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THE

POWER PARKS OF

Bloomington Parks, Recreation and Open Space Comprehensive Master Plan

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SPECIAL THANKS & ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Bloomington Parks & Recreation Department: Paula McDevitt, President Kim Clapp, Office Manager Julie Ramey, Community Relations Manager Crystal Ritter, Program/Facility Coordinator Park Board: Les Coyne Ellen Rodkey Israel Herrera Kathleen Mills

Plan prepared by:


Table of Contents 1.0 Introduction 2.0 Parks Profile Overview Past Goals and Progress Made Parks Department Parks Board Parks Support Programs & Activities Budget Review

3.0 Context Location Map Natural Features Other Planning Documents Demographic & Economic Factors Recreation & Programming Trends

4.0

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The Bloomington Parks & Recreation System Overview Parks Broadview Park Brown’s Woods Bryan Park Building Trades Park Crestmont Park Ferguson Dog Park Goat Farm Griffy Lake Nature Preserve Highland Village Park Latimer Woods Leonard Springs Nature Park Lower Cascades Park Miller Showers Park Olcott Park Park Ridge Park Park Ridge East Park Peoples Park RCA Community Park Rev. Ernest D. Butler Park Schmalz Farm Sherwood Oaks Park Southeast Park Switchyard Park Upper Cascades Park Waldron Hill Buskirk Park Wapehani Mountain Bike Park Winslow Woods Park Trails Facilities Analysis

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

5.0 Public Engagement Purpose of the Report Survey Methods Stakeholder Meetings Public Meetings Public Input Survey Results

6.0 ADA & Accessibility 7.0 Meeting the 2020 Moment Responding to the COVID-19 Pandemic How Can A Park System Address Anti-Racism How Can A Park System Address Homelessness?

8.0 Benchmarks Community Benchmarks

9.0 Needs Analysis Level of Service

10.0 Goals, Strategies, & Action Schedule Platform For Civic Engagement Enhance Public Health Strengthen Municipal Resiliency Drivers of Economic Development Part of Retention and Recruitment Repository of History and Culture

11.0 Appendicies


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CITY OF BLOOMINGTON PARKS & RECREATION


1.0 Chapter One Introduction

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The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department (Department) is a significant community asset that repays residents’ investments every day. Thanks to the Department’s facilities, lands, and programs, residents enjoy higher property values, improved neighborhoods, and enhanced lives and job performance as they exercise, play, and relieve stress in a greener and more beautiful and sustainable urban environment. As a sign of the Department’s commitment to serving Bloomington, it is one of only four parks and recreation departments in the State of Indiana to be accredited by the National Recreation and Park Association’s Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies (CAPRA). Achieving this status indicates that the Department has met national standards of best practices for providing high-quality services and experiences. The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department Master Plan is intended to help today’s leaders and residents make sound and fruitful decisions that will help the community maintain and enhance the Department’s programs, events, parks, trails, and facilities from 2021 through 2025.

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


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The Planning Process and Scope of Work The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department (BPRD) is building on its rich history of planning by undertaking a 5-year park master planning process. This plan will aid stakeholders in prioritizing the City of Bloomington’s parks and recreation needs and ensure residents and visitors have the most optimal experiences when using the parks, trails, amenities, and facilities. This plan will also ensure that residents and visitors benefit from all funds invested in the parks.

amenities, facilities, and programs for the next five years. These recommendations should prioritize what benefits the Bloomington community most. The BPRD Five-Year Master Plan aims to accomplish the following: • Gather feedback from a diverse group of stakeholders, residents, and park users and report the findings in an accurate manner.

• Set achievable goals and objectives that reflect Bloomington underwent a planning process when current issues, challenges, and opportunities as creating the 2016–2020 Master Plan, which was they relate to the current park system. adopted in 2015. At that time, the plan identified maintaining and providing safe parks, trails, and • Inventory and evaluate the physical condition of facilities as a key issue. In addition, planners identified existing parks, amenities, and facilities. the need for expansion of trails. These issues resulted in the reauthorization of a general obligations Parks • Inventory and evaluate existing parks and recreation programming. bond to support $7 million in capital improvement projects and the dedication of a Bicentennial Bond • Provide a guide for the development of park and that is currently funding the Griffy Loop Trail project. recreation resources, amenities, facilities, and programs that reflects the interests and needs of This Master Plan will review the progress of the the community. 2016–2020 Plan. It will also identify existing park and

recreation needs in Bloomington through an analysis • Expand opportunities to obtain support and of current inventory, feedback from stakeholders, funding for the recommendations. residents, and park users, and through an evaluation of the conditions of the parks, amenities, facilities, and programming. The proposed recommendations for additional or improved recreational resources, park amenities, facilities, and programs will be based on several factors, including: • An assessment of current resources, amenities, facilities, and programs • Review of the 2016–2020 Five-Year Master Plan • Input from the community at large and from stakeholder groups • Input from the Bloomington Parks and Recreation Board and staff • An evaluation of the present opportunities, constraints, and goals The proposed recommendations in this plan can serve as a guide for the development of resources, 10

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


Master Parks Plan Objectives

Discover strengths, opportunities, weaknesses, and threats. Acquire input and gather support from the citizens of Bloomington. Analyze information and public input to determine strategies, priorities, and an action plan for the next five years. The primary objectives of this plan, the Parks Board, and Parks Department, are as follows:

Obtain Parks Board adoption of the plan. Submit a final plan to IDNR to receive approval from IDNR for Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) Program eligibility. Identify opportunities to add or improve Parks and Recreation programs and amenities. Serve as a supporting document to secure funding for proposed projects .

Definition of Planning Area The City of Bloomington consists of 23.16 square miles. The influx of park users from across the region helps support economic development using businesses in nearby incorporated and unincorporated areas of the County.

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How to Use the Plan The Five-Year Master Plan should be used as a guiding document for the future of Bloomington’s Parks and Recreation services. The plan sets forth the goals, action plan, proposed projects, strategies, and potential costs associated with improvements over the next five years and beyond. The plan analyzes existing conditions, natural features, social and demographic factors, and other contextual elements that will impact the usage and goals for Bloomington Parks. In addition, Bloomington initiated a massive public engagement effort to solicit feedback from residents of Bloomington. A comprehensive survey provides information about how people currently use the parks, facilities, amenities, and trails. It also includes data about how residents would like to use the parks in the future. Results of the public input survey are included in the report and influence many of the recommendations throughout. The recommendations of the plan are summarized through an action plan matrix. This matrix identifies goals, strategies, and action items for the parks system, and where applicable, it provides an anticipated cost range, timeline for implementation, and potential

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

resources or partnerships for each goal. This plan also allows the City to be eligible for the Land and Water Conservation Fund grant. The LWCF grant can be used to acquire land and develop new parks or make capital improvements to existing parks. In addition to the LWCF, the plan increases Bloomington’s chances to secure other grants by having a master plan in place that is rooted in public input. Many funding entities are more likely to award grants to applicants that have previously gone through planning efforts for the proposed project because they know there is a higher probability for a successful project and a better return on investment.


BLUEPRINT MOVING FORWARD

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2.0 Chapter Two Park Profiles

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


CITY OF BLOOMINGTON PARKS & RECREATION


Overview Bloomington is home to approximately 85,000 residents with 48,000 of those residents being students at Indiana University, the flagship campus of IU’s seven campuses and two regional centers in the state. In 2019, the City of Bloomington was ranked the #1 best city to live in Indiana by the Indiana Chamber of Commerce. Bloomington has received multiple accolades. It has achieved the status of Playful City USA since 2008, a Tree City USA since 1984, a Bird Town since 2017, and a Gold Level Bicycle Friendly Community since 2014. It is no surprise that this city, located in the rolling hills of South-Central Indiana, was designated as a Top College Town named by USA Today. Like the City, Bloomington’s Parks and Recreation Department is also distinguished with an enviable accreditation from the Commission for Accreditation for Park and Recreation Agencies (CAPRA). The Department was first given this accolade in 2001 and has received it in 2006, 2011, and most recently, in 2016. The Parks and Recreation Department is responsible for $84 million of this diverse city’s community assets, and it manages more than 2,200 acres of property that includes 40 park sites, a golf course, ice arena, two pools, three community centers, two sports complexes, three natural resource properties, 13 ball fields, 22 tennis courts, 24 basketball courts, and approximately 30 miles of trails. More than 300 sports and recreation programs are provided annually to Bloomington through the support of Mayor John Hamilton, the City Council, the Board of Park Commissioners, and the citizens of Bloomington.

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


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The mission of the Parks and Recreation Department is to provide essential services, facilities, and programs necessary for the positive development and wellbeing of the community through the provision of parks, greenways, trails, and recreational facilities while working in cooperation with other service providers in the community in order to maximize all available resources.

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


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Bloomington’s existing vision statement is “to provide the highest quality parks, recreation services, and greenspace to enhance the quality of life in the community.”

Values The Parks and Recreation Department is proud to be characterized by what it values. These values include:

Stewardship 20

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Diversity

Responsive


Respect

Progressive

Quality

Service

Accountability

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2016-2020 MASTER PLAN GOALS AND STRATEGIES In 2015, the Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department launched a 5-year action planning process. These goals were a reaction based off of the 2007-2012 master plan, which focused on funding, partnerships, continued high level of service, and trails. • • • • • •

It was determined that because of the 2008 recession, some of the previous goals were not met. As a result Maximize the Planning Effort of public engagement activities with stakeholders, Increase Traditional and Alternative Funding residents, and visitors and as a result of an analysis Sources of the parks’ resources, amenities, facilities, and Evaluate Pricing and Cost Recovery programs, the Department established an updated Increase Partnerships and Collaborations set of master planning goals. These goals put more of Ensure Continued High Level of Service in Parks an emphasis on finances and on maintaining existing Increase Level of Service for Parks and Trails parks, trails, and facilities. These included:

01

02

03

04

Maintain and provide safe parks, trails, and facilities.

Position BPRD activities, programs, and partnerships to positively impact community health.

05

Be responsive to BPRD and redevelopment opportunities that enhance the park system. 22

• Increase Level of Service for Indoor Recreation Services • Evaluate Programming and Collaborative Efforts • Evaluate Marketing and Communications Practices

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Expand the BPRD trail system to improve connectivity with other active design assets.

Continue to provide highquality programs, events, and recreational opportunities.

06

Consider adding or repositioning BPRD resources so the department can achieve its Master Plan goals.


2016-2020 Master Plan Progress The Bloomington Parks and Recreation previous five-year Master Plan spanned from 2016 through 2020. In that plan, six goals were established for the Park Board and/or Department. A synopsis of each follows, with highlights of accomplishments on each goal.

1. Maintain and provide safe parks, trails, and facilities. • Addition of 10 acres—The Parks and Recreation Department now manages more than 2,200 acres. • The approval of $1 million investment in TIF bonds made it possible to make upgrades in the parks. • The approval of $6.9 million in Park Bonds for capital improvements—This was used for capital investments from 2017–2020. • Approval for a $34 million TIF Bond for an investment in Switchyard Park—Switchyard Park was purchased in 2009. It is the largest park project in the City’s history. This park opened in 2019 and includes a performance stage, spray pad, skate park, community gardens, an inclusive playground, and 2 miles of trails. 2. Expand BPRD trail system to improve connectivity with other active design assets. • 2015 issued a total of 24 Special Use Permits: eight for the B-Line Trail, five for the Waldron, Hill and Buskirk Park, five for Bryan Park, three for the Jackson Creek Trail, one for Lower Cascades Park, one for Peoples Park, and one for the Clear Creek Trail. • Installation of Storywalk trail at Rev. Ernest D. Butler Park. • With the bicentennial bonds being sold, seven additional miles of the city’s network of trails and greenways were extended.

added two more parks to the building docket: the pilot road-to-trail conversion project through the leafy refuge of Lower Cascades and a long-awaited six-mile loop trail around Griffy Lake. 3. Position BPRD activities, programs, and partnerships to positively impact community health. • Creation of partnership with a Behavioral Health Center—This provided jobs and training for maintaining parks and facilities. The vision of this program is to reduce the number of people in Bloomington, including children, who live in poverty. • Banneker Community Center received $243,600 in grant funding: $199,600 from Regional Opportunities Initiative, $4,000 from Walmart, and $40,000 anonymously. Banneker was the first in the region to receive the Regional Opportunities Initiative grant that has transformed spaces throughout the facility. The goal of the funding is to establish Banneker as a cultural hub in Bloomington and Monroe County, celebrating diversity and culture through programming, events, and community partnerships. • New partnership with The Code & Key Escape Room—This resulted in the Bloomington Trail Outdoor Escape Adventure, which filled to capacity with 110 participants. 4. Continue to provide high-quality programs, events, and recreational opportunities. • Implementation of a nutritious food program—The Summer Food Program provides food and educational programming to vulnerable children in Bloomington. • Creation of low-cost summer day camp—This program gives children of low-income families an opportunity for safe, wholesome recreation. • Implementation of Double Market Bucks Program—Through a private donor’s gift, this program doubles the value of SNAP benefits redeemed at the BPRD Farmer’s Market, improving access to fresh, nutritious food and supporting local growers and small businesses.

• Bloomington’s active transportation network TROYER GROUP

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5. Be responsive to BPRD and redevelopment opportunities that enhance the park system. • Implementation of environmental quality initiatives—Numerous initiatives to protect the parks’ assets include planting native plants to offer food sources for pollinators; creating a pest management plan to guide the reduction of pesticides; and reducing fossil fuels and carbon imprint by adding solar power panels to 10 different park facilities that generate 1.5 million kilowatts annually. • The Department joined the city’s commitment to add five megawatts of solar power in 2017 and to take advantage of the state’s net metering incentives. Solar panels were installed at 13 Parks and Recreation sites, and the panels are expected to generate 1.519 million kilowatt hours of energy. A 651-kilowatt photovoltaic installation at the Twin Lakes Recreation Center is expected to save $79,158 a year in annual energy costs for that facility alone. 6. Consider adding or repositioning BPRD resources so the department can achieve its Master Plan goals. Progress Summary At a glance, 2015–2020 has been a success from the Parks Department’s perspective in addressing the emphasis on finances and putting those dollars to good use in the parks. In just five years, multiple facilities have been updated, the Department has secured several grants and bonds, trail development and planning have been priorities, an emphasis on key programs such as creating low-cost summer day camps has had positive results, and a movement toward environmental sustainability has created important and productive partnerships.

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


The Parks and Recreation Department’s ambitious and transformative undertakings... combined with countless facilities and programs our tireless Parks staff operates....increases our residents’ physical and emotional wellbeing and steward our natural assets. In survey after survey, our residents report that their access to and enjoyment of these properties and programs is one of their favorite things about Bloomington.” Mayor John Hamilton

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BLOOMINGTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department was formed in 1946. At the time, the City Recreation Council oversaw the governance of the Department. The City Recreation Council was made up of the School Board, a Park Board, the Recreation Commission, and 7 at-large members. Two years later, the Department was governed by the Board of Education and the Board of Recreation. By 1952, the Department met for the first time. Today, it is governed by the City Park Board and the Department of Recreation. The Parks Department is responsible for more than $84 million in City assets. The Department manages 2,342 acres of property, including 33 parks, 27 playgrounds, a golf course, ice arena, two pools, three community centers, three natural resources properties, 13 ballfields, 22 tennis courts, 19 basketball courts and just over 38 miles of trails. The Department is proud to be one of 171 nationally accredited agencies through the National Recreation and Park Association Commission for Accreditation of Parks and Recreation Agencies. The accreditation standards are used as a management tool throughout the year for planning, operations, financials, community involvement, and evaluation. The Department was first accredited by CAPRA in 2001, and has been re-accredited in fiveyear increments in 2006, 2011, and most recently in 2016. The Department is organized and managed in four program divisions including Administration, Recreation Services, Sports Services and Operations, and Development Services. These divisions are staffed by 53 full-time staff members and 454 seasonal staff. In 2019, the dedicated and talented staff set 112 annual budget goals of which 72 (64.29%) were accomplished and 27 (24.11%) substantially accomplished. Only 13 (11.61%) were not met. The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department’s Main office is located at: 401 N Morton St #250 Bloomington, IN 47404 Website: https://bloomington.in.gov/departments/parks Phone number: 812-349-3700

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Paula McDevitt, Parks Director

The Parks System received the 2018 National Gold Medal for Excellence in Park and Recreation Management, awarded by the American Academy for Park and Recreation Administration, in partnership with the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA)! Bloomington took top national honors in its category among communities with a population between 75,000 and 150,000.


MAIN OFFICE STAFF

Paula McDevitt, Director | Email: mcdevitp@bloomington.in.gov | Phone: 812-349-3711 Leslie Brinson, Community Events Manager Email: brinsonl@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3715

Jessica Klein, Health & Wellness Coordinator Email: kleinj@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3771

Ellen Campbell, Community Relations Specialist Email: campbele@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3799

Farmers Market, Farmers Market Email: farmersmarket@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3700

Kim Clapp, Office Manager Email: clappk@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3710

Brenda McGlothlin, Customer Service Rep II Email: mcglothb@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3701

Steve Cotter, Natural Resources Manager Email: cotters@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3736

Sarah Owen, Community Relations Coordinator Email: owensa@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3700

Community Gardens Email: communitygardens@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3700

Ethan Philbeck, Customer Service Rep II Email: philbece@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3757

Melissa Grabowski, Customer Service II Email: grabowsm@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3700

Julie Ramey, Community Relations Manager Email: rameyj@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3719

Tiffany Hall, Customer Service Rep III Email: halti@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3702

Bill Ream, Program/Facility Coordinator Email: reamw@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3748

Erin Hatch, Urban Forester Email: erin.hatch@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3716

Crystal Ritter, Program/Facility Coordinator Email: ritterc@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3725

Rebecca Higgins, Recreation Services Director Email: barrickb@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3713

John Turnbull, Sports Services Director Email: turnbulj@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3712

Rebecca Jania, Natural Resources Coordinator Email: janiar@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3700

Tim Street, Operations & Dev Director Email: streett@bloomington.in.gov Phone: 812-349-3706

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PARKS BOARD History The Bloomington City Park Board, responsible for the acquisition, development, and maintenance of city parklands, held its first meeting on December 7, 1921. The Board formed the Department of Recreation in 1946. The City Recreation Council, which consisted of the School Board, the Park Board, the Recreation Commission, and seven members at-large, governed the Department. In 1948, the governing body was changed, and the Department was sponsored by the Board of Education and the Board of Recreation. The new Department of Parks and Recreation held its first meeting on June 26, 1952, bringing the efforts of the City Park Board and the Department of Recreation into one department. This structure serves the park and recreation needs of the City today. The Board of Park Commissioners is a policy-making authority for the City of Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department. The Board is comprised of four members appointed by the Mayor. Recently, the Board of Park Commissioners approved 137 contracts and service agreements and 32 community partnership agreements.

Park Board Members Kathleen Mills (President)(D)

Jim Whitlatch (Member)(R)

Ellen Rodkey (Member)(I)

Les Coyne (Immediate-Past President) Term Expired: 2020-12-31

Term Expires: 2023-12-31 Phone: (812) 330-7714 Ext. 51093 Email: kmills@mccsc.edu Office: Bloomington High School South 1965 S. Walnut St. Bloomington, IN 47401 Term Expires: 2021-12-31 Phone: (979) 240-8696 Email: ellen@indiana.edu Office: Indiana University Foundation 1550 State Rd. 46 Bloomington, IN 47408

Israel Herrera (Plan Commission Rep.)(D) Term Expires: 2022-12-31 Phone: (812) 679-9169 Email: herrerai@indiana.edu 1200 E. Hillside Dr. Bloomington, IN 47401

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Term Expires: 2024-12-31 Phone: (812) 332-9295 Email: jwhit@lawbr.com Office: Bunger & Robertson 226 South College Ave Bloomington, IN 47404


PARKS SUPPORT Bloomington Parks Foundation The Bloomington Community Park and Recreation Foundation works to provide funding to enhance park experiences for all segments of the Bloomington community. Particular emphasis is placed on park and greenspace enhancement and recreational program development for low-income youth so that they may have an opportunity to develop healthy habits and learn valuable skills. The Foundation also works to provide scholarships for youth that provide opportunities to participate in recreation programs. Park Foundation Leadership • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Debbie Lemon, President Travis Vencel, Past President Jim Murphy, Vice President Chris Quackenbush, Secretary Chris Hawk, Treasurer Jason Banach Doug Bruce John Carter Les Coyne Ted Ferguson John Hurlow Erin Martoglio Aaron Mobley Tony Mobley Valerie Pena Tony Rastall Gary Scott David Skirvin Karin St. John Trish Sterling Jon Tichenor

Community Partnerships The Parks and Recreation Department entered into 28 partnership and cooperative service agreements to maximize available resources and avoid duplication of services. The Department is proud to partner and collaborate with these organizations in 2019 and looks forward to the continued and additional partnerships in 2021:

Association • Bloomington Figure Skating Club • Bloomington Junior League Baseball Association • Centerstone • Code and Key Escape Rooms • Comfort Keepers • David Prall • Downtown Bloomington Inc. • Hilltop Garden and Nature Center at Indiana University • Hoosier Hills Food Bank • Indiana University Center for Veteran and Military Students • IU Health • IU School of Public Health-Recreation, Parks and Tourism Studies Department • Ivy Tech Community College • Jazzercise, Inc. • Lake Monroe Sailing Association • Let’s Go Sports • Mad 4 My Dog • Middle Way House • Monroe County Civic Theater • Monroe County Fair Association • Monroe County History Center • Monroe County Identify and Reduce Invasive Species (MC-IRIS) • Monroe County Public Library • Monroe County Senior League Baseball Association • Mother Hubbard’s Cupboard • The Ryder Magazine and Film Series • Special Olympics Indiana Monroe County • Summer Star Foundation • Volunteers in Medicine

• Bloomingfoods • Bloomington Blades High School Hockey • Bloomington Blades Youth Hockey TROYER GROUP

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PROGRAM ACTIVITIES Cascades Golf Course Lessons Cascades Golf Course consists of three nine-hole courses, which can be combined to create three separate 18-hole configurations. The Quarry Course is the oldest of the three courses, dating back to 1928. The Quarry Course is a par-35, playing a maximum of 2,995 yards. The Pine Course was constructed in 1931 and is a par-36, playing a maximum of 3,135 yards. The Ridge Course is the newest course, opened in 2000. Park Ambassador The Ridge Course is a par-36 which plays a maximum The Park Ambassador program is an all-volunteer of 3,086 yards. Individual or group golf lessons may program that gives the public an opportunity to be scheduled. Leagues are offered for all ages. promote community stewardship and bridge the communication between the community and the Lunar Skating Parks Department. The Park Ambassador program Skate in a specially lit, lunar-like arena while listening sends a message that the community cares about its to the best hits of the ’80s, ’90s and today courtesy of parks. the Arena’s super-watt sound system. Groups of all Through weekly visits to the park, Ambassadors sizes and skaters of all ability levels are welcome.Lunar document maintenance needs, report acts of skating involves the use of strobe and other specialvandalism, interact with park users, promote park effect lighting. Bloomington’s mission is to provide essential services, facilities, and programs necessary for the positive development and well-being of the community through the provision of parks, greenways, trails, and recreational facilities while working in cooperation with other service providers in the community in order to maximize all available resources. Following is a sampling of programs offered:

safety, and encourage an overall positive use of public space. The Ambassador position is a minimum one-year commitment and requires volunteers to attend an Ambassador orientation program prior to participation in the program.

Objectives for the Park Ambassador program are to bridge the line of communication between the community and Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department; assist Bloomington Parks and Recreation with the general maintenance and upkeep of parks through close observation, which will enhance safety for park visitors while, at the same time, provide a presence to deter crime and vandalism; and encourage the community to take a proactive approach in maintaining the integrity and intended use of parks and green space. Community Garden The Butler Park and Willie Streeter Gardens enable gardeners to learn and practice gardening techniques in rented plots. The gardens include in-ground plots available in two sizes and raised beds for rent. Services provided include fencing, access to water, composting facilities, advice from program staff, the Garden Beet newsletter, and community garden events and workshops. Communal tools are available for use at scheduled times during the week. To ensure gardening opportunities are available to all community members, financial assistance is available. 30

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Night Owl Skating Enjoy late-night skating at the Frank Southern Ice Arena. Figure Skating Club of Bloomington Figure Skating Club of Bloomington offers members of all ages the chance to learn figure-skating skills, practice those maneuvers in a safe environment, participate in the club show, test to various ISI levels, and compete. House Hockey House Hockey is an instructional league designed for the beginning through advanced hockey player. It provides all the information and equipment rental that make the league affordable. Adult Hockey League This is an open league for players of all skill levels who are at least 18 years old. Full equipment is required for competition. This program accepts the first eight properly registered teams. Coaches are responsible for forming teams. The arena will facilitate a player pickup list and goalie pickup list for those teams that need extra players. Minimum 15 players per team. Community Farmers’ Market The Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market is a treasure trove of farm products including fruits, vegetables, flowers, meats and cheeses, as well as


annual and perennial plants. Don’t forget about the prepared food section where vendors rustle up a variety of tasty treats for your enjoyment. Shop, socialize, and help support our community’s farmers. A Fair of the Arts: An Arts and Fine Crafts Fair Bloomington Parks and Recreation hosts a celebration of art and community with the sales, demonstrations, and displays of arts and fine crafts by local and regional artists. Performing Arts Series The Performing Arts Series offers the Bloomington community numerous opportunities to experience the talent of its local artists. These take place at a variety of venues around Bloomington and showcase local musicians. Beesponsible Bees play a vital role in our everyday lives that many of us may not realize. In fact, one-third of the food we eat depends on bees, specifically honey bees. They pollinate plants such as apples, almonds, pumpkins, and blueberries. Bee populations may be in decline, but we can help! Learn fun facts about honey bees and pollinators and how to make a honey bee feel at home in your backyard during this program celebrating National Honey Bee Day! FitnessCoach The FitnessCoach program offers fitness center and at-home exercise options to its covered special needs or dual-eligible members who also qualify for Medicare/Medicaid. Covered members may include individuals covered by Medicaid or those with physical impairments, developmental disabilities, cognitive impairments, or mental/behavioral health conditions, or other individuals with special needs who may benefit from improved physical fitness. Bloomington Walking Club The Bloomington Walking Club is a weekly, informal group that walks on the paved trails surrounding Olcott Park. Adults of all ages and ability levels are welcome. Walkers choose their own pace. Dog- and stroller-friendly. You can find a complete list of all the programs and activities that the Parks and Recreation Department offers in the annual program guide located on their website. TROYER GROUP

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BUDGET REVIEW 2014 -2019 BUDGET SUMMARY

10 ,0 00 ,0 00

$8,991,109

$8,896,552

$9,622,593

$9,545,330

8,

40

0,

00

0

8,

80

0, 00

0

In addition to the tax revenue, BPRD receives funds from the Bloomington Parks Foundation, which distributes tens of thousands of dollars each year for youth-related activities, such as swimming, ice skating lessons, and Kid City Summer Camp activities.

$8,778,797

9, 20 0, 00 0

9, 60 0, 00 0

Expenditures

$9,271,023

10 ,4 00 ,0 00

BPRD receives its funding through property tax levies. Each year, the Controller's Office gathers City department budget requests to prepare the City's annual budget. Expenditure and revenue estimates are compiled and the Mayor, with input from the Common Council, makes decisions regarding spending priorities. Individual departmental budgets are presented to the Common Council in August. The Council's public hearing on the budget occurs in September with approval in mid-October. After it is approved, the budget is submitted to the Department of Local Government Finance (DLGF). The DLGF issues a final budget order.

2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2014 - $8,778,797 (Revenue)

$8,668,819 (Expenditures)

2015 - $8,896,552 (Revenue)

$8,325,395 (Expenditures)

2016 - $8,991,109 (Revenue)

$8,268,132 (Expenditures)

2017 - $9,271,023 (Revenue)

$9,126,961 (Expenditures)

2018 - $9,545,330 (Revenue)

$9,923,989 (Expenditures)

2019 - $9,622,593 (Revenue)

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

$10,581,273 (Expenditures)


To supplement the budget and maintain necessary services and operations, BPRD can seek other revenue/funding sources, such as: • • • •

User fees or program fees Financial and in-kind support Community partnerships Grants and/or donations to fund capital expense projects

BPRD actively pursues grant opportunities to supplement the budget. The following chart shows some of these grants and how the dollars were used.

GRANT

AMOUNT OF GRANT

USAGE

Regional Opportunity Initiative

$199,600

Banneker Community Center

Indiana State Department of Health Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity Youth and Adolescent Physical Activity (YAPA) Grant

$9,937

Banneker Community Center

Walmart Community Foundation

$3,000

Banneker Community Center

Raymond Foundation

$15,000

Leonard Springs Nature Days

Indiana State Department of Health Division of Nutrition and Physical Activity Youth and Adolescent Physical Activity (YAPA) Grant

$10,000

Health and Wellness Programs

Monroe County Community School Corporation 21st Century Community Learning Center

$32,434

Banneker at the View Afterschool Program

Community Foundation of Bloomington and Monroe County

$45,000

14-passenger bus for Banneker Community Center

Summer Star Foundation

$4,860

Banneker Summer Nature Days

Indiana Department of Natural Resources Lake and River Enhancement (LARE) Grant

$11,600

Invasive Aquatic Vegetation Management

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CITY OF BLOOMINGTON PARKS & RECREATION


3.0 Chapter Three Community Context

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Elletsville

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BLOOMINGTON

Kirby

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


N

CONTEXT MAP New Unionville

Totaling 23.16 sq. miles, Bloomington is in the south-east part of Indiana, approximately 50 miles from Indianapolis. With a population of over 85,000, the city holds steady as the 7th largest city by population in Indiana (2019). Home to one of the largest state colleges (Indiana University) 48,000 student residents make up the city’s already growing population. The city also serves as the county seat for Monroe County.

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KEY Indiana University Bloomington Parks & Recreation Headquarters Monroe County Parks Hospitals

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NATURAL FEATURES CLIMATE

a high content of coarse fragments within the Berks subclass and moderate soil production and restrictive root depths in the Weikert subclass. In addition, two other soil types are found predominantly throughout the county; Crider Silt Loam (Crc0 and Bedford Silt Loam (BdB). These soil types similarly allow for moderate to high permeability and water capacity to reflect the surrounding landscape.

The climate of Bloomington has an index score of 7.2 out of 10. A higher score indicates a more comfortable year-round climate, based on a comfort range of 7085 degrees. Historically, recipitation rates for the area make it one of the wettest places in the state. The Source for information: in.gov/dnr temperature range for the city is between 20 degrees and 85 degrees, making it more or less a moderate WATER RESOURCES temperature zone. The city of Bloomington has several small bodies of On average, Bloomington receives 48 inches of rain per water that exist within the city boundaries. Only one of year, which is comparable to the national average of these, Griffy Lake, is considered to be an assest to the 38 inches. The city’s average snow accumulation of 17 community. As part of Griffy Lake Nature Preserve, Griffy inches per year more than doubles the national average Lake serves as a recreational source for community of 28 inches. members, but it vital to the Nature Preserve’s wildlife.

GEOGRAPHY AND TOPOGRAPHY

The city’s surface water source for drinking water comes from Lake Monroe, located just south of the city in southern Monroe County. The 10,750 acre lake is part of Brown County state park and serves as a water source for several other communities around the county.

Geography and topography is a determining factor for suitability of land use for building, recreation, farming, or different types of development. Understanding the bedrock and soils can determine suitability and design requirements for building foundations. Different soils may favor farming or other use of certain lands. INVASIVE SPECIES Bloomington’s geogology was transformed and With over 2,000 acres of city properties it should be morphed overtime by the Mississippian Period, a assumed that there would be the prescence of invasive time when most of the area was covered by a shallow, species. Bloomington Parks and Recreation compiled a inland sea. This period left behind siltstones, shales, vegetation report in 2018 which layed out all invasive fine sandstones and isolated carbonates stretching species currently tracked within the parks system; this multiple counties throughout the bottom half of the included asian bush honeysuckle (in a majority of state. Indiana Limestone, one of the valuable forms of their parks and along trails), garlic mustard, japanese salem limestone are only found within Monroe and siltgrass, along with a few others. The managment plans Lawerance counties, 10x35 sq. miles. list out a variety of methods of control that are to be All of Bloomington and the surrounding landforms were administered city wide. These are mechanical, cultural, created in the wake of the retreating glaciers 10,000 biological, chemical and education. The success of years ago, during the Ice Age. Floods from the melting the plan however relies on the constant monitoring glaciers caused massive erosion and helped carve the and assessments of the parks to which an action plan landscape as we know it today as Karst topography, can be made out to appropriatly treat areas of most with rolling hills, sinkholes and underground caves and concern. streams.

Sourcefortheprevious information:naturalbloomington. WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT The city of Bloomington experiences a relatively high com/natural history count of deer in urban and suburban areas. To help SOILS mitigate and manage the growing ecological impact Commonly found within Monroe County, Berks-Weikert from the deer the Joint City of Bloomington-Monroe Complex (BkF) covers approximately 24.5% of the land. County Deer Task Force was formed in response to These soils have moderately high soil productivity and resident’s growing concerns. 38

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


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OTHER PLANNING DOCUMENTS As part of the inventory and analysis phase of the master plan, review of existing planning documents was conducted. Summaries of the findings from these documents are as follows:

Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department

MASTER PLAN 2016-2020

PARKS & REC MASTER PLAN UPDATE: 2016-2020 Much like this Master Plan, the past master plan looked at planning frameworks that would successfully lead the Bloomington Parks System to develop action plans and goals that would contend with and surpass other town and city park systems. Using those valuable resources, the Parks and Recreation Department was able to devise strategies and objectives to help accomplish their goals. Six goals emerged from the community engagement and research process as the basis for future action and decision-making for Bloomington’s Parks and Recreation Master Plan. These goals align with the Department’s mission. The six goals are: 1. Maintain and Provide Safe Parks, Trails, and Facilities 2. Expand Department Trail System to Improve Connectivity with other Active Design Assets 3. Position Department Activities, Programs, and Partnerships to Positively Impact Community Health 4. Continue to Provide High-Quality Programs, Events, and Recreational Opportunities 5. Be Responsive to Development and Redevelopment Opportunities that enhance the Park System

The maintenance of existing parks, trails, and facilities is one of the major goals of this Master Plan.

CHAPTER 6

COMMUNITY VISION AND GOALS Through public meetings, stakeholder interviews, surveys, benchmark community analysis, and national trend research, the Bloomington Parks and Recreation 'HSDUWPHQW0DVWHU3ODQSURMHFWWHDPKDVLGHQWLÀHGVL[JRDOVWKDWZLOODGYDQFH FRPPXQLW\QHHGVDQGUHÁHFWQDWLRQDOWUHQGVLQSDUNVDQGUHFUHDWLRQ&KDSWHU 6 details these six goals and provides suggestions for policy and long-range actions that the Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department should take in order to achieve these goals. To be successful, the Plan will require the commitment and resources of the Department, City, other government agencies, local businesses, user groups, and the general population.

6. Consider adding or repositioning Department Resources so the Department can achieve its Master Plan Goals

The foundation of Bloomington Parks and Recreation is built on the Department’s mission. The individual goals, objectives, actions, and recommended policies that have emerged through the master plan process are informed by this mission. ,PSOHPHQWDWLRQRIWKHVSHFLÀFSROLFLHVDQGORQJUDQJHDFWLRQVLQWKLVFKDSWHU will require incremental action planning and follow-through on a 1-to-5 year basis. The most immediate actions and priorities for implementation are presented in Chapter Nine’s Implementation Plan, which will be updated on an annual basis by the Department. Together, these goals, policies, and actions provide a framework for implementing the Bloomington Parks and Recreation 'HSDUWPHQW·V0DVWHU3ODQ7RVXFFHHGVSHFLÀFWDVNVDVZHOODVLQGLYLGXDOV UHVSRQVLEOHIRUOHDGLQJWKHPZLOOQHHGWREHLGHQWLÀHGDVSURMHFWVDUHPRYHG forward by the Department. 52

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department


CITY OF BLOOMINGTON HOUSING AND NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT CONSOLIDATED PLAN 2015-2019 Developed by the Housing and Neighborhood Development Department of the City of Bloomington, this report is a plan that the City will use to pursue goals outlined by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development as a requirement for administering federal programs like the HOME Investment Partnership Project and the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG). The Consolidated Plan features two strategies that address Bloomington’s priority needs and directly impact the Parks and Recreation Department. Strategy 3 calls for the City to “Create or improve infrastructure in target areas” and notes that one method for achieving this is to “provide funding for pedestrian pathways such as sidewalks (including curb improvements), ADA transition ramps, and multi-purpose pathways.” Strategy 4 calls for the City to improve public facilities. To facilitate this, the plan calls for funding to be provided to “non-profits for the improvement of public facilities that are primarily used by HAND target populations.”

BICYCLE & PEDESTRIAN TRANSPORTATION & GREENWAYS SYSTEM PLAN 2008 This plan guides the development of bike routes, bike lanes, sharrows, bicycle boulevards, side paths, connector paths, greenways, multi-use trails, and unimproved trails in the City of Bloomington. The City devised the plan to undertake “an important step toward improving the health, fitness, and quality of life of its residents. [The plan] represents a commitment by the City to design, construct, and maintain a network of safe, convenient, and attractive bicycle and pedestrian facilities for commuting and recreational use throughout the City.” The plan was designed to be reviewed frequently, and a new review would be warranted in light of the findings for this Master Plan. The BPTGSP indicates that multi-use paths, like the ones that the Department administers, should be pursued in the urbanizing ring of the town, and Master Plan data supports this approach. The BPTGSP features several suggested “future paths” for trails that could be administered by the Department. The Department should analyze these potential trails and determine which of these trails would best fit the needs that are identified in the Master Plan.

Strategies 3 and 4 represent areas in which the Parks and Recreation Department could potentially collaborate and utilize funding to improve trails and facilities that are “primarily used by HAND target populations.” Because trails and maintenance are top priorities of this Master Plan, such a collaboration could be fruitful.

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2018 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN CITY OF BLOOMINGTON

The Plan establishes the framework and provides direction for City-elected and appointed officials and staff to make decisions regarding the desired location and intensity of growth, development and redevelopment opportunities, transportation facilities, parks, and other public services. Methods to help foster a healthy local economy, actions to protect and enhance the natural environment, and providing equitable access to housing and delivery of public services are also integral parts of the Plan.

The Bloomington Comprehensive Plan is the city’s long-range plan for land use and development. It is a set of goals, policies, maps, illustrations, and implementation strategies that state how the City of Bloomington should address development: physically, socially, and economically. This is the third edition of the City’s comprehensive plan; it renames and replaces the Growth Policies Plan of 2002, which in A process was initiated to update the GPP, starting turn replaced the Growth Policies Plan of 1991. in 2011. The Plan Commission adopted a final draft While the Bloomington Comprehensive Plan has a at their June 2017 meeting to be considered by the horizon of 2040, it should be reviewed periodically Common Council. The Common Council adopted and updated regularly in response to land use trends, a final draft at their January 17, 2018 meeting with changes in population, or any significant events that Resolution 18-01. The Plan Commission, subsequently may affect Bloomington’s future. These updates approved the Plan at their March 19, 2018 hearing. will ensure that the Plan and its individual elements remain relevant.

2018 Comprehensive Plan

City of Bloomington

Importantly, the Comprehensive Plan identifies several key synergies that relate to Bloomington’s parks and public spaces. Noteably, the expressed values of respect for environmental quality, alternative transportation options (particularly bike/ ped. options), physical appearance, and supporting an equitable and inclusive community all are echoed throughout this plan. To support the Growth Policies Plan Vision, as part of the overall Comprehensive Plan update, the BPRD should address these values through a targeted focus on diversity, equity, and inclusion - across each of its updated goals. 42

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


BLOOMINGTON TRANSPORTATION PLAN 2019 The Bloomington Transportation Plan (Plan) supports Bloomington’s vision of a safe, efficient, accessible, and well-connected multimodal transportation system with enhanced transportation options and reduced dependence on the individual automobile, and, it will guide the city as it continues to grow and face new transportation challenges. This Plan fulfills the 2018 Comprehensive Plan requirement that calls for the development of an updated Master Thoroughfare Plan that includes elements of an active transportation plan. As an update to the 2002 Master Thoroughfare Plan, this Plan identifies new projects and programs as well as opportunities to coordinate their delivery for maximum benefit to community members. This Plan will be incorporated as part of the City’s Comprehensive Plan, and it will guide the City’s transportation investments, policies, and operations

towards its 2040 vision. This Plan recognizes the growing rates of walking, bicycling, and transit riding in Bloomington and the importance of planning for these active and healthy modes while continuing to maintain and improve the City’s existing transportation infrastructure. The Plan achieves this shift by rethinking street classifications and providing updated multimodal facility recommendations. As Bloomington has limited rightof-way (ROW) for new or expanded transportation infrastructure, the City will consider the needs of all travelers in various types of environments as it retrofits existing facilities. This multimodal and context-driven approach positions Bloomington to meet its current and future transportation needs and goals.

CLIMATE ACTION PLAN The Bloomington Climate Action Plan is a comprehensive roadmap that identifies activities that will have the greatest impact in reducing emissions identified in Bloomington's greenhouse gas inventory, namely reducing the impacts of the energy, transportation, and waste sectors. Additional strategies are identified within the plan as preventative measures to reduce the worst impacts of climate change and increase resilience in coming years. The document will serve as an evidencebased policy in response to community concerns about Bloomington's contribution to and response to climate change, as well as meeting the objectives of the Sustainability Action Plan's vision to continue to minimize the generation of GHG emissions from all sources, toward an end goal of carbon neutrality, and prepare for climate change. Bloomington’s parks play a large role in climate mitigation strategies - with implications to parkland, Department facilities, and equipment as well as the operation and on-going maintenance of each.

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SUSTAINABILITY ACTION PLAN Bloomington’s 2018 Sustainability Action Plan is evidence of the City’s commitment to environmental sustainability. As Bloomington Parks and Recreation leaders and staff make decisions for each of the parks, they should be aware of the goals and action items recommended in the Sustainability Action Plan. As described in the Executive Summary section of the plan, the plan “represents the first formal sustainability planning effort of the Bloomington community, with an explicit focus on goals and actions that address the most pressing environmental issues, with a view towards economic prosperity and social equity.” Though the Sustainability Action Plan is the first formal five-year plan, Bloomington has a long history of implementing programs that prioritize energy conservation, renewable energy, waste reduction, and food availability. These programs have made Bloomington, including the Parks and Recreation Department, a regional leader when it comes to sustainability initiatives.

area for which the City will need to continue striving to be inclusive is in the area of social equity: “The SAP provides a summary of past community sustainability initiatives and lays the groundwork for future goals and successes. While social equity was an inherent part of the community conversation during the development of this plan, a much stronger effort is needed to address equity in future planning efforts. This plan represents a first step in a community conversation about what a comprehensive sustainability framework includes but additional work is needed to address issues such as affordable housing, living wages, and racial equity that are closely tied to the areas of focus in this plan.”

The Sustainability Action Plan serves as a set of priorities for the City, which leaders acknowledge will grow and change as priorities, programs, technologies, and other key factors change. The City cannot singularly implement the plan, which is also true of implementing a park master plan. Rather, the City will need to rely on the collaboration of its many partners, the stakeholders, and the community as a The Sustainability Action Plan was developed through whole. Everyone will need to be invested in managing a partnership between the Gnarly Tree Sustainability resources to optimize best practices and outcomes. Institute and the City’s Department of Economic and Sustainable Development (ESD). Numerous employees and stakeholders in the City provided input through either a community outreach session, a working PLAN STRUCTURE: group, or as a participant on the Advisory Board. The This SAP is divided into eight chapters: team working on the plan established the following 1. Climate Change and Adaption vision: “The City of Bloomington, Indiana, will become 2. Energy and the Built Environment a sustainability leader by working as a community to 3. Transportation preserve our natural resources, maintain our distinct 4. Local Food and Agriculture culture, build a diverse and thriving economy, and 5. Waste ensure a healthy and equitable standard of living.” 6. Water The Sustainability Action Plan includes eight chapters 7. Ecosystem Health on key sustainability topics: climate change and 8. City Operations adaptation, energy and the built environment, transportation, local food and agriculture, waste, SUSTAINABILITY PLAN INSIGHTS: water, ecosystem health, and City operations. Each Similar to the Comprehensive Plan update, the chapter includes information about current and past Sustainability Action Plan has many overlaps work. Each section also outlines in a table the current with the vision and mission of the Bloominton’s goals, actions, timelines, partners, and costs, creating Parks Department. Parks will play a major role an action plan for each key area of focus. Several in the preservation of natural resources and action items in the plan are related to the City’s there are several opportunities to include equity Comprehensive Plan and many of the goals of the across all departmental aspects, particularly Parks and Recreation Department. programming. As parks are a major contributor Through the 9-month planning process, the City to overall ecosystem health, expressing that built volunteer capacity with over 200 people actively value within this plan will help to align each of being involved in the plan’s creation. However, one these planning efforts. 44

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


Bloomington, Indiana

Sustainability Action Plan City of Bloomington • 2018

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MAYORAL INITIATIVES CURRENT MAYOR: JOHN HAMILTON Support and Maintain Public Safety, Civility and Justice Provide fire service and law enforcement and collaborate with agencies to promote justice and civility. Provide ongoing support and direction to issues of downtown livability, homelessness, the opioid crisis, and more. Affordable Housing Implement and refine an affordable housing strategy as part of the Comprehensive Master Planning process, including updates to the Unified Development Ordinance. Facilitate Economic Development through Enhancing Quality of Place Continue to work with small businesses, associations, artists, nonprofits, and entrepreneurs to make Bloomington a great place to establish and grow as an employer. Creating engaging physical spaces, supporting great events and experiences, nurturing sustainable practices, and enhancing a spirit of innovation and vitality are all part of a strong, healthy economic future. Transparency/Community Engagement Communicate with and engage the public about how City government performs, as well as increase use and access to data from City departments. Examples of this transparent community engagement include the Polco public engagement website for collecting public input on current issues facing the City, the biennial Community Survey, ongoing budget goal updates, the 142 data sets on the B-Clear data portal on the City website, the Bloomington Revealed site providing visual representation of such data and the mayor’s open office hours. 46

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Asset Management and Investment Invest in the repair and replacement of existing Cityowned assets by providing necessary funding to all City departments responsible for City-owned assets. Invest in new City assets that respond to needs of the community. Innovation Invest in staff and create a culture of innovation that encourages piloting new ideas that will improve the delivery of services to the community while increasing efficiency to maximize City taxpayer dollars.


