Issuu on Google+


Doctor of Ministry:

Forming Reflective Practitioners, Specialists with Proven Ministry Skills – Actively Engaged in Strengthening the Church in Biblical Exposition/ Preaching, Liturgy, Ascetical Theology/Christian Spirituality, and Congregational Development.

For more information, contact admissions@nashotah.edu.


Table of 6

Contents

FACULTY FEATURE: GLORIOUS THINGS OF THEE ARE SPOKEN

Garwood P. Anderson PhD Professor of New Testament & Greek

9 16 22

published quarterly by Nashotah House, a theological seminary forming leaders in the Anglican tradition since 1842.

ALUMNI FEATURE

The Rev. Thomas Myers, SSC, ’07

PUBLISHER The Rt. Rev. Edward L. Salmon, Jr

MEDITATION

The Rev. Canon Brien Koehler, SSC, ’76

NASHOTAH HOUSE: BOLDLY GOING WHERE WE’VE NEVER GONE BEFORE

The Rev. Charleston D. Wilson, ’13

PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Mrs. LaRae Baumann SENIOR EDITOR The Rev. Andrew J. Hanyzewski, ’09 MANAGING EDITOR Mrs. Rebecca Terhune, MTS, ’15 ART DIRECTOR Mrs. Bliss Lemmon CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Mr. Nat Davauer Mr. Gabriel Morrow, MDiv, ’14 FEATURE WRITERS The Rev. Canon Brien Koehler, SSC, ’76 The Rev. Charleston D. Wilson, ’13

16

22

R E N O I S MIS

ThE

In keeping with our theme of this edition, Hebrews 12:28, Nashotah House humbly gives gratitude to God with all worship, reverence and awe, thankful for having received a kingdom that cannot be shaken.

2

STAFF WRITERS Mr. Tyler Blanski, MDiv, ’14 The Rev. David Bumsted, ’13

THE MISSIONER

USE Ah hO NAShOT

ADDRESS & TELEPHONE 2777 Mission Road Nashotah, Wisconsin 53058-9793 262.646.6500 WEBSITES nashotah.edu give.nashotah.edu THE MISSIONER EMAIL missioner.editor@nashotah.edu 2013 ELMAS MIChA , NO.1 VOL. 30

NASHOTAH.EDU

FOLLOW US ON SOCIAL MEDIA


JANUARY 2-13, 2014 “LITURGY AND PIETY OF THE MEDIEVAL CHURCH IN ENGLAND” This three-credit elective course is part of the Epiphany Term 2014 with possible credit as Liturgy, Ascetical Theology, or Church History. Our Norwich Seminar of 2013 was such a success, and our relationship with the Norwich Cathedral Chapter, especially the exceptional support and hospitality of Canon Jeremy Haselock, was so mutually agreeable, that we have decided to return to Norwich in 2014. The focus of the 2014 seminar will be

on the liturgy and piety of the English Church in the later Middle Ages. Norwich is an ideal location in which to find in one-square mile more than 40 surviving medieval parish churches, plus the remains of numerous monastic orders, devotional guilds, and the cell of the mystical writer and anchoress Julian. The countryside surrounding Norwich also has the greatest surviving concentration of medieval parish churches in the British Isles — more than six hundred. Also nearby is Walsingham and the restored pilgrimage center of

Our Lady of Walsingham, which in the Middle Ages was second only to St. Thomas à Becket’s shrine at Canterbury in its power and popularity. Norwich Cathedral will continue to be the center for the course, with our full participation in the daily round of services in a building that has been prayed in for more than 800 years. The city’s churches will be our “textbooks” in which to understand the liturgical and pious practices that created them as both works of art and centers of devotion.

The following topics and places will have a place of primary importance in our itinerary:

All participants will read a common set of materials to provide background and allow for discussion of the people, events, and sites that we encounter. Each participant will also be responsible for one aspect of our common learning, as well as pursuing an individual project with the guidance of the instructors.

Benedictine liturgy and the Opus Dei (Divine Office), especially at the Cathedral

Cistercian spiritual practices and its contrasts in art and prayer to the Benedictine tradition, of which it is a part

** Students and friends of Nashotah who wish to audit the course are welcome to apply. If accepted, they will expected to complete the required readings and participate in the communal activities.

Mendicant spirituality in preaching and spiritual direction of the laity, especially looking at the importance of the Black Friars (Dominicans) in Norwich public life

Mystical writers of the 14th-15th centuries in England, especially Julian of Norwich, in her anchor hold at St. Julian’s Church and Margery Kempe of King’s Lynn

Parish life and piety in the late Middle Ages, especially the roles played by the laity in the patronage, maintenance and liturgical life of their parishes

Importance of relics, devotion to the saints and pilgrimage— with our own pilgrimage to Walsingham

Theology and significance of prayers and Masses for the Dead, including confraternities, chantry chapels, etc. and a visit to the Great Hospital

“Seeing as believing” in public worship and private devotion— images, stained glass, illuminated books of devotion and rood screens


D

integrated approach as is the case in other leading seminaries and educational institutions. This major investment in technology was necessary to systematize our strategies and give life to our plans.

ear Friends,

As you read this issue of The Missioner, which has as its primary emphasis the story of giving, I hope that you will become as encouraged and excited about the future of Nashotah House as I am. I will not rehearse word for word the story of the financial support this last fiscal year, but I encourage you to study the information contained in the various reports, noting the remarkable growth while praying about your role in the House’s future. Suffice it to say, the support provided by the Jackson Kemper Annual Fund is quite remarkable, and points to an even brighter future. In July, we began — for the first time in the history of the House — to focus on building up our endowment purposefully and systematically so that our future may be secured now. My hope is that your own support of the House is part of that future picture. We are grateful to God and to you for the generous support we have received. Being grateful for what you have done also means that we have a responsibility to be good stewards, using the financial support we have received wisely and with an eye to the future. For many years we balanced our budget by spending bequests. As of May, 2012, any bequest received goes into the restricted endowment if it is not already so designated, providing a lasting legacy for generations to come. You have already heard and will continue to hear more about opportunities for Planned 4

THE MISSIONER

Giving, using current tax law and careful financial planning that benefits you, your family and the House. Both planned and annual giving will position the House for its next season of growth and beyond. We now welcome the Rev. Philip Cunningham, ’07, a priest excellent in finances and administrative capabilities, as our Dean of Administration. Further, in January, 2013, three students with experience in industrial and business management began the re-organization of our Administration. They have gone through our contracts, leases and insurance and have been able to save several hundred thousand dollars. Currently, we are seeking a priest skilled in fundraising and forming relationships to continue the good work started by the Rev. Charleston D. Wilson when his season ends with us in the Spring, 2014. Although residential classes were not in session, our summer was incredibly busy. In addition to welcoming our Distance Learners, Doctor of Ministry and Master of Sacred Theology students in July, Nashotah House completed our integrated technology project, which not only saves in labor costs, but also integrates development, recruitment, academics and the registrar functions, allowing on-line applications and an NASHOTAH.EDU

Buildings and Grounds has been reorganized so that we are not contracting out for work that can be done by our own crew, resulting in considerable savings. With the retirement of our wonderful Chardy Booth after seventeen years, the Mission Bookstore will be managed by students on scholarship, providing another area for considerable savings. As of the end of this last academic year, the Refectory has also been reorganized under new management. We will continue to organize the House’s administration so that everything we do enables us to carry out our only mission of raising up priests and lay leaders for service on the modern frontier. Nashotah House remains faithful to its Benedictine traditions of a common life, worship, study and work with some adjustments to the curriculum made by the faculty this academic year. We continue to be committed to our classical theological core and to the common life of prayer, which is so integral to our formation process. So, while there may be adjustments, the fundamentals remain the same. As we look to the next 170 years, seeking to be good stewards of today so that the great heritage we received from Bishop Jackson Kemper will bless the Church of tomorrow, we are indeed grateful for your support.

The Right Rev. Edward L. Salmon, Jr. Dean of Nashotah House Theological Seminary


The Right Rev. Daniel H. Martins, ’89 11th Bishop of Springfield, Chairman of the Board of Trustees

C

atholic Christianity— the well from which Nashotah House drinks deeply to renew her very soul and identity— is a fundamentally communitarian and corporeal endeavor. Certainly, individuals matter, but it is only and precisely through the Body that the individual members maintain any connection to the Head. That is, there is no relationship with Jesus Christ apart from a relationship with his Church — that is the essence of high churchmanship. Simply put, we need one another. This is patently true in our families and households, as I discovered last spring while recovering from heart surgery under the ever-watchful and caring eye of my wife. We need one another in our public life as well — a government fails without the active participation of the governed. We need one another in our non-governmental social and educational institutions. Institutions like Nashotah House. Whenever I come to campus, often I make it a point to spend some quality time in the cemetery. It is an obviously holy place, but I find it quite liminal as well. There’s a certain permeability there that is very compelling. I’ve reached a point in life now where, as I stroll among the headstones, I recognize some of the names not as abstractions but as people whom I once knew and had a very real relationships. One of them is the priest from whom I first learned about Nashotah House nearly four decades ago. Most belong to MICHAELMAS 2013

people I know nothing about apart from what their headstones reveal. Yet, I feel a bond with them. Each, in his or her way, helped make Nashotah what it is today. Then there are the names of professors, deans and bishops — Kemper, Larrabee, Cole. Their contribution is more easily calculable. It is true to state we stand on the shoulders of others, both contemporaries and forebears. In our churches and para-church institutions, very few of us are founders. We all build on top of foundations and structures that were laid and established by others. We need one another, whether the “other” works in the next office or lived in the last century before. All of us who are “stakeholders” in Nashotah House are for that very reason also stewards. We have each been entrusted, in varying ways and to varying degrees, with a piece of the larger puzzle. Stewardship is a serious responsibility, if for no other reason than that stewards are eventually called upon to render an accounting of their stewardship. But, here again, we need one another, because none of us is capable of exercising our stewardship faithfully alone, isolated from others.

entrusted. These other resources equip us not only to stand on the shoulders of others, but to become the shoulders that others stand on, both now and in the future. What an exciting prospect this is. As I am sometimes reminded, I don’t have great resources, but I do have some. What a joy it is to think that my faithful stewardship can help enable the mission of the House to continue, to the benefit of generations yet unborn. As I walk through the cemetery, I imagine where the final resting place of my mortal remains might one day be. May it please God that multiple generations of students will see my headstone, and probably not recognize my name. Nonetheless they may know that, through my stewardship, I helped make their formation as disciples of the Risen Christ possible, and they may continually be reminded of the words: “Bless the founders and benefactors of this House, and recompense them with the riches of your everlasting kingdom.”

Simply safeguarding one piece of the puzzle does nothing to bring the larger picture together and reveal it to the world. Stewardship is a holistic discipline. We are stewards not only of one piece of the puzzle that is Nashotah House, but of all the other assets—time, talent, and treasure—with which we have been NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

5


Garwood P. Anderson PhD Professor of New Testament & Greek

Therefore, since we are receiving a kingdom that cannot be shaken, let us give thanks. Heb 12:28

T

he biblical story traverses from a garden to a city punctuated by several mountains in between. It is especially the mountains that capture the imagination of the author of the Letter to the Hebrews — which before it came to be a “letter” was probably first a most eloquent sermon. And it is particularly the mountains named Sinai and Zion that tell the story of this early Christian homily. Mount Sinai stands for tangible glory, evoking awe, if not even dread — “a blazing fire, and darkness, and gloom, and a tempest, and the sound of a trumpet, and a voice whose words made the hearers beg that not another word be spoken to them” (Heb 12:18-19). The scene recalled is a mix of terrible splendor accompanying the giving of the law, God drawing frightfully near in revelation and judgment. Indeed, so holy was the mountain that any animal that touches it must be stoned and even Moses himself confesses that he “trembles with fear.” So extreme, so almost hyperbolic, is this vivid portrait of Sinai that one might suppose that the preacher is soon to extol the glories of the law, calling back a wayward people to remember whence they had fallen. But the appeal of Hebrews is not to turn back but to carry forward, not to reprise the good old days but to press forward to the new day, which even now has dawned in the redemption of the cosmos by the Lord Jesus Christ. Whatever the glory of Sinai — and our preacher holds nothing back in that

regard — it turns pale in the blazing and more perfect light of Mount Zion. It is, after all, not to Sinai we shall return but in Zion that we shall repose, “the city of the living God, the heavenly Jerusalem, and to innumerable angels in festal gathering, and to the assembly of the firstborn who are enrolled in heaven, and to God the judge of all, and to the spirits of the righteous made perfect, and to Jesus, the mediator of a new covenant” (Heb 12:22-24). The preacher understands what some of his contemporaries had apparently forgotten. Sinai was never a destination mountain. It was never, with all its glory and for all its necessity, the land of promise. The story never meant to end with Sinai, but in Zion. The preacher is not telling a new story; he is telling the old story with a surprising recent plot twist. The Zion of old merely prefigures a heavenly counterpart, an eternal city into which Christian pilgrim worshipers stream, an unshakeable eternal kingdom. But say what you will of earthly Zion, it was not unshakable; it was positively shaky. The symbol of God’s rule and glory, it was a perpetually contested space. Its history was that of a promise only intermittently fulfilled, being as often the site of shame and reproach as of honor and glory. At one such low point, God had chastised his self-absorbed people through the prophet Haggai because his house sat in shameful ruins while they dwelt in “paneled houses” (Hag 1:4). But he also promises to restore Jerusalem’s fortunes, taking the inhabited world as if by the ankles and shaking all of its treasures loose as an involuntary offering to Jerusalem — “The silver is mine, and the gold is mine,

Garwood P. Anderson is the Professor of New Testament and Greek and Director of Distance Learning Programs. On his sabbatical, Dr. Anderson is working on a book which traces St. Paul’s understanding of salvation through the course of his career and letters.

says the LORD of hosts” (Hag 2:6-9). And so it is that our preacher understands the eternal purpose of God unfolding right before his eyes. God, having once already shaken the earth by his voice at Sinai declares, “Yet once more I will shake not only the earth but also the heaven” (Heb 12:26). And only what remain, only the kingdom of God and her loyal subjects, shall abide forever in the presence of an awesome God who is a consuming fire (Heb 12:27-29). The promise of this unshakable kingdom — everlasting, enduring and invincible — the surety that joys the heart of all of its citizens. Rightly so. “Happy are those whose help is the God of Jacob, whose hope is in the LORD their God” (Ps 146:5). At the same time, the Lord’s determination to shake loose from the cosmos all its false objects of allegiance, its ephemeral preoccupations, even its fleeting pleasures is a call to devote ourselves now to that which will occupy us for eternity: “For here we have no lasting city, but we are looking for the city that is to come” (Heb 13:14).

