Slow Flowers Journal Summer 2023: BOTANICAL COUTURE

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AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEK

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SUMMER 2023

BOTANICAL COUTURE



EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Debra Prinzing CREATIVE DIRECTOR Robin Avni COPY EDITOR Judith H. Dern CONTRIBUTORS April Lemly, Blair Roberts Lynn, and Deborah Mittelman PHOTOGRAPHERS A Natural Portrayal Photography, Jill Bader, Niesha Blancas, Cecily Gubitosi, Madeline Isabella, Missy Palacol, Haley Richter, Kirsten Smith, Crystal Whiteaker, Britt Willoughby Dyer ON THE COVER As a returning American Flowers Week botanical couture designer, Jennifer Reed of Jennifer Designs Events imagined a model dressed in all white florals -- locally-grown peonies and sweet peas -- and posed her as a timeless female statue, transporting us to a neoclassical garden of the 1920s. JENNIFER DESIGNS EVENTS jenniferdesignsevents.com @jenniferdesignsevents COVER PHOTOGRAPHER Haley Richter Photo haleyrichterphoto.com @haleyrichterphoto

dive into summer. BLOOM Imprint and Slow Flowers Society have lots to celebrate, including American Flowers Week (June 28 to July 4), our eighth annual promotion. At its heart is our botanical couture collection and we love showcasing Slow Flowers' floral artists, farmer florists, and growers as they interpret and express seasons, places, and stories through wearable floral fashions. Floral design, art, and craft come together in two stories featuring our members. Read about Debby Mittelman's Fleurmania, a gathering that elevated Arizona-grown flowers and sparked new interest across the state. BAM in Bloom recently showcased local and U.S.-grown botanicals at the Bellevue Art Museum, one of the Pacific Northwest's important cultural institutions, with nine Slow Flowers members interpreting works of art through flowers. Congratulations to Carlee Donnelly of Goldenrod Floral Design for

© 2023 by SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL and BLOOM Imprint. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written permission of the publisher.

winning the Viewer's Choice Award! Speaking of awards, BLOOM Imprint and Slow Flowers have received industry recognition for recent projects. Garden Communicators International awarded us the 2023 Silver Laurels Medal in three categories. We were honored for our books "Black Flora" and "Growing Wonder," plus the Fall 2022 issue of "Slow Flowers Journal." These projects are now moving into the Gold Award round to be announced in August. Enjoy the season!

Debra + Robin SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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CONTRIBUTORS

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summer. APRIL LEMLY. An artist, illustrator, and former flower farmer based in Los Angeles, California, April earned an MFA in graphic design in 2008 from the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. Her work encompasses branding, print design, painting, and drawing. Her playful illustration techniques depict female characters, animals, and plants, all included in the 2023 American Flowers Week branding. aprillemly.com

BLAIR ROBERTS LYNN. Blair is a Maryland-based floral designer whose business Sweet Blossoms LLC, focuses on green and sustainable practices. She places a high priority on ordering flowers from domestic farms and works to cultivate relationships with as many local farmers as possible. She composts all organic waste and recycles at least 75 percent of all materials used in her studio. All Sweet Blossom designs are foam free. Blair has been featured in Slow Flowers Journal, Washingtonian Magazine, and Florist’s Review. sweetblossomsllc.com.

DEBORAH MITTELMAN. Debby is a floral designer, photographer, and owner of Phoenix-based MiViva Designs and founder of the Fleurmania workshop. She has earned her AzMF designation as an Arizona Certified Master Florist. She is a member of the Slow Flower Society, the Arizona State Florists Association, and is the first Arizona member of Chapel Designers. mivivadesigns.com fleurmania.com

MISSY PALACOL. A Seattle-based portrait and brand photographer, digital marketing expert, speaker, and travel junkie. She teaches people and companies how to capture their authentic visual brand, and how to leverage social and digital media to grow their businesses. In 2014, Missy left her job in corporate marketing and struck out on her own with Missy Palacol Photography, capturing rich and memorable images for individuals, families, events, and brands. missypalacol.com

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SPRING 2023


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departments

special section

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FLORI COGNOSCENTI

stunning market bouquets.

BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023

summer's bounty. coming down the runway: we present

SLOW FLOWERS HEROES

six botanical couture looks featuring

a q&a with Britain's shane connolly.

seasonal blooms, stylish designs,

BOTANICAL STYLE

BAM in bloom. THE BUSINESS OF FLOWERS

a sustainable studio.

and inventive expressions of domestic and local flowers.

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2023 AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEK ARTIST

april lemly. FLORAL RETREAT

cultivating connnection. fleurmania's designers bring wearable flowers to Arizona.

SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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FLORI COGNOSCENTI

Q: go-to elements for a stunning market bouquet? From palette and recipe to wraps and branding

TAMMY OSSELAER LITTLE PETAL FARM | INDIANA WEBSITE INSTAGRAM

Our market bouquets with seasonal flowers are big sellers. One popular summer design features pink lisianthus and creamy white hydrangeas. Customers love its light and romantic palette. We often package market bouquets in a cute brown bag, perfect for a special occasion or birthday gifting. With this bouquet, I include a mini-wrapped bouquet of our farm's lavender as a special token.

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SUMMER 2023


RACHEL BURGOON FEATHERS AND FLOWERS WASHINGTON WEBSITE INSTAGRAM

This is my very first year making market bouquets for Sage Mountain Natural Foods in Leavenworth, Washington. I treat my market bouquets as a small preview of what's currently in bloom and to highlight what we grow locally.

LYNN WINDMEYER HOMEPLACE FIELDS | MISSOURI WEBSITE INSTAGRAM

Pretty in pink and yellow! A fleeting poppy pairs with soft pastel snapdragons, cosmos, and bachelor's buttons, while the lysimachia provides golden touches. When we design, we want customers to enjoy watching flowers evolve over time, which is why we include blooms at different stages of their life -- to be an ever-changing pageant of beauty before their eyes.

SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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FLORI COGNOSCENTI

LAURA GONZALEZ SWALLOW'S SECRET GARDEN | CALIFORNIA WEBSITE INSTAGRAM

This vibrant bouquet lifts spirits at our Saturday farmers' market. It combines bells of Ireland and hydrangeas just in bud. The verbascum pulls together the purples (Malva ‘Mystic Merlin’, Verbena rigida, phlox) and orange alstroemeria, while ammi adds sparkle and sweet peas provide fragrance.

ELIZABETH VAN EMST FLOWER THIEF FARM | CALIFORNIA WEBSITE INSTAGRAM

Our signature market wrap is our cornerstone product with each bouquet mindfully designed to capture seasonality and a moment in time from the flower fields. We work hard to grow unique flowers in colors our clients can't get elsewhere, and we focus on high-end design with lots of textures. Our tagline is funky, but funk-free!

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SUMMER 2023


RECHELLE DAY FRECKLED BLOOM | OREGON WEBSITE INSTAGRAM

We offer premium seasonal blooms through our Freckled Bloom Flower Club (monthly or bimonthly subscriptions) and for custom orders. Our weekend farm stand features "Freckled Bloom Jars" for $22, each containing the best of our seasonal harvest. When folks are out and about on the weekends, their flowers stay hydrated, and for easy transport, the jars fit perfectly in a car's cup holder. Customers return their recycled containers and vases to support our sustainability efforts.