HISTORY, FEATURES, POPULATION AND ECONOMIC FACTORS HISTORY In 1816, President James Madison selected Bloomington to become the site of a seminary, and in 1818, the Indiana General Assembly created Monroe County, named after the sitting president of the United States at the time, President James Monroe. The County’s boundaries were established in 1836. Today, Bloomington is the seat of the County. It is a thriving, vibrant community. Known as the “Gateway to Scenic Southern Indiana” and located 50 miles south of Indianapolis, the first settlers of the city were so impressed with the “haven of blooms” that they called the city Bloomington. Bloomington and the surrounding area have multiple state parks, state and national forests, and city parks. Monroe County includes Lake Monroe and Lake Lemon. Lake Monroe supplies water to the County, and both lakes have become key recreational centers. Bloomington is also the home of Indiana University (founded in 1820), which is one of the oldest and largest state universities in America. The Bloomington City Park Board, responsible for the acquisition, development, and maintenance of city parklands, held its first meeting on December 7, 1921. The Board formed the Department of Recreation in 1946. The Department was originally governed by the City Recreation Council, which consisted of the School Board, the Park Board, the Recreation Commission, and seven members atlarge. In 1948, the governing body was changed, and the Department was sponsored by the Board of Education and the Board of Recreation. The Department of Parks and Recreation held its first meeting on June 26, 1952, bringing the efforts of the City Park Board and the Department of Recreation into one department. This structure serves the park and recreation needs of the City today.

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MAN-MADE HISTORICAL FEATURES AND ARTS CULTURE FEATURES Bloomington offers an abundance of things to see and do throughout the City. From its historical districts, to its cultural centers on Indiana University’s campus and in the City, to the art that is seen, heard, and performed, the City offers its residents a culturally rich experience. Historic Districts

• Fairview Historic District: This is the smallest historic district but has a rich history and includes several African American landmarks. • Showers Brothers Furniture Factory Historic District: This district pays homage to the Showers Brothers Furniture Factory, founded by Charles C. Showers in 1868. The furniture company had a strong impact on Bloomington’s history until the mid 1950s. • Courthouse Square Historic District: This district is home to the courthouse, a local historic landmark.

• Restaurant Row Historic District: This district Bloomington’s historic districts reflect a variety of features several restaurants that feature global architectures and geographies that create unique cuisine. landscapes and culturally rich neighborhoods that attract residents from all walks of life and visitors from • McDoel Historic District: This district is a residential district and showcases homes from the Industrial around the world. The historic districts are: boom era that started in the early twentieth • Garden Hill Historic District: This neighborhood century. is on the northside and includes a variety of • Matlock Heights Historic District: This is the first architectures and landscapes. mid-century historic district in the state of Indiana. • Greater Prospect Hill Historic District: This District surrounds Bloomington’s earliest local district and • Maple Heights Conservation District: This neighborhood was developed in the early many of the homes in it are over 100 years old. twentieth century when homes were built for the • Prospect Hill Historic District: This is Bloomington’s workforce that was needed to meet the demands first historic district and was listed as one in 1991. of industrial expansion. • University Courts Historic District: Described as • Near West Side Conservation District: This a “rare illustration of truly urban early twentiethneighborhood also developed as a result of the century,” this residential historic district was listed Industrial boom of the early twentieth century. in 2007. Wood-frame homes characterize this district. • Elm Heights Historic District: This district dates to Source for the previous information: Bloomington. the 1920s and reflects “the greatest concentration in.gov of architect-designed homes in the city.”

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Historic Landmarks The following list showcases some of the popular historic landmarks in Bloomington: • Buskirk-Chumley Theater: A national landmark, this “Spanish mission revival silent movie house is one of the busiest community theaters in the country” (VisitBloomington. com). Theater performances include music, theatre, dance, film, nationaltouring performances, comedy shows, and community events. • Farmer House Museum: This historic residence was given to the City by Mary Ellen and Ed Farmer who wanted to encourage historic preservation and cultural memory. • Fountain Square Mall: This mall provides a unique shopping experience. • Hilltop Garden & Nature Center: In addition to being part of the Bloomington Garden Walk, Hilltop has greenhouses, ponds, and perennials. • Hinkle-Garton Farmstead Community Historic Site: Visitors can see a mid-1800s farmstead. • IU Auditorium: A cultural center on IU’s campus, the IU Auditorium hosts international and national performers. • Monroe County History Center: Consisting of a museum, library, and gift store, this center exhibits Monroe County historical artifacts. • Rose Hill Cemetery: This historic landmark has the gravesites and headstones of several prominent Bloomington citizens.

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Arts and Culture The art and cultural assets in Bloomington reflect a “blend of Midwestern values, international influences, intellectual pursuits, and spiritual growth” (VisitBloomington.com). There are numerous ways to learn about Bloomington’s history: historic landmarks, art galleries, museums, cultural centers, and regional trails. Art Galleries and Museums Bloomington has numerous art galleries representing a diverse group of artists. Some galleries display the work of local and regional artists, such as Dimensions Gallery, GallerySCG, Pictura Gallery, the I-Fell Building, Monroe Convention Center Gallery, and the Vault at Gallery Mortgage. Other galleries showcase national and international artists. These include Eskenazi Museum of Art at Indiana University, Grunwald Gallery of Art, Untitled Light Gallery at the Mill, and the Venue Fine Art & Gifts. The City also has several museums. The Elizabeth Sage Historic Costume Collection has over 19,000 objects in its costume collection. The Glenn A. Black Laboratory of Archaeology exhibits the Great Lakes/Ohio Valley archaeology and entho-history. The Indiana Geological 50

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and Water Survey Museum has an interactive learning lab and science discovery exhibits. The IU Archives has the “most comprehensive source of information on the history and culture of Indiana University.” The Lilly Library is another great resource and is known for its rare book and manuscript collection. For a more worldly experience, residents and visitors can check out the Mathers Museum of World Cultures.


Cultural Centers

cultural awareness regarding Latinos

The Indiana University campus is home to numerous • Neal-Marshall Black Culture Center: A center cultural centers that celebrate the blend of cultures the promotes its commitment to academic on campus and in Bloomington. These cultural excellence through quality educational, cultural, centers bring students together to help them adjust and social programs that promote awareness of to university life. Following is a list of centers: the Black experience • Asian Culture Center: A center that focuses on the Asian culture • El Centro Comunal Latino: A center focused on the Latino community

• Tibetan Mongolian Buddhis Cultural Center: Though outside of the City, this center offers a place for meditation and reflection

• First Nations Educational and Cultural Center: A cultural center that addresses issues related to the education of and about Native people • Gaden Khachoeshing Buddhist monastery

Monastery:

A

Tibetan

• Helene G. Simon Hillel Center: A center focused on Jewish college students • La Casa Latino Cultural Center: A center whose purpose is to enhance the historical, political, and

Regional Trails

Cultural Insights

In addition to the experiences of the previous indoor venues, Bloomington residents and visitors can explore the arts through one of two regional artisan and heritage trails. ArtsRoad 46 connects Bloomington, Nashville, and Columbus, Indiana. Each unique community offers trail travelers a cultural arts district experience. The Indiana Limestone Heritage Trail also provides an arts and culture experience. Each site along the trail features limestone, whether it’s a quarry, mill, or sculpture. This trail runs along the Salem Belt through Monroe County and Lawrence County.

As is clear from the roster of activities and centers, Bloomington benefits from Indiana University’s influence. While the multiculturism emphasis gives the community a much larger “feel”, it also highlights equity gaps - an expressed priority throughout the planning process. In order to address any service disparity, greater emphasis within this plan should be placed on raising the level of awareness of existing and potential equity strategies, such as partnerships. TROYER GROUP

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Housing & Households According to census.gov, the following are the demographic statistics for Bloomington households: Owner-occupied housing unit rate

34.6%

Median value of owner-occupied units

$108,100

Median gross rent

Population In the southern portion of Indiana, Bloomington (IU students included) is the largest city in the county, 7th largest city in state (24th without students), and 400th in the country with a 2020 population of 85,981 (38,000 without IU). In comparison to Monroe County, the City of Bloomington holds a majority of the population. Future projects by Bloomington’s 2018 Comprehensive Plan suggests the population of the Bloomington metro area age 55/above will grow 20%, non-student adult population will grow 13%, and youth population by only 7% from 2020–2040. Year

Bloomington

Monroe County

1980

43,262

98,785

1990

60,633

108,978

2000

69,291

120,771

2010

80,405

138,560

2020

85,981 *This includes

48,000 seasonal IU students

147,311

Age and Sex According to census.gov, the following are the demographic statistics for age and sex: Bloomington

52

National

Persons under 5 years

3.3%

6.0%

Persons under 18 years

11.3%

22.3%

Persons over 65 years

9.2%

16.5%

Male

50.3%

49.2%

Female

49.7%

50.8%

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

$887

Households

30,897

Persons per household

2.24

Language other than English spoken at home

14.2%

Health According to census.gov, 7.6% of Bloomington residents under the age of 65 have a disability. Of residents under the age of 65, 9.6% do not have health insurance.


Race and Hispanic Origin

The City of Bloomington’s school corporation is the According to census.gov, the following are the Monroe County Community School Corporation. demographic statistics for race and hispanic origin: Following is a list of the schools in the Monroe County Community School Corporation followed by the grades each serves. White alone (not Hispanic or Latino) 81.4% • Arlington Heights Elementary School (K-6) Hispanic or Latino 4.1% • Binford Elementary School (3-6) Black or African American alone 4.3% • Bloomington Graduation Schools (9-12) American Indian & Alaska Native alone 0.3% • Bloomington High School North (9-12) • Bloomington High School South (9-12) Asian alone 9.2% • Childs Elementary (K-6) Native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander alone 0.1% • Clear Creek Elementary (K-6) Two or more races 0.6% • Early Learning Center School (PK-PK) • Fairview Elementary School (K-6) Education • Grandview Elementary School (K-6) • Highlight Park Elementary School (K-6) According to census.gov, 92.4% of Bloomington • Hoosier Hills Career Center (9-12) residents that are older than 25 are a high school • Hoosier Hills Childcare Center (PK-PK) graduates or higher compared to the national • Jackson Creek Middle School (7-8) average of 87.7%. Of residents older than 25 years, • Lakeview Elementary School (K-6) 55.8% have achieved a bachelor’s degree or higher. • Lora L Batchelor Middle School (7-8) • Marlin Elementary School (K-6) • Rogers Elementary School (K-2) • Summit Elementary School (K-6) • Templeton Elementary School (K-6) • The Academy of Science and Entrepreneurship School (9-12) • Tri-North Middle School (7-8) • Unionville Elementary School (K-6) • University Elementary School (K-6) Following is a list of private schools located in Bloomington: • • • • • • • • • •

St. Charles Boromeo School (PK-8) Clear Creek Christian School (K-6) Harmony School (PK-12) Bloomington Montessori School (PK-6) Pinnacle School (K-12) Lighthouse Christian Academy (PK-12) Grace Baptist Academy (PK-K) Adventist Christian Academy (K-5) Wings of Love Christian Academy (K-10) Lutheran Campus Ministry Elca

Indiana University and Ivy Tech Community College Bloomington are the two colleges located in Bloomington. There are numerous other colleges in the region, including Franklin University, Harrison College Columbus, and DePauw University. TROYER GROUP

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SOCIOECONOMIC FACTORS According to census.gov and datausa, the following are the statistics for the economy in Bloomington: Bloomington National 57.8%

62.9%

In civilian labor force (female 16+) 57.2%

58.2%

In civilian labor force (total 16+)

• Electric Equipment Manufacturing • Printing and Publishing According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics Data, the unemployment rate in Bloomington at the end of 2019 was 2.7%. In September 2020, the rate was 4.5%. It was over 10% a few months earlier, but that was likely a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Between 2017 and 2018, the median household income grew from $33,172 to $34,435, a 3.81% increase. Though this is significantly lower than Poverty rate 36.6% 10.5% the state average of $55,746, this number may be From 2017 to 2018, employment in Bloomington brought down by the higher number of young adults grew at a rate of 0.77% from 40,000 to 40,400 living on IU’s campus or in the City. Property values employees. According to the Greater Bloomington are on average higher than the state with the average Chamber of Commerce, the top 10 major employers property value being $182,100, or about $35,000 higher than the state average. in Bloomington are: Median household income

$34,435

$60,293

1. Indiana University - Bloomington 2. Cook Group, Inc. 3. Indiana University Health Bloomington 4. Monroe County Community School Corporation 5. Baxter Healthcare Pharmaceuticals 6. City of Bloomington 7. General Electric 8. Monroe County 9. Internal Medicine Associates 10. Richland Bean Blossom Schools

Reviewing Bloomington’s 2018 Comprehensive Plan gives some insight into the city’s economic health. Although seemingly growing in some sectors, growth of aggregate jobs is sluggish outside of healthcare and education. Those blue-collar jobs—manufacturing, construction, and retail—have declined since 2000. IU, local government, schools and private-sector support make up 74% of the local employment base.

Poverty Levels Per Capital Personal Income (annual) in 2019 was $43,411, which is approximately $5,000 less than the state average of $48,678. Over 60 families receive welfare (TANF). Almost 9,000 receive food stamps and about 6,450 of children in Bloomington receive free and reduced lunch fees. According to census data, approximately 36% of the population lives in poverty.

Economic Impact

More than one industry contributes to the overall economic health of Bloomington; however, Indiana University is the driving force of economic growth and stability in the region. The university commissioned Emis, a company that provides economic impact studies and labor market data to educational institutions, to conduct a study. In October 2020, the Despite the substantial number of jobs noted above, study showed that IU added $9.9 billion in income Bloomington still has a diverse local economy. to Indiana’s economy in fiscal year 2018–2019. Those other industries that contribute signficant According to the study, for every $10,000 spent on IU students’ education, there is a return of $24,000 employement are as follows: to taxpayers. This kind of economic impact supports • Arts, Entertainment, Recreation, and Visitors over 150,000 jobs, according to the study. • Biomedical/Biotechnical (Life Sciences) • • • • • • • •

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Chemical & Chemical Related Products Forest & Wood Products Information Technology & Telecommunications Computer & Electronic Products Mining (Non-metal) Defense and Security Education and Knowledge Creation Advanced Materials

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Another industry in Bloomington that tells a compelling story of economic success is that of the arts. The arts and culture economy in Bloomington generates over $72 million in total economic activity. The industry supports about 3400 jobs and generates about $63.6 million in household income. It also creates another $6.3 in local and state government revenue.


COMMUNITY ATTRACTIONS In addition to the historic features and arts and culture features of the City, Bloomington serves as the hub of activity in the region with numerous other top-notch attraction destinations. Some of these are: » » » » » » » » » » »

Indiana University B-Line Trail Morgan-Monroe State Forest Wonder Lab Hoosier National Forest Bloomington Community Farmers’ Market Monroe Lake Lake Griffy BBQ Train Oliver Winery & Vinyards Bloomington Freight Station

Transportation

Bloomington is located just 45 minutes south of Indianapolis and two hours from Louisville right in the heart of the Midwest. The surrounding rolling hills and scenic forests attract visitors from all over the world.

Major Highways » » » » » »

I-69 SR 37 SR 45 SR 46 SR 48 SR 446

Air

» Monroe County Airport (No commercial) » Indianapolis International Airport (Commercial; 50 miles away)

Railway – Passenger

» Amtrak (Nearest station is in Indianapolis)

Bus Lines

» Bloomington Transit (includes transportation for persons with disabilities) » Hoosier Ride (regional) » IU Campus Bus (services students at IU) » Go Express Travel (service to Indianapolis Airport and downtown) » Rural Transit (surrounding areas of Bloomington) » Star of America Shuttle (service to Indianapolis Airport) » Greyhound (statewide service, U.S., and Canada) » Catch-A-Ride (services IU students only) TROYER GROUP

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Festivals and Fairs

Bloomington hosts numerous annual festivals and fairs throughout the year, creating a tourism draw that has a significant impact on Bloomington’s economy. The Freezefest Festival in January, the Pride Film Festival in February, and the Indiana Heritage Quilt Show make up some of the key events in the first quarter of the year. The spring season kicks off a busier festival season with the Bloomington Craft Beer Festival, the Hoosier Half Marathon and 5k, and the IU Little 500 Weekend. May continues the trend with Harrodsburg Heritage Days and the Bloomington Early Music Festival. June makes for a fun summer in Bloomington with the Limestone Comedy Festival, Arts Fair on the Square, and Taste of Bloomington. In July, residents can enjoy the Fourth of July parade and festivities or the Monroe County Fair. August rounds out the summer activities with the Bloomington Blues and Boogie Woogie Piano Festival, Pridefest, and Indiana Toy and Comic Expo. Fall starts with a busy September and includes the B’Town Jazz Fest, Fourth Street Festival of the Arts and Crafts, Garlic Fest & Community Art Fair, Bubblefest, Kiwanis Indiana Balloon Fest, Monroe County Fall Festival, Hoosiers Outrun Cancer, and the Lotus World Music & Arts Festival. October is just as packed with events and includes the Midway Music Festival, IU’s Homecoming Weekend, the Great Glass Pumpkin Patch, Hilly Hundred Bicycle Tour, and Bloomington Restaurant Week. November doesn’t slow down the pace in Bloomington. Events include the Artisan Guilds of Bloomington Holiday Show, the Bloomington Handmade Market, Canopy of Lights, and the Holiday Market. In December, residents and visitors can enjoy Krampus Night. All year long, there is a First Thursdays Festival and a Gallery Walk in downtown Bloomington.

OTHER RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES In addition to the amenities provided by the Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department, community members have other recreational opportunities in Bloomington and Monroe County. Some of these opportunities include: County Parks Karst Farm Park • Splash pad • Trails • Picnicking • Day camping • Biking • Disc golf 56

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


• Athletic fields • Playgrounds Flatwoods Park • Trails • Biking • Bird watching • Picnicking • Playgrounds Will Detmer Park • Basketball • Bike repair • Fenced garden plots and raised beds • Trails • Biking • Picnicking Jackson Creek Park • Fitness station • Trails • Basketball • Playground Monroe Lake and Griffy Lake • Fishing • Boat/kayaking rentals • Camping • Burton’s Knightridge Kampground • Lake Monroe Village • Paynetown Campground • Monroe Causeway Campground • Salt Creek State Recreation Area • White Oak Loop • Yogi Bear’s Jellystone Park at Lake Monroe

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Amateur Softball Association Bloomington Bicycle Club Bloomington Blades Youth Hockey Association Bloomington Community Bike Project Bloomington Fencing Club Bloomington Flying Fish Volkssporting Club Bloomington Fools Flash House Harriers Bloomington Junior League Baseball Association Bloomington Walking Club Bloomington Wrestling Club Bloomington Yacht Club, Inc. Cutters Soccer Club Griffy Lake Nature Preserve Guardian Martial Arts Hoosier Canoe Club Indiana Swim Club Indiana Track Club Lake Monroe Sailing Association Monroe County Senior League Baseball Association Monroe County YMCA Monroe County Youth Soccer Pokemon Go Bloomington Richland Bean Blossom Youth Sports Riddle Point Rowing Association Smithville Diamonds Special Olympics Indiana – Monroe County

Youth Sports Programming in City of Bloomington • Baseball • Basketball • Golf • Hockey • Personal training • Pickleball • Skating • Soccer • Softball • Special Olympics Indiana – Monroe County • Swimming • Tennis • Volleyball Community Organizations • Active Living Coalition • Agon • Alpine Ski Club TROYER GROUP

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CONCLUSIONS Several conclusions can be drawn from the demographic data in Bloomington, and this will have an impact on planning for Parks and Recreation facilities and services. The population of Bloomington has grown 6.1% since 2010. It is projected to grow by approximately 9% more by the year 2030. With this projected growth, growing the amount of available park land, amenities, and programs may be an area of focus for park planners. At the same time, as noted in the population differential, Bloomington is a different community across all Census categories during the summer (as most of the students leave at this time). Though Bloomington’s school-aged (Pre-K through 18) population is significantly lower than the state average, the college age population is more than twice the average of the state. The number of aging adults (65 and older) makes up less of the population than the state average as does the older adult population (45 to 64). These population demographics may influence planners’ decisions when it comes to creating park amenities and programs. Though demographic trends might show a need for more amenities and programming targeting the college age population, planners should also consider how to attract more families and teens to the region by focusing on these populations. In addition, they should consider the underrepresented populations in the City. Another significant factor for planners is a socioeconomic one. The low median household income (compared to the state average) in Bloomington coupled with the high poverty level indicates that planners need to be aware of social inequities and economic disparities of the population they serve. Access to resources, availability of those resources to everyone, and inclusiveness are important to improving social inequities. Improving quality of life for current residents and attracting workforce to live in the City are initiatives Bloomington leaders are actively working on and should continue to be a focus. It will be critical to use statistical information like this when presenting information to funding entities about placemaking and quality-of-life improvements such as parks projects. 58

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


Recent national trends emphasize that quality of life plays a key role in the success of a community. Bloomington’s numerous cultural, art, and recreational assets create a strong foundation on which to build quality of life. These assets contribute to overall community health and pride, important measures of success. The Parks and Recreation Department is critical to improving quality of life and attracting workforce and families. Attracting workforce and families will lead to a stronger tax based, increase school population, and a more vibrant and healthier community. While the schools, particularly Indiana University, supplement the available open space and additional recreational programming, neither are reflected in Level of Service or Benchmarking data for this plan - strategic opportunities for both programming and additional parkland should be explored, particularly to address any diversity, equity, and inclusion disparities.

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4.0 Chapter Four The Bloomington Parks & Recreation System

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


CITY OF BLOOMINGTON PARKS & RECREATION

C I T Y O F B LO O M I N TO N PA R K S & R EC R EAT I O N


OVERVIEW The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department manages 2,274 acres of parkland and offers hundreds of programs for Bloomington residents of all backgrounds, ages, and abilities. The department is responsible for numerous park facilities, including the Twin Lakes Recreation Center, Bryan Park Pool, and Winslow Sports Park. This includes 35.39 miles of trails, 2 outdoor pool facilities, 1 (27-hole) golf course, 1 ice arena, 28 park shelters, 26 playgrounds, 3 recreation/community centers, 1 skate park, 1 theater, 26 basketball courts, 26 tennis courts, 7 volleyball courts, 16 ball diamonds, 1 disc golf course, 1 dog park, and 8 rectangular fields.

for neighborhood identities, gathering places for friends and family, opportunities for informal play, and natural settings for quiet reflection close to home. These parks typically range in size between 5 and 25 acres and are usually located within walking distance of neighborhood residences (within a halfmile radius).

Parkland

The most common types of spaces and facilities that are designed within neighborhood parks include the following: shelters, picnic tables, grills, playground equipment, ball diamonds, tennis courts, and basketball courts. Neighborhood parks also generally include an open playing field for informal activities such as pick-up sports games and practices for baseball, soccer, and other league games.

Urban park systems generally provide a wide array of diverse settings for many uses, and this is certainly the case for Bloomington. A park classification system based upon industry best practices, community engagement, and benchmark research, has been developed for the Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department to measure the development of an equitable system of parks for the city. Urban/Mini-Parks Bloomington’s park system includes three urban parks, also known as miniparks. These parks serve residents living or working within a ¼-mile walking distance. Urban parks are the smallest park classification and provide surrounding residences, offices, and commercial buildings with open space, which research has shown promotes health and wellness. They serve individual daily needs and occasional group needs. Although there is some programming at these parks, such as the concerts at People’s Park, the majority of use is unscheduled. Urban parks provide benches and limited shelter for people to enjoy a meal. They can also provide landscape as a buffer to surrounding roads and land use. Passive recreational areas for senior citizens are also available. Other features include walkways, benches, gardens, picnic tables, quiet areas, outdoor picnic areas with small shelters, and a small parking lot. Neighborhood Parks Neighborhood parks are foundational for community development because they can provide focal points 62

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Neighborhood parks provide a wide variety of recreational opportunities within residential areas. They typically include space and facilities for the active recreational pursuits of children, teenagers, and young adults, as well as quiet landscaped areas that act as buffers to residential settings and offer space in which older residents can relax with their families.

Community Parks/Sports Parks/Golf Courses Community parks are larger than neighborhood parks and generally include a mix of active and passive park areas and active recreation facilities. Community parks provide space for those recreational activities that serve a wider population than the surrounding neighborhood and are intended to serve several neighborhoods within a larger geographic area of the city. These parks typically range from 20 to 100 acres in size and provide a balance of natural environments and developed facilities. Physical features commonly found in community parks include multiple sports fields for baseball, softball, soccer, football, and other related sports that are scheduled for leagues and tournaments. They can also provide tennis courts and multi-purpose courts for basketball, volleyball, and handball. Other amenities include playgrounds, picnic shelters, tables, paths, and off-street parking lots. In some communities, this classification has been retitled as “community parks and open space” to better fit the type of land use in the park system. Although community parks are larger in size and serve


a broader purpose than neighborhood parks, they can meet the need for close-to-home parks much like neighborhood parks do. The focus is on meeting the recreation needs of several neighborhoods or a large section of the community, as well as preserving unique landscapes or natural use areas. They allow for group activities and offer other recreational opportunities that are not feasible, and may not be desirable, at the neighborhood level. The primary purpose of a community park is to provide opportunities for social contact among a wide variety of members of different neighborhoods and ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds. These parks meet the specialized needs of a broader community, have higher technical design requirements, provide a sense of community, and increase economic development potential. Like neighborhood parks, they offer a balance between active and passive recreation activities. For this Master Plan, Sports Parks are captured under this classification. Nature Preserves The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department manages four nature preserves: Brown’s Woods, Griffy Lake, Latimer Woods, and Leonard Springs. These locations make up the bulk of the Department’s land acreage. Bloomington’s nature preserves comprise 63.4% of the Department’s total acreage, leaving just 36.6% of acreage to the remaining land designations. Based on feedback from Bloomington residents, it is clear that people value the recreational opportunities that these preserves provide and utilize them at a high rate.

wildlife migration corridors and habitats. Currently, the Department provides paved and unpaved trails for a total of 35.39 miles of paths. As issues around alternative transportation, public health, and economic vitality continue to affect planning decisions, there will be increased discussion about how the physical connectivity provided by urban trails can help meet community objectives. Just as proximity of homes to neighborhood and community parks has emerged as a priority in recent years, so too has the proximity of homes to trails. Dog Parks In recent years, there has been a boom of pet owners across the U.S., becoming one of the fastest growing participants to parks and one of the most important features to include in parks today. With growing populations and the opportunity to work remotely becoming a viable option, families are deciding to move to areas that offer pet -friendly amenities. According to the NPRA research studies, being outdoors in a dog park offers diverse therapeutic, physiological, psychosocial, and psychological benefits. A community’s commitment towards offering these pet services attracts a richly diverse and active culture. The benefit of dog parks is their flexibility, being suited for any size, large and small. These spaces allow for dogs to be active off-leash without infringing on private property. In urban settings, this creates attractive solutions for restrictive land opportunities or rework of underutilized parks.

The Department contains two dog parks, located on the north side of the town and one at Switchyard Park. Cemetaries The Department oversees Rose Hill Cemetery and At 18.5 acres and an offering to both large dogs and White Oak Cemetery for Bloomington. Cemeteries are small dogs, the north side park sees a considerable not used for many planned programs and events but amount of traffic. do feature some informal uses for running and walking, and they can serve as points of historical interest. The Undeveloped Land Department manages these two cemeteries for the The Parks and Recreation Department currently has city because they have the staff and knowledge to one undeveloped property. Located on the west side properly maintain the grounds. of town, Brown’s Woods is considerably sized at 16 acres. No plans have been developed for the property Multi-Use Trails as of yet. Multi-use trails that are managed by the Department The park system is continually working to fiscally provide close-to-home recreation and non-motorized acquire more property that would appropriately fit links between residential areas, parks, downtown, commercial areas, and schools. They also foster into the existing park system layout. improved public health and a sense of community, increase economic development potential, and protect TROYER GROUP

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Facilities

The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department operates a wide range of facilities from outdoor pools to playgrounds. These facilities support both general informal use by the public as well as specialized or scheduled use for athletic competitions, recreation programs, or other events. Recreation facilities have highly specialized maintenance and management requirements and are subject to different standards than urban parkland. Specialized facilities operated by the Department include Banneker Community Center, Twin Lakes Recreation Center, Twin Lakes Sports Park, Winslow Sports Park, Cascades Golf Course, Frank Southern Ice Arena, and a dog park. While some of these facilities can be used for different activities, many are singleor narrow-purpose. Active recreation facilities are typically more costly to develop and operate over time. Community decisions about the provision of these facilities generally take into consideration the extent of the user base, lifecycle management costs, and existence of similar facilities in or near the community. Passive or community recreation facilities include trails, playgrounds, picnic shelters, community gardens, and some open rectangular fields for use that is unstructured and informal. These facilities are found in the parks that are located throughout the City, and they play a significant role in giving parks their character. As a result of their broader use, a wider segment of the general public tends to access them. While passive/community recreation facilities are usually less expensive to develop and maintain, they also have notable lifecycle costs associated with their management.

Activities included in this division include: • Clerical Support • Financial Support • Marketing • Promotions • Sponsorships • Volunteer Organization

Operations and Development

The Operations Division is responsible for maintenance, security, sanitation, capital improvements, planning, construction, and development of all City parks and natural areas, facilities, trails, and greenways. It is also responsible for beautification of parks and public areas, including landscaping, the administration and maintenance of Rose Hill and White Oak Cemeteries, and urban forestry. This Division is responsible for the establishment, management, and enhancement of City–owned natural resource properties, including Griffy Lake Nature Preserve, Wapehani Mountain Bike Park, and Leonard Springs Nature Park. Natural resources staff offer outdoor recreational, educational, and volunteer opportunities.

Recreation and Sports Services

The Recreation Division is responsible for programs, events, and services specially designed for preschoolers, youth, teens, adults, senior adults, and participants with varying degrees of ability. These activities are held at Department facilities such as the Allison-Jukebox Community Center, Banneker Community Center, and Showers Common. A number of programs are facilitated through partnership Administration and Community agreements with other community organizations, Relations including: Aquatics - The Aquatics program plans, The Administration Division implements policy as set coordinates, and facilitates recreational swimming, forth by the Board of Park Commissioners. formal lessons, private rentals, special group use, and Community Relations coordinates graphic design, advanced aquatic and personal safety training for the Bloomington community and its visitors. promotions, marketing, sponsors, and volunteers. The Administration and Community Relations division carries out two main responsibilities: office management and relations with the community. In the Department’s organizational chart, the Community Relations Manager and Office Manager oversee these tasks. 64

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• Aqyatics: The Aquatics program plans, coordinates, and facilitates recreational swimming, formal lessons, private rentals, special group use, and advanced aquatic and personal safety training for the Bloomington community and its visitors.


• Adult Sports: Adult Sports plans, coordinates, and facilitates adult sports for the Bloomington community at Twin Lakes Sports Park and local tennis courts. • Youth Sports: Youth Sports plans, coordinates, and facilitates operations for Winslow Sports Complex, Rev. Butler Park, Frank Southern Ice Arena, and Bryan Park ball diamonds. These facilities host Bloomington Junior League Baseball, Monroe County Senior League Baseball, and MCCSC baseball and softball events.

Jukebox Community Center and satellite sites. It also includes the Inclusive Recreation area. The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department is committed to an inclusive approach to recreation. • Banneker Community Center: The Banneker Community Center is a Bloomington Parks and Recreation facility that is dedicated to inspiring youth to maximize their potential through safe and effective programming and to provide programs and activities that connect the Bloomington community.

• Frank Southern Ice Arena: Frank Southern Ice Arena provides recreational and organized ice Recreation Services provides programs, events, and skating to ice enthusiasts from Bloomington services for the Department. These include Community Events that provide an eclectic mix of cultural and and surrounding communities. outdoor activities and year-round events to provide • Twin Lakes Recreation Center: The Twin Lakes enjoyment, education, and a sense of community Recreation Center, a 100,000-foot indoor sports, for the diversity of people who make Bloomington recreation, and fitness facility, was purchased their home. Special events and programs, art fairs, by the department in 2009. Amenities include Performing Arts Series, Movies in the Park, Farmers’ five basketball courts, a turf field, a fitness area Market, Community Gardens, and the Holiday Market with strength equipment and free weights, are examples of the diversity in programming and a cardio studio, a mirrored exercise studio, projects Community Events offers to the Bloomington 1/5-mile indoor track, and meeting rooms. community. The Department offers programs, through the TLRC and other facilities, that help make Bloomington a healthy, active community. • Cascades Golf Course: Cascades Golf Course has the objective of maximizing public play with a balance of leagues, tournaments, youth programs, and golf outings. Youth programs include the First Tee of Bloomington and the PGA Junior League. The Sports Division is responsible for providing formal and informal sports programs and services for the adults and youth of our community. These activities are provided at Department facilities such as Cascades Golf Course, Frank Southern Ice Arena, Twin Lakes Sports Park, Winslow Sports Complex, and a variety of other Department-owned and operated facilities. In addition, facilities are utilized in a cooperative agreement with Monroe County Community School Corporation. Some of these main programs provided are: • Youth Programs: This program is responsible for programs and services designed for youth. These activities take place at the AllisonTROYER GROUP

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


PARKS

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CITY PARK LOCATIONS 1. Broadview Park 2. Brown’s Woods (undeveloped) 3. Bryan Park 4. Building Trades Park 5. Crestmont Park 6. Ferguson Dog Park 7. Goat Farm 8. Griffy Lake Nature Preserve 9. Highland Village Park 10. Latimer Woods 11. Leonard Springs Nature Park 12. Lower Cascades Park 13. Miller Showers Park 14. Olcott Park 15. Park Ridge Park 16. Park Ridge East Park

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25 2

17. Peoples Park 18. RCA Community Park 19. Reverand Ernest D. Butler Park 26

20. Schmalz Farm Park 21. Sherwood Oaks Park 22. Southeast Park 23. Switchyard Park 24. Upper Cascades Park 25. Waldron Hill Buskirk Park 26. Wapehani Mountain Bike Park 27. Winslow Woods Park 68

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

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6

City Limits 24

8

12

13 5

19 15

17

16

25

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10 3 23 22 18 1

27 7

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Broadview Park ve. S Brown A

The Board of Park Commissioners in November 2005 approved a cooperative service agreement between the Monroe County Community School Corporation (MCCSC) and the Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department for a one-acre neighborhood park at the former Broadview Elementary School. With the closure of the Broadview Elementary School, the City of Bloomington Housing and Neighborhood Development Department, the Planning and Transportation Department, and the Broadview Neighborhood Association proposed that the Parks and Recreation Department operate the area behind the school that contained playground equipment and a small basketball court to maintain the benefits of keeping this area as a neighborhood park. MCCSC retains ownership of the Broadview Park property. The Parks and Recreation Department received a $125,000 Community Development Block Grant to fund the installation of new playground equipment,and to install a picnic shelter, park benches, a drinking fountain, and picnic tables. The playground was officially opened May 23, 2007.

Accessibility • Playground and picnic shelter • Designated parking space available

PARK METRICS • 20x30’ permanent shelter • 15x15’ open canvas shelter • 36” open pit grill • Small playground (Ages 2–5)

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Park Address: 704 W Graham Dr. Bloomington, IN 47403 Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• Large playground (Ages 5–12) • Half court basketball


Bloomington Graduation School

S Ford Ave.

W Graham Dr.

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• Swing set; 4 regular, 2 infant, and 1 • 2 bike rack rungs ADA accessible swing • Shared parking • 8 benches • 5 picnic tables • Little Free Library • 1 solar panel TROYER GROUP

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Interstate 65

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PARK METRICS • No metrics as of yet.

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


Brown’s Woods

S. Mu ller P

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Browns Woods sits at 16 total acres on the west side of town sandwiched between Interstate 65, Forest Ridge Apartments, Limestone Crossing Apartments and the Indiana Rail Road. The undeveloped woodland is loaded with karst topography and full of sink holes making it perfect for a trail walk. The land has no plans for futher development as of yet, but with the nearby Twin Lakes Sports Park this parkland could potentially be linked with via trail system and, and serve as additional nature park for the parks system and require little maintenance. With limited access (2 points) this would prohibit certain park development. Nonetheless, the property serves to be a considerable asset for the surrounding residents.

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Accessibility • Not ADA accessible

Park Address: 101 W Kirkwood Ave Ste 307 Bloomington, IN 47404TROYER GROUP

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Bryan Park

E. Wylie St.

Bryan Park was purchased in January 1951 for $1. The name “Bryan” refers to William Lowe Bryan, President of Indiana University from 1902–1937. At 33 acres, the park serves the Vinegar Hill Historic District of Bloomington, home to some of the leading Indiana University faculty members. It offers an array of diverse activities for ages young and old. The most popular amenity on site, Bryan Park Pool hosts an annual total anywhere from 30,000–50,000 attendees. Bryan Park Pool, built in 1959, is open seasonally, Memorial Day through Labor Day.

E. Allen St.

Parking is available: • At the intersection of Henderson St. & Dixie St. • At the intersection of Henderson St. & Allen St. • In the park near the intersection of Woodlawn Ave. & Weatherstone Ln.

S. Henderson Ave.

As one of the leading Bloomington parks in acerage and centrally located, the park supplies an ample amount of parking in and around the park because of its heavy usage.

E. Dixie St.

• Off-site parking along Woodlawn Ave. across from Bryan Park Pool • Off-site parking along Woodlawn Ave. across from the tennis courts Restrooms: Centrally located near ball diamonds. Restrooms are accessible and open seasonally (April through October).

E. Davis St.

Accessibility • Designated parking spaces, restrooms, juvenile playground, basketball courts, walking trail, Woodlawn Shelter, and playground

PARK METRICS • 25x60’ permanent shelter • 2 - 20x35’ permanent shelter • 15x15’ open canvas shelter • 20x30’ storage building • 2 full-size basketball courts

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Park Address: 1001 S Henderson St., Bloomington, IN Master 47401 Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Plan

• Community pool with slides • Splash pad


S. Stull Ave.

S. Woodlawn Ave. E. Sheridan Dr. E. Southdowns Dr.

S. Weatherstone Ln.

N

• Main event building

• Fitness playground

• 3 baseball fields

• 6 parking lots

• 5 tennis courts

• Multi-use paved trail loop

• Small natural playground

• Horseshoes pits

• Small playground (Ages 2–5)

• 3 restrooms

• Large playground (Ages 5–12)

• 3 pedestrian bridges

• 3 swing sets

• Open recreation lawn TROYER GROUP

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S. Fairview St.

S. Weatherstone Ln.

S. Maple St.

W. 2nd St.

PARK METRICS • 17x20’ permanent shelter

• Small playground (Ages 2–5)

• 20x30’ permanent shelter

• Large playground (Ages 5–12)

• 30x30’ restroom building

• 2 swing sets

• 20x30’ storage building

• ADA accessible paths

• 4 full-size basketball courts

• Parking

• Open recreation lawn 76

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


Building Trades Park Building Trades Park was first known as the “Second Street Park.” The park land had been owned, sequentially starting in 1895, by the Henley Stone Company, Oolitic Stone Company, and South Side Stone Company. It was once the site of a limestone mill. South Side Stone left the land around 1920. Neighbor and area historian Don Shiflet said the quarry holes were still present on the property, although there were no buildings in 1927. In about 1949, businessmen Ralph Rogers and John R. East helped fill in and smooth the site. East used clinkers from his coal business. The park is named Building Trades Park because it was established with help of local union workers. Records show the parcel was purchased from the Bloomington Chamber of Commerce on July 26, 1949 for $1. The multiple-use concrete slab area was completed in August 1967. New playground equipment was installed in 2003. The shelterhouse was renovated in 1981 and rehabbed in 2009 by the Labor and Trades Union. Only two acres, the park is located at 619 W. Howe St. across from IU Health Bloomington Hospital. One unknown about the park is that it offers a ¼-mile loop trail that encircles most of the park and is used in conjunction with a sidewalk and the boardwalk.

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Shelters: The Park’s single reservable shelter is located across from IU Health Bloomington Hospital on Second Street and can accommodate a maximum of 30 people. It is wheelchair accessible with accessible restrooms nearby. There is a grill and access to water at the shelter, but no electricity.

Accessibility • Designated parking space on West Howe Street lot • Shelter and playground

Park Address: 619 W Howe St. Bloomington, IN 47403TROYER GROUP

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Crestmont Park Located on the north side of Bloomington, Crestmont Park is a 14-acre park with multiple activities to provide visitors. In addition to basketball hoops, a picnic area, and a natural area to walk, the park offers a unique attraction with an 18-hole disc golf course that challenges users with grade changes and hidden baskets that present a challenge. In 2019, the construction of a new playground added another attraction for park users to experience.

15th St.

N Illinois St.

Accessibility • Parking available, playground

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PARK METRICS • 2 - 20x30’ permanent shelter • 2 full-size basketball courts • Open recreation lawn • Temporary parking (Northside)

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Park Address: 1209 W 15th St. Bloomington, IN 47404 Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• Parking (Southside) • Disc golf course


W. 16th St.

N. Monroe St.

N. Hancock Dr.

W. 14th St.

W. 13th St.

N. Orris Dr.

N

• Large playground (Ages 5-12) • Dry creek bed • Community garden

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N. Stone Mill Rd.

Old State Rd. 3

PARK METRICS • Gravel lot parking • Portable restroom • Small tree nursery • Large dog play area • Small dog play area 80

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


Ferguson Dog Park Bloomington’s largest dog park, Ferguson Dog Park, a total of 18.7 acres in size, is located at 4300 N. Stone Mill Road near the intersection of Old State Road 37 and Stone Mill Road. The park is accessible from Lower Cascades Park via the Cascades Park Trail. The Ferguson Dog Park is approximately one mile from the Sycamore Shelter at Lower Cascades Park. The Ferguson Dog Park includes two fenced areas, one for use by large dogs and one for small dogs. A drinking fountain with dog drinking bowl and dog wash stations is open seasonally. Picnic tables and a shade structure are located in the large dog area.

37

N Accessibility • Sidewalks into the dog park

Park Address: 4300 N Stone Mill Rd. Bloomington, IN 47404TROYER GROUP

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S. High St.

E. Winslow Rd.

On June 19, 2007, the Bloomington Parks Foundation on behalf of the City of Bloomington, accepted a donation of 31.5 acres of land known as the “Goat Farm”, which is valued at more than $870,000. This donation came from the Sherman Rogers family. This piece of property adjoins the existing Sherwood Oaks Park just south of the site, and it serves as a place of contemplation for walkers on the Jackson Creek Trail who may also enjoy the natural prairie.

E. Rogers Rd.

Goat Farm

Accessibility • Trail

PARK METRICS • Connection to Jackson Creek Trail

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Park Address: 2000 E Winslow Rd. Bloomington, IN 47401 Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• Mowed hiking trail • 1 barn


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Sherwood Oak Park

N

TROYER GROUP

83


7 Rd .3 Sta te

N. H

inkle

Rd.

Old Gr e ak yL

iff

N. Dunn St. d.

ey R

eadl

N. H

Griff

The Pfau Course at Indiana University

PARK METRICS • Kayak/canoe rental facility • Kayak/boat launch • Bathroom • Parking • Hiking trails 84

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

y Cre

ek


Griffy Lake Nature Preserve Scenic woodlands teeming with wild flora and fauna surround the 109-acre Griffy Lake at this 1,200-acre nature preserve. Swimming is prohibited. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources has stocked the lake with bluegill, redear sunfish, largemouth bass, channel catfish, and crappie. A valid Indiana fishing license is required for fishing at Griffy Lake. The lake remains open daily to private boats. During hours when the boathouse is open, privately owned boats must pay an $8/day launch fee. Boat motors are limited to electric trolling motors only.

N Accessibility • Kayak rental building and kayak/boat launch

Park Address: 3595 N Headley Rd. Bloomington, IN 47408TROYER GROUP

85


Highland Village Park Highland Village Park is one of ten neighborhood parks located in the City of Bloomington spreading across 6+ acres on the west side. Purchased by the city for $1 in 1970, the park was formerly known as “Park Square Park,” but the name changed to incorporate in it the surrounding area. The park has a small number of amenities, but it is suitable for the neighborhood that surrounds it. It has a trail loop that is approximately .5 mile in length, a full-size basketball court, an accessible playground, and a shelter. The park also provides plenty of open lawn area for visitors who want to rent the shelter and host larger events. In addition, the park lies less than a quarter mile east of the Karst Farm Greenway.

Accessibility • Playground, swings, and trail

PARK METRICS • 20x30’ permanent shelter • Paved walking trail • Full-size basketball court • Open recreation lawn

86

Park Address: 950 S Harvey Dr. Bloomington, IN 47403 Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• Large playground (Ages 5–12) • Swing set


S. Harvey Dr.

N • ADA accessible paths • Parking

TROYER GROUP

87


S. College Mall

Rd.

College Mall

PARK METRICS • Unpaved nature trail

88

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

E. Buick Cadillac Blvd.


Latimer Woods

S. Clariz

Hidden on the east side of town is a small ten-acre plot of old-growth forest known as Latimer Woods, appropriately named since Mr. Hugh Latimer and his family dedicated this parcel of land to the Bloomington Community Foundation in 1999. The Foundation turned the wood’s management over to the City of Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department. Latimer Woods was passively managed until 2005 when a new focus was placed on this oldgrowth forest.

z Blvd.

Latimer Woods has been managed for low-impact activities such as research, casual visitation, and education. The Latimer Woods property is an isolated but valuable forest fragment that invites visitors to travel back through Bloomington’s cultural and natural history. This small parcel is a moment in time protected thanks to the generosity of the Latimer Family and the resources of the Bloomington community. Latimer Woods has a designated trail called the Latimer Woods Nature Trail. This trail is a moderatelevel course at .38 mi of dirt and wood chips. The Trail winds through the woods of the former Latimer Farm. Interpretive signs detail the history of the property.

N Accessibility • Not ADA accessible

Park Address: 3200 E. Buick Cadillac Blvd. Bloomington, IN 47401TROYER GROUP

89


Leonard Springs Nature Park The property contains Leonard Spring and Shirley Spring, which issue from a number of outlets in two large spring alcoves. The City of Bloomington purchased the property between 1914 and 1917 in order to construct an impoundment which would store water for municipal use. By 1943, the City was receiving water from other sources. The lake was drained, and the property was not used. In 1998, Bloomington Parks and Recreation purchased the property from Bloomington Utilities Service Board. Leonard Springs Nature Preserve was dedicated on October 18, 1999. The park has an assortment of scenic viewsheds for visitors to take complete advantage of while hiking through the nature park on a 1.1 mile rugged trail that provides steep slopes, stairs, views of the wetland, two caves, Shirley Springs and much more. Access to the park is limited being by one way, Ridgetop Road; a gated gravel road beginning at the parking lot and extending to the end of the park. This non-looping road ends at the park’s restrooms. No drinkable water is available within the park.

d Sp

onar

S. Le

Restrooms- Vault-type restroom facilities are open seasonally and are located at the end of Ridgetop Road, which travels through the park.

s ring Rd.