Savior, if of Zion’s city, I through grace a member am, Let the world deride or pity, I will glory in Thy Name. Fading is the worldling’s pleasure, All his boasted pomp and show; Solid joys and lasting treasure None but Zion’s children know. John Newton, England, 1779


TO SERVE Without Being Seen By Mr. Tyler Blanski, ’14, author of When Donkeys Talk: Rediscovering the Mystery and Wonder of Christianity (Zondervan, 2012)

I

s it my imagination or is my cassock actually mocking me? It was only my second week here at Nashotah House, and with every rhythmic liturgical step my new black cassock seemed to whisper, “Imposter, fake, fool…Who do you think you are, wearing clerical clothing as if you were holy?” Whether it was my imagination, a divine nudge, or an actual outcry from by my brand-spanking-new black robe, one thing was for sure. I totally agreed with my cassock. I was just beginning my studies here at Nashotah House Theological Seminary, and the formidable work ahead of me looked less like the yellow brick road and more like a sinuous scar cutting its way up a mountain more foreboding than Mount Everest. An exhausting distance stretched between me and the summit.

I had barely begun to follow God’s call to be a priest, and the only thing I knew was that I was already tired, unequipped, and my stomach was churning with what felt more like vice than virtue. MICHAELMAS 2013

Having grown up in the church, I thought I knew all about functioning at high altitude spirituality. After all, between my having read C.S. Lewis and Thomas Merton, I thought I had always lived more than a mile above sea-level spirituality. I had seen panoramic views. I had tasted glacier spring water. But here I was at the House — unprepared, out of breath, my skinny legs hardly able to kneel during the Confession. After lunch I found a huge oak tree by the lake and sat beneath it to rest my tired brain in the late September heat. Who I was became undeniably clear. Compared to the saints of yore and the seasoned priests all around me, I was a straggler, a tagalong, the runt of the litter, an aspirant who could barely aspire. I had barely begun to follow God’s call to be a priest, and the only thing I knew was that I was already tired, unequipped, and my stomach was churning with what felt more like vice than virtue.

NASHOTAH.EDU

STUDENT FEATURE

Mr. Tyler Blanski, ’14, is in the MDiv program and he and his wife are following God’s lead to plant a church in the Anglican tradition in Minneapolis, MN following graduation. He blogs at www.holyrenaissance.com and his second book, When Donkeys Talk, is available for purchase through The Mission Bookstore by calling 262.646.6500.

What am I doing here, God? I asked the One who sent me to a theological seminary in the first place. For a moment, all I could hear was the buzz of my own self-berating. But then, there was a pause. Gently, and without a trace of mockery, I heard God say, Less of you, and more of Me. I looked back up the proverbial ordination trail to a summit I could not see through the clouds, and I realized what I should have known all along: ministry is not about how awesome I am, but about how awesome God is. To grow in Christ, I need to get out of the way — or better, become a way — for God to do the climbing. Immediately, my cassock’s staged protest against my efforts at spiritual formation were silenced. I could hear birdsong, and the chapel choir practicing from within the cloister, I could hear the laughter of students. They were probably wearing their black, button-down cassocks just like me, but not because they are kindof-a-big-deal. Students at Nashotah House do not wear cassocks because they fancy themselves more holy than the rest. They wear cassocks because they want to fade into the background. They want to become like a good waiter: one who serves without being seen.

THE MISSIONER

7


Music & Liturgy in the Anglican Tradition Canon Jeremy M. Haselock of Norwich Cathedral to Speak at Convocation 2013

C

anon Jeremy Matthew Haselock, MA (Oxon) FSA, HonFGCM, Chaplain to Her Majesty, Elizabeth II, Vice Dean and Precentor of Norwich Cathedral, will be our speaker for the annual Academic Convocation. The theme for the Convocation, following-up on last year’s honoring of Metropolitan Hilarion, is “Music and Liturgy in the Anglican Tradition.” Canon Haselock’s presence with us is quite appropriate, given his involvement in the development of Common Worship in the Church of England and his ongoing supervision of the liturgical and music life of Norwich Cathedral. Canon Haselock’s qualifications are easily seen in a brief look at his career. In 1988, Bishop Eric Kemp, Bishop of Chichester (1974 – 2001), appointed the Rev. Jeremy M. Haselock his Domestic Chaplain and in the same year set up a Diocesan Liturgical Committee with him as secretary. In 1991, newly appointed Vicar of Boxgrove, Haselock presided over a small, rural parish, and became a part-time Diocesan Liturgical Adviser. This work involved preparing the parishes for the liturgical renewal which would issue from the replacement of the Alternative Service Book 1980 with the liturgical provision of the huge Common Worship project which was to take place in 2000. In 1994 Jeremy Haselock was made 8

THE MISSIONER

a Prebendary (Canon) of Chichester Cathedral. In 1995 he was elected to the General Synod of the Church of England as a Proctor in Convocation for the diocese and began to contribute frequently to the liturgical debates in Synod surrounding the draft services proposed for inclusion in the new liturgical provision. After Canon Haselock’s first few months of engagement with this work, it was decided that the catholic tradition he represented needed to be included in the membership of the Liturgical Commission which was to produce the amount of new material — eight volumes were planned — envisaged for the Common Worship project. Newly appointed to the Commission, the Canon then served ten years, during a most liturgically productive time in the life of the Church of England, and continued as a consultant until the publication of the final volume of Common Worship in 2008. While his involvement with the Initiation Services revision work continued, Canon Haselock was also appointed to the group charged with revising the Eucharistic Rites and to the synodical Steering Committee overseeing the authorization process of the resulting NASHOTAH.EDU

Holy Communion Orders One and Two. This also involved membership of the drafting group revising and composing new Eucharistic Prayers. He wrote Prayer E, and had considerable input into all seven others, and wrote (or adapted from the Roman Sacramentary) all the new Extended Prefaces. The custom of communicating the sick and housebound from the reserved sacrament has long been part of Church life, but shortage of priests and evergrowing numbers of parishes within a single benefice, led to a demand for authorization of a formal rite of Extended Communion. Canon Haselock was then asked to chair the drafting group and as chairman of the steering committee, to see the whole process through Synod. In 1998, largely in acknowledgement of his Liturgical Commission work, Canon Haselock was offered a Crown Canonry at Norwich by the Prime Minister’s appointments secretary. This residency post carried the responsibility of Precentor of the cathedral chapter and chairman of the Norwich Diocesan Liturgical Committee together with the position of Diocesan Liturgical Adviser. The Bishop also asked him to represent liturgical and re-ordering considerations on the Diocesan Advisory Committee for the care of churches. (Continued on page 18.)


ALUMNI FEATURE

THE

PROVISION OF GOD’S GRACE

FOUND IN THE STORM

T

The Rev. Thomas Myers, SSC, ’07

he coast of New Jersey and its beaches are a thoughtfully guarded secret, with most people thinking of New Jersey as being covered from east to west, and north to south with highways and heavy industry. It’s true, the recent television reality show, “The Jersey Shore” has shown another aspect of “Jersey” culture with the likes of Snooki and Vinnie. There is also the vast reputation of Mafioso links here and there throughout the past century. However, as you see from the photos, there are 200 miles of white, sandy beaches, stretching from the northern coast of Sandy Hook to Cape May in the south. Further west and north along the Delaware Bay, the beaches extend to the mouth of the Delaware River. For the last five years, I have been the Priest-in-Charge of Saint Simeon by-the-Sea in North Wildwood, NJ. Originally from the upper coast, I grew up near the town of Mantoloking, a MICHAELMAS 2013

small summer town on the Atlantic Ocean and Barnegat Bay. Along the dozen barrier islands from Bay Head to the Wildwoods there are Episcopal and Anglican Churches in nearly every town along the Shore. Most of the churches were founded between the 1850s and 1890s, with some much older, preceeding the American Revolution. Many were summer chapels built by residents of New York, northern New Jersey and Philadelphia. ‘Clam diggers,’ the affectionate nickname for natives, were the so-called northern summer visitors; and ‘Bennys,’ and ‘Shoobies,’ if they were from the south. The so-called Bennys carried train tickets that read BENNY, for Bayone, Elizabeth, Newark and New York. The Shoobies came to town with lunches in their old “shoe boxes.” Both terms were meant to be affectionate, though slightly condescending. Years ago, many people amusingly thought the Bennys and Shoobies had no idea how to handle the surf. NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

9


Aerial view of Ortley Beach, NJ Courtesy Star Ledger

Today, the area is home to more than 50 towns, cities and villages, with many being summer residences. As the years go by, many homes have become year-round. Unfortunately, the East Coast has always been prone to hurricanes. I can remember Hurricanes Carol, 1954, and Diane, 1955, that were particularly destructive, leaving more than 275,000 people homeless. Even as recently as the summer of 2011, Hurricane Irene threatened the Jersey Shore, and while it caused major flooding and damage, it did not compare to what would occur the following year. During the last week of October, 2012, as the weather forecasters tracked Tropical Storm Sandy, they noticed that it began to build in force, transforming into hurricane level on Saturday, October 27. It was still nearly one-hundred miles east in the Atlantic Ocean, when Governor Chris Christie came to North Wildwood and gave a news conference, encouraging residents saying, “Don’t be foolish! Get out while you can!” Immediately, evacuation was declared for the Jersey Shore. As the storm moved further west towards us, the winds picked up, the rain fell in torrents, and people began to flee. I relented the urge to stay, but not before being sure that several handicapped people had found safety. Our local retired Senator and parishioner arranged for a bus to take people to shelters. When I first arrived on the Five-Mile Island, there was talk of the Great March Storm of 1962 when the bay and the ocean met. And this time we were expecting eight to nine foot tides and surges. I left town and headed inland for safety, along with a friend of mine, also a priest from Christ Church, Woodbury. The storm hit that night. We had expected it to land south in the town of 10

THE MISSIONER

NASHOTAH.EDU

Cape May. Instead, it landed in Brigantine, a town on the same island as Atlantic City, to our north. Hurricanes turn counter-clockwise which means that those to the south of the storm benefit from the winds that blow back out to sea, lessening the tides and the surge, Those to the north, and in this case, from Brigantine to New York Harbor, about 150 miles, and then along the South Shore of Long Island, were hit directly by the storm’s full brunt of nine-foot surges and extraordinary high tides. The devastation was beyond everyone’s imagination. The summer chapel of St Elizabeth in Ortley Beach was entirely washed out to sea. Only the bishop’s chair was found nearby. We escaped yet saw the storm damage, extensive all over our island. The ground floor of the rectory, only five-feet above high tide, had to be restored due to flooding. Several parish families lost everything. Yet, suddenly we felt God’s grace. The parish jumped in to find our friends a new place to live, new furniture, clothing, and food, all they needed to start over. A Seminary brother of mine from Nashotah House, Father Joel Prather ’09, and his wife, Tammy, called only days after the storm and asked how their church, the Church of the Savior in Plano, TX, could help out near us. Meanwhile, local ministries from North to South Jersey, and from all over the country began to pour in help, with clothing, food, furniture. Our local Fire Department stocked the donations, organized by all kinds of local, state and national organizations, including a pastoral branch of the


State Emergency Management Association (SEMA) to reach out to those suffering from the psychological distress of losing everything. The outpouring of the Holy Spirit was truly awesome. To this day, the United Methodist Church in Manasquan, NJ, continues to offer evening meals for those who are still rebuilding. My nephew, Dylan Myers, is working on a team in his town, Manasquan, for the rebuilding of homes. Every house on the beachfront and most as far as two blocks in from the beach were destroyed or heavily damaged. In some places the displaced sand reached the ceiling of garages! This is the same for nearly every town along the Jersey Shore, New York City and the South Shore of Long Island. Like so many tragedies in our lives in general, this storm has awakened in our parish of Saint Simeon by-the-Sea, and our local churches and agencies, a feeling of loving family, which is is the work of the Holy Spirit. Often we are hesitant to admit how sometimes adversity helps pave the way for God’s grace and mercy to be lived out. Although there has been enormous financial and material damage, and lives have been forever changed, for many people, this change has given the Holy Spirit a path into once-hardened hearts, and we rejoice for the work of the Lord in all His wonderful and marvelous ways. MICHAELMAS 2013

Originally from northern New Jersey, Fr. Myers majored in French at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and traveled to France after college to learn French. After 35 years of teaching English, raising a family of three boys and now one grand-daughter, answered God’s call, first heard as a teenager. Fr. Myers soon began his theological studies, first in French at the Institut Protestant de Theologie in Paris, then at the Cambridge Theological Federation in East Anglia. His final year of priestly formation was spent at Nashotah House in 2007. Fr. Myers then accepted the call to Saint Simeon’s, where he has served since June 2008.

NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

11


TOURING Places of Faith:

O

10 Hours, 4 Churches, 1 Bus by The Rev. David Bumsted, ’13

n May 3, 2013, Nashotah House packed up a bus with students, staff, and faculty for our annual Church Tour in Chicago, IL. As planned by our own Professor of Church Music, Canon Joseph Kucharski, we had the opportunity to visit four places of worship: one synagogue, an Episcopal parish church, and two Roman Catholic basilicas. We left early in the morning after a light continental breakfast in the Breck refectory, and our first stop was the North Shore Congregation Israel. For many of us, this was our first visit to a synagogue, and Senior Rabbi Steven S. Mason provided a very warm welcome and orientation. He brought us into the main worship space and provided a brief overview of some of the liturgical practices of the congregation and showed us some of the many impressive architectural elements of the building. Rabbi Mason then invited our group onto the raised platform from which the cantors and Rabbis leads services. He explained the importance of the congregation’s Ark and its contents. Beautifully adorned, with silver breastplates and other ornamentations, we were amazed when he opened the ark to show us various hand-copied scrolls of the Torah. Before our next destination, Rabbi Mason took us to the much smaller and more intimate worship space within the North Shore Congregation’s building, built in the last thirty


Along with St. Hyacinth and Queen of All Saints, Our Lady of Sorrows (above) is one of three churches in Illinois designated by the Pope with the title of basilica.

years, yet more traditional in design. As we reflected upon our surroundings, we were considered how humbled we were by Rabbi Mason’s hospitality. We next visited an Episcopal parish, St. Paul’s-By-the-Lake in Roger’s Park. The rector, Fr. John Heschle is a longtime friend of Nashotah House. He has been a great presence during his visits to the House, working as a confessor, spiritual director and guest lecturer. During our visit, he opened his parish to us, walking us through the daily activities of an urban parish with a thriving ministry to the surrounding neighborhood. The inside of St. Paul’s is warm and inviting, with plenty of wood and stone working together to make a quintessentially Anglo-Catholic place for worship. While Fr. Heschle was careful to describe the piety at St. Paul’s as Anglo-Catholic, he also explained the diverse community of parishioners, many of whom come from the Sudan and Burma. Fr. Heschle understands the role of St. Paul’s to be primarily a house of worship, and flowing from faithful sacramental worship developed a desire in the parish to meet the changing needs of the surrounding community. Not only does the church have a rich liturgical life, but an abiding love for the people that dwell in the bounds of the parish. After Fr. Heschle’s presentation, we went upstairs for a delicious lunch. MICHAELMAS 2013

Our final two churches were a study in contrasts. Both were Roman Catholic Basilicas, with the attendant privileges and responsibilities. But they were quite different after that fact. One, Our Lady of Sorrows, a massive place held an aesthetic intended to evoke a nineteenth-century view of the Italian Renaissance. With ornamentation and filled with history, sadly the parish membership has declined as the neighborhood has changed around it. However, there remains a committed group of religious who continue to worship in the Church’s chapel. Dedicated in 1929, Queen of All Saints Basilica is reminiscent of an English Gothic style, which made it a more familiar type of space for Nashotah students. Though not as ornamented, it does contain a great many feats of artistry, one standout being the very beautiful mosaic of Our Lady over the high altar. Both were places of reverent worship, familiar given our own liturgical heritage at Nashotah House, with enough distinction to highlight some of the differences between our traditions. We left the Queen of All Saints and drove back to the Milwaukee area where we enjoyed one of the great Midwestern traditions — the Friday Fish Fry. After a day in churches and on a bus, sitting at the table with friends and fish was quite welcome. With great thanks to Canon Kucharski, we began to wonder what he would come up with next year.

NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

13


Alumni Feature GOD’S PEOPLE

ANCHORED BY WORD&

A

SACRAMENT

s a church that is welcoming, inviting and equipping God’s people for the work of ministry, Church of the Redeemer in Sarasota, FL is continuing to build up the Body of Christ by Word and Sacrament. That is what Nashotah House alumnus, the Reverend Fred Robinson, STM ’82, has confirmed to be essential to the focus of mission and teaching that he brought with him from Nashotah House. As an integral part of the diocesan leadership, with an average Sunday attendance reaching more than 800 souls, Redeemer is among the churches in the Diocese of Southwest Florida sharing Christ with their diverse community of singles, retirees, empty nesters, and young families. “Worship is at the very heart of all that we are and do as members of the Body of Christ,” says Fr. Robinson. “The truth in which we live and the foundation upon which we build is Jesus Christ; in this knowledge we embrace the future with boundless hope.” Arriving at Nashotah House with his wife Linda and their two children, Fr. Robinson had sought the House for several reasons. Two of which, liturgy and formation, he knew he would take into the parish as he set out to teach others. “When I accepted the call of ministry, my bishop advised me to attend Nashotah House,” says Fr. Robinson. “My background as a Methodist minister had prepared me for many things. As I studied further, I realized what I had in common with John Wesley was Anglicanism. When I was received into the Episcopal Church, I realized that completing the STM degree in liturgics would bring together a lifelong love for the teaching of the Church and this would carry into parish life.” Reflecting the Diocese of Southwest Florida’s vision of ministering to Hispanic families, Redeemer works with the diocese to minister to congregations, planning Latino and Hispanic worship opportunities in their existing churches. Today there are two mature Latino/Hispanic congregations at Redeemer and St. Francis Tampa. A new congregation at St. Giles Pinellas Park has also started, with three more churches expressing an interest in establishing a Latino/ 14

THE MISSIONER

NASHOTAH.EDU

Hispanic congregation. At Redeemer, Daily Mass, Morning and Evening Prayer, the time-honored Evensong, the observation of Holy Week, Feast Days, and Solemn High Eucharist continue to reflect who the Church is. “We are not the typical

parish,” says Fr. Robinson. “The Gospel continues to show itself as unique in our area. Nashotah House helps to cultivate a mission-mindedness. Worshiping at St. Mary’s Chapel made me realize the importance of daily worship. Knowing those who have worshiped there in the past, the daily formation, the whole community participates – a teaching chapel. It was an anchor there for me.” Reflecting on his time of worship in St. Mary’s, Fr. Robinson is now working to anchor others to the hope and forgiveness offered by the Church. Having been taught by the Rev. Louis Weil, author of Liturgical Sense: The Logic of Rite, Fr. Robinson was mentored at Nashotah House to bring liturgy back into the parishes, which is then reflected in service and gratitude to others in the name of Christ, “Serving others over self is often sought as a quality to teach to others,” he says. Our staff and priests reflect this and God daily shows us how to serve and not be served.”

The Rev. Fredrick A. Robinson, STM ’82, is the rector at the Church of the Redeemer in Sarasota, FL. He and his wife Linda live in Sarasota, and have two grown children Michael and Rebecca.


Approaching Advent:

Publishes Second Volume of Meditations Nashotah House is pleased to publish the second edition of Keeping a Holy Advent With Nashotah House, featuring meditations from alumni, seminarians, friends and honorands. To preorder copies for your parish, please visit nashotah.edu. If your parish or Diocese would like to sponsor this or any subsequent issue, we invite you to contact the Rev. Charleston David Wilson, Associate Dean of Institutional Advancement at cwilson@ nashotah.edu.


MEDITATION

“Grant us, Lord, not to be anxious about earthly things, but to love things heavenly...”

T

Proper 20, The Book of Common Prayer

his world has never seen a kingdom that cannot or has not been shaken. The desire for permanence of place, culture, politics, or society is well known in every age; but equally well known is the fact that change is inevitable: those things that we believe cannot be shaken fall again and again to the force of change. The fragment remains of the ancient civilizations, the once powerful kingdoms of this world, are for us enduring testimony to the power of change. But the facts of worldly change should not cause alarm or uncertainty for Christians. “Here we have no lasting city, but we seek the city which is to come” (Heb 13:14). Christians

16

THE MISSIONER

NASHOTAH.EDU

have always lived in two places at once. We have a city, or a society or a culture, in which we live out our days, but we also live in the coming kingdom as well. The “kingdom that cannot be shaken” is not of this world. Pilate, an agent of the kingdom of this world, learned this truth when Jesus said, “my kingship is not of this world” (Jn 18:36). We “seek it, believing that we have found it and will one day reach it” (R.W. Church, “Faith Amid Changes” in Advent Sermons, 1885, 2). This is the Christian certainty that builds our hope. “Amidst the chances and changes of this life one topic of consolation will ever remain, namely, the eternity and immutability of God our Saviour, of him who was, and is, and is to come” (George Horne, Commentary on the Book of Psalms, American Edition, 1824, 420). Jesus Christ, “the same yesterday, today, and for ever” (Heb 13:8) is the one foundation of the kingdom that cannot be shaken, and this is the source of our thanksgiving, our worship, our reverence, and our awe.


Chances and Changes of a Kingdom That Cannot be Shaken The Rev. Canon Brien Koehler, SSC, ’76,

Chaplain at Nashotah House and Associate Rector of Christ Church, San Antonio, Tx

In our worship together, the Church joins in the worship of heaven. The Eucharist brings us into the joy of the New Jerusalem even as we live among the things, which are passing away. In proclaiming the mystery of faith, we assert our confidence in our hope fulfilled in the kingdom that cannot be shaken. And the proclamation of hope marks our worship in the Daily Office as well. In the reading of Holy Scripture and especially in the rhythm of the psalms we hear the constant theme of the sovereignty of God, even over circumstances that defy explanation or understanding. “The idea of the sovereignty of God is the counterpart throughout the Psalms, set over against all that is unsatisfying, disastrous, transitory, untrustworthy, not only in man’s condition but in the best he can do in it. The Psalms are always the expression of the will to fulfill God’s purpose, though very often of that will baffled; but [the psalmists] always fall back … not on despair, but on the

MICHAELMAS 2013

conviction that man’s ‘times are in God’s hand’” (Church, 16). Day by day and year by year the psalms condition and train us in the ways of reverence and awe. Every offering of Morning or Evening Prayer and each celebration of the Eucharist are comprehensive proclamations of the hope of the Church both in this world and the next. Worship strengthens our hope as we walk in faith toward the City that is promised. Gratitude, worship, reverence, and awe are the essential qualities of life in the kingdom that cannot be shaken. “Grant us, Lord, not to be anxious about earthly things, but to love things heavenly; and even now, while we are placed among things that are passing away, to hold fast to those that shall endure; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.” (BCP, 234).

NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

17


Convocation 2013 Continued from page 8 For six years, beginning in 2000, Canon Haselock chaired the “Times and Seasons” Sub Group for Common Worship which drafted a huge amount of new liturgical material and eventually produced two volumes of seasonal provision to supplement the core book. These were published in 2006 and 2008 as desk editions and as altar books in 2010 and 2011. He remained a consultant to the Liturgical Commission while these volumes were in production after he had served for the full membership of ten years.

In 2005 Canon Haselock was elected by General Synod to the Cathedrals’ Fabric Commission for England (CFCE) which has statutory responsibility for granting permission for major and minor works to the fabric of their 42 cathedral buildings. This reflected his expertise as a practicing liturgist in a major cathedral and his academic background in medieval art and architecture. He served the full term as a Commissioner and was then appointed to CFCE’s Liturgy Committee which is a statutory consultee in all cathedral re-ordering and furnishing

projects. Canon Haselock indicated, “I continue to work with this committee and am currently advising on projects at Leicester and Newcastle cathedrals.”

a one-size-fits-all, generic assembly line, schooling model. Yet, formation, character, and sanctification are all intended to take place within the context of community, within the body of Christ.

people of different generations rather than buying into the cultural paradigm of isolating age groups? What would the church look like if we welcomed all children as valued participants in the people of God? What do our baptismal and confirmation responses, “We Will” look like when we take the catechesis of our children seriously?

Canon Haselock has also served as an adjunct professor at Nashotah House. It is a great joy to welcome him. The Board of Trustees voted to honor him with honorary Doctorate of Music, which will be conferred at Convocation.

PILGRIMMAGE: Launching the Journey–

Symposium on Children’s Ministry in the Anglican Tradition

H

osted by the Rev. Jack Gabig, PhD, Nashotah House will offer Pilgrimmage: Launching the Journey – Symposium on Children’s Ministry in the Anglican Tradition, available for one-credit to students. Please join us September 27-28, 2013 with instructors Dr. Leslie Thyberg and Mrs. Shelly Buchan. What do you think of when you hear “children’s ministry?” What comes to mind when you hear “spiritual formation of children?” For the most part, churches across America typically use a pragmatic, industrial model when it comes to thinking about Christian Education and spiritual formation. We either view children’s ministry as a sort of babysitting service with crafts and entertainment, or we think of spiritual formation as strictly “information” with 18

THE MISSIONER

Children’s ministry is typically viewed as something done “to” and “for” the children, rather than intentionally catechizing and including children in worship and formation. With the best of intentions, many churches strive to provide bigger, better, and glitzier programs for the children in hopes of attracting families. Rather than focusing on innovative ways to use technology and creating “funday school” curriculum, what would happen if we more intentionally included children in our worship and formation activities? What would church look like if we emphasized relationships between NASHOTAH.EDU

Join us by registering at nashotah.edu • The Spirituality of Childhood • Child Development and Learning • Principles of Ministry with Children • Six Models of Children’s Ministry in Anglicanism Today • The Best Practices of Children’s Ministry


LUMNI aculty

TUDENT

HIGHLIGHTS

FACULTY HIGHLIGHTS On the Trail Together: Considering Robert Webber The Rev. Thomas N. Buchan, III, PhD., associate professor of Church History and STM program director, recently contributed an essay in the revised edition of Robert Webber’s Evangelicals on the Canterbury Trail. As his former student, and as someone who has walked that very trail, I must admit that Fr. Buchan is also one of my dearest friends. In fact, he has been a guide on the trail, having presented me for both Confirmation and Diaconal Orders. In his essay, one sees three themes that arise often in conversation with him: his deep interest in symbolism and its appropriate use, his careful consideration of historical contexts, and his ability to be critical and charitable.