TO SEE MORE STUNNING MARKET BOUQUETS FROM SLOW FLOWERS MEMBERS

CLICK HERE.

SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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FLORI COGNOSCENTI

JACKY SURBER ALPENGLOW GARDENS | CALIFORNIA WEBSITE INSTAGRAM

We make wrapped bouquets weekly for a favorite local café, a wonderful way to use flowers that don’t fit a wedding design color palette. Using “leftovers” results in color combinations I would not intentionally choose, but I’m always surprised at how well the bouquets turn out.

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SUMMER 2023


BRIANA BOSCH BLOSSOM AND BRANCH | COLORADO WEBSITE INSTAGRAM

Our successful market bouquets mix textures, different foliages, feathery touches, ruffles, and spikes, the variety always prompting customer questions. I also make sure the focal flowers sit up high in the bouquet -- key to perceived value.

Organically grown in the Rocky Mountains WEBSITE |

FACEBOOK | INSTAGRAM | YOUTUBE

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PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRITT WILLOUGHBY DYER


SLOW FLOWERS HEROES BY DEBRA PRINZING

shane connolly. shane connolly & co. | london, england Shane Connolly is a renowned floral designer and ambassador for sustainable floristry. His clients range from prominent institutions like the Victoria & Albert Museum, the Royal Academy of Arts, and the National Portrait Gallery, to a veritable who's who of the great and the good of British life. He is perhaps best known for his public work for The Royal Family. His most recent commission was the Coronation of Their Majesties The King and The Queen in Westminster Abbey in May 2023. He also designed the flowers for their marriage at Windsor Castle in 2005, and for the wedding of the Prince and Princess of Wales in 2011. Shane has approached all these iconic moments with the same respect for nature, season, and setting. Everything is thoughtful,

SHANE CONNOLLY IN SEATTLE SEPTEMBER 29-30, 2023 Slow Flowers Society presents two days of sustainable floral design lecture, design demonstrations, and a floral design workshop. Advance registration is recommended to the public lecture. Advance registration is required for the workshop.

MAKE RESERVATIONS AND ORDER TICKETS HERE

in all senses of the word. Shane has designed events in countries as diverse as the United States and India, and always with the same aim: to leave the smallest footprint behind and be led by what is local and available. Shane works with the Royal Horticultural Society

SEPTEMBER 29, 2023

Lecture, Design Demonstration, and Book-Signing Event

to improve sustainability in floristry in their annual shows, and he

2 P.M. LECTURE

is also a judge at RHS Chelsea. He has written five books and teaches

$45 per person

his approach to flower design all over the world. In 2019, Debra Prinzing visited Shane at his studio in London's North Kensington district and recorded Episode 403 of the Slow Flowers Podcast, which originally aired May 29, 2019. This Q&A is condensed and edited from that conversation: SFJ: Can you give me a snapshot of Shane Connolly & Co. and the scope of your studio? SC: Gosh, sometimes it feels like it's a cottage industry and sometimes it feels like it's international; sometimes it feels like a tiny company and sometimes it feels big. I wish someone would have told me when I was 16 how exciting my life in flowers would be. And I'm glad that no one told me how little money you actually make from it; but honestly, the excitement has outweighed

Lecture + signed copy of A Year in Flowers

$70 per person ---

SEPTEMBER 30, 2023 Floral Design Intensive Workshop 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. ALL-DAY WORKSHOP

$749 ($649, Slow Flowers Members) Refreshments, lunch, flowers, vessels, and supplies provided Includes photography + signed copy of A Year in Flowers

SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF SHANE CONNOLLY & CO.

SLOW FLOWERS HEROES

everything. When I first started, I thought

see it as an unusual approach because I was

I would be doing parties and weddings with

basically doing what I had always done.

flowers, but I never thought it would lead me

SFJ: What is your typical approach to

to giving talks, writing books, and traveling. I can't believe that I've been asked to so many places to meet and talk with people about flowers. SFJ: The initial way I learned of you was from your mission and having a brand related to British-grown flowers and sustainability. SC: I would be very happy to take that description!

to be happy and feel like they have led the process so that when the party or wedding actually happens, they think, "I feel at home; I feel comfortable." As the designer, you really have to get the ego out of it. SFJ: There are so many in the industry who have a look or a signature style and it doesn't sound like that's your approach.

of the Prince and Princess of Wales gave

SC: Well, if someone said to me, "I want my

flowers.

SUMMER 2023

SC: It begins with the client. I want the client

SFJ: Designing the flowers for the wedding you a special opportunity to talk about local

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designing wedding or event flowers?

event or wedding to be full of flowers and really colorful," that's not exactly my personal

SC: That's what they wanted, and it was

preference (I love things to have an airiness

completely natural and organic -- I didn't

about them), but I can also think, what flower


looks good massed together at that time of

SC: Yes, completely. Now-a-days, you would

year? In the autumn it might be hydrangeas

call it an internship or an apprenticeship.

heaped in bowls. And what if we added pears and medlar fruits on the stem? That approach gives the clients the really, rich intense look that they wanted. SFJ: Sometimes clients get locked into a specific flower though, right? SC: The best thing would be to say, "Let's decide on a color and leave the rest to me." But increasingly, because of social media,

SFJ: Do you think that path explains why you're so focused on seasonality, and also, maybe the greener, pre-1950s techniques before floral foam? SC: I did use foam in the past, but I never liked it. I never liked the touch or the smell. I don't know why I didn't think there were ecological issues around its use, for years, none of us did.

that's harder because people want us to work

SFJ: What is your preferred foam-free

from photographs.

mechanic now?

SFJ: We loved your story of how you first started working with flowers. It seems

SC: I use chicken wire or the right container with water.

as if you fell down the rabbit hole of

SFJ: What about all the floral arches and

loving flowers versus going into a formal

floral walls that seem to be engineered with

educational program?

foam?

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SLOW FLOWERS HEROES

SC: Back in the day, before

And I think the look or the mood

It's a fundamental reason for

flower walls and the obligatory

you want to create should be the

having flowers. The next question

archway over the church door for

obsession.

is: Where do flowers come from?

photography, you would do a nice display of plants on either side of

SFJ: Back to creating a floral arch ...

They come from a garden or a field, and they come from nature.

the church door, which I still think

SC: If there is a budget, you can have

If you detach too much from that,

is quite beautiful. Yet today, so

a metal structure made by a welder,

then you might as well use fluffy

many people want the floral arch for

which then could be covered with

cushions on your table. To me,

an Instagram photo opportunity.

chicken wire. Everything can be fed

people want to be moved by nature

SFJ: But how do you create an

into buckets filled with water and

and to be moved by the beauty of

archway of flowers? What is your

you can use water tubes for extra

nature, not by my cleverness, if it

technique?

things. It's important to develop

exists.

relationships with growers and ask

SFJ: It seems that you have always

them, "What could you grow or

been oriented to the garden and

what do you have?" We did a party

the seasons.

SC: It depends on the budget! I receive so many messages that begin with, "It's all very well for you, but I have a budget." We have constraints, like every designer. We do not have "Money is no object" thrown at us, ever. I never have had that situation in 30 years!

where I created an archway with potted hornbeam trees that could later be planted in the garden. For another event, we used flowering shrubs grown on tripod structures, planted in big urns on either side of

SFJ: Do you think that is because

a doorway. Why does something like

flowers often have to get in line

that have to meet in the middle?!

behind the caterer or the dress

SC: Maybe in the past 10 years and certainly in the past five years, suddenly (the garden) is the thing, but it's always the way I approached things. I used to be slightly puzzled by people who got really excited by wanting peonies in December in England.

