appearance of light passing through the space which cannot be seen without them. The panels were made from a mesh of ultra-thin transparent threads made of a double-layered resin. This allows panels to receive a moderate amount of light, enabling the panels to appear and disappear. The panels overlap intricately; the plurality of strings which suspend each panel are designed so as not to cross each other. This space focuses on Japanese dance.

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T O K Y O , J A PA N N A K A M U R A K A Z U N O B U D E S I G N - WO R K S

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About Nakamura Kazunobu Design-Works This is an art studio for Kazunobu Nakamura to create designs.The studio that designs spaces such as installation design and interior design. Photograph: Atsushi Ishida 62 | texture


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20 YEARS FROM NOW, YOUR MIELE WILL STILL IMPRESS YOU



Choosing the best Appliances alone don’t make a kitchen. However, from a functional perspective, they are arguably some of the most important elements in this space. We speak to leading appliance manufacturer, Miele’s Jon Molyneaux, for some guidelines on what to look for when choosing your kitchen appliances. Most contractors will tell you that if you are renovating or building a new kitchen, it is best to start by selecting your appliances first, as they can radically influence the layout of your kitchen design. Whether they are laundry, dishwashing, cooking, refrigeration or vacuums, they will take up a large chunk of your budget – so ideally, you want something that is durable, stylish, easy and convenient to use, and with state-of-the-art extras. But, with all the options on the market, it is not always that easy to know where to start. Says Jon Molyneaux, from leading appliance manufacturer, Miele: “With so many options to choose from, selecting your kitchen appliances can be a confusing task. I believe that the best place to start is by choosing a reliable and trusted kitchen appliance brand, and then working back from there. My reasoning behind this is that by choosing a well-known brand, you will have automatically narrowed down your search, and by working within your chosen brand’s parameters, you will have defined your budget, expectations and the quality of the appliances in question.” Reputation and reliability So how do you choose a good brand? First off, Molyneaux notes that any brand worth its salt must come with a good track record – the longer the better: “You want to avoid the newer brands that haven’t proven themselves yet, and the flyby-nights whose longevity in the market hasn’t been defined. A long-standing, trusted brand that has built up a reliable reputation over the years, and who promises to offer long-term after-sales service and spare parts is definitely preferable. Take Miele for example, it has been involved in manufacturing highend, state-of-the-art appliances for over 120 years. “This guarantees that you know what you are getting when you invest in a Miele appliance – a best-in-market appliance that has been designed, manufactured and tested to last for a minimum of 20 years. An appliance where every detail has been crafted with meticulous German engineering, and perfected using techniques and knowledge that has been honed with over a century’s worth of experience. Its ongoing track record continuously earns Miele numerous international best brand awards. We are especially excited about the awards given by the consumers themselves. Miele has repeatedly been voted “Most Trusted Brand” by Readers Digest readers and has been awarded first place for best customer service several times by the German Kundenmonitor (customer monitor) – distinctions that reflect a high level of customer confidence in our products.” Once you have narrowed your search to include only reputable appliance brands, the next step is to consider quality. This is a very broad term to navigate, however, it makes it easier to classify by using its three defining elements: craftmanship, performance and sustainability.

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Craftmanship Craftmanship is an indicator of the quality of design and workmanship of something that has been made. It comes from creating with passion, care, and attention to detail, and it is a quality that is honed, refined, and practiced over time. In today’s modern world, we often sacrifice real craftsmanship at the altar of expediency – but at the end of the day, you always get what you pay for. Jon explains: “When it comes to kitchen appliances, even though you might be paying more for a well-crafted appliance from the onset, such as a Miele for example, your investment will pay off in the long run by saving you time and money – the appliance will last longer, it will do a better job, it will save you time and effort, and it will run more efficiently. “Everybody talks about quality, making the grade, meeting the mark – but Miele goes the extra mile and looks beyond this. It doesn’t celebrate the 99% that made it, but focuses on the 1% that didn’t and tries tirelessly to better this. It means taking superb work and starting over to create designs that actually surpass what is currently considered state-of-theart. Miele is so serious about adhering to the highest level of craftmanship that it makes its own parts, from its own iron, each appliance is checked by hand, and Miele even makes the machines that make the machines. Because only by crafting and perfecting every detail does Miele achieve ultimate reliability – and that’s quality and craftmanship ahead of its time!” Performance Performance is the action or process of performing a task or a function, and the quintessential defining character of any kitchen appliance is ultimately how well it performs the tasks it was designed to do. Performance of an appliance can be quantified through performance tests. Jon elaborates: “To ensure industry-leading performance results year after year, Miele proves its appliances performance with up to 10 000 hours of testing, running them continuously day and night for comprehensive and precise results. This is up to three times longer than the performance tests of some car engines!” He adds that Miele’s appliances are so reliable because a third of its development time goes into testing: “Due to the continuous benchmark-setting performance results of Miele’s appliances, the brand keeps on winning performance tests globally – a testament to their durability and functionality!”