MICHAELMAS 2013

NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

19


Fr. Buchan begins his piece by examining Webber’s use of the controlling “trail” image for his description of Evangelicals’ interest in liturgical traditions. Fr. Buchan writes, “In his metaphor of the ‘Canterbury Trail,’ Webber’s brilliant and ingenious gift of saying — and not saying — so many things at once is on display” (165). Buchan appreciates this image because it is not forcefully propositional and does not make any exclusive denominational claims, despite the late Webber’s own commitment to the Episcopal Church. In fact, the “trail” may lead people towards other “mainline” strands of American Christianity, ones that contain within their structures a much more historically-centered view of their ecclesial identity. The use of such a strong image is evocative of a pilgrimage narrative, carrying with it the sense that a journey from one spiritual home to another is itself an act of spirituality, one that can avoid polemics and apologetics; resting instead on movement with God. Webber’s careful use of this symbol is helpful, but one senses that Buchan has a caveat coming, but before that he wants his readers to consider the reality of the landscape of North American Anglicanism. Throughout our friendship, a characteristic of conversations with Buchan is that he lovingly disallows irresponsible or facile statements -unless, of course, they are amusing. In this piece, Buchan’s commitment as an academician to the nuance of history is present in his brief description of variety present in Anglicanism’s American expressions. In his survey of Anglican diversity in North America, he cites several examples of ecclesial groups asserting claims of Anglican identity over against The Episcopal Church and other smaller church groups. Buchan is drawing attention to the Canterbury Trail’s many possible destinations, and that variation in American Anglicanism is not a new thing with some Anglican groups having been founded in the 1870s. A favorite comment in this section reads, “To be candid, contests over who or what is authentically Anglican have always been a part of being Anglican.” Buchan does not end his piece by 20

THE MISSIONER

NASHOTAH.EDU

describing the sad state of Anglican disunity in North America. Rather, he leads the reader through hard questions about the usefulness of the “trail” metaphor given what has changed in North American Anglicanism in the years since Webber’s first edition of the book. He also asks broader questions of the Anglican movement given the maze of communions: full, impaired, with Canterbury, and all manner of combinations thereof. Here is where Buchan’s methodology really shines: the questions he asks beg an answer, but do not require defense. Instead, they require careful and critical appraisal of the meaning of Anglican Christianity on the ground in North America. Buchan’s style is incisive without being malicious: the difference between the doctor’s scalpel and the mugger’s switchblade. Buchan grieves over recent unpleasantness and separation, and ties it back to Webber’s work by lamenting that the “trail” now has so many endings that the “Canterbury” component seems sadly obscured. This piece shows the type of discourse that Anglicanism sorely needs. Sensible, yes. Anchored in reality, definitely. But most importantly, vulnerable and openhearted to the experience of others on the way, bearing the burden of the journey together. Buchan’s small piece in this book makes a friend hopeful for things to come, from him and for the Church.

The Rev. David Bumsted, ’13, is Assistant for Youth at The Church of the Redeemer in Sarasota, FL. You can find him there with his wife, Rebekah. Drop them a line during the winter if you want to escape the frigid north.


STAFF HIGHLIGHTS’: The House Bids a Fond Farewell “We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give,” is a saying often attributed to Winston Churchill. While there is no proof that he actually said or wrote this during his life, it certainly applies to our beloved Chardy Booth upon her retirement from The Mission Bookstore after 17 years. Each day she’s been here, she has made a life for herself and also for the House, inspiring others to do the same. Chardy began working in The Mission Bookstore in 1996 under our seventeenth Dean, the Very Rev. Gary W. Kriss. In those days, Nashotah’s community was smaller and comprised almost exclusively of residential students and faculty. With previous retail experience MICHAELMAS 2013

at Books and Company, formerly The Little Professor, in Oconomowoc, WI, we knew little how much she would impact the very heart of Nashotah House during her tenure. Chardy was an ambassador of Nashotah House to all with whom she came in contact on a daily basis. Whether as the face of Nashotah to guests stopping through to browse and tour campus, as a representative at local diocesan conventions, by hosting book signings with notable guests, working with local businesses for artwork and jewelry, searching for books requested by faculty, students and alumni, or processing incoming and outgoing packages, she did it with love and efficiency. She helped dozens of students and former students simply by organizing the incoming donations of used clericals and making them available for browsing. Her merchandise was always well-stocked NASHOTAH.EDU

and chosen with personal care. Everyone who knows Chardy knows of her love for her family, and has no doubt been shown proudly the latest pictures of the grandkids. Now that her retirement is here, she can devote more time to her wonderful family without reservation, and we look forward to hearing tales of their adventures. Farewell, Chardy! Go with God, and may you continue to make a life by giving so much of yourself, as you have here. “Almighty God, we entrust all who are dear to us to thy never-failing care and love, for this life and the life to come, knowing that thou art doing for them better things than we can desire or pray for; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.” (BCP, 831). THE MISSIONER

21


“Come, labor on! Who dares stand idle on the harvest plain? Where all around him waives the golden grain? And to each servant does the Master say, ‘Go work today.’ – Hymnal, 1982, 526

22

THE MISSIONER

NASHOTAH.EDU

give.nashotah.edu


Nashotah House:

The Rev. Charleston David Wilson, ’13 Associate Dean of Institutional Advancement

BOLDLY GOING WHERE WE’VE NEVER GONE BEFORE

I

n this issue of The Missioner we give thanks for our many benefactors – for the first time over 1,300 souls – who have made our recent expansion possible. The renewed response to Bishop Kemper’s 1842 appeal to “give freely and largely,” has given us intensified zeal and purpose, making the fiscal year ending June 30, 2013, the House’s best and continues to pave the way for next 170 years. Our saintly founder, together with his successors who sacrificed to give us our precious heritage, would be proud to see our recent growth and future promise. And we’ve only just begun. Because of the prayers and support of our partners, we now boldly move forward, going places we’ve never gone before. Our recent progress and future possibilities do, however, cause questions to loom in my mind. With literally thousands of causes worthy of a Christian’s patronage, what makes Bishop Kemper’s mission “to the western reaches” so special? After all, there are many worthwhile causes in need of prayers and financial support. In fact, there are more registered charities than ever before. Because I’m naturally a curious sort, I have begun to ask, “Why did you support the House so generously this year?” Much to my surprise and delight, the answer is always, without exception: “I support the House because it is the best MICHAELMAS 2013

investment I can make.” I ponder the word “investment,” and realize that our donors have invested blood, sweat and tears into many endeavors that left them disappointed, so I’m always keen to ask a follow-up question. Frequently, donors will realize they have referenced a purely secular term, so they explain, “Well, maybe ‘investment’ is the wrong term.” At this point in the conversation, I attempt to stop them, saying, “Don’t fret: ‘investment’ is the perfect word to describe what your support is providing.” We are not to shy away from the reality that God calls us to invest in enterprises that build up His Body, the Church. Writing to the Corinthians, St. Paul reminded the faithful, “Whoever sows sparingly will also reap sparingly, and whoever sows bountifully will also reap bountifully,” (II Cor 9:6). There is no better investment in the Church’s future than partnering with our work today, providing the prayers and resources we need to raise up leaders for service on the modern frontier. In this issue of The Missioner, we celebrate the more than the people who have indeed invested their prayers and resources with us so that the next 170 years are even more incredible than the last. By making the Jackson Kemper Annual Fund a success, this issue of The Missioner gives expression of our eternal gratitude. With the seeds our many partners are sowing liberally now, the whole Church will reap bountifully in the future. Will you keep investing in the cause of Christ at Nashotah House?

NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

23


Reaching New Frontiers with Time-Honored Teaching

Board of Visitors, 2013

W

ise counsel and energetic voice, a passion for raising up priests and lay leaders – the livelihood of Nashotah House’s mission. More than 170 years ago, Bishop Kemper visited General Theological Seminary on W. 21st Street in New York City to give the charge to seminarians to serve in the “western reaches.” Missionary Bishop for Missouri, Wisconsin and Iowa, and Bishop in Charge of the Diocese of Indiana, Kemper would return many times to the east, seeking prayers, resources and wisdom to expand the mission of Nashotah House.

The duty enjoined upon the Church is exceedingly arduous, and demands the utmost exertions and every sacrifice. We are charged with delivering the entire world from captivity. Almighty God has so far blest our efforts, that we have abundant reason to be thankful, and take courage…What is incumbent upon us at the present time, judging from our ability and the demands and opportunities pressing upon us and opening to our view?”

The Board of Visitors continues to be a dynamic group of men and women, clergy and laity, assisting the Dean of the House in a range of activities that help advance the mission of the House, including public relations, and long-term strategic planning. Fostering and nurturing a culture of generosity and relational self-giving, the Board serves the larger community, informing and providing encouragement to the Church.

In his sermon, “The Duty of the Church with Respect to Missions,” preached in St. Paul’s Chapel, New-York, 1841, he said, “I submit the following propositions to your consideration:

What are the demands facing Nashotah House today? At the Board of Visitors meeting, hosted at Nashotah House, July, 2013, many agreed the demands are much the same as the Church faced nearly two centuries ago. The answer is simple yet complex, found in the encouragement from Bishop Kemper, “We are to teach the elevating and holy doctrines of Christianity in all their vital influence, to extend far and wide.”

“The frontier has changed from Kemper’s definition,” says Bishop Paul Lambert, Diocese of Dallas, TX. “Mission has come to be known as local as well as world-wide. Mission is focused on a return to the cities and the churches. We seek to establish the churches, transform the communities, and be responsive to God’s people. Nashotah House continues to be the place to train missionaries for the world.”

24

NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER


Lessons & Carols Lessons and Carols

A Service of Advent

“STIR UP YOUR POWER, O LORD, AND WITH GREAT MIGHT COME AMONG US”

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 12, 2013 AT 5 O’CLOCK IN THE EVENING THE CHAPEL OF ST. MARY THE VIRGIN Featuring of

the

Chapel Choir

Nashotah House

under the direction of

Canon Joseph A. Kucharski

community dinner to follow

Reservations Required


FINANCE AT A GLANCE

2013 FISCAL YEAR GIVING REPORT

W

ith hearts overflowing with gratitude, it is our pleasure to publish the 2013 Fiscal Year Giving Report, detailing the support we received from July 1, 2012 through June 30, 2013. This report does not reflect gifts received between the beginning of our current fiscal year (July 1, 2013) and the publication of the Michaelmas issue of The Missioner. Every gift we receive – no matter the size – sustains and strengthens our mission of raising up priests and lay leaders for service on the modern frontier. Infinitely more than names and numbers, this report celebrates the abundant generosity of our many partners and highlights the fellowship we share. Far more than categories and contributions, this report reflects the enduring charitable work of the men and women, lay and ordained, who have provided the prayers and resources necessary for forming heralds of the gospel in the twentyfirst century. Beyond dollars and dates, this report affirms that there is no greater investment in the Church’s future than partnering with Nashotah House. May God grant us all hearts aflame with a zeal for the mission of the Church.

The Rev. Charleston David Wilson, ’13 Associate Dean of Institutional Advancement

26

THE MISSIONER

NASHOTAH.EDU

Rev’d Charleston David Wilson Associate Dean of Institutional Advancement


FINANCE AT A GLANCE The Jackson Kemper Annual Fund “Can we not then as individuals, and especially as parishes however poor, do more for the cause of Christ and His Church than we ever yet have done?” – Bishop Jackson Kemper, 1842. In 1842 Bishop Jackson Kemper, the first missionary bishop of the Episcopal Church, articulated an ambitious vision of forming a “mission to the western reaches.” His vision would become Nashotah House Theological Seminary. Joining Bishop Kemper and giving expression to his desire for solid and faithful financial management, we have established The Jackson Kemper Annual Fund, the cornerstone of our annual fundraising and the springboard for expanding the legacy entrusted to us. The dollars raised help us to support our budget and strengthen our programs. The Jackson Kemper Annual Fund allows Nashotah House to expand scholarship offerings, attract the best faculty, enhance our learning environment and improve campus life in a host of ways. The annual fund enables us to bridge the sizeable gap between tuition revenue and the actual operating expenses of the House. Gifts to the Jackson Kemper Annual Fund provide flexible and immediate use dollars, allowing us to respond to our needs and to pursue unexpected opportunities.

Far more than categories and contributions, this report reflects the enduring charitable work of those men and women, lay and ordained, who have provided the prayers and resources necessary for forming heralds of the gospel in the twenty-first century. MICHAELMAS 2013

NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

27


“Can we not then as individuals, and especially as parishes however poor, do more for the cause of Christ and His Church than we ever yet have done?” – Bishop Jackson Kemper, 1842. n 1842 Bishop Jackson Kemper, the first missionary bishop of the Episcopal Church, articulated an ambitious vision of forming a “mission to the western reaches.” His vision would become Nashotah House Theological Seminary. Joining Bishop Kemper and giving expression to his desire for solid and faithful financial management, we have established The Jackson Kemper Annual Fund, the cornerstone of our annual fundraising and the springboard for expanding the legacy entrusted to us.