-- and you're further down the

SFJ: You've often been asked to

SFJ: Thank you so much for your

pecking order when it comes to the

speak and write about floral design

leadership in conversations around

wedding budget?

and your philosophy of flowers.

sustainable practices, Shane. Your

What inspiration can you share?

voice has inspired so many of us.

the time, you are. Yet, I always say

SC: We recently went to Barcelona

SC: I appreciate what Rita Feldmann

that it's not "just flowers." We

and, of course, the architect Gaudi

of the Sustainable Floristry

are creating an ambience; we're

is associated with Barcelona. One

Network says: "How can you be

creating a mood, and the fact that

of the things he said really struck

doing something that is supposed

it's a beautiful, transient thing that

me: "If you want to be original, you

to glorify nature if it's actually

might only last for four hours or

need to get back to the origin." That

working against and in spite of

for the length of a meal . . . that's

inspires the questions fundamental

nature?" I've found that getting

part of its beauty. For those four

to my work: What is the origin of

older suddenly makes me more

hours, the guests are immersed in

flowers? Why do we bring flowers

confident. You suddenly think,

nature, and they have an homage

SC: I would say yes, 90 percent of

inside? We bring them inside

"I feel strongly and I don't really

to the world of nature in front of

because we want to see nature,

care what people think if I speak out

them, along with delicious food

I think. Why do we give flowers to

loudly about it."

and delicious wine. Sometimes,

someone who's just had a baby or

SHANE CONNOLLY

the budget becomes the obsession.

whose mother has just died?

WEBSITE INSTAGRAM SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEK 2023

SUMMER'S BOUNTY

We've gathered a fresh crop of floral fashions IN 2015, SLOW FLOWERS INTRODUCED AMERICAN FLOWERS

Week, inviting flower lovers, gardeners, growers, and designers across the country to share their red-white-and-bluish blooms during June 28- July 4th. The promotion celebrates domestic flower farming and engages people everywhere with local botanicals. The hashtag #americanflowersweek encourages flower fans to follow and enjoy the campaign's beauty and floral diversity. Since 2016, when American Flowers Week debuted its annual botanical couture collection with Susan McLeary's red-white-and-blue floral Afro, we have commissioned more than 50 wearable looks, each one created by our member designers and flower farmers. Read on to enjoy this year's Haute Couture Harvest! ILLUSTRATION BT APRIL LEMLY

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AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEK 2023 DESIGN BY TARA FOLKER PHOTOGRAPHY BY MADELINE ISABELLA

FLORALS GIVE MENSWEAR AN UPGRADE A DRAMATIC DEPARTURE FROM THE TRADITIONAL

boutonnière or floral pocket square, this exaggerated look is Tara Folker's modern idea of botanical menswear. "I wanted to take things to an extreme and play around with building a floral lapel," she says. About half of the ingredients came from Tara's Splints & Daisies garden, located northwest of

Philadelphia. The Rustic Bunch, a Slow Flowers member, and Riverside Blooms also contributed design elements. Grape hyacinths, daffodils, anemones, poppies, hellebores, along with flowering forsythia, plum, and magnolia branches, appear to "grow" from the left lapel of the model's honey brown velvet jacket, extending far above his torso and head. "A smaller floral accent on the right sleeve balances this out," Tara notes. She inserted layers of branches, stems, and blooms, which are held in place by small pieces of chicken wire stitched onto the garment to create a base mechanic. The vivid spring-blooming palette includes a cluster of bright orange flowers of the Fritillaria imperialis -- creating a jolt of joy.

DESIGN + CONCEPT: Tara Folker, Splints & Daisies, splintsanddaisies.com, @splintsanddaisies PHOTOGRAPHY: Madeline Isabella, @madeline.isabella FLOWER SOURCES: Splints & Daisies, @splintsanddaisies, The Rustic Bunch, @therusticbunch, Riverside Blooms, @riversideblooms MODEL: Kris Boston VENUE: Splints & Daisies garden, Lancaster, Pennsylvania, @splintsanddaisies

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BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023 DESIGN BY JENNIFER REED PHOTOGRAPHY BY HALEY RICHTER

thE ROMANCE OF PEONIES A LONG-FORGOTTEN HISTORIC GARDEN IGNITED

Jennifer Reed's imagination for her contribution to this

year's American Flowers Week collection. Owner of Jennifer Designs, based in Mullica Hill, New Jersey, the floral artist told how the Crowninshield Garden at Hagley Museum in Wilmington, Delaware, inspired her. "I envisioned a sculptural and statuesque botanical couture design to emulate the feel of the 1920s neoclassical garden," she explained. "I drew from the story of this garden's original owner, Louise Evelina Dupont Crowninshield, an American heiress, historic preservationist, and philanthropist. Louisa was influenced by her travels to Rome, and she established her garden with replicas of the architectural features she saw there."

DESIGN + CONCEPT: Jennifer Reed, Jennifer Designs Events, jenniferdesignsevents.com; @jenniferdesignsevents FLOWER SOURCES: Owlet Farms, Pilesgrove, New Jersey, @owletfarms; CamFlor Inc., Watsonville, California, @camflorinc; Muth Family Farm, Williamstown, New Jersey, @muthfamilyfarm MODEL: BrookeG. @brookeitlist PHOTOGRAPHY: Haley Richter, Haley Richter Photo, @haleyrichterphoto HAIR + MAKEUP: Jessica Saint Beauty @jessicasaintbeauty and Toni Burke @toniburke_muah VENUE: Hagley Museum, Wilmington, Delaware, @hagleymuseum TABLE STYLING: Shannon Wellington @shannonwellingtonweddings DESIGN ASSISTANCE: Jennifer Bender @thisholidayhouse




BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023 DESIGN BY JENNIFER REED PHOTOGRAPHY BY HALEY RICHTER

Created as an intentional "ruin," the garden includes cascading layers of Italianate pools, columns, statuary, and colonnades, built in the early 20th century, but crafted to appear weathered by time. Through local horticulture contacts, Jennifer received permission to photograph her botanical look in the gardens, even though they are still being restored and not open to the public. "I thought this was the perfect location for my wearable floral creation, worn by a model who looked like an ancient sculpture dressed in all-white florals," she said. "We painted her hair and body to match the white flowers, creating the illusion of a statue."

Using 330 stems of 'Bowl of Cream' and 'Gardenia' peonies and 40 stems of sweet peas, all grown by Owlet Farms of Pilesgrove, New Jersey, Jennifer fashioned her garment to emulate the fluid drape of a silk gown. Other ingredients included peppercress, larkspur, snapdragons, delphiniums, dusty miller, and ornamental wheat, all of which added textural details to the monochromatic white palette. Due to the garden's hills and multiple levels, this floral look had to be more than pretty. "I've learned that if you want a model to walk in a floral garment, it needs to be comfortable," she added. "This dress is actually made with four different panels, and each is attached to a belt at the waist. When we moved locations, there were four of us who walked with

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BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023 DESIGN BY JENNIFER REED PHOTOGRAPHY BY HALEY RICHTER

Brooke, our model, by holding onto the panels." Sections of lightweight plastic mesh form each of the skirt sections, "flowered" by Jennifer and a design assistant. They inserted hundreds of peonies into small openings in the THE CROWNINSHIELD GARDEN AT HAGLEY MUSEUM AND LIBRARY WEBSITE The Garden is named for its designers: Louise du Pont Crowninshield and her husband, Francis (“Frank”) Boardman Crowninshield.

mesh material, taping individual stems in place on the back side of the skirt panels. Larkspur covers a contrasting section in the skirt, creating the look of lace, while a braided cord crosses the model's bare back adding feminine detailing. Jennifer made a separate peony-and-sweet-pea shawl to wrap around the shoulders, and also attached peonies and sweet peas to a metal headband for the model's crown.