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Sustainability Sustainability is the avoidance of the depletion of natural resources in order to maintain an ecological balance. With the state of our environment, sustainability is an increasingly important aspect when it comes to any kitchen appliance – not only must they run efficiently with regards to energy and water consumption, but the longevity of the machine also needs to be considered, as well as the sustainable practices used in its manufacturing processes. For most consumers, the efficiency of the actual appliance is an important consideration, as using electricity and water as sparingly as possible is as good for the environment as it is for the consumer’s pocket – allowing for massive savings on utility bills over an appliance’s lifetime. However, the way the machine is made is also important – the brand in question should use sustainable practices when making it, and the better quality the machine is, the longer it will last, and the smaller its overall carbon footprint will be.


Says Jon regarding Miele’s annual Sustainability Report: “The company’s focus is on its range of products and thus on sustainability aspects that run the whole gamut of its business: from development, through the essential usage phase, to recycling and disposal. It’s this holistic approach distinguishes Miele appliances and Miele's sustainability strategy from its competitors. “Miele boasts some of the best sustainable rankings in the world with regards to its business as a whole, as well a its products. Unlike the majority of other kitchen appliances that are manufactured to last for 7 years, Miele’s are designed, tested and manufactured to last for 20 years (www.miele.co.za/20years). So, instead of using many appliances over the years, you will just need one Miele appliance that can be used and repaired over its lifetime. Furthermore, at Miele, we recycle metal from our old machines into new ones to create a more sustainable circular economy.” By investing in a reputable and trusted kitchen appliance brand, like Miele for example, you are investing in a defined level of quality, craftmanship, performance, sustainability, and service, as well as in the brand’s reputation that it has carefully grown over its lifetime. Jon says that what this means for you as a consumer, is that you are investing in peace of mind: “So the next time you invest in a kitchen appliance, choose your brand wisely.” That's Quality Ahead Of its Time.


The Rolls-Royce Black Badge Cullinan is the start of a very interesting photo exhibition dubbed ‘King of the Night’, created through the lens of photographer Mark Riccioni, whereby the uber-luxurious SUV was photographed greeting automotive subcultures in the Los Angeles area.


S U B C U LT U R E P H O T O G R A P H E R P R E S E N T S R O L L S - R O Y C E ‘ K I N G O F T H E N I G H T ’ E X H I B I T I O N


The photo shoot was done with the sole purpose of welcoming the Cullinan Black Badge into the world. The car appeals to a certain niche who connect with the brand in a specific way, according to Rolls-Royce. Therefore, a different take was needed, and that’s what Riccioni came up with. He was invited by the British brand to Los Angeles to create a pictorial series of the car.


“The things that connect us are always more powerful than the things that separate us, and this series is a wonderful demonstration of that. I selected each subculture because it shares the philosophies that inform the creation of a Black Badge Rolls-Royce. From the obsessive attention to detail lavished on a lowrider and visceral power of a hot rod to the bold execution of tuned imports and deeply personal customizations applied to ‘brat’-style motorcycles,” said Riccioni.




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Black Badge Cullinan CO2 emission: 370-377g/km (Combined); Fuel consumption: 17-17.3mpg / 16.3-16.6 L/100km (Combined)

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Form Follows Function

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T U S C A N T R A N S F O R M AT I O N


VSHD Design, a Dubai-based interior architecture firm specializing in residential and commercial projects, is proud to unveil a luxurious residential design within the Four Seasons Orlando Resort in Florida. With 22,000 sq. ft. this project marks the first residential undertaking by the firm in the United States. “From the onset, we realized that we were facing numerous challenges with this project,” notes Rania Hamed, interior architect and founder of VSHD Design. “In addition to strict regional building and environmental codes, there were requirements imposed by Four Seasons Resorts to ensure that the residence blended stylistically with its neighbouring properties.” A modern Tuscan approach In approaching the external Tuscan theme exhibited by homes within the exclusive development, the challenge was to maintain some existing structural elements, while delivering on the client’s vision of a modern home that would be luxurious, yet warm, comfortable and ideal for entertaining guests. The client envisioned a sort of boutiquestyle hotel environment that would provide family and friends with privacy and luxurious amenities, even in the absence of its owners. To achieve this challenging balance, Hamed embarked on a mission to modernize the external Tuscan façade, while infusing contemporary luxury into the home’s interior to align with the client’s vision. While Tuscan architecture in its purest form embraces natural, rustic elements, VSHD Design avoided abundant use of materials such as brick and wrought iron, in lieu of a modern interpretation. Grey brick overhangs, positioned above the external façade’s windows and passages, pay homage to Tuscan influences. Black frames of expansive French windows, certified to hurricane standards, provide contemporary contrasts to the façade’s white walls, culminating in a modern Mediterranean style that adheres to the Four Seasons aesthetic requirements. To complement the structural design, VSHD Design developed all of the home’s outdoor spaces, beginning with its swimming pool. European limestone tiles, stylistic planters, and luxurious sunbeds from the Italian design house, Gervasoni, provide the exterior spaces with an authentic Mediterranean look and feel.