The dollars raised help us to support our budget and strengthen our programs. The Jackson Kemper Annual Fund allows Nashotah House to expand scholarship offerings, attract the best faculty, enhance our learning environment and improve campus life in a host of ways. The annual fund enables us to bridge the sizeable gap between tuition revenue and the actual operating expenses of the House. Gifts to the Jackson Kemper Annual Fund provide flexible and immediate use dollars, allowing us to respond to our needs and to pursue unexpected opportunities.

Parishes and Dioceses

Parishes contributing 1, 2 or 3 percent of their net operating budget annually to Nashotah House represent almost 50% of our annual gifts. These gifts are partnerships, given and received in a spirit of mutual encouragement and thanksgiving for one another. All Saints Ashmont All Saints Church All Saints’ Church All Saints Episcopal Church All Saints Episcopal Church All Saints’ Episcopal Church All Saints’ Episcopal Church All Saints’ Episcopal Church Anchor House Ministries Anglican Church Of The Good Samaritan Anglican Diocese of San Joaquin Anglican Diocese of the South, Inc. Anglican Global Mission Partners Anonymous Ascension Episcopal Church Benedictines of Christ the King Calvary Episcopal Church Carolyn S. Lindsey TUW Charitable Cathedral Church of St. Luke Cathedral Church Of The Advent Christ Church Christ Church Christ Church Anglican Mission 28

THE MISSIONER

Boston, MA Woodbridge, VA San Diego, CA Chevy Chase, MD Moline, IL Lakeland, FL Jensen Beach, FL Baldwin, NY Auburndale, FL St. John’s, NL Fresno, CA Loganville, GA Ambridge, PA Portland, OR Chicago, IL Indian Rocks Beach, FL Clearwater, FL Orlando, FL Birmingham, AL Bradenton, FL Warrenton, VA Lemoore, CA NASHOTAH.EDU

Christ Church Cathedral Christ Church Midland Christ Church Quaker Farms Christ Episcopal Cathedral Christ Episcopal Cathedral Christ Episcopal Church Christ Episcopal Church Christ Episcopal Church Christ Episcopal Church Christ Episcopal Church Christ the King Anglican Church Christ the King Lutheran Church Christ the King Lutheran Church Christ the Redeemer Anglican Church Christ the Redeemer Anglican Church Church of Our Saviour - Oatlands Church Of Saint Thomas And Saint John Church of the Advent Church of the Ascension Church of the Cross Church Of The Good Shepherd Church of the Holy Apostles Church Of The Holy Communion Church of the Incarnation

Sherman, TX Midland, TX Oxford, CT Eau Claire, WI Salina, KS La Crosse, WI Delavan, WI Greenwich, CT Springfield, MO St. Joseph, LA Spokane, WA De Soto, IL Delafield, WI East Peoria, IL Fort Worth, TX Leesburg, VA New Richmond, WI Denver, CO Orlando, FL Hopkins, MN Lake Charles, LA Barnwell, SC Charleston, SC Dallas, TX


Church of the Redeemer Church of the Redeemer Church of the Resurrection Church of the Transfiguration Community Foundation of the Ozarks Community of St. Mary-Western Province Cummins-Allison Daughters of the King Diocese of Centeral Florida Diocese of Central Florida Diocese of Western Anglicans Dubose Scholarship Fund ECW - St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church ECW - St. John’s Episcopal Church ECW - St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church ECW- St. Martha’s Guild ECW-St. Mary’s Episcopal Church Emmanuel Church Emmanuel Episcopal Church Emmanuel Episcopal Church Emmanuel Episcopal Church Episcopal Cathedral of Our Merciful Savior Episcopal Church of St. Mary and St. John Episcopal Church of the Ascension Episcopal Church of the Ascension Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd Episcopal Church of the Resurrection Episcopal Churches of Richmond County, Virginia Episcopal Diocese of Albany Episcopal Diocese of Easton Episcopal Diocese of Eau Claire Episcopal Diocese of Fond du Lac Episcopal Diocese of Fond du Lac Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth Episcopal Diocese of Iowa Episcopal Diocese of Minnesota Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina Episcopal Diocese of North Dakota Episcopal Diocese of Pennsylvania Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island Episcopal Diocese of South Carolina Episcopal Diocese of South Dakota Episcopal Diocese of Springfield Episcopal Diocese of Tennessee Episcopal Diocese of the Virgin Islands Episcopal Diocese of Upper South Carolina Episcopal Diocese of Western Louisiana First Congregational Church of Mukwonago First Presbyterian Church George Mercer, Jr. Memorial School of Theology Good Shepherd Episcopal Church Good Shepherd Episcopal Church Good Shepherd Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grand Chapter of Missouri Order of the Eastern Star Holy Comforter Episcopal Chapel Holy Trinity Episcopal Church Holy Trinity Episcopal Church Holy Trinity Parish Jesus the Good Shepherd Anglican Church MICHAELMAS 2013

NASHOTAH.EDU

Orangeburg, SC Sarasota, FL Tampa, FL Mountain Grove, MO Springfield, MO Milwaukee, WI Mt Prospect, IL Satellite Beach, FL Orlando, FL Long Beach, CA Lake Charles, LA Granite City, IL St James City, FL Morris, IL Peoria, IL Burlington, NJ Corry, PA Keyser, WV Rapid City, SD Lockhart, TX Faribault, MN Butte, MT Pittsburgh, PA Chicago, IL Maitland, FL Franklin, TN Warsaw, VA Greenwich, NY Easton, MD Eau Claire, WI Appleton, WI Appleton, WI Fort Worth, TX Des Moines, IA Minneapolis, MN Raleigh, NC Fargo, ND Philadelphia, PA Providence, RI Charleston, SC Sioux Falls, SD Springfield, IL Nashville, TN St Thomas, VI Columbia, SC Alexandria, LA Mukwonago, WI Pittsburgh, PA Garden City, NY Venice, FL Dallas, TX Granbury, TX Monroe, LA Jamestown, ND Ludington, MI Sheboygan, WI Pittsburgh, PA Old Saybrook, CT Carthage, MO Columbia, MO Lecompte, LA Melbourne, FL Clearwater, FL Hillsdale, MI Henderson, NV

THE MISSIONER

29


Messiah Episcopal Church Missionary Diocese of All Saints National Christian Foundation Roman Catholic Diocese of Tulsa Saint Andrews Episcopal Church Saint Martin in the Fields Episcopal Church Saint Matthew’s Parish Scholarship Foundation of Santa Barbara Sisterhood of the Holy Nativity Society of Anglican Missionaries and Senders Society of the Transfiguration St. Alban’s Episcopal Church St. Andrew’s Anglican Church St. Andrew’s Anglican Church St. Andrew’s Anglican Church St. Andrews Church St. Andrew’s Church St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church St. Annes Episcopal Church St. Anne’s Episcopal Church St. Anskar’s Episcopal Church St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church St. Bride’s Episcopal Church St. Columba’s Church St. David of Wales Episcopal Church St. Dunstan’s Anglican Church St. Francis Church St. Gabriel’s Retreat House St. George’s Church St. George’s Episcopal Church St. Gregory’s Church St. James Episcopal Church St. James Episcopal Church St. James’ Episcopal Church St. James’ Episcopal Church St. James’ Episcopal Church St. John in the Wilderness Episcopal Church St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church St. John the Evangelist Church St. John’s Church St. John’s Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. Johns’ Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church of Florence St. Jude’s Episcopal Church St. Laurence Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Anglican Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Parish St. Martin’s Church St. Martin’s Episcopal Church St. Martin’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church 30

THE MISSIONER

Saint Paul, MN Donora, PA Birmingham, AL Tulsa, OK Breckenridge, TX Atlanta, GA Fort Motte, SC Santa Barbara, CA Ripon, WI Ambridge, PA Cincinnati, OH Spirit Lake, IA Versailles, KY Lewis Center, OH Rome, GA Boca Grande, FL New Kensington, PA Fort Pierce, FL Greenville, SC Valparaiso, IN Mer Rouge, LA Abington, PA Morrison, IL Hartland, WI Pewaukee, WI Nashville, TN Chesapeake, VA Fresno, CA Denton, TX Largo, FL Dunlap, IL Catonsville, MD Macomb, IL Summerville, SC Mansfield, TX Leesburg, FL Goose Creek, SC Fort Yates, ND Mesilla Park, NM Oskaloosa, IA Elkhorn, WI Orlando, FL Stockton, CA Savannah, GA Tampa, FL Detroit, MI Matherville, IL Decatur, IL Johns Island, SC Lancaster, OH Florence, SC Buffalo, NY Southlake, TX Manchester, MO La Crescenta, CA Baton Rouge, LA Mineral Wells, TX Springfield, IL Cypress Mill, TX Coleman, TX Beaver Dam, WI Waupaca, WI Arlington, TX Howe, IN Monroeville, PA Houston, TX Richmond, VA Franklin, LA Abingdon, MD Franklin, LA Dousman, WI Robinson, IL NASHOTAH.EDU

St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church - Castleton St. Matthias Episcopal Church St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church St. Michael and All Angels’ Episcopal Church St. Michaels Anglican Church St. Michael’s Episcopal Church St. Olaf’s Episcopal Church St. Paul the Apostle Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Anglican Church St. Paul’s Anglican Parish St. Paul’s by-the-Lake Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Ashippun St. Paul’s Episcopal Parish, K Street St. Peter and St. Paul Episcopal Church St. Peter’s Anglican Church St. Peter’s Anglican Church St. Peter’s Episcopal Church St. Peter’s Episcopal Church St. Peter’s Episcopal Church St. Peter’s Episcopal Church St. Simeon’s by-the-Sea Episcopal Church St. Simeon’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Anglican Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Thomas Episcopal Church St. Thomas Episcopal Church St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church Fifth Avenue St. Timothy’s Episcopal Church St. Vincent’s Episcopal Cathedral The Anglican Cathedral of the Epiphany The Anglican Foundation of Stockton The Annunciation Mission The Domestic & Foreign Missionary Society-Episcopal Church The Episcopal Church of St. Gregory the Great The Episcopal Church of St. John the Evangelist The Episcopal Church of the Advent The Episcopal Church of The Blessed Sacrament The Episcopal Missionary Church The International Anglican Church The Order of the Daughters of the King The Society for the Increase of the Ministry Trinity Anglican Church Trinity Church Trinity Church Trinity Church ECW Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Episcopal Church Truro Anglican Church Upper Arlington Lutheran Church

Bonita Springs, FL Burlington, NJ Tomah, WI Staten Island, NY Shreveport, LA Sanibel, FL Dallas, TX Denver, CO Okauchee, WI Charleston, SC Amherst, WI Savannah, GA Visalia, CA Bakersfield, CA Chicago, IL Carlinville, IL Schenectady, NY Mancos, CO Artesia, NM Healdsburg, CA Greenwich, NY Oconomowoc, WI Washington, DC Arlington, TX Tallahassee, FL Birmingham, AL Sheboygan Falls, WI Fort Atkinson, WI Canton, IL Columbia, TN North Wildwood, NJ Stanley, WI Heathsville, VA Cincinnati, OH Fargo, ND Hobart, IN Oak Ridge, TN Billings, MT Horseshoe Bend, AR Morris, IL Eustis, FL New York, NY Alexandria, LA Bedford, TX Columbia, SC Stockton, CA New Orleans, LA New York, NY Mansfield, TX Elkhart, IN Dunnellon, FL Placentia, CA State College, PA Colorado Springs, CO Woodstock, GA West Hartford, CT Monmouth, IL Rock Island, IL Myrtle Beach, SC Logansport, IN Pass Christian, MS Oshkosh, WI Lincoln, IL Baraboo, WI Deridder, LA Fairfax, VA Columbus, OH


Legacy Accords with Vision As a seminary within the Anglican tradition, Nashotah House continues to hold the vision to spread the witness of the Gospel of Jesus Christ in accord with Bishop Jackson Kemper’s vision for evangelism in the western frontier. After the founding of Nashotah, Bishop Kemper wrote, “I perceive much cause to bless God and take courage, for I fully believe, that, with divine blessing, we are laying a deep and permanent foundation upon which the Church of the living God will be gloriously established.” Truly, for 170 years Nashotah House has held fast to that “deep and permanent foundation,” providing faithful priests and laity for service in the Church. Of the prayers Nashotah House students and faculty daily pray, they mindfully ask God to, “bless the founders and benefactors of this House ...” Through profession of the worship, theology and spirituality, along with a contemplative emphasis on daily Eucharist and a life devoted to serving God and His Church, Nashotah House’s primary mission is the education and formation of priests and lay people. As a result, Nashotah House offers a variety of opportunities to help support the seminary and their mission – the Alice Sabine McGee Legacy Society, the Jackson Kemper Annual Fund, and the Bishop Parsons Scholarship Fund. Often donors are asked, “Why Nashotah House? When there are so many other similar and worthy causes?” According to one anonymous donor, “Nashotah is a holy place. There you will find Christianity lived out. From the genuine, teaching nature of Dean Salmon to the kind, approachability of the seminary students. Students from Nashotah House who are ordained into the Church bring a quality of the Gospel with them that they received while being formed at the House.” St Benedict of Nursia taught his students, “Whatever good work you begin to do, beg of God with most earnest prayer to perfect it.” So follows Nashotah House, a theological seminary in the Anglican tradition, concerned for the proclamation of the Gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ, the mission of the Church in the world, the salvation of all people, and the worship of Almighty God.