Accessibility • Not ADA accessible

PARK METRICS • 15x15’ Restroom • Parking • Hiking Trails

90

Park Address: 4685 S Leonard Springs RD Bloomington, IN 47403 Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


N

TROYER GROUP

91


Miller-Showers Park One of the discussions of the first City Park Board meeting in 1921 concerned the acquisition of this narrow strip of land. Originally the Jacob & Loretta Miller Homestead, it was purchased by the city in 1929 for $1. It contains two notable sculptures: “Axis” and “Red, Blond, Black, and Olive.” Miller-Showers Park was awarded a Community Enhancement Award in October 2004 by the Bloomington Chamber of Commerce and was presented with an Outstanding Project Award by the Indiana Urban Forest Council in October 2005. Miller-Showers Park, from 2001–2004, underwent a significant facelift that transformed the area from an often flooded and little-used strip of land to a stateof-the-art stormwater retention facility and beautiful gateway to the city of Bloomington. The Park’s large holding ponds retain stormwater that drains from more than 170 acres of downtown Bloomington. A .6 mile accessible, multi-use trail circles the Park and allows views of the ponds and sculptures from all sides. A pier, pedestrian bridge, and interpretive signage complete the picture.

ld

W. O

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N Accessibility • Designated parking is available in the W. 17th Street lot and a trail

PARK METRICS • 11 parking spaces • 2 ADA parking spaces • Bridge overlook • Pavedpedestrian loop

92

Park Address: 1500 N College AVE Bloomington, IN 47404 Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• 2 monuments • Bridge crossing


E. 19th St.

ut St.

W. 17th St.

N. Waln

N. College Ave.

• Terraced water remediation ponds

TROYER GROUP

93


Dr. da E. C ana

The Stand E. Cedarwood Dr.

s Rd.

Trilail ackson CreeTkra

J n Creek Jackso

PARK METRICS • Restroom and concession building

• Paved pedestrian loop

• Octagonal picnic shelter

• Mowed pathways

• 2 football fields

• Connection to Jackson Creek Trail

• Open recreation lawn

• Parking

• Large playground (Ages 5–12) • Swing set 94

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


r Sa S.

Olcott Park

d. eR

Olcott Park was purchased from Southside Landholding Company in August 1998. Lloyd and Joan Olcott gifted to the Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department enough money to build a playground, park shelter (Young Pavilion), and limestone entrance wall with landscaping. The park was officially named Olcott Park in a ceremony on June 2, 2000. 41.4 acres in size, the park hosts a multitude of events throughout the year, one of the most popular being the rental use of the multi-purpose fields that local soccer and football leagues use year-round.

Jackson Creek Middle School

The Bloomington Walking Club meets once week to use the Olcott Loop Trail. This .5-mile, accessible looping trail skirts the Olcott playing fields and crosses briefly through a small wooded area. One trailhead is located at the parking lot of Jackson Creek Middle School and the other trailhead is located at the Olcott Park parking lot. The Young Pavilion is located near the restroom building and playground. This round pavilion can accommodate up to 50–75 people. It is wheelchair accessible and comes equipped with picnic tables and a group grill; however, it does not have lights or electricity.

N Accessibility • Designated parking spaces in a lot, playground, and shelter • A playground with equipment for older and younger children

Park Address: 2300 E. Canada Dr. Bloomington, IN 47401TROYER GROUP

95


Park Ridge East Park

idge Rd.

E. Cambridge Ct.

N. Park R

This 4.49-acre neighborhood park located on the east side of town on the corner of Park Ridge Road and Morningside Drive was purchased from the Bloomington Development Corporation for $1 in 1974. The park serves as a community asset; it provides neighborhood residents the opportunity to walk down the street a short distance to let kids expend energy while having fun. At only .9 miles from the next city park, Park Ridge East Park provides a great link to parks for this side of town. It offers an assortment of activities. In 2008, the playground equipment was replaced.

E. Mornin

gside Dr.

Accessibility • Shelter and Playground

PARK METRICS • 18x35’ permanent shelter • Full-size basketball courts • Open recreation lawn • Large playground (Ages 5–12)

96

Park Address: 4421 E Morningside DR Bloomington, IN 47408 Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• Swing set • Baseball/softball field


N

• Little Free Library • Parking

TROYER GROUP

97


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ail

s

-u

is

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Ex

PARK METRICS • 20x20’ canvas shelter • Half-size basketball court • Open recreation lawn • Large playground (Ages 5–12) • Swing set • Connection to bike trail 98

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

M

ti ul

r eT


Park Ridge Park

E. Long ve.

view A

This ½-acre park was purchased by the City of Bloomington from Joseph and Daisy Garton in 1974. Situated between a residential neighborhood and group of apartment complexes, the park host several users. In addition, more users are able to access the site through the use of a multi-use trail that ends/ starts at the park. This trail runs along the railroad and connects to more apartment complexes to the west. A new accessible playground, benches, picnic tables and shade structure were constructed at the park in 2015. The park is located less than a mile from its counterpart, Park Ridge East Park.

N Accessibility • Playground and shelter

Park Address: 3421 E Longview Ave. Bloomington, IN 47408TROYER GROUP

99


Peoples Park Peoples Park is one-third of an acre and located near Sample Gates at the corner of Dunn Street and Kirkwood Avenue. The Park was deeded December 17, 1976, the result of a donation from Katherine Thomas Canada who specifically expressed that the site be used for the public interest. In the late 1970s and early 1980s, various landscaping improvements and site amenities were installed. In 1994, as a result of meetings with business owners, citizens, and park users concerned about park safety and cleanliness, park site amenities were replaced. The locations of benches and tables were changed, additional lighting was installed, exposed aggregate sidewalks were repaired, and trash receptacles and ash urns were added. In keeping with the tradition of the park as a gathering place for socialization, no other significant improvements of physical changes have occurred in the park’s 20-year history. In 1995, a partnership with Rhino’s All-Ages Club resulted in the construction of a mural wall, allowing club members the opportunity to display artwork in the park. In addition, seasonal outdoor concerts were held in the park. Both programmatic initiatives have been successful and well received by the public and park users. Indiana University recently completed significant landscaping, lighting, sidewalk and parking improvements in the area surrounding Peoples Park. These improvements and the intensive use of the park highlighted what has been judged to be a “run down” or unkept appearance in the park. With endorsement and unanimous support by the Board of Park Commissioners and with discussion and ultimate approval by the City of Bloomington Common Council, the Parks and Recreation Department 1998 Budget included an appropriation of $123,000 in capital improvement funds for Peoples’ Park. Accessibility • Parking and pathways

Park Address: 501 E Kirkwood Ave. Bloomington, IN 47408 Parks Comprehensive Master Plan 100 Bloomington

PARK METRICS • Painted mural • Sculpture of a bench in the shape of opposing wings • Picnic tables • Multiple benches


Mixed-use Building

Bicycle Garage, Inc.

E. Kirkwood Ave.

N. Dunn St.

N

TROYER GROUP

101


W. RCA

PARK METRICS • 20x30’ permanent shelter

• 2 pickleball courts

• 40x45’ permanent shelter

• 3 tennis courts

• 2 - 15x15’ canvas shelter

• Small playground (Ages 2–5)

• 12x20’ restroom building

• Large Playground (Ages 5–12)

• 2 full-size basketball courts

• Sandbox

• Open recreation lawn

• 2 swing sets

102

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


RCA Community Park RCA Community Park began as Thomson Community Park with the donation of 48.6 undeveloped acres on the city’s southwest side by Thomson Consumer Electronics in October 1991. The company made the donation in recognition of the partnership forged between the residents of the community and this major industry. In 1992, a $75,000 Land and Water Conservation fund grant was awarded to the Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department for partial development of the park. The first phase of development, including tennis and basketball courts, a paved interpretive trail, and a playground, was completed in 1995. In December 2009, Bloomington resident Gib Apple approached the Board of Park Commissioners about changing the name of the park from Thomson Community Park to RCA Community Park (the local RCA manufacturing facility in Bloomington closed in 1998). Thomson Consumer Electronics released the specifications in the deed that required the park to be named Thomson, and the name of the park was changed to RCA Community Park in December 2009.

Park Dr.

A new playground was installed in November 2012 with a $205,600 Community Development Block Grant.

N Accessibility • An interpretive walking trail, designated parking spaces, and shelters

• Paved pedestrian trail • Boardwalk • Parking Park Address: 1400 W RCA Park DR Bloomington, IN 47403TROYER GROUP

103


Rev. Ernest D Butler Park Reverend Ernest D. Butler Park, 9 acres in size, is located at 812 W. Ninth St. at the intersection of West Ninth and North Fairview Streets. Parking is available along Ninth Street, or in the small parking lot near the playground off North Fairview. Bike racks are available near the parking lot. Butler Park is a relatively new name for the park, but the park has a long and colorful history as a city park. It began as West Ninth Street Park, and in 1972 was still owned by the Illinois Central Railroad. The property was leased by the city, and the first summer concerts sponsored by the Human Relations Committee were held in West Ninth Street Park in summer 1968. In May 1973, the Board of Park Commissioners voted to repair the spray pool at the park and to leave the spray pool in its present location. New playground equipment was installed in Ninth Street Park in 1984,and again in 1998. West Ninth Street Park was renamed Reverend Ernest D. Butler Park in June 2005 in honor of Reverend Butler, who played a significant role in founding the local Human Rights and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commissions. Butler died in 2003. He had been the pastor of the Second Baptist Church for more than 40 years. Bloomington Mayor Mark Kruzan presented a copy of the park’s interpretive sign honoring Reverend Butler’s accomplishments to the Butler family in a ceremony on June 25, 2005. In 2011, local graffiti artist Mike Burchfield painted murals on the north and east sides of the restroom building at Butler Park. Fitness station equipment was installed in 2014 by IU Health in an IU Health Day of Service project. The fitness equipment was installed where the old spray pad was located, near the restroom building on Ninth Street.

PARK METRICS

Accessibility • Playground, shelters and basketball court

• 12x40’ restroom building

Park Address: 812 W 9th St. Bloomington, IN 47404 Parks Comprehensive Master Plan 104 Bloomington

• 20x35’ permanent shelter • 20x20’ permanent shelter • 2 half-size basketball courts • Open recreation lawn • Small playground (Ages 2–5)


N. Fairview St.

W. 9th St.

N

• Large playground (Ages 5–12)

• Parking

• Swing sets • Baseball field • Community garden • Outdoor fitness gym • Paved pedestrian path TROYER GROUP

105


E. Daniel St.

E. Rogers Rd.

PARK METRICS • 17x20’ permanent shelter

• Small playground (Ages 2–5)

• 20x30’ permanent shelter

• Large playground (Ages 5–12)

• 30x30’ restroom building

• 2 swing sets

• 20x30’ storage building

• ADA accessible paths

• 4 full-size basketball courts

• Parking

• Open recreation lawn 106

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


Schmalz Farm Park This moderately sized neighborhood park sits on the east side of the city. Donated in 1994 to the Bloomington Community Park and Recreation Foundation, the park was named after its donors, the Dr. William J. Schmalz family. It was part of the former 35-acre Schmalz Farm. Formerly farmland, the park kept the Schmalz barn which is currently on the northwest part of the park but was built in 1833.

N Accessibility • Playground and shelter

Park Address: 3010 E Daniel St. Bloomington, IN 47401TROYER GROUP

107


Sherwood Oaks Park The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Foundation (now known as the Bloomington Parks Foundation) on behalf of the City of Bloomington, accepted a donation of 31.5 acres of land known as the “Goat Farm.” Donated on June 19, 2007 by the Sherman Rogers family, this donation was valued at more than $870,000.

Goat Farm Jac

kso

According to the donation agreement, the deed to the Goat Farm property will be held by the Foundation, while the Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department will manage the area solely for public recreational purposes and passive green space. The Foundation also agreed that protecting water quality in Jackson Creek, which runs through the property, will remain one of the Goat Farm’s primary functions. As part of a linkage of greenspaces in the city, Jackson Creek Trail connects the southeastern part of the city to Olcott Park.

Accessibility • Tennis courts and playground

PARK METRICS • 20x30’ permanent shelter • Full-size basketball courts • 2 tennis courts • Practice court • Open recreation lawn

Park Address: 1600 E Elliston Dr Bloomington, IN 47401 Parks Comprehensive Master Plan 108 Bloomington

• Large playground (Ages 5–12)

n


Olcott Park

Tra il

Ell

ist

on

Dr

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ek

E.

Cre

N

• Swing set • Connection to Jactkson Creek Trail • Mowed hiking Trail • Parking • 1 barn

TROYER GROUP

109


k Trail

c Renwi

E. Moores Pike

Sycamore Ct.

PARK METRICS • 15x20’ permanent shelter

• Parking

• Full-size basketball court

• Paved pedestrian path

• Open recreation lawn

• Connection to Renwick Trail

• Large playground (Ages 5–12) • Swing set • 2 tennis courts 110

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


Southeast Park Right off College Mall road and Moores Pike the Southeast Park property was purchased by the Bloomington Development Corporation in December 1974. Because of its size at nine acres, the park is a enormous asset to its surroundings that consist of many housing types; single-family homes, duplexes, townhomes and even apartments. Accessibility for these housing types is made easy with the connection of the Renwick Trail that directly connects to the park.

S. Montclair Ave.

In addition to its’ exceptional placement Southeast Park is adjacent to a 3.5 acres neighborhood-owned park, Cathcart Park, helping to create a greenspace linkage for the area and an opportunity for amenity expansion.

N Accessibility • Playground, shelter, and tennis courts

Park Address: 1600 S Sycamore Ct. Bloomington, IN 47401TROYER GROUP

111


Switchyard Park S. Rogers St.

Switchyard Park, formerly known as the McDoel Switchyard, served as a hub for railroad operations for a series of companies including the New Albany and Salem Railroad, the Monon Railroad, and eventually CSX Railroad. CSX Railroad made the decision to phase out its services in 2000, and the last train left McDoel Switchyard in 2004. The City of Bloomington purchased 18 acres of old railroad bed that ran through the Switchyard, and opened the second phase of the B-Line Trail, a paved, accessible pathway that extends 3.1 miles from Adams Street on the north to Country Club Drive on the south, in 2011. The City then set its sights on transforming the former switchyard into a community park. The city purchased most of the land that was to become Switchyard Park in 2009.The city had a vision for the former railroad property, and collected input from its residents, stakeholders, interest groups, environmental advocates, and neighboring property owners to develop a Master Plan that would guide the development of Switchyard Park. Construction of the new Switchyard Park began in 2017 with a year-long project to install critical infrastructure: a 40” sanitary sewer line. Weddle Brothers Building Group LLC was awarded a construction contract for Switchyard Park in April 2018, for a total cost of $25,857,200 Members of the public gathered with elected officials on May 11, 2018 for a ceremonial groundbreaking at Switchyard Park near Grimes Lane. Switchyard Park was officially revealed to the public in November 2019.

PARK METRICS • Main event building • Large Picnic Shelter • Picnic/Bathroom shelter • Band shelter • Full-size basketball courts

Park Address: 1601 S. Rogers St., Bloomington, IN 47401 Parks Comprehensive Master Plan 112 Bloomington

t.

lnut S

S. Wa

• Open recreation lawn • Small playground (Ages 2–5) • Large playground (Ages 5–12)


W. Patterson Rd.

N • Fitness playground

• Plaza space with seating

• Amphitheature

• Water tower

• Swing sets

• Splash pad

• Skate park

• Natural playground

• Community garden

• 4 shade structures

• Bocce ball courts

• Connection to B-Line Trail

• Rock climbing walls • Parking • Bike racks • Adult swings TROYER GROUP

113


W. Old State Rd. 37

W. Club House Dr.

e

ser Pik

N. Kin

W. Rosewood Dr.

N. Kinser Pike

PARK METRICS • 30x80’ permanent shelter

• Swing set

• Swing set

• Sand volleyball court

• Parking

• Small playground (Ages 2–5)

• Portable restroom

• Large playground (Ages 5–12)

• 35x105’ Picnic/Restroom shelter

• Canvas shelter

• 30’x60’ Picnic shelter

• 10x20’ restroom building

114

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


Upper & Lower Cascades Park Upper Cascades Park was purchased in 1929 along with portions of the property that became Cascades Golf Course. The accessible Lion’s Den picnic shelter and a playground are located on the north side of Clubhouse Drive, across from the Cascades Golf Course Clubhouse. The picnic shelter and and one of the city’s largest accessible playgrounds encompass about one acre.

N. Walnut St.

The Cascades Park Trail officially opened May 17, 2012. The trail is asphalt, 8 feet wide, and parallels Old State Road 37 North from Lower Cascades Park past the Lower Cascades ballfields to the traffic signal at North College Avenue. There are pedestrian crossing signals for both North College and North Old State Road 37. The trail crosses Griffy Creek via a pedestrian bridge, and continues along Old State Road 37 before it turns next to Dunn Street and ends at the Griffy Lake dam.

N. Kinser Pike

Stateroad 45

The Cascades Park Trail also turns up Clubhouse Drive at the Sycamore (North) Shelter, and runs past the Cascades Golf Course clubhouse and ends at Kinser Pike. The Cascades Park Trail was constructed with State Trail Grant funds from the Indiana DNR Division of Outdoor Recreation. Plans for the Cascades Park Trail call for it to connect Acuff Road to Lower Cascades Park, and Miller-Showers Park to Lower Cascades Park. Funding for the additional phases of trail construction has not yet been identified.

N

• Bike racks • Paved multi-use pedestrian trail

The Skate Park at Upper Cascades was opened in 2004. The construction of the skate park was funded by a 2001 General Obligation Park Bond for $605,150.

Accessibility • Designated parking spaces playground, and shelter

at

clubhouse,

Park Address: 514 W Club House Dr. Bloomington, IN 47404TROYER GROUP

115


Twin Lakes Sports Park Twin Lakes Sports Park was not always Bloomington’s premier softball tournament destination! A reservoir was built on the property in 1892, where the ballfields now sit. It was known as “Upper Twin Lake.” Upper Twin Lake and Lower Twin Lake, built in 1905 just across Bloomfield Road, were temporary water supplies for the city.

Interstate 65

Deed records show that 13 acres of property were purchased from Otis Huff and Myrtle Huff in 1922, but the park is not mentioned again in meetings of the Board of Park Commissioners until the early 1970s. The Rotary Club in 1972 took on the “Twin Lake Area” as a community project, and the Indiana Department of Natural Resources was asked to manage the lake by cleaning it up and restocking it for fishing. “Twin Lake” was renamed “Rotary Community Park” in 1973, but it is not known exactly what the Rotarians did in the park area surrounding the lake. A letter to the Board of Park Commissioners dated March 16, 1979 stated the area known as “Rotary Park” had not been associated with the Rotary Club for some time, and the Rotary Club would no longer provide financial or physical support. Eventually, the lake was drained and development of the Twin Lakes Sports Park began in 1990. The Parks and Recreation Department hosted its first Amateur Softball Association national softball tournament in 1993 when Twin Lakes Sports Park officially opened.

Accessibility • Playground, designated parking spaces, ballfields, and Twin Lakes lodge (except kitchen)

PARK METRICS

What’s missing?

• 4 softball fields

Park Address: 2350 W. Bloomfield Road Bloomington, IN 47403 Parks Comprehensive Master Plan 116 Bloomington

• Playground • Concession stand • Onelodge (reservable)


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om

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• Restrooms • Picnic tables • Parking • Trail

TROYER GROUP

117


S. Washington St. Allison Jukebox Community Center

E. Smith Ave.

PARK METRICS • Water fountain • Band shelter • Open plaza space • Playground (Ages 5–12) • Swing set • Picnic area 118

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• Open recreation lawn


Waldron, Hill & Buskirk Park

S. Lincoln St.

In May 1922, a committee was appointed by the Park Board to investigate the possibility of obtaining the land on East Third Street belonging to the Hill-BuskirkWaldron estates for a city park. Mr. Charles Waldron wrote from Washington that he and his mother would be willing to turn over their part of the land to the city, providing the city would assume the indebtedness (about $5,000) and give the park a name honoring the three families. The Park Board agreed to buy the property in July 1922. Although the deed stipulated that the park should be named “The Waldron, Hill and Buskirk Park”, the park was known as Third Street Park by the Bloomington community from the 1920s through the 2000s. On April 10, 2011, the park was officially renamed The Waldron, Hill and Buskirk Park in a celebratory ceremony. The Allison-Jukebox Community Center, then known as the “Juke Box Teen Center,” was built in 1938. Mr. William Adams and Mrs. B.F. Adams gave the Park Board $10,000 to build a swimming pool in the park in 1927. About $15,000 in additional bond funds were acquired, and the pool was constructed in 1928. The “Third Street Pool” was permanently closed in 1967. An outdoor bandstand was built in 1938 and was demolished at the same time as the Third Street Pool, in 1967. A new band shell was built in the park in 1992, and an arched canopy was installed over the stage in 2002. A historic fountain from Rose Hill Cemetery was renovated and installed in the park in 1997.

N

The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department partnered with The Project School, IU Health Bloomington Hospital, and KaBOOM! to build a new playground with the help of more than 300 volunteers on May 20, 2011. Accessibility • Designated parking space available behind stage and sidewalk through the park What’s missing?

Park Address: 331 S Washington St. Bloomington, IN 47401TROYER GROUP

119


Wapehani Mountain Bike Park Interstate 69

The City leased the Weimer Lake grounds to the White River Council, Boy Scouts of America on August 31, 1954. Mutual release on termination of the lease was recorded on July 10, 1980. It is believed that Utilities took over the property at that time, but there was no written documentation. Wapehani Mountain Bike Park was the first mountain bike park in the state of Indiana, and it was opened in 1990. Weimer Lake (also referred to as “Lake Wapehani”) at Wapehani Mountain Bike Park was formed in 1909 when a dam was constructed on the West Fork of Clear Creek in order to form a small water supply reservoir. Originally a City of Bloomington Utilities resource, it was given over to the management of the City of Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department after Lake Lemon and Lake Monroe were created. The White River Council of the Boy Scouts of America leased what was then known as “Camp Wapehani” from the city in 1954. The BSA returned the Camp Wapehani property to the city in 1980, when the newly constructed State Road 37 cut the property in half. The Wapehani Mountain Bike Park (49.58 acres) opened as Indiana’s first mountain bike park in 1990. There are more than five miles of dirt mountain bike trails at the park.

Accessibility • Inaccessible What’s missing?

PARK METRICS • Parking • Mountain bike trails • Hiking trails • Fishing dock

Park Address: 3401 W Wapehani Rd Bloomington, IN 47403 Parks Comprehensive Master Plan 120 Bloomington


W. Wapehani Rd.

S. Weimer Rd.

W. Schmalz Blvd.

N

TROYER GROUP

121


YMCA of Monroe County - Southeast

S

e.

d Av

hlan . Hig

S. Highland Ave.

E. ea

al

Az . Ln

PARK METRICS • 2 baseball fields • 4 softball fields • Batting cages

122

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• • • • • •

Parking 6 tennis courts Community gardens Community orchard Nature trail Playground (Ages 5–12)


Winslow Woods Park Winslow Woods Park is one of Bloomington’s largest parks in the city. This 40-acre property is a cornerstone park serving as a major softball/baseball hub for several youth sports clubs and hosting several tournaments throughout the year. Along with ballfields the park offers tennis, walking trails, a fully ADA accessible playground and one the city’s largest community garden. E. Winslow Rd.

The park’s constant use can not only be attributed to residents throughout the city, but also to the nearby YMCA that caters to local youth. Following are the amenities offered in the park: Walking Trail: Nature Trail (0.74 mi.) This looping trail winds through Winslow Woods past mature trees and a number of sinkholes. Parking Areas: Approximately 40 spaces Playground Equipment: Built in 1990 by the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity as a service project, the equoipment is designed to accommodate physically challenged children and is wheelchair accessible.

S. Highland Ave.

Community Gardening: Willie Streeter Community Garden is located in Winslow Woods Park. Since 1984, Willie Streeter Community Garden has offered a variety of gardening opportunities to those who lack the space to garden at home or who would like to garden in the company of others. The garden offers conventional and organic plots as well as accessible raised beds. Services provided include the initial preparation of the garden plots, sources of water, composting facilities, fencing, and the Community Gardening Program newsletter. Plots are available for use April through October.

N • • • • • • •

Full-size basketball court Swing set 30x60’ picnic shelter 30x55’ Restroom/Concession building 20x25’ storage building Paved multi-use trail Outdoor fitness playground

Accessibility • Playground and designated parking spaces, community garden, and shelter What’s missing?

Park Address: 2120 S Highland AVE Bloomington, IN 47401TROYER GROUP

123


124

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


TRAILS

TROYER GROUP

125


CITY TRAIL LOCATIONS Fitness Trails

(Paved or Gravel Surface)

1. Ninth Street Loop 2. Southeast Park Connecting Path and Renwick Trail

3. Building & Trades Park Loop Trail 4. RCA Community Park Interpretive Trail 5. Bryan Park Loop and Streamside Trail

TRAIL TYPES PARK OWNED TRAILS OTHER

6. Winslow Sports Complex Trail Multi-use Trails

(Paved trails intended for bicycle and pedestrian use)

7. B-Line Trail 8. Bloomington Rail Trail 9. Cascades Park Trail 10. Clear Creek Trail 11. Park Ridge Bike Trail 12. Jackson Creek Trail

10

13. Olcott Loop Trail 14. Miller Showers (Paved Loop Trail) Hiking Trails

18

(Natural Surface)

15. Griffy Lake Nature Preserve Hiking Trails 16. Latimer Woods Nature Trail 17. Winslow Woods Park Nature Trail 18. Wapehani Mountain Bike Trail 19. Leonard Springs Trail 20. Lower Cascades Park Overlook Trail 19

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City Limits 15 9 20

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FACILITY ANALYSIS An analysis of park amenities system-wide can identify gaps and overlaps in educational and recreational opportunities for park users. Bloomington Parks contain a wide range of amenities for passive natural resource-based recreation including boardwalks and bird observation areas. Active recreation facilities include innertubing hills, a disc golf course and playgrounds.

FACILITIES Allison-Jukebox Community Center Banneker Community Center Bryan Park Pool Cascades Golf Course

The upper section of the matrix to the right itemizes the types of amenities located at each city park, facility Frank Southern Ice Arena and trail. Mills Pool Analysis Twin Lakes Recreation Center Across the board the Bloomington Parks seem to

have covered most base amenities needed on these properties with the top services offered; electricity, lighting, drinking fountains, benches and picnic tables. If we dissect the biggest need per the current amenity counts, lighting on trails and in parks is a crucial need to offer users a safe experience at all points throughout the day and allow for use outside of daylight hours. Although most parks have some type of amenity not every park is supplied with up-to-date amenities. It is strongly encouraged that a facilities study be done in addition to this master plan to research individual park needs. This will help give direction of capital funds towards the updating of even the simplest amenities 128

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TRAILS B-Line Trail B-Link Bloomington Rail Trail Cascades Park Trail Clear Creek Trail Jackson Creek Trail


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PARKS Broadview Park Brown’s Woods Bryan Park Building Trades Park Rev. Ernest D. Butler Park and Community Gardens Crestmont Park Ferguson Dog Park Goat Farm Griffy Lake Nature Preserve Highland Village Park Latimer Woods Leonard Springs Nature Park Lower Cascades Park Miller-Showers Park Olcott Park Park Ridge East Park Park Ridge Park Peoples Park RCA Community Park Rose Hill Cemetary Schmalz Farm Park Seminary Park Sherwood Oaks Park Skate Park at Upper Cascades Southeast Park Switchyard Park The Waldron, Hill and Buskirk Park Twin Lakes Sports Park Upper Cascades Park Wapehani Mountain Bike Park White Oak Cemetery Winslow Sports Complex Winslow Woods Park/Willie Streeter Community Gardens 130

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1 10.91 33 3.3 9.7 14 18.5 31.5 1,191 6.2 10 84.8 62.4 9 41.5 4.5 .5 .3 47.9 26.3 6 1 15.8 32 8.9 48.9 5.5 52.9 6.1 43.3 3.7 40 40

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while having a large impact on park usership: benches, picnic tables, accessibility, etc. The parks that need one of the first looks are Bloomington’s urban/mini-parks: Peoples Park, Seminary Acres, and Waldron, Hill & Buskirk Park. According to survey results, these parks over the past two master plan cycles have continually had low park usage numbers. There could potentially be an abudant amount of reasons for this, and with the help of a facilities study this could mean that further attractive amenities needed to be added to the individual parks in order to sustain proper usage. The Parks Department just recently updated Waldron, Hill & Buskirk Park outdoor bandstand with the replacement of new pavers. This improvement helped to raise inclusivity of the park with the benefit of ADA accessibility, a benchmark that further park improvements across the board should look to provide. Although not a crucial item, public art is another amenity that could be bolstered in future planning, working with local contracted artists. Public art helps to fortify community identity and sense of ownership to the area, as well as providing key destination points.

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C I T Y OF O F BLOOMINGTON B LO O M I N TO N PA RKS & EC R EAT I O N CITY PARKS & RRECREATION


5.0 Chapter Five Public Engagement

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PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT Public involvement in the planning process is necessary for final plans to reflect the needs and wants of the public. In the end, implementation of the plan by Bloomington Parks should be well supported to effectively deliver a communityoriented park system. Community collaboration builds trust and invites successful master planning efforts. A successful public involvement process should accomplish several tasks: Acquire input about the parks and feedback on ideas, increase support for the parks, and expand the community’s understanding of what the parks have to offer. The Parks Board and other stakeholder groups are at the forefront of master planning process, but it takes deep public participation to identify contemporary action items reflective of the community priorities. Several methods of outreach were completed to involve participation from the residents of Bloomington to broaden the reach and impact of the planning process. This section discusses the methodology and results of the public engagement strategies implemented during the planning process.

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PURPOSE OF THIS REPORT This report represents research findings specific to the statistically valid Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department community survey. It will ultimately inform the content of the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, but this report does not necessarily constitute the final narrative that will be presented in the plan. Table 1 depicts the progression of research and planning for this survey. to take the survey in Spanish. An introductory letter from the BPRD outlined the importance of public INTRODUCTION engagement in the plan development and outlined With an process that had a distinct emphasis on the information needed to develop a comprehensive people, a guiding part of the BPRD Master Plan update plan. Participants were informed that the target is public engagement and feedback on the current length of the survey was not to exceed 10 minutes. state of the park system. This feedback also sets the Survey objectives were refined by staff and involved direction moving forward. Involving the public builds preliminary feedback from the advisory group. trust in the Department, ensures relevancy, enables The objectives identified for the survey included: accountability, and gives the BPRD an opportunity to better communicate its values. The civic engagement • Awareness of community parks and recreation resources process being used for this plan aims to be inclusive, account for potential bias, and reflect the interests of • Usage of those resources and facilities the community. A community survey developed by • Barriers (perceived and actual) to the use of parks Troyer Group and the BPRD gauged public opinion, and recreation resources interests, and beliefs about the current parks and recreation system as well as providing a platform for • Association of parks and recreation resources with each facet of public health (social, mental, physical), guiding its future direction. The survey is one part environmental resiliency, economic sustainability, of an intensive effort to gather input, emphasizing as well as community recruitment and retention. “meeting people where they are”, despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Other public participation • Importance of having parks and recreation resources in the community activities involved stakeholder interviews, public meetings, pop-up meetings in various park locations, • Satisfaction with community parks and recreation a digital public whiteboard, and online engagement resources through social media and the City website. Survey Population and Sample

SURVEY METHODS

If sample size is too small, a disproportionate number of individuals which are outliers and anomalies may be included and skew the results. This could jeapordize any inferences made regarding the larger population. While more participants do result in more accurate findings, the whole study could get too complex. Therefore, the following methodology was applied to this study using the Qualtrics Probability Sampling Methodology:

Objectives The following objectives provided the framework for the survey, many of which carried over previous questions and themes from the last master plan. These questions were amended to reduce the total number of questions, reduce question complexity, while also including contemporary frameworks for better understanding “who” was participating. These updates involved more inclusive questions on gender • The sampling frame (i.e., source of population as well as providing options for participants wishing information from which the sample was drawn) 138

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was comprised of a listing of all households in the study area. • 2020 population (estimated): 85,981 - Based on US Census data • People aged 18+ (survey population): 76,179 • Primary residences: City of Bloomington and Monroe County, IN • Confidence level: 95% • Confidence interval/margin of error: 5% • Sample size required: 384 • Sample drawn: 5000 mailed postcards Survey Instrument and Distribution Households included in the sample were mailed a postcard in early August stating they were randomly selected to participate. The postcard contained a QR Code and URL for both English and Spanish language options that instructed the recipient how to complete the survey. Each survey featured a unique identifier based on Internet Protocol (IP Address). Only one response per IP Address was accepted. This helped to ensure sample integrity and excluded any member of the general public without a unique identifier to take the survey. Additionally, a general public survey was launched simultaneously, to allow more feedback to be gathered. Responses from each survey were kept separate. A follow-up postcard sent to members of the random sample a week in early September. A total of 531 useable surveys were returned, yielding a response rate of almost 11%. All survey results from the random survey are presented in the Appendix. 156 surveys from the general survey were also returned and presented as supplemental to the random survey.

• 61% of respondants rated the parks condition as Good or Excellent. • 32% of respondants had used a recreation or program service, with 85% rating those as Good or Excellent. • The most used facilities include B-Line Trail, Bloomington Rail Trail, Burkirk-Chumley Theater, Clear Creek Trail, and Jackson Creek Trail. • 64% of responses rate facilities as Important or Very Important, with preference toward the most used facilities. • 38% or respondants preferred to learn about BPRD programs and services via the website and seasonal programming guide. • Physical Wellness (21%), Mental/Emotional (19%), and Environmental Health (19%) were the highest priority areas of health and wellness. • 67% of respondants said they felt welcome, 28% somewhat welcome, with 3% saying they felt not welcome. • The highest priority desired outcomes include improving physical health, improving mental health, making Bloomington a desireable place to live, making the natural assets more sustainable and resilient, preserving open space and the environment, and providing access to the outdoors. • The top barrier preventing park use was Not Enough Time (23%), Personal Safety Concerns (17%), and the perception that My Neighborhood Doesn’t Have a Park within a 10min Walk (13%). • 23.4% of respondants would use their tax dollars for additional trails, 22% on maintaining existing parks, and 34.76% on acquiring new parkland or building new parks. • 18% felt their neighborhood got its fair share of public dollars (41% felt unsure) and 83% of respondants were statisfied with the value. • The three most important issues to address within the Master Plan include Connecting Trails (15%), Focusing on Maintenance (12%), and Reducing Vandalism/Safety (11%). Arts and Cultural Events were a close 4th (10%). • 60.5% of respondants were 55 or older, 27.7% were 35-54, 11.7% were 19-34. • 78% of respondants were white, 11% BIPOC, and 11% preferred not to answer. • 59% of respondants were female, 43% male, 1% non-binary, and 7% preferred not to answer.

How the Survey Informs Key Issues This section reviews select survey items that are relevant to emerging key issues to be considered in the Master Plan. This report serves as an initial step in determining what critical data from the survey could be used in developing solutions to the community’s needs. Troyer Group, with feedback from the BPRD staff, and Advisory group identified three key issues and themes from the survey as well as important Key Themes statistics for further consideration in the process. • Maintenance Survey Statistics: • Most used parks include: Bryan Park, Lower Cascades Park, Griffy Lake Nature Preserve, Olcott Park, and Switchyard Park.

• Social/Environmental Justice • Trail connectivity Refer to the next section and the Appendix for additional analysis and complete results.

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STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS MEETING FORMAT

KEY THEMES FROM MEETINGS

Several stakeholder meetings were held throughout • Mission only addresses physical amenities, should the late summer and early fall of 2020 involving key further address services and programs. How stakeholder groups with a critical interest in the Parks should we address both reaching out and physical Department. assests post-COVID, avoid wordy and long mission, address equality and inclusion. Stakeholder groups that were interviewed include: • Address leadership transition, hiring practices, • Master Planning Steering Committee training, and outreach. • BPRD Operations Division • Diversity, equity, and inclusion were recurring • BPRD Recreation/Sports/Administration Divisions topics with emphasis on social and environmental • Volunteer Groups: Park Ambassadors, Adopt an justice. Acre, and Adopt a Stream • Money and time are barriers, some staff level feel • Bloomington Parks Foundation overloaded to manage roles. • Business Community/Community Organizations • The effects of parks dealing with homelessness/ • Board of Commissioners (Les Coyne and Ellen litter/biohazards, more people experiencing Rodkey) homelessness, resources are needed to address • Board of Commissioners (Kathleen Mills and Israel the resulting damages. Herrera) • Maintenance is a high concern for current and • Community Partnership/User Groups future problems. • BPRD Advisory Team • Advisory Councils (Environmental Resources Advisory Council, Tree Commission, Golf Committee) • Mayor Hamilton • Deputy Mayor Renneisen • Public Open House (2 hours, hosted via Zoom, Facebook Live, and Miro) Engagement activities (Miro) created by the project team were used as data collection tools in addition to group discussion with core area questions prompts. Each of the meetings were structured similarly, hosted via Zoom, with a review of existing mission, vision, and goals before diving into new areas. The overarching discussion topics addressed the borad lenses to examine the entire BPRD system and included topic areas of administration, people, natural resources, park facilities, program and events. These hour-long discussions also allowed participants to provide comments to specific parks via the Miro whiteboard (more than 100 responses were collected via this tool).

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ZOOM MEETINGS PARKS OPERATION DIVISION Tuesday, August 25th, 1:00pm – 2:00pm

services and programs the parks department provides. The mission should address equality and inclusion, as well as how the parks department plans to continue providing physical and distance opportunities for the community. Some of the current major concerns include lack of funding and resources, and the need for capacity improvements. The department should cultivate partnerships, aim for many smaller grant funding opportunities, and create long term plans for all facilities. Another concern is how to stay relevant against so many competitors, and how to attract and retain people within the community. The city needs to be adaptive and flexible to accommodate the growing and changing needs of the future community. More resources are needed to cope with the effects of handling homelessness, and research needs to be provided to understand the core of the issue- is homelessness and vandalism the result of not connecting with the community? The parks department should be focusing on attracting targeted audiences and focusing efforts to include a diversity of cultures within their programming. A standard training for the department would help with accountability. The parks department need to be proactive about being anti-racist, and seek out diverse individuals for government and community jobs; it isn’t good enough to just say that we hire who applies, we need to make an effort to obtain a diverse pool of applicants. The department needs to add metrics and active items to demonstrate their accountability and efforts to be anti-racist, having policies and one training a year is just not enough. The efforts need to go beyond people and need to be reflected in events, and the persistence of the department to continue providing for overlooked community members. Transportation is one of the biggest barriers to inclusivity. Some of the most important things to improve on in this coming master plan are communication and outreach, addressing the maintenance back log, building on sustainability, improving image, climate change efforts, and demonstrating resilience and energy.

The mission statement is not known and visible to the public, the mission should be accessible to view easily but the community. The mission statement is very broad and should utilize more inclusive and specific language. Some effective points that the mission should address valuing sustainability, climate change efforts, making diversity efforts a focus, and providing essential services. There should be more efforts placed on natural and cultural resource preservation and protections. Increased rainfall events have been harmful to Griffy Lake ecosystem and should be addressed, and programming events should be reflective and highlight the different cultures within the community. Overall, more outreach is needed to communicate the state of natural and cultural resources, and this outreach should be accessible to all community members, whether that is in terms of providing equal access or having information displayed in multiple languages. A sustainability action plan should be created to address water way protections, invasive species management, and layout funding for natural resources. Some of the biggest challenges include managing a budget for all the necessary maintenance of the existing parks, handling the new rise of park visitation and avoiding parks being “loved to death”, and managing the homeless populations and drug/vandalism related issues. Approaches to being anti-racist include reaching out for diversity in hiring, planning inclusive events, attract diversity and different cultures to programming and events within the parks, and addressing the community as a whole family. Specific actions that should be taken include hiring practices such as targeted job advertisement, targeting programming towards specific diverse PARKS AMBASSADORS/ADOPTS AN ACRE & user groups, and recognition and stewardship of ADOPTS A STREAM VOLUNTEERS indigenous lands. Monday, August 31st, 4:00pm – 5:00pm

The vision is better received than the mission statement, the mission needs to be as inspiring as Tuesday, August 25th, 2:30pm – 3:30pm the vision. More funding needs to be allocated for The mission only addressed the physical amenities environmental and water resources, there are a lot and should be revised to reflect the importance of the of habitat and water resource issue that need to RECREATION/SPORTS/ADMINISTRATION

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be attended to and addressed. Things like invasive species clean ups, planting for pollinators, addressing industrial pollution, along with overall more environmental education is needed and should be allocated resources. The biggest issue when it comes to sustaining environmental resources is funding. The farmers market and parks department need to take a stronger stance and have a quicker response when it comes to racial issues. Need to make stronger efforts to demonstrate that the city is anti-racist. The city needs to listen to people’s stories and explore diversity and look at how the city is attracting and retaining people of all different cultures. Focus efforts on attracting children and young families. Create and communicate safe spaces, and let the people of Bloomington know they area a priority.

visual impairments. Homelessness is seen as a major challenge, and the city should offer services. Seminary Park is currently overrun by a homeless population, and it is in theory due to its proximity to services. Switchyard park is well done but homelessness is still an issue there as well. Partnerships with Centerstone could help provide homelessness services. There is an agreement that there is no need for increased parks properties and area, and the resources should be focused on maintaining and investing in existing park area and facilities. There should be a focus on connecting the existing parks system through more trail development. The is a good amount of programing and events offered, the guidebook is jam packed, however, this does not mean there is enough programming geared towards culturally inclusive events. Implicit bias training would help the city departments and officials to listen to underrepresented community BLOOMINGTON PARKS FOUNDATION members. The major goals for the next 5-year master Tuesday, September 1st, 11:00am – 12:00pm plan include increasing connectivity, obtaining grants This group was comfortable with the current mission, and food security funding, developing partnerships, a few changes will be needed just to address the and enhancing communications and marketing to more relevant issues. The trails within the county are reach more people more effectively. extremely important and should be continued to be built upon and added to. A major concern is the lack BUSINESS COMMUNITY/COMMUNITY of maintenance funding, and how increased use will ORGANIZATIONS further affect it. Vegetation within the downtown area requires a lot of maintenance and can be unsafe due to Tuesday, September 1st, 1:00pm – 2:00pm TROYER GROUP

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There is room for further development when it comes to protecting the communities cultural and natural resources, and the steps to improve stewardships come down to funding. The economy needs to diversity in order to sustain growth, or economic turmoil and ability to fundraise will be future challenges. Currently, the city is seeing an overuse of parks and people are desperate to get outside. While the city is working and adapting to the new norms of the community and society, there is a need to continuously improve while still being able to maintain everything. The parks department should partner with schools to help meet the growing needs of working families. All parks facilities need to be equally maintained and provided attention, and this would help alleviate the high stress on certain parks and spread out park usage intensity. Providing transportation is another major need that would help disperse park usage across all city parks. Another idea is to meet people where they are and focus efforts on bringing the programing and event s to the underserved communities instead of always hosting things at the premier park locations that often cater specifically to the majority. Partnering with schools’ boys/girls club, Banneker, Crestmont, and other organizations would help department cater to minority, lower income, and persons with disabilities users. There is not a need to continue adding onto the park’s facilities, but more of a need to further maintain the existing ones. When talking about approaches to being anti-racist, the idea of meeting people where they are, actively engaging, and offering more cultural celebrations and partnerships where some tactics that were discussed. In order to address previous instances, the department and city need better overall communication, and visible statements within the mission and vision that identify inclusion as an important aspect of growing the community. While statements are needed, they are only empty words if there is no action and accountability. The city needs to actively build trust again. The major goals over the next 5 years are to provide better and more effective communication that is include, broaden the end user base, serve people where they are, and reflect the community as a whole.

equity issues and look at the current issues through a public health lens. There is the discussion of providing social work services but is it the place of the parks department to take on that role, especially since it has limited resources as it is. The economic impact of the parks facilities and programs should be reflected in the mission and communicated to the community. There is not a need to continue adding park property and facilities, but the focus should be put towards maintaining existing facilities. The biggest challenges that were identified include finance and the economic ability to keep the level of activities and programs available, technology and the cities efficiency and adaptability, and the homelessness problem and the addiction, psychological issues, and affordable housing problems that stem from that. Anti-racism efforts should start by taking inventory of how racial issues are a part of ever aspect and asking deeper questions to understand the problem and better address systemic racism. The city needs to set an example with their programing and hiring and go out of the way to attract diverse workers, partner with group fighting racial disparity, and create an HR department that is accountable. The department needs to take a stance and demonstrate that the community is dedicated to better equity. The goals of the 5-year plan include these anti-racism efforts, trail development and continuation of building connectivity and equitable transportation, developing the hospital site greenway, addressing sustainability and accessibility, and better utilizing the resources that are currently available. PARKS BOARD (KATHLEEN MILLS & ISRAEL HERRERA) Tuesday, September 1st, 4:00pm – 5:00pm

The goals for BPRD and the 5-year master plan include improving public health, sustainability, data collection, public engagement, events and youth activities, human services, accessibility and equity, and creating spaces and atmospheres for the community to come together post COVID19. COVID has helped people to see how important open space is, and it has also increased usage. There is a concern of mission creep and the department over stepping what it can feasibly accomplish, there should be a focus on doing the best PARK BOARD (LES COYNE & ELLEN RODKEY) at what is expected from the parks department and Tuesday, September 1st, 2:30pm – 3:30pm not trying to do too much. Other concerns include The mission statement needs to use inclusive language homelessness health, invasive species, and food that specifically calls out the “who” and “what” that it insecurity. Budgeting to solve these issues is the is referring to. The mission should address the social biggest overarching challenge, and the inequality level 144

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needs to be addressed, possibly through subsidizing. The parks department needs to respond to the continuing change in use trends, such as the decline in baseball field use and increase in soccer field usage, as well as responding to the changing amenity needs, like possibly adding wifi to public spaces. The City’s response to the farmers market incident was not enough, the town needs to take a stronger stance to demonstrate that they are anti-racist. The parks need to be equitable in spread of amenities throughout all the parks, not just focusing on some parks and neglecting others. Everyone should ideally live within a mile of a park and be provided equal access and opportunities for activities and programs. The parks need to provide programs at all parks and in parks in underserved areas, not just at the premier parks. Lastly, the department and 5-year plan should address sustainability efforts and climate change impacts and mitigation in the face of COVID19. COMMUNITY PARTNERS AND USER GROUPS Wednesday, September 2nd, 11:00am – 12:00pm While the mission statement is adequate and is currently being met but will probably not fit for the next 5-years. The department is inclusive but has room for growth. With the changing environment and community needs, the department has room for growth in providing access to all and investing in virtual programing. Careful planning and use of funds need to be allocated to the right places to continue growing and providing. There is a potential for overuse of parks facilities, the splash pad at Switchyard is very overused, there is a concern about exhaustion of facilities and capacity limits. Since the parks department cannot provide everything alone, partnerships will be key to increase capacity with fewer resources and funding. Partnerships with schools and lower income areas and organization will help to provide after school programs and programs targeted towards lower served groups and provide more accessibility-i.e. meet people where they are. Providing equitable transportation is a major focus and should be sought after while looking at funding, resources, and partnerships. Programs should help to activate less used parks, such as Crestmont, which is currently maintained but not active like some of the other parks. In terms of being actively anti-racist, the city needs to take a greater stance on the farmers market issue and needs to reach out to include diverse leaders and partnerships. The parks should offer programs that tie

into different cultural elements and celebrations, lead by diverse community members and leaders to avoid appropriation. Diverse group should be sought after to give minorities a greater voice in the community, and let people have advocacy and ownership, allow things to not be a top-down proclamation. Department needs to act and not just make statements via social media. Communication needs to be addressed actively and tangibly, statements need follow up and longterm change behavior to obtain trust again. Looking at the overall goals of the plan, inclusivity needs to be added and addressed in some way. While trails and transportation are important to continue to grow, it is less important in this master plan. The goals should revolve around maintaining and increasing users across all parks, not just expanding on facilities. ADVISORY COUNCILS (FARMER’S MARKET, BANNEKER COMMUNITY CENTER) Wednesday, September 2nd, 4:00pm – 5:00pm The mission is broad and should better define what wellbeing means, as well as who the mission statement is specifically addressing, the underserved communities should be the people who the mission statement is geared towards. With the current issues of the farmers market, there is a question if the market is something that should be included in the parks department narrative. Within the mission statement, the term recreation leaves out a whole subset of activities because of the way recreation is perceived. The mission should be further expanded to include services provided outside of purely recreation and should emphasize encouraging people coming together from different backgrounds and cultures for shared experiences. Cultural resources are not viewed as valued or protected. There is another problem of lack of direct information, and the question of if the department is utilizing technology and communication tools effectively. The BPRD has a history of only focusing on facilities and dollars, and not enough on people and experiences. The goals for the next 5-years include creating more partnerships, such as Hoosier Hills Food Bank and Farm to Family Fund and continue existing partnerships with Banneker and corporations will be crucial for funding and resources. Anti-racism efforts need to include programming for underserved groups, as well as updating and providing more for parks in underserved/minority areas such as Rev Butler Park. Restrooms and shelters should be provided and open to homeless community. TROYER GROUP

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The city needs to not be afraid to take a stance against racism and condemn racist actions. The staffing efforts should also better reflect the community, and minorities, POC, and indigenous people need to be front and center of initiatives and programming efforts. Al government departments should have extensive anti-racism training. ADVISORY TEAM: Thursday, September 3rd, 11:00am – 12:00pm Health and wellness should be addressed within the mission statement, as well as the availability of services. Overall, the mission needs to use more equitable language. There should be a set standard for the parks department to follow, and the standards should be reassessed on an annual basis to allow for regular changes within the mission, values, and goals. This would allow for a more precise maintenance list, and smaller improvements that can be looked at and achieved on an annual basis. The department needs clearly stated standards that are then carried out. Homelessness is a major challenge and takes a good amount of resources. Certain parks, such as Seminary and People’s Parks, are avoided due to the homeless issue and people perceiving them as unsafe. To address anti-racism effort, the department needs to systematically invite minority groups into employment and volunteer opportunities. Diversity should be included on the event planning end, not just on the invitation end. Changing planning initiatives and efforts, and study what will attract a diverse population. There is a need to not just program for park use, but to program for what people and community actually want and need. There was an idea to program near churches and to include/partner with churches and other community organization and groups that already attract a diverse population. ADVISORY COUNCILS (ENVIRONMENTAL RESOURCES ADVISORY COUNCIL, TREE COMMITTEE, GOLF COMMITTEE) Thursday, September 3rd, 1:00pm – 2:00pm The mission statement of the parks should incorporate language around equity and reflects that all people have equal access to parks and programs. Sustainability should and environmental education for future generations should also be a part of the mission. More time and funding should be going towards protecting the natural resources. Some tasks, such as handling 146

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invasive species and managing water resources, are just too big for parks to handle with the current allotted resources. There should be an effort to protect green spaces and natural habitat and have less impediment by man-made structures. Bloomington does well to incorporate arts in public spaces, more marketing could help spread awareness and stewardship of cultural and environmental educational resources. With more people and programs needing outdoor spaces, there is a stress on parks to provide more and increasing use is a foreseen issue in terms of parking, degrading of natural area, and homelessness. The city should utilize more partnerships with resources for homeless populations, such as Center Stone and health care providers since there is a direct connection between parks and public health. Encouraging and promoting sustainability and health are major goals, some idea including promoting a smart commuting week or some sort of transportation challenge that would also draw more attention to the trail system. The people would like to see more trail development and connectivity between the city and county trails. With more demand for programs in outdoor spaces that maintain social distancing, parks will need to look at how to activate outdoor space year-round- this could lead to great potential for business partnerships. The programs should be available at every park, especially targeted at underserved park areas, and the programs and events held should be planned with diversity, culture, and minorities in mind and at the forefront of planning initiatives. Low income housing options should be adequately planned around parks, along with accessible transportation. There needs to be a focus in the future around the overall accessibility and connectivity of the parks systems in relation to low income/underserved areas. The question of public safety arose, and how it is managed within the parks system. Police tend to instill fear in some community groups, and there may be better ways of monitoring the parks that don’t necessarily involve police action. Looking at anti-racism, the farmers market needs to take a stronger stance against racism and condemn individual actions. The department needs to have more overall transparency and efforts within staffing to better reflect and serve the community. Some of the most important things that need to be addressed are equity and sustainability, education, improvement of transportation and passive recreation, preservation, and overall land and resource protection. A few goals should be added to talk about providing safe, equitable, and welcoming spaces for all community


members, and providing fair access to resources no matter who the community members are or where they live. Other goals include dedicating more time and resources to invasive species management and ecological awareness. Lastly, the new goals should address the pandemic and social distancing.