The Crowninshields were the

Jennifer and photographer Haley Richter posed their peony-

last residents of the Dupont

garbed model in many places throughout the extensive

family home at Eleutherian Mills—part of Hagley

garden landscape to reflect its unique architectural vignettes

Museum since 1958.

and destinations. Their visual story honors the alluring

The Crowninshields began

garden's original owner, an heiress to the Dupont fortune.

designing the garden in the

Shannon Wellington brought the faux ruins to life, creating

1920s, after Louise’s father, Henry Algernon du Pont,

a table laden with flowers, candles, and platters of food. "She

bought Eleutherian Mills

styled it in the spirit of a roaring twenties party that might

(the area encompassing the

have originally taken place here," Jennifer said.

historic home and garden) from the Dupont Company in 1923. In their garden, they attempted to recreate

These images, photographed at an iconic American garden, narrate the best of American Flowers Week. The story is

replicas of architectural

told via a classical garment that celebrates quintessential

features they had seen

American-grown peonies, designed and made by a gifted

on their travels in Rome. It was intentionally designed

floral artist.

to appear aged and worn by time. The Crowninshield Garden is unique among American garden landscapes. In its current form, it is a maintained ruin of a 1920s ruin garden, built on top of the industrial ruins of a 19th century gun powder factory. It is a ruin within a ruin with a ruin.

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BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023 DESIGN AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY NIESHA BLANCAS

TU TIEnES MI coRAzoN SLOW FLOWERS SOCIETY'S SOCIAL MEDIA MANAGER Niesha Blancas is not a florist or a grower, but she is a fashionista, having graduated from California State University Fresno with a B.S. degree in Fashion Merchandising. Niesha brings both talent and heart to her floral fashion this year, her third contribution to American Flowers Week's botanical couture collection. The strapless full-length gown, an upcycled Jessica McClintock prom dress that Niesha thrifted for $2, features a bodice covered in sunflower petals that flows into a flared skirt embellished with flower heads -- strawflowers, pincushion proteas, yarrows, sunflowers, and craspedia Billy balls. Pointed flames are outlined by deconstructed yarrow and yellow-orange sunflower petals. "This dress easily weighed 40 pounds," Niesha says, laughing. Fortunately, her friend Irys Jazmin Flores was up for the modeling assignment. Niesha's inspiration was highly personal, as she revisited childhood memories of growing up in a small Fresno community called Calwa. "I lived there until I was in sixth grade. My late father was born and raised in Calwa; my grandma had her house there." For the photography venue, Niesha chose the Calwa playground where she remembered

DESIGN + CONCEPT + PHOTOGRAPHY: Niesha Blancas, Fetching Social Media, fetchingsocialmedia.com, @fetchingsocial FLOWER SOURCES: CamFlor Inc., Watsonville, California, @camflorinc MODEL: Irys Jazmin Flores HAIR + MAKEUP: Irys Jazmin Flores VENUE: Calwa Park, Fresno, California, calwarecreation.org DESIGN ASSISTANCE: Ana Quinata, @anaquinata

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BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023 DESIGN AND PHOTOGRAPHY BY NIESHA BLANCAS

climbing an iconic rocket ship play structure as a kid. "This year's theme is an homage to my childhood and my love of Chicano culture, which my dad introduced me to while growing up. Calwa is populated by many Hispanic farm workers, and I wanted to give this place my love." The love is symbolized by a Corazón (Heart), which Niesha displays as the Sacred Heart, created with red alstroemeria petals layered over a heart-shaped piece of chicken wire. Its "flames" are made with green acuba foliage, a botanical element that has also appeared in Niesha's previous botanical couture looks. "I intended for my dress to bring life back into this dull community and serve as the heart of this neighborhood that I love," she explained. "It was important to use bright and colorful flowers, especially yellow ones to convey my concept." This stunning gown gains authenticity from Niesha's styling, prop selection, and accessory choices. "The sacred heart reflects the Chicano heritage, but so does the lowrider car, which I knew I wanted for my photography," she notes. To locate the car, she put out the call and a friend's brother who is involved in California car culture helped her find and borrow "Purple Haze," a dazzling magenta Cadillac, completely suited with gold-rimmed wheels and custom detailing. "I could not have envisioned a more perfect car for this photoshoot, especially when it comes down to the littlest details." Accessories are also a nod to her Chicano culture, from the model's Ray Bans, the oversized bamboo hoops and gold jewelry, to the pair of Nike Cortez sneakers. "Before heading to our photoshoot location in Calwa, we stopped at the local corner market for some last-minute props. I brainstormed many different Mexican snacks and settled for two of my go-tos -- a Mandarin Jarrito and Flamin' Hot Cheetos. Once we finished with the photo shoot, we realized we had forgotten to incorporate them. But then my model started snacking on them, and I realized how truly perfect they were for my story." Of course, as both designer and photographer, she captured that perfect moment on camera. SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023 DESIGN BY BLAIR LYNN PHOTOGRAPHY BY KIRSTEN SMITH PHOTOGRAPHY

CUTTING GARDEN COUTURE BLAIR ROBERTS LYNN IS AN EXPERIENCED WEDDING

and event florist whose feminine, two-piece floral ensemble expresses her affection for seasonal and local flowers. Her friends Sarah Daken and Tom Precht contributed flowers from their Grateful Gardeners farm in Maryland, and then also invited Blair and photographer Kirsten Smith to use their farm's fields as the photography setting. Blair cut mop head hydrangeas from her own garden to fashion a delicate bandeau top covered in tiny florets. A full-length skirt is finished with hydrangea foliage and ostrich ferns at the waist, while Annabelle hydrangeas form a ruffle at the hips and Limelight hydrangeas trim the hem and flirty slit. A medley of pink and orange botanicals covers the remaining skirt silhouette, including bold bands of marigolds and a floral pattern of vibrant lisianthus, celosia, sunflowers, and snapdragons. Dinner plate dahlias dance across this colorful floral background to finish the look. "I feel passionately about local flowers, and I loved being able to highlight what Tom and Sarah are growing at Grateful Gardeners," she said.