The Annual Fund Giving Societies The Annual Giving Societies represent extraordinary annual gifts, ranging from $10,000 - $100,000. They include:

Society

The Bishop Jackson Kemper Visionary Society The James Lloyd Breck Sustainers Society The John Henry Hobart, Jr. Pioneer Society The James DeKoven Discovery Society The William Henry Adams Explorer Society

Commander

Frank

Mr. and Mrs. Mr. The Rev. Mr. and Mrs.

Terry Albert H. Stewart Richard

The Hon. and Mrs.

George Herbert

Annual Partnership Amount $100,000+ $75,000 – $100,000 $50,000 - $75,000 $25,000 - $50,000 $10,000 - $25,000

All Saints Episcopal Church Anonymous Braden Church of the Redeemer Hamilton Roddis Foundation, Inc. Kohler Nicholas Ross Schwaab St. Laurence Episcopal Church Walker, III St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church Fifth Avenue

Chevy Chase, MD Sarasota, FL Madison, WI

Southlake, TX New York, NY

Dean’s Fellow Dean’s Fellows contribute between $5,000 - $10,000 annually, affirming that no other seminary better forms priests and lay leaders for service on the modern frontier than Nashotah House. The Rev.

Henry

The Rev. Mr. Mrs. Ms. The Rt. Rev. Mr. The Rev.

Sarah Eugene Claire Margaret Edward L. James Raymond

The Rev. Dr.

Ralph

32

THE MISSIONER

Avent Anonymous Bronos Cole Greene Porter Salmon, Jr. Sloan Smith St. Martin’s Episcopal Church St. Michael and All Angels’ Episcopal Church Walker NASHOTAH.EDU

Houston, TX Denver, CO


Dean’s Executive Committee Those contributing between $2,500 - $5,000 become members of the Dean’s Executive Committee, joining others who have provided significant support for the work of the Jackson Kemper Annual Fund. The Rev.

Francis

The Rev. The Most Rev.

Neal Robert

Dr. The Rev. Dr. & Mrs. Mr. Mrs. The Rt. Rev. The Rev.

John Arnold Oliver Mary William Andrew

Mr. Ms. The Rev.

Roger Margaret Raymond

Anonymous Baltz Cathderal Church of the Advent Church of Our Saviour - Oatlands Dow Duncan Episcopal Church of the Ascension Keller Klukas Langenberg Langenberg Love Mead Mitford Children’s Foundation Nielsen Porter Smith St. John’s Episcopal Church St. Laurence Episcopal Church Truro Anglican Church

Birmingham, AL Leesburg, VA Chicago, IL

Esmont, VA

Decatur, IL Southlake, TX Fairfax, VA

Dean’s Cabinet Donors who contribute between $1,000 - $2,500 are enrolled as members of the Dean’s Cabinet, reflecting their substantial commitment to the mission of the House.

Mr.

John

Mr. Mrs. The Rev. Canon The Rev. Canon The Rev.

Kevin Frances William Robert Robert

MICHAELMAS 2013

All Saints Church All Saints Episcopal Church Allen Anonymous Babb Barr Blewett Brown Browning NASHOTAH.EDU

Woodbridge, VA Moline, IL

THE MISSIONER

33


34

Mr.

Harvey

The Rev. Dr.

Clifford

Mr. Mr. The Rev. Canon Mr. Mrs. The Rev. Dr.

Philip Jay George James Lynn D. Stuart

Mr. Dr. Ms.

David Ilse Carlotta

Mr. The Rt. Rev. The Rt. Rev. The Rt. Rev. Mrs. Dr. The Rev. Canon The Rt. Rev. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Dr.

Allan Jack Russell Charles Beverly Sarah R. Brien Daniel H. David Charles Donald William

The Rt. Rev. Mrs. Mr. Mrs. The Rt. Rev. Miss Mr. Mrs. The Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Canon The Rt. Rev. Mrs.

James Carolyn Robert Mary Donald Phoebe David Martha Fredrick Marvin David Nelson Dabney Dorothy

The Rev.

Warren

The Rev. Mr. The Rt. Rev. The Rev. The Rev.

Larry Walter William Terrence Arthur

THE MISSIONER

Burkett Christ Church Cathedral Christ the King Lutheran Church Christ the Redeemer Anglican Church Church of the Good Shepherd Church of the Holy Communion Comfort Community Foundation Of The Great River Bend Conover Crouse Dettwiller Dixon Douthitt Dunnan Emil Ewald Foundation, Inc. Emmanuel Church Emmanuel Episcopal Church Episcopal Diocese of Iowa Erbeck Fuller Gary Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Hayssen Family Foundation, Inc. Iding Iker Jacobus Jenkins Joutras Karlowicz Koehler Martins Mason McAlpin Meinig Miller Mitford Children’s Foundation Montgomery Mugar Neale Neuses Parsons Pettingell Pitts Pope Robinson Schuette Shanks Skinner Smith Spaulding St. Anne’s Episcopal Church St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church St. Bride’s Episcopal Church St. David of Wales Episcopal Church St. James’ Episcopal Church St. John’s Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Martin’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Matthias Episcopal Church St. Michaels Anglican Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Peter and St. Paul Episcopal Church St. Peter’s Episcopal Church Tanghe Trinity Church Trinity Episcopal Church Valentine Virden III Wantland Welty III Woolley

NASHOTAH.EDU

Sherman, TX De Soto, IL Fort Worth, TX Lake Charles, LA Charleston, SC Bettendorf, IA

Oconomowoc, WI Corry, PA Keyser, WV Des Moines, IA

Sheboygan, WI Old Saybrook, CT Sheboygan, WI

Esmont, VA

Morrison, IL Nashville, TN Chesapeake, VA Denton, TX Mesilla Park, NM Savannah, GA Decatur, IL Johns Island, SC Baton Rouge, LA Cypress Mill, TX Houston, TX Abingdon, MD Bonita Springs, FL Shreveport, LA Okauchee, WI Healdsburg, CA Arlington, TX Fort Atkinson, WI Rock Island, IL Lincoln, IL


Nashotah House Heritage Club Those giving between $500 – and $1,000 annually are enrolled as members of the Nashotah House Heritage Club, a dedicated group of men and women, lay and ordained, who make sizeable annual gifts to the Jackson Kemper Annual Fund. All Saints’ Church Mr.

John

Mr. Mr. Mrs. The Rt. Rev. Sister Ms. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Deacon Mrs. Professor

Kevin David Barbara Sperry Peter

Mr. & Mrs.

Gary

Mr. Mr.

David Daniel

The Rev. Dr. Mr.

Reginald William

The Rev. Mr. Dr. Mrs. Mrs. Dr. The Rt. Rev.

Marie Thomas Judith Diane Shelley H. David Daniel

Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Mrs. Mr. Dr. Mr. The Rev. Dr. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mr.

Pamela Jon James Beverly Kenneth Bruce Robert James Philip David Richard Charles Lloyd

The Rev. Mr. The Rt. Rev. Mr. Mrs.

Dennis David Clarence Charles Jean

Miss Mr.

Lillian David

Mr.

Gaylord

Mrs.

Ruth

Charlotte Nancy Thomas Michael Barbara Richard

Allen Anglican Global Mission Partners Anonymous Babb Barta Bearden Beckwith Boniface Booth Boyle Brouillard Burg Burton Carnell Christ Church Christ Episcopal Church Christ Episcopal Church Christ Episcopal Church Christ the King Lutheran Church ECW-St. Mary’s Episcopal Church Engels Episcopal Diocese of North Carolina Erbeck Ewing First Bank Financial Centre Fuller Godbey Grace Episcopal Church Gray Gresik Hancock Hazlewood Hendershot Herman Herzog Holy Comforter Episcopal Chapel Jackson Jenkins Johnson Joutras Kuehn Larson Lea Lemler Livingston Mason Martin McAlpin Miles Missionary Society of San Miguel Odekirk Pitts Pope Rice Rosling Saint Andrews Episcopal Church Saint Matthew’s Parish Savage Shanks Shell Oil Company Foundation Smith Society of the Transfiguration Spoerri St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church

San Diego, CA Ambridge, PA

Bradenton, FL Delavan, WI Greenwich, CT St. Joseph, LA Delafield, WI Burlington, NJ Raleigh, NC Oconomowoc, WI Jamestown, ND

Lecompte, LA

Seguin, TX

Breckenridge, TX Fort Motte, SC Princeton, NJ Cincinnati, OH Mer Rouge, LA Pewaukee, WI


Mr.

Robert

Mr.

David

Mrs. The Rev. The Rev.

Jane Stephen S.P. Robert

St. Bride’s Episcopal Church St. Dunstan’s Anglican Church St. George’s Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Matthias Episcopal Church St. Michael and All Angels Episcopal Church St. Paul the Apostle Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Anglican Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Peter’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Anglican Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Strother Trinity Church Trinity Episcopal Church Underwood Virginia Crouse Charitable Trust Will Wlosinski Woodbury

Chesapeake, VA Largo, FL Macomb, IL Manchester, MO Mineral Wells, TX Beaver Dam, WI Franklin, LA Shreveport, LA Dallas, TX Savannah, GA Visalia, CA Healdsburg, CA Fort Atkinson, WI Heathsville, VA Oak Ridge, TN Cincinnati, OH Rock Island, IL Lincoln, IL Cleveland, OH


Nashotah House Guardian’s Circle By their faithful watchfulness, those contributing $250 - $500 annually are enrolled in the Nashotah House Guardian’s Circle. The Rev. The Rt. Rev.

Keith James

The Rev. Canon

John G.

Lt. Col. Mr. Mrs. Sister Mrs. Mr. The Rev. Miss

John David Barbara Sperry

Mrs. Mrs. Mr. The Rev. The Rev.

Judith Georgiana Franklin Dennis William

Mr. Mr.

William William

The Rt. Rev. Dr. The Rev. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Dr. The Rev. Canon The Rev. Canon Ms. Dr. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Ms. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. The Rev.

Richard Judith John Diane Katherine Shelley Jane Donald Lloyd Dudley Arthur K. Charles Helen Robert William Carl William Herman Stephen J. Ralph Frederick Franklin Richard M. Dow Fernando Douglas Marilyn Ryan Dwight James Raymond Stuart

The Rev.

Doran

Nancy David Thomas Maxine

MICHAELMAS 2013

Acker Adams Aegon Transamerica Foundation Andrew Anonymous Armstrong Barta Bearden Boniface Boyle Breisch Brouillard Bull Christ Episcopal Church Church Of Saint Thomas And Saint John Cook Crouter Davis Day Easterling Episcopal Diocese of Easton Episcopal Diocese of Rhode Island Gagin Godbey Good Shepherd Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grein Hancock Harper Hazlewood Heidt Hendershot Hoffman Hughes Johnson Jones Kephart King McDowell Mead Moore Mosley Murphy Page Parsons Patston Philputt Reinauer Roehrich Sanderson Santos Sarcia Schrader Schwarz Shackelford Siepmann Smith Smith St. Andrew’s Church St. Columba’s Church St. Gregory’s Church St. James Episcopal Church St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Vincent’s Episcopal Cathedral Stambaugh NASHOTAH.EDU

Cedar Rapids, IA

La Crosse, WI New Richmond, WI

Easton, MD Providence, RI Dallas, TX Pittsburgh, PA Monroe, LA

New Kensington, PA Fresno, CA Mansfield, TX Leesburg, FL Orlando, FL Baton Rouge, LA Hobart, IN Billings, MT Fargo, ND Bedford, TX

THE MISSIONER

37


Mr. Mr. Mr.

John Harwood James

Mrs. The Rev. Mrs. The Rev. Mr.

Virginia Larry Diane Peter Ralph

The Rev. The Rev.

Charleston Lonell

38

THE MISSIONER

Stucker Sturtevant Sweeney The Episcopal Church of St. Gregory the Great The Episcopal Church of The Blessed Sacrament Tisdall Valentine Valentine Vaughn Webb Wells Fargo Educational Matching Gift Program Wilson Wright Xcel Energy Foundation - Matching Gifts Program

NASHOTAH.EDU

Mansfield, TX Placentia, CA

Princeton, NJ Minneapolis, MN


“The priceless value of the soul...

demands the ready, the cheerful sacrifice of time, of talents and of life.” Bishop Jackson Kemper, 1841

MICHAELMAS 2013

NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

39


The Jackson Kemper Annual Fund Calls Upon You Often, alumni and friends of Nashotah House share stories of how they are blessed by the House. One anonymous donor said, “Although I know I cannot give much, I know I can give a little. And I know how deeply grateful to all those who support the House. The men and women who are sent out to be priests are truly God’s anointed. We are rewarded daily by the priests’ teaching and care.” Joining Bishop Kemper and giving expression to his desire for solid and faithful financial management, the House established The Jackson Kemper Annual Fund, the cornerstone of annual fundraising and the springboard for expanding the legacy entrusted to the House. The dollars raised help Nashotah House to support our budget and strengthen our programs. The Jackson Kemper Annual Fund allows Nashotah House to expand scholarship offerings, attract the best faculty, enhance our learning environment and improve campus life in a host of ways. The annual fund enables us to bridge the sizable gap between tuition revenue and the actual operating expenses of the House. Gifts to the Jackson Kemper Annual Fund provide flexible and immediate use dollars, allowing us to respond to our needs and to pursue unexpected opportunities. The success of the annual fund is absolutely essential in order to maintain the unparalleled education and spiritual formation that has been our hallmark since 1842.