TROYER GROUP

147


PUBLIC MEETINGS A virtual public open house to seek input on the plan was held on September 03, 2018. The meeting was announced via press release to local media as well as advertised via the City’s website and social media channels. Because of the on-going COVID-19 pandemic, the meeting was conducted virtually using a publicly accessible Zoom link and broadcast on Facebook Live, using the Department’s popular channel. In order to allow people ample time and opportunity to attend, it was conducted as an open house format over the course of two hours. Additionally, the meeting utilized the digital “whiteboard” application Miro, which housed a PDF copy of the agenda, PowerPoint presentation, digital mapping and abstract lens category exercises, and a link to the online general survey (separate from the randomly sampled survey and provided in both Spanish and English). A total of 10 users logged in exclusively through the Miro application, with 5 visitors sending questions through Facebook Live, and several people logging into the Zoom to watch over the course of the meeting. Questions submitted via email prior to the meeting were read aloud and addressed throughout. Two brief presentations outlining the process and project themes were made at the beginning and midway through the meeting. After the presentations, directions for the mapping activities were reviewed, which gave people the opportunity to add comments to specific geo-referenced locations within each park. In a separate exercise, “lens” boards with the abstract categories of “natural resources”, “programs and events”, “park facilities”, “people”, and “administration” were shared to garner more feedback using category prompts to help elicit more specific information about the Department. For those that missed the verbal description of the exercises, the aerial maps and abstract “lens” boards along with their instructions remained available throughout the entire meeting and open through the entire public engagement process. Over 30 comments were collected through these exercises. The Miro digital whiteboard tool is shown in greater detail on the following page, and will continue 148

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

to serve as a digital repository for the duration of the project, with all the collected information available for continued review and feedback. All the feedback collected at this open house included addressing social and racial equity concerns, amplifying the value of the existing trail system through additional connection opportunities, and emphasizing the need for maintenance over providing additional park developments.


TROYER GROUP

149


SURVEY RESULTS PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT BY THE NUMBERS

17

2

INTERNAL AND EXTERNAL STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS

PUBLIC OPEN HOUSE MEETINGS

87

10

STATISTICALLY VALID SURVEY RESPONSES

156

ADDITIONAL PUBLIC SURVEYS SUBMITTED

557 47,205

COMMUNITY STAKEHOLDERS

POP-UP AND SOCIAL INTERCEPTS AT 7 PARKS

OPEN COMMENTS AND FEEDBACK

DATA POINTS FROM SURVEYS

25

25

7

4

STAKEHOLDER GROUPS / ORGANIZATIONS

150

531

DEPARTMENT MEETINGS

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

SOCIAL AND PHYSICAL CONTEXT STUDY AREAS

OVERARCHING THEMES


The following graphics are a compliation of the survey results recieved from the statistically valid survey. Do you use this park? Yes

No

3rd Street Park (Waldron, Hill & Buskirk) Broadview Park

22% 2%

Bryan Park

57%

Building and Trades Park (2nd Street)

10%

Lower Cascades Park

44%

Crestmont Park Ferguson Dog Park

4% 13%

Griffy Lake Nature Preserve

48%

Goat Farm Prairie

11%

Highland Village Park

5%

Latimer Woods

6%

Leonard Springs Nature Park

21%

Miller-Showers Park

9%

Olcott Park

32%

Park Ridge Park

5%

Park Ridge Park East

5%

Peoples Park

8%

RCA Park (formerly Thomson)

14%

Rev. Ernest Butler Park (9th Street)

13%

Schmalz Farm Park

9%

Seminary Park

7%

Sherwood Oaks Park

14%

Southeast Park

8%

Switchyard Park

52%

Winslow Woods Park

17%

None, do not use any parks (skip Q2)

5%

Question 1 Part I Respondents were asked to go through all the parks within Bloomington and indicate if they or anyone in their household visited the park. Then, they were asked to indicate which four of the parks they or their family members visit most frequently. Switchyard Park, Bryan Park, and Griffy Nature Preserve were shown to be the most visited parks and most frequently used, with over 50% of respondents reporting that they visited each of the parks, and approximately 30% of respondents indicating that the three parks were in their top four most visited parks in the city. Lower Cascades Park and Olcott Park were also indicated as popular parks with relatively high visitation rates. Crestmont Park, Latimer Woods, Park Ridge Park, Park Ridge Park East, and Highland Village Park were shown to have lower visitation rates, and Broadview Park was indicated as the least utilized and visited park facility with only 2.25% of respondents indicated that have been to the park.

Of all the parks, which do you use the most? (choose up to four, percentages of total responses Lower Cascades Park

Bryan Park

20% 36%

Olcott Park

Griffy Lake Nature Preserve

19% 32%

Switchyard Park 29%

TROYER GROUP

151


Question 1 Part II Survey respondents were then asked to rate the condition of each park within Bloomington; the scale included options for poor, fair, good, excellent, and unsure. The parks that were shown to have the most visitation were also indicated to have the best conditions, with the majority of respondents indicating good or excellent conditions. Switchyard Park was shown to have the best conditions, with 66% of respondents reporting that it was in excellent condition. While Switchyard was not a park when the 2015 survey was given, Bryan Park, another highly visited park, was indicated on both surveys as the top maintained park. Seminary Park was shown to be most in need of attention to conditions, with 39% of respondents indicating that it is in poor condition.

This is similar to the 2015 survey, which also showed Seminary and People’s parks were considered to be in the worst condition. Parks that had lower visitation rates, such as Broadview and Crestmont Park, also tended to have a higher percentage of respondents indicating that they were unsure of park conditions. This may indicate that lack of use in these parks may be due to location or other factors not related to the physical condition of the park.

How would you rate the condition of these parks? Poor 3rd Street Park (Waldron, Hill & Buskirk) Broadview Park Bryan Park Building and Trades Park (2nd Street) Lower Cascades Park Crestmont Park Ferguson Dog Park Griffy Lake Nature Preserve Goat Farm Prairie Highland Village Park Latimer Woods Leonard Springs Nature Park Miller-Showers Park Olcott Park Park Ridge Park Park Ridge Park East Peoples Park RCA Park (formerly Thomson) Rev. Ernest Butler Park (9th Street) Schmalz Farm Park Seminary Park Sherwood Oaks Park Southeast Park Switchyard Park Winslow Woods Park

152

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Fair

Good

Excellent

Unsure


Have you or other members of your household participated in any recreation programs and services offered by the City of Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department in the past 12 months? If yes, how would you rate the overall quality of the recreation programs and services that you and members of your household have participated in? Unsure 6% Poor 4% Fair 5%

Yes - 32%

Good 37%

No - 68%

Question 2 asked respondents if they had used any of the parks services or programs within the past year, and if so, to rate the quality of those services and programs. Of the responses, 68% of people reported not utilizing any services or programs within the last year. Of they 32% of people who had used a program or service, an overwhelming majority (85%) said that the quality of the programs and services was good or excellent. Similar to the 2015 survey, only 9% of those who has utilized programs or services gave them a rating of fair or poor. *Question 5 is same as Question 2

Excellent 48%

95 90 85 80 75 70 65 60 55 50 45

Percentage of respondents who use this facility Percentage of respondents who reported using this facility the most often (top 4 options) Further analysis to be done to determine reason for low respondent usage

Question 3 Part I asked respondent to go through all the parks and recreation facilities offered in Bloomington, and indicated if they used them or not, and then again asked to indicate four options that they used the most frequently. Bloomington Rail Trail, Burkirk-Chumley Theater, Clear Creek Trail, Jackson Trail, and B-Line Trail were all shown to have the highest use and visitation rates of all the park facilities, with B-Line Trail being the most popular, showing 69% of respondents using the trail and 47% indicating it as one of their top four most utilized facilities. Compared to the survey results from the previous BPRD Masterplan 2016-2020, the results showed similar popularity within the top used facilities, although all of which showed to have decreased overall used comparatively. While B-Line Trail was shown to be the most used facility in both surveys, the 2015 survey showed that 80% of respondents used the trail, while the 2020 survey showed that 69% of respondents used the trail. This decrease in use was similar for many of the facilities. Overall, use rates for recreation facilities across Bloomington remained relatively the same between the two surveys.

40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 Alli son -Ju keb ox Com mu nity Ba Cen nn eke ter B rC L i om ne T m r ail un Blo ity om Cen ing ter ton Ra il T Bry Bu rai an rkir l Par k-C kP hu o m o Ca l ley sca The des ate Clu Ca r sca bH des ou se G olf Ca sca Co urs des e Ska te P Ca a r sca k des Cre Tra stm Clear il Cre on tD ek isc Tra G il Co mm olf Co Fra u u rse ni nk Sou ty Ga rde the ns rn Ice Jac Are kso n nC a ree kT rai l Mil Olc ls P She ott oo lter Sw l Par ho itch k fi use yar eld s in dP s ark Cit yP Bo Sw ark itch cce Ba Sw s itch l yar l C our yar dP dP ts ark ark Pav Sw ilio itch Pickle n Bal yar l Co dP Sw ark urt itch s Ska yar Tw te P dP in L ark ark ake Spr sR ay ecr Pad eat T w Wa ion in L peh Cen ake an sS ter iM po rts ou nta Par in B k Wi nsl ike ow Par Spo k rts Par k

0

Please indicate if you or members of your household have used any of the following recreation facilities listed below in the past year. Please also indicate the 4 you use most.

TROYER GROUP

153


How important is this facility to your family’s recreational needs? Not Very Important

Somewhat Important

Important

Very Important

Unsure

Allison-Jukebox Community Center B-Line Trail Banneker Community Center Bloomington Rail Trail Bryan Park Pool Burkirk-Chumley Theater Cascades Club House Cascades Golf Course Cascades Skate Park Cascades Trail Clear Creek Trail Crestmont Disc Golf Course Community Gardens Frank Southern Ice Arena Jackson Creek Trail Mills Pool Olcott Park fields Shelter houses in City Parks Switchyard Park Bocce Ball Courts Switchyard Park Pavilion Switchyard Park Pickle Ball Courts Switchyard Park Skate Park Switchyard Park Spray Pad Twin Lakes Recreation Center Twin Lakes Sports Park Wapehani Mountain Bike Park Winslow Sports Park

Question 3 Part II The respondents were asked to rate the importance of each park facility on a scale ranging from not important to very important, with an additions “unsure” option. The most commonly used facilities also showed to have the highest importance, with the top five most used facilities (B-Line Trail, Bloomington Rail Trail, BurkirkChumley Theater, Clear Creek Trail, and Jackson Trail) having over 50% of respondents indicating that they were of high importance for each facility. Almost all facilities were ranked of high importance for at least 20% of the respondents, apart from Allison-Jukebox Community Center, Cascades Club House, Cascades Skate Park, and Crestmont Disc Golf Course. These four facilities were also shown to have the highest

154

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

percentage of respondents choosing them as not important. The ranking of facility importance was very similar to the rankings surveyed in the 2015 survey, however, the results showed an overall lower indication of importance across all facilities. For example, the B-Line trail, the overall most important facility indicated in both surveys, was selected as very important by 71% of only respondents in the 2015 survey, where as in the 2020 survey it was selected as very important by 58%. This trend in lower indicated importance is similar across all facilities in the 2020 survey.


Please select ALL the ways that you CURRENTLY learn about BPRD programs and services. Also select the ways you prefer to learn about BPRD programs and services. Other Social media (Facebook/Instagram)

City of Bloomington Website Conversations with Park and Recreation staff

Fliers/Posters Seasonal Program guide

Friends and neighbors

Radio

Parks Department e-mail bulletins

Newspaper advertisements

Newspaper articles

Question 4 sought to understand how people currently receive information about the parks department, as well as how they would prefer to receive information going forward. Currently, the majority of people learn about parks programs and services through the season program guide, the City of Bloomington website, and social media. Less popular but still effective ways to reach the public included parks department email bulletins and word of mouth through friends and neighbors. Comparing this to the previous survey, the increase in personal technology ownership and use is evident. Forms of communication such as newspaper articles, advertisements and posters, and radio announcements showed significant decreases within the five year period. Social media and blogs showed a significant increase in the amount of people who utilize

them for information from the parks department. The seasonal programs guide and the City of Bloomington website remained the top ways across both surveys in which people learn of events and programs from the parks department, and were indicated as the top two ways in which people wish to continue receiving information from the City and the department.

TROYER GROUP

155


Question 6 Part I Asked the respondents to indicate which types of facilities they or member of their household used from a compiled list of varying facilities offered by BPRD.

Please indicate if YOU or members or your HOUSEHOLD use these facility types Community Gardens

47

Greenspace / natural areas 235 Large community parks 261 Off-leash dog park

98

Playground equipment

182

Small neighborhood parks

227

Spray pad

84

Water park

76

Aquatics facility (indoor)

53

Community theater

166

Facility rental space (pavilion)

95

Ice arena

91

Nature center

87

Recreation event space

83

Fitness and exercise facilities (indoor)

116

Fitness and exercise stations (outdoor)

106

Running/Walking track (indoor)

109

Walking and biking trails 394 Baseball and softball fields (youth)

58

Basketball courts (outdoor)

82

Basketball courts (indoor)

39

Bocce ball Disc golf Football fields (youth)

156

12 40 11

Futsal

2

Golf course

90

Mountain bike park

58

Pickleball courts

34

Soccer fields (youth)

41

Softball fields (adult)

21

Skateboarding park

40

Sports fields (indoor)

20

Tennis courts (outdoor)

97

Volleyball courts (indoor)

8

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


Question 6 Part II then asked the respondents to indicate the importance of these types of facilities on a scale from not important to very important with an option to check “unsure”. Walking and Bike trails were by far the most used facility, followed by large community parks, greenspace/natural areas, small neighborhood parks, playground equipment, and community theater. These facilities were also rated as the most important. Overall, outdoor park feature and amenities were shown to have the most use. Sports facilities such as tennis courts, golf courses, and

basketball courts were also shown to have relatively high use and importance. The area of lowest use and importance to respondents include futsal, volleyball, bocce ball, and football fields. Compared to the 2015 survey, the same facilities were indicated as the highest use and priority, and showed very similar percentages of use and importance.

How important is this facility to your family’s recreational needs? Not Very Important

Somewhat Important

Important

Very Important

Unsure

Community Gardens Greenspace / natural areas Large community parks Off-leash dog park Playground equipment Small neighborhood parks Spray pad Water park Aquatics facility (indoor) Community theater

Facility rental space (pavilion) Ice arena Nature center Recreation event space Fitness and exercise facilities (indoor) Fitness and exercise stations (outdoor) Running/Walking track (indoor) Walking and biking trails Baseball and softball fields (youth) Basketball courts (outdoor) Basketball courts (indoor) Bocce ball Disc golf Football fields (youth) Futsal Golf course Mountain bike park Pickleball courts Soccer fields (youth) Softball fields (adult) Skateboarding park Sports fields (indoor) Tennis courts (outdoor) Volleyball courts (indoor) TROYER GROUP

157


Question 7 moved on to health, wellness, and inclusion aspects of the facilities, programs, and events offered by the parks department. Respondents were asked to rank which areas of health and wellness Bloomington should prioritize. Of the areas provided, physical wellness was chosen most often as the highest priority

items, quickly followed by environmental wellness, and then mental/emotional wellness. Financial, intellectual, and social wellness were all ranked as lower priority items, with financial being chosen as the lowest priority item most often.

Which areas of health and wellness do you think Bloomington should prioritize? Rank these areas Though there are more than four areas to rank, ensure that at least one area is assigned a 1 (high priority) and at least one area is assigned a 4 (low priority).

Highest

Second Highest

Physical wellness (fitness) 21%

Lowest

10%

Environmental 19%

3%

Financial 13%

2% 2%

3%

4%

5%

Social/relationships 16%

3%

6%

8%

Mental/emotional wellness 19%

Intellectual 12%

Third Highest

5% 3% 3%

2%

5%

6%

3%

4% 2%

1%

5% 6%

4%

3%

How do we convert these percentages to “high” priorities?

Question 8 asked how welcome the respondents felt using the facilities and programs offered by the parks department. The majority of people, approximately 95%, indicated that they felt at least somewhat welcome, with about 5% reporting that they did not feel welcome or preferred not to answer. A major focus for the department should be get the 32% of people who either don’t feel welcome, or only feel somewhat welcomed, to feel invited and welcome at all programs, facilities, and events. *Question 17 is same as Question 8

158

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

How welcome do you feel using the park amenities, facilities, and programs? Prefer Not To Answer 3% Not Welcome 3% Somewhat Welcome 28%

Very Welcome 67%


Question 9 Part I Respondents were given a list of social and cultural programs/services offered by the parks department and asked which one they use. The farmers market was indicated as the most used program, with about 80% of respondents indicating that they have attended the famers market. Arts and cultural events, community events, concerts, movies in the park, health and wellness programs, and volunteer activities were also shown to be highly utilized programs/services. While no specific area was recorded as under-utilized, organized softball leagues, special permit events, and self-directed sports activities showed to have the least overall

involvement. These results paralleled the previous results of the 2015 survey, with the farmers markets, community events, and arts, movies, and musical events at the top of participation, and special permit events and specialized sporting events at the lower end of participation. *Question 11 is same as Question 9

Please indicate if YOU or members or your HOUSEHOLD use these programs/services. Art and cultural events

387

Community events

363

Community garden plots

204

Concerts

371

Environmental education (groups)

202

Farmers’ Market

436

Gardening classes

189

Gardening education (groups)

178

Health and wellness programs

228

Movies in the Park

263

Nature programs for youth/adults

207

Organized softball leagues (adults)

160

Pet programs

187

Preschool programs

177

School vacation programs

198

Services for people with disabilities

189

Special event permits

159

Sports leagues/programs (adult)

170

Sports leagues/programs (youth)

194

Self-directed sports activities (adult)

182

Self-directed sports activities (youth)

161

Summer Food Service Program

175

Volunteer activity

215

Other

31

TROYER GROUP

159


Question 9 Pat II asked the respondents to then importance ratings for each program or service from indicate the importance of each of these programs/ the pervious 2015 survey. services. The number of responses for each service or program varied, so percentages for each individual program or service were used to compare how important the service or program is to those who use it. Not surprisingly, services that were highly utilized also were ranked to have high importance within the community. Some specialized services that were not heavily used, such as services for people with disabilities and the summer food service program, were still given high importance rankings within the community. These numbers coincided with the

How important is this program/service to your family’s recreational needs? (Graphs show percentages of responses, not numerical number of responses)

Not Very Important Art and cultural events Farmers’ Market Services for people with disabilities Volunteer activity Concerts Summer Food Service Program School vacation programs Preschool programs Community events Health and wellness programs Sports leagues/programs (youth) Environmental education (groups) Self-directed sports activities (adult) Sports leagues/programs (adult) Self-directed sports activities (youth)

Nature programs for youth/adults Community garden plots Pet programs Gardening classes Movies in the Park Gardening education (groups) Special event permits Other Organized softball leagues (adults)

160

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Somewhat Important

Important

Very Important

Unsure


Question 10 provided a list of organizations within to the previous survey, apart from the addition of the Bloomington and asked the respondents if they or Buskirk-Chumley Theater, that was not an option on members of their household utilized any of them for the 2015 survey. indoor or outdoor recreation programs or services during the past year, and if they did, which two of the organizations they used the most. The BuskirkChumley Theater, City of Bloomington Parks & Recreation Department (BPRD), Karst Farm and other county parks, YMCA (Northwest or Southeast), were the most popular responses. While not using any of the organizations was the lowest response, travel sports teams/club, and the Boys and Girls Club were also lower in use. These responses were almost identical

From the following list, please check ALL the organizations that you or members of your household have used for indoor and outdoor recreation programs and services during the past year. 285

Used during the past year

270

Used the most often

255

How do we bring these numbers up in the following years?

240 225 210 195 180 165 150 135 120 105 90 75 60 45 30

her Ot

ne

ter Th ea

No

Cit

ski rkBu

Bo ys

an

Ch um

ley

dG

irls

Clu

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0

Ch yo urc f Bl hes Rec oom rea ing tio n D ton P epa ark Ind ian rtm s & aU ent niv ers ity Fac J oh ilit ies nW ald ron Ar t sC ent Ka er rst Far ma cou nd o Ot nty the her pa r hea rks lth /fit n ess Sch cen oo ter l fa cili tie s (M C Tra or CSC RB vel B) spo r ts tea ms /clu YM bs CA (No rth So west uth eas or t)

15

TROYER GROUP

161


The following are some of the outcomes that you and your household may receive from parks, trails, recreation facilities, programs, and services. For each potential outcome, please indicate the level of priority you think it should be assigned. Highest Priority

High Priority

Low Priority

Lowest Priority

Unsure

Improve physical health & fitness Provide access to the outdoors & nature Preserve open space and the environment Make Bloomington’s natural assets more sustainable & resilient Improve mental health & reduce stress Make Bloomington a more desirable place to live Strengthen sense of community Increase opportunities for people of different cultures to interact Help reduce crime Improve social connections Enhance community appearance Foster a sense of belonging through equity-driven park planning Provide educational opportunities through programming Promote & provide opportunities for artists Improve diet and nutrition Protect historical attributes of the City

Lowest Priority

Help attract new residents & businesses Increase property values in surrounding area Promote tourism to the City

Question 12 Respondents were given a list of possible outcomes that they or their household may have received from parks, trails, recreation facilities, programs, and services provided by the parks department, and asked to indicate the level of priority they feel should be assigned to each outcome. Areas that were indicated to be highest priority to most respondents were improving physical health and fitness, providing access to the outdoors and nature, and preserving open space and the environment. Other higher priority areas included improving mental health and reducing stress, making Bloomington’s natural assets more sustainable and resilient, and making Bloomington a more desirable place to live. Areas that respondents indicated to be a lower priority 162

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

were helping to attract new residents and businesses, increase property values in the surrounding area, and promoting tourism in the city. These results were very similar to the previous 2015 survey, with the same top five outcomes indicated as the highest priority items.


Question 13 Respondents were asked to indicate possible reasons why they do not utilize the parks facilities, services, or programs thar are offered by BPRD. Several probable reasonings were listed, and respondents could select as many reasons as necessary. Not having enough time was by far the most indicated reasoning for not utilizing the park facilities/services. Park and trail safety concerns, as well as location and proximity to parks were other reasons that had a high amount of response. Compared to the 2015 survey, while not having enough time was also the most frequent response for this question, there was a substantial decrease of respondents who indicated

a lack of interest in the parks facilities/programs as reasoning for not using them. In 2015, 21% of reasons for not using the parks were shown to be a lack of interest in the facilities, programs, or services offered, while in the most recent survey, only 12% of respondents indicated that reason for not using the parks. This helps the department understand that new and improved programming is helping to better suit public interest, and to continue in the direction they have been on.

Please indicate which of the following things prevent you or members of your household from using park and recreation services. Other 5.2% The Department’s programs, parks, or facilities are not accessible to people with disabilities 1.8% Programs that the Department offers do not interest me 11.6%

Personal safety concern – the walk to the park or trail is not safe due to traffic or roadways 10.3%

Personal safety concern – the park or trail is not safe 16.5%

Inadequate or poorly maintained facilities 7.3% My neighborhood does not have a park, recreation facility, or trail within a 10-minute walk 12.6%

Not enough money 7.1%

Not enough time 22.8%

Personal health problem 4.8%

TROYER GROUP

163


Question 14 asked respondents how they would allocate $100 worth of tax revenue across the various parks and recreation priority areas. The numeric responses were totaled and average for each area. Constructing new walking and biking trails had the highest average of allocated taxes at $23.39 of the $100 budget. Continuing to provide existing sports programs and services had the lowest average allocation of taxes at $13.60. These results differed from the previous 2015 survey, where the highest allocation of money was given to maintaining/ renovating existing neighborhood parks. On the 2015 survey, constructing new walking and biking trails had the third highest average of allocated tax dollars, at $15.09. While the allocated amount of

money from maintaining/renovating existing parks and facilities stayed relatively the same, the increase in public demand for funding of walking and biking trails clearly indicates that area as a higher priority items for this masterplan and the next five years of updates. Acquiring new park land and open space was another priority area that had a much higher allocation of funding in the 2020 survey as compared with the 2015 survey. In 2015, respondents allocated an average of $9.90 out of the $100 tax budget for acquiring new park land and open space, where as in the 2020 survey, the same category was allocated $20.00, more than doubling the previous allocation of funds.

If it were up to you, how would YOU allocate $100 in taxes across these competing priorities?

Acquiring new parkland and open space $20.00

Since 2015

Constructing new parks and facilities to meet community needs $14.76

Constructing new walking and biking trails $23.39

Since 2015

Continuing to provide existing community events and recreation programs $15.69

Continuing to provide existing sports programs and events $13.60

Since 2015

Maintaining/renovating existing facilities (community centers, sports fields, pools, golf course, etc.) $19.57 Maintaining/renovating existing neighborhood parks (playgrounds, shelters, features, etc.) $21.95

164

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Since 2015


Question 15 Asked respondents to consider their neighborhood was inadequately given it’s fair share neighborhood, and analyze whether they feel their of funds. area receives an adequate amount of funding for it’s parks and recreation needs, and if their neighborhood gets it’s fair share of the funds compared to other neighborhoods. The majority of responses (41%) indicated that the people didn’t know or were unsure if their neighborhood received an adequate amount of funding. 32% of respondents felt that their neighborhood often or almost always received it’s fair share of funding, and about 23% indicated that they felt their neighborhood seldomly or never gets its fair share. Comparatively, dissatisfaction in allocated neighborhood funds increased significantly, from only 15% of people reporting on the 2015 survey that their

Thinking about how public money has been spent on recreation parks and facilities in the past 5-10 years, which of the following statements is most accurate? Other 5%

Do Not Know / Not Sure 41%

My neighborhood never gets its fair share 10%

My neighborhood often gets its fair share 18%

My neighborhood almost always gets its fair share 14%

My neighborhood seldom gets its fair share 13%

TROYER GROUP

165


Question 16 Assessing the overall satisfaction, respondents were asked how satisfied they were with the value that they receive from the BPRD. 83% reported that they were either satisfied or very satisfied with the department, while only 9% reported dissatisfaction. This was similar to the satisfaction leveling in the 2015 survey, with a slight increase in responses indicating that they were dissatisfied.

Please rate your satisfaction with the overall value your household receives from the BPRD.

No Opinion 8% Very Satisfied 34%

Satisfied 49%

166

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Very Dissatisfied 2% Dissatisfied 7%


Question 18 Respondents were asked to rank their three most important issues they believe the parks department must address within the fiveyear master plan. The top response was to connect trails, shortly followed by focusing on maintenance, reduce vandalism and address safety, and provide arts, festivals, and cultural events. Most of the other issues and options were ranked similarly in terms of

importance, with the exception of building facilities and parks, which we’re ranked significantly lower than all other options. These results were vastly different from the previous master plan survey, where connecting trails was ranked as the lowest priority item, and constructing new trails was the highest priority. The public has shifted focus from building new, to maintaining and connecting existing facilities.

Rank the 3 most important issues the BPRD must address Connect Trails

45.2%

Focus on Maintenance

37.5%

Reduce Vandalism/ Address Safety

34.0%

Arts, festivals, and cultural events

29.7%

Build Trails

26.8%

Continue Current Programs

22.0%

Acquire open land/space

21.6%

Sustainability and Climate Change

19.9%

Equity and Inclusion

19.1%

Upgrade Facilities

18.5%

Food Security

11.8%

Build Parks

8.9%

Other

2.9%

Build Facilities

1.9%

*Percentage of individual responses (518)

TROYER GROUP

167


1% Age 15 - 19 2% Age 20 - 24

8% Age 75+

9% Age 25 - 34

30% Age 65 - 74

#

17% Age 35 - 44

OF PEOPLE

Survey Respondents

IN

HOUSEHOLD Question 19 Same/Similar age group of sampled individuals.

11% Age 45 - 54 23% Age 55 - 64 4% 18% Residence of 49% Monroe County

13%

16%

LOCATION

3% 20% 46%

Residence of Bloomington 18%

&LENGTH

OF RESIDENCY

12%

Question 20 Similar sampled individuals of city/county residency. Increase in IU student participation, doubled from 4 responses (1%) in 2015 to 9 responses (2%) in 2020.

≤1 Year

11 - 15 Years

1 - 5 Years

≥16 Years

6 - 10 Years

168

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

31% 69%

Indiana University Student


11% Prefer Not To Answer 1% Other 1% Native American 2% Two or More Races 2% Hispanic or Latino 2% Black or African American 3% Asian

RACE / ETHNICITY Question 22 Similar percentages of ethnic diversity recorded. Slight increases within the Black/African American and Asian communities. Difficult to compare, 28% of those in the 2015 survey opted for “prefer not to answer”.

78% White

(Non Hispanic or Latino)

HOUSEHOLD

$$$

Prefer Not To Say

$100,000 or more $75,000 $99,999

$50,000 $74,999

$25,000 $49,999 Under $25,000

OVERALL

Question 23 Similar- more responses from household making under $25,000 annually (from 4% to 7% of responses) difficult to analyze, many in both surveys opted not to respond.

Excellent 42%

Poor 1% Fair 10%

HEALTH

Question 21 Same/similar in population health, slight increase in the number reporting ‘excellent’ health, slight decrease in those reporting ‘good’ health. Same percentages of those reporting poor and fair health conditions.

Good 48% TROYER GROUP

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GENDER

IDENTITY 49% Female

170

43% Male

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Question 24 Similar response rate from females and males across both surveys, slightly more females respondents with both. Increase in nonbinary individuals (was not provided as an option in 2015). The 2015 survey had a larger proportion of people choosing not to respond- may have been due to only having female/male gender options.

1% Non-binary

7% Prefer Not To Say


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6.0 Chapter Six ADA & Accessibility

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ACCESSIBILITY REVIEW ASTM 1951-99 and ASTM 1242-99 ADA compliant safety surfacing underneath), with accessible route The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) took effect connections in between them all. January 26, 1992 and is aimed at protecting the rights of people with disabilites. The passage of ADA BLOOMINGTON PARK SYSTEM guarantees access to recreation and play settings as a ACCESSIBILITY OVERVIEW civil right for all Americans. The City of Bloomington prepared its first ADA According to the 2017 Disability Statistics Annual Transition Plan in 1990 and has updated the plan Report by the National Institute on Disability, several times over the years, with it’s most recent Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research, update in 2014. To help facilitate the process and about 13% of the population has a disability. The manage goal-setting efforts the city designated report defines a person as having a disability if they its own ADA Coordinator that works in conjunction are deaf or have serious hearing deficiency; blind or with Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department. have serious sight deficiency with glasses; difficulty The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department concentrating, remembering or making decisions created the position of Inclusive Recreation due to a physical, mental, or emotional condition; Coordinator to make sure all programs offered by the difficulty walking or climbing stairs; difficulty dressing department are accessible to all. or bathing; or difficulty doing errands alone due to a The department regularly surveys its facilities to physical, mental, or emotional condition. Other report make sure all are accessible and identify those that findings include: do not meet compliance. Implementation plans are • The percentage of those with a disability in the U.S. then set to remove those barriers to accessibility as civilian population slowly increased from 11.9% in quick as possible with the ADA Transition Plan in 2010 to 12.8% in 2016. place. Currently, most of the park facilities have had • Disability increases sharply with age. For ages improvements done to comply with regulations. Those 5-17, 5.6% had a disability; for ages 18-64, the rate that have not been improved have been integrated was 10.6%; and for ages 65+, the rate was 35.2%. into the ADA Transition Plan for future improvements • In 2016, 38.9% of people ages 18 and over with and capital projects. disabilities were obese. In comparison, only 26.4% of those without disabilities were obese. • In the U.S. in 2016, 35.9% of people with disabilities ages 18-64 were employed. The employment percentage was more than double for people in the same age group without disabilities at 76.6%.

ADA AND DISABILITY OVERVIEW

WHAT DOES ADA COMPLIANCE LOOK LIKE? The definition of an accessible route (5’ wide minimum, no gaps over ½”, ASTM 1951-99 “Firm and Stable” surface, minimum slope or cross slopes, etc.). Sidewalks of less than 5’ width are not the same as an accessible route. It’s a good idea to design and build accessibility in steps, from the outside in; first from parking, to routes, to restrooms, to play areas (whose accessible equipment also have TROYER GROUP

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There is a permanent position for an Inclusive Recreation Coordinator, to make sure that SELF EVALUATION PARKSas AND RECREATION FACILITIES its programs are as OF accessible possible. Anyone with a question about accessibility at a Parks property COMPLETED IN 2014or event should contact the Parks and Recreation Department. Table 3. Assessment of City-owned Parks and Parks Facilities Park

Accessible

Inaccessible

B-Line Trail

3.1 mile hard surfaced recreational trail, parking lot, site amenities (benches, tables, fountains) 2 mile crushed stone surface recreational trail

Bloomington Rail Trail Broadview Park

Fully accessible shelter and playgrounds (2), site amenities

Brown's Woods (owned by the Community Foundation)

Undeveloped property

Bryan Park

Picnic shelters (2), playgrounds (3), parking lots (6), swimming pool, restrooms, stream bridges (2), south of stream paved fitness trail, site amenities

North shelter, north of September 2014 stream paved fitness trail, one stream bridge

Building & Trades Park

Basketball courts (5), restrooms, playgrounds (2), shelters (2), perimeter walking trail with ramp, parking lot Accessible

Inaccessible

Butler Park

Playgrounds (2), parking lot, restrooms, basketball court

Park

Cascades Park-Lower Cascades Park-UpperLions Den Upper CascadesSkatepark Clear Creek Trail Crestmont Park Ferguson Dog Park

ADA Transition Plan City of Shelters(2), parking lot,Bloomington playgrounds (2)

5

Shelter, playground, site amenities Basketball court, parking, site amenities Trailhead parking lots (3), site amenities, 2.3 mile hard surfaced recreational trail Parking lot, basketball courts, playground (1), site amenities Parking, access path to fenced dog area, site amenities

Shelters (2), Disc Golf Course

Parking, boat rental, boat dock, trails

Trails

Goat Farm Griffy Lake Nature Preserve

Parking, shelter, basketball courts, playground, paved walking trail, site amenities 0.6 mile hard surfaced recreational trail, site Creek Trail Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan 176 Jackson amenities Highland Village Park

Paved walking trail

Undeveloped park property (any future development will be made accessible)


it implements plans andamenities budgets for removing those barriers as quickly as possible. There is a permanent position for an Inclusive Recreation Coordinator,Undeveloped to make sure parkthat SELF EVALUATION OF PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES CONT’D property (any future itsGoat programs Farm are as accessible as possible. Anyone with a question about accessibility at development will be COMPLETED IN 2014 a Parks property or event should contact the Parks and Recreation Department. made accessible)

Griffy Lake Nature

Parking, boat rental, boat dock, Table 3. Assessment of City-owned Parks and trails Parks Facilities Preserve

Park Highland Village Park JacksonTrail Creek Trail B-Line Latimer Woods (owned Bloomington Rail Trail by the Community Foundation) Broadview Park Nature Leonard Springs Park Brown's Woods (owned by the Park Miller-Showers Community Foundation) Olcott Park

Bryan Park Park Park Ridge Park Ridge East Park Peoples Park Building & Trades Park RCA Park

Park Schmalz Farm Park Seminary Park

Parking, shelter, basketball courts, playground, paved Inaccessible Accessible walking trail, site amenities 0.6 mile hard surfaced recreational trail, site 3.1 parking lot, amenities site amenities (benches, tables, fountains)

Fully accessible shelter and playgrounds (2), site amenities Restrooms Parking, observation pier, 0.5 mile paved walking trail, site amenities Parking, woods trail, shelter, playground, restroom/concession building, site amenities Picnic shelters (2), playgrounds (3), parking lots (6), swimming pool, restrooms, stream bridges (2), south of stream paved fitness trail, site amenities Tennis courts, shelter, basketball courts, playground, site amenities Basketball courts (5), restrooms, playgrounds (2), Sidewalks, amenities shelters (2),site perimeter walking trail with ramp, parking lot Parking, tennis courts, basketball courts, shelters (2), restroom, playground, north walking trail, site amenities

Hiking trails

Undeveloped property Trail to Sherwood Oaks Park North shelter, north of Shelter**,playground** stream paved fitness basketball courts bridge trail, one stream Play field

September 2014

South walking trail, hiking trails Pedestrian entrance*, Inaccessible play field

ADA Transition Plan 5 City of Bloomington

Access to shelter*, basketball court, play field Asphalt trail to basketball court* Undeveloped park property (any future development will be made accessible) Perimeter soft surface walking trail Parking, mountain biking trails Soft surface fitness trail** Hiking trails, Community Orchard

Sidewalks, plaza, site amenities

Parking, tennnis courts, playground, site amenities

Southeast Park

Parking, tennis courts

6

Switchyard Property Parking, ballfields, playground, restrooms, concessions, site amenities

Parking, ballfields, playground, restrooms, concessions Parking, basketball courts, playground, shelter, Winslow Woods Park garden plots, site amenities * accessibility improvement listed in 5 year capital plan ** accessibility improvement planned for fall 2014 Winslow Sports Park

2 mile crushed stone Soft surface walking surface recreational trail trails

Accessible Playground, ADA shelter,Transition site amenitiesPlan City of Bloomington

Sherwood Oaks Park

Twin Lakes Sports Park Wapehani Mountain Bike Park

Trails

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With it’s commitment to accessibility and inclusivity Bloomington provides many programs and services promoting participation of people with disabilities. Those looking to find more information on or be involved with can access the park’s website and get connected with partnering organizations; Council for Community Accessibility, Monroe County Coalition on Access and Mobility, and Human Rights Commission. As part of inclusive approach the park provides individuals with and without disabilities the ability to request reasonable accomodations, such as individualized techniques and resources used to enhance program participation without fundamentally altering a program. Public notice of these services and Bloomington’s pledge are found in the BPRD collective Program Guide that is distributed throughout the year. Once requested a questionairre from Bloomington Parks and Recreation Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist, Amy Shrake (shrake@bloomington.in.gov, 812-349-3747), will contact the participant to establish an indiviualized inclusion plan. In addition to reviewing the accessibility of physical amenities, communication practices were also reviewed. Information about the park system and its accessible park and recreation amenities should be added to the parks’ website, along with a grievance policy and contact information. Then, if citizens have an ADA grievance, they may submit comments to the proper personnel. The ADA Coordinator for the City of Bloomington is Barbara McKinney. Barbara can be contacted at mckinneb@bloomington.in.gov or 812349-3429. The ADA grievance procedure is included in the appendices. The ADA Coordinator for the City of Bloomington: Barbara McKinney Legal Department 401 N Morton St Suite 220 Bloomington, IN 47404 812-349-3426 The ADA Coordinator for Monroe County: Angie Purdie Commissioners Office, Courthouse Room 323 100 W. Kirkwood Ave., Bloomington, IN 47404 812-349-2550

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ADA Resources ADA Information Hotline: (800) 514-0301 ADA Home Page www.usdoj.gov/crt/ada/adahom1.htm ADA Checklist www.adachecklist.org


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7.0 Chapter Seven Meeting the 2020 Moment

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RESPONDING

TO THE The far reaching effects from the COVID-19 pandemic have yet to be fully realized for Parks and Recreation Departments across the Country. What is clear is the systemic value that parks provide, particularly due to such dramatic increases in free outdoor spaces, providing a much needed respite to the community. Additional, virtual meetings provided greater accessibility and allowed for increased participation in public meetings. Those aspects are likely to remain, even after the threat of the pandemic subsides.

Moving forward, several themes and potential action items emerged for additional Departmental consideration. These include elements to address both facilities and programming, as well other operation and service areas. The following list, though not inclusive, provides some guidance for BPRD: • Implement anti-microbial standards for all finishes and surface treatments for BPRD parks, facilities, and equipment. • Create lasting social distancing and sanitation standards. • Determine social distancing standards for all structures including larger circulation routes, additional SF per person, more sophisticated HVAC systems, contact-less

• • • • • •

transaction standards, and increased single-occupant restroom buildings (with external circulation). Potential for more modular seating with fewer fixed benches, more moveable tables/chairs. Continued virtual programming and meetings. Potential for increased wifi access and mobile communications. Address funding long term funding challenges and reallocation of resources. Address labor challenges associated with COVID responses. Address challenges associated with increased park and trail usage.

COVID-19

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HOW CAN A

PARK SYSTEM It has long been known that the crisis of homelessness plays out in public spaces. Over the last couple of decades several strategies to deter the presence of people without housing have been met with justifiable criticism and unintended consequences of discouraging the participation of all groups in these spaces. The homelessness crisis in Bloomington is highly visible, with hundreds of people taking refugee in the City’s parks, especially Seminary Park, and it was identified as a core issue to address in the open comments portion of the survey. All the more serious how the pandemic compounds the situation. As Nate Storring from the Projects for Public Spaces notes, “James Brasuell of Planetizen has described homelessness as “the crisis within the crisis” of the COVID-19 outbreak. As with many other vulnerable communities, the pandemic has both drawn attention to and worsened many of the existing challenges that face people living on the street.” It was also frequently noted that social services have often fallen on the public entities like libraries, parks, post office locations, and recently the police to manage, though they each are ill equipped to appropriately serve homeless people. Much of the necessary work involves competency that lies outside of the BPRD current offerings and mission. At the same time, significant financial and operational burden has been placed on the Department because of increased maintenance,

sanitation, and management that does fall within the purview of the parks. It is apparent that this is a top of mind issue for the community, which will require a multifaceted strategy, working with community partners moving forward. Strategies and Action Items for this Master Plan will reflect the necessary steps for BPRD involvement in this broad, City led effort.