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SEAMLESS TRANSITIONS


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B E S P O K E WA RD R O B E S



The new collection of wardrobes by blu_line focuses on a luxury aesthetic developed through touch materials and subtle detailing. The focus of the new collection which spans their closed, sliding and open system offerings, was that the internal experience of the wardrobe was accentuated by the outer materials. Fume glass, natural marble, herringbone veneer and fabric materials all work together to offer their clients a new level of luxurious living.


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KLEINFELD BRIDAL Founded in 1941, Kleinfeld is the largest luxury bridal retailer in the world, carrying an unparalleled selection of American and European designer gowns. The 35,000 square-foot flagship salon is located in the heart of Chelsea, New York City.




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CHEMIN DES CARRIÈRES ROSHEIM, FRANCE

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Chemin des Carrières, the Quarries’ Track, came about through our ambition to offer people an opportunity to travel and to experience not only the contrasting landscape of the area but also the resurrection of the Rosheim-St Nabor railway in Alsace, France. Appearing rather ominous and sometimes hidden, the vestiges of the railway still identifies the original character of the site. The desire to create a route to serve the quarries had to be adapted to the undulating landscapes of the sub-Vosges hills and the way in which this has been achieved tells the history of the region as well as that of the men who worked there. The journey to re-discover forgotten landscapes or to take a different view on everyday situations is aimed at both local users as well as tourists. Like the old track that offered a dual function (industrial and passenger transport), the route has a double purpose where the functional must rub shoulders with the visualisation of travel. Along the 11km path a story is told which is split into five chapters, and is connected to the five stops which take place along the way. The result is one of different and varied experiences and the highlighting of remarkable sites. Unusual elements, including regular encounters with water are aimed at awakening the visitor’s senses. Rosheim tells the story of the past. Consisting of y intertwined circles in Corten steel, the pavilion has a labyrinthine character and features irregular concave and convex interiors, within which the visitors are free to roam. The train tracks are conserved in that area, benches have been built and openings created to allow for chosen views of the landscape, enabling people to sit, reflect and contemplate on their surroundings. Boersch tells the story of water. The river, which historically provided a connection to the outside world is evidence of the true cleanliness of the place. It is a dynamic element in the landscape, running to the ocean. We enlarged the riverbed and built a large open-air amphitheatre to provide access to the water. Leonardsau tells the story of the land. Two large corten steel plates amplify the effect of the opening which is found at the end of the long, green forest corridor and embodies a gate, the opening of which allows a view towards Mont StOdile, which creates a feeling of discovery. Ottrott tells the story of travel. Formerly a train station, the stop describes the history of the railway and highlights the presence of various facets of its heritage (balance, bridge, crane, pump...) The combination of dwellings, the reservoir, symbolizing water, and concrete crossings, succeed in connecting the housing to historical elements and the landscape. Saint-Nabor tells the story of luck. Closed for years due to an ongoing “renaturalisation" process, the quarries symbolize the recapture of the vegetation on a former industrial site. On one of the highest machine created platforms, the traveller will discover the most spectacular work: a promontory in corten steel offering a wide view of the valley of Rosheim and the plain of Alsace. From this vantage point, inspired by a four-leaf clover, the visitor will feel privileged to enjoy the view of such a beautiful environment.


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Over the years RRA has produced a wide range of innovative and ground-breaking projects with an exceptional variety of scale and program


RRA have earned a reputation for creating bold, simple architecture with a strong connection to the Scandinavian context and the impressive Scandinavian landscape in particular.


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In the detail


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The design of Antrax IT is tailored to perfectly integrate into the kitchen


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A Design Studio Showcasing the Value of Play New York, United States The Urban Conga

Oscillation in New York City utilizing sight, sound, and movement to spark spontaneous social interactions and conversations within a once underutilized plaza. Photo credit: Savannah Lauren

Each unit of the installation acts like a giant Theremin, a musical instrument that you can play without touching. Sparking spontaneous dance parties and jam sessions.

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9STUDIO DESIGN GROUP

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PA S S I N G T R A I N S P R O V O K E A WAT E R F A L L O F L I G H T I N A R T WO R K B Y M AT T H I A S O O S T R I K

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ANSHUKA MARC NEWSON BLU_LINE YING GAO ROLLS ROYCE KLEINFELD BRIDAL NAKAMURA KAZUNOBU M I E L E O D A A R C H I T E C T U R E V S H D E S I G N M AT T H I A S O O S T R I K 9 S T U D I O D E S I G N G R O U P L E M AY + E S C O B A R