Additional Individual Gifts to the Jackson Kemper Annual Fund The Rt. Rev. The Rev’d Canon The Rt. Rev. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Mr.

Keith Charles James David George Meredyth Comer

The Rt. Rev. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev.

C. FitzSimons John William Kent

40

THE MISSIONER

Ackerman Ackerson Adams Adams Ahrens Albright Alden All Saints’ Episcopal Church All Saints’ Episcopal Church Allison Ambelang Anderson Anderson NASHOTAH.EDU

Baldwin, NY Jensen Beach, FL


The Rev. Canon

John G.

Mr. Mr. Lt. Col. Ms. Mr. The Rev. The Very Rev. Dr. The Rev. Dr. Dr. Ms. The Rev. The Rev. Dr. The Rev. Mrs. Mr. Mr. Mr. Ms. Ms. Mrs. Mr.

Michael John R. John Diane Peter Vernon Harry David James Virginia William David Craig Dwayne Judith Marshall Douglas Thomas Karen Suzanne Ruth Palmer

The Rev. Dr. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Canon Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. Deacon Ms. Mr. Mr. Ms. Mr. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mrs. The Rev. Deacon Mr. Mrs. The Rev. Canon The Rev. Dr. Mr. Ms. Mrs. Dr. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Miss The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Mr.

Richard Bruce H.J. David Anna Bruce James Peter Virginia Harriette Kevin Edward T.L. Esther Arthur Shirley Thomas Jack Harry Linda Martha Dewey Mary Michael Allen Charles Maurie Marylou Willis Byron Royce Barney Robert Tom Thomas Douglas Maxine Norman Donald Tommy James

The Ven. Dr. Ms. The Rev. Ms. The Rev. Ms. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Mr.

Myles Jean T. Kimball Christine Stephen Mary Ramona Virginia W. Michael Marcus

Andrew Anonymous Apfeld Armstrong Armstrong Arnold Augustine Austin Aveling Bailey Bardenwerper Barnard Barnds Barr Bartos Bauman Bay Beale Beard Beck Becker Beckley Bedore Beebe Benedictines of Christ the King Bennet Benshoff Bergami Bergesen Bertsch Bevans Biegler Bird Bird Black Bland Borie Bork Borrelli Bowen Bowers Bowling Bowman Bracken Bradley Breisch Bridges Brooks Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Brown Bruce Brumder Bruns Bryant Buchanan Bull Burke Bush Bye Cabot Calvary Episcopal Church Calvin Campbell Cannon Cannoot Capitelli Caraway Carlson Carr Cassell Cassimus

Chicago, IL

Indian Rocks Beach, FL


The Rev.

Norman

Mr. The Rev. Mr. Ms.

Gregory A. Milton Thomas Doris

The Rev. The Rev. Canon Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. Deacon Ms. Mrs. The Rev. Dr.

Forrest Frank Katherine Milo Christopher Anson John Martha Diane Clifford

Mr. Miss Mr. The Rev. The Very Rev. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Dr. Colonel Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mrs. Mr. Mrs. Mr. The Rev. The Ven. Mr. The Rev. Ms. The Rev. Canon Dr. Mr. Ms. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. The Very Rev. Mr. Mr. Ms.

John Jean David Robert William Joseph Philip Gregory John Joseph Richard Ruby James Thomas Franklin Dennis Richard Elizabeth Charles Virginia Stephen Lawrence Shawn Albert William Sheila Robert Donald Jean Arthur Shawn Charles Charles William Robert Richard Martin M. John R. Eric Jacque

The Rev. The Rev. Dr. Mrs. Mr. Mr. Mr.

William Nancy Maria Thomas William William

42

THE MISSIONER

Caterpillar Foundation Catir Cerebral Palsy Assoc. Chase Cheney Chester Chortek Christ Church Quaker Farms Christ Episcopal Cathedral Christ Episcopal Church Christ the Redeemer Anglican Church Church of Our Saviour - Oatlands Church of the Incarnation Church of the Redeemer Church of the Transfiguration Clark Clark Clark Coerper Colby Cole Coleton Collinsworth Combs Comfort Community of St. Mary-Western Province Compton Connor Corbin Coval Crary Croman Cunningham Curran Curtis Dalferes Daly Dart Davis Davis Davis Day Dean Dean Dearmey DeGolier DeGolier Deihle Denney Dennler Dennler Denzin DeWolfe Dexter Di Beneditto Dilg Doubet Doyle Drake Drake Duerr Duprey Dwyer Dyrud Dyrud Easter ECW - St. Bartholomew’s Episcopal Church ECW - St. John’s Episcopal Church ECW - St. Thomas’ Episcopal Church ECW- St. Martha’s Guild Edwards Eggert Ehrenberger Ehrmann Elliott Emanuelson NASHOTAH.EDU

Peoria, IL Baton Rouge, LA

Oxford, CT Salina, KS Delavan, WI East Peoria, IL Leesburg, VA Dallas, TX Orangeburg, SC Mountain Grove, MO

Milwaukee, WI

Granite City, IL St James City, FL Morris, IL Peoria, IL


Mrs. Mrs.

Elizabeth Dorothy

Ms. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Mrs. Mr. The Rev.

Beverly Daniel James Paul Rosalind Roy Peter

Ms. Mr. Mr. The Very Rev. The Reverend The Rev. Dr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Dr. Miss Ms. Ms. Ms. Mr. Ms. Mr. Mr.

Lucille Graydon James Gus Jay Reginald Ronald Bill John Walter Cecille Judith Mary Barbara Jay Edra Lynn Perry Drell

Dr. The Rev. Mr.

J. Temple Harrington Thomas

Mrs. Mrs. The Rev. Mrs. The Rt. Rev. The Rev. Mr. Dr. Mrs. Mrs. Mr. Mr. Mr. Ms. The Rev. The Rev. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Col. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mrs. The Very Rev. Dr. Mrs. Mrs. The Rev. Mr. Mrs.

Marlene Claire David Jeannette Richard Walter Daniel Sigurd Lillian June Douglas James Eric Karin Joel Daniel Jeanette Robert John Myron John Stephen J. Michael Harold Kempton Michael Sally Chad Richard Vida Catherine De Launay W. Weller Alan Nancy

44

THE MISSIONER

Emmanuel Episcopal Church Emmanuel Episcopal Church Engels Entrikin Episcopal Cathedral of Our Merciful Saviour Episcopal Church of the Resurrection Episcopal Churches of Richmond County, Virginia Episcopal Diocese of Easton Episcopal Diocese of Eau Claire Episcopal Diocese of the Virgin Islands Evans Ewing Fedosuk Felton Fitzpatrick Flinchbaugh Floyd Fort Myers Memorial Gardens and Funeral Home Foust Fox Fox Franklin Friberg Fuller Funk Gabelhausen Gabig Gager Gallant Gaskell Gaul Gaynor Gentle George Gervais Goff Good Shepherd Episcopal Church Goodman Gordon Gough Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Grace Episcopal Church Graham Greene Greer Gregory Grein Griesmeyer Gross Gundersen Gunner Gunst Haag Hallwas Hamburg Hammer-Williamson Hampton Hank Hansen Hansen Harper Harrington Hart Hart Hartenstine Hartshorne Hastings Hatch Hatfield Hatfield Hawthorne Hazlett Head Heatherington Heiligstedt NASHOTAH.EDU

Rapid City, SD Lockhart, TX Faribault, MN Franklin, TN Warsaw, VA Easton, MD Eau Claire, WI St Thomas, VI

Ft. Meyers, FL

Granbury, TX

Ludington, MI Jamestown, ND Monroe, LA


The Rev. The Rev. Deacon The Rev. The Rev. Mr. The Rt. Rev. The Rev. The Rt. Rev. The Rev. Dr. The Rev. The Rev. Dr. Mr. The Rev. Dr. Mrs. Mr. Ms. Mr. Ms. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Ms. The Rev. The Rev. Ms. The Rev. Canon The Rt. Rev. The Rev. Ms. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Ms. The Rev. Deacon The Rt. Rev. Mrs. The Rev. Canon Mr. The Rev.

U. Dean John Marion Joseph William Daniel John David Harry Cynthia John M. Fred Wayne Silas Edith Jane Harold Patricia John Bonnie Joan Ruth Georgia Edith Henry Donald Jean James Donald Joseph Elsa Patric Peter T. Denman Elizabeth Katherine Russell Julianne Richard Pete Jacqueline Raymond

Hekel Hellrung Hendrickson Hermerding Herrera Herzog Heschle Hicks Hill Hill Himes Himmerich Hinds Hirte Ho Hoffman Hoffman Hoffman Holmes Holsonbake Holtorf Hough Howie Howson Hubbard Hughes Huismann Hulbert Hultstrand Huneycutt Hurst Hutton Ingeman Isgett Jackson Jacob Jacobus James Janke Jenkins Jenkins Jennison


Mr. The Rev. Dr.

Jan Robert

Mr. Mrs. Mrs. Mr. The Most Rev. The Rev. Deacon The Rev. The Rev. Dr. Dr. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mrs. The Rev. Canon Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mrs. Mr. Mrs. Ms. Mr. The Rev. Canon The Rev. Canon Ms. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Ms. Mrs. The Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Ms.

Conrad Gayle Josephine Jeremy Walter Mary-Frances Walter Craig Sarah G. Frederick Albert Raymond David Eleanor David Eric James H. Timothy Marcia Brian Marion Betty Robert Jonathan Charles Carol Jack Norton Edmund Bobbi Ivy Edward Kirk Robert Robert Robert Lindsey

Jensen Jenson Jesus the Good Shepherd Anglican Church Johnson Johnson Johnson Johnson Jones Jones Kalbhen Kallio Karlowicz Kasten Keller Kemp Kennedy Kennedy Kent Kent Kenyon Kesy Kiefe Kimball Kincaid Kindle King King King Kluver Knight Kollmann Kopietz Kraft Kreamer Kresowaty Kreuzwieser Kunes Kunes Kurtenacker Landreneau

Henderson, NV


Mr. The Rev. Dr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mrs. The Rev. Dr. Miss Ms. Mr. Dr. Mr. Ms. Mr. Mrs. Mrs.

James Lewis Stevenson Gilbert Charles Gerhard Gary E. C. Nicholas Bobby Oscar Virginia John Kerri Helen Roy Warren Keith Ellen Fred Anna Alice

Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mrs. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Major Ms. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. Canon The Rev. Ms. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Mrs. Dr. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. The Rt. Rev. The Rev. Dr. Ms. Dr. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev.

David Melvin William Robert Helen J. Carleton Robert Raymond Carl Joseph Calvin Karl Donald Adriane Donald Lawrence J. Douglas Hugh Kathleen Richard Paul John Helen F.C. Russell John George Michael Steven William Virginia George Joseph William Wayne A.R. David

Mr. Ms. The Rt. Rev. LTC Mr. Mrs. Mr.

Ralph Mary James M. Gardner William Mary William Shirley Walter Carl J. Douglas John William Rose Eunice Michael

Mr. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mrs. Mrs. The Rev.

MICHAELMAS 2013

Landsverk Lane Langmuir Larsen Larson Laun Lawler Lee Lee Leverenz Lewis Linebarger Lintott Lippitt Llamas Locke Long Long Long Lord Lord Lorraine Mulberger Foundation, Inc. Lovett Low Luley Mac Ewen Mackie MacNeil Madalon Malecek Mann Marek Marquis Marsh Marshall Martin McConnell Mcgin McGlynn McGowan McGraw McHenry McKee McKenzie McKinstry McMains Meals Metcalf Midgley Millard Miller Miller Miller Mims Minnis Minnis Mionske Miracle Missionary Diocese of All Saints Missionary Society of San Miguel Modjeska Moerer Montgomery Moody Moore Moritz Morrison Morse Morton Mosley Moyer Munson Murchison Murdock Murphy Murphy

Delafield, WI

Donora, PA Seguin, TX

NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

47


The Rev. Mrs. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Dr. Ms. Mr. Mrs. The Rev. Ms. Ms. Mrs. The Rev. Mrs. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Mrs. The Rev. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Canon The Very Rev. Dr. The Rev. Mrs. Mrs. Dr. Dr. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Canon Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Canon The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Mrs. Mrs. Mrs. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Ms. The Rev. Dr. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Dr. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mrs. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Ms. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mr. 48

Thomas Jean Anthony John John I Janet James Barbara James Christina Joan Martha Jennie Marjorie Jonathan J.D. Paul Todd Sandra John Julie Herman Albert Richard Thomas Margaret Laura Mary Rebecca Maxine Steven Langdon Gilbert George G. Allen Wilfred Harold F. Frederick Nelson Warren John Douglass Calvin Celia Dawn Mary David Donne Ray Linda George David William John John Fred Harry Sandor Daniel Richard William Charles David David Wilson Betty Ann Fredrick Robert Reynaldo Judith Richard John H. Stewart Scott Charles

THE MISSIONER

Myers Nauman Navarra Needham Neilson Nettey Nicholas Nicholls Nichols-Rubin Nilon Norcross Norgaard Ohrt Olbrych Osterhoudt Ostman Ostrander Oswald Owen Owens Paavola Page Palmer Palmer Papazoglakis Parkinson Parks Parsons Parsons Peacock Peay Pegram Pemberton Pence Penniman Penny Peters Peters Philputt Pinder Platt Porter Post Potter Prehn Preisler Pritzlaff Prueher Puckle Pullen Pullins Pursley Quigg Radant Raish Rasmus Raybourn Reis Rendeczky Repp Reul Rhett Rice Richard Risto Roane Roberts-Punko Robinson Robinson Rodriguez Roe Roehrich Roof Ross Ross Roth NASHOTAH.EDU


Ms. Mr.