ADDRESS

HOMELE

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ESSNESS TROYER GROUP

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HOW CAN A

PARK SYSTEM From the onset of the project, the BPRD was adamant about a commitment to the active work of being anti-racist. To adhere to the department’s stated values and ideals of inclusivity and equity, BPRD strongly rejects all elements that erode the rights and freedom of people. Focused on the parks and shared public spaces outlined in the mission statement, the BPRD has continually sought to create positive experiences. At the same time, BPRD understands that not everyone has easy access to parks, nor the comfort to feel welcomed. In collaboration with other City Departments, civic agencies, community organizations, and the public – the BPRD can and will do more. Recent events have created heightened awareness and priority toward creating a more just, socially equitable, environmentally resilient, and verdant park system. This was reflected in stakeholder commentary and priorities throughout the engagement process. To most effectively address systemic and structural racism, the BPRD must take a system-wide approach. Starting with internal administration and working outward, the BRPD Master Plan, through updated and direct

BE

goals, will seek to employ best practices in anti-racism and more fully realize their mission. Systemwide Anti-Racism Strategies Relying on known and highly regarded resources, like Ibram X. Kendi’s How To Be An Anti-Racist and Richard Rothstein’s The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America as well as work from the Opportunities Insights organization and the Southern Poverty Law Center, several opportunities arose across three oversight areas of the BPRD: Administration, Assets, and Operations. This research was coupled by the ongoing efforts of the National Recreation and Parks Association (NRPA) and The Trust for Public Land. Assets Through partnerships and oversight from the City, parks systems should examine historical roots and contemporary manifestations of racial prejudice and discrimination. Understanding that these roots have evolved over time and may not be fully realized, this work will understandably involve additional feedback and investigation.

ANTI-R To create an equal society, we must commit to making unbiased choices and being antiracist in all aspects of our lives.

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9 24

Operations At the core of the BPRD’s mission, equality of opportunity involves developing new approaches to engaging and celebrating the community. Ongoing research to identify appropriate antiracist resources to incorporate into programming and events as well as indentifying and counteracting any bias will help all members of the community feel more welcome in the BPRD system. Assessing the programming and events with a focus on making them more inclusive and reflective of the entire community is also an opportunity. Administration 7 Lastly, it falls on the administration of the BPRD to effectively deal with both internal and external racial tensions and conflicts. While collaboration with other City Department’s will be necessary to more fully address all areas, ensuring that personnel policies and practices are consistent with equity goals and that managers are provided with the knowledge and skills to implement equity programs will be helpful steps to build on existing strategies.

8

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17

16

25

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26

18 1

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RACIST THINK | TALK | ACT TROYER GROUP

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8.0 Chapter Eight Benchmarks

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COMMUNITY BENCHMARKING INTRODUCTION Benchmarking is a useful tool in assisting the planning team in outlining new goals and exploring new ideas for its parks and recreational facilities within the City of Bloomington. This process is conducted by gathering information related to park performance, availability of certain amenities within the Bloomington Park System, and other useful information regarding the recreational experience in Bloomington then comparing it to the cities that have similar characteristics and desirable park systems. This comparison data is used as a measurement for Bloomington to see in which ways their parks and recreational facilities can be improved within this master planning document.

These benchmark communities cannot be selected at random as the comparison to Bloomington will not yield any comparable results. In order to make sure the selected communities will give insight to how Bloomington can improve its park system, a rationale must be created for these communities. This rationale will give a logical criteria in which the selected benchmark communities must follow, for the most part, in order to have a set of data that will compare cities that are similar to Bloomington. A general list of conditions was created to make this selection and is as followed: • Similar Population/ Pop. Density/ City Size • Similar Socio-Economic Factors • Student Population (Higher Education) • Similar Park System Numbers • Desirable Park System

The rationale for the benchmark study needed to include cities that were similar in size and population to Bloomington, similar socio-economic factors, and desirable park systems. The selected benchmark communities were also chosen for their similar METHODOLOGY contextual qualities to the City of Bloomington. Another The following guideline was used to produce the important attribute that was considered in creating this comparison data for this benchmarking study: rationale was the presence of a student population, as • Creating a Rationale For Benchmark Communities this is a major characteristic of Bloomington. Based on this rationale, the selection of the benchmarking • Selecting Benchmark Communities communities will result in logical comparison data to • Creating Community Snapshots make informed planning decisions. • Benchmark Communities Summary SELECTING BENCHMARK COMMUNITIES • Inventory of Benchmark Communities Many different cities from across the country were • Analysis and Benchmark Study Takeaway considered for this benchmark study. Eventually, Comparison data for this benchmarking process was the list was narrowed down to five. The selected collected through several peer agencies. The majority benchmark communities for this study are: of information collected came from data collected • Boulder, CO off park agency websites, park master plans, phone • Bend, OR conversations with city officials, and other online resources. Some of the metrics used by different • Ann Arbor, MI agencies will vary based on their collection methods, • Iowa City, IA reasonable comparisons were made when applicable • Columbia, MO and when data was synonymous with other agencies. These 5 communities followed the rationale created BENCHMARK COMMUNITIES RATIONALE for this benchmarking process and display many Selecting benchmarking communities is an important similarities with the City of Bloomington. With similar step in this process in order to provide valuable populations to Bloomington (75,000-125,000), data that is worth comparing. Creating a rationale the selected benchmark communities will provide for the selected communities will provide more important comparisons for setting new planning legitimacy to the comparison data and creating a standards for Bloomington Parks and Recreation. more effective Parks Plan for the City of Bloomington. 190

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COMMUNITY SNAPSHOT In order to assist the comparison of these communities, a community snapshot will provide some informational and visual introductions to the five selected benchmark communities. This will be useful in order to see what some of these park systems are doing well, how they stack up to Bloomington, and what makes them unique.

Boulder, CO Boulder has a very involved Parks and Recreation Board who are actively trying to improve the quality of their recreational experience. Having recently gone through a master planning process themselves, Boulder has created a plan that they used to identify the needs of the community and address them with actions that create inclusive, cost-effective, and publicly supported park and recreation areas. By using a balanced approach, the City of Boulder plans to continue the development of its strong parks, open spaces, and recreation areas. Some of the things that make Boulder Parks unique are their use of the existing landscapes and over a hundred miles of trails and a Bike Score of 86 compared to Bloomington’s 57 (Bike Score measured out of 100, scores how bike-able a community is) Boulder is also home to the University of Colorado Boulder, with an almost identical student population to Bloomington. Another great aspect about Boulder Parks is the distribution of its parks across the city. Boulder is home to 60 neighborhood and “pocket” parks. This gives almost all of its residents access to an outdoor recreational space that is within close proximity to their home. This availability of park space is what has made Boulder such a desirable place to live as well as a place for the lovers of the outdoors to attend school.

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Bend, OR Bend maintains a similar population to Bloomington and is home to a couple of different university campuses (Central Oregon Community College/Oregon State University-Cascades). While it is geographically distant from Bloomington, there are many desirable characteristics about Bend parks that make it valuable to compare to. Bend parks have been nationally recognized multiple times, being awarded the National Gold Medal Award for excellence in Park and Recreation Management in 2006 as well as Bend parks being certified by CAPRA (Commission of Parks and Recreation Agencies) for meeting national standards of excellence in 2015. With over 80 parks and 70 miles of trail, Bend has created a park system and a parks and recreation board that is focused on strengthening the community by fostering healthy lifestyles through exceptional parks and recreational services. With over 3,000 acres of developed and undeveloped parkland, Bend has greatly valued it’s natural spaces, ensuring there is a variety of park experiences for its residents and visitors alike. Additionally, Bend offers over 1,000 recreational programs for all ages through its local recreational centers.

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Ann Arbor, MI Ann Arbor also boasts many similarities with the City of Bloomington, both being cities from the Midwest with comparable populations and city size (within 5 sq miles). Ann Arbor is also home to a major public university with the University of Michigan’s campus being located in the heart of the city. Additionally, these cities have almost identical percent student populations with roughly a 38% when comparing total number of university students to the overall population. Utilizing it’s natural landscapes like the Huron River Valley as well as incorporating neighborhood and “pocket” parks across the city in more urban areas, Ann Arbor has developed an incredibly successful and desirable parks system. To illustrate further the diversity of Ann Arbor’s park system, there are almost 160 total parks across the city, with almost 80 parks with playgrounds, and roughly 70 miles of trails and multi-use paths across the city. Ann Arbor parks have also been very active in improving the city’s overall recreational experience. In their recent master plan (2016-2020), they showcased over 100 park improvement projects completed from 20112015 and described plans for many future park projects. A great example of staying proactive in improving the park experience in a city instead of being reactive and allowing issues to arise that can degrade the overall park experience for a community. CITY OF ANN ARBOR

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Iowa City, IA Like Ann Arbor, Iowa City is also home to a major public university at the heart of its community with the University of Iowa having an enrollment that is also identical to Indiana University Bloomington. Iowa City also meets the rationale in terms of similar park system inventory and physical community metrics. With some other regional similarities as well, Iowa City is a valuable comparison for the City of Bloomington. Having adopted a new city parks master plan in 2017, Iowa City has set out with a plan that is focused on accessibility and park equity. With over 50 parks and over 70 miles of trail, Iowa City has a number of different recreation options available. One of the most unique experiences is the Devonian Fossil Gorge where visitors can search for the ancient remnants and impressions of fossilized creatures from millions of years ago. Not satisfied with being complacent, Iowa City has an aggressive plan to bring park access into lower income areas and in areas where they have identified as in need of more park space. In particular, they identified the need of more neighborhood and “pocket” parks in order to increase the amount of availability of park space and creating a better distribution of park space across the entire city. This strategy could be one that could be similarly adopted to improving the availability of park space in Bloomington.

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Columbia, MO The last benchmark community selected for this study is Columbia, MO. While slightly larger than Bloomington in population and size, Columbia has many similarities in its park space to Bloomington and the other 4 benchmark communities. Columbia is also where the University of Missouri is located, its campus at the heart of the community as well. While some of the other benchmark communities have the advantage of a major river running through the city or geographically unique landscapes like mountains to utilize for park space, Bloomington and Columbia are similar in their limited unique natural landscapes. Columbia still has an impressive park system with over 70 parks and over 3000 acres of park space across the city. To add to this, in 2013, Columbia was voted top 25 places to retire by Forbes Magazine because of its encouragement of an active retirement with 65 miles of biking and walking trails. Columbia also recently went through a 10-year master planning process back in 2013 in which it outlined maintaining its strong parks, ensuring public safety at parks and facilities, and become a leader in sustainability and environmentally friendly parks. Community engagement was also an integral part of their master planning process, like the other benchmark communities, making sure their community’s voice was heard and used to guide the planning process. TROYER GROUP

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BENCHMARK COMMUNITIES SUMMARY Each city approached the improvement of their parks and recreation through a similar approach, yet unique to the identity and issues pertaining to the individual cities. There were many key take aways that could be applied to Bloomington and assist the planning process moving forward. Combined with the input from the community to define what areas can be improved, Bloomington can create a plan that is catered to the needs of the community and driven on planning knowledge that has been successful in other cities.

• Maintaining and improving existing parks so that they are sustainable, safe, and effective, even 10-20 years from now. INVENTORY OF BENCHMARK COMMUNITIES The next step in this process is to take inventory of each benchmark community and compare their park system numbers across the board. This inventory will then be able to guide the analysis of Bloomington’s park system to create planning solutions to improve their own recreational experience. The areas of inventory selected were based on some of the take aways from the benchmark communities summary and other amenities that go into making a great park system.

To summarize further, each city looked to address park issues with specific planning solutions. Some of the cities were already sufficient in areas that other cities were not and addressed solutions to Upon reviewing the information gathered for the maintaining the existing park system. The following inventory, there are a few areas that have been is a list of takeaways from studying the benchmark highlighted as to having significant variance from communities and reviewing their strategies: that of Bloomington’s park numbers (refer to table • Utilizing natural landscapes to create park below). The first being the difference between the space and providing infrastructure that allows number of parks in Bloomington compared to the residents to easily take advantage of these average of the benchmark communities with only 30 natural features. in Bloomington compared to the 85 park average for • Accessibility to park space is important the other cities. Another area that was highlighted is Bloomhave ington, IN easy Baccess oulder, CO  toAnn Arthe bor, MItotalBenumber nd, OR Ioof wa Cplaygrounds ity, IA Columbia, Macross O ensuring that all residents Bloomington Population 85,981 107,353 121,890 97,590 76,290 123,180 outdoor recreational space. (26) compared to the 47 average of the benchmark Student Population  33,084 33,246 46,716 13,687 33,334 29,843 distribution can greatly included C• ity Size (Park Sq Mi) 28.79 66.04 Bloom23.42 ingtoimprove n, IN Bou27.36 lder, CO  Ann A rcommunities. bor, MI Be33.32 nd, OR Other Iowa26.14  Chighlighted ity, IA Colum bia, sections MO Totpaul lA 2,270 1,490 2,088 3,035 1,699 3,000 P atciroenage Of Parks (est.) 85,981 107,353 121,890 97,590 76,290 123,180 accessibility to park space - utilizing smaller total miles of trails and number of park shelters as 26.4 13.88 18.3 31.1 22.27 24.35 SPtaurdk eAnctr ePaogpeu lpaetiro 1n, 000 residents 33,084 33,246 46,716 13,687 33,334 29,843 neighborhood parks/“pocket” parks often having significant differences from Bloomington in C 23.42 27.36 28.79 33.32 26.14 66.04 Nioty.  oSfiz Pea (rSkqs Mi) 30 60 159 74 51 73 TBoatlla fli eAlcdrsmore eage Of Parkseffective  (est.) 2,270 1,490 2,088 3,035 1,699 3,000 16 24 32 15 17 33 than having a smaller number this initial inventory. renadgse per 1,000 residents 26.4 13.88 18.3 31.1 22.27 24.35 Plaarykg Arocu 26 40 79 41 28 48 of larger parks that people would have to Interpreting this data will be the next step in N Palrlk Csourts 30 60 159 74 51 73 Baos.k oeft b 26 47 35 13 7 22 to. this process, analyzing why these differences are 16 24 32 15 17 33 B Soacllc feier lFdiscommute elds 8 20 24 18 28 18 P loalylegyrb oaulnHaving 26 40 79 41 28 48 V• l dCsourts 7 2 0 2 4 8 a strong network of multi-use trails occurring and create an action plan to address said B s g Trails (mi) 26 47 35 13 7 22 Mauslktei‐tUbsaell/ C Woaulrktin 35 110 70 65 can also greatly improve the connectivity issues. To 70181also aid in72285 this inventory and analysis SPoococlse/rS Fpilealsdhs Pads 8 20 24 18 2 5 4 6 Vo l aCtoeur ra ts city’s parks system and2 7 the pedestrian 2 0 2 4 8 process, additional maps, images, and other visual A mllpehyibthaleof 0 0 1 2 1 Meuclrtei‐aUtsioen/W 70 70 72 65 R al aCleknintge rTsrails (mi) 2 3 3 3 Parks and Recreation accessibility (without using353a vehicle) of1103 a aids pertaining to Bloomington Poomlsm/Supnliatsyh G Paardsens 2 5 4 1 5 6 C 3 4 0 1 3 city’s park space. have been13 assembled on the following page. Dm ogp Phaitrhkesater 4 3 5 A 2 0 0 2 1 Park Shelters Recreational Centers

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Iowa C2ity, IA

Columb5ia, MO

Dog Parks Bloomin2gton, IN Park Shelters 28 Population 85,981 Student Population  33,084 City Size (Sq Mi) Bloom23.42 ington, IN Total Acreage Of Parks (est.) 2,270 arpku Alactrio esn Per Sq Mi  96.93 Po 85,981 P 26.4 Staurdk eAnctr ePaogpeu lpaetiro 1n, 000 residents 33,084 N 30 Cioty.  oSfiz Pea (rSkqs Mi) 23.42 B 16 Toatlla fli eAlcdrseage Of Parks (est.) 2,270 Plaarykg Arocu n d s 26 res Per Sq Mi  96.93 B a s k e t b a l l   C o u r t s 26 P r  Acreage per 1,000 residents 26.4 Sooc.c oefr  PFaierkldss 8 N 30 Vaoll efiyebldasll Courts 7 B 16 Mlauyltgir‐U 35 P ousen/dW s alking Trails (mi) 26 2 Poasoklse/tSbpallal sCho Puartdss B 26 A 2 Somcpcehrit Fhieealdtes r 8 R 3 Veocllreeyabtaiolln Caol uCretns ters 7 C  Gaalkridnegn Tsrails (mi) 3 Moumltm i‐Uusneit/yW 35 D Poogl sP/aSrpklsash Pads 2 Wmalpkh Sitchoeraet (eW 43 A r alkability)  2 B i k e   S c o r e   57 Recreational Centers 3 Paorm k m Shuenlitteyr sGardens 28 C 3 Dog Parks 2 Walk Score (Walkability)  43 Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan Bike Score  57 Bloomington, IN ‐ W/O  Park Shelters 28

196

Northern Parks

34 107,353 33,246 Bou27.36 lder, CO  1,490 54.46 107,353 13.88 33,246 60 27.36 24 1,490 40 54.46 47 13.88 20 60 2 24 110 40 5 47 0 20 3 2 4 110 4 5 57 0 86 3 34 4 4 57 86 Bould34 er, CO 

19 121,890 46,716 28.79 Ann A rbor, MI 2,088 72.54 121,890 18.3 46,716 159 28.79 32 2,088 79 72.54 35 18.3 24 159 0 32 70 79 4 35 0 24 2 0 0 70 3 4 50 0 69 2 19 0 3 50 69 Ann Ar19 bor, MI

30 97,590 13,687 Be33.32 nd, OR 3,035 91.09 97,590 31.1 13,687 81 33.32 15 3,035 41 91.09 13 31.1 18 81 2 15 70 41 1 13 1 18 3 2 1 70 3 1 33 1 53 3 30 1 3 33 53 Ben30 d, OR

45 76,290 33,334 Iowa26.14 City, IA 1,699 65.00 76,290 22.27 33,334 51 26.14 17 1,699 28 65.00 7 22.27 28 51 4 17 72 28 5 7 2 28 3 4 1 72 2 5 44 2 64 3 45 1 2 44 64 Iowa 45 City, IA

51 3

51 123,180 29,843 66.04 Colum bia, MO 3,000 45.43 123,180 24.35 29,843 73 66.04 33 3,000 48 45.43 22 24.35 18 73 8 33 65 48 6 22 1 18 3 8 3 65 5 6 31 1 40 3 51 3 5 31 40 Colum51 bia, MO

Average of 5 Benchmark  Communities 105,261 31,365 Average of 5 Benchmark  36 Communities 2,262 66 105,261 22 31,365 85 36 24 2,262 47 66 25 22 22 85 3 24 77 47 4 25 1 22 3 2 77 3 4 43 1 62 3 36 2 3 43 62 Average of 5 Benchmark  36 Communities


The first mountain bike park in the state of Indiana, Wapehani is a 46 acre park off Weimer Road in southwestern Bloomington. The park contains approximately 5 miles of easy, intermediate, and expert level mountain bike trails. For trail updates and closures please see the information sign located at the park trailhead.

BIKE

MOUNTAIN

BIKE PARK

3401 W. Wapehani Rd.

Signed Bike Routes

signs indicate a preferred route

Multi-use Paths Bike Lanes

signs indicate a preferred route

markings indicate where to ride

HAZARDS

&

N

Parks Trailheads

Neighborhood Greenway

Schools

Trails

Swimming Pools

markings indicate where to ride

EMERGENCIES

Overpass/Underpass Bike Shops

closed to motor vehicles

>> BIKESMITHS BICYCLE SHOP 112 S. College Ave. Bloomington, IN 47404 812-339-9970 >> BLOOMINGTON COMMUNITY BIKE PROJECT A volunteer non-profit organization that reuses bike parts and provides tools to fix your own bike.

SEPTEMBER 2017

Shared Lanes

01 IN CASE OF AN EMERGENCY Call 9-1-1 or tell someone else to call for you

SHOPS

214 N Madison St. Bloomington, IN 47404

>> Bike Shops with Rentals >> Bike Shops

>> PEDEGO ELECTRIC BIKES 224 N. College Ave. Bloomington, IN 47404 812-287-7764

>> BICYCLE DOCTOR 8551 W. Gardner Rd. Bloomington, IN 47403 812-825-5050

>> REVOLUTION BIKE AND BEAN 401 E. 10th St. Bloomington, IN 47408 812-336-0241

>> BICYCLE GARAGE, INC. 507 E. Kirkwood Ave. Bloomington, IN 47408 812-339-3457

>> SALT CREEK CYCLES 235 W. Dodds St. Bloomington, IN 47403 812-334-2453

02 IF YOU ARE INVOLVED IN A CRASH >> Call 9-1-1 or tell someone else to call for you

the MONTH of MAY is

>> If you are in pain, stay put. Moving yourself or someone who is injured could cause even more injury. >> If your crash involves a car, make sure you get (1) the driver's name and contact info (2) license plate number (3) insurance info >> Get an incident report number from the police officer at the scene

www.bloomington.in.gov/bike

No assurance of safety of legal right-of-way is implied by this publication.

03 REPORT A ROAD HAZARD OR CLOSE CALL INCIDENT Visit bloomington.in.gov/ureport to report close calls, potholes, glass, and other dangerous conditions.

in

nta

u Fo Dr

Registering your bike can assist you in recovering your bike if it’s stolen. Register your bike through Indiana University at the Parking Operations office located in the Henderson Parking Garage, 301 S. Indiana Ave.., and we recommend registering your bike online with a bike registration company.

HOW to

REGISTER your BIKE

BICYCLE

LOVE your

An initiative of the League of American Bicyclists, the Bicycle Friendly America program is "a tool for states, communities, businesses and universities to make bicycling a real transportation and recreation option for all people." Bloomington was the first League designated Bicycle Friendly Community in Indiana and is proud to be recognized as a Gold rated community.

FRIENDLY America

01

BIKE?

So Do Bike Thieves

02

>> U-Locks are best, followed by heavy-duty cable/key locks >> Securely lock both wheels and frame to a bike rack, at the very least lock your frame and front wheel >> Lock your bike where a thief is more apt to be noticed, ie: a busy intersection >> Bicycles that are registered have a much greater chance of being returned

The following local organizations have also been recognized by the League through the Bicycle Friendly America program:

BIKING at

SEPTEMBER 2017

NIGHT

A COLLABORATION BETWEEN THE FOLLOWING ORGANIZATIONS

If drivers can see you, they are less likely to hit you. Visibility is key. Wear bright blinking lights and try to wear reflective clothing. Coming Summer 2018

DESIGN >> SPECTRUM STUDIO, INC.

BLOOMINGTON / MONROE COUNT Y

BICYCLE MAP

BIKE

Every Bloomington Transit bus has a bike rack that carries up to two bicycles at no additional charge. Simply flip the rack down, load your bike and secure the front wheel with the support arm. Board the bus and enjoy the ride!

& RIDE

PASS

BUSES

TIME / DISTANCE SCALE

CYCLIST

on the Left

Bus drivers have blind spots to their rear and right. Pass on the left so you don’t get squeezed against the curb if the bus is pulling over or turning right.

YES

NO

NO

Depending on your pace, 5 minutes of uninterrupted cycling will yield the following average trip distances: >> If you travel at a leisurely 10 mph pace, you will travel 0.8 miles >> If you travel at a medium 15 mph pace, you will travel 1.25 miles NO

NO

>> If you travel at a quick 20 mph pace, you will travel 1.7 miles

BICYCLE

Stop

TIPS

*

Left Right Respect Pedestrians Give pedestrians plenty of space and let them know you’re near with your voice or a ring of your bell.

Walk Right, Pass Left Pass others, going your direction, on their left. Common courtesy calls for providing ample space when passing pedestrians, especially for kids and pets who can often be unpredictable.

Use Hand Signals Your movement affects other drivers. Let them know what you intend to do. Signal as a manner of self-protection and courtesy.

Yes No Sidewalk Riding is Generally Discouraged Always yeild to pedestrians, and be cautious at driveways and intersections. Respect posted dismount zones.

Scan the Road Scan behind you to check for other vehicles prior to changing lanes. Scan the road ahead for pedestrians, hazards, car doors, and zombies.

Negotiate with Drivers Communicate with drivers as a manner of safety. Signal and make eye contact with them. Assume they don’t see you until they make eye contact with you.

Use Caution at Intersections The majority of crashes happen at intersections. Make sure you are visible, signal your intentions, be prepared to stop, and proceed with caution.

Be Aware of Car Doors Motorists can unexpectedly open doors, so be especially careful if you see someone in a car. It’s best to ride a car door's width away from parked cars. Take extra space in the lane if you need to.

Ride Straight Don’t dodge between parked cars. Ride in a straight line. Pass on the left and watch for cars entering the roadway from driveways and alleys.

Yes

No

Watch for Right Turns Scanning the road ahead and taking the lane will keep you in a safe position. Stay behind traffic at intersections in case other vehicles turn right with no warning.

See and Be Seen For safety and courtesy, use lights at night. The law requires the use of a white front light visible from at least 500 feet away and a rear red light visible from 500 feet away.

Ride Single File State law says bicyclists may not ride more than two abreast except on paths or parts of roadways set aside for the exclusive use of bicycles. Riding single file when being passed is courteous to other road users.

COVER ILLUSTRATION BY AVI A. KATZ >> WWW.AVIAKATZ.COM

Bloomington, Indiana A COLLABORATION BETWEEN THE CITY OF BLOOMINGTON AND MONROE COUNTY PLANNING DEPARTMENTS ADDITIONAL GRANT FUNDING PROVIDED BY THE INDIANA GREENWAYS FOUNDATION AND THE BLOOMINGTON BICYCLE CLUB

TROYER GROUP

197


ANALYSIS AND TAKEAWAYS

Using the compliance zones from the Housing and Neighborhood Development map from the previous page and State Rd 45 as a guide, Bloomington was divided into “West Bloomington” and “East Bloomington” on the map on the following page. Measuring the acreage of park space falling within each respective zone, it is found that “West Bloomington” has roughly 13.5 Acres of Parkland per 1000 Residents while “East Bloomington” has roughly .88 Acres of Parkland per 1000 Residents. This estimation could vary based on population density related to these specific areas but the difference between areas of parkland for the two sides is apparent, with “East Bloomington” containing approximately 32 acres of park land compared to the 485 acres in “West Bloomington”.

Comparing Bloomington to the five benchmark communities, several standout areas of data are found within Bloomington Parks. First is the number of parks located across Bloomington compared to the average for the five benchmark communities Bloomington has 30 total parks compared to the 85 average number of parks for the benchmark communities (64.5 average without including Ann Arbor’s 163 total number of parks). Bloomington still manages a total park acreage, and park acreage per 1,000 residents, that is similar to the average for the benchmark communities, meaning, Bloomington does not necessarily have “fewer parks”, but rather has a smaller number of larger parks making up its park system. This explanation can be seen when looking at the park space map on the Upon further research into the parkland distribution of previous page with the largest portion of the park space in the 5 benchmark communities, public park spaces are Bloomington pertaining to the Bnorthern by loomington, IN most Bpart oulder, Cof O  the Ann Armore bor, MI evenly Bend, Odistributed R Iowa Cityacross , IA Ccities olumbia, M O a greater number P o p u l a t i o n 85,981 107,353 121,890 97,590 76,290 123,180 city (Griffy Lake Nature Preserve, Lower/Upper Cascade of smaller neighborhood or “pocket” parks. Ann Arbor Student Population  33,084 33,246 46,716 33,334 Park, Ferguson Dog Park). and Bend 13,687 are great examples of29,843 cities who are utilizing City Size (Sq Mi) 23.42 27.36 28.79 33.32 26.14 66.04 this strategy to effectively3,000 bring park space to all Total Aillustrate creage Of Parks (esfurther, t.) 1,490 2,088 3,035in order 1,699 To the average 2,270 size of a Bloomington Park Acreage per 1,000 residents 26.4 13.88 18.3 31.1 22.27 24.35of the city. Iowa City of its residents, across the entirety park is roughly 75 acres compared to the average60size of a 159 No. of Parks 30 74 51 73 explained this same problem in their own master plan and park 16 This inflation 24 can be 32 15 17 33 Ball fieldsin Ann Arbor is roughly 13 acres. generated a41 plan to bring neighborhood parks to underPlaygrounds back to the over 1,300 acres 26 40 79 28 48 traced of parkland contained Basketball Courts 26 47 35 13 of the community 7 22 served areas to increase park equity. within the aforementioned parks in the northern section Soccer Fields

8

20

24

18

28

18

of To gain a better understanding of the 2size and Another area that is showed differences when compared Vollethe yball Cocity. urts 7 0 2 4 8 Multi‐Use/Walking Trailsof  (mi) park space in the more 35 110 areas 70 70 72 distribution residential to the benchmark communities for65 Bloomington is miles Pools/Splash Pads 2 5 4 1 5 6 south of State Rd 45, this 1,300 acres of parkland was of multi-use/walking trails. With 35 miles compared to Amphitheater 2 0 0 1 2 1 removed from Bloomington’s park3 numbers to 3see the the 77 miles average3 of the benchmark communities, Recreational Centers 2 3 3 affects graph4 below). Bloomington could look at multi-use trails as an Community Gon ardensits overall numbers (see adjusted 3 0 1 1 3 Dog Parks 2 4 3 3 2 5 Total park acreage shifts to around 930 acres and park 19 opportunity30to improve45its recreational experience. Boulder Park Shelters 28 34 51 acreage per 1,000 residents changes from 26.4 acres to has around 110 miles of trails and it has positively affected Average of 5 Benchmark  10.9. Both of these data pointsBloexperienced aBosignificant an 86 Bike omington, IN ulder, CO  Ann Arits bor, recreational MI Bend, OR experience Iowa City, IA withCthe olumbcity ia, MO earning Communities change and now vary greatly from85,981 the other benchmark Score, meaning the city While a “bike105,261 Population 107,353 121,890 97,590 76,290is very “bike-able”. 123,180 31,365 Student Population  33,084 33,246 46,716 13,687 33,334 29,843 communities average total park space (2,262 acres) and able” community is one important component to 36 a park City Size (Sq Mi) 23.42 27.36 28.79 33.32 26.14 66.04 2,262 Total Acreage Of Parks (est.) 2,270 1,490 2,088 3,035 1,699 3,000 the average park acreage per 1,000 residents (22 acres). 72.54 system, improving trails greatly increases the connectivity 66 Park Acres Per Sq Mi  96.93 54.46 91.09 65.00 45.43 22 Park Acrestarts age per 1,000to  resideillustrate nts 26.4 distribution13.88 18.3 31.1 22.27 24.35in general, giving This an uneven of park of a park system, and a community the 85 No. of Parks 30 60 159 81 51 73 24 Ball fields in the residential areas of Bloomington 16 24 17 33 space south of 32 pedestrian 15more freedom and options for recreation. 47 Playgrounds 26 40 79 41 28 48 State in these 35 25 Basketball CRd ourts 45. Park accessibility and26 distribution 47 13 7 22 From this, Bloomington can generate an outline to create 22 Soccer Fields 8 20 24 18 28 18 residential areas can be highlighted as a planning focus 3 Volleyball Courts 7 2 0 more successful 2 4 plan, focusing 8 a park on creating more 77 Multi‐Use/Walking Trails (mi) 35 110 70 70 72 65 for Bloomington in order to improve the overall parks and 4 Pools/Splash Pads 2 5 4 5 6 areas, creating park space 1in the eastern residential more 1 Amphitheater 2 0 0 1 2 1 recreational experience for their community. neighborhood parks with amenities3 that are less abundant 3 Recreational Centers 3 3 2 3 3 Community Gardens 3 4 0 1 1 3 Researching the distribution of Bloomington Parks south (playgrounds, soccer fields, park shelters), adding23 needed Dog Parks 2 4 3 3 2 5 43 Walk Score (Walkability)  43 57 44 31 of State Rd 45 also shows a stark difference in park space 50 amenities to33 existing parks, and creating a connected park 62 Bike Score  57 86 69 53 64 40 Park Shelters in the eastern residential areas 28 34 19 30 45 and proposed 51 located of Bloomington. system through existing multi-use36trails.

Population City Size (Sq Mi) Total Acreage Of Parks (est.) Park Acreage per 1,000 residents Park Acres Per Sq Mi No. of Parks

198

Bloomington, IN ‐ W/O  Northern Parks

Boulder, CO 

Ann Arbor, MI

Bend, OR

Iowa City, IA

Columbia, MO

85,981 23.42 937 10.9 40.01 26

107,353 27.36 1,490 13.88 54.46 60

121,890 28.79 2,088 18.3 72.54 159

97,590 33.32 3,035 31.1 91.09 81

76,290 26.14 1,699 22.27 65.00 51

123,180 66.04 3,000 24.35 45.43 73

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

Average of 5 Benchmark  Communities 105,261 36 2,262 22 66 85


EAST BLOOMINGTON WEST BLOOMINGTON

WEST BLOOMINGTON: Area Approx. - 6,200 Acres Park Acreage Approx. - 485 Acres Acres of Park per Sq. Mile - 50.06 Acres/Sq Mi Pop. Density of Bloomington - 3,700 people/Sq Mi 13.53 Acres of Park Per 1000 Residents

EAST BLOOMINGTON: Area - 4,600 Acres Park Acreage Approx. - 32.5 Acres Acres of Park per Sq. Mile - 3.25 Acres/Sq Mi Pop. Density of Bloomington - 3,700 people/Sq Mi .88 Acres of Park Per 1000 Residents

TROYER GROUP

199


Chapter Nine Needs Analysis

200

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

C I T Y O F B LO O M I N TO N PA R K S & R EC R EAT I O N

9.0


CITY OF BLOOMINGTON PARKS & RECREATION


LEVEL OF SERVICE ANALYSIS To better understand the impact of both the existing park system as well as the relative success of its strategies to implement the overall goals, this Master Plan process employed contextual measurement techniques that collected qualitative and quantitative data. Quantitative methodologies, which rely on numbers to report results, included public input surveys, amenity boards with sticky dot responses, census research, as well as the spatial analysis of the parks themselves. Quantitative data collection tactics included group dialogue at the stakeholder and public meetings, fill-in options on the surveys, and the use of sticky note responses in our planning exercises.

be challenging for several reasons. • Parks and recreation systems can be measured in different ways. (Parkland acreage, numbers of recreation facilities, distance to parks and facilities, qualities of parks and facilities, operating costs, revenues, etc.). • LOS metrics differ between various components of a parks system (ball fields vs trails vs nature reserve). • Appropriate LOS standards may also differ based on the community context. (Proximity to urbanized or rural areas).

With this in mind, the NRPA also notes that the diversity of communities and their park systems does not necessarily lend to comparing different systems against each other. While it is important to benchmark Bloomington parks against other similar communities to help understand potential deficiencies, it should be Common in the public sector, civic departments and used as only one of the analysis tools in a toolbox that agencies utilize LOS standards to plan and monitor includes other contextual analysis methods. the quality of services provided to their constituents. A common example of this is the LOS roadway scores that transportation engineers and planners use to categorize traffic flow. “Grades” are assigned to roadways based on speed, density, and other performance measures. In all cases, these metrics tell only part of the overall story, emphasizing the need for reframing the measures of success that do not directly relate to parks (economics, for instance) as well as multiple source validation of the data collected. National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) Metrics, formerly PRORAGIS, offers data standards and insights for park and recreation agencies. Based on the 2018 NRPA Agency Performance Review Key Findings, the typical park and recreation agency offers: Referencing this data against itself, the Project Team determined reliability and validity of the responses. This information can then be used to verify existing Parks Level of Service(LOS) successes and gaps, using three typical metrics: system acreage, amenities, and access.

• One park for every 2,114 residents served • 10.1 acres of parkland per 1,000 residents • Operating expenditure per capita of $78.26/ year • Revenue-to-operating expenditure of 28% • 7.9 full-time equivalent employees per 10,000 residents • In spite of this information, determining LOS standards for parks and recreation systems can 202

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


PARK CLASSIFICATION TOTALS Park Classification Urban / Mini‐Parks Neighborhood Parks Community / Sport Parks and Golf Course Regional Parks Multi‐Use Trails Nature Preserves Dog Parks Cemeteries Developed Parkland Subtotal Undeveloped Land Types Facility Acreage Not Counted in Parks Total

Current Acres 7.03 68.96 649.92 0 42.34 1316.41 18.7 29.99 2133.35 16

2015 LOS 0.084 0.83 7.80

2020 LOS 0.082 0.80 7.56

2024 LOS 0.080 0.78 7.39

0.51

0.49

0.48

0 0

0 0

0 0

4282.70

ACREAGE LEVEL OF SERVICE Acreage LOS evaluates the total amount of park acreage a community has when compared with its current and projected population (expressed in acres per 1,000 residents). This technique is often one of the most widely utilized because of its ability to assimilate complex data into easily understood and applicable metrics. It is generally regarded that the higher the acreage LOS, the higher the quality of life enjoyed by the community’s residents. The Indiana Statewide Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) guidelines for recreation lands and facilities was reviewed to determine if the IDNR standards were consitently met or well exceeded by Bloomington Parks and Recreation.These guidelines recommend 20 acres of recreation land per 1,000 population at the

NRPA Standards 0.25‐0.50 1.00‐2.00 5.0‐8.0 5.0‐10.0 2.0‐4.0 N/A N/A N/A 11.25‐20.5 N/A N/A 11.25‐20.5

2015 Acres 6.81 68.96 649.12

Change 0.22 0 0.8

148.02 1,302.48 18.5 29.99 2223.88 34.02 15.42 2273.32

‐105.681 13.93 0.2 0

local or community level. Bloomington has roughly 85,000 residents, so per SCORP’s recommended LOS, this equates to 1,700 acres. Bloomington has about 4,050 acres of recreational land, which surpasses the recommended LOS. Bloomington has a higher amount of recreational acreage than most communities its size because it is home to a 1200-acre nature preserve; Griffy Lake. Without the nature preserve, Bloomington falls just short the sufficient acreage at 1,650, reaching only 933 acres. The city should improve upon this by acquiring land in existing park gaps around the city to unify the parks system and lend more opportunity for future trail planning and connection while keeping up with LOS acerage standards as the Bloomington population increases. TROYER GROUP 203


Urban / Mini‐Parks Peoples Park Seminary Park Waldron, Hill, and Buskirk Park Total Additional acreage required by 2024 to maintain current LOS Total acreage required by 2024 to maintain current LOS Additional acreage required by 2024 to meet NRPA Standard Total acreage required by 2024 to 2024 to meet NRPA Standard

Current Acres 0.3 1.22 5.51 7.03 0.16 7.19 14.97 22.00

2015 LOS 0.003600058 0.014189181 0.063714382 0.084

Urban / Mini-Parks There are a combined seven acres of urban parks within Bloomington. These three parks serve residents living or working within a 1/4-mile walking distance. Typical Characteristics of Urban Parks 1. Typically one acre or smaller 2. Typically serve residents living within easy walking and biking distance (1/4 mile or a 5-minute walk) 3. Offer non-programmed outdoor space including paths, seating areas, places to picnic, and landscaping that enhances and preserves the site’s natural cultural character. Although centrally located within the city and only

204

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

2020 LOS 0.003489143 0.014189181 0.064083926 0.082

2024 LOS 0.003409355 0.013864711 0.062618489 0.080

NRPA Standards

0.25‐0.50

Percent of  Usage 2015

Percent of  Usage 2020 8% 7% 22%

a short distance from the IU campus, the public survey suggest that these parks’ usership is very low, particularly in Peoples park and Seminary Park. It was found that despite the park locations that the type of amenities offered and the small size of the parks often lend visitors to overlook these parks, often passing by unknowningly or having no desire to stay in the park. The data collected for the level of service for these parks combined falls well below the national level. In order for the Parks system to meet the current minimum acreage needed for NRPA standards would be 20.81 acres. In order for the parks system to meet the standards in 2024 14.97 acres will need to be acquired in addition to the existing neighborhood park acreage.


Neighborhood Parks Sherwood Oaks Crestmont Reverend Butler Southeast  Highland Village Schmalz Farm Park Ridge East Building and Trades Broadview Park Park Ridge Maple Heights Total Additional acreage required by 2024 to maintain current LOS Total acreage required by 2024 to maintain current LOS Additional acreage required by 2024 to meet NRPA Standard Total acreage required by 2024 to 2024 to meet NRPA Standard

Percent of  Percent of  Current Acres 2015 LOS 2020 LOS 2024 LOS NRPA Standards Usage 2015 Usage 2020 15.76 0.189123026 0.18329631 0.179104788 23.3% 14.0% 14.00 0.168002688 0.162826671 0.159103238 5.5% 4.0% 9.7 0.116401862 0.112815622 0.110235815 18.5% 13.0% 8.90 0.106801709 0.103511241 0.101144201 14.5% 8.0% 6.17 0.074041185 0.07176004 0.07011907 5.5% 5.0% 6.03 0.072361158 0.070131773 0.068528038 6.0% 9.0% 4.49 0.053880862 0.052220839 0.051026681 11.9% 5.0% 3.10 0.037200595 0.036054477 0.035230003 16.1% 10.0% 1.00 0.012000192 0.011630477 0.011364517 3.5% 22.6% 0.50 0.006000096 0.005815238 0.005682259 8.6% 5.0% 0 0 0 0 69.65 0.84 0.81 0.79 1.00‐2.00 1.63 71.28 18.34 87.99

Neighborhood Parks Bloomington’s neighborhood parks provide focal points for neighborhood identities, often serving in response to their surrounding demographic and cultural characteristics providing opportunities to interact with the environment, family, friends, and facilitate physical and passive activity. Typical Characteristics of Neighborhood Parks 1. Typically five acres or larger although some communities include parks as 1 acre, or smaller (eliminating urban/mini-parks as a classification)

10-minute walk) 3. Offer non-programmed outdoor space including seating areas, places to picnic and play catch, children’s play areas, and landscaping that enhances preserves the site’s natural character. Bloomington Parks and Recreation currently holds 68.96 acres of neighborhood parks and has held constant since 2015 with a LOS of .8. NPRA Standards suggest that the LOS should hold between 1-2 which means an additional 19.09 acres would be needed to meet the minimum LOS of 1.00 in 2024.

2. Typically serve residents living within easy walking and biking distance (half a mile or a TROYER GROUP

205


Community / Sport Parks and Golf Course Cascades‐Lower Twin Lakes Sports Park Switchyard RCA Wapehani Main Bike Olcott Winslow Woods Winslow Sports Park Bryan Cascades‐Upper Skate Park Cascades‐Lower Sports Park Miller‐Showers Cascades‐Upper Skate Park Total Additional acreage required by 2024 to maintain current LOS Total acreage required by 2024 to maintain current LOS Additional acreage required by 2024 to meet NRPA Standard Total acreage required by 2024 to 2024 to meet NRPA Standard

Percent of  Percent of  Current Acres 2015 LOS 2020 LOS 2024 LOS NRPA Standards Usage 2015 Usage 2020 62.43 0.749171987 0.726090648 0.709486797 61.0% 44.0% 52.92 0.635050161 0.615484816 0.60141024 8.2% 4.0% 48.90 0.586809389 0.568730301 0.555724882 N/A 52.0% 47.86 0.574329189 0.556634605 0.543905784 18.5% 14.0% 43.35 0.520208323 0.504181156 0.492651812 3.0% 8.0% 41.50 0.498007968 0.482664775 0.471627456 33.6% 32.0% 40.00 0.48000768 0.46521906 0.45458068 21.7% 17.0% 40.00 0.48000768 0.46521906 0.45458068 26.4% 14.0% 33.00 0.396006336 0.383805725 0.375029061 79.3% 57.0% 32.00 0.384006144 0.372175248 0.363664544 5.2% 5.0% 19.20 0.230403686 0.223305149 0.218198727 9.00 0.108001728 0.104674289 0.102280653 9.0% 6.12 0.073441175 0.071178516 0.069550844 476.28 5.72 5.54 5.41 5.0‐8.0 11.15 487.43 0 476.28

Community Parks

Parks and Recreation. The current acreage will suffice Community parks are larger than neighborhood parks in 2024, but will drop below the minimum point prior and generally include a mix of active and passive park to reaching 2030. areas and active recreation facilities. Community Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department parks provide space for those recreational activities should not need to look at adding land within the next that serve a wider population than the surrounding couple years, but should be ready to move forward neighborhood and are intended to serve several with planning additional acquisitions. neighborhoods within a larger geographic area of the city. Bloomington Parks and Recreation currently holds 476.28 acres designated as community parks and based on LOS numbers reaches over the minimum at 5.72. NPRA Standards suggest that the LOS should hold between 5.0 and 8.0 which helps alleviate the need for additional parkland in this category of Bloomington 206

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Nature Preserves Brown's Woods Griffy Lake Latimer Woods Leonard Springs Total

Percent of  Current Acres 2015 LOS 2020 LOS 2024 LOS NRPA Standards Usage 2015 10.91 0.130922095 0.126888499 0.123986881 1200 14.4002304 13.9565718 13.63742041 10 0.12000192 0.116304765 0.11364517 95.5 1.146018336 1.110710506 1.085311374 1316.41 15.80 15.31 14.96 N/A

Nature Preserves The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department manages four nature preserves: Brown’s Woods, Griffy Lake, Latimer Woods, and Leonard Springs. These locations make up the bulk of the Department’s land acreage. Bloomington’s nature preserves comprise 63.4% of the Department’s total acreage, leaving just 36.6% of acreage to the remaining land designations.

Percent of  Usage 2020 N/A 48.0% 6.0% 21.0%

Lake ranked the third most visited. The other preserves dropped slightly in overall population usage, but can be attributed to Griffy Lakes size comparison of more than a 10:1 ratio, general public unawareness of park proximity, and certain not amenities offered at the other preserves.

Based on survey feedback for the community survey 48% of the respondents commented that they visited Griffy Lake more so than the other nature preserves. In comparison to all other parkland owned by Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department, Griffy

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Cemeteries Rose Hill Cemetery White Oak Cemetery Total

Current Acres 26.29 3.70 29.99

Percent of  Usage 2015 21.7% 3%

Percent of  usage 2020 ‐ ‐

Cemetaries

Rose Hill Cemetery

The Department oversees Rose Hill Cemetery and White Oak Cemetery for Bloomington. The cemeteries combine for 29.99 acres. There is no set national standard for cemetery acres managed by parks departments. Though cemeteries are not used for extensive programming, they do receive some passive use in walking, jogging, and as points of historical interest. The Department manages these two cemeteries for the city mainly because they have the staff and knowledge to properly maintain the grounds. Though the city will probably continue to have the Department maintain these locations, there is no need for the Department to expand is cemetery management to other locations based on residential feedback and budgetary considerations. Adding another property would cost labor, time, and use of equipment while providing minimal recreational opportunities for the public.

