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Missio Dei: The Mission of God in the World

By Mr. Matthew Kemp, ‘13

A Lenten Meditation

By the Rev. Steven A. Peay, PhD

2011 Nashotah House

Contributor Listing

Lent 2012 Vol 28, No 3


New on the

Shelf:

Thornton Reprints Support Charity

By Chardy Booth Bookstore Manager At the Mission Bookstore, I enjoy working with many publishers. One in particular is Wipf & Stock from Eugene, Oregon. Since 1995 they have specialized in bringing back academic classics through their Custom Reprint Service. There are some newly republished authors that are of great interest to customers of the store. Mrs. Monica Thornton, the widow of Anglican theologian Martin Thornton, has given to Wipf & Stock for reprint her late husband’s works. She is sharing the royalties from these sales with the charity, Emmaus, which helps the homeless in the UK to help themselves. Please visit www.emmaus.org.uk for more information on this charity. Currently I have on the shelf these Thornton titles:

• Christian Proficiency ($24.00) • English Spirituality ($36.00) • I will order soon The Heart of the Parish (formerly Pastoral Theology). Forthcoming Thornton titles for May release are:

• • •

Spiritual Direction Prayer: A New Encounter A Joyful Heart: Meditations on Lent

Wipf & Stock has also recently published two of Archbishop of Canterbury Michael Ramsey’s books, each at $16.00. They are Be Still and Know and The Christian Priest Today. The author list for Wipf & Stock is long and distinguished, but one that might be of interest to The Missioner readers is Spiritual Counsel in the Anglican Tradition edited by David Hein and Charles R. Henery. This book reaches into the treasury of Anglican spirituality and draws out pearls of wisdom for today’s needs. Other volumes usually on the shelf at The Mission Bookstore are: • The Christian Faith by Moss • Defense of the True and Catholic Doctrine of the Sacrament of the Body and Blood of Our Savior Christ by Cranmer • A Manual for Priests of the American Church by Maddux • The Parson’s Handbook by Dearmer • The Elements of Spiritual Life by Harton

To order from The Mission Bookstore

please call 262-646-6529 or e-mail cbooth@nashotah.edu.


Experience Nashotah March 15-16, 2012

Whether you’re discerning a call to ministry or considering the possibility of attending seminary, there’s no better place to retreat from the cares of the world and begin to contemplate your call than Nashotah House. A two-day feast of worship, classroom experience, private reflection and candid discussion with our students, faculty, and staff, Experience Nashotah! is expressly designed for prospective students like you. • • • •

Worship in the historical chapel of St. Mary the Virgin Visit classes Meet the Dean, faculty, and staff Spend time with current students

For more information, contact Carol Klukas, Director of Admissions, at admissions@nashotah.edu. Register for Experience Nashotah! at www.nashotah.edu.

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In This Issue

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The 350th Anniversary of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer

By the Rev. Canon Arnold Klukas, PhD

The Underwood Collection of the Frances Donaldson Library

By Mr. David Sherwood

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Lessons from Lima Missio Dei: The Mission of God in the World

By Mr. Matthew Kemp, ‘13

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A Tribute to the Rev. Steve Schlossberg

By Garwood P. Anderson, PhD

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On Nashotah!

By the Rt. Rev. Daniel H. Martins

Greed: A Lenten Meditation

By the Rev. Steven A. Peay, PhD

18 Bless the founders and benefactors of this House... 2

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2011 Nashotah House Contributor Listing LENT 2012


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LETTER FROM THE DEAN

ear Friends,

As I was preparing to write my column for The Missioner, I discovered that the Lenten issue is the occasion when contributors to Nashotah House are listed so that we might show our appreciation to them. In the House Prayer we pray daily, “Open, O Lord, the hearts and hands of thy people that they may be ready to give and glad to distribute to our necessities.” This list of individuals, congregations, and organizations are those whose hearts and hands were open to our necessities during 2011. We are indeed thankful, and seek God’s grace to be good stewards of their generosity and pray that our benefactors will be blessed as well. Upon reflection, we may ask why have a focus on money in the season of Lent? The Ash Wednesday Collect begins by reminding us that God hates no thing that he has made and freely forgives the penitent. It then asks that God create and make in us new and contrite hearts that we may lament our sins and unworthiness and through God’s mercy receive remission of our sins and forgiveness. As we reflect on the threats to our relationship with God, money immediately comes to mind. The scripture gives money a name—Mammon, a false God. A significant percentage of Our Lord’s teachings are around money and possessions. Money gives a false sense of security and power. We come to believe it bestows values; it makes us somebody. We adore it and lust after it. This relationship then robs us of the

free gift of God’s grace from the Cross that bestows life and value through His work in the Cross, Resurrection, Ascension, and the gift of the Holy Spirit. We receive it by believing and abiding in our relationship with Jesus Christ. The gifts of our benefactors are signs of a victory over Mammon and point to the blessing that comes through giving. Our task is to seek God’s grace to be good stewards. We are in the midst of reorganizing the operation of the House, not its academics or proven capability for spiritual formation. We are creating an efficient administration so as to maximize our ability to raise up a priesthood that can impact this culture and empower the Church for the work of ministry. We are reorganizing our communication. We have two new associate editors for The Missioner—Fr. Andrew Hanyzewski, ’09, and Mrs. Jeneen Floyd, so that the life of this Community becomes more and more known and visible in the Church and has an impact upon it. We do not want to be a fortress; we want to be like an explosion. We know who we are. A fortress is defensive, and defends its borders. An explosion is red hot at the center, and needs no defense of its borders. We want to be good stewards of the resources we have been given. We want to make a difference for the Catholic faith we teach our students. My prayer for us all is that by the power of the Holy Spirit, we may keep a Holy Lent, and know ever more deeply God’s perfect remission and forgiveness. Yours faithfully in Christ,

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A Nod to the 1662 Book of Common Prayer by the Rev. Canon Arnold Klukas, PhD

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his year is the 350th anniversary of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, which remains to this day the only official service book in the Church of England. This year’s celebration may not make the splash that the 400th anniversary of the Authorized [King James] Bible will, but it runs as a close second. Ironically, the KJV was commissioned as an antidote to the more 4

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radically “reformed” versions of the English Bible, such as the Geneva Bible of 1560 which was translated by Protestant exiles of the Roman Catholic Queen Mary. It has now become the only version favored by reactionary Protestants and fundamentalists. James I, who commissioned the KJV, was also a strong advocate of the conservative view of the Reformation upheld by his Archbishop, William Laud. (Both James and Laud have windows dedicated to their memory in St. Mary’s Chapel.) Both felt that the 1552 Book of Common Prayer had gone too far in a Protestant direction. Even Queen Elizabeth, who can be considered the founder of the Anglican Church as the via media between Rome and Geneva, felt that the 1552 book had gone too far in a Genevan direction. Eventually, the rest of the English people recognized that they too had lost their heads (literally)! When Parliament begged Charles II to return from exile and succeed his father as the English king, LENT 2012


TOP LEFT Boies Penrose II Manuscript MIDDLE Portrait of Charles II from the 1662 Book of Common Prayer TOP RIGHT Sarum Book of Hours (c. 1400) showing devotions to the wounds of Christ SIDE TOP Title page of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer SIDE BOTTOM Sarum Book of Hours (c. 1400)

he made it perfectly clear that the restoration of the monarchy required the restoration of the Church of England as well as its Book of Common Prayer. But which edition of this book would be acceptable to a nation recovering from regicide and dis-establishment? Parliament wanted a compromise that would accommodate all parties, but Charles II and those clergy who had gone into exile with him would have nothing less than the via media first established by the Virgin Queen. “Catholic in worship and evangelical in doctrine” became the foundational approach to the new Prayer Book which Charles II and his bishops gratefully received in 1662 by Act of Parliament and Royal Consent. The 1662 Book of Common Prayer is still the standard by which every (or nearly every province but that of North America) considers essential to an Anglican identity. As with the KJV, the BCP 1662 is so foundational to the English language and to Anglophone culture that many Americans are completely unaware of how heavily their political and religious vocabularies are dependent upon these

supposedly antiquated and royalist documents. Every time an American soap opera portrays a marriage, it is the words from the 1662 BCP that echo over the airwaves. Even “The Life of Brian” of Monty Python fame quotes the 1662 BCP in nearly every scene. The English language, wherever it is spoken around the globe, would be impoverished without the 1662 BCP.

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t Nashotah House, we are thankful that this illustrious tradition is not only alive and well in our chapel services (half the year we use Rite I exclusively), but that also our Library has original editions of all the succeeding liturgical books of Anglicanism; from the medieval Sarum Liturgy (in Latin, with all the names of all the popes crossed out under King Henry VIII) but also the 1549, 1552, 1559, 1604, 1637 (Scots), to the 1662 in many sizes and dates. It is a great privilege for me, as a professor of liturgics, to be able to show my students the authentic examples of each generation within the life of the Church. Indeed, God has blessed us with a goodly heritage!