DESIGN + CONCEPT: Blair Lynn, Sweet Blossoms, www.sweetblossomsllc.com, @thesweetblossoms FLOWER SOURCES: Dahlias, Lisianthus, Marigolds, Celosia, Ostrich Fern, Snapdragons, Hydrangea, Grateful Gardeners, @grateful_gardeners; Hydrangea blooms and foliage, Sweet Blossoms, @thesweetblossoms PHOTOGRAPHY: Kirsten Smith Photography, @kirstensmithphotography MODEL: Tanya Ferrell HAIR + MAKEUP: Tanya Ferrell VENUE: Grateful Gardeners Farm, Poolesville, Maryland, @grateful_gardeners

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SUMMER 2023




BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023 DESIGN BY SARAH WAGSTAFF PHOTOGRAPHY BY CECILY GUBITOSI PHOTOGRAPHY

fLOWERS IN HIS HAIR

SARAH WAGSTAFF OF SUOT FARM AND FLOWERS

wanted to flip the script on who wears flowers and so she recruited her husband Keith Chaplin, their 8-year-old son

Huck Chaplin, and Steve Hayes, a willing friend, to model her creations for a American Flowers Week celebration. Dressing adult men and a younger boy with botanicals reminds Sarah of Peter Pan and Captain Hook. "Remember when Pan comes back to Neverland after he becomes a grownup and has forgotten how to be childlike? That's a story within us all," she says. "I wanted to remember and recognize the child within each of us, especially in men. Sarah wanted to attach flowers to every part of Steve's body -- his head, shoulders, neck, chest, back, arms, wrists, fingers, and legs. The botanical headpiece, a sunray shape, extends around neck and shoulders, covers his shirt, and fills the chest pocket. She used eyelash adhesive to glue flowers to his skin and wrapped his shoulders and arms with a 20-foot-floral boa fabricated from cedar boughs, tulips, peonies, and other cuts from her farm For her son Huck, whose interest in the project peaked when photographer Cecily Gubitosi encouraged him to take

DESIGN + CONCEPT: Sarah Wagstaff, SUOT Farm & Flowers, @suotfarm DESIGN ASSISTANCE: Olivia Yates O'Donnell, FloravoreNW, @floravorenw PHOTOGRAPHY: Cecily Gubitosi Photography, @cecilygubitosiphotography FLOWER SOURCES: SUOT Farm & Flowers, Tulips, peonies, frittilaria, ranunculus, poppies, daffodils, ferns, Spanish blue bells, bleeding heart, alliums, lilac, violas, hellebores, forget-me-nots, grasses, ivy, cedar, clematis, bones/shells MODELS: Steve Hayes, Keith Chaplin, Huck Chaplin VENUE: SUOT Farm & Flowers, Burlington, Washington, @suotfarm

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BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023 DESIGN BY SARAH WAGSTAFF PHOTOGRAPHY BY CECILY GUBITOSI PHOTOGRAPHY

a few photos with her camera, Sarah devised a floral mohawk headpiece (a nod to Rufio), wrapped his wrists with floral cuffs, and donned his fingers with floral rings. "It's really beautiful to watch him developing this connection with the world of gardens and plants, because I helped to cultivate it, too." In the final moments of the photo session, which took place at SUOT Farm + Flowers, Sarah's husband Keith agreed to model a floral headpiece and have his beard flowered. "I often feel like flowers are assigned a feminine trait, but they don't have to be gender related," Sarah says. "I really wanted to use male figures leaning into this aspect of botanical couture . . . to show how flowers can be gender bending."


BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023 DESIGN BY NAN MATTESON + LINDA SPRADLIN PHOTOGRAPHY BY JILL BADER

URBAN SECRET GARDEN "THE URGE TO GROW CAN TAKE ROOT ANYWHERE,"

says Nan Matteson of Queen City Flower Farm, a devoted city gardener. "Pick your city. If you're walking down the street

you might get a glimpse of a private garden, seen from an alley or through a gateway." The idea of a pocket garden led Nan Matteson and fellow grower Linda Spralin to create a wrap jacket with two inspirations -- a shawl collar composed of dried botanicals to suggest a 1920s fur-collared woman's coat and a 19th century Japanese firefighter kimono, often, traditionally, only a plain garment with a decorative textile lining. The coat, sewn by Nan from a pattern she adapted, has a sky blue lining against which a spring flower garden is displayed -- a secret border rooted in small, moss-covered bags that provide a water source at the hemline. "I just love the whole concept of a guardian inside the fireman's coat, providing protection even if you didn't know it was there," she says, smiling. Similarly,

DESIGN + CONCEPT: Nan Matteson, @queencityflowerfarm and Linda Spradlin, @inthegardenflowerfarm PHOTOGRAPHY: Jill Bader, @jillmbader FLOWER SOURCES: Collar: Dried amaranthus, craspedia, love-in-the-mist, celosia (plume and crested), scabiosa, gomphrena, spirea, dock, foraged grasses.Secret Garden: redbud, tulip, bluebell, daffodil, hyacinth, hellebore, columbine, moss. All flowers grown by the designers. MODEL: Carmen Sanders @Carmen.sanders3 VENUE: Cincinnati Art Museum, . Cincinnati, Ohio, @cincyartmuseum

the flower-lined garment illustrates how much our gardens can provide a sense of comfort and protection -- even if we're the only ones who see them. SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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AMERICAN FLOWERS WEEK 2023

APRIL LEMLY

The 2023 American Flowers Week artwork was created exclusively for Slow Flowers Society by April Lemly, an artist, illustrator, and former flower farmer based in Los Angeles, California.

APRIL IS A LONG-TIME FRIEND OF THE SLOW Flowers Movement who previously owned and operated Kamama Flowers in Sequim, Washington. AFW: April, can you describe yourself as an artist? AL: At my core, I'm a creative and I've had the luck to fall in love with many different mediums. And when I fell in love with working with flowers, I was able to say, "Oh, flowers are just another medium for my art." AFW: Describe your path to becoming an artist. AL: I had been making art since I was a child. I wanted to be a teacher, so my bachelor's degree had an emphasis on teaching art to elementary-aged children. But I knew I wanted to pursue a master's degree and earned an MFA in graphic design in 2008 at the Academy of Art University in San Francisco. AFW: We love your style! What inspires you? AL: I've always been a 'nature child' at heart. I love animals. I love wilderness. Flora and fauna are my muses. They all show up in my work. As long as I keep creating work that I am really passionate about, the joy shows up. I love bold color, yes, and I'm pretty free with it in personal projects. Of course, when I'm working with a client's branded palette, the project scope always drives the design.

40 SUMMER 2023


AFW: Tell us about the chapter of your life when

discuss working together for the American Flowers

you were a farmer-florist.

Week artwork. I wanted to honor that time (when

AL: I was living and working in Portland, Oregon, and my home garden was like a quilt of flowers from all the previous owners -- for example, a rose garden over here and succulent rock garden over these, peonies

I grew flowers) and how special it was for me. And even though I don't have that business anymore, I do have such fond memories of that time and I really am grateful for it.

along the house and so forth. It was beautiful! I was

AFW: Your illustration captures that sense of

making vases of flowers for friends and family and

community! The gathering of different growers and

someone suggested I should grow flowers and design

their diverse appearances is really symbolic. We're

for weddings, kind of as a weekend project. We knew

hearing really positive responses!

someone who was getting married, so I volunteered -and it kind of blossomed out of that. A local organization called EcoTrust had a "Meet Your Farmer CSA" event and I signed up for that. I was the only florist there at the time! From that, I gained a half dozen CSA customers and that was really how I got my name out. AFW: What time period did that cover? AL: I started Kamama Flowers in 2013 and grew flowers in Portland until 2016. Then, I farmed in Washington for two years after that. Now that I'm in "concrete" Los Angeles, I miss it. The flower farmers and florists I knew and worked with in the Pacific Northwest are part of a wonderful community with so much heart and soul and respect for one another. They share and help one another -- and I don't have that here.