Rose Hill Cemetery (26.29 acres) contains the burial sites of many people who were influential in Bloomington and Indiana University history. This includes one of IU’s first trustees, Dr. David Maxwell; IU’s first president, Andrew Wylie; noted researcher Alfred Kinsey; and renowned composer and musician Hoagland (Hoagy) Carmichael. Rose Hill came under the jurisdiction of the City of Bloomington in 1868 when the land was transferred from Monroe County Commissioners.23 The Department cares for the site by providing landscaping and maintenance of the site.

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White Oak Cemetery This cemetery began as the United Presbyterian Cemetery. The City of Bloomington purchased it in 1914 and renamed it White Oak in 1983.24 The Department cares for the site by providing landscaping and maintenance of the site.


Park Distance Map City Park Facility 1/4 Mile 1/2 Mile 1 Mile

City Limits

N ACCESS LEVEL OF SERVICE Access LOS is used to analyze the distance residents must travel to utilize parks and recreation facilities within the city. Currently Bloomington has parks in most areas of the city. Few residents are further away than a 1/2 mile from a park. While parks and recreation standards haven’t been set for access, 1 mile is an acceptable distance for the density of Bloomington’s population. In accordance to a study completed by SmartcitiesDive the max comformtable distance

to walk is a quarter mile. A large majority of BPRD parks are outside of this range. While this distance is somewhat of an issue, providing safe pedestrian access to the parks and functional, appealing amenities at each park should be priorities. Many residents may live within a half mile of a park, but don’t all have a safe way to bike or walk to the park whether it is a lack of sidewalks or sidewalks in poor condition. Also, some parks lack amenities that attract families, which doesn’t give residents a reason to go to them. TROYER GROUP

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PARKS AND RECREATION NEEDS ANALYSIS The 2016-2020 Indiana Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) takes an in-depth look at recreation needs and trends in Indiana. The report is based on thousands of survey responses and input from park professionals in the state and nationwide. During analysis of the feedback acquired, several themes became common. Nearby recreation appears to be vital to Hoosiers and their families, as well as the free or low-cost local parks and recreational options. Additionally, outdoor activities that were inexpensive and did not require a great deal of skill were more popular than their expensive, skillful counterparts. This statewide trend coincides with national recreation trends. In the past ten years, both walking and cycling have seen dramatic participation increases across all age groups. Similarly, running and jogging participation rates have also increased. These activities are particularly popular because they can be done with a partner or alone. Team sports are very popular among school-aged children, with over half of students participating every year. However, participation declines during and after high school, with only about 25% of the 16 and older population participating every year. This trend suggests there is no urgent need for additional sports fields unless a community is at a deficit in this area. Bloomington Parks and its partners manage twelve baseball/softball fields and have consistent league participation, in 2019 closing in on 79,000 participants . Maintaining this activity for youth and adults is important to the citizens of Bloomington. Upgrading the facilities or replacing them might be more affordable than adding new fields.

and disc-golf have seen a rise in popularity. This fits the needs of citizens who desire an inexpensive family activity. ACCESS AND CONNECTIVITY The popularity of walking and cycling, especially fattire cycling, has impacted the construction of trails and paths suitable for activities throughout Indiana and the United States as a whole. Parks and Recreation Departments throughout Indiana are focused on maintaining existing trails and constructing new trails, paved and non-paved. These trails serve multiple purposes as they connect a variety of community centers and green spaces, and serve as an excellent venue for recreation and exercise. Furthermore, participants who use these trails and paths are more likely to use other park facilities. Indiana’s statewide obesity epidemic is still increasing. The SCORP report states that according to a U.S. CDC health survey, one-third of Hoosiers are obese. This percentage places Indiana as one of the most overweight states in the nation, with much concern. Some of the reasons for this are many communities are built in ways that make it difficult or unsafe to be physically active. Access to parks and recreation centers may be difficult or lacking and public transportation may not be available. Safe routes for walking or biking to school, work, or play spaces may not exist.

Looking to improve connectivity between parks, schools, and neighborhoods has been shown to improve physical activity. Many funding programs such as Safe Routes To School have been developed to help communities build safe pedestrian infrastructure to connect neighborhoods and schools. This continues to be a prevalent issue the government wants to Some alternative sports such as skateboarding have help solve, so Bloomington should continue to plan seen a significant increase in the past ten years. With pedestrian connectivity and seek state and federal the sport making its first Olympics appearance in funding to help implement projects. 2021, it should continue to increase in popularity. Pedestrian connectivity is especially important for Participants involved in “urban associated” activities families that have no or limited access to vehicular are more likely to increase their participation level of transportation. Providing equitable access to parks for “traditional” activities, so improving the skate park all users may help reverse the concerning trend of less should increase activity levels in other recreational affluent families having higher inactivity rates. pursuits. The city should be able to receive better participation metrics with the opening of it’s newest park, Switchyard Park, making it the first city in the state to have two concrete skateparks. Family oriented activities are also popular among Hoosiers. Activities such as picnicking, splash pads, 210

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ACTIVE RECREATION PARTICIPATION The 2019 Outdoor Participation Report analyzes the participation rates in different recreational activities by age, race, and income. By analyzing this information, trends can be realized, and strategies can be determined that align with trends or aim to fix negative trends that can be reversed. While the figures below show national population and may not reflect the levels in Bloomington specifically, it is important to understand the national trends. Merging this data with local data may yield more specific results.

An outlier from most years, 2020 must also be considered in trends for the future. As social distancing efforts are making their way towards design applications, Bloomington Parks must also adapt and develop programs that work to promote social distance practices. If need be, some existing programs will need to be reworked to not become obsolete.

Bloomington participation rates since 2011 are fairly consistent with national measures, although after 2013 there is a significant drop. Since 2015 the numbers have undulageted quite frequently and it can be Some of the key findings from the report display a dip assumed this is due to several reasons, but in large in outdoor outings because of a consistent decline in part the drop is associated to program participation in the Twin Lakes Recreation Center. The numbers vary participation. drastically year to year. For example, in 2012 the facility

KEY FINDINGS

1 2

MORE THAN

In 2018, participants went on a collective

151.8

10.2

Million

billion

of the U.S. population participated in at least one outdoor activity in 2018.

outdoor outings, a significant 6.5% drop in three years

Since 2016, outdoor participation rates have grown an average of

Female outdoor participation rates increased by an average of

1.4%

1.7%

over the last three years

BLOOMINGTON

1000+ 900+ 800+

Projected

500+ 400+

20

19

600+

OUTDOOR PARTICIPATION TRENDING

(NRPA NATIONAL RESULTS)

20

18

20

17

20

16

20

20

15

14

20

13

20

12

20

11

20

20

20

10

Missing Data

700+

Participation (thousands)

1100+

PARTICIPATION RATES

YEAR TROYER GROUP

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hosted close to 408,321 participants while in 2017 CONCLUSIONS there is a starke constrast of only 159,550 participants. It is important to look at the national and state level Without recieving final 2020 counts we can predict of service standards to see how the BPRD provides that total participants overall will be significantly recreational opportunities to its residents. That being lower with the postponement of numerous programs said, each community is unique and has contextual with the global pandemic. Because of the nature of implications that go beyond state or national these particular programs involving large groupings standards. There may be very appropriate reasons of people these will be dicounted for the year. why a community may lack in some areas compared In 2021, there should be a stabilization of numbers to national standards while far exceeding standards in again that reflect closely to 2019 numbers with other areas. the rebirth of programs and the restlessness of Bloomington residents wanting to be active. The one factor that will dictate positive numbers is the amount of funding the parks system will have due to statewide cuts in funding over the last year.

As a whole Bloomington Parks and Recreation checks the box in offering a suitable amount of acreage in comparison to national standards. However, when diving further into the specific park categories, this picture changes in the coming years with an increase in population. Bloomington Parks and Recreation needs to look into the expansion of its urban/miniINACTIVITY RATES OF THE UNITED STATES parks as well as the total acreage of neighborhood The 2018 Physical Activity Council Participation Report park properties it owns and maintains. These two park analyzes the inactivity rates in the United States types are particularly low in acreage comparison to all based on age, income, and race. Trends continue to other park-owned properties. show that inactivity has many influences, from lower BPRD has adequate amenity numbers throughout income levels to health to educational attainment. its parks, but a parks system can always benefit from In 2017, most age groups saw a slight decrease in an offering of more diverse amenities or upgrades inactivity. While this is promising, the two age groups as trends change nationally and locally. Some old that became more inactive were ages 18-24 and 65+. amenities can be replaced with newer amenities that While many initiatives and programs are aimed to align with recent trends in recreation such as splash fight inactivity and obesity, about a quarter of the US pads, alternative sports, and growing sports such as population, 82.4 million people, did not participate pickleball and futsal. in even the lowest caloric burning activity in 2017. Perhaps even more concerning is the trend concerning Using park facilities to address related issues such inactivity and income level shown in the figure below; as obesity, quality of life, workforce attraction, and the affluent are becoming more active, and the less economic development should be priorities for future planning park improvements and acquiring funding. affluent are becoming more inactive. This past year, without the final metrics known, it is While most people live close to a park, having safe expected to show a heavy decrease in activity rates access to the parks and each park having functional, to the COVID-19 pandemic. As park systems work appealing, and unique amenities should be a focus so through their future plans, development of programs residents can have a good reason to go their nearby and upgrading of facilities it is important to explore park and safe way to get there other than by vehicle. new design requirements of social distancing as these will impact Bloomington citizens continued involvement in the parks.

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CITY OF BLOOMINGTON PARKS & RECREATION


10.0 Chapter Ten Goals Strategies Action Schedule

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BLOOMINGTON PARKS & RECREATION SYSTEM ACTION PLAN The BPRD has made consistent progress in maintaining Gold Level CAPRA standards, while also dealing with the unprecedented context of a global pandemic, a groundswell of awareness surrounding racial injustice which has had direct local implications, and confronting stark socio-economic realities (homelessness) that playout in Bloomington’s public spaces. Through an extensive physical and social inventory and analysis process that included research into best practices, the BPRD Master Plan project team has identified four goals to address all departmental activity and responsibilities contained within the mission. These goals also directly respond to and incorporate community feedback and national park and recreation considerations, with an emphasis on public health, sustainability, and justice. This chapter details these four overarching goals and provides strategy recommendations and long-range actions that the BPRD should take to achieve these goals. The Plan requires the commitment and resources of the Department, City, other government agencies, local businesses, user groups, and the community to achieve the level of success that Bloomington is accustomed to seeing in its parks. The BPRD Vision and Mission are the bedrock of the plan, serving as guiding lenses to aid in both broad and daily decision making. Stemming from early stakeholder discussions, the mission was amended to reflect contemporary issues while also adding some clarity to the statement. Coupled with the context analysis, each of the goals, objectives, and actions that have evolved through the planning process are informed by this mission. The overarching goals and key strategies provide a framework for implementing the BPRD Master Plan. Incremental action planning over the next five years will support the implementation of the specific strategies outlined in this chapter. On an annual basis the BPRD will updated the most immediate actions and priorities. To succeed, specific tasks as well as individuals responsible for leading them will need to be identified as projects are moved forward.

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Vision

We strive to provide the highest standards in parks, recreation services, and greenspaces to enhance the quality of life for our community. - The vision for Bloomington Parks over the next five years reflects and summarizes the intent of the Master Plan’s goals.

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The Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department will enrich community well-being and foster positive development through the equitable, just, and environmentally sound provision of essential parks, green spaces, trails, and recreation facilities as well as programs and events. - The mission, which reflects the organizational purpose, is the roadmap to achieve that vision and the lens the BPRD looks through to address Departmental decision making. During the Master Plan Engagement process, focus groups mentioned that the mission lacked the Department’s contemporary values of sustainability and social equity. A concise mission, frequently referenced, lends both to memorability and applicability.

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BLOOMINGTON PARKS AND RECREATION

2021-2025 GOALS AND STRATEGIES Four overarching goals emerged from the physical and social context investigation process as the basis for future action, decision-making, and reporting for the BPRD Master Plan. These goals also philosophically align with the Department’s long-term vision and action-oriented mission.

4

THE

GOALS ARE:

1

MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE THE ASSETS AND NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGED BY THE DEPARTMENT.

2

REINFORCE ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMS THAT POSITIVELY IMPACT PUBLIC HEALTH, SUSTAINABILITY, AND CLIMATE ACTION.

3 4

PRIORITIZE DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION. DEVELOP ADMINISTRATIVE AND STAFFING CAPACITY.

Each of the goals featured in this Master Plan provide greater detail and specificity to the BPRD vision and mission. The resulting strategic direction will concentrate the commitment and efforts of the City of Bloomington, other municipal departments, local businesses, and user groups on the necessary steps to improve and maintain the parks, facilities, and programs offered by the BPRD. The remainder of this chapter will elaborate on the goals. After a description of each goal and its supporting documentation, proposed departmental strategies are outlined. 220 Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


GOAL #1

MAINTAIN AND ENHANCE THE ASSETS AND NATURAL RESOURCES MANAGED BY THE DEPARTMENT. Description: Throughout the entire context analysis process, the maintenance and improvment of the physical assets of the department were a top priority. Indeed, these resources are necessary community infrastructure. Consistent with the previous master plan, the statistically valid survey respondents listed maintenance of existing parks and facilities as the top spending priority for the Department. Next on that list was expanding the existing trail system, which ranked highly in the assets used by the community. The other strategies outlined in this section reflect the ongoing activities of the department necessary for operating the BPRD system and programs. Another new strategy is addressing the long-term implications of the pandemic, which will result in ongoing updates to facilities and operations, such as virtual meetings.

1.1 Maintain and provide safe parks, trails, and facilities. 1.2 Maintain and improve existing equipment and assets. 1.3 Expand trail system to improve connectivity with other community assets. 1.4 Be responsive to development opportunities that enhance the park system. 1.5 Expand sustainability initiatives throughout all programming, maintenance, and development efforts. 1.6 Consider parkland addition where it aligns with goals and values. 1.7 Prioritize sustainability and climate action within parks and facilities. 1.8 Address capital improvements where needed. 1.9 Develop long-term standards to address public health responses across all parks and facilities.

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GOAL #2

REINFORCE ACTIVITIES AND PROGRAMS THAT POSITIVELY IMPACT PUBLIC HEALTH, SUSTAINABILITY, AND CLIMATE ACTION.

Description: In addition to exceptional parks and recreational facilities, BPRD consistently offers exceptionally rated programs and events. These efforts complement the cultural and natural resources of the BPRD and are necessary to achieve the holistic health, sustainability, and justice-oriented goals of the broader civic entities and community. The encompassing strategies amplify this goal by providing strategic coverage of Departmental activities while also addressing specific community feedback.

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2.1

Continue to provide high-quality programs, events, and recreational opportunities.

2.2

Develop long-term tactics for virtual programming and engagement.

2.3

Integrate tactics that address public health guidelines for future programs and events.

2.4

Continue and expand promotion and marketing of activities, facilities, programs, events, and other Department efforts.


GOAL #3

PRIORITIZE DIVERSITY, EQUITY, AND INCLUSION.

Description: Perhaps no other area was as widely commented on or consistently mentioned as addressing the diversity, equity, and inclusion needs of the community through each aspect of BPRD. Given the frequency and timeliness of this issue, this Master Plan elevated it to the level of a goal, ensuring greater visibility and application within all areas of the Department. Strategies were devised, reflecting all areas of the BPRD and specific community feedback from both the statistically valid survey and direct comments.

3.1

Advocate for workforce recommendations, in partnership with the City’s Human Resources Department, that employs equity, inclusion, and diversity best practices.

3.2

Support inclusive employee culture initiatives that celebrate the diversity and equity of the BPRD team.

3.3

Reflect diversity, equity, and inclusion values in internal and external communications.

3.4

Explore new partnerships to facilitate better engagement and reduce barriers with underserved populations.

3.5

Prioritize program expansion in underserved areas of the community.

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GOAL #4

DEVELOP ADMINISTRATIVE AND STAFFING CAPACITY

Description: To continue to respond the evolving demands of operating a Gold Medal standard department and reflect feedback from stakeholders, this goal reflects the contemporary administration needs of the BPRD. This goal is also necessary for the long-term success of the Department, particularly as the embodied knowledge of long-standing employees and Board Members leaves due to retirements and other departures.

4.1 Conduct workflow analysis to address changing demands and capacity needs. 4.2 Enhance training and development plan for staff and leadership. 4.3 Reinforce strategic volunteer programs and opportunities. 4.4 Leverage new and existing revenue streams. 4.5 Address community satisfaction.

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FINANCIAL Introduction Funding decisions made over the next few months will determine whether our shared public spaces become more accessible and equitable, further amplifying their health benefit to the community or fail to meet the moment of the pandemic. It is widely reported that during the last year of the COVID-19 pandemic, parks and public land are seeing extremely high usage, often despite social distance warnings or park closure, all while operating under pre-COVID-19 funding levels. Across the entire country, parks departments are reporting dramatic upticks in visitors for free amenities, like trails, and shifts in operational needs or requirements. A 2020 Google Mobility Report for Indiana shows that parks have received a 225% increase in visitors compared to the baseline, where many other public spaces have seen marginal or decreased visits. This increased usage leads to increased costs for parks systems across the state. At the same time, there have been dramatic decreases in revenue generating events due to public health related cancellations. Parks have proved their essential role in how society copes with and recovers from the pandemic, while also demonstrating the need to reexamine funding and operation costs. Despite the difficult financial and public health situation, the BPRD strived to provide high-quality facilities, programs, and services to the community. Unfortunately, over the last couple of years the BPRD budget reflects growing shortfalls between revenues and expenditures, nearly erasing the gains 2014 through 2017. While 2020 numbers are still being compiled, given the significant number of cancellations, it is safe to assume that expected revenues will be down. Between 2014 and 2019, revenue generated totals $55.1M with expenditure totals at $54.89M. Both revenues and expenditures have steadily increased over the last six years, up to nearly $2M over that same period. While revenues steadily outpaced expenses from 2014 through 2017, resulting in a net total of nearly $1.55M, expenses have increased since 2018, resulting in only a positive of $210,835 over the entire period. To fund its operations, the BPRD primarily relies upon tax proceeds and user fees for programs and services, with the latter decreasing by 40% during the study period. The seven-year trend is encouraging for the 226

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Department and demonstrates a certain stability in its funding for programs and events. However, cost recovery is challenging with smaller, socially distance events and the Department will need to find new ways of addressing this at least in the short term. As noted in the Park Profiles section in Chapter 2, the BPRD 2019 annual reporting notes that 112 financial goals were set with 64.29% were accomplished, 24.11% substantially accomplished, and 11.61% were not met which left close to a $1M gap between revenues and expenditures. At the same time, funding for programs and events has been steady, which will lend to greater efficacy with Goals 2 and 3. Funds for capital projects and maintenance have been lower, with the exception of the recent Switchyard Park completion. This lack of funding will make it difficult to meet Goal 1 fully. Though capital funding has been provided through TIF and other non-traditional sources, they are not typically applied to maintenance projects and are not a guaranteed source. Implications for the Parks and Recreation Master Plan Funding and cost recovery for programs and events have been steady, though the numerous programmatic and facility shutdown due to COVID-19 have had a dramatic fiscal impact. The challenge of operating parks systems is adapting to economic realities of shifting or reduced traditional sources, while taking advantage of newer models such as “Build Operate Transfer” and P3 (Public Private Partnership). An NRPA survey in April of 2020 indicated that approximately 50% of responding departments had already been asked to reduce their budgets by 10-20% for FY2021. Reduction in municipal tax revenues may reflect levels seen after the 2008/2009 recession. This may lead to increased scope for partnership involvement, like Friend’s groups participating in programming or maintenance, beyond just injecting capital. Given the economic context, the Department and City must be aware that costs in the next five years will continue to increase. It is within this reality that the Department must plan. The operational changes, whether from pandemic responses or from changing demand, and any new multi-use trails will necessitate more funding for maintenance and operation, as the workload for necessary repairs will increase as these new facilities are added to the Department’s existing asset portfolio.


SYSTEMWIDE PLAN

• Park, Trails, and Facilities –the parks and recreation assets that provide opportunities for active and passive recreation as well as their locations within the community.

• Recreation Programs –the planned activities and events that provide instruction, socialization, Parks are widely recognized as critical community competition, and learning to a wide range of infrastructure that significantly benefits public health community members and visitors. and wellness. With social distancing precautions At the same time, the plan represents a watershed increasing anxiety, stress, and depression, the role moment for BPRD, in addressing latent community of parks combating these negatives while at the issues and needs. The plan primarily addresses same time improving physical health have become operational and administrative adjustments, rather than more visible and essential during this public health sweeping capital projects, to both address community crisis. The community in Bloomington has taken full expectations and contemporary challenges. As advantage of the parks, trails, facilities, programs, and proposed, the goals and strategies of BPRD are unified events provided by the BPRD and the high approval into a single system geared toward a more healthy ratings in both operations and facilities demonstrate and equitable community. With the implementation satisfaction. of this master plan update, more community members Introduction

This system offers health and economic benefits to will have recreation opportunities close to their Bloomington, and community members highly value home with safe, walkable connections to parks and the Department’s facilities and services. recreation facilities throughout Bloomington. • Economic benefits: The local economy benefits through attracting and maintaining an educated and healthy workforce, the local tourism industry benefits through attracting visitors for special events, and local businesses benefit through increased sales, which in turn produce increased tax revenues for the City. • Health benefits: Bloomington’s parks and recreation facilities provide active and passive health benefits addressing all facets of health in a holistic, systemic manner - including physical health, mental health, and social health opportunities. • Environmental benefits: Bloomington’s natural park resources significantly contribute to climate mitigation strategies in effective stormwater management, energy reduction through urban heat island mitigation and ambient micro-climate management, as well as providing habitat for many wildlife species. Building on the financial information, this plan outlines action opportunities and alternatives that will allow the parks and recreation system to meet critical needs, adapt to changing demands, while maintain relevance with the community and continuing to provide a high quality of life for the city. The plan lays out strategies focused on system’s interrelated elements and overall mission: TROYER GROUP

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PARKS DEPARTMENT ACTION ITEMS MATRICES The Action Plan takes a deeper look at the goals and strategies presented and provides action items that align with each strategy. Action items may vary from a policy to a maintenance item to a specific strategy. Some may be tangible while others are intangible. Certain action items may be a one-time improvement or effort, while others may be an ongoing initiative. The Parks Department utilizes these action items to produce an annual action item list that guides decisions and efforts for the upcoming year. The list is reviewed with the Parks Board periodically to ensure that the Parks Department is making progress on each yearly action item list.

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ON GOING TASKS TO REVISIT IN 2021 On Going Tasks To Revisit In 2021 Division Distribute customer service surveys quarterly, with a completion rate of 18%, achieving an 80% rate of all returned surveys with positive  satisfaction in customer service, defined as very positive or somewhat positive.  Inactive Administration Facilitate and prepare materials for 12 Board of Park Commissioners meetings for review/ approval of approximately 150‐170 contracts and  In Progress partnerships. Administration In Progress Coordinate one new fitness/wellness program per quarter, with 15 participants each, at Switchyard Park by December 2020. Health and Wellness Offer one mental health session, either online or in‐person, per quarter for city employees by December 2020. Delayed Health and Wellness In Progress Increase participation in Veteran’s Day Run from 30 to 100 by November 11, 2020. Health and Wellness Create a monthly fitness program for city employees in Council Chambers, with 15 participants in each session, by December 2020. Inactive Health and Wellness Increase total advertising budget by 10%, from $78,000 to $85,800 to effectively promote facilities and programs across all platforms through  value‐added, volume contracts with print, broadcast, and digital media. Inactive Health and Wellness Recognize, during monthly Board of Park Commissioners meetings, volunteers (individuals and groups) who make significant contributions to  Health and Wellness In Progress Parks and Recreation with a “Bravo” Award at least nine times in 2020. Identify and recognize outstanding sponsors and partners with a “Park Partner” award quarterly in 2020 (January, April, July, and October)  In Progress during that month’s Board of Park Commissioners meeting. Health and Wellness Recruit, train, track, and thank at least 1,000 individuals to contribute at least 5,000 volunteer hours to support Parks and Recreation  In Progress programming. Health and Wellness Increase attendance at Mills Pool by 5% (9,530 to 10,006) by the end of season in August. Inactive Health and Wellness Facilitate 32 private pool rentals for the season. Inactive Health and Wellness Increase Learn to Swim participation by 2% (389 to 397) Inactive Health and Wellness In Progress Rent 100% capacity hours (590 of 600 in 2018) of ice time to outside groups. Community Relations In Progress Provide 500+ hours of public skating time and attempt to exceed 10,500 participants, keeping public skate sessions at capacity. Community Relations In Progress Register 560 participants (554 in 2018) in Skating School. Community Relations In Progress Register 60 participants in the Hockey Initiation program (55 in 2018). Community Relations In Progress Sell minimum of 20,000 18‐hole rounds of golf (19,769 sold in 2018). Golf Services In Progress Sell minimum of $48,000 in range balls ($60,000 sold in 2018), with IU course closure. Golf Services In Progress Install Zoysia grass on the Pine Course by September 1, 2020. Golf Services In Progress Sell over 260 season passes to boost capacity. Golf Services In Progress Facilitate environmental education programming for all MCCSC 4th  and 6th  grade students and for 500 local children during the summer. Natural Resources Provide boat rental opportunities for 6,000 boaters at Griffy Lake from April‐October 2020, including 2,500 kayak rentals, 2,500 canoe rentals,  In Progress 900 standup paddleboard rentals, and 100 row boat rentals Natural Resources In Progress Complete bird inventory update for Griffy Lake Master Plan by December 1, 2020. Natural Resources In Progress Construct Griffy Lake Loop Trail by May 31, 2021. Natural Resources In Progress Reconnect Lake Loop Trail at Wapehani Mt. Bike Park by August 31, 2020. Natural Resources In Progress Enhance the Wapehani trail system following user input to create a contiguous 5‐mile loop by November 1, 2020. Natural Resources Use Community Hunting Access Program funds to hire a CHAP Coordinator to recruit, vet and train volunteer hunters, and to supervise the hunt  In Progress in order to protect ecologic areas through deer management. Natural Resources Increase total rental hours by 10% from an average of 38 hours/month to an average of 42 hours/month Inactive Allison Jukebox Community Center/Youth Services Offer three after hours activities, including two overnights and one parent night, out to Kid City Camp participants by August 2020 Inactive Allison Jukebox Community Center/Youth Services Implement a minimum of 10 Kid City Break Day sessions with 75% repeat campers by December 31, 2020 Inactive Allison Jukebox Community Center/Youth Services Increase average number of campers with disabilities’ weekly participation in Kid City summer camp by 12% (from 31 to 35) by August 2020. Inactive Allison Jukebox Community Center/Youth Services In Progress Increase membership gross sales by 2% from 2018 (from $282,905 to $288,563). Twin Lakes Recreation Center In Progress Maintain about 900 active members. Twin Lakes Recreation Center In Progress Increase facility rentals by $4,000 Twin Lakes Recreation Center Achieve a 20% profit on gross sales for concessions/vending sales to increase $98,000 with 18% profit ($17,244). efficiency. Gross sales in 2018  In Progress was  Twin Lakes Recreation Center Maintain self‐sustaining Farmers’ Market, with at least 250,000 participants annually, and all associated activities by December 2020. Inactive Community Events Increase weekday market participation by 10%  from 1,986 to 2,184 by October 2020. Inactive Community Events In Progress Create a concert series for Switchyard Park that consists of a minimum of six performances to take place by October 31, 2020. Community Events Increase the attendance of the People’s Park concert series by at least 10%  to 1,348 by October 2020. Inactive Community Events Work with community groups or organizations to hold a new large‐scale event with an attendance of more than 2,000 people to be held at  Switchyard Park for the summer or fall seasons. Inactive Community Events Create two new events for Switchyard Park by December, 2020. Inactive Community Events In Progress Create a partnership with a theater group to secure a minimum of ten volunteers for the Trick or Treat Trail event by October 1, 2020. Community Events Host four “pop‐up”‐type competitions at Twin Lakes Sports Park. Inactive Adult Sport Services Register 150 league softball teams between the spring, summer and fall seasons. Inactive Adult Sport Services Exceed 13,000 spectators for league play and 5,000 spectators for tournament play. Inactive Adult Sport Services Host one national softball tournament in July 2020, creating an economic impact of over $500,000. Inactive Adult Sport Services Increase use at sites by recruiting nine user groups between Olcott Park and Winslow Sports Complex. Youth Sports Services Inactive In Progress Host three rental tournaments at Winslow Sports Complex (average between 1‐ 3 per year) to fill capacity on weekends. Youth Sports Services Create a new teen/facility activities supervisor for the Teen Leadership Institute and weekly facility rentals by August 2020. Delayed Banneker In Progress Develop strategic partnerships with 2 agencies to support Banneker youth and adult programming year‐round by December 2020. Banneker Increase average Preschool Sports partnership participation from 50 to 100 (100%) participants by December 2020. Inactive Banneker In Progress Offer two family events per season to increase participation from 100 to 125 (25%) participants per event by December 2020. Banneker Increase participation in the Teen Leadership Institute by 50%  by providing transportation for Bloomington South High School and Jackson Creek  Middle School. Delayed Banneker Promote year round inclusion with a minimum of 3 methods (social media, inclusive brochure distribution, and outreach to disability‐focused  In Progress agencies) each program guide season (Jan‐Apr, May‐August, Sept‐Dec) by December 31, 2020. Inclusive Recreation Increase inclusive participations in Kid City and Breakdays from 284 in 2018 to 300. Inactive Inclusive Recreation In Progress Provide support where needed in new Switchyard Park Operations In Progress Conduct inspections for 28 playground locations minimum of 4 times by December, 2020. Operations Develop Preventative Maintenance Manual for efficiency, reduce costs and establish consistent practices designed to improve the performance  In Progress and safety of equipment, and effectively manage properties by November 30, 2020. Operations In Progress Install culvert and pour concrete slab to improve drainage in storage yard at Adams Street Operations Center by December 2020. Operations Install new roof at Bryan Park maintenance garage by December 18, 2020. Inactive Operations Purchase critical operations equipment (two zero turn mowers, two electric gators, and floor scrubber) by April 2020. Inactive Switchyard Assign a Park Ambassador to Switchyard Park by June 2020. Inactive Switchyard In Progress Have all aspects of the park 100% complete and operational by July 2020. Switchyard Generate $12,000 revenue through special use permits, pavilion rentals, and stage rentals by December 2020. Delayed Switchyard Host four events with minimum attendance of 2,000 guests by December 2020. Delayed Switchyard Activate Switchyard Park with the following new and existing events: Mid‐week Farmers’ Market, Kite Festival, Friday Night Concert Series,  GlowFest, Farm to Table dinner, Junk in the Trunk. Inactive Switchyard In Progress Develop plan for 5‐acre expansion of the Goat Farm Prairie by December 31, 2020. Landscaping Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan Increase native plant diversity and visual appeal at Miller‐Showers Park by implementing Year 2 of the 10‐Year Vegetation Management Plan  In Progress (approximately 17,000 sq. ft. will have been treated in 2019 and 41,000 sq. ft. will be treated in 2020). Landscaping Remove 5 acres of Asian Bush Honeysuckle at Lower Cascades Park by September 1, 2020. Inactive Landscaping

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Install new roof at Bryan Park maintenance garage by December 18, 2020. Inactive Operations Purchase critical operations equipment (two zero turn mowers, two electric gators, and floor scrubber) by April 2020. Inactive Switchyard Assign a Park Ambassador to Switchyard Park by June 2020. Inactive Switchyard In Progress Have all aspects of the park 100% complete and operational by July 2020. Switchyard Generate $12,000 revenue through special use permits, pavilion rentals, and stage rentals by December 2020. Delayed Switchyard Division On Going Tasks To Revisit In 2021 Host four events with minimum attendance of 2,000 guests by December 2020. Delayed Switchyard Distribute customer service surveys quarterly, with a completion rate of 18%, achieving an 80% rate of all returned surveys with positive  Activate Switchyard Park with the following new and existing events: Mid‐week Farmers’ Market, Kite Festival, Friday Night Concert Series,  satisfaction in customer service, defined as very positive or somewhat positive.  Inactive Administration GlowFest, Farm to Table dinner, Junk in the Trunk. Switchyard Develop plan for 5‐acre expansion of the Goat Farm Prairie by December 31, 2020. In Progress Facilitate and prepare materials for 12 Board of Park Commissioners meetings for review/ approval of approximately 150‐170 contracts and  Landscaping In Progress partnerships. Administration Increase native plant diversity and visual appeal at Miller‐Showers Park by implementing Year 2 of the 10‐Year Vegetation Management Plan  In Progress Coordinate one new fitness/wellness program per quarter, with 15 participants each, at Switchyard Park by December 2020. Health and Wellness (approximately 17,000 sq. ft. will have been treated in 2019 and 41,000 sq. ft. will be treated in 2020). Landscaping Offer one mental health session, either online or in‐person, per quarter for city employees by December 2020. Delayed Health and Wellness Remove 5 acres of Asian Bush Honeysuckle at Lower Cascades Park by September 1, 2020. Inactive Landscaping In Progress Increase participation in Veteran’s Day Run from 30 to 100 by November 11, 2020. Health and Wellness Treat 250 acres of Japanese Stiltgrass at Griffy Lake Nature Preserve by November 1, 2020. Landscaping Create a monthly fitness program for city employees in Council Chambers, with 15 participants in each session, by December 2020. Inactive Increase community engagement by providing volunteer opportunities for 500 community members to maintain natural spaces at 1st Saturdays  Health and Wellness Events, Adopt‐an‐Acre, and more volunteer events. In Progress Increase total advertising budget by 10%, from $78,000 to $85,800 to effectively promote facilities and programs across all platforms through  Landscaping value‐added, volume contracts with print, broadcast, and digital media. Inactive Health and Wellness Develop plans for ‘Scatter Garden’ and ‘Green Burial Area’ expansion at White Oak Cemetery and hire a consultant. Complete plans by  December 31, 2020. In Progress Recognize, during monthly Board of Park Commissioners meetings, volunteers (individuals and groups) who make significant contributions to  Cemeteries In Progress Parks and Recreation with a “Bravo” Award at least nine times in 2020. Health and Wellness Plant 625 public trees. Urban Forestry Prune 1,000 public trees. In Progress Identify and recognize outstanding sponsors and partners with a “Park Partner” award quarterly in 2020 (January, April, July, and October)  Urban Forestry In Progress during that month’s Board of Park Commissioners meeting. Health and Wellness Remove 500 hazardous public trees. Urban Forestry Recruit, train, track, and thank at least 1,000 individuals to contribute at least 5,000 volunteer hours to support Parks and Recreation  In Progress Receive Tree City USA status for the 36 consecutive year. Urban Forestry programming. In Progress Contract 500 public street trees for pruning. Health and Wellness Delayed Urban Forestry Increase attendance at Mills Pool by 5% (9,530 to 10,006) by the end of season in August. Inactive Health and Wellness Add two new members to the Bloomington Tree Commission by way of changes in the Tree Ordinance. Inactive Urban Forestry Facilitate 32 private pool rentals for the season. Inactive Health and Wellness Revise/update the Tree Care Manual with the Bloomington Tree Commission. In Progress Urban Forestry Increase Learn to Swim participation by 2% (389 to 397) Inactive Health and Wellness Continue year seven of Ash tree EAB protection with assistance. In Progress Urban Forestry Rent 100% capacity hours (590 of 600 in 2018) of ice time to outside groups. In Progress Develop a Storm Management Plan by September 1, 2020. Community Relations Inactive Urban Forestry Provide 500+ hours of public skating time and attempt to exceed 10,500 participants, keeping public skate sessions at capacity. In Progress Implement recommendations made by the Street Tree Inventory, as funds allow. Community Relations In Progress Urban Forestry In Progress Register 560 participants (554 in 2018) in Skating School. Community Relations In Progress Register 60 participants in the Hockey Initiation program (55 in 2018). Community Relations In Progress Sell minimum of 20,000 18‐hole rounds of golf (19,769 sold in 2018). Golf Services In Progress Sell minimum of $48,000 in range balls ($60,000 sold in 2018), with IU course closure. Golf Services In Progress Install Zoysia grass on the Pine Course by September 1, 2020. Golf Services In Progress Sell over 260 season passes to boost capacity. Golf Services Completed Tasks That May Move Forward  In Progress Facilitate environmental education programming for all MCCSC 4th  and 6th  grade students and for 500 local children during the summer. Natural Resources Increase the number of followers on the Parks and Recreation Facebook page from 7,853 to 9,000 by end of Q4. Provide boat rental opportunities for 6,000 boaters at Griffy Lake from April‐October 2020, including 2,500 kayak rentals, 2,500 canoe rentals,  Generate an additional $1,500 in sponsor revenue (from $38,000 to $39,500) from first‐time sponsors by end of Q4. In Progress 900 standup paddleboard rentals, and 100 row boat rentals Natural Resources In Progress Complete bird inventory update for Griffy Lake Master Plan by December 1, 2020. Natural Resources Re‐design seasonal program guide and increase page count from 44 to 48 to accommodate the addition of Switchyard Park programs and  In Progress Construct Griffy Lake Loop Trail by May 31, 2021. Natural Resources facilities to better inform the community of Parks and Recreation opportunities. In Progress Reconnect Lake Loop Trail at Wapehani Mt. Bike Park by August 31, 2020. Natural Resources Rent 30 of the 39 garden beds at Switchyard Park. In Progress Enhance the Wapehani trail system following user input to create a contiguous 5‐mile loop by November 1, 2020. Natural Resources Use Community Hunting Access Program funds to hire a CHAP Coordinator to recruit, vet and train volunteer hunters, and to supervise the hunt  Increase Community Gardening Program revenue by $1,500, from $11,154 to $12,654 compared to 2019 revenue, by October 2020. In Progress in order to protect ecologic areas through deer management. Natural Resources Maintain at least 70 participants per day in the Banneker Camp program between June‐August, 2020. Increase total rental hours by 10% from an average of 38 hours/month to an average of 42 hours/month Inactive Allison Jukebox Community Center/Youth Services Secure five sponsors for Banneker Camp totaling $750‐$1,000 by May 2020. Offer three after hours activities, including two overnights and one parent night, out to Kid City Camp participants by August 2020 Inactive Allison Jukebox Community Center/Youth Services Implement a minimum of 10 Kid City Break Day sessions with 75% repeat campers by December 31, 2020 Increase average participation in Banneker at the View Afterschool program from 30 students to 40 students by May 2020. Inactive Allison Jukebox Community Center/Youth Services Increase average number of campers with disabilities’ weekly participation in Kid City summer camp by 12% (from 31 to 35) by August 2020. Inactive Maintain at least 12 participants per day in the Teen Summer Camp program between June‐August, 2020. Allison Jukebox Community Center/Youth Services In Progress Increase membership gross sales by 2% from 2018 (from $282,905 to $288,563). Twin Lakes Recreation Center Obtain 1 new and 3 re‐certifications for CPO Certified Pool Operators by June 30, 2020. In Progress Maintain about 900 active members. Twin Lakes Recreation Center Hire and train one RFT working foreperson and one reassigned foreperson by March 2020. In Progress Increase facility rentals by $4,000 Twin Lakes Recreation Center Achieve a 20% profit on gross sales for concessions/vending sales to increase $98,000 with 18% profit ($17,244). efficiency. Gross sales in 2018  Install 5,000 native plants (City Hall, Courthouse Square, Kirkwood, B‐Line Trail) by July 1, 2020. In Progress was  Twin Lakes Recreation Center Remove 10 acres of invasive woody vegetation along the Bloomington Rail Trail/Clear Creek Trail Corridor by December 31, 2020. Maintain self‐sustaining Farmers’ Market, with at least 250,000 participants annually, and all associated activities by December 2020. Inactive Community Events

COMPLETED TASKS THAT MAY MOVE FORWARD

TROYER GROUP

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FUNDING RESOURCES Recommendations in the action plan section of this Master Plan include operational expenses, maintenance expenses, and larger capital expenses. With a limited annual budget, park systems often need to be creative in finding resources for funding their parks. Whether it is operational expenses or deferred maintenance, the day-to-day costs that parks have typically exhaust much of the budget so there isn’t readily available funding for capital projects. Leveraging as many funding resources as possible will be essential in the board’s efforts to implementing some of these items.

funding is intended to fund infrastructure to promote development that would not occur if it wasn’t for the added infrastructure financed by the TIF revenues. General Obligation Bonds General Obligation Bonds provide a funding source for larger projects that typically exceed funding available by other grants. Public hearings must be held and City Council needs to approve any bonds that are issued.

Recreation Impact Fees Recreation Impact Fees allow for new housing developments to assist in the funding of facilities to Non-Reverting Operations Funds Non-Reverting Operations Funds are used for serve that particular population growth. These funds appropriations made by the Park Board for operational are not to be used for maintenance or repairs on expenditures. This fund is sourced from program and existing facilities. event fees, sale of merchandise or concessions, user fees, and rental fees. Non-Reverting Capital Funds Non-Reverting Capital Fund Accounts are created for the purpose of acquiring land or making specific capital improvements. This is funded by sale of park property, equipment, or any special user fees established by the Parks Board. Tax Increment Funding (TIF) TIF Funding is a public financing method that is used as a subsidy for redevelopment, infrastructure, or other community improvement projects. TIF 232

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


GRANTS AND FUNDING PROGRAMS Recommendations in the action plan section of this Master Plan include some larger capital expenses that may seem beyond the financial reach of the parks and community resources. Grants and funding programs will be essential in the board’s efforts to implementing some of these items. The Park Board should look for grant opportunities for capital projects. Following are some examples of grant opportunities. IDNR Recreational Trails Program (RTP) RTP provides 80% grant/20% local funding for acquisition and development of multi-use trails. Funding is more limited than TE funds, but can provide grants up to $200,000.

IDNR, Division of Forestry These are grants for community and urban forestry programs to assist with street and park tree inventories, management plans, and tree plantings. Grants range from $2,000 to $20,000 and must have an equal cash/inkind match. Safe Routes to School (SRTS) This provides 80% grant/20% local funding to promote walkability in communities where school facilities are located. CDBG Funding OCRA provides funding for community development projects from Community Development Block Grants. The Historic Preservation Fund offers 50% matching grants for acquisition, restoration, and preservation of historic properties.

Lilly Endowment The Lilly Endowment supports facilities and programs IDNR Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) LWCF provides 50% grant/50% local funding for the that advance the city’s economic revitalization and development of park facilities. The LWCF is best used community recreational opportunities. for projects that involve land acquisition to expand park Indiana Native Plant and Wildflower Society (IN PAWS) property. IN PAWS offers small grants to promote the appreciation, preservation, conservation, utilization, and scientific study Next Level Trails This grant program from IDNR will provide several of the flora native to Indiana and to educate the public rounds of funding over the next few years to create local about the values, beauty, diversity, and environmental and regional trails with 80% state funds and a 20% local importance of indigenous vegetation. match. IDNR Lakes and Rivers Enhancement Program (LARE) LARE offers grants to protect and enhance aquatic habitat OCRA Quick Impact Placebased (QuIP) Grant This grant funds space enhancement projects that spark for fish and wildlife to ensure the continued viability community conversation and creativity. It encourages of Indiana’s publicly accessible lakes and streams for partnerships between local government, residents, and multiple uses, including recreational opportunities. community organizations and agencies. Patronicity CreatINg Places Patronicity partnered with the Indiana Housing and Community Development Authority to provide a grant program based on crowd-funding. IHCDA will match the dollars raised by the community up to $50,000. Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST Act) Provides 80% grant/20% local funding for transportation alternative projects. This includes pedestrian and bicycle facilities, recreational trails, historic preservation, and environmental mitigation related to storm water and habitat connectivity. This could include monies for the trail, associated parking, restrooms, and other basic improvements.

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IMPLEMENTATION Future Action With the acceptance of this Master Plan, the BPRD commits to the overarching goals, detailed strategies, and ongoing actions outlined in the previous section. The goals outlined in this document represent what the BPRD will use for implementation of an annual “strategic action” planning process that will be an integral part of the Departmental reporting, its annual work plan, and its annual City budgeting process. After the adoption of the Master Plan, the Department’s strategic action planning process over the next five years includes the following elements: • Reviewing potential initiatives • Developing an annual action plan (contained in a separate spreadsheet) • Establishing a deliberate, planned annual process of evaluating the current year’s action plan with updated planning for the following three years This strategy allows the BPRD Master Plan to be flexible and adaptable, particularly necessary considering unforeseen events like the pandemic, while also ensuring that the mission and main objectives of the department are fully incorporated. This strategy also allows the document to be actively employed throughout each of the next five years, maintaining relevancy and accountability to the community’s stated goals.

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

The Annual Action Planning Process The action planning process is straightforward and begins prior to budget formation and with oversight from the Park Board. As noted, the purpose is to make mid-course adjustments in the action plan, maintaining relevancy and allowing for effective responsiveness for the community, while also making the most effective use of resources. The Annual Action Planning Process is depicted in and includes the following: • Review the Master Plan • Reassess and update the status of current year Action Plan • Update the Needs Assessment, including review of local participation and population data, national recreation and park trends, findings from community engagement, levels of service • Outline the next two years of the Action Plan, reflecting any changes • Develop and secure approval of updated Action Plan(s) in tandem with budget request to the City • Implement Action Plan


ACTION PLAN CONCLUSION The framework for facility improvements and maintenance will be directly tied to stabilizing funding. Additional resources, both funding and partnerships, will contribute to addressing any maintenance backlog. Alternative funding sources allow for broader participation, particularly for programs with lower turn out, and will contribute to addressing levels of service improvements. The projection for programs and events is less clear in the short-term. Ensuring that resources are directed toward the programs of highest community benefit has been a focus, but does not fully include all members of the Bloomington community. Increases in FTE may be pursued as a result. As per the norm, the Department will make trade-offs between current programs to develop new ones and enhance programming that aligns with community priorities.

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235


11.0 Chapter Eleven Appendices

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


CITY OF BLOOMINGTON PARKS & RECREATION


PUBLIC ENGAGMENT SURVEY Community Interest Survey: Let Your Voice Be Heard Today! The City of Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department would like your input to help determine park and recreation priorities for the next five years. This survey will take 10 minutes or less to complete. We greatly appreciate your time.

Programs and Facilities From the following list of City of Bloomington parks, please select All PARKS that you and members of your household This sectionhave deals with yourthe perception the also available anduse facilities within BPRD parks. used during past year. of Please chooseprograms the four you the most. For any parks that you and members of your household have used, please rate its condition.