UNDERWOOD COLLECTION

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by David Sherwood, Director Frances Donaldson Library

amed after the donor Mr. Walter S. Underwood, the Underwood Prayer Book Collection is the centerpiece of the Frances Donaldson Library’s stock of rare books. Mr. Underwood was a prominent Chicago attorney and senior partner in one of the largest law firms in Chicago: McLease, Spray, Price & Underwood. A longtime parishioner of the Church of the Ascension, he served as Chancellor of the Episcopal Diocese of Chicago. His gift arrived at Nashotah House in 1977 and has been used in support of the House’s courses ever since. In recent years, items from the Collection have also been exhibited in museums at Marquette University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Since 1977, The Underwood Foundation has provided financial support for the library’s efforts to preserve and publicize the Collection. Among the highlights of the Underwood Collection are two magnificently illuminated, late medieval manuscripts. The first of these is a Sarum Use Book of Hours, circa 1400. The volume features many finely painted scenes, illuminated capitals, and extensive decoration. The second illuminated medieval manuscript in the Collection is known as the Boies Penrose II Manuscript. This volume contains many lovely illuminated capitals, with handsome decoration on most pages. In addition, the Underwood Collection includes first editions of the Books of Common Prayer of 1549 and 1552, as well as the Prymer of 1554, commonly called Queen Mary’s Book. Most important subsequent editions of the Book of Common Prayer are also represented in the Collection, including two versions of the 1662 book, the so-called Provisional Prayer Book of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of

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America of 1786, and the first authorized edition of the American Book of Common Prayer of 1790. Additional photos and details of the Underwood Collection are posted on the library’s web page, www.nashotah.edu/library, and the books in the Collection are also available in HouseCat, the library’s online catalog. TOP Title page of a large-format 1662 Book of Common Prayer BOTTOM Decorated initial from the Boies Penrose II Manuscript

LENT 2012


Lessons from Lima by Matthew Kemp, ’13

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can honestly say that I have never had any experience in my life quite like going to Lima, Peru in January of this year. Having barely ventured past the United States’ northern and southern borders, this was by far the farthest from home I have ever been. Yet I was richly blessed to see the same church ministering in a different part of the world; proclaiming the kingdom of the same God who is worshipped by Christians in North America. Furthermore, I found that I had much to gain and learn from my brothers and sisters in Peru about the mission of the church and what it means to live sacrificially as Christians. Five of us from Nashotah House, including myself and my wife Alethea, as well as Cindy Bisser, ’13, Richard Moseley, ’14, and Marcia Allison, flew from Milwaukee to Lima on January 6, the Feast of the Epiphany. We met up with six others from

various parts of the U.S., as well as the Rev. Jack Gabig, who led a course on mission at the Diocesan Center in Lima, titled “Missio Dei: The Mission of God in the World.” This course met in the evenings of the week that we were there, and was also attended by clergy and lay leaders in the area. During the daytime our group visited various mission sites in the area with some priests and seminarians from the diocese. In addition to these profound opportunities to experience and and share in these ministries, we enjoyed the hospitality and fellowship of a number of the missionary clergy and families of the Diocese of Peru, especially the Rt. Rev. William and Judith Godfrey, the Rt. Rev. Michael and Linda Chapman, the Rev. Allen and the Rev. Dcn. Rachel Hill, the Rev. Ian and Polly Montgomery, and the Rev. John and Susan Park. The week ended with a two-day conference featuring the inaugural John H. Heidt Lecture Series,


This is, I believe, one of the great charisms larger, more established parishes plant of the Anglican tradition: being catholic, various mission congregations, like the legs of a spider, which in turn grow into parishes evangelical, and charismatic, it has the which can plant other congregations. potential to be the ecumenical meeting Many of these new missions are led by lay ground between differing expressions of leaders or deacons until enough priests Christianity. In Lima, however, I saw this can be trained and ordained to lead these not just as potential but as an actuality. congregations. The diocese runs Saints he ministry of the Diocese of Augustine Seminary (named for both St. Peru, however, is not limited Augustine of Hippo and St. Augustine of to ecumenism. Much of their Canterbury) to train its priests, deacons, work is among people who and lay leaders for this ministry. Overall, it are otherwise neglected: the was an encouraging experience to see the poor, persons with disabilities, those not Anglican Church there so vibrant in its life ministered to by other churches. The sites and mission. Given we visited revealed much of this, including church “...how much more is the current turmoil of Anglicanism in plants in hillside shantytowns which lacked such required of those of us North America, it is too easy to become basic necessities as clean in wealthier nations, all disheartened about drinking water. It was incredible to see how the where even our poor our tradition, but in Peru we saw it strong church seeks to meet both have far more than and full of life, a sure the physical and spiritual sign that God is at needs of the people. For most people in the work there. We need instance, one priest we met only remember that is pouring his talents into world?” it is the same God who catechesis while playing is at work in the American church as well. a mentoring role to the children at his One of the things which most impressed parish and a local school. Meanwhile me, however, is how the church there another priest is using his connections does so much with so little. One of in the local chapter of the Rotary Club to the great temptations in the American provide means of purifying water to the church is to put too much stock in our areas where he ministers. Likewise, we material resources. We often think, “If visited two parishes which run schools only we had a larger endowment, or for local children, as well as one center for a better building, or a more talented children with disabilities which provides music director, then we could grow both education and various forms of our church and expand our ministries.” physical and developmental therapy. But I saw in Peru that what is We also saw how the church really needed are men and women who are there, while small, is expanding rapidly. devoted to the gospel, the kingdom of Their approach to church planting was God, and the church; men and women described as a “spider model,” in which

T TOP Matthew and Alethea Kemp

titled “Theology Shaping Mission,” given by the Rt. Rev. Michael NazirAli, retired bishop of Rochester. The conference was attended by clergy, seminarians, and lay leaders from Peru, Bolivia, England, and the United States. here was certainly a lot packed into those twelve days before we returned to Nashotah House on January 17. It was a lot to take in, but it was greatly encouraging to see what God is doing in another part of the world. The Anglican Church in Peru is small in numbers but great in influence; often acting in a mediating role between Roman Catholics on the one hand and evangelicals and Pentecostals on the other, who tend to be at odds with one another.

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who are willing to give of themselves, even if all they have to give, like the widow’s mite, is but a small offering by worldly standards. One Peruvian priest we met asked me what I thought of the Anglican Church in Peru. I gave him the first answer I thought of: “I wish the church in the U.S. were more like it.” He responded by noting that the Peruvian church was materially poor but spiritually rich, whereas the American church is materially rich, and thus more susceptible to spiritual poverty. I do not think this priest is aware of the many problems that beset North American Anglicanism at present, but I believe he has insightfully hit on one root of many of those issues. That is not to say that material wealth is in itself bad. On the contrary, without the resources of many in the U.S. we would not have been able to go to Lima at all, and would have missed this amazing opportunity to see and share in the church’s ministry there. I believe I speak for my fellow travelers on this trip in expressing our gratitude for the many people who

saw their money as a blessing from God which was meant to be shared with others, and so donated in support of our trip. For Alethea and me, this was by no means the first time we have benefited from the generosity of others. Were it not for scholarships through Nashotah House, monthly financial support from our home parish, St. Paul’s bythe-Lake in Chicago, and annual support from Upper Arlington Lutheran Church in Columbus, Ohio, where I grew up, I highly doubt that I would be able to be in seminary at all. On top of this, we have often been given money or gift cards from friends and relatives, several times anonymously. If this has taught us one thing, it is that God does indeed supply our daily bread; even if we can only hope to receive enough for one day at a time. This lesson will become even more important for us this May, when we expect the birth of our first child, a girl. ut we have also been moved by the fact that some who have given to us do not have much more expendable income than we do. If they can be so generous, why should we not be so as well? This has certainly challenged us to be more generous and sacrificial in giving to others. I do not want to limit giving to finances; on the contrary, I have recently learned how much we can give to the church and the kingdom of God out of our time and skills, irrespective of how much money we might have. Nevertheless, I find my normal excuse for not giving more financially, that I am in seminary and thus on a very strict

budget, to be seriously questioned by seeing how little some people in the world live on, and how generous they are with their small means. For instance, we met a woman in one of the shanty-towns on the edge of Lima who lives in extreme poverty, but works to feed others in her neighborhood. If this is possible for someone with almost nothing, how much more is required of those of us in wealthier nations, where even our poor have far more than most people in the world? or this and many other reasons I feel deeply blessed for having the opportunity to visit Peru and to learn from our brothers and sisters there more about the mission of God in the world, and how that mission is accomplished through the sacrificial work of his church. It was especially meaningful for Alethea and me to be there while pregnant, as we look forward to telling our daughter that she was there with us.

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LEFT The Rt. Rev. Eric Menees, Bp. of San Joaquin (ACNA), the Rt. Rev. Frank Lyons, Bp. of Bolivia, MDiv ’80, DD ’01, Cindy Bisser, ’13, the Rt. Rev. Michael Chapman, Suffragan Bp. of Peru, ’90, Richard Moseley, ’14, the Rev. Tripp Prince, the Rev. Allen Hill, Dean of Sts. Augustine Seminary, Lima, the Rev. Michael Brooks, ’05, the Rt. Rev. H. William Godfrey, Bp. of Peru, DD ’08, the Rt. Rev. Michael NazirAli, Bp. of Rochester (retired), DD ’10, Marcia Allison, Alethea Kemp, Matthew Kemp, ’13, the Rev. Jack Gabig, Associate Prof. of Practical Theology, the Very Rev. Canon John Park, Dean of Cathedral of the Good Shepherd, Lima

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We hope to instill in her, from an early age, a passion for the kingdom of God. Moreover, I have learned much about how different parts of the church, separated by geography, language, and culture, can still live as one body and mutually benefit one another. It is not simply for us as wealthy Americans to give to the material needs of those in poorer nations. Rather I feel like I am the one who was enriched spiritually by the witness of the Peruvian church. I hope and pray that this mutual enrichment will continue in spite of the disunity among Anglicans and Christians in general, until we “grow up in every way into him who is the head, into Christ, from whom the whole body, joined and held together by every joint with which it is equipped, when each part is working properly, makes the body grow so that it builds itself up in love” (Eph. 4:15-16).

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Fr. Schlossberg

Escapes

Unnoticed

– Almost

Fr. Steve arriving at his “surprise” roast/going away party.

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Garwood P. Anderson, PhD

Associate Professor of New Testament and Greek Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

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r. Steve Schlossberg almost escaped the Nashotah House campus in November without notice in The Missioner. If The Missioner almost didn’t notice Fr. Schlossberg’s departure as the House’s Director of Communications to become Rector of St. John’s Episcopal Church in Troy, New York, there can only be one explanation. Fr. Schlossberg served as the editor of this magazine for four and half years, including our most recent issue and was too self-deprecating to make a point of his own transition. For students, staff and faculty, the November 8th send-off celebration – appropriately, a roast – was an occasion for not a few tears and even more gratitude for one who had become dear to us. While taking on the task of serving as the seminary’s Director of Communications upon his graduation from the House in 2007, Fr. Schlossberg took up a calling to become a mentor and guide to seminarians and their families, and a pastor at-large to all of us. And while some poignant accounts in The Missioner of life at the House and the ministry of her alumni will be remembered (along with some mischievous accounts of the Black Monks’ fortunes on the gridiron), more memorable than these will be Fr. Schlossberg’s four and a half years of sermons in the Chapel of St. Mary; sermons which punctuated our life together with a call, at once clarion and artful, to take up the cross in service of the Christ. More enduring perhaps than even the sermons will be the friendship and example of one who lived among us as a man called and faithful. And now that call and that faithfulness take him to St. John’s Episcopal Church to carry on a good work in a new place. Installed January 8th as the new Rector of St. John’s by Bishop William Love of the Diocese of Albany, himself a Trustee and son of the House, Fr. Schlossberg begins the work he came to Nashotah House in 2004 to be trained for, and miss him though we do, we can hardly begrudge him for fulfilling his vocation. Moving with Fr. Schlossberg – against their own better judgment – is the Schlossberg family: Angie, who had served in the library and in so many other ways among us, and their children: Abe, Joe, and Lydia, no less members of our community. The oldest two Schlossberg children, Jacob and Isaac are staying in the Chicago area, and, we can hope, provide incentive for frequent visits to the Midwest from the rest of the family. Godspeed, Schlossbergs!