AL: I wanted it to reflect how society ought to be represented, frankly. I tried to draw some of the people as gender-neutral; I have the hippie guy with the peace sign on his shirt. I'm not really sure who the child belongs to. It was all intentional. AFW: What was your technique to make this piece? AL: It is a digital illustration, all done in Procreate. I usually start with some reference imagery. I drew the background and land first; then the people; and then the flowers and the little details. I have to say that the flowers were actually the hardest -- the center bouquet had so many different iterations. But finally, I landed on the sunflowers. Who doesn't love sunflowers? AFW: Yes, it is the quintessential American flower! And by the way, although this is a two-dimensional drawing, there are layers of texture throughout it!

AFW: Great memories of a time when you were

AL: Even if I'm drawing an owl or a bat, I love texture,

more deeply immersed in flowers, right?

so I try to put that in.

AL: Definitely. I was so honored when we started to

AFW: Thank you, so much, April!

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FLORAL RETREAT STORY DEBORAH MITTLEMAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY CRYSTAL WHITEAKER

WORKSHOP Produced by Debby Mittelman, MiViva Designs, mivivadesigns.com @mivivadesigns_florals

CULTIVATING CONNECTION

Discovering the beauty of locally grown flowers IN APRIL 2023, FLOWER FARMERS AND FLORISTS GATHERED in the heart of Scottsdale, Arizona, for Fleurmania, a three-day workshop featuring the best of Arizona-grown botanicals. As the event's producer, I developed Fleurmania to promote connection and creativity, inviting Susan McLeary and others to lead sustainable floral design sessions, floral meditations, discussions about finding one's leadership strengths and core values, plus ways to avoid burnout and learning to rest. Fleurmania had its roots in workshops I have attended in the past and was influenced by my relationships with floral designers, flower farmers, and business experts whose work I value. After

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SUMMER 2023

INSTRUCTORS Susan McLeary, @passionflowersue Crystal Whiteaker, @crystallilycreative Shanti Rade, @whipstonefarm Jorday Maney, @thejordanmaney Heather McFarland, @floralhealingcoaching MODEL Chauné Rael-Whitsitt, @sweethoneyrael


SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL


44 SUMMER 2023


FLORAL RETREAT

attending numerous in-person and online workshops focused on creativity and floral design, my vision for Fleurmania took shape. I wanted to feature Arizona blooms, sustainable mechanics, and supportive relationships. The instructors I invited responded enthusiastically, including Sue McLeary and Arizona flower farmer Shanti Rade of Whipstone Farm. I also invited Jordan Maney, a wedding planner whose work is now focused on anti-racism teaching and coaching in the floral industry and other creative professions. Crystal Whiteaker agreed to photograph the workshop and to lead sessions about aligning one's brand with personal values and purpose. Heather McFarland, a therapistturned-floral-healing-coach, joined the panel to guide attendees in floral meditations for mindful relaxation exercises. And of course, the abundance of seasonal blooms set the stage for a successful event.

On the first day of Fleurmania, growers delivered their freshest springtime blooms to the Clayton House, the workshop venue in old-town Scottsdale. I was able to source and buy from multiple businesses who provided a diverse selection of blooms from different corners of Arizona. I wanted the variety because regional climates here range from warm, low desert to cool mountain regions, which create distinct seasonal differences around the state. Tiny, delicate muscari and violas arrived in bud vases alongside dill flowers towering more than five feet high! More than 30 persons attended the afternoon program, which included conversations around forming a collective to bring locally grown flowers to market. For highlights, Sue created a brightly colored spring centerpiece, while Heather led a meditation focused on flowers to honor the work of the many growers who attended. During the next two days, Sue demonstrated multiple options

SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

45


FROM LEFT: Lead design instructor Susan McLeary; floral jewelry; Susan with flower farmer Shanti Rade; an all-Arizona grown botanical wearable.

for sustainable mechanics, such

mechanics. Fortunately, the

growers for resources as needed

as using dried smilax as a base

desert's spring weather was perfect

for her events, and has initiated a

layer for floral crowns or shaping

for working outdoors.

collaborative effort modeled by the

bullion wire for versatile jewelry styles. Other foam-free mechanics included using chicken wire and Oshun pouches. The designers then selected blooms and used these options to create their own exuberant designs for headpieces and wearable flowers. Chauné Rael-Whitsitt then modeled the individual pieces in the courtyard, photographed by Crystal Whiteaker for each designer's portfolio.

For some, Fleurmania was their first immersive, in-person

Holly Lukasiewicz of the District 2

workshop. Others had never before

Floral Studio in Omaha, Nebraska,

built installations or had their work

valued our support of many Arizona

displayed on a professional model.

flower farmers, the sustainability

Everyone was encouraged to have

of the event, and the fusion of

fun and spread their creative

contemporary topics around

wings. Courtney Rosiak-Quinto of

various forms of justice pertaining

Quaintrelle Farms said, “The three-

to race, gender, values, and

day experience was bursting with

physical rest.

creativity, learning opportunities, and knowledge sharing.” As a

Each attendee also designed a

farmer-florist, she returned home

centerpiece, and then collaborated

to Santa Cruz, California, feeling

to create two large group

confident in her decision to turn

installations. The installs were

down work involving unsustainable

built with reusable steel frames,

practices not in line with her ethos,

water buckets, and chicken wire

such as bleaching or spraying materials. She also reported she has reached out to other local

46

SUMMER 2023

growers at Fleurmania.

She also appreciated knowing at the end of Fleurmania, materials used in the workshop were donated. For this effort, after breaking down the installations, the group made bouquets for ReBloom, a nonprofit whose volunteers picked up and delivered the fresh arrangements to hospice patients.


Marin Kees, owner and designer at

Christina Blodgett of Urban Desert

Phoenix-based Florence and Rose

Flora in Phoenix, said, “Fleurmania

Floral Co., said Fleurmania gave

allowed space for a community

her, “A shift in my career that I've

joining Arizona farmers and floral

always wanted. To be able to spend

artists where there once was

a few days in pure magic in all local

none. It was a springboard for the

blooms of Arizona was just the

growth of floristry in Arizona and

start, but the best part was meeting

allowed our wonderful community

all the growers behind that magic.”

of farmers and floral artists to

Racquel Pleasants is a farmer-

connect.”

florist, an emergency room nurse,

Behind the scenes, I learned that

and the owner of Rose and Olive

producing multi-day educational

in Walla Walla, Washington. She

workshops is both equally

said, “Fleurmania was an enriching

exhausting and exhilarating. As the

workshop, a moment in time where

event organizer, I am most proud

an incredible group came together

to know Fleurmania was a catalyst

from all walks of life and connected

for what is becoming a vibrant and

through the magic of flowers. The

dynamic local flowers community

experience was healing and life

here in Arizona.

changing with the addition of new lifelong friendships.”