From the following list of City of Bloomington parks, please select All PARKS that you and members of your household have used during the past Do you If YES, how would the condition of Which 4 household year. Please also choose the four you use the most. For any parks that youuse and members of your have used, pleaseyou rate rate its condition.

Name of Park

Name of Park

this park? the park? parks do you Which 4 If YES, how would you rate the condition ofGood the park? Excellent use most? NO Poor Fair parks do

Do you use this Yes park?

3rd Street Park (Waldron, Hill & Buskirk)Yes Broadview Park 3rd Street Park (Waldron, Hill & Buskirk) 22% Bryan Park Broadview Park 2.26% Building and Trades Park (2nd Street) 57% Bryan Park Cascades Park Building andLower Trades Park (2nd Street) 10% Crestmont Park Lower Cascades Park 44% Crestmont Park 4% Ferguson Dog Park Ferguson Dog Park Lake Nature Preserve 13% Griffy Griffy Lake Nature 48% Goat Preserve Farm Prairie Goat Farm Prairie 11% Highland Village Park Highland Village Park 5% Latimer Woods Latimer Woods 6% Leonard Nature Park Leonard Springs NatureSprings Park 21% Miller-Showers Park Miller-Showers Park 9% Olcott Park Olcott Park 32% Park Ridge Park 5% Park Ridge Park Park Ridge Park 5% ParkEast Ridge Park East Peoples Park 8% Peoples Park RCA Park (formerly Thomson) 14% RCA Park (formerly Thomson) Rev. Ernest Butler Park (9th Street) 13% Rev. Ernest Butler Park (9th Street) Schmalz Farm Park 9% Schmalz Farm Park Seminary Park 7% Sherwood Oaks Park Park 14% Seminary Southeast Park 8% Sherwood Oaks Park Switchyard Park 52% Southeast Park Winslow Woods Park 17% Switchyard Park None, do not use any parks (skip Q2) 5% Winslow Woods Park None, do not use any parks (skip Q2)

NO 78% 98% 43% 90% 56% 96% 87% 52% 89% 95% 94% 79% 91% 68% 95% 95% 92% 86% 87% 91% 93% 86% 92% 48% 83% 95%

you use most? 8% 0.6% 36% 4% 20% 1% 5% 32% 6% 3% 1% 9% 3% 19% 1% 3% 4% 6% 4% 6% 1% 6% 5% 29% 8%

Poor

Fair

Good

Excellent

Unsure

3% 8% 1% 0% 3% 0% 5% 2% 0% 5% 7% 3% 0% 1% 0% 5% 15% 4% 8% 4% 39% 0% 5% 0% 3%

20% 12% 9% 26% 19% 21% 17% 12% 11% 7% 12% 11% 16% 7% 19% 14% 14% 12% 14% 7% 15% 13% 14% 8% 21%

43% 14% 50% 18% 42% 12% 28% 46% 21% 20% 22% 33% 31% 37% 17% 27% 39% 32% 29% 28% 8% 46% 25% 21% 31%

18% 0% 38% 17% 30% 0% 20% 35% 26% 11% 5% 33% 18% 41% 15% 19% 15% 21% 19% 23% 0% 16% 17% 66% 21%

16% 65% 3% 38% 5% 67% 30% 5% 43% 57% 54% 19% 35% 14% 49% 34% 17% 31% 30% 37% 38% 25% 40% 5% 24%

4%

13%

33%

28%

Have you or other members of your household participated in any recreation programs and services offered by the City of Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department in the past 12 months? If yes, how would you rate the overall quality of the recreation programs and services that you and Please check ALL reasons that prevent you or others member of your household from using the Twin Lakes Rec. Center. members of your household have participated in?

Reason Twin Lakes Recreation CenterParticipation is not used Customer service is poor Yes NO Distance is too far from our residence 32% 68% Facility operating hours are not convenient Fitness equipment does not meet my needs Full program (so could not attend) I am not physically active I did not know that this facility exists Lack of quality programs Program times are not convenient Programs do not fit my needs Registration for group classes is difficult Transportation Use another fitness facility Other

238

If YES, how would you rate the quality Check One of the program or service? Poor 4%

Fair 5%

Good 37%

Excellent 48%

City of Bloomington Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan Parks and Recreation Department – 2020 Community Input Survey

Unsure 6%


Please indicate if YOU or members of your HOUSEHOLD have used any of the following recreation facilities listed below in the past year by checking Yes. Please also indicate the 4 you use most. If YOU or members of your HOUSEHOLD have used a facility in the past year, please indicate how important the facility is to your family’s recreational needs.

Name of Facililty

Do you use this facility? Yes

Allison-Jukebox Community Center B-Line Trail Banneker Community Center Bloomington Rail Trail Bryan Park Pool Burkirk-Chumley Theater Cascades Club House Cascades Golf Course Cascades Skate Park Cascades Trail Clear Creek Trail Crestmont Disc Golf Course Community Gardens Frank Southern Ice Arena Jackson Creek Trail Mills Pool Olcott Park fields Shelter houses in City Parks Switchyard Park Bocce Ball Courts Switchyard Park Pavilion Switchyard Park Pickle Ball Courts Switchyard Park Skate Park Switchyard Park Spray Pad Twin Lakes Recreation Center Twin Lakes Sports Park Wapehani Mountain Bike Park Winslow Sports Park

NO

3% 69% 5% 43% 17% 46% 7% 12% 5% 17% 38% 3% 5% 13% 24% 4% 13% 16% 2% 14% 4% 6% 9% 14% 4% 8% 14%

Which do you use most (choose up to 4) 0% 47% 1% 22% 6% 25% 2% 5% 3% 38% 19% 1% 2% 3% 12% 1% 5% 4% 1% 4% 2% 2% 4% 5% 1% 1% 6%

If YOU or members of your HOUSEHOLD have used a facility in the past year, please indicate how important the facility is to your family’s recreational needs. Not Very Important

23% 3% 20% 4% 7% 6% 27% 15% 17% 9% 3% 18% 15% 16% 5% 15% 11% 8% 16% 8% 11% 12% 8% 8% 8% 16% 7% 9%

Somewhat Important

12% 14% 7% 14% 11% 7% 23% 21% 7% 17% 13% 8% 5% 10% 10% 17% 10% 8% 8% 12% 0% 9% 19% 14% 8% 19% 14% 12%

Important

12% 23% 13% 25% 32% 25% 18% 21% 33% 33% 27% 14% 27% 28% 25% 14% 26% 16% 16% 24% 23% 27% 11% 26% 21% 17% 23% 24%

Very Important

8% 58% 24% 54% 35% 57% 13% 36% 16% 28% 53% 12% 24% 28% 46% 20% 35% 22% 22% 36% 32% 28% 42% 35% 33% 26% 42% 40%

Unsure

46% 1% 35% 3% 14% 5% 20% 16% 28% 13% 5% 47% 29% 17% 14% 34% 19% 39% 39% 20% 35% 24% 20% 17% 29% 22% 15%

Please select ALL the ways that you CURRENTLY learn about BPRD programs and services. Also select the ways you prefer to learn about BPRD programs and services. Current Communication Methods Blogs City of Bloomington Website Conversations with Park and Recreation staff Fliers/Posters Friends and neighbors Newspaper advertisements Newspaper articles Parks Department e-mail bulletins Radio Seasonal Program guide Social media (Facebook/Instagram) Television Other ______________________

How do you currently learn of BPRD offerings? 2% 15% 0% 0% 8% 0% 0% 10% 0% 22% 13% 0% 0%

How do you prefer to learn about the offerings? 0% 13% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 20% 0% 0% 0%

Have you or other members of your household participated in any recreation programs and services offered by the City of Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department in the past 12 months? If yes, how would you rate the overall quality of the recreation programs and services that you and members of your household have participated in?

Check One (Yes or No) Yes No No Response

29% 62% 9%

Poor 4%

Fair 5%

Good 37%

Excellent 48%

Unsure 6%

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Please indicate if YOU or members or your HOUSEHOLD use the facility types listed below. Do you use this type How important is it to you to have this facility in Bloomington? of facility Type of Facility Yes

Amenities/Park Features (Outdoor) Community Gardens Greenspace / natural areas Large community parks Off-leash dog park Playground equipment Small neighborhood parks Spray pad Water park Facilities/Centers (Indoor) Aquatics facility (indoor) Community theater Facility rental space (pavilion, smaller spaces) Ice arena Nature center Recreation event space Health and Wellness Features/Facilities Fitness and exercise facilities (indoor) Fitness and exercise stations (outdoor) Running/Walking track (indoor) Walking and biking trails Sports Baseball and softball fields (youth) Basketball courts (outdoor) Basketball courts (indoor) Bocce ball Disc golf Football fields (youth) Futsal Golf course Mountain bike park Pickleball courts Soccer fields (youth) Softball fields (adult) Skateboarding park Sports fields (indoor) Tennis courts (outdoor) Volleyball courts (indoor) Other ________________

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No

Not Very Important

Somewhat Important

Important

Very Important

Unsure

47 235 261 98 182 227 84 76

16 9 5 15 5 6 12 9

14 6 12 21 20 17 26 21

28 53 64 35 56 62 34 28

33 199 207 72 138 173 54 58

9 7 6 7 4 7 6 8

53 166 95 91 87 83

12 12 10 16 7 11

14 13 15 26 16 8

24 65 53 38 37 40

41 102 49 43 54 50

19 8 10 10 11 11

116 106 109 394

8 19 12 0

10 26 10 16

43 43 33 66

84 50 82 322

14 13 15 6

58 82 39 12 40 11 2 90 58 34 41 21 40 20 97 8

8 8 9 14 13 10 10 12 12 13 4 10 11 8 10 10

8 8 4 8 16 5 1 13 17 6 7 4 11 9 15 4

24 45 27 9 20 9 5 36 23 13 19 16 17 13 36 9

43 45 25 7 21 16 6 56 35 25 41 20 29 17 63 12

12 13 11 14 9 11 22 12 14 15 10 12 12 15 10 14


Health, Wellness, and Inclusion This section deals with your perception of health, wellness, and inclusion within BPRD parks and facilities as well as its programs and events. Which areas of health and wellness do you think Bloomington should prioritize?

Wellness Area

Rank these areas Though there are more than four areas to rank, ensure that at least one area is assigned a 1 (high priority) and at least one area is assigned a 4 (low priority). High

Environmental Financial Intellectual Mental/emotional wellness Physical wellness (fitness) Social/relationships

8% 2% 2% 5% 10% 3%

Second Highest

4% 3% 3% 6% 6% 5%

Third Highest

Lowest

3% 2% 4% 5% 3% 4%

19% 13% 12% 19% 21% 16%

2% 6% 3% 3% 1% 5%

How welcome do you feel using the park amenities, facilities, and programs? Select one answer. Very welcome Somewhat welcome Not welcome I prefer not to answer

67% 28% 3% 3%

Please indicate if YOU or members of your HOUSEHOLD use the programs and services listed below. For each program/service that you use, please rate its importance. Do you use this Please then rank how you would rate the quality of them. program? Type of Program or Service Not Very Somewhat Very Unsure Important Yes No Important

Important

Art and cultural events Community events Community garden plots Concerts Environmental education (groups) Farmers’ Market Gardening classes Gardening education (groups)

387 363 204 371 202 436 189 178

6% 6% 25% 6% 18% 9% 21% 24%

9% 11% 17% 15% 19% 12% 30% 31%

31% 40% 32% 34% 28% 27% 26% 22%

Important

53% 42% 21% 43% 31% 50% 20% 18%

2% 2% 5% 2% 4% 2% 4% 4%

Health and wellness programs (nutrition, fitness, etc.)

228

11%

15%

34%

38%

3%

Movies in the Park Nature programs (guided) for youth/adults Organized softball leagues (adults) Pet programs Preschool programs

263 207 160 187 177

14% 13% 26% 22% 13%

27% 17% 21% 19% 12%

36% 40% 33% 30% 30%

20% 25% 11% 22% 41%

4% 6% 10% 7% 5%

School vacation programs (day camps/break days)

198

11%

9%

34%

42%

5%

Services for people with disabilities Special event permits Sports leagues/programs (adult) Sports leagues/programs (youth) Sports activities that are self-directed (adult) Sports activities that are self-directed (youth) Summer Food Service Program Volunteer activity Other ______________________

189 159 170 194 182 161 175 215 31

8% 21% 20% 16% 14% 17% 22% 12% 32%

10% 11% 21% 7% 12% 14% 8% 7% 0%

29% 34% 28% 35% 39% 37% 20% 32% 0%

51% 19% 26% 39% 30% 25% 42% 46% 16%

3% 14% 5% 4% 5% 6% 8% 3% 52%

From the following list, please check ALL the organizations that you or members of your household have used for indoor and outdoor recreation programs and services during the past year. Organizations Used Boys and Girls Club Buskirk-Chumley Theater Churches City of Bloomington Parks & Recreation Department (BPRD) Indiana University (SRSC, Wildermuth Intramural Center, Woodlawn Field, etc.) John Waldron Arts Center Karst Farm and other county parks Other health/fitness center School facilities (MCCSC or RBB) Travel sports teams/clubs YMCA (Northwest or Southeast) None Other ______________________

Used during the past year (Check all 35 284 179

Which TWO of the organizations do you and members of your household use THE MOST for indoor and outdoor recreation programs and services? 11 132 116

277

167

145

68

175 201 106 125 35 196 25 13

59 74 37 54 16 108 4 9

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241


Which FOUR do you use most and which four do you think contribute most to your health? Please rank how you would rate the quality of them. Which 4 do you Which 4 think Quality of Program or Service Type of Program or Service do you contribute use most? most to your Poor Fair Excellent Unsure health? Art and cultural events 247 128 1% 14% 80% 5% Community events 173 81 2% 26% 67% 5% Community garden plots 21 19 19% 19% 44% 19% Concerts 170 67 2% 23% 71% 4% Environmental education (groups) 19 9 26% 23% 16% 35% Farmers’ Market 270 118 10% 29% 57% 4% Gardening classes 7 9 25% 20% 15% 40% Gardening education (groups) 5 3 23% 23% 18% 36% Health and wellness programs (nutrition, fitness, etc.)

77

68

4%

31%

57%

8%

Movies in the Park Nature programs (guided) for youth/adults Organized softball leagues (adults) Pet programs Preschool programs

46 27 14 25 17

15 19 8 11 10

0% 11% 19% 9% 17%

50% 26% 27% 38% 13%

36% 32% 23% 28% 46%

14% 32% 31% 25% 25%

School vacation programs (day camps/break days)

19

7

9%

13%

53%

25%

Services for people with disabilities Special event permits Sports leagues/programs (adult) Sports leagues/programs (youth) Sports activities that are self-directed (adult) Sports activities that are self-directed (youth) Summer Food Service Program Volunteer activity

19 7 23 47 62 17 11 65

16 5 12 21 43 8 6 40

0% 17% 13% 10% 6% 0% 20% 0%

25% 13% 28% 18% 9% 15% 0% 31%

30% 21% 31% 56% 68% 42% 28% 55%

45% 50% 28% 15% 17% 42% 52% 14%

The following are some of the outcomes that you and your household may receive from parks, trails, recreation facilities, programs, and services. For each potential outcome, please indicate the level of priority you think it should be assigned. Highest High Low Lowest Do Not Know Outcomes Priority Priority Priority Priority Enhance community appearance 97 250 63 9 14 Foster a sense of belonging through equity-driven park 92 195 76 28 28 planning Help attract new residents and businesses 71 179 119 40 14 Help reduce crime 114 182 75 27 30 Improve diet and nutrition 78 170 93 37 28 Improve mental health and reduce stress 192 190 53 9 11 Improve physical health and fitness 254 165 29 5 8 Improve social connections 96 182 98 27 19 Increase opportunities for people of different cultures to 121 173 82 33 25 interact Increase property values in surrounding area 65 149 125 58 24 Make Bloomington a more desirable place to live 180 175 66 22 8 Make Bloomington’s natural assets more sustainable 190 158 44 17 15 and resilient. Preserve open space and the environment 239 160 33 11 7 Promote and provide opportunities for artists (visual, 81 179 103 29 20 performance, and so on) Promote tourism to the City 49 138 152 56 17 Protect historical attributes of the City 71 190 112 26 14 Provide access to the outdoors and nature 248 159 21 8 9 Provide educational opportunities through programming Strengthen sense of community Other _____________________

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

83

194

97

21

14

126 6

181 0

81 0

18 0

13 25

Please indicate which of the following things prevent you or members of your household from using park and recreation services. Reasons Inadequate or poorly maintained facilities

Check all that apply. 7.3%

My neighborhood does not have a park, recreation facility, or trail within a 10-minute walk

12.6%

Not enough money Not enough time Personal health problem

7.1% 22.8% 4.8%

Personal safety concern – the park or trail is not safe

16.5%

Personal safety concern – the walk to the park or trail is not safe due to traffic or roadways

10.3%

Programs that the Department offers do not interest me

11.6%

The Department’s programs, parks, or facilities are not accessible to people with disabilities Other

1.8% 5.2%


Funding, Value, and Priorities This section pertains to funding for the parks, what value you find in the park’s programs and facilities, and what your priorities are moving forward. If it were up to you, how would YOU allocate $100 in taxes across these competing priorities? Priorities

Dollar value of the total $100 (Total must add up to $100)

Acquiring new parkland and open space

$20.00

Constructing new parks and facilities to meet community needs

$14.76

Constructing new walking and biking trails

$23.39

Continuing to provide existing community events and recreation programs

$15.69

Continuing to provide existing sports programs and events Maintaining/renovating existing facilities (community centers, ice arena, sports fields, pools, golf course, etc.) Maintaining/renovating existing neighborhood parks (playgrounds, shelters, features, etc.)

$13.60 $19.57 $21.95

Other ______________________________ Thinking about how public money has been spent on recreation parks and facilities in the past 5-10 years, which of the following statements is most accurate? Check One My neighborhood often gets its fair share 18% My neighborhood almost always gets its fair share 14% My neighborhood seldom gets its fair share 13% My neighborhood never gets its fair share 10% Do Not Know / Not Sure 41% Other ____________________________ 5% Please rate your satisfaction with the overall value your household receives from the BPRD. Check Overall Satisfaction Level One Very Dissatisfied 2% Dissatisfied 7% Satisfied 49% Very Satisfied 34% No Opinion 8%

How welcome do you feel using the park amenities, facilities, and programs? Check One Very welcome 67% Somewhat welcome 28% Not welcome 3% I prefer not to answer 3% Please rank the three most important issues the BPRD must address with its five-year master plan. Most important Important Issues issues 22% Acquire land/open space 30% Arts, Festivals and Cultural Events 2% Build facilities 9% Build parks 27% Build trails 45% Connect trails 22% Continue current programs 19% Equity and inclusion 37% Focus on maintenance 12% Food security 34% Reduce vandalism/Address safety 20% Sustainability and climate change 19% Upgrade facilities 3% Other __________________________

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243


Please Tell Us About Yourself This section helps us understand your perspective in greater detail. All responses are anonymous. Counting yourself, how many people in your house are: Number of people in household

Number of People 1 this age

Under Age 5 Ages 5-9 Ages 10-14 Ages 15-19 Ages 20-24 Ages 25-34 Ages 35-44 Ages 45-54 Ages 55-64 Ages 65-74 Ages 75+

2 this age

40 48 38 32 22 44 43 43 45 58 30

15 20 15 14 6 32 55 31 28 56 20

What is YOUR age?

3 this age 4 this age 2 3 1 5 5 1 0 0 0 0 1

(Check One)

5+ this age 1 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0

1% 2% 9% 17% 11% 23% 30% 8%

11.7% 27.7% 60.5%

Where do you live? How long have you lived there? Indicate one of the following: Check All That Less than More than 1-5 years 6-10 years 11-15 years Apply 1 year 16 years I live in the City I live in the County I live outside the County I am a Student at Indiana University

73% 24% 0% 2%

Would you rate your overall health? Health Rating

What is your race/ethnicity? Race / Ethnicity American Indian and Alaskan Native Asian Black or African American Hispanic or Latino Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Two or more races White (not Hispanic or Latino) Prefer not to answer Other ___________________ What is your gender identity? Income Level Female Male Non-binary Prefer not to answer

244

1% 10% 48% 42%

Check One

18% 13% 0% 31%

12% 16% 100% 0%

46% 49% 0% 0%

1-7 days

8-15 days 16-21 days

21-30 days

31+ days

What is your household income? Income Level 1% 3% 2% 2% 0% 2% 78% 11% 1%

Check One

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

20% 18% 0% 69%

If you rate your health Poor, please indicate for how long you have been in poor health. Select 1.

Check One

Poor Fair Good Excellent

3% 4% 0% 0%

49% 43% 1% 7%

Under $25,000 $25,000-$49,999 $50,000-$74,999 $75,000-$99,999 $100,000 or more Prefer not to answer

3

Check One

4% 15% 14% 16% 27% 24%


Survey Reminder Bloomington Parks and Recreation

5-year Master Plan Community Survey P.O. Box 848 Bloomington, IN. 47402

WE STILL NEED YOUR HELP! Your input will directly shape the goals and priorities of Bloomington Parks and Recreation for the next five years.

REMINDER:

Please take a moment to scan the below QR code with your smartphone camera, or enter the website address directly into your web browser.

You were randomly selected to help determine the future of Bloomington’s City parks! If you have already filled out the online survey, THANK YOU! We appreciate your input! If you have not filled out the online survey, please follow the instructions on the reverse side to take the survey. Your feedback will help shape the future of Bloomington Parks!

The survey is open through SEPTEMBER 18, 2020. TAKE THIS SURVEY IN ENGLISH

RESPONDA ESTA ENCUESTA EN ESPAÑOL

LEND YOUR VOICE!

You have been randomly selected to offer your insights on how the parks can improve. This survey should take less than 10 minutes.

https://tinyurl.com/y62pdllo

https://tinyurl.com/y6m6tdt7

Thank you for your time and participation!

TROYER GROUP

245


STAKEHOLDER COMMENTS Parks Operations Division Tuesday, August 25th, 1:00pm – 2:00pm • Existing mission statement is not seen frequently, group thinks it is trying to say a lot, there is something to be said about providing essential services, sustainability should be included, push ourselves, align with what we do, inclusion of diversity help to make it a reality. Utilize inclusive language, value sustainability and address climate change • We can always improve our cultural and natural protections and awareness, need more efforts on cultural preservation and protections (rose Hill cemetery needs a costly monument restoration) • Steve addresses increased rainfall events and sedimentary into Griffy Lake, fragmented natural community, long term maintenance is an issue • Erin asked if the programing was reflective of other cultures • More outreach is needed to communicated state of natural and cultural resources • Provide information in multiple languages – Rebecca. Dedicate a department to nature resources • Protect water ways, sustainability action plan • In favor of more funding for natural resources • Biggest challenges include dealing with the homeless populations and drug related issues, vandalism/graffiti, getting more support for the police to handle these issues, transient members put staff at risk, invasive species are a big issue, over use of parks spaces “love to death”, addressing the magnitude of COVID increased, • Anti-racist: reach out for diversity in use (hiring), plan inclusive events i.e. bring in different cultures, Banneker is anti-racist, it should be further emulated. Address community as family, increase of more diversity within community groups. • Hiring practices: targeted advertising, targeted programming for specific groups, recognition of indigenous land and stewardship of land Recreation/Sports/Administration Tuesday, August 25th, 2:30pm – 3:30pm • Mission only addresses physical amenities, 246

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

• • •

should further address services and programs. How are we addressing reaching out and physical assets post COVID, avoid wordy and long mission, address equality and inclusion Capacity improvements, resources are a barrier, band aid solutions Go for smaller grants, collective/partnership purchasing for things like chairs, pop-up tents, carts Long term planning for facilities Money and time is a barrier, some staff feel over loaded to manage How to stay relevant (so many competitors) adaptions to meet future needs and wants to cultivate trust, ability to adapt and be flexible The effects of parks dealing with homelessness/ litter/biohazards, more people experiencing homelessness, in addressing this (damage control) more is needed Vandalism Grow target audience (is vandalism result of not connecting?) Reaching targeted audience inclusive cultures Combined issue under city government(politics & racism) Internal communication issues (covid) solid message to function better, not guessing at what we’re enforcing Standard training (not piecing together as we go along ) not taking so long to orient Policies and procedures/ questions from public but don’t always form policies, can look up municipal code Not “anti-racist” can be, not emphasizing (engaging/listening) we already know what the public wants, looking for people to reinforce) building relationship not good enough to say we only hire who applies, obtain a diverse pool of applicants Can do more, add metrics and active items to prove, not just have policies, can’t just be one training a year Beyond people, reflecting in events, eliminate or just understand all barrier, persist in providing for overlooked community Transportation is one of the biggest barriers to inclusivity


• Improve communication (top down priority) • Most important things: maintenance backlog always comes up, older equipment, Winslow Woods, may not catch everything, Losing operation division, training over next 5 years, building on sustainability, resilience, purchasing, energy, lacking education and support system, improve image, overall farmers market creates doubts but parks department may be unfairly attacked, climate change Parks Ambassadors/Adopts an Acre and Adopts A Stream Volunteers Monday, August 31st, 4:00pm – 4:00pm

• Partnership with Center Stone organization to help provide homelessness services • Switchyard park is well done but homelessness is still an issue • Not a need for additional parks, focus needs to be on updating and upgrading existing parks and facilities • Focus on connecting the existing parks system, continue trail development • A good amount of programing and events are offered, the guidebook is jam packed, need more programing and events that are inclusive towards specific groups • Implicit bias training, listening to underrepresented and underserved communities • Address tensions between people and the police department • Goals include adding connectivity, grants and food security funding, good cooperative impact, partnerships, enhance communications and marketing to reach more people

• What’s the difference between the mission and vision? Vision is more inspirational • Not doing enough to protect water resources, environment, and habitat- more environmental education • Need to focus on funding cleanup for invasive and focus on planting for pollinators, we have a ton of resources but are they being used Business Community/Community Organizations efficiently Tuesday, September 1st, 1:00pm – 2:00pm • Industrial pollution • Mission statement is good • Budget is the biggest issue when it comes • Provide more access, room for development to protecting and sustaining environmental when it comes to protecting natural and cultural resources resources • Farmers market and city need to take a stronger • Steps to improve stewardship come down to and quicker response for POC and anti-racist funding issues • A lot of eggs in one basket, need to diversify the • Need to listen to people’s stories and explore economy in order to maintain growth diversity. How does the city attract people? • Economic turmoil and ability to fundraise are Getting children to use the facilities are key. future challenges • Creating safe spaces and letting people know • Over use of parks, people are desperate to get they are a priority out, how do we improve as well as maintain Bloomington Parks Foundation safety Tuesday, September 1st, 11:00am – 12:00pm • Working and adapting to the new norms of community and society • Comfortable with current mission • Partner with schools to meet the growing needs • Trails have become more important, continue of working families building upon these • Diversify and spread out park usage intensity • Not enough maintenance funding • Transportation access is a huge concern • Not a fan of lot of vegetation in the downtown • Bringing programs to underserved communities area, impedes sight lines, requires a lot of and people, meeting people where they are at maintenance, safety concerns • Partnerships with school and boys/girls club, • Maintenance is a high concern for current and Banaker, Cresmont, partnering with programs future potential problems and organizations caterings to people with • Homelessness is a major challenge, city should disabilities offer lots of services, seminary park is overrun • Maintenance and access, there is not a need to with homelessness due to proximity to services TROYER GROUP

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add but to maintain existing Parks Board (Kathleen Mills & Israel Herrera) • Anti-racist: meeting people where they Tuesday, September 1st, 4:00pm – 5:00pm are, actively engaging, statement about • Goals include public health, sustainability, data inclusiveness, offer more cultural celebration, collection, public engagement, events and youth partnerships activities, human services, addressing social • Not top down economic factors and barriers, accessibility and • Statements are one thing and can be empty equity, a place for community to come together words, need accountability and action in order post COVID to build redemption and trust • Learning how important open space is, views on • Improve overall communication which parks are used • Goals include inclusivity of end users/broadening • Mission creep is a concern, what does parks & end users, serving people where they are, reflect rec do? community as a whole • Homelessness health, invasive species, food • Goals 2& 5 are not applicable insecurity are all issues • Multigenerational, affordable Park Board (Les Coyne & Ellen Rodkey) • Providing new amenities such as wifi in parks Tuesday, September 1st, 2:30pm – 3:30pm and public spaces to keep up with the demands • Address social equity issues within mission and needs of users statement, providing a platform for social work • Budgeting is a major challenge, homelessness • Is social work the job of the parks department? causes stress on parks, need training to manage What other department should this fall on? • Responding to use trends, such as less baseball Potential for partnerships to address social use and increased soccer use, be adaptable and equity issues continuously evaluating and changing. • Mission should use more specific language • People are saying the town’s and parks response • Mission statement need to have inclusive to farmers market incident is not enough, not language, reflect impacts of the pandemic, and necessarily our job to sensor but appears to be look through a public heath lens not affirmative enough of a stance • Reflect the economic impact of parks and parks • Need to address level of inequality (subsidizing) programs • Parks need to be equitable in spread of amenities • Not adding more but maintaining • Everyone should live within a mile of a park, • Biggest challenges include economic ability to equal access and opportunity for activities, keep level of activities and programs, being more expand programs to outside of “main” or efficient with technology, implications of social “premier” parks issues (racism/inclusion/access) homelessness • Sustainability, addressing climate change and more economic fall out, addressing mitigation in the face of covid homelessness, addiction, psychological issues • Alternative energy uses (solar panels) and affordable housing • Anti-racism: take inventory of how we Community Partners and User Groups intersect on racial issues through every aspect Wednesday, September 2nd, 11:00am – 12:00pm (programming/hiring), demonstrate that the • Good mission statement, parks and rec is high community is dedicated to better equity, asking quality. Mission is being met currently, but no deeper questions to address systemic racism, one knows if it will fit in 5 years. What is the set an example within hiring at BRPD, and go growth plan if any out of way to get at major social problems, • Very inclusive department but has room for partnership with those fighting racial disparity, growth. accountable HR departments • Looking at virtual programing, provide access • Goals include anti-racism efforts, trail continue to all, room for development, to be a priority, connectivity and equitable • Funding opportunities, careful planning is transportation, hospital site greenways, needed, diversify economy accessibility, sustainability, better utilization of • Potentially overuse is seen as a future issue, resources splash pad at switchyard park is too crowded, 248

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capacity concerns and funding concerns. • Should the farmers market be included in the Exhaustion of facilities park department narrative • Parks department can’t do it all, but partnerships • The term recreation leaves out subset of will increase capacity even with fewer resources, activities because of the way “recreation” is diversify perceived, mission should address people • Partner with school to help meet the needs coming together from different backgrounds that schools can’t meet, before and after school and serving new people but not under umbrella programs, children with disabilities programs • Maximize all available resources • Partnering with lower income areas and make • No cultural resources are being protected programs more accessible, • Direct relay of information is lacking, people need • Transportation issues are a huge concern for better communication from parks department, communities for availability for all are we using resources and communication • Look for potential for partnerships and amenities tactics effectively in transportation and access, Transportation • BPR has a culture challenges, for so long needs to be a focus everything has been focused on facilities and • Bring programs to the community – meet dollars, not people and experiences. Department people where they are at needs accountability • Lack of parks presence in some area such as • Goals for the next 5 years include creating more Crestmont, it’s maintained but not active like partnerships, (Hoosier hills food bank, farm other parks areas to family fund) corporations and partnerships • Farmers market need to be address by (Banneker) will be crucial department and Bloomington as a whole • Anti-racist, need specific programing for • Anti-racism approach needs to reach out to underserved groups include diverse leaders and partnerships. • Rev Butler park and other parks in minority • Offer programs that tie into different culture areas are underserved and neglected elements and celebrations. Not an appropriation• Restrooms and shelter space should be provided create partnerships with a diversity of leaders. and open to homeless community Form partnerships with diverse groups to give • Department and city need to not be afraid to them a voice. Meeting people where they are at, condemn racist actions, they need to take a let people have advocacy and ownership. bring stronger stance people in, not being a top down proclamation. • Minorities, POC, indigenous people need to be • Understand it cannot all be on social media, front and center of initiatives and programming statements are one thing, action is another. • Staffing should reflect the community • Communication need to be addressed actively • Extensive and adequate training for government and tangibly, follow through on statements, departments change the behavior is most affective. Mistrust Advisory Team needs to be rebuilt with the community Thursday, September 3rd, 11:00am – 12:00pm • Add inclusivity to goals • The community has done more with health and • Expanding the trails is not as important, change wellness. Should be addressed in the mission goal 2 and 5 • Address the availability of services • Make goals revolve around maintaining and • Add equitable language to mission increasing users, not necessarily expanding on • Parks department coverage is too broad and is facilities expected of too much Advisory Councils (Farmer’s Market, Banneker • Natural resources are being well protected, Community Center) reasonably good job. Wednesday, September 2nd, 4:00pm – 5:00pm • There needs to be a set standard for parks • The mission is broad, but needs to define what department to follow, and every year during “well being”, the “who” is not clear in the mission the annual retreat do a review of standards and statement and is problematic because of people reassess, allow for regular changes within the who are underserved. parks mission, values, and goals. TROYER GROUP

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• Develop a list of maintenance projects • Discuss more improvement opportunities on an annual basis • Homelessness is a huge challenge and takes a lot of resources • More clearly stated standards that are agreed on and actual carried out • Seminary park and Peoples park - people avoid these parks and find them to be “unsafe” areas, mostly due to homeless population • Systematically decided to invite minority groups into employment and volunteer opportunities • Include diversity on the planning event end, not just on the invitation to events end. • Change the way things are planned, study what will attract a diverse population • Don’t just program for parks, program for people and the community • Programming near churches, including churches that attract very diverse populations Advisory Councils (Environmental Resources Advisory Council, Tree Committee, Golf Committee) Thursday, September 3rd, 1:00pm – 2:00pm • Parks are getting so much more use since pandemic • Incorporate some language within the mission statement and overall parks document around equity and ensure that the statement reflects that all people have equal access to parks and programs • address sustainability and environmental education for future generations • invasive plants are taking parks over, parks is trying but job for education is too big. more resources are necessary. • more resources necessary to maintain natural areas, • water resources: water quality and sustainable use of water continue dedicating resources to those efforts • Improving the free flowing nature of the parks, less impediment my man-made structures • protect habitats, Bryan park has nice greenbelt that should be further emulated • Bloomington does well to incorporate arts in public spaces, more marketing could help spread awareness and stewardship of cultural and environmental educational resources • Marketing for education and awareness • More community groups are trying to utilize the 250

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• • •

• • • •

• • • • • •

• •

outdoor spaces since community buildings are closed off, more of a need for parks to take on an event hosting role More space availability is an increasing issue in the present and future Hospital site development is a contentious issue, homelessness is a major issue in family park deterrence Increased use is a foreseen issue, limited availability due to increased human traffic, the effects of that on the environment. Parking overuse Partner with resources for homeless populations, center stone partnerships, partnerships with health care providers, direct connection between parks and public health Smart commuting week or challenge, encourage sustainability and health. promote the parks, trails and health and wellness Pickle ball is extremely popular, continue to provide more amenities Continue trail development and provide more connectivity between city and county trails See more parks programming to social distance - yoga in the park, thai chi in the park, bird watching groups and walks, etc. (provide more programs that encourage social distancing) Partnerships^^ How to keep parks active all the time and year-round invasive species control and programs for environmental and resource management and education Make sure we are looking at all parks and not paying attention to some parks and not others Looking at programs and making sure all cultures needs are being met and represented Are programs and events geared towards particularly white activities?? More programming specific to minority groups Low income housing options should be adequately planned around parks, providing accessibility and transportation. Public transportation, all around accessibility and connectivity How is public safety managed within parks? Parks department or police department? Which should it be? Police instill a fear in community populations. Access who manages park safety Farmers market needed to take a more prominent stance against anti-racism Having transparency and keeping the


• •

• • • • • • • •

community up to date Staffing, needs to reflect community diversity Most important things: equity and sustainable use, educational programing geared for school aged kids, trails and preservation, reduction of invasive species and natural land protect. (been doing well but keep going), greenspace, improvement of passive recreation Focus on maintaining and improving, not building more Take out goal 6, it is implied by the process. Add a potential goal to talk about providing safe and welcoming spaces for all community members that provides equitable access Connectivity is still very important, falls under the umbrella of sustainability Dedicating people to species management Energy and ecological awareness, address native and invasive plants and management Meeting needs of the entire community, having equitable and fair access no matter who the community members are or where they live Addressing pandemic and social distance and social awareness within the goals

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IMAGE DATABASE Chapter 1 Intro Picture Pg. 6,7 – 2017 Annual Report BPRD

com/edwin-fulwiders-early-1900s-boyhoodbloomington-memoir/

Paula McDevitt National Gold Medal Award Pg. 24 https://bloomington.in.gov/news/2018/09/25/3702

“Art of work” - https://indianapublicmedia.org/arts/

Park Staff Photo Pg. 25– 2019 Annual Report BPRD Pg. 26 Photo – 2019-2020 Program Guide BPRD John Hamilton headshot Pg. 42 – Bloomington.in.gov Background image pg. 42 - https://www. bloomingtonrevealed.com/ Pool jump pg. 52 - https://benweller.photoshelter.com/ image/I0000CAs9dmuNw6Q Park aerials pg. 54-106 – Google Maps Clear creek trail pg. 108 - https://www.visitbloomington. com/listing/clear-creek-trail/130/ New switchyard park accessibility pg. 144,145 https://www.magbloom.com/2020/02/new-switchyardpark-its-large-has-lots-of-stuff-its-eco-friendly/ Rev. Ernest D. Butler Park pg. 146 – Google map images, courtesy of “RayStriker” Social Distancing pg. 148 - https://www.wglt.org/post/ coronavirus-blog-41620-trail-signs-encourage-socialdistancing#stream/0 Bloomington “Black Lives Matter” pg. 150 - https:// indianapublicmedia.org/news/city-of-bloomington-saysvandalized-peoples-park-mural-is-due-for-a-refresh-thissummer.php Chapter 9 Intro Bloomington pg. 154 - https://www. dangtravelers.com/things-to-do-in-bloomington-in/ Lower Cascades Park tables/benches pg. 164 - https:// www.pinterest.com/pin/496733033871921282/ Chapter 12 Intro pg. 176 - https://issuu.com/ bloomingtonparks/docs/tree_care_manual_4th_ edition_0117 Basketball photo pg. 178 - https://www.idsnews.com/ article/2020/02/bloomington-neighborhood-grantsprovide-funding-for-dream-projects Switchyard aerial graphic - https://www.hoosiertimes. com/herald_times_online/news/local/ceremony-marksnext-step-in-switchyard-park-project/article_46471713c087-58d2-966e-cf61ce66c4fb.html History photo - https://www.limestonepostmagazine.

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Farmers market - https://www.visitbloomington.com/ things-to-do/downtown/farmers-market/ Bloomington Transit - https://www.hoosiertimes. com/study-recommends-more-direct-routes-morefrequent-service-to-improve-bloomington-transit/ article_3b674dc0-bacf-5226-8497-a7f0e8cc0fa3.html Hoosier National Forest - https://www. fs.usda.gov/detail/hoosier/learning/parentsteacher/?cid=STELPRDB5344310 I-69 - https://www.dronegenuity.com/projects/i69evansville-bloomington/ Artsroad 46 - https://www.visitbloomington.com/ artsroad/ Basketball hoop_building trades park - https:// www.idsnews.com/article/2020/02/bloomingtonneighborhood-grants-provide-funding-for-dreamprojects Lotus Festival - https://www.magbloom.com/2020/09/ lotus-is-coming-up-get-the-virtual-lineup/ GarlicFest - http://www.explorethis.city/2014/09/ bloomington-in-garlicfest-and-community.html Freezefest - https://www.visitbloomington.com/ freezefest/ Hilly Hundred - https://www.bgindy.com/about/hillyhundred-weekend-resource-page-pg1290.htm Latimer Woods - http://anthonymarletta.blogspot. com/2012/12/latimer-woods-restoration.html Level of Service - https://bloomingtonbucketlist. wordpress.com/tag/parks/ Gold Medal Award, Goal #4 - https://www.idsnews. com/article/2018/09/bloomington-parks-and-recreationdepartment-voted-best-in-us Traffic Control Measure, Action Plan page - https:// www.wglt.org/post/bloomington-consider-design-plansnew-o-neil-aquatic-center#stream/0 Meeting the 2020 Moment pg. 180-181 - https://www. azuremagazine.com/article/park-politics-inequality-andpublic-space-during-covid-19/


REFERENCED PLANS

Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department

MASTER PLAN 2016-2020

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a trust for public land special report

Parks and the pandemic

parks and the pandemic

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1


2017 City park facts

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2010-2012, 2015-219 ANNUAL REPORTS CITY OF BLOOMINGTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

2010 Annual Report

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

2011 Annual Report

KaBOOM! playground design day with The Project School, April 20, 2011.

Bloomington Youth Basketball image by Kirkwood Photo Lab. Used with permission.

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

2015 Annual Report

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

2012 Annual Report

Messy Mania at Rev. Ernest D. Butler Park, July 2012.

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

2016 Annual Report

2017 Annual Report

Olcott Park, August 2015

Leonard Springs Nature Days, April 2016

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Messy Mania at Bryan Park, July 2017

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

2018 Annual Report

2019 Annual Report

Touch A Truck at Winslow Sports Complex, June 2018

Switchyard Park Grand Opening, November 2019


2019 OUTDOOR PARTICIPATION REPORT

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Survey Greeting Letter

Agosto 10, 2020 El Departamento de Parques y Recreación de Bloomington está iniciando un nuevo proceso de planificación maestra de cinco años este mes. Nuestro departamento tiene una larga historia de utilización del proceso de planificación maestra para establecer prioridades en el cumplimiento de las necesidades de nuestra comunidad para parques, recreación y espacios abiertos. Nuestro plan maestro actual, para los años 2016-2020, fue adoptado en 2015. Este plan maestro identificó algunos problemas clave en nuestra comunidad, incluido el mantenimiento y la provisión de parques, senderos e instalaciones seguros. Esto resultó en la reautorización de un bono de Parks de obligación general para apoyar $ 7 millones en proyectos de mejora de capital. El plan también identificó la necesidad de expandir el sistema de senderos, lo que resultó en la dedicación de fondos del Bicentennial Bond para Griffy Loop Trail, ahora en la fase de diseño. Parques y Recreación de Bloomington valora las opiniones de nuestra comunidad. Reconocemos la importancia de la participación de los residentes en el desarrollo de las principales prioridades para nuestro Departamento. Como tal, el primer paso en el proceso del plan maestro es realizar una encuesta comunitaria para obtener más información sobre qué parques, instalaciones recreativas, programas y servicios que utiliza, desea y necesita en Bloomington. Esta encuesta tomará aproximadamente 10 minutos para completar. Cada pregunta es importante. El tiempo que invierta en completar esta encuesta nos ayudará a adoptar un enfoque dirigido por los residentes para tomar decisiones, decisiones que esperamos afecten positivamente su vida y la vida de sus amigos y familiares. ¡Esperamos sus comentarios y mejorar la calidad de vida en nuestra comunidad!

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Sinceramente,

Sinceramente,

Sinceramente,

Paula McDevitt Administradora

John Hamilton Alcalde

Kathleen Mills Presidenta de la Junta de Parques

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS Meeting Agenda Bloomington Parks 5 Year Master Plan Steering Committee Kick-Off Meeting

July 2020

AGENDA: 1. Overview of the Parks Master Plan process 2. Role of the Steering Committee • Introduction to the role of the Steering Committee and expectations for involvement • Summary from each person about their involvement with the parks and the group they represent • Goals you wish to achieve from the master plan 3. Project Schedule • Inventory/Analysis: July - August • Engagement and online survey: July - August i. External Stakeholder Meetings: Park Board Retreat, Friends of BPMD Meeting ii. Internal Stakeholder Meetings: Programming Staff and Maintenance Staff iii. Public engagement meeting • Park Board and Steering Committee meetings to review information • Strategies and action plan development: September – November • Development of draft master plan: September – November i. Steering Committee meeting ii. Park Board Retreat • Submit final draft plan to IDNR: December i. Public review and comment period ii. Final plan updates iii. Park Board plan adoption & final submittal to IDNR 4. Requirements for the Master Plan • Park Board and Parks Department summary • Natural and landscape features • Man-made, historical, and cultural features July 28, 2020 • Social and economic factors • Supply analysis • Public engagement • Accessibility review and self-evaluation • Needs analysis • Park location and facility maps • Priorities and action plan schedule It comes down to people and their experiences | Together, We Will

550 Union St. | Mishawaka, IN 46544 | p 574.259.9976 | www.troyergroup.com

5. Bloomington Parks Discussion • Review Mission, Service area, Park facilities • Goals from the previous five years and overview of progress made • Potential goals for the next five years • Opportunities • Resources • Review Public Engagement Survey 6. Closing discussion and next steps • Miro: https://miro.com/app/board/o9J_kr0NXko=/

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Meeting Agenda Bloomington Parks 5 Year Master Plan Stakeholder Meetings

September 2020

AGENDA: 1. Overview of the Master Plan (There will be a short presentation at 4:05pm and again at 5:05pm EST) 2. Exercise One: Please take a moment to comment on the following questions • Does the existing mission meet current or future needs? If not, how should it be updated? • Are the most important natural and cultural resources being adequately protected? What steps should be taken to continue and improve stewardship? • What is the biggest challenge you see with the parks currently? What about in the future? • How can we better leverage partnerships? • Are there any new amenities, programs, or events would you like to see added in the next five years? • Are there any amenities, programs, or events that you think BPRD should change or discontinue considering available resources (staff, funding, equipment, etc.)? • How can the BPRD be “anti-racist”? • What is the most important thing that could be improved in parks over the next five years? • What major goals do you think BPRD should have over the next five years? 3. Exercise Two: Please take a moment to leave a comment on each of the boards (type “c” and place a comment on a specific location or place anywhere for non-specific information) • Physical Inventory and Insights Boards • Abstract Boards Inventory and Insights • Natural Resources: Protect, Enhance, Promote • Programs and Events • Park Facilities: Property, Amenities, Infrastructure • People: Culture, Community, & Diversity • Administration: Staff, Operations, Funding, Partnerships

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It comes down to people and their experiences | Together, We Will


Meeting Agenda

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

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Meeting Agenda

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11.0 Chapter Eleven Appendices

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CITY OF BLOOMINGTON PARKS & RECREATION


PUBLIC ENGAGMENT SURVEY Community Interest Survey: Let Your Voice Be Heard Today! The City of Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department would like your input to help determine park and recreation priorities for the next five years. This survey will take 10 minutes or less to complete. We greatly appreciate your time.

Programs and Facilities From the following list of City of Bloomington parks, please select All PARKS that you and members of your household This sectionhave deals with yourthe perception the also available anduse facilities within BPRD parks. used during past year. of Please chooseprograms the four you the most. For any parks that you and members of your household have used, please rate its condition.