The House is pleased to welcome Fr. Schlossberg back to campus as part of our Petertide Course Offerings. Fr. Schlossberg, along with Dr. Garwood Anderson, will be co-instructors for our Preaching the Sermon on the Mount course July 9 -20, 2012. We’re looking forward to seeing him then!

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Biddings & Bindings Ordinations & Appointments

The Rev. Charles G. Ackerson, ’86, has been named Honorary Canon of Cathedral of the Incarnation, by the Rt. Rev. Lawrence Provenzano, Diocese of Long Island, New York. Cathedral of the Incarnation, 50 Cathedral Avenue, Garden City, New York 11530. The Rev. Meredyth L. Albright, ’12, was ordained Deacon on December 17, 2011, by the Rt. Rev. Russell E. Jacobus, Diocese of Fond du Lac, WI. The Rev. Susan Lynn Blake, ’10, was ordained Deacon on December 10, 2011, by the Rt. Rev. John W. Howe, Diocese of Central Florida. She is Deacon at St. Edward’s Episcopal Church, 460 North Grandview Street, Mount Dora, FL 32757. The Rev. Canon James H. Davis, ’54, has been named Honorary Canon of Diocese of the Northeast, by the Rt. Rev. Brian R. Marsh, Diocese of the Northeast , ACA. The Rev. Mark E. Evans, ’09, is Rector of Trinity Episcopal Church, 402 Pekin Street, Lincoln, IL 62656. The Rev. Matthew M. Frick, ’08, is Rector of St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church, 2627 Horseshoe Drive, Alexandria, LA 71301. The Rev. Andrew J. Hanyzewski, ’09, is Priest-in-Charge of St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, 302 Merchants Avenue, Fort Atkinson, WI 53538. The Rev. Susan G. Waldron, ’08, is Rector of St. Mary’s Episcopal Church, P.O. Box 211, Lake Luzerne, NY 12846.

Retirement

The Rev. Canon James H. Davis, ’54, retired as Interim Rector of Trinity Anglican Church, Rochester, NH.

Notification of Death

The Rt. Rev. A. Donald Davies, ’71, died October 16, 2011, age 91. The Rev. Dr. Arra M. Garab, ’05, died August 22, 2011, age 81.

In Memoriam The Rt. Rev. Clarence C. Pope, Jr.

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Second Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth ishop Pope served on the Nashotah House Board of Trustees since 1981, most recently as an honorary Trustee. He also received an honorary Doctor of Divinity degree from Nashotah House in 1985. The following is adapted from the obituary published in Texas and Louisiana newspapers: A longtime resident of Baton Rouge and a native of Shreveport, the Rt. Rev. Clarence C. Pope, Jr. died Saturday, January 7, 2012, at age 82. He was the first curate and school chaplain at Trinity Episcopal Church in Baton Rouge serving from 1954 until 1956. Later he was assigned to establish St. George’s Episcopal Church in Bossier Parish and was the priest in charge and served as their first rector from the summer of 1956 until 1962. He then moved to Baton Rouge and served there from 1962 until 1985 as the second rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church. In 1985 he was elected the second Bishop of The Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth, TX, in which he served until his retirement in 1995. After retirement he moved back home to Baton Rouge. Bishop Pope worked tirelessly for the cause of Christian unity and the reconciliation of his beloved Anglican tradition with the Catholic Church. His consultations in the 1990s with Cardinal Joseph Ratzinger, now Pope Benedict XVI, helped lead to the recent foundation of the Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter, for those Anglican groups coming into full communion with the Catholic Church. He is remembered and loved by many colleagues in the sacred ministry for his pastoral leadership and generous spirit. Bishop Pope is survived by his wife of over 54 years, Martha Haley Pope, M.D.; daughter, Juliet Haley Pope and husband John J. Hohensee, Sr.; son, Clarence Cullam Pope, III and wife Mandy Montgomery Pope, sisters, Mary Helen Pope White and Patricia Pope Laenger; and four grandchildren, Virginia Pope Guidry and Raegan

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Elizabeth Pope, Quinton Montgomery Pope, and Clarence Cullam Pope, IV. On the news of his passing, the Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker said, “We are deeply saddened by the death of Bishop Clarence Pope, who faithfully shepherded this diocese during a turbulent decade in the life of the Anglican Communion. He will be remembered first as a loving pastor who cared deeply for his clergy and their families, and second as a defender of the historic faith and order of the catholic church. We give thanks to God for his courage and perseverance in engaging the conflicts that engulfed his episcopate. On a personal note, I feel the loss of a valued mentor and beloved friend.” Two memorial services were held for Bishop Pope. The first was a requiem mass on Thursday, January 12 at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church, Baton Rouge, LA. The Rev. Canon Chad Jones served as celebrant and preacher. Interment followed at the Grace Episcopal Church Cemetery in St. Francisville, LA. The second requiem mass was said Monday, January 23 at St. Vincent’s Cathedral Church, Bedford, TX. The Rt. Rev. Jack L. Iker served as celebrant and preacher. Memorial donations in honor of Bishop Pope may be made to the Nashotah House Scholarship Fund, 2777 Mission Road, Nashotah, WI 53058. LENT 2012


On Nashotah!

the actual reality of life in Throughout my 22 years of parish ministry community. Many of my before becoming a bishop, I not only peers in the student body prayed the office, but nearly always did so A Reflection by the Rt. Rev. Daniel H. Martins held views on various publicly at stated times. Sometimes I had matters that differed sharply company and sometimes I did not, but from my own. Sometimes snarky or nasty my parishioners knew that the “official” first heard about Nashotah House in words were exchanged. Faculty members prayer of the church was being offered 1974 while I was a graduate student had quirks. Sometimes the music or on their behalf. My Nashotah formation in music history at the University of liturgy in the chapel didn’t quite get the has given me the energy to persist in this California at Santa Barbara. Brenda job done, in my opinion. The food in the routine. Life in community, of course, and I had just begun attending refectory was ... well, just imagine sausage is the other big piece in the formation St. Michael & All Angels’ Church, the links cooked in deep fat. There was puzzle. Learning to pray and work and Episcopal campus ministry at UCSB, and discomfort. And it was precisely in the eat alongside people with whom I have the Vicar, Father George Hartung, was a midst of that discomfort (and not in my some fairly fundamental disagreements son of the House from the 1940s. Shortly earlier idealism) that a most wonderful was good practice for much of my afterward, I began to wrestle with my own process was taking place: ordained ministry, and call to ordained ministry, and while Fr. I was being formed. I was I should say, especially Hartung never pressured me, he always being formed as a disciple in the episcopate. had an anecdote about his seminary of Jesus, and I was being years, so there was no way I was not going formed as a priest. With So now it’s going on 23 to give Nashotah House a serious look. each uncomfortable years since I heard the encounter or exchange or Academic Dean say I made my prospective student visit to moment of realization, a “Descendit alumni” to Nashotah in June of 1975. This included piece of stone was being my graduating class. The a substantive, if somewhat intimidating, chipped away, until, three Nashotah experience conversation with Dean John Ruef, years later, enough pieces was an aspiration for informal interaction with a handful of were chipped away to more than a decade, students, a long walk all around the green reveal a priest of Christ’s and it felt like I would and leafy campus, and attendance at Holy Catholic Church. never get there. Now Evening Prayer in St. Mary’s Chapel (Said, it’s been a memory for since it was out of term). I was in love. Yes, I also attended more than two decades, I was infected with the soul of the place classes and read books and sometimes it feels as The Rt. Rev. Daniel H. Martins and what it represented in the history of and wrote papers though I never left. This the Episcopal Church and the Catholic (and took a few tests along the way). I is because, in so many ways, it made me movement in Anglicanism. I virtually learned a great deal in that process. I am who I am. When I visited the campus in salivated at the thought of becoming part particularly grateful for the mandatory 1999 for commencement, Alumni Day, of that community; weaving my own exposure to biblical languages that I and my ten-year class reunion, while biography with that of the institution. experienced in the classroom; I’m not at walking mindfully up the road from the

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As events unfolded (including a move from one diocese to another, and a difficult route through “the process” in the diocese to which I moved), I may hold the record for the longest elapsed time between looksee visit and matriculation--eleven years! It was not until August of 1986, now with three young children added to the mix, that we formed a two vehicle caravan (one of which was a U-Haul truck) and made our way from the Pacific Northwest to southeast Wisconsin. (In a pre-internet and pre-cell phone era, this was truly an adventure.) This time, we all fell in love with Nashotah. It was a pivotal moment for me. Nashotah House had been fairly intensely on my radar for nearly one-third of my life. To have such a long-held aspiration materialize was indeed a blessing. Then I had to actually be at Nashotah. It was a challenge to integrate the idealized vision with which I had arrived with

all sure a parish priest should presume to preach or teach without having had that exposure. There wasn’t much room in the curriculum for elective courses, and, I have to say, I’m grateful for that too. While it is true that the landscape of parish ministry is always shifting, and has changed considerably even since I was a student, Nashotah’s classical approach to theological education has stood the test of time and weathered enough change to reveal itself as perennially appropriate.