FLEURMANIA WEBSITE INSTAGRAM

Reflecting on the workshop,

SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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SUMMER 2023


BOTANICAL STYLE BY DEBRA PRINZING PHOTOGRAPHY BY MISSY PALACOL

BAM in bloom. bellevue arts museum | bellevue, washington Inspired by popular floral exhibitions at art museums around the country, the Bellevue Arts Museum debuted BAM in Bloom in May 2023, its inaugural four-day event combining the power of art with the beauty of nature. Floral arrangements created by 10 floral designers, including nine Slow Flowers Society members, were displayed beside artworks found in the museum's galleries and Forum exhibition spaces. As BAM's new executive director, E. Michael Whittington had experienced successful floral-and-art events at institutions he previously led, and said he wanted to bring the concept to the greater Seattle area. "I did this most recently at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art and it has become one of their largest events, one which has since become a significant fundraiser,"

HANNAH MORGAN, FORTUNATE ORCHARD WEBSITE | INSTAGRAM KEHINDE WILEY: MARECHAL FLORIANO PEIXOTO II

Whittington said. "An Art in Bloom event provides an

"I was so excited to be paired with

entry point for people who love flowers, who love art --

Kehinde Wiley‘s painting. Seeing

and who come to the museum to experience both."

the painting in person, and then

Whittington invited Slow Flowers Society to join BAM in

taking in the impressive scale and nuance was such an important part

STEPHANIE DOWNES, VANITA FLORAL WEBSITE | INSTAGRAM SCREENS: DYLAN NEUWIRTH

"The gesture and vibrance of flowers in conversation with the characteristics of mixed media art and audience

of the experience. In my flower arrangement, I did my best to reflect the color story of Wiley’s painting, the physicality, and perhaps even some of the intensity that his image conveys."

is pure purpose as a floral designer. BAM in Bloom was electrifying! The Vanita floral I created for this inaugural exhibition was made to illicit questions from the audience, challenge what are commonly considered 'pretty flowers,' and remind us that nature is micro and macro -- present in the vase and in incomparable scale in the stars." SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

49


BOTANICAL STYLE Bloom as a community partner and encouraged member florists to apply. Interested in making the event as sustainable as possible, he created guidelines based on Slow Flowers' principles, encouraging the use of domestically grown or locally grown floral products. Designers were told no bleached, dyed, or synthetically preserved material and no floral foam would be accepted in the displays. BAM's mission is to engage its audiences in the power of art, craft, and design, and the museum passionately supports emerging and established artists from the Pacific Northwest, Whittington noted. The 10 floral designers responded to a wide array of art -- photography, painting, textiles, mixed media, and sculpture -- using both floral and botanical ingredients. "It was a wonderful opportunity to welcome people to BAM and show off the museum and JON THRONE, COUNTRYSIDE FLORAL AND GARDEN WEBSITE | INSTAGRAM NICOLA LOPEZ: HALF-LIFE NO. 13

also to show off the creativity of the artists who were doing floral design," he added. Plans are already taking shape for the 2024

"It's always fun to have an opportunity to

BAM in Bloom and Whittington expects it

take a concept and run with it. In the flower

will again take place in early May. He hopes

shop or with wedding florals, you don't

to expand the number of participating florists

always have such creative freedom. To be

and also incorporate some of the museum's

able to take concepts out of my brain and make them come to life is always a relief and allows more creative ideas to be able to bloom."

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the great works of art in the exhibition, and

SUMMER 2023

courtyard and outdoor spaces. "I just want to blow it out of the ballpark next year." BELLEVUE ART MUSEUM WEBSITE | INSTAGRAM


THERESA RAO, BELLE PÉTALE

JEAN LOUISE PAQUIN ALLEN, JUNIPER FLOWERS

INSTAGRAM

WEBSITE | INSTAGRAM

WENDY RED STAR: FOUR SEASONS

LEONARDO DREW: NUMBER 215B

"Belle Pétale was profoundly honored to

"Being not only a floral artist but also

have been selected as one of the 10 local

a painter, I am always drawn to an

designers to participate in the splendid,

opportunity to interpret another’s artwork.

inaugural BAM in Bloom event! It was a true

At my first sight of Number 215B, I thought,

delight to see The Bellevue Arts Museum

'No way! How would I interpret that piece?'

welcoming local floral designers to take

However, I found myself so captivated by

part in creating an arrangement inspired by

both its immense stature and my initial

a work of art on display, and encouraging

strong feelings, I knew it was the only

sustainability in their designs (which is

choice. Emotionally, I looked upon this as

such an important feature of my floral

an exercise in organized chaos. Depicting

business). This allowed me the opportunity

the textures and outward movement of

to showcase my floral skills and floral art

the piece was most satisfying, as well as

interpretation, while representing the

figuring out how to create depth with such

mission of The Slow Flowers Society."

a neutral and closely-toned color palette." SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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ANNIKA MCINTOSH, HAZEL DESIGNS WEBSITE | INSTAGRAM PRESTON WADLEY: CODE SWITCHER

"My artist statement: 'Standing on strata, nurtured by stories. Nimble, adaptable, but weary with choices and the pursuit of authenticity. Our substantial warm human bodies tread proudly in the interstices, shuffling in constant negotiation, dancing on soup, rarely resting. We come from

52

CARLEE DONNELLY, GOLDENROD FLORAL DESIGN WEBSITE | INSTAGRAM KO KIRK YAMAHIRA

tangled layers of past truths, but we can

"BAM in Bloom felt like a unique and special

balance here, choosing to see meaning and

opportunity to bring flowers as a medium

beauty.' I used moss, driftwood, huckleberry

and type of art to life. I have always dreamed

roots, wild bleeding heart, sword ferns, red

of having my flowers in a museum and this

osier dogwoods, and bright, long-lasting

event was really top-notch for florists to be

proteas and ranunculus displayed in glass

part of. I would absolutely do it again. It was

Ehrlenmeyer flasks."

well received and absolutely worth it."

SUMMER 2023


BOTANICAL STYLE

ANNE BRADFIELD, ANALOG FLORAL WEBSITE | INSTAGRAM JAMES LAVADOUR: UNTITLED AND DEEP MOON

"I loved working with such vibrant colors and really diving into all the textures of the design. For my retail and everyday work, I use more foliages. For the BAM piece, it was a true indulgence to create something so decadently flower-rich! I also loved the feeling of being part of the floral community for the show."

SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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BOTANICAL STYLE

SHARLET DIGGS, SHARLET FLORAL INSTAGRAM PRESTON WADLEY: ABSTRACT TRUTH

"I was so excited to participate in BAM in Bloom! In 2019, I attended Art Alive at the San Diego Art Museum, which is their BLAISE BOUCHAND,

biggest yearly fundraiser, pairing floral

MAISON DE FRANCE INTERIOR DESIGN

designers with art pieces to interpret. Being

WEBSITE | INSTAGRAM

able to participate in the first local version of

JULIE MEHRETU

this concept was a true honor! Interpreting

“My custom floral design interprets the

the multi-layered art of Preston Wadley was

emotions, the colors, and the movements

an even further honor. It challenged me to

reflected in the painting. It expresses the

think outside normal design parameters to

Katrina hurricane and tornadoes and their

tell a story in the way he challenges people

devastating aftermath."

to 'Listen with Your Eyes.' I hope this is the beginning of a great tradition and that we will see this event grow in the future."