From the following list of City of Bloomington parks, please select All PARKS that you and members of your household have used during the past Do you If YES, how would the condition of Which 4 household year. Please also choose the four you use the most. For any parks that youuse and members of your have used, pleaseyou rate rate its condition.

Name of Park

Name of Park

this park? the park? parks do you Which 4 If YES, how would you rate the condition ofGood the park? Excellent use most? NO Poor Fair parks do

Do you use this Yes park?

3rd Street Park (Waldron, Hill & Buskirk)Yes Broadview Park 3rd Street Park (Waldron, Hill & Buskirk) 22% Bryan Park Broadview Park 2.26% Building and Trades Park (2nd Street) 57% Bryan Park Cascades Park Building andLower Trades Park (2nd Street) 10% Crestmont Park Lower Cascades Park 44% Crestmont Park 4% Ferguson Dog Park Ferguson Dog Park Lake Nature Preserve 13% Griffy Griffy Lake Nature 48% Goat Preserve Farm Prairie Goat Farm Prairie 11% Highland Village Park Highland Village Park 5% Latimer Woods Latimer Woods 6% Leonard Nature Park Leonard Springs NatureSprings Park 21% Miller-Showers Park Miller-Showers Park 9% Olcott Park Olcott Park 32% Park Ridge Park 5% Park Ridge Park Park Ridge Park 5% ParkEast Ridge Park East Peoples Park 8% Peoples Park RCA Park (formerly Thomson) 14% RCA Park (formerly Thomson) Rev. Ernest Butler Park (9th Street) 13% Rev. Ernest Butler Park (9th Street) Schmalz Farm Park 9% Schmalz Farm Park Seminary Park 7% Sherwood Oaks Park Park 14% Seminary Southeast Park 8% Sherwood Oaks Park Switchyard Park 52% Southeast Park Winslow Woods Park 17% Switchyard Park None, do not use any parks (skip Q2) 5% Winslow Woods Park None, do not use any parks (skip Q2)

NO 78% 98% 43% 90% 56% 96% 87% 52% 89% 95% 94% 79% 91% 68% 95% 95% 92% 86% 87% 91% 93% 86% 92% 48% 83% 95%

you use most? 8% 0.6% 36% 4% 20% 1% 5% 32% 6% 3% 1% 9% 3% 19% 1% 3% 4% 6% 4% 6% 1% 6% 5% 29% 8%

Poor

Fair

Good

Excellent

Unsure

3% 8% 1% 0% 3% 0% 5% 2% 0% 5% 7% 3% 0% 1% 0% 5% 15% 4% 8% 4% 39% 0% 5% 0% 3%

20% 12% 9% 26% 19% 21% 17% 12% 11% 7% 12% 11% 16% 7% 19% 14% 14% 12% 14% 7% 15% 13% 14% 8% 21%

43% 14% 50% 18% 42% 12% 28% 46% 21% 20% 22% 33% 31% 37% 17% 27% 39% 32% 29% 28% 8% 46% 25% 21% 31%

18% 0% 38% 17% 30% 0% 20% 35% 26% 11% 5% 33% 18% 41% 15% 19% 15% 21% 19% 23% 0% 16% 17% 66% 21%

16% 65% 3% 38% 5% 67% 30% 5% 43% 57% 54% 19% 35% 14% 49% 34% 17% 31% 30% 37% 38% 25% 40% 5% 24%

4%

13%

33%

28%

Have you or other members of your household participated in any recreation programs and services offered by the City of Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department in the past 12 months? If yes, how would you rate the overall quality of the recreation programs and services that you and Please check ALL reasons that prevent you or others member of your household from using the Twin Lakes Rec. Center. members of your household have participated in?

Reason Twin Lakes Recreation CenterParticipation is not used Customer service is poor Yes NO Distance is too far from our residence 32% 68% Facility operating hours are not convenient Fitness equipment does not meet my needs Full program (so could not attend) I am not physically active I did not know that this facility exists Lack of quality programs Program times are not convenient Programs do not fit my needs Registration for group classes is difficult Transportation Use another fitness facility Other

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If YES, how would you rate the quality Check One of the program or service? Poor 4%

Fair 5%

Good 37%

Excellent 48%

City of Bloomington Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan Parks and Recreation Department – 2020 Community Input Survey

Unsure 6%


Please indicate if YOU or members of your HOUSEHOLD have used any of the following recreation facilities listed below in the past year by checking Yes. Please also indicate the 4 you use most. If YOU or members of your HOUSEHOLD have used a facility in the past year, please indicate how important the facility is to your family’s recreational needs.

Name of Facililty

Do you use this facility? Yes

Allison-Jukebox Community Center B-Line Trail Banneker Community Center Bloomington Rail Trail Bryan Park Pool Burkirk-Chumley Theater Cascades Club House Cascades Golf Course Cascades Skate Park Cascades Trail Clear Creek Trail Crestmont Disc Golf Course Community Gardens Frank Southern Ice Arena Jackson Creek Trail Mills Pool Olcott Park fields Shelter houses in City Parks Switchyard Park Bocce Ball Courts Switchyard Park Pavilion Switchyard Park Pickle Ball Courts Switchyard Park Skate Park Switchyard Park Spray Pad Twin Lakes Recreation Center Twin Lakes Sports Park Wapehani Mountain Bike Park Winslow Sports Park

NO

3% 69% 5% 43% 17% 46% 7% 12% 5% 17% 38% 3% 5% 13% 24% 4% 13% 16% 2% 14% 4% 6% 9% 14% 4% 8% 14%

Which do you use most (choose up to 4) 0% 47% 1% 22% 6% 25% 2% 5% 3% 38% 19% 1% 2% 3% 12% 1% 5% 4% 1% 4% 2% 2% 4% 5% 1% 1% 6%

If YOU or members of your HOUSEHOLD have used a facility in the past year, please indicate how important the facility is to your family’s recreational needs. Not Very Important

23% 3% 20% 4% 7% 6% 27% 15% 17% 9% 3% 18% 15% 16% 5% 15% 11% 8% 16% 8% 11% 12% 8% 8% 8% 16% 7% 9%

Somewhat Important

12% 14% 7% 14% 11% 7% 23% 21% 7% 17% 13% 8% 5% 10% 10% 17% 10% 8% 8% 12% 0% 9% 19% 14% 8% 19% 14% 12%

Important

12% 23% 13% 25% 32% 25% 18% 21% 33% 33% 27% 14% 27% 28% 25% 14% 26% 16% 16% 24% 23% 27% 11% 26% 21% 17% 23% 24%

Very Important

8% 58% 24% 54% 35% 57% 13% 36% 16% 28% 53% 12% 24% 28% 46% 20% 35% 22% 22% 36% 32% 28% 42% 35% 33% 26% 42% 40%

Unsure

46% 1% 35% 3% 14% 5% 20% 16% 28% 13% 5% 47% 29% 17% 14% 34% 19% 39% 39% 20% 35% 24% 20% 17% 29% 22% 15%

Please select ALL the ways that you CURRENTLY learn about BPRD programs and services. Also select the ways you prefer to learn about BPRD programs and services. Current Communication Methods Blogs City of Bloomington Website Conversations with Park and Recreation staff Fliers/Posters Friends and neighbors Newspaper advertisements Newspaper articles Parks Department e-mail bulletins Radio Seasonal Program guide Social media (Facebook/Instagram) Television Other ______________________

How do you currently learn of BPRD offerings? 2% 15% 0% 0% 8% 0% 0% 10% 0% 22% 13% 0% 0%

How do you prefer to learn about the offerings? 0% 13% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 20% 0% 0% 0%

Have you or other members of your household participated in any recreation programs and services offered by the City of Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department in the past 12 months? If yes, how would you rate the overall quality of the recreation programs and services that you and members of your household have participated in?

Check One (Yes or No) Yes No No Response

29% 62% 9%

Poor 4%

Fair 5%

Good 37%

Excellent 48%

Unsure 6%

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Please indicate if YOU or members or your HOUSEHOLD use the facility types listed below. Do you use this type How important is it to you to have this facility in Bloomington? of facility Type of Facility Yes

Amenities/Park Features (Outdoor) Community Gardens Greenspace / natural areas Large community parks Off-leash dog park Playground equipment Small neighborhood parks Spray pad Water park Facilities/Centers (Indoor) Aquatics facility (indoor) Community theater Facility rental space (pavilion, smaller spaces) Ice arena Nature center Recreation event space Health and Wellness Features/Facilities Fitness and exercise facilities (indoor) Fitness and exercise stations (outdoor) Running/Walking track (indoor) Walking and biking trails Sports Baseball and softball fields (youth) Basketball courts (outdoor) Basketball courts (indoor) Bocce ball Disc golf Football fields (youth) Futsal Golf course Mountain bike park Pickleball courts Soccer fields (youth) Softball fields (adult) Skateboarding park Sports fields (indoor) Tennis courts (outdoor) Volleyball courts (indoor) Other ________________

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

No

Not Very Important

Somewhat Important

Important

Very Important

Unsure

47 235 261 98 182 227 84 76

16 9 5 15 5 6 12 9

14 6 12 21 20 17 26 21

28 53 64 35 56 62 34 28

33 199 207 72 138 173 54 58

9 7 6 7 4 7 6 8

53 166 95 91 87 83

12 12 10 16 7 11

14 13 15 26 16 8

24 65 53 38 37 40

41 102 49 43 54 50

19 8 10 10 11 11

116 106 109 394

8 19 12 0

10 26 10 16

43 43 33 66

84 50 82 322

14 13 15 6

58 82 39 12 40 11 2 90 58 34 41 21 40 20 97 8

8 8 9 14 13 10 10 12 12 13 4 10 11 8 10 10

8 8 4 8 16 5 1 13 17 6 7 4 11 9 15 4

24 45 27 9 20 9 5 36 23 13 19 16 17 13 36 9

43 45 25 7 21 16 6 56 35 25 41 20 29 17 63 12

12 13 11 14 9 11 22 12 14 15 10 12 12 15 10 14


Health, Wellness, and Inclusion This section deals with your perception of health, wellness, and inclusion within BPRD parks and facilities as well as its programs and events. Which areas of health and wellness do you think Bloomington should prioritize?

Wellness Area

Rank these areas Though there are more than four areas to rank, ensure that at least one area is assigned a 1 (high priority) and at least one area is assigned a 4 (low priority). High

Environmental Financial Intellectual Mental/emotional wellness Physical wellness (fitness) Social/relationships

8% 2% 2% 5% 10% 3%

Second Highest

4% 3% 3% 6% 6% 5%

Third Highest

Lowest

3% 2% 4% 5% 3% 4%

19% 13% 12% 19% 21% 16%

2% 6% 3% 3% 1% 5%

How welcome do you feel using the park amenities, facilities, and programs? Select one answer. Very welcome Somewhat welcome Not welcome I prefer not to answer

67% 28% 3% 3%

Please indicate if YOU or members of your HOUSEHOLD use the programs and services listed below. For each program/service that you use, please rate its importance. Do you use this Please then rank how you would rate the quality of them. program? Type of Program or Service Not Very Somewhat Very Unsure Important Yes No Important

Important

Art and cultural events Community events Community garden plots Concerts Environmental education (groups) Farmers’ Market Gardening classes Gardening education (groups)

387 363 204 371 202 436 189 178

6% 6% 25% 6% 18% 9% 21% 24%

9% 11% 17% 15% 19% 12% 30% 31%

31% 40% 32% 34% 28% 27% 26% 22%

Important

53% 42% 21% 43% 31% 50% 20% 18%

2% 2% 5% 2% 4% 2% 4% 4%

Health and wellness programs (nutrition, fitness, etc.)

228

11%

15%

34%

38%

3%

Movies in the Park Nature programs (guided) for youth/adults Organized softball leagues (adults) Pet programs Preschool programs

263 207 160 187 177

14% 13% 26% 22% 13%

27% 17% 21% 19% 12%

36% 40% 33% 30% 30%

20% 25% 11% 22% 41%

4% 6% 10% 7% 5%

School vacation programs (day camps/break days)

198

11%

9%

34%

42%

5%

Services for people with disabilities Special event permits Sports leagues/programs (adult) Sports leagues/programs (youth) Sports activities that are self-directed (adult) Sports activities that are self-directed (youth) Summer Food Service Program Volunteer activity Other ______________________

189 159 170 194 182 161 175 215 31

8% 21% 20% 16% 14% 17% 22% 12% 32%

10% 11% 21% 7% 12% 14% 8% 7% 0%

29% 34% 28% 35% 39% 37% 20% 32% 0%

51% 19% 26% 39% 30% 25% 42% 46% 16%

3% 14% 5% 4% 5% 6% 8% 3% 52%

From the following list, please check ALL the organizations that you or members of your household have used for indoor and outdoor recreation programs and services during the past year. Organizations Used Boys and Girls Club Buskirk-Chumley Theater Churches City of Bloomington Parks & Recreation Department (BPRD) Indiana University (SRSC, Wildermuth Intramural Center, Woodlawn Field, etc.) John Waldron Arts Center Karst Farm and other county parks Other health/fitness center School facilities (MCCSC or RBB) Travel sports teams/clubs YMCA (Northwest or Southeast) None Other ______________________

Used during the past year (Check all 35 284 179

Which TWO of the organizations do you and members of your household use THE MOST for indoor and outdoor recreation programs and services? 11 132 116

277

167

145

68

175 201 106 125 35 196 25 13

59 74 37 54 16 108 4 9

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241


Which FOUR do you use most and which four do you think contribute most to your health? Please rank how you would rate the quality of them. Which 4 do you Which 4 think Quality of Program or Service Type of Program or Service do you contribute use most? most to your Poor Fair Excellent Unsure health? Art and cultural events 247 128 1% 14% 80% 5% Community events 173 81 2% 26% 67% 5% Community garden plots 21 19 19% 19% 44% 19% Concerts 170 67 2% 23% 71% 4% Environmental education (groups) 19 9 26% 23% 16% 35% Farmers’ Market 270 118 10% 29% 57% 4% Gardening classes 7 9 25% 20% 15% 40% Gardening education (groups) 5 3 23% 23% 18% 36% Health and wellness programs (nutrition, fitness, etc.)

77

68

4%

31%

57%

8%

Movies in the Park Nature programs (guided) for youth/adults Organized softball leagues (adults) Pet programs Preschool programs

46 27 14 25 17

15 19 8 11 10

0% 11% 19% 9% 17%

50% 26% 27% 38% 13%

36% 32% 23% 28% 46%

14% 32% 31% 25% 25%

School vacation programs (day camps/break days)

19

7

9%

13%

53%

25%

Services for people with disabilities Special event permits Sports leagues/programs (adult) Sports leagues/programs (youth) Sports activities that are self-directed (adult) Sports activities that are self-directed (youth) Summer Food Service Program Volunteer activity

19 7 23 47 62 17 11 65

16 5 12 21 43 8 6 40

0% 17% 13% 10% 6% 0% 20% 0%

25% 13% 28% 18% 9% 15% 0% 31%

30% 21% 31% 56% 68% 42% 28% 55%

45% 50% 28% 15% 17% 42% 52% 14%

The following are some of the outcomes that you and your household may receive from parks, trails, recreation facilities, programs, and services. For each potential outcome, please indicate the level of priority you think it should be assigned. Highest High Low Lowest Do Not Know Outcomes Priority Priority Priority Priority Enhance community appearance 97 250 63 9 14 Foster a sense of belonging through equity-driven park 92 195 76 28 28 planning Help attract new residents and businesses 71 179 119 40 14 Help reduce crime 114 182 75 27 30 Improve diet and nutrition 78 170 93 37 28 Improve mental health and reduce stress 192 190 53 9 11 Improve physical health and fitness 254 165 29 5 8 Improve social connections 96 182 98 27 19 Increase opportunities for people of different cultures to 121 173 82 33 25 interact Increase property values in surrounding area 65 149 125 58 24 Make Bloomington a more desirable place to live 180 175 66 22 8 Make Bloomington’s natural assets more sustainable 190 158 44 17 15 and resilient. Preserve open space and the environment 239 160 33 11 7 Promote and provide opportunities for artists (visual, 81 179 103 29 20 performance, and so on) Promote tourism to the City 49 138 152 56 17 Protect historical attributes of the City 71 190 112 26 14 Provide access to the outdoors and nature 248 159 21 8 9 Provide educational opportunities through programming Strengthen sense of community Other _____________________

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

83

194

97

21

14

126 6

181 0

81 0

18 0

13 25

Please indicate which of the following things prevent you or members of your household from using park and recreation services. Reasons Inadequate or poorly maintained facilities

Check all that apply. 7.3%

My neighborhood does not have a park, recreation facility, or trail within a 10-minute walk

12.6%

Not enough money Not enough time Personal health problem

7.1% 22.8% 4.8%

Personal safety concern – the park or trail is not safe

16.5%

Personal safety concern – the walk to the park or trail is not safe due to traffic or roadways

10.3%

Programs that the Department offers do not interest me

11.6%

The Department’s programs, parks, or facilities are not accessible to people with disabilities Other

1.8% 5.2%


Funding, Value, and Priorities This section pertains to funding for the parks, what value you find in the park’s programs and facilities, and what your priorities are moving forward. If it were up to you, how would YOU allocate $100 in taxes across these competing priorities? Priorities

Dollar value of the total $100 (Total must add up to $100)

Acquiring new parkland and open space

$20.00

Constructing new parks and facilities to meet community needs

$14.76

Constructing new walking and biking trails

$23.39

Continuing to provide existing community events and recreation programs

$15.69

Continuing to provide existing sports programs and events Maintaining/renovating existing facilities (community centers, ice arena, sports fields, pools, golf course, etc.) Maintaining/renovating existing neighborhood parks (playgrounds, shelters, features, etc.)

$13.60 $19.57 $21.95

Other ______________________________ Thinking about how public money has been spent on recreation parks and facilities in the past 5-10 years, which of the following statements is most accurate? Check One My neighborhood often gets its fair share 18% My neighborhood almost always gets its fair share 14% My neighborhood seldom gets its fair share 13% My neighborhood never gets its fair share 10% Do Not Know / Not Sure 41% Other ____________________________ 5% Please rate your satisfaction with the overall value your household receives from the BPRD. Check Overall Satisfaction Level One Very Dissatisfied 2% Dissatisfied 7% Satisfied 49% Very Satisfied 34% No Opinion 8%

How welcome do you feel using the park amenities, facilities, and programs? Check One Very welcome 67% Somewhat welcome 28% Not welcome 3% I prefer not to answer 3% Please rank the three most important issues the BPRD must address with its five-year master plan. Most important Important Issues issues 22% Acquire land/open space 30% Arts, Festivals and Cultural Events 2% Build facilities 9% Build parks 27% Build trails 45% Connect trails 22% Continue current programs 19% Equity and inclusion 37% Focus on maintenance 12% Food security 34% Reduce vandalism/Address safety 20% Sustainability and climate change 19% Upgrade facilities 3% Other __________________________

TROYER GROUP

243


Please Tell Us About Yourself This section helps us understand your perspective in greater detail. All responses are anonymous. Counting yourself, how many people in your house are: Number of people in household

Number of People 1 this age

Under Age 5 Ages 5-9 Ages 10-14 Ages 15-19 Ages 20-24 Ages 25-34 Ages 35-44 Ages 45-54 Ages 55-64 Ages 65-74 Ages 75+

2 this age

40 48 38 32 22 44 43 43 45 58 30

15 20 15 14 6 32 55 31 28 56 20

What is YOUR age?

3 this age 4 this age 2 3 1 5 5 1 0 0 0 0 1

(Check One)

5+ this age 1 0 0 2 2 1 1 1 0 0 0

1 0 0 0 3 0 0 1 0 0 0

1% 2% 9% 17% 11% 23% 30% 8%

11.7% 27.7% 60.5%

Where do you live? How long have you lived there? Indicate one of the following: Check All That Less than More than 1-5 years 6-10 years 11-15 years Apply 1 year 16 years I live in the City I live in the County I live outside the County I am a Student at Indiana University

73% 24% 0% 2%

Would you rate your overall health? Health Rating

What is your race/ethnicity? Race / Ethnicity American Indian and Alaskan Native Asian Black or African American Hispanic or Latino Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander Two or more races White (not Hispanic or Latino) Prefer not to answer Other ___________________ What is your gender identity? Income Level Female Male Non-binary Prefer not to answer

244

1% 10% 48% 42%

Check One

18% 13% 0% 31%

12% 16% 100% 0%

46% 49% 0% 0%

1-7 days

8-15 days 16-21 days

21-30 days

31+ days

What is your household income? Income Level 1% 3% 2% 2% 0% 2% 78% 11% 1%

Check One

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

20% 18% 0% 69%

If you rate your health Poor, please indicate for how long you have been in poor health. Select 1.

Check One

Poor Fair Good Excellent

3% 4% 0% 0%

49% 43% 1% 7%

Under $25,000 $25,000-$49,999 $50,000-$74,999 $75,000-$99,999 $100,000 or more Prefer not to answer

3

Check One

4% 15% 14% 16% 27% 24%


Survey Reminder Bloomington Parks and Recreation

5-year Master Plan Community Survey P.O. Box 848 Bloomington, IN. 47402

WE STILL NEED YOUR HELP! Your input will directly shape the goals and priorities of Bloomington Parks and Recreation for the next five years.

REMINDER:

Please take a moment to scan the below QR code with your smartphone camera, or enter the website address directly into your web browser.

You were randomly selected to help determine the future of Bloomington’s City parks! If you have already filled out the online survey, THANK YOU! We appreciate your input! If you have not filled out the online survey, please follow the instructions on the reverse side to take the survey. Your feedback will help shape the future of Bloomington Parks!

The survey is open through SEPTEMBER 18, 2020. TAKE THIS SURVEY IN ENGLISH

RESPONDA ESTA ENCUESTA EN ESPAÑOL

LEND YOUR VOICE!

You have been randomly selected to offer your insights on how the parks can improve. This survey should take less than 10 minutes.

https://tinyurl.com/y62pdllo

https://tinyurl.com/y6m6tdt7

Thank you for your time and participation!

TROYER GROUP

245


STAKEHOLDER COMMENTS Parks Operations Division Tuesday, August 25th, 1:00pm – 2:00pm • Existing mission statement is not seen frequently, group thinks it is trying to say a lot, there is something to be said about providing essential services, sustainability should be included, push ourselves, align with what we do, inclusion of diversity help to make it a reality. Utilize inclusive language, value sustainability and address climate change • We can always improve our cultural and natural protections and awareness, need more efforts on cultural preservation and protections (rose Hill cemetery needs a costly monument restoration) • Steve addresses increased rainfall events and sedimentary into Griffy Lake, fragmented natural community, long term maintenance is an issue • Erin asked if the programing was reflective of other cultures • More outreach is needed to communicated state of natural and cultural resources • Provide information in multiple languages – Rebecca. Dedicate a department to nature resources • Protect water ways, sustainability action plan • In favor of more funding for natural resources • Biggest challenges include dealing with the homeless populations and drug related issues, vandalism/graffiti, getting more support for the police to handle these issues, transient members put staff at risk, invasive species are a big issue, over use of parks spaces “love to death”, addressing the magnitude of COVID increased, • Anti-racist: reach out for diversity in use (hiring), plan inclusive events i.e. bring in different cultures, Banneker is anti-racist, it should be further emulated. Address community as family, increase of more diversity within community groups. • Hiring practices: targeted advertising, targeted programming for specific groups, recognition of indigenous land and stewardship of land Recreation/Sports/Administration Tuesday, August 25th, 2:30pm – 3:30pm • Mission only addresses physical amenities, 246

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

• • •

should further address services and programs. How are we addressing reaching out and physical assets post COVID, avoid wordy and long mission, address equality and inclusion Capacity improvements, resources are a barrier, band aid solutions Go for smaller grants, collective/partnership purchasing for things like chairs, pop-up tents, carts Long term planning for facilities Money and time is a barrier, some staff feel over loaded to manage How to stay relevant (so many competitors) adaptions to meet future needs and wants to cultivate trust, ability to adapt and be flexible The effects of parks dealing with homelessness/ litter/biohazards, more people experiencing homelessness, in addressing this (damage control) more is needed Vandalism Grow target audience (is vandalism result of not connecting?) Reaching targeted audience inclusive cultures Combined issue under city government(politics & racism) Internal communication issues (covid) solid message to function better, not guessing at what we’re enforcing Standard training (not piecing together as we go along ) not taking so long to orient Policies and procedures/ questions from public but don’t always form policies, can look up municipal code Not “anti-racist” can be, not emphasizing (engaging/listening) we already know what the public wants, looking for people to reinforce) building relationship not good enough to say we only hire who applies, obtain a diverse pool of applicants Can do more, add metrics and active items to prove, not just have policies, can’t just be one training a year Beyond people, reflecting in events, eliminate or just understand all barrier, persist in providing for overlooked community Transportation is one of the biggest barriers to inclusivity


• Improve communication (top down priority) • Most important things: maintenance backlog always comes up, older equipment, Winslow Woods, may not catch everything, Losing operation division, training over next 5 years, building on sustainability, resilience, purchasing, energy, lacking education and support system, improve image, overall farmers market creates doubts but parks department may be unfairly attacked, climate change Parks Ambassadors/Adopts an Acre and Adopts A Stream Volunteers Monday, August 31st, 4:00pm – 4:00pm

• Partnership with Center Stone organization to help provide homelessness services • Switchyard park is well done but homelessness is still an issue • Not a need for additional parks, focus needs to be on updating and upgrading existing parks and facilities • Focus on connecting the existing parks system, continue trail development • A good amount of programing and events are offered, the guidebook is jam packed, need more programing and events that are inclusive towards specific groups • Implicit bias training, listening to underrepresented and underserved communities • Address tensions between people and the police department • Goals include adding connectivity, grants and food security funding, good cooperative impact, partnerships, enhance communications and marketing to reach more people

• What’s the difference between the mission and vision? Vision is more inspirational • Not doing enough to protect water resources, environment, and habitat- more environmental education • Need to focus on funding cleanup for invasive and focus on planting for pollinators, we have a ton of resources but are they being used Business Community/Community Organizations efficiently Tuesday, September 1st, 1:00pm – 2:00pm • Industrial pollution • Mission statement is good • Budget is the biggest issue when it comes • Provide more access, room for development to protecting and sustaining environmental when it comes to protecting natural and cultural resources resources • Farmers market and city need to take a stronger • Steps to improve stewardship come down to and quicker response for POC and anti-racist funding issues • A lot of eggs in one basket, need to diversify the • Need to listen to people’s stories and explore economy in order to maintain growth diversity. How does the city attract people? • Economic turmoil and ability to fundraise are Getting children to use the facilities are key. future challenges • Creating safe spaces and letting people know • Over use of parks, people are desperate to get they are a priority out, how do we improve as well as maintain Bloomington Parks Foundation safety Tuesday, September 1st, 11:00am – 12:00pm • Working and adapting to the new norms of community and society • Comfortable with current mission • Partner with schools to meet the growing needs • Trails have become more important, continue of working families building upon these • Diversify and spread out park usage intensity • Not enough maintenance funding • Transportation access is a huge concern • Not a fan of lot of vegetation in the downtown • Bringing programs to underserved communities area, impedes sight lines, requires a lot of and people, meeting people where they are at maintenance, safety concerns • Partnerships with school and boys/girls club, • Maintenance is a high concern for current and Banaker, Cresmont, partnering with programs future potential problems and organizations caterings to people with • Homelessness is a major challenge, city should disabilities offer lots of services, seminary park is overrun • Maintenance and access, there is not a need to with homelessness due to proximity to services TROYER GROUP

247


add but to maintain existing Parks Board (Kathleen Mills & Israel Herrera) • Anti-racist: meeting people where they Tuesday, September 1st, 4:00pm – 5:00pm are, actively engaging, statement about • Goals include public health, sustainability, data inclusiveness, offer more cultural celebration, collection, public engagement, events and youth partnerships activities, human services, addressing social • Not top down economic factors and barriers, accessibility and • Statements are one thing and can be empty equity, a place for community to come together words, need accountability and action in order post COVID to build redemption and trust • Learning how important open space is, views on • Improve overall communication which parks are used • Goals include inclusivity of end users/broadening • Mission creep is a concern, what does parks & end users, serving people where they are, reflect rec do? community as a whole • Homelessness health, invasive species, food • Goals 2& 5 are not applicable insecurity are all issues • Multigenerational, affordable Park Board (Les Coyne & Ellen Rodkey) • Providing new amenities such as wifi in parks Tuesday, September 1st, 2:30pm – 3:30pm and public spaces to keep up with the demands • Address social equity issues within mission and needs of users statement, providing a platform for social work • Budgeting is a major challenge, homelessness • Is social work the job of the parks department? causes stress on parks, need training to manage What other department should this fall on? • Responding to use trends, such as less baseball Potential for partnerships to address social use and increased soccer use, be adaptable and equity issues continuously evaluating and changing. • Mission should use more specific language • People are saying the town’s and parks response • Mission statement need to have inclusive to farmers market incident is not enough, not language, reflect impacts of the pandemic, and necessarily our job to sensor but appears to be look through a public heath lens not affirmative enough of a stance • Reflect the economic impact of parks and parks • Need to address level of inequality (subsidizing) programs • Parks need to be equitable in spread of amenities • Not adding more but maintaining • Everyone should live within a mile of a park, • Biggest challenges include economic ability to equal access and opportunity for activities, keep level of activities and programs, being more expand programs to outside of “main” or efficient with technology, implications of social “premier” parks issues (racism/inclusion/access) homelessness • Sustainability, addressing climate change and more economic fall out, addressing mitigation in the face of covid homelessness, addiction, psychological issues • Alternative energy uses (solar panels) and affordable housing • Anti-racism: take inventory of how we Community Partners and User Groups intersect on racial issues through every aspect Wednesday, September 2nd, 11:00am – 12:00pm (programming/hiring), demonstrate that the • Good mission statement, parks and rec is high community is dedicated to better equity, asking quality. Mission is being met currently, but no deeper questions to address systemic racism, one knows if it will fit in 5 years. What is the set an example within hiring at BRPD, and go growth plan if any out of way to get at major social problems, • Very inclusive department but has room for partnership with those fighting racial disparity, growth. accountable HR departments • Looking at virtual programing, provide access • Goals include anti-racism efforts, trail continue to all, room for development, to be a priority, connectivity and equitable • Funding opportunities, careful planning is transportation, hospital site greenways, needed, diversify economy accessibility, sustainability, better utilization of • Potentially overuse is seen as a future issue, resources splash pad at switchyard park is too crowded, 248

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


capacity concerns and funding concerns. • Should the farmers market be included in the Exhaustion of facilities park department narrative • Parks department can’t do it all, but partnerships • The term recreation leaves out subset of will increase capacity even with fewer resources, activities because of the way “recreation” is diversify perceived, mission should address people • Partner with school to help meet the needs coming together from different backgrounds that schools can’t meet, before and after school and serving new people but not under umbrella programs, children with disabilities programs • Maximize all available resources • Partnering with lower income areas and make • No cultural resources are being protected programs more accessible, • Direct relay of information is lacking, people need • Transportation issues are a huge concern for better communication from parks department, communities for availability for all are we using resources and communication • Look for potential for partnerships and amenities tactics effectively in transportation and access, Transportation • BPR has a culture challenges, for so long needs to be a focus everything has been focused on facilities and • Bring programs to the community – meet dollars, not people and experiences. Department people where they are at needs accountability • Lack of parks presence in some area such as • Goals for the next 5 years include creating more Crestmont, it’s maintained but not active like partnerships, (Hoosier hills food bank, farm other parks areas to family fund) corporations and partnerships • Farmers market need to be address by (Banneker) will be crucial department and Bloomington as a whole • Anti-racist, need specific programing for • Anti-racism approach needs to reach out to underserved groups include diverse leaders and partnerships. • Rev Butler park and other parks in minority • Offer programs that tie into different culture areas are underserved and neglected elements and celebrations. Not an appropriation• Restrooms and shelter space should be provided create partnerships with a diversity of leaders. and open to homeless community Form partnerships with diverse groups to give • Department and city need to not be afraid to them a voice. Meeting people where they are at, condemn racist actions, they need to take a let people have advocacy and ownership. bring stronger stance people in, not being a top down proclamation. • Minorities, POC, indigenous people need to be • Understand it cannot all be on social media, front and center of initiatives and programming statements are one thing, action is another. • Staffing should reflect the community • Communication need to be addressed actively • Extensive and adequate training for government and tangibly, follow through on statements, departments change the behavior is most affective. Mistrust Advisory Team needs to be rebuilt with the community Thursday, September 3rd, 11:00am – 12:00pm • Add inclusivity to goals • The community has done more with health and • Expanding the trails is not as important, change wellness. Should be addressed in the mission goal 2 and 5 • Address the availability of services • Make goals revolve around maintaining and • Add equitable language to mission increasing users, not necessarily expanding on • Parks department coverage is too broad and is facilities expected of too much Advisory Councils (Farmer’s Market, Banneker • Natural resources are being well protected, Community Center) reasonably good job. Wednesday, September 2nd, 4:00pm – 5:00pm • There needs to be a set standard for parks • The mission is broad, but needs to define what department to follow, and every year during “well being”, the “who” is not clear in the mission the annual retreat do a review of standards and statement and is problematic because of people reassess, allow for regular changes within the who are underserved. parks mission, values, and goals. TROYER GROUP

249


• Develop a list of maintenance projects • Discuss more improvement opportunities on an annual basis • Homelessness is a huge challenge and takes a lot of resources • More clearly stated standards that are agreed on and actual carried out • Seminary park and Peoples park - people avoid these parks and find them to be “unsafe” areas, mostly due to homeless population • Systematically decided to invite minority groups into employment and volunteer opportunities • Include diversity on the planning event end, not just on the invitation to events end. • Change the way things are planned, study what will attract a diverse population • Don’t just program for parks, program for people and the community • Programming near churches, including churches that attract very diverse populations Advisory Councils (Environmental Resources Advisory Council, Tree Committee, Golf Committee) Thursday, September 3rd, 1:00pm – 2:00pm • Parks are getting so much more use since pandemic • Incorporate some language within the mission statement and overall parks document around equity and ensure that the statement reflects that all people have equal access to parks and programs • address sustainability and environmental education for future generations • invasive plants are taking parks over, parks is trying but job for education is too big. more resources are necessary. • more resources necessary to maintain natural areas, • water resources: water quality and sustainable use of water continue dedicating resources to those efforts • Improving the free flowing nature of the parks, less impediment my man-made structures • protect habitats, Bryan park has nice greenbelt that should be further emulated • Bloomington does well to incorporate arts in public spaces, more marketing could help spread awareness and stewardship of cultural and environmental educational resources • Marketing for education and awareness • More community groups are trying to utilize the 250

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

• • •

• • • •

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• •

outdoor spaces since community buildings are closed off, more of a need for parks to take on an event hosting role More space availability is an increasing issue in the present and future Hospital site development is a contentious issue, homelessness is a major issue in family park deterrence Increased use is a foreseen issue, limited availability due to increased human traffic, the effects of that on the environment. Parking overuse Partner with resources for homeless populations, center stone partnerships, partnerships with health care providers, direct connection between parks and public health Smart commuting week or challenge, encourage sustainability and health. promote the parks, trails and health and wellness Pickle ball is extremely popular, continue to provide more amenities Continue trail development and provide more connectivity between city and county trails See more parks programming to social distance - yoga in the park, thai chi in the park, bird watching groups and walks, etc. (provide more programs that encourage social distancing) Partnerships^^ How to keep parks active all the time and year-round invasive species control and programs for environmental and resource management and education Make sure we are looking at all parks and not paying attention to some parks and not others Looking at programs and making sure all cultures needs are being met and represented Are programs and events geared towards particularly white activities?? More programming specific to minority groups Low income housing options should be adequately planned around parks, providing accessibility and transportation. Public transportation, all around accessibility and connectivity How is public safety managed within parks? Parks department or police department? Which should it be? Police instill a fear in community populations. Access who manages park safety Farmers market needed to take a more prominent stance against anti-racism Having transparency and keeping the


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community up to date Staffing, needs to reflect community diversity Most important things: equity and sustainable use, educational programing geared for school aged kids, trails and preservation, reduction of invasive species and natural land protect. (been doing well but keep going), greenspace, improvement of passive recreation Focus on maintaining and improving, not building more Take out goal 6, it is implied by the process. Add a potential goal to talk about providing safe and welcoming spaces for all community members that provides equitable access Connectivity is still very important, falls under the umbrella of sustainability Dedicating people to species management Energy and ecological awareness, address native and invasive plants and management Meeting needs of the entire community, having equitable and fair access no matter who the community members are or where they live Addressing pandemic and social distance and social awareness within the goals

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IMAGE DATABASE Chapter 1 Intro Picture Pg. 6,7 – 2017 Annual Report BPRD

com/edwin-fulwiders-early-1900s-boyhoodbloomington-memoir/

Paula McDevitt National Gold Medal Award Pg. 24 https://bloomington.in.gov/news/2018/09/25/3702

“Art of work” - https://indianapublicmedia.org/arts/

Park Staff Photo Pg. 25– 2019 Annual Report BPRD Pg. 26 Photo – 2019-2020 Program Guide BPRD John Hamilton headshot Pg. 42 – Bloomington.in.gov Background image pg. 42 - https://www. bloomingtonrevealed.com/ Pool jump pg. 52 - https://benweller.photoshelter.com/ image/I0000CAs9dmuNw6Q Park aerials pg. 54-106 – Google Maps Clear creek trail pg. 108 - https://www.visitbloomington. com/listing/clear-creek-trail/130/ New switchyard park accessibility pg. 144,145 https://www.magbloom.com/2020/02/new-switchyardpark-its-large-has-lots-of-stuff-its-eco-friendly/ Rev. Ernest D. Butler Park pg. 146 – Google map images, courtesy of “RayStriker” Social Distancing pg. 148 - https://www.wglt.org/post/ coronavirus-blog-41620-trail-signs-encourage-socialdistancing#stream/0 Bloomington “Black Lives Matter” pg. 150 - https:// indianapublicmedia.org/news/city-of-bloomington-saysvandalized-peoples-park-mural-is-due-for-a-refresh-thissummer.php Chapter 9 Intro Bloomington pg. 154 - https://www. dangtravelers.com/things-to-do-in-bloomington-in/ Lower Cascades Park tables/benches pg. 164 - https:// www.pinterest.com/pin/496733033871921282/ Chapter 12 Intro pg. 176 - https://issuu.com/ bloomingtonparks/docs/tree_care_manual_4th_ edition_0117 Basketball photo pg. 178 - https://www.idsnews.com/ article/2020/02/bloomington-neighborhood-grantsprovide-funding-for-dream-projects Switchyard aerial graphic - https://www.hoosiertimes. com/herald_times_online/news/local/ceremony-marksnext-step-in-switchyard-park-project/article_46471713c087-58d2-966e-cf61ce66c4fb.html History photo - https://www.limestonepostmagazine.

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Farmers market - https://www.visitbloomington.com/ things-to-do/downtown/farmers-market/ Bloomington Transit - https://www.hoosiertimes. com/study-recommends-more-direct-routes-morefrequent-service-to-improve-bloomington-transit/ article_3b674dc0-bacf-5226-8497-a7f0e8cc0fa3.html Hoosier National Forest - https://www. fs.usda.gov/detail/hoosier/learning/parentsteacher/?cid=STELPRDB5344310 I-69 - https://www.dronegenuity.com/projects/i69evansville-bloomington/ Artsroad 46 - https://www.visitbloomington.com/ artsroad/ Basketball hoop_building trades park - https:// www.idsnews.com/article/2020/02/bloomingtonneighborhood-grants-provide-funding-for-dreamprojects Lotus Festival - https://www.magbloom.com/2020/09/ lotus-is-coming-up-get-the-virtual-lineup/ GarlicFest - http://www.explorethis.city/2014/09/ bloomington-in-garlicfest-and-community.html Freezefest - https://www.visitbloomington.com/ freezefest/ Hilly Hundred - https://www.bgindy.com/about/hillyhundred-weekend-resource-page-pg1290.htm Latimer Woods - http://anthonymarletta.blogspot. com/2012/12/latimer-woods-restoration.html Level of Service - https://bloomingtonbucketlist. wordpress.com/tag/parks/ Gold Medal Award, Goal #4 - https://www.idsnews. com/article/2018/09/bloomington-parks-and-recreationdepartment-voted-best-in-us Traffic Control Measure, Action Plan page - https:// www.wglt.org/post/bloomington-consider-design-plansnew-o-neil-aquatic-center#stream/0 Meeting the 2020 Moment pg. 180-181 - https://www. azuremagazine.com/article/park-politics-inequality-andpublic-space-during-covid-19/


REFERENCED PLANS

Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department

MASTER PLAN 2016-2020

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a trust for public land special report

Parks and the pandemic

parks and the pandemic

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan

1


2017 City park facts

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2010-2012, 2015-219 ANNUAL REPORTS CITY OF BLOOMINGTON PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT

2010 Annual Report

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

2011 Annual Report

KaBOOM! playground design day with The Project School, April 20, 2011.

Bloomington Youth Basketball image by Kirkwood Photo Lab. Used with permission.

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

2015 Annual Report

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

2012 Annual Report

Messy Mania at Rev. Ernest D. Butler Park, July 2012.

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

2016 Annual Report

2017 Annual Report

Olcott Park, August 2015

Leonard Springs Nature Days, April 2016

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Messy Mania at Bryan Park, July 2017

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

City of Bloomington Parks and reCreation dePartment

2018 Annual Report

2019 Annual Report

Touch A Truck at Winslow Sports Complex, June 2018

Switchyard Park Grand Opening, November 2019


2019 OUTDOOR PARTICIPATION REPORT

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Survey Greeting Letter

Agosto 10, 2020 El Departamento de Parques y Recreación de Bloomington está iniciando un nuevo proceso de planificación maestra de cinco años este mes. Nuestro departamento tiene una larga historia de utilización del proceso de planificación maestra para establecer prioridades en el cumplimiento de las necesidades de nuestra comunidad para parques, recreación y espacios abiertos. Nuestro plan maestro actual, para los años 2016-2020, fue adoptado en 2015. Este plan maestro identificó algunos problemas clave en nuestra comunidad, incluido el mantenimiento y la provisión de parques, senderos e instalaciones seguros. Esto resultó en la reautorización de un bono de Parks de obligación general para apoyar $ 7 millones en proyectos de mejora de capital. El plan también identificó la necesidad de expandir el sistema de senderos, lo que resultó en la dedicación de fondos del Bicentennial Bond para Griffy Loop Trail, ahora en la fase de diseño. Parques y Recreación de Bloomington valora las opiniones de nuestra comunidad. Reconocemos la importancia de la participación de los residentes en el desarrollo de las principales prioridades para nuestro Departamento. Como tal, el primer paso en el proceso del plan maestro es realizar una encuesta comunitaria para obtener más información sobre qué parques, instalaciones recreativas, programas y servicios que utiliza, desea y necesita en Bloomington. Esta encuesta tomará aproximadamente 10 minutos para completar. Cada pregunta es importante. El tiempo que invierta en completar esta encuesta nos ayudará a adoptar un enfoque dirigido por los residentes para tomar decisiones, decisiones que esperamos afecten positivamente su vida y la vida de sus amigos y familiares. ¡Esperamos sus comentarios y mejorar la calidad de vida en nuestra comunidad!

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Sinceramente,

Sinceramente,

Sinceramente,

Paula McDevitt Administradora

John Hamilton Alcalde

Kathleen Mills Presidenta de la Junta de Parques

Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


STAKEHOLDER MEETINGS Meeting Agenda Bloomington Parks 5 Year Master Plan Steering Committee Kick-Off Meeting

July 2020

AGENDA: 1. Overview of the Parks Master Plan process 2. Role of the Steering Committee • Introduction to the role of the Steering Committee and expectations for involvement • Summary from each person about their involvement with the parks and the group they represent • Goals you wish to achieve from the master plan 3. Project Schedule • Inventory/Analysis: July - August • Engagement and online survey: July - August i. External Stakeholder Meetings: Park Board Retreat, Friends of BPMD Meeting ii. Internal Stakeholder Meetings: Programming Staff and Maintenance Staff iii. Public engagement meeting • Park Board and Steering Committee meetings to review information • Strategies and action plan development: September – November • Development of draft master plan: September – November i. Steering Committee meeting ii. Park Board Retreat • Submit final draft plan to IDNR: December i. Public review and comment period ii. Final plan updates iii. Park Board plan adoption & final submittal to IDNR 4. Requirements for the Master Plan • Park Board and Parks Department summary • Natural and landscape features • Man-made, historical, and cultural features July 28, 2020 • Social and economic factors • Supply analysis • Public engagement • Accessibility review and self-evaluation • Needs analysis • Park location and facility maps • Priorities and action plan schedule It comes down to people and their experiences | Together, We Will

550 Union St. | Mishawaka, IN 46544 | p 574.259.9976 | www.troyergroup.com

5. Bloomington Parks Discussion • Review Mission, Service area, Park facilities • Goals from the previous five years and overview of progress made • Potential goals for the next five years • Opportunities • Resources • Review Public Engagement Survey 6. Closing discussion and next steps • Miro: https://miro.com/app/board/o9J_kr0NXko=/

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Meeting Agenda Bloomington Parks 5 Year Master Plan Stakeholder Meetings

September 2020

AGENDA: 1. Overview of the Master Plan (There will be a short presentation at 4:05pm and again at 5:05pm EST) 2. Exercise One: Please take a moment to comment on the following questions • Does the existing mission meet current or future needs? If not, how should it be updated? • Are the most important natural and cultural resources being adequately protected? What steps should be taken to continue and improve stewardship? • What is the biggest challenge you see with the parks currently? What about in the future? • How can we better leverage partnerships? • Are there any new amenities, programs, or events would you like to see added in the next five years? • Are there any amenities, programs, or events that you think BPRD should change or discontinue considering available resources (staff, funding, equipment, etc.)? • How can the BPRD be “anti-racist”? • What is the most important thing that could be improved in parks over the next five years? • What major goals do you think BPRD should have over the next five years? 3. Exercise Two: Please take a moment to leave a comment on each of the boards (type “c” and place a comment on a specific location or place anywhere for non-specific information) • Physical Inventory and Insights Boards • Abstract Boards Inventory and Insights • Natural Resources: Protect, Enhance, Promote • Programs and Events • Park Facilities: Property, Amenities, Infrastructure • People: Culture, Community, & Diversity • Administration: Staff, Operations, Funding, Partnerships

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It comes down to people and their experiences | Together, We Will


Meeting Agenda

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Meeting Agenda

o o o o o o o o

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Bloomington Parks Comprehensive Master Plan


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City of Bloomington, Indiana Parks and Recreation Department Master Plan, 2021-25  

Master Plan that guides Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department programs and priorities for the years 2021 through 2025.

City of Bloomington, Indiana Parks and Recreation Department Master Plan, 2021-25  

Master Plan that guides Bloomington Parks and Recreation Department programs and priorities for the years 2021 through 2025.

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