Still, though many seminaries make academics their show window to the world, Nashotah House has never done so, not because it has any need to be ashamed of its academic rigor--it does not--but because academics is only one ingredient in the recipe for formation in ministry-whether it’s the priesthood or something else. The rhythm of chapel worship, and the expectation that attendance is part of the mutual accountability between members of the student and faculty community, is another of those key ingredients. NASHOTAH.EDU

beach to the back of the library, I had a moment of mystical insight: Nashotah House is the hinge on which my whole life has turned. In that moment, I felt more “at home” in that place than I ever have anywhere else. Indeed, one day--not too soon, I trust!--my mortal remains will be committed to the earth in the Nashotah graveyard, where I spent so much time practicing sermons, setting my notes on a pulpit-like headstone, and hoping never to get a response from that particular congregation. In the meantime, it is a joy and privilege to serve the House any way I can, and with a grateful heart.

The Rt. Rev. Daniel H. Martins graduated cum laude from Nashotah House in 1989 and received a D.D. in 2011. He has served as Alumni Trustee for the Midwest Region since 2010. He has served in the dioceses of Louisiana, San Joaquin, and Northern Indiana and was consecrated Bishop of Springfield in March, 2011. He is married to Brenda and they have three grown children. the MISSIONER

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Spirits Flow as Koehler

taps Nashotah

Re-est. A.D.

2011 While on campus for a tour this fall, the Rev. Canon R. Brien Koehler visited the Cellar of St. Gambrinus, the new pub in the basement of “the Fort.” During the tour, Fr. Koehler mentioned his daughter worked in the beverage business and he would like to make a donation to the Cellar. Three days later, a kegerator arrived! In honor of his spirited donation, Master Barkeep

Aaron Zook, ’12, and his Cellar co-founders, Lars Skoglund, ’14, and Ben Jefferies, ’14, found and purchased a beer tap handle with the name “Koehler”, from Koehler Beer Company in Nashville. Our thanks go to Fr. Koehler for his donation. Fr. Koehler is a Trustee and alumnus class of 1976. He recently retired as rector of St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Baton Rouge, LA.

TOP Aaron Zook, ’12, Lars Skoglund, ’14, and Ben Jefferies, ’14. BOTTOM Ben Jefferies, ’14, at the opening of The Cellar.

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LENT 2012


M. John Dyrud: A Spirit of Giving

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BY RICHARD J. LONGABAUGH, PROVOST

ashotah House has been blessed by many people who feel its call to give. One such individual is M. John Dyrud, board member of the Nashotah House Foundation. A part-time resident of Lake Country, Chicago and Sarasota, FL, John has had a love affair with Nashotah House for more than five years. Born in Prairie du Chien, WI, John describes himself as a “cradle Episcopalian”. He is a graduate of Lawrence University and now retired from a career in sales management with an electronics company owned by Sunbeam. John’s first visit to the House came about one summer when he attended morning prayers. “I could feel a warmth and closeness to God when I came in the chapel,” he said. “I was immediately welcomed by everyone there. I became a regular attendee and after being invited to breakfast two or three times, and stubbornly declining, I finally accepted and was hooked.” During the years of his relationship with the House, John has had two partners. The first was his wife, Suzy Swallow Mead Dyrud, now departed. “Suzy came to love Nashotah House on her own. In fact, her parents were married at the House. We viewed Nashotah House as part of our journey of faith,” John recalls. The second is his brother, Eric, who has been his right-hand man on numerous projects around the House. John’s spirit of giving has led him to be involved with Nashotah House in many ways. He and Eric have not been afraid to get their hands dirty. One of the first projects, John recalls, was dealing with a flood and clean-up in one of the laundry rooms. In the years since, the Brothers Dyrud have done painting, planting, step repair and donated the brass plaques on the stone pillars at the entrance to the House. John also has a strong interest in the maintenance of the cemetery gravestones and tree trimming. To be sure, John is high-energy and is always looking for ways to help the House. John noted, “I just like being involved; active. Sometimes, I just see things that need a personal touch or that no one has had a chance to get to.” John’s early involvement was a happy convergence of a desire to find a worship community and a range of needs at Nashotah House. His only reward was a sense of satisfaction that he had contributed in some small way to excellence at Nashotah House. As a result, several years ago he was named to the board of the Nashotah House Foundation.

Over the years, John has been active in soliciting financial support for various House projects including the renovations in the vesting room and the remodeling in St. Mary’s Chapel. “I know a lot of people and I always enjoy telling them about the House. I’m glad to help them find ways to get engaged in the House.” One of John’s great passions M. John Dyrud at Nashotah House is the students. “I get most excited when I ask a seminarian how they came to the House and then listening to their story.” This connection with students has helped John become keenly aware of the financial strain that seminary education places on students and families. Insights gained here have led John to his most recent project on behalf of the House. Through the Nashotah House Foundation, John has laid the ground work to establish a scholarship fund for students in the Residential program. He has made significant financial contributions that will setup a matching fund to help defray students’ living costs. The details of the fund will be released prior to Experience Nashotah! in March 2012. “Scholarship money and finding ways to help students pay their costs is one of the most pressing needs at Nashotah House and I think this program can be a great help.” When asked why he continues to give and support Nashotah House, John said, “I think there is going to be a shortage of clergy in the church. I have talked to many people about seminary education around the country and when it comes to things like the library or faculty, I’m convinced there is no better place to go for theological training than Nashotah House. I feel like this is a great place to serve the Lord at this period in my life.” The love of Christ and a willingness to serve the Lord led John to Nashotah House. Through his example, he has shown that no matter how large or small, the House derives great benefit from the generosity of its many supporters. John does not hesitate to encourage others to share their time, talent and treasure. John said, “There are a lot of people seeking a relationship with the Lord and I think Nashotah House can be a good starting point for them.” NASHOTAH.EDU

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Greed: A Lenten Meditation The Rev. Steven A. Peay, PhD

Associate Professor of Church History/Director of Field Education

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was asked to consider “greed” for this Lenten meditation and my mind went immediately to two speeches, one by Gordon Gekko (the character from the movie Wall Street) and the other by our Lord, Jesus Christ. The point is, ladies and gentleman, that greed, for lack of a better word, is good. Greed is right, greed works. Greed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit. Greed, in all of its forms; greed for life, for money, for love, knowledge has marked the upward surge of mankind. And greed, you mark my words, will not only save Teldar Paper, but that other malfunctioning corporation called the USA. Thank you very much. Gordon Gekko Wall Street – 1987 16

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“Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust consume and where thieves break in and steal, but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust consumes and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there will your heart be also. “The eye is the lamp of the body. So, if your eye is sound, your whole body will be full of light; but if your eye is not sound, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light in you is darkness, how great is the darkness!” “No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and mammon.” Matthew 6:19-24. Gekko, memorably played by Michael LENT 2012


there. When we become self-focused or greedy then what we’re really doing is showing where our treasure is and who our Lord is. reed obscures our spiritual sight, which is why Jesus addresses the “clear eye” that will allow the heart to see. As John Shea, contemporary theologian and storyteller points out, “In biblical spirituality the heart is connected to the eyes. When the heart burns, the fire pushes up the chest and flows out of the eyes. This allows the person to see. The eyes are like the headlights of a car. They are lit from within in order to peer into the darkness without. When the fire in the heart dies down, the person’s sight dims and eventually goes out. This may be poor physiology, but it is good spirituality.” To be self-focused is to obstruct that vision and then not be in touch with our spiritual center so life thus becomes one-dimensional, flat. One could go so far as to say that we can even quench the fire which is to burn in our hearts so we become cold and blind. If our spiritual sight is clear and functioning, then we can see who is really worthy of our devotion and of our service. Greed, mammon, may have its attractions, but it also has its price – the soul. Jesus isn’t saying that we can possess nothing or that we cannot attach ourselves to any ideology. He is telling us that whatever we do, we must make the distinction between possessing and being possessed. Greed, in all of its forms, possesses and as it does, it narrows us; renders us spiritually sclerotic as it were, taking away our ability to freely respond. However, the more the servant of God is bound by growth in selfless service the freer that servant becomes and giving of one’s self becomes the most natural response. We have been recipients of a freely given gift, is it any wonder that we would respond in like manner? When our heart’s treasure is God and God’s Kingdom the interest it bears is the ongoing advancement of the common good. We can liken the difference between servants to the two seas found in Palestine: the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea. The Sea of Galilee is a body of water that supports life; people live around it, fish in it and enjoy it. The Dead Sea is just that – dead; it cannot support life. What is the difference? The Sea of Galilee is formed by the Jordan River, which flows into it and then out of it. The Dead Sea is also formed by the Jordan River, but it only flows in. One receives and gives and lives. The other only receives and is dead. Gordon Gekko was correct in saying, “Greed clarifies, cuts through, and captures the essence of the evolutionary spirit.” It does, and it shows just how lacking and destructive it is. Greed is anything but good, regardless of the form it takes, or the ideal it espouses. Jesus teaches us that our lives are to reflect His own, which was, in the words of the Kerygma, the earliest preaching of the Church, taken up with “going about doing good.” The love of the Father that flowed into Him flowed out, even to the ultimate act of self-giving on the Cross. As His followers, that same love is to flow into us and then find its way out in our giving of ourselves: our time, our talent and our material possessions. Lent’s call to slow down and reflect, to “come apart and rest,” should give us an opportunity to recommit ourselves to finding our heart’s true sight and true treasure, and to make a difference for others along the way.

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Douglas, articulates the world in which we live. A world that grows ever more concerned with money, things and individual welfare. Gekko’s evolutionary “upward surge” carries with it an undermining of the common good in the rush to make sure that “I’ve got mine,” without concern for the needs of others. The current crises in the world economy, the American political scene, and in the Church can all be traced back to the core reality of greed, in one way or another. And what is greed? Webster’s Dictionary tells us that it is “a selfish and excessive desire for more of something (as money) than is needed.” The concern is for my welfare, my ideology and my interpretation, even at the expense of others. Greed is about being self-centered and this is precisely what Jesus tells us we’re not to be; because we no longer need to be. Our treasure is to be our life in God. Our relationship with God in Christ doesn’t need a security guard and doesn’t need a broker. It cannot be stolen. It will never lose its value, but instead will grow in value, regardless of market conditions, which is why Jesus tells us to put our hearts

“When our heart’s treasure is God and God’s Kingdom the interest it bears is the ongoing advancement of the common good.”