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SUMMER 2023


SLOW FLOWERS PODCAST HIGHLIGHTS

top five. Slow Flowers Podcast Episodes (April-June 2023)

EPISODE 607 | APRIL 26TH From botanist to flower farmer with Kate Watters of Arizona’s Wild Heart Farm. WATCH HERE

EPISODE 609 | MAY 10TH Falling in love with a country farm and building a life around flowers with Abby Matson of Diddle & Zen. WATCH HERE

EPISODE 611 | MAY 24TH A conversation with Julie Remy of Fleuris Studio and Blooms, along with a tour of her prolific cutting garden on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. WATCH HERE

EPISODE 613 | JUNE 7TH Island Flower Growers, a cooperative flower hub serving all of British Columbia’s Vancouver Island, with president Lorna Jackson and market manager Cara Scott WATCH HERE

EPISODE 614 | JUNE 14TH Julio Freitas of The Flower Hat designs a spring arrangement and previews his Slow Flowers Summit appearance. WATCH HERE

SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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SPRING 2023

A NATURAL PORTRAYAL PHOTOGRAPHY


THE BUSINESS OF FLOWERS BY BLAIR LYNN

a sustainable studio. Take a zero- or low-waste approach and you just might save some money! TIPS + TRICKS How often have you delivered a lovely wedding order bursting with gorgeous flowers, only to return to the studio feeling overwhelmed by the amount of trash bags needing to be taken out? As I've continued to define what I want my company's brand to symbolize, I've become painfully conscious of just how wasteful our gorgeous wedding industry can be. It seems counterintuitive, right? It can be hard to reconcile the amount of beauty we put out into the world with the amount of trash those actions can produce. Whether you’ve ordered flowers that are shipped to you or receive deliveries from a wholesaler, you’re likely dealing with packing materials, including, but not limited to: boxes, ice packs, packing paper, cellophane or plastic floral sleeves, rubber bands, elastics, or twist ties. Plus, there is no denying the excessive bubble wrap and Styrofoam that accompanies all the hard goods we regularly order. Then, there are the materials for armatures and design mechanics, and the most obvious: all the plant material, stems, leaves, and debris from creating our designs! Have I covered it all?

Adopt these habits to feel better about your studio's footprint. ONE Consider using chicken wire or other reusable mechanics to reduce waste. TWO Organize your studio with bins to hold all the items you’ll be reusing and recycling. THREE If you aren’t already having your recycling and green waste picked up, call your county or municipal recycling center to find out what items they pick up, or whether you need to drop some items at a recycling center. You may also be able to pay a small fee to a private company to have your recycling picked up. FOUR Consider using vendors who package their product in recyclable materials or use minimal plastic or Styrofoam.

Would you believe that even with all this “trash” that we regularly contend with, my studio recycles three quarters of it -- and often more! How? I credit being organized, determined, and creative as I seek ways to reuse or recycle all these materials. You can do it too! I have listed some tips and tricks here, and if you want to dig deeper into my ideas for reorganizing your physical studio and improving studio processes to cut down on trash, you can check out our 11-page digital guide, "How to Run a Sustainable Floral

Order Blair's 11-page digital guide HERE: "How to Run a Sustainable Floral Studio". In this downloadable PDF, she shares tips and tricks for how she has organized her studio, as well as some habits you can adopt to feel better about your company’s carbon footprint. The guide is available for $15.

SLOW FLOWERS JOURNAL

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A NATURAL PORTRAYAL PHOTOGRAPHY

THE BUSINESS OF FLOWERS

Studio." It's available for order on

I've realized that it’s just as

Each time I encounter a new

my website.

important, if not MORE important,

challenge, I know I can modify my

to reduce my company’s carbon

methods. When we know better,

footprint as it is to create beautiful

we can do better.

This sounds like a lot of work, right? I suppose it does. But when you really care about making a difference and changing habits to become more sustainable, it doesn’t feel like such a burden. It's possible to incorporate waste reduction so these practices feel like a natural part of your process. I believe it's important to have a shift in mindset. Does it require

events for my clients. If the trash bags from my events outweigh

BONUS

the quantity of flowers I use, what

There is a noticeable cost savings

sort of impact is my company really having on this planet? I only want to be a part of this industry if I engage in a way that doesn’t require me to take out multiple bags of trash every single week.

a time commitment? Yes. Will

With just a few extra steps, and

it involve changing the way you

some extra motivation, you can

operate your business? Yes. BUT.

reduce the amount of waste in

Once you have systems in place

your floral studio. It helps to first

for recycling and reusing the

focus on reducing and reusing

abundance of materials generated

before thinking about recycling.

by a floral studio, I guarantee it

Most importantly, I've learned

will become second nature.

that I can always educate myself about how to be more sustainable.

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SPRING 2023

when I reuse design mechanics and packing materials. I don’t buy chicken wire often because I use and reuse it. My flower frogs are investments that will last for years. I also don’t buy materials for transporting and delivering flowers because I often reuse boxes and bubble wrap for packing! Anything you can reuse is something you don’t have to buy again -- and this is therefore saving you money! WEBSITE


SLOW FLOWERS MANIFESTO Slow Flowers aims to reconnect flower consumers and floral professionals with the source of their flowers. We believe that when the origin of all botanical varieties sold to consumers and florists is clearly labeled, we place higher value on local, seasonal, and sustainably-grown florals, used artistically to express beauty.

SLOW FLOWERS COMMITS TO THE FOLLOWING PRACTICES 1. To recognize and respect the seasons by celebrating and designing with flowers when they naturally bloom. 2. To reduce the transportation footprint of flowers and foliage by sourcing as locally as possible. 3. To support flower farmers small and large by crediting them when possible through proper labeling at the wholesale and consumer level. 4. To encourage sustainable and organic farming practices that respect people and the environment. 5. To proactively pursue equity. inclusion. and representation in the floral marketplace. intentionally valuing Black floral professionals and farmers. floral designers, and vendors of Color in our business practices with as much support as we give to environmental sustainability. 6. To eliminate waste and the use of chemical products in the floral industry.

The Slow Flowers Movement puts a priority on sourcing local and domestic flowers In a way, this also means that we redefine beauty. As a Slow Food chef cooks with what is seasonally available, a Slow Flowers florist designs with what is seasonally available.

slowflowerssociety.com I @slowflowerssociety © Slow Flowers LLC

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about BLOOM Imprint BLOOM identifies and develops projects that shine a light on the floral lifestyle, showcasing the stories of floral personalities, creatives, entrepreneurs, farmers, and artisans.

OUR BOOKS FEATURED IN

BOOK DEVELOPMENT + EZINE PUBLISHING Founded in 2020, BLOOM engages readers to experience a new relationship with flowers, inspiring them to embrace local, seasonal, and sustainable practices. Our publications reveal the voice and vision of our authors and writers, pairing their written narratives with beautiful imagery and strong graphic design concepts. Located in the Pacific Northwest, the company works with a variety of creativies on the development and/or production of books, magazines, and specialty publications.

BLOOMIMPRINT.COM | @BLOOM.IMPRINT | BLOOM@BLOOMIMPRINT.COM


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SLOW FLOWERS MANIFESTO

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page 59

top five.

3min
pages 55-58

BAM in bloom.

4min
pages 49-54

CULTIVATING CONNECTION

3min
pages 42-49

APRIL LEMLY

3min
pages 40-42

URBAN SECRET GARDEN

1min
page 39

BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023

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pages 38-39

fLOWERS IN HIS HAIR

1min
page 37

CUTTING GARDEN COUTURE

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pages 34-37

TU TIEnES MI coRAzoN

2min
pages 30-34

BOTANICAL COUTURE 2023

2min
pages 26-30

thE ROMANCE OF PEONIES

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pages 23-25

FLORALS GIVE MENSWEAR AN UPGRADE

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pages 20-23

shane connolly.

7min
pages 13-17

RECHELLE DAY

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pages 9-12

Q: go-to elements for a stunning market bouquet?

1min
pages 6-8

BOTANICAL COUTURE

2min
pages 1-5
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