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Individual Donors The Rev. and Mrs. Keith J. Acker The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Keith L. Ackerman The Rev. Thomas D. Ackerman The Rev. Dr. Charles G. Ackerson The Rt. Rev. James M. Adams, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Frank G. Adams Mr. George M. Ahrens Mr. and Mrs. Charles R. Allison The Rev. and Mrs. Phillip L. Anderas Dr. and Mrs. Garwood Anderson Mr. and Mrs. David Anderson Mr. Paul M. Androski Mr. and Mrs. John R. C. Armstrong Lt. Col. and Mrs. John F. Armstrong The Rev. and Mrs. Russell L. Arnett The Rev. and Mrs. Vernon A. Austin

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Ms. Suzanne Bacheller Mr. and Mrs. Harry D. Baker The Rev. and Mrs. Francis B. Baltz The Rev. Daniel L. Banner, SSC Dr. and Mrs. James E. Bardenwerper Mrs. Frances K. Barr, D.H.L. The Rev. and Mrs. David L. Barr Mr. and Mrs. David A. Barta Dr. and Mrs. Craig L. Bartos The Rev. Dwayne R. Bauman Mr. and Mrs. Gerry Bay Mr. David A. Beaulac Mr. and Mrs. Thomas F. Beck Ms. Suzanne K. Beckley Mr. and Mrs. H.J. Bergami The Rev. Canon and Mrs. David E. Bergesen The Rev. John W. Berry Mr. and Mrs. Jim Bertoglio The Rev. Bruce and the Rev. Marjorie Bevans 18

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The Rev. and Mrs. James C. Biegler Mr. and Mrs. Kevin H. Bland The Rev. Canon William E. Blewett, PhD, SSC Mr. Macon Boddy Mr. and Mrs. Edward T.L. Borie The Rev. Thomas D. Bowers, DD Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Braasch Mrs. Linda J. Bracken Cmdr. and Mrs. Frank E. Braden Mr. David J. Breisch Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Brenner Col. Thomas H. Brouillard The Rev. Byron H. Brown, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Mark W. Brown Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Brown The Rev. Canon Robert J.C. Brown The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Allen W. Brown, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Brown Ms. Maurie Brown Dr. and Mrs. Willis E. Brown, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Steve Brown Mr. and Mrs. Theodore R. Brown The Rev. and Mrs. Robert G. Browning, Jr. Mr. Ronald C. Brugger Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Brumder The Rev. and Mrs. Tom C. Bruns Mr. and Mrs. Russell J. Brydon, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James Brzezinski Ms. Maxine B. Bull The Rev. and Mrs. Norman C. Burke Mr. and Mrs. Paul D. Burroughs The Rev. Canon and Mrs. James T. Butcher

The Rev. and Mrs. Daniel Caballero The Rev. Robert D. Campbell Dr. Kenneth Campbell

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Mr. and Mrs. Eugene P. Campbell Mr. and Mrs. Brewster P. Campbell The Rev. and Mrs. T. Kimball Cannon The Rev. and Mrs. Richard A. Cantrell The Rt. Rev. and Rt. Hon. The Lord Carey of Clifton and Lady Carey Mrs. Ramona J. Carlson The Rev. Canon Robert G. Carroon The Rev. and Mrs. Thomas H. Carson, Jr. Mrs. Carla A. Castle Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Castro The Rev. and Mrs. Norman J. Catir, Jr. Mr. Michael A. Chandra Mr. Gregory N. Chase The Rev. and Mrs. A. Milton Cheney III Mr. Thomas C. Chester, Sr. The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Frank H. Clark Mr. Joseph Cobetto The Rev. and Mrs. Milo G. Coerper The Rev. Albert S. G. Colbourne Mr. and Mrs. Eugene J. Cole Mrs. Diane C. Ellis The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Clifford A. Comfort Mr. and Mrs. John T. Conner, Jr. Ms. Jean L. Connor Mr. and Mrs. Philip L. Conover Mrs. Judith A. Cook The Rev. and Mrs. Richard G. Copeland Mr. David N. Corbin The Rev. Charles W. Cornell Ms. Shanon Cotta The Rev. and Mrs. Robert P. Coval The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. William J. Cox The Rev. Canon and Mrs. James R. Cox The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Robert Crafts, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Eric J. Craig The Very Rev. William A. Crary, Jr. The Rev. Robert D. Creech, SSC Mr. and Mrs. John W. Curtis

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Mrs. Margaret S. Dahlman The Rev. and Mrs. Richard R. Daly Mr. and Mrs. William O. Daniel Dr. Ruby B. Dart The Rev. Canon and Mrs. James H. Davis Mr. Thomas J. M. Davis Ms. Sarah E. Day Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Dean Mrs. Elizabeth K. Dean Mrs. Virginia R. DeGolier Ms. Delores DeGolier Mr. and Mrs. Stephen DeGolier The Rev. and Mrs. Lawrence C. Deihle Mr. and Mrs. Leo H. Delaney Ms. Melanie Delaney The Rev. Jacob W. Dell Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Denman The Ven. and Mrs. Shawn W. Denney The Rev. William D. Dennler The Hon. George M. DePolo The Rev. Canon George F. Dettwiller II The Rev. M. Allen Dickson, DD The Rev. and Mrs. Arthur C. Dilg Mrs. Lynn A. Douthitt The Rev. Henry L. Doyle Mr. Charles B. Doyle Mr. and Mrs. William W. Drake The Rev. Robert K. Duerr, Jr. Mr. Philip C. Dunbar Mrs. Nara E. Duncan The Rev. and Mrs. Tom L. Duncan Mr. Richard Duprey The Very Rev. Martin J. Dwyer Mr. M. John Dyrud

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The Rev. and Mrs. William R. Easterling Mr. and Mrs. Dennis T. Edmon The Rev. and Mrs. John R. Edwards, Jr. Mrs. Maria T. Ehrenberger Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Ehrmann The Rev. Wibur F. Eich III, MD Dr. Thomas M. Ellington Mrs. Gloria N. Ellinwood The Rev. and Mrs. John D. Else Mr. William Emanuelson The Rev. and Mrs. James J. English, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. David H. Erbeck The Rev. Forrest E. Ethridge The Rev. and Mrs. Robert R. Evans The Rev. Mark E. Evans and Mrs. Sandra Moore Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Evans The Rev. and Mrs. James W. Evans Mr. and Mrs. Daniel C. Ewing

2011 Calendar Year Contributors to Nashotah House

Individual Donors

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Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Fitzpatrick Mr. Roy B. Flinchbaugh, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Peter M. Floyd The Rev. Timothy L. Fountain Ms. Lucille B. Foust Mr. and Mrs. Graydon C. Fox The Very Rev. Gus L. Franklin III Mr. Harold L. Freeman The Rev. Jay Samuel Friberg The Rev. Dr. Reginald H. Fuller Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Funk

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Mr. and Mrs. Bill Gabelhausen Mr. and Mrs. William P. Gagin Ms. Cecille R. Gallant Ms. Carlotta Gary Ms. Judith Gaskell Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Gavin The Rev. and Mrs. Robert J. Gearhart Mrs. Eugenia K. Glasser Dr. J. Temple Goodman Mr. and Mrs. Peter Gottsacker Mrs. Marlene D. Graham Mrs. Deborah O. Gravatt The Rev. Marie T. Gray Mrs. Elizabeth Gray Mr. Justin A. Green Mrs. Jeannette B. Gregory Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Gresik Mr. and Mrs. William Gretz The Rev. and Mrs. Ray K. Grieb The Rev. and Mrs. Russell A. Griffin The Rev. Gary A. Grindeland Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Gross Mr. and Mrs. David Gross The Rev. and Mrs. James M. Guill Mrs. Mary D. Guill Dr. Sigurd B. Gundersen, Jr. Mrs. June H. Gunst

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Mr. and Mrs. Douglas W. Haag Mrs. and Mrs. Daniel Haag The Rev. and Mrs. Allen K. Hall The Rev. and Mrs. James H. Hall Ms. June E. Hall Mr. and Mrs. James G. Hallwas The Rev. and Mrs. Joel E. Hampton Dr. Gerre and Dr. Judith Hancock The Rev. and Mrs. Robert F. Hansen, Jr. Mrs. Jeanette V. Hansen Col. and Mrs. Myron Harrington, Jr.

The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Frederick C. Harrison, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. J. Michael Hartenstine Ms. Elizabeth A. Hartung-Cole The Rev. and Mrs. Kempton B. Hastings The Very Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Chad Richard Hatfield Mrs. Sally Hatfield Mr. and Mrs. John W. Hausmann Mrs. Vida E. Hawthorne Mrs. Catherine De Launay Hazlett Mr. Charles J. Headland The Rev. and Mrs. U. Dean Hekel Mr. William Henry The Rt. Rev. Bertram N. Herlong, DD Dr. and Mrs. H. David Herman Mr. William L. Herrera The Rev. Canon and Mrs. H. W. Herrmann The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Daniel W. Herzog The Rev. John H. Heschle, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Richard H. Hinchcliff Dr. Edith J. Ho The Rev. and Mrs. David J. Hogarth The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Holtzen Mrs. Ruth A. Hough Dr. Michael W. Howell Ms. Edith B. Howson The Rev. and Mrs. Donald R. Hughes Ms. Jean C. Huismann The Rev. Canon James E. Hulbert, DD The Rt. Rev. Donald M. Hultstrand, DD Mrs. Laura E. Hutton

Mr. and Mrs. Allan E. Iding The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Jack L. Iker The Rev. and Mrs. Peter L. Ingeman The Rev. and Mrs. John M. Inserra

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Ms. Elizabeth A. Jackson Ms. Elaine J. Jacobe The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Russell E. Jacobus The Rev. Cecil D. James, SSC Ms. Julianne P. James The Rev. Canon Richard K. Janke The Rev. and Mrs. Frederick B. Jansen Mr. Albert J. Jelinek The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Charles E. Jenkins III The Rev. and Mrs. Raymond E. Jennison, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Jan S. Jensen The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Robert W. Jenson Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur F. Joffrion Mrs. Gayle Johnson The Rev. and Mrs. James B. Johnson The Rev. and Mrs. Lloyd W. Johnson, Jr.

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Mr. Charles W. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Andrew P. Johnson Dr. and Mrs. Dudley D. Jones The Rev. Mary-Frances Jones Mr. and Mrs. John E. Jones Mrs. Beverly P. Joutras Ms. Elisabeth R. Jurchen

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The Rev. Canon and Mrs. James A. Kaestner The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Richard A. Kallenberg The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Craig M. Kallio Mrs. Sarah H. Karlowicz Mrs. Janice M. Karon, D.H.L. The Rev. Ed Kelaher Mr. Albert P. Keller Mr. and Mrs. Raymond R. Kemp Mr. and Mrs. Matthew B. Kemp The Rev. David C. Kennedy, SSC, DD Mr. and Mrs. Eric H. Kent The Rev. and Mrs. James H. B. Kenyon The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Christopher J. Keough The Rev. Canon Arthur K. D. Kephart The Rev. and Mrs. Mitchell M. Keppler, Sr. Mrs. Marcia J. Kiefe The Rev. and Mrs. George A. Kimball, Jr. Mrs. Marion T. Kincaid Ms. Betty L. Kindle The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Charles B. King, Jr. The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Jonathan L. King The Very Rev. Heidi E. Kinner The Rev. and Mrs. John M. Kinney Estate of A. Darwin Kirby, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Arnold and Dr. Carol Klukas The Very Rev. and Mrs. M. Bill Knapp The Rev. Jack C. Knight The Rev. Floyd L. Knox The Rev. Canon and Mrs. R. Brien Koehler Mr. Terry and Mrs. Mary Kohler Mr. and Mrs. Norton N. Kollmann Mrs. Ivy G. Kreamer The Rev. and Mrs. Edward F. Kresowaty Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth W. Kuehn Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Kunes, Sr. Mr. Robert S. Kurtenacker Mr. and Mrs. Sam Kuykendall

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Mr. and Mrs. Harry H. Lacey III Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Lacourciere Mrs. Carol J. Lagerman Mr. and Mrs. James B. Landsverk The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Lewis C. Lane III Mr. Oliver M. Langenberg Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Langer Mr. and Mrs. Glenn E. Langer Mr. and Mrs. Stevenson Langmuir Mrs. Margaret M. Larsen The Rev. and Mrs. Gilbert S. Larsen 20

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Mr. and Mrs. Charles J. Larson Dr. and Mrs. Bruce A. Larson The Rev. and Mrs. Gerhard H. Laun Estate of The Rev. Karl G. Layer, A.H.C. The Rev. Canon Dr. Bruce E. LeBarron, SSC Mr. and Mrs. C. Nicholas Lee The Rev. Margaret and Mr. Frank W. Lee Mrs. Judith W. LeFevre Mr. and Mrs. Oscar T. Leverenz Mr. and Mrs. Robert G. Lewis Ms. Kerri J. Lintott The Rt. Rev. Richard W. Lipka The Rev. and Mrs. Philip I. C. Livingston Mr. Roy Llamas Mr. Richard J. Longabaugh Mrs. Anna C. Lord Mrs. Alice S. Lord Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Louallen The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. William H. Love Mrs. Virginia K. Lovett Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Ludlum The Rev. and Mrs. William T. Luley

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The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Edward H. MacBurney The Rev. and Mrs. Ross J. Mack Mrs. Helen E. Mackie Mr. and Mrs. J. Carleton MacNeil, Jr. Mr. Eric E. Magnuson III Mr. Dennis J. Mahoney Mr. and Mrs. Ralph S. Major, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Malecek The Rev. Thomas V. Malionek Mrs. Charlotte L. Mallon The Rev. and Mrs. Carl D. Mann Mr. and Mrs. Glenn P. Marcel Mr. James S. March The Rev. and Mrs. Joseph J. Marek Mr. Calvin J. Marquis The Rt. Rev. Brian R. Marsh The Rev. James E. Marshall, OSB The Rev. Dr. Richard Cornish Martin The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Daniel H. Martins Mr. David E. Mason Mr. Verlon S. Matthews Mrs. Kate R. Maxfield Mr. and Mrs. Roy W. Mayberry The Rev. and Mrs. Donald B. McAlister The Rev. Steve McCarty Mr. and Mrs. A. Keith McDowell Ms. Helen O. McDowell Ms. E. Jane McGinn The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. J. Douglas McGlynn The Rev. Hugh J. McGowan III Mr. Paul W. McKee Mrs. Helen E. McKinstry The Rev. William D. McLean III The Rev. Canon and Mrs. James D. McQueen Mr. and Mrs. Thomas O. McWilliams

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The Rev. and Mrs. Andrew C. Mead Dr. Robert T. Mead Mr. Donald W. Meinig Mr. and Mrs. O.W. Mendenhall Mr. John C. Metcalf Mr. John F. Michalski Mr. Lloyd F. Miles Ms. Joyce F. Miles The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. William C. Miller Ms. Virginia M. Miller Mr. Thomas E. Miller Mrs. Sandra and Mr. Robert Mills Dr. and Mrs. George E. Mims The Rev. and Mrs. Joseph A. Minnis The Rev. David R. Miracle The Rev. Canon George W. Monroe The Rt. Rev. James W. Montgomery, DD Lt. Col. M.G. and Mrs. Mary Moody Ms. Ruth Moore Mrs. Mary K. Moritz Mrs. Rosalee Morris Mr. and Mrs. William A. Morrison Mr. and Mrs. Gabriel C. Morrow The Rev. and Mrs. Joel J. Morsch Mr. Walter H. Morton The Rev. Carl E. Mosley The Rev. Michael D. Moyer The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Robert S. Munday The Rev. and Mrs. John H. Munson Mrs. Rose M. Murdock The Rev. and Mrs. William M. Murphy Mrs. Eunice M. Murphy The Rev. and Mrs. Michael J. Murphy The Rev. C. Thomas Myers, SSC

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Mr. and Mrs. Umberto L. Napolitano Mrs. Jean H. Nauman Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Neale Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Neill The Rev. and Mrs. Lee M. Nelson Mrs. Mary Ann Neuses Mr. and Mrs. Albert O. Nicholas Mrs. Marion Nichols Mr. Theodore J. Nicou Mr. Roger P. Nielsen The Hon. and Mrs. Paul V. Niemeyer The Rev. and Mrs. Stephen C. Norcross Mrs. Joan C. Norgaard

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The Rev. and Mrs. Dennis R. Odekirk Mrs. Martha F. Ohrt The Rev. Gary L. Olsen The Very Rev. and Mrs. J. Robert Orpen, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Edward F. Ostertag The Rev. John E. Owens, Jr.

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Mrs. Julie E. Paavola The Rev. John B. Pahls, Jr., S.T.M. The Rev. Dr. Richard T. Palmer The Rev. Thomas and the Rev. Beth Papazoglakis The Rev. and Mrs. Limuel G. Parks, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Parrish The Rev. Jamie A. Parsley The Rt. Rev. Donald J. Parsons, D.C.L. Dr. Mary M. Parsons The Rev. and Mrs. J. Ralph Patston The Rev. and Mrs. Lewis A. Payne Mrs. Maxine E. Peacock The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Steven A. Peay The Rev. Langdon Pegram, MD The Rev. Wilfred F. Penny Mr. Harold G. Peters Mr. and Mrs. Richard A. Peterson Dr. and Mrs. Glen Petta Mr. and Mrs. M. Fred Pfeil The Rev. and Mrs. John M. Phelps The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Nelson W. Pinder The Rev. Warren C. Platt Dr. Colin Podmore Mr. and Mrs. Michael L. Polley Mrs. Martha J. Pope The Rev. and Mrs. John A. Porter Mr. and Mrs. Douglass J. Post The Rev. and Mrs. Peter J. Powell Mrs. Kathy F. Powell, D.Mus. The Rev. Andrew L. Powell The Rev. Robert G. Preston Mrs. John C. Pritzlaff, Jr. The Rev. Donne E. Puckle, SSC The Rev. and Mrs. Richard A. Pugliese The Rev. and Mrs. George W. Pursley

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Dr. and Mrs. David L. Quigg

The Rev. William F. Radant The Rev. and Mrs. John W. Raish The Very Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Roger W. Raskopf The Rev. and Mrs. John E. Rasmus The Rev. Philip D. Read II, SSC Mr. and Mrs. James S. Reeve II Mr. Franklin Reinauer III The Rev. and Mrs. Harry A. Reis, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. John W. Reishus The Rev. and Mrs. Daniel S. Repp Mr. and Mrs. Richard C. Reul The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. William P. Rhett, Jr. Mr. Charles M. Rice II The Rev. and Mrs. Wilson K. Roane Mrs. Betty Ann Roberts-Punko The Rev. and Mrs. Fredrick A. Robinson Mr. and Mrs. Robert A. Robinson

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2011 Calendar Year Contributors to Nashotah House

Individual Donors Dr. and Mrs. Gordon F. Robinson Ms. Jan B. Robitscher Ms. Judith A. Roe Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Roehrich The Rev. and Mrs. Zeke L. Rogers Mr. and Mrs. H. Thomas Rogers Mr. and Mrs. Alexander K. Rogers The Rev. and Mrs. John P. Roof The Rev. H. Stewart Ross Mr. Scott Ross

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The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Edward L. Salmon, Jr. The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Samples Mr. and Mrs. John B. Sanders Mr. and Mrs. Douglas A. Sarcia Ms. Ezgi Saribay Ms. Lillian T. Savage The Rev. Canon Stephen H. Schaitberger Mr. and Mrs. Carl C. Scheid Mr. Charles Schlegel III The Rev. and Mrs. Stephen K. K. Schlossberg Mrs. Mary L. Schmidt The Rev. and Mrs. Gerald L. Schnackenberg Mrs. Carol L. Schott Ms. Marilyn L. Schrader Ms. Robin E. Schrock Mr. Bernie Schroeder Mrs. Ruth Schuette Mr. and Mrs. Richard L. Schwaab Mr. Ryan M. Schwarz Mrs. Sarah E. Scott Col. and Mrs. Robert W. Scott Mr. and Mrs. Winfield J. Scott Mr. and Mrs. Francis P. Sears, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Glenn I. Sears The Rev. and Mrs. D. Robert Seay The Ven. and Mrs. Donald A. Seeks The Rev. Dr. Robert W. Seney Mr. and Mrs. Roger D. Senn Ms. Ann Sewell Mr. and Mrs. Dwight R. Shackelford The Rev. Lee F. Shafer Mr. and Mrs. David L. Shanks Mr. and Mrs. Scott Shanks Mr. Karl O. Sharp Mr. and Mrs. Edson P. Sheppard, Jr. Mr. David G. Sherwood The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Harry W. Shipps Ms. Karen J. Shoemaker Mr. and Mrs. Harold Shogren The Rev. Timothy J. Shotmeyer Mr. and Mrs. Thomas L. Shriner, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. James P. Siepmann Mr. and Mrs. Crispian Sievenpiper

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The Rev. and Mrs. James M. Sigler Mr. and Mrs. Glenn R. Simpson, Jr. The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Theodore F. Sirotko Mr. Stephen J. Sirotko Mrs. Kay E. Skoglund Mr. James F. Sloan The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Dabney T. Smith The Rev. and Mrs. Stuart B. Smith The Rev. Raymond R. Smith, Jr. The Ven. and Mrs. Edwin B. Smith Dr. William D. Smith Dr. and Mrs. Jan D. Smith Mr. Michael and Mrs. Alissa White Smith Mr. and Mrs. Leslie C. Smith The Rev. Robert C. Snyder Mr. and Mrs. David W. Somers Mrs. Dorothy W. Spaulding, D.H.L. The Rev. Robert H. Speer Ms. Nancy L. Spencer The Rev. and Mrs. John T. Splinter Mrs. Ruth R. Spoerri Mr. and Mrs. James Spotts The Rev. and Mrs. Doran B. Stambaugh Mr. and Mrs. Gerald E. Stanton The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Ralph J. F. Stanwise Dr. Michael J. Staples Ms. Miriam K. Stauff The Rev. James L. Steele Mr. and Mrs. Nigel C. Stewart Mr. Collis C. Stewart The Rev. and Mrs. Gerald C. Stoppel The Rev. William E. Strickland, Jr. Mr. Robert F. Strother Mrs. Laura P. Stucker Mr. and Mrs. Harwood N. Sturtevant The Rev. and Mrs. David A. Sullivan Mr. and Mrs. Jerry K. Sutton The Rev. and Mrs. Richard A. Swan Mr. and Mrs. Robert R. Swanson Mr. and Mrs. Dwight J. Swanson Mr. James Sweeney

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Mrs. Suzanne K. Talmage The Rev. and Mrs. Warren Tanghe Ms. Valerie A. Taylor Mr. and Mrs. William F. Templin Mr. Richard C. Thalleen The Rev. and Mrs. Charles C. Thayer, Jr. The Rev. and Mrs. Edgar A. Thompson Mrs. Alice C. Thompson Mr. and Mrs. Dale E. Tieman Mrs. Virginia L. Tisdall Dr. and Mrs. Donald R. Tracey Mr. and Mrs. Dee Trostle The Rev. and Mrs. Richard C. Tumilty 22

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U V W

2011 Calendar Year Contributors to Nashotah House

Individual Donors

Dr. and Mrs. Ned A. Underwood

Mr. and Mrs. William L. Vaitl The Rev. Larry E. Valentine Mrs. Diane C. Valentine Mr. and Mrs. Walter Virden III The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Arthur A. Vogel Mr. and Mrs. Neil M. Voskuil

The Rev. Karin E. Wade Mr. and Mrs. Franklin E. Walbrink The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Ralph T. Walker The Rev. and Mrs. Lance S. Wallace Mrs. Mary Wallsteadt Mr. and Mrs. Brian W. Walsh The Rev. and Mrs. Verne L. Walter The Rev. and Mrs. Charles F. Walton, Jr. The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. William C. Wantland Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Ward Mr. Joseph E. Warren Mr. and Mrs. James R. Wartinbee, Sr. Mr. Richard M. Watson Mr. and Mrs. Ralph A. Webb The Rev. and Mrs. Edwin C. Webster Mrs. Mildred C. Weidemann Col. James R. Wells, USMCR The Rev. and Mrs. Terrence A. Welty III The Rev. Dr. and Mrs. Daniel A. Westberg Mr. and Mrs. James N. Wetherbee The Rev. J. Michael Wheeler The Rev. and Mrs. Ronald E. White Mrs. Joan G. White Mr. and Mrs. Peter C. White Mrs. Isabel E. White The Rev. Canon Carl E. Wilke, Sr. Mrs. Jane R. Will The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Daren K. Williams The Rev. and Mrs. Francis E. Williams Dr. Frederick Williford The Rev. and Mrs. H. David Wilson The Rev. and Mrs. J. Scott Wilson Mr. Randy Winn Mr. Robert W. Winston, Jr. The Rev. Dr. Thomas D. Wintle Dr. and Mrs. James F. Witten The Rev. and Mrs. Edwin P. Wittenburg The Rev. Stephen Wlosinski and the Rev. Cynthia Peterson-Wlosinski Mr. and Mrs. W. Steven Woodward The Rev. Arthur E. Woolley, Jr. The Rev. Canon and Mrs. Benjamin R. Wright

Mrs. Eunice W. Yost

Y Z

Mr. and Mrs. Rowe C. Zehms, Jr. The Rev. Canon C. William Ziegenfuss Mrs. Martha A. Zuelke The Very Rev. and Mrs. Erich A. Zwingert

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CHURCHES, DIOCESES & RELIGIOUS GROUPS

TOP The Rt Rev Edward L. Salmon Jr. at his Installation. BOTTOM Lord Carey and the Rt Rev Edward L. Salmon Jr. at the dedication of Adams Hall.

All Saints’ Church All Saints Episcopal Church All Saints Episcopal Church All Saints’ Episcopal Church All Saints’ Episcopal Church All Souls Anglican Church Anchor House Ministries Ascension Episcopal Church Benedictines of Christ the King Cathedral Church of The Advent Christ Church (AMiA) Christ Church Anglican Mission Christ Church Cathedral Christ Church Midland Christ Episcopal Cathedral Christ Episcopal Cathedral 24

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Woodbridge, VA Moline, IL Jensen Beach, FL Baldwin, NY Lakeland, FL Wheaton, IL Auburndale, FL Portland, OR Chicago, IL Birmingham, AL Clemmons, NC Lemoore, CA Sherman, TX Midland, TX Eau Claire, WI Salina, KS NASHOTAH.EDU

Christ Episcopal Church Christ Episcopal Church Christ Episcopal Church Christ Episcopal Church Christ the King Anglican Church Christ the King Episcopal Church Christ the Redeemer Anglican Church Christ The Redeemer Anglican Church Church Of Saint Thomas And Saint John Church of the Ascension Church of the Cross Church of the Incarnation Church of the Redeemer Church of the Redeemer Church of the Resurrection Church of the Transfiguration Community of the Transfiguration ECW - St. Alban’s Episcopal Church ECW - St. Ann’s Guild Trinity Church ECW - St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church ECW - St. John’s Episcopal Church ECW - St. Mary’s Episcopal Church ECW - St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church Emmanuel Episcopal Church Emmanuel Episcopal Church Episcopal Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour Episcopal Chapel of St. Mary the Virgin Episcopal Church of the Ascension Episcopal Church of the Incarnation Episcopal Churches of Richmond County, Virginia Episcopal Diocese of Albany Episcopal Diocese of Central Florida Episcopal Diocese of Eau Claire Episcopal Diocese of Fond du Lac Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth Episcopal Diocese of Long Island Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina Episcopal Diocese of North Dakota Episcopal Diocese of Northern Indiana Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania

La Crosse, WI Pensacola, FL Valdosta, GA East Tawas, MI Spokane, WA Fort Worth, TX Fort Worth, TX Danvers, MA New Richmond, WI Orlando, FL Hopkins, MN Oviedo, FL Sarasota, FL Orangeburg, SC Tampa, FL Bennington, KS Cincinnati, OH Marshfield, WI Mount Vernon, IL Granite City, IL St. James City, FL Burlington, NJ Morris, IL Keyser, WV Rapid City, SD Faribault, MN Nashotah, WI Pittsburgh, PA West Point, MS Warsaw, VA Albany, NY Orlando, FL Eau Claire, WI Appleton, WI Fort Worth, TX Garden City, NY Raleigh, NC Fargo, ND South Bend, IN Philadelphia, PA LENT 2012


2011 Calendar Year Contributors to Nashotah House

CHURCHES, DIOCESES & RELIGIOUS GROUPS Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina Episcopal Diocese of Southwest Florida Episcopal Diocese of Springfield Episcopal Diocese of Western Louisiana Good Shepherd Episcopal Church Good Shepherd Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Holy Nativity Episcopal Church Holy Trinity Episcopal Church Missionary Diocese of All Saints Missionary Society of San Miguel New Grace Church Our Saviour Episcopal Church Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church SEWAAC South American Missionary Society St. Alban’s Episcopal Church St. Andrew’s Anglican Church St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church St. Anne’s Episcopal Church St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church St. Bride’s Episcopal Church St. Clare’s Anglican Mission - Rushville St. Columba Church St. David of Wales Episcopal Church St. Dunstan’s Episcopal Church St. Francis Church St. Gabriel’s Retreat House St. George’s Episcopal Church St. George’s Episcopal Church St. George’s Episcopal Church St. Gregory’s Episcopal Church St. James Episcopal Church St. James Church St. James’ Episcopal Church St. James’ Episcopal Church St. John Episcopal Church St. John in the Wilderness Episcopal Church St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church St. John the Evangelist Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. Jude’s Episcopal Church St. Laurence Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Church St. Martin-in-the-Fields Episcopal Church

Providence, RI Charleston, SC Sarasota, FL Springfield, IL Alexandria, LA Lake Charles, LA Venice, FL Pittsburgh, PA Carlsbad, NM Plano, TX Clearwater, FL Berlin, MD Seguin, TX Orange Park, FL Okeechobee, FL Breckenridge, TX Oconomowoc, WI Ambridge, PA Spirit Lake, IA Nashville, TN Mer Rouge, LA Abington, PA Pewaukee, WI Virginia Beach, VA Frederick, IL Fresno, CA Denton, TX Madison, WI Dunlap, IL Catonsville, MD Helmetta, NJ Macomb, IL Summerville, SC Mansfield, TX Leesburg, FL Sonora, CA Oskaloosa, IA Mesilla Park, NM Elkhart, IN Elkhorn, WI Mt. Carmel, IL Stockton, CA Fort Worth, TX Keokuk, IA Norristown, PA Lancaster, OH Preemption, IL Tampa, FL Buffalo, NY Grapevine, TX Manchester, MO Mineral Wells, TX Baton Rouge, LA Springfield, IL Cypress Mill, TX Baton Rouge, LA Beaver Dam, WI Coleman, TX Waupaca, WI Arlington, TX Atlanta, GA

St. Martin’s Church St. Martin’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church - Castleton St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church St. Matthias Episcopal Church St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church St. Michael and All Angels’ Episcopal Church St. Michael the Archangel Episcopal Church St. Michael’s Anglican Church St. Michael’s Anglican Church St. Nicholas’ Church St. Olaf’s Episcopal Mission Church St. Paul’s Anglican Church St. Paul’s by-the-Lake Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Ashippun St. Peter and St. Paul Episcopal Church St. Peter’s Anglican Church St. Peter’s Episcopal Church St. Peter’s Episcopal Church St. Peter’s Episcopal Church St. Peter’s Episcopal Church St. Simeon’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Anglican Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Thomas Episcopal Church St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church St. Thomas Episcopal Church - Fifth Avenue St. Wilfred Episcopal Church The Annunciation Mission The Cathedral Church of St. Luke The Church of St. Anne The Domestic & Foreign Missionary Society- Episcopal Church The Episcopal Church of the Advent The Episcopal Church of The Blessed Sacrament The International Anglican Church The Order of the Daughters of the King The Parish of All Saints Transfiguration Episcopal Church Trinity Church Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Episcopal Church Truro Church NASHOTAH.EDU

Monroeville, PA Richmond, VA Tomah, WI Salamanca, NY Bonita Springs, FL Burlington, NJ Abingdon, MD Staten Island, NY St. Matthews, SC Shreveport, LA Sanibel, FL Denver, CO Colorado Springs, CO Nashotah, WI Ridgecrest, CA Atwater, CA Amherst, WI Visalia, CA Chicago, IL Schenectady, NY Artesia, NM Healdsburg, CA Greenwich, NY Oconomowoc, WI Arlington, TX Tallahassee, FL Columbia, TN Canton, IL North Lake, WI Sheboygan Falls, WI Stanley, WI Heathsville, VA Hurst, TX Billings, MT Cincinnati, OH Horseshoe Bend, AR Hobart, IN Oak Ridge, TN Fargo, ND Eustis, FL Morris, IL New York, NY Sarasota, FL New Orleans, LA Orlando, FL Morrison, IL New York, NY Dunnellon, FL Placentia, CA Colorado Springs, CO Woodstock, GA Boston, MA Mountain Grove, MO Rock Island, IL Monmouth, IL Marshall, TX Logansport, IN Oshkosh, WI Deridder, LA Fairfax, VA

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CORPORATE DONORS Aegon Transamerica Foundation Allison Educational Fund Carolyn S. Lindsey - TUW Charitable Caterpillar Foundation Community Foundation Of The Great River Bend Dubose Scholarship Fund Emil Ewald Foundation, Inc. First Bank Financial Centre Fred Davis Memorial Foundation Gordon Flesch Company, Inc. Groskopf Construction, Inc. Hamilton Roddis Foundation, Inc. Hayssen Family Foundation, Inc. IBM Corporation - Matching Gift Program Jackson Kemper Foundation Lorraine Mulberger Foundation, Inc. Lyford Cay Foundation Inc. Merck & Co., Inc. Rogers Memorial Hospital, Inc. RX Frames N Lenses Ltd. Shell Oil Company Foundation The Greater Milwaukee Foundation, Inc., Henry C., Eva M., Robert H.,& Jack J. Gillo Charitable Fund The Underwood Foundation Upper Arlington Lutheran Church Wells Fargo Educational - Matching Gift Program William A. & Elizabeth B. Moncrief Foundation Xcel Energy Foundation - Matching Gift Program

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Cedar Rapids, IA Palm Harbor, FL Clearwater, FL Peoria, IL Bettendorf, IA Lake Charles, LA Oconomowoc, WI Oconomowoc, WI Miami, FL Madison, WI Okauchee, WI Madison, WI Sheboygan, WI Research Triangle Park, NC Hawthorn Woods, IL Oconomowoc, WI Nassau, Bahamas West Point, PA Oconomowoc, WI Cincinnati, OH Princeton, NJ Milwaukee, WI Chicago, IL Columbus, OH Princeton, NJ Fort Worth, TX Miami, FL

LENT 2012


2011 Calendar Year Contributors to Nashotah House

CORPORATE Donors

Bless, O Lord,

this House, set apart to the glory of your great name and the benefit of your Holy Church; and grant that your Name may be worshipped here in truth and purity to all generations. Give your grace and wisdom to all the authorities, that they may exercise holy discipline, and be themselves patterns of holiness, simplicity, and self-denial. Bless all who may be trained here; take from them all pride, vanity, and self-conceit, and give them true humility and selfabasement. Enlighten their minds, subdue their wills, purify their hearts, and so penetrate them with your Spirit and fill them with your love, that they may go forth animated with earnest zeal for your glory; and may your ever living Word so dwell within their hearts, that they may speak with that resistless energy of love which shall melt the hearts of sinners to the love of you. Open, O Lord, the hearts and hands of your people, that they may be ready to give and glad to distribute to our necessities.

Bless the founders and benefactors

of this House, and recompense them with the riches of your everlasting Kingdom, for Jesus’ sake. Amen.

Thank you for remembering the House and her mission with such generosity this past year. Your continued support is vital to our work of witness and ministry. NASHOTAH.EDU

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House Finances at a Glance: The Impact of Giving By Richard J. Longabaugh, Provost

This issue of The Missioner has highlighted the many ways in which your giving has helped our mission: to form leaders in the Anglican tradition who will in turn serve God’s church and fulfill the call of Jesus Christ to help all His people. Whether it is a mission trip to Lima, Peru, tree trimming and cemetery maintenance, or outfitting The Cellar to aid in student fellowship, your donations are necessary to sustaining our growth and securing our future. Periodically, we will be providing you, our benefactors, with a snap-shot of the finances at Nashotah House. In reviewing the operating revenues and expenses of the House for the first six months of the fiscal year compared to the same period last year, there is reason for excitement and optimism. In spite of a weak economy and an erratic stock market, contributions to Nashotah House increased in 2011. As you no doubt have seen in this issue, our benefactors have been very generous in their support of the mission of the House. Giving has come in the form of bequests and contributions, carrying our current deficit to approximately $100,000 for the first half of the fiscal year. This points to the critical role that fund-raising plays in the life of the House and how much we depend on the generosity of you, our loyal patrons. We are committed to doing our part to search out new stewards of Nashotah House for the balance of the year as we seek to eliminate our deficit. In the words preached in 1841 by Bishop Jackson Kemper, founder of the House, “With the talents we possess…with the talents committed to our trust and the privileges we enjoy, cannot our faith, our liberality and our self-denial, GREATLY increase?... But I would stir up, with God’s permission, the pure mind of each one, by way of remembrance. It is the spirit of missions I earnestly and most affectionately advocate.” We thank you for your continued support in 2012 and may God’s blessings flow on you this year and always.

Summer calendar Session I: July 9 – 20, 2012

CS Lewis and Christian Formation Instructor: Jerry Root, PhD Sacred Space: Architecture for Christian Worship Instructor: The Rev. Canon Arnold Klukas, PhD Preaching the Sermon on the Mount Instructors: Garwood Anderson, PhD and the Rev. Steve Schlossberg The Missional Leader Instructor: The Very Rev. Kevin Martin

Session II: July 23 – August 3, 2012 Preaching the Hidden Secrets of 1st Corinthians Instructors: Kenneth Bailey, ThD and the Rev. Canon Douglas McGlynn Intro to Monastic History Instructor: The Rev. Steven Peay, PhD “That They All May Be One”: Liturgical Convergence After Vatican II Instructor: The Rev. Frank Senn, PhD For more information on these course offerings and to register please visit www.nashotah.edu

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Editors’ Notes

The

Missioner

published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary forming leaders in the Anglicanism tradition since 1842.

On the

COVER

Publisher The Rt. Rev. Edward L. Salmon, Jr.

In keeping with our theme this edition, our cover invokes an image of preparing oneself for service to others, just as Jesus Christ did during the Maundy Thursday foot washing of His disciples.

We

Associate Editors The Rev. Andrew J. Hanyzewski, ‘09 Mrs. Jeneen Floyd Design and Layout Mrs. Bliss Lemmon Photographers Mrs. Bliss Lemmon Mr. Gabriel Morrow, ‘14 Archivist The Ven. Thomas Winslow

want to hear from you!

lease visit us at http://www.nashotah.edu/news. Select “The Missioner” to email us your comments, feedback, and latest updates. We’d love to know how our alumni and friends are spreading the gospel at home and abroad. Have a suggestion for an article? Please pass it along and you may be featured in an upcoming edition.

Address 2777 Mission Road Nashotah, Wisconsin 53058-9793 Telephone 262.646.6500 Facsimile 262.646.6504 Website www.nashotah.edu The Missioner email missioner.editor@nashotah.edu

Follow us on social media as well.


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Nashotah, WI 53058 Permit No. 1

The Missioner (ISSN 1521–5148) is published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary forming leaders in the Anglican tradition since 1842. 2777 Mission Rd., Nashotah, WI 53058–9793, Tel.: 262.646.6500. www.nashotah.edu

LIFE & THOUGH T

PART 2:

APRIL 19-21, 2012 RETROSPECT & PROSPECT REGISTER NOW hether as a matter of ecumenical Featured speakers include:

W

dialogue, a locus of theological debate, or a matter of dueling biblical exegesis, everyone, it seems, is talking about justification. Anglicans, too, are talking about justification, and have for some time – actually from the very beginning of the movement. But what if Anglicanism, rather than a site of perpetual skirmish, is a space for conversation? Nashotah House is sponsoring just this sort of theological conversation this spring. Having featured notable historians of the 16th century English Reformation in October 2011, we offer a second installment of the conversation.

• • •

To register and find out more please go to our event site,

Dr. David Steinmetz on “Luther and the English Reformation” The Rt. Rev. C. Fitzsimons Allison, PhD, on “Justification from Hooker to Newman” The Rev. Ephraim Radner, PhD, on “Justification and the Future of Anglicanism” Along with additional plenary sessions and approved papers.

http://events.nashotah.edu

Join the conversation!

The Missioner Lent 2012  

Volume 28 No. 3

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