Suzy Joseph

The Rev. Dr. Mr. Ms. The Rev. Canon Ms. Mr. Mrs. Mr. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Dr. Mrs. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. The Ven. Mr. The Rev. Dr.

Stephen Fernando Grace Stephen Emmy Charles Mary Steven Carol George Fred Sarah Winfield Kevin Francis D. Robert Charles Donald Roger Federico

Miss The Rev. Deacon Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Dr. Mr. The Rev. Canon Mr. The Rt. Rev. Ms. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mrs. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Dr. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mr.

Ann Marlyne Dwight Richard Lee Karl Timothy Edson Harry Karen Harold Timothy Thomas James James Edwina Edward Alexander Stephen Theodore Robert Robert Trevor James

MICHAELMAS 2013

Ruhe Ryan Saint Martin in the Fields Episcopal Church Samples Santos Schaefer Schaitberger Schallhorn Schlegel Schmidt Schoonderwoerd Schott Schulenberg Schumacher Scott Scott Seabaugh Sears Seay Secord Seeks Senn Serra-Lima SEWAAC Sewell Seymour Shackelford Shackleford Shafer Sharp Shaw Sheppard Shipps Shoemaker Shogren Shotmeyer Shriner Siepmann Sigler Sill Simmons Simpson Sirotko Sirotko Snyder Speer Spencer Spotts St. Andrew’s Church St. Bride’s Episcopal Church St. Columba’s Church St. Gabriel’s Retreat House St. James Episcopal Church St. John in the Wilderness Episcopal Church St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. John’s Episcopal Church St. Jude’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Luke’s Episcopal Church St. Mark’s Episcopal Parish St. Martin’s Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Michaels Anglican Church St. Paul’s Anglican Church St. Paul’s by-the-Lake Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Parish, K Street St. Simeon’s by-the-Sea Episcopal Church St. Simeon’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church NASHOTAH.EDU

Atlanta, GA

Milwaukee, WI

New Kensington, PA Chesapeake, VA Fresno, CA Catonsville, MD Leesburg, FL Elkhorn, WI Orlando, FL Matherville, IL Detroit, MI Buffalo, NY Manchester, MO Baton Rouge, LA Cypress Mill, TX Howe, IN Monroeville, PA Tomah, WI Robinson, IL Okauchee, WI Visalia, CA Chicago, IL Carlinville, IL Schenectady, NY Mancos, CO Washington, DC North Wildwood, NJ Stanley, WI Oak Ridge, TN Billings, MT

THE MISSIONER

49


50

THE MISSIONER

NASHOTAH.EDU


Mr. Mr. Ms. The Rev. Mrs. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Ms. Ms. Mr. Mrs. Mr. The Rev. The Rt. Rev. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mrs. Ms. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev.

Stewart Gerald Miriam Barbara Ann Charles Nigel John William Ellen Judy John Laura Harwood David Ray Jerry Warren Robert Dwight Robert R. Raymond Martha Phyllis William Benjamin Richard Charles

The Very Rev. The Rev. Dr. Mr.

Bejnamin Edgar Donald Raymond

Mr. Mr. The Rev. Ms. Mr. Dr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Dr. Mrs. The Rev. Ms. Mr. The Rev. Dr. Mr. Mrs. The Rev. Mrs. Mr. Mr. Mrs. The Rev. Col. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Mrs. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Mr.

Dee Raymond Richard Shirley James Frederic David Tommy Duane William John Bonnie Karin Lynn Franklin Susan Edward Jack Lynne Herbert Mary Joseph James Mildred William James James Roger Elijah Joan Peter J.F. Mark Jerome J. Payton Francis Robert William

MICHAELMAS 2013

Stambaugh Stanton Stauff Stellman Stephenson-Moe Stewart Stewart Street Strickland Strommen Stuart Stucker Stucker Sturtevant Sullivan Sutton Sutton Swaar Swanson Swanson Swenson Swope Taddeo Taylor Teets Templin Ten Eyck Thalleen Thayer The Episcopal Church of St. John the Evangelist Thomas Thompson Tracey Trenum Trinity Anglican Church Trinity Church ECW Trinity Episcopal Church Trinity Episcopal Church Trostle Tucker Tumilty Tyler Tyler Tyszka Underwood Valentine Vetter Vincent Vogel Voskuil Wade Waedekin Walbrink Waldron Wallace Walsh Waltman Ward Ward Warren Wartinbee Weidemann Weiler Wells Wetherbee Wharton White White White White White Wick Wieland Williams Williams Williams NASHOTAH.EDU

Elkhart, IN

Monmouth, IL Logansport, IN Pass Christian, MS Baraboo, WI

THE MISSIONER

51


Dr. The Rev.

Frederick H. David

Mr. Dr. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Canon

Gerald James Stephen S.P. Russell Michael W. Steven Benjamin

Mrs. The Rev. Mrs. Mr. Mrs.

Eunice Tim Sean Margaret George Martha

Williford Wilson Wilson & Biggs, PLLC Wisnewski Witten Wlosinski Wohlever Wood Woodward Wright Xcel Energy Foundation - Matching Gifts Program Yost Youmans Zerwekh Zimmer Zuelke

Corporation and Foundation Gifts to the Jackson Kemper Annual Fund Aegon Transamerica Foundation Allison Educational Fund Anonymous Carolyn S. Lindsey TUW Charitable Caterpillar Foundation Cerebral Palsy Assoc. Community Foundation Of The Great River Bend Cummins-Allison Dubose Scholarship Fund Emil Ewald Foundation, Inc. First Bank Financial Centre Fred Davis Memorial Foundation Hamilton Roddis Foundation, Inc. Hayssen Family Foundation, Inc. IBM Corporation - Matching Grants Program Jackson Kemper Foundation Lorraine Mulberger Foundation, Inc. Lyford Cay Foundation Inc. Mitford Children’s Foundation Ricker Contracting Inc. Shell Oil Company Foundation The Eagle Foundation The Greater Milwaukee Foundation, Inc. The Underwood Foundation Vollrath Company Wells Fargo Educational Matching Gift Program Windway Capital Corportion Xcel Energy Foundation - Matching Gifts Program 52

THE MISSIONER

NASHOTAH.EDU

Ridgeland, MS

Minneapolis, MN


Funding Our Future: The Adams Hall Campaign We received pledge payments from the following individuals to complete the funding of Adams Hall, the addition to the James Lloyd Breck Refectory Complex, which provides space for possible future growth. Dr.

Garwood

The Rev.

Francis

The Most Rev.

Robert

The Rev. Mr. & Mrs. Mr. Rev. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Dr. Mr. The Rt. Rev. The Rev. Dr. The Rev. Canon Mr. and Mrs. The Rev. Dr. The Rev.

Mark and Sandra Moore Eugene G. Thomas Marie Mary Daniel Thomas Allan Jack Arnold and Dr. Carol R. Brien Terry and Mary Lewis Andrew

Mr. The Rt. Rev. The Rev. and Mrs. The Very Rev. The Rev. The Rev. The Rt. Rev. and Mrs. Mr. and Mrs. Mr. Mr. The Rt. Rev.

Robert Donald Steven Roger Philip Fredrick Edward Richard David Glenn Dabney

The Rev. Dr. and Mrs.

Daniel

Anderson Anonymous Baltz Church of the Transfiguration Duncan Episcopal Diocese of Springfield Evans Evans Graves Gray Guill Hank Holtzen Iding Iker Klukas Koehler Kohler Lane Mead Mitford Children’s Foundation Parrish Parsons Peay Raskopf Read Robinson Salmon Schwaab Sherwood Simpson Smith St. Andrew’s Anglican Church St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church The Episcopal Church of St. John the Evangelist Westberg

Bennington, KS Springfield, IL

Esmont, VA

Nashville, TN Baton Rouge, LA Elkhart, IN

The Bishop Parsons Scholarship Fund Subsidizing the costs both of an excellent theological education and the spiritual formation forged by three years of worship, service and community life at Nashotah House, the Bishop Parsons Scholarship Fund, named in honor of our 14th Dean, the Rt. Rev. Donald Parsons, helps the House to remain competitive with seminaries which enjoy large endowments. Mr.

George

Mr.

Bob

Mr. Mr.

Felix Jack

Adams All Saints’ Episcopal Church Allbritton Allison Educational Fund Alston Amoroso

MICHAELMAS 2013

Morton, IL Palm Harbor, FL

NASHOTAH.EDU

THE MISSIONER

53


Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Ms. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Col. Mr. Mr. Mrs. The Rev. Mr. Ms. Mrs. Mr. Mr. Ms. Ms. The Rev. Miss Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Canon Mrs. Mrs. Mr. Mr.

Ms. Mr. Mr. Ms. The Rt. Rev. Mr. Mr. Mrs. Ms. Mr. The Rev. Ms. Mr. The Ven. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mrs.

Ms. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Ms. Mr. Ms. Mr. 54

Anglican Church Of The Good Samaritan Anonymous J.A. Arnau Christopher Ashmore Kevin Babb Daniel Bachman Ruth Baldwin Francis Baltz David Baxter Duane Beauchamp Robert Bell Donald Bengtson Frank Berghuis Anna Bertsch Big Bolls Farms John Biggs Jeffrey Blaga Tiffani Boerio Shirley Bowen Timothy Bowers William Bridgforth Patricia Briney Marjorie Brooks David Brown Maxine Bull Harvey Burkett Joel Cagwin William Carroll Robert Carroon Lydia Castaneda Georgina Castro-Freitas Nicholas Charles Thomas Chester Christ Church Christ Church Anglican Mission Christ the King Anglican Church Church of Good Shepherd Church of the Redeemer Dora Clark R. Bradley Clay Graham Cole Marcie Courtney James A.J. Cowan F. Corby Dale Kevin Daley Tracy Dallen Claire Danell Mark Dawson Dennis Day Sarah Day Lionel Delaware Shawn Denney Diocese of Central Florida Frank Dixon Matthew Drewry Philip Dunbar Kinloch Dunlap Robert Dunwoody ECW - St. Alban’s Episcopal Church ECW Diocese of West Missouri Gloria Ellinwood Episcopal Church of the Redeemer Episcopal Diocese of Northern Indiana Episcopal Diocese of the Rio Grande Episcopal Diocese of Western Louisiana Deborah Fish Thomas Flowers David Foster James Fox Richard Franklin Fred & Don Giacomazzi Farms Fred Davis Memorial Foundation Karen Frey William Gagin Adelaide Gantt Steve Gaspar THE MISSIONER

NASHOTAH.EDU

St. John’s, NL

Corcoran, CA

Warrenton, VA Lemoore, CA Fort Worth, TX Norfolk, VA Sarasota, FL

Orlando, FL

Marshfield, WI Kansas City, MO Ruston, LA South Bend, IN Albuquerque, NM Alexandria, LA

Hanford, CA Miami, FL


Bishop Parsons Scholarship Fund The Rev. and Mrs. Frank Baltz, from Marietta, GA, give to the Bishop Parsons Scholarship Fund. It is a daunting fact that the cost of a seminary education is more than $100,000 for a three-year divinity degree. Often seminarians remain unsupported by their diocese, yet Nashotah House has sought to remedy this fact. By giving an annual or monthly gift to the Bishop Parsons fund, donors are able to allow the student body to grow. However, as students arrive at Nashotah House younger and more enthusiastic, they are also increasingly ill-equipped to make the financial commitment that three years of residential seminary education demands. In fact, a growing number of gifted applicants to Nashotah House find themselves forced to withdraw their applications because they are unable to shoulder the financial burden. This should not be the case. Fr. Baltz, MDiv, ‘69, and holding an STM, retired from St Jude’s Episcopal Church in Marietta, GA, regularly returns to Nashotah to teach various courses on parish ministry. With Frs. Steven Peay and Jack Gabig, he focuses on parish life and the on-going needs of parishoners. This Ephiphany, 2014, Fr. Baltz will teach Building Congregations that Thrive. “Nashotah House continues to give students their tools they need for ministry,” he said. “There are ongoing needs for Nashotah to keep maintain their learning environment. People need to visit Nashotah regularly, to see for themselves that a new day has dawn there–practical theology combined with the classical education continually offered.” For all its wealth of beauty, holiness and vibrant tradition, Nashotah House lacks the financial resources to provide adequate scholarships to these students. This represents a great loss the House. And it represents an even more significant loss to the Church. Fr. Baltz said, “We must remember to give and to give generously.” The Bishop Parsons Scholarship Fund is changing that.


The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mrs.

Howard Danny Jo John Eleanor

Mr. The Rev. Ms. Ms. Mrs. Ms. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rt. Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mrs. Ms.

G. Thomas Marie Rachel Nancy Jeannette Julie Daniel William Randy W. Daniel John Wayne Robert Martha Bonnie

Mr. Mr.

Allan Nicholas

Mr. Mr. Mr. Ms. Mr. The Rev. Dr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Ms. Mr. The Rev. The Rt. Rev. Ms.

Edward Raymond Steven Stephanie Jason Arnold Richard Gilbert Scott Margaret Frances Victor Philip William Carol

Mr. The Rev. Mr. Ms. Ms. The Rt. Rev.

Jim Carl Montelle Adriane Ann Daniel

Dr. Mr. Ms. The Rev. Canon The Rev. Ms. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mr. Ms. Mrs. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Ms. Mr. Mrs. Mr. Ms. Dr. Mr. Mr. The Rt. Rev. Dr. The Rev.

Michael Frederick Gloria Carole Richard Cynthia John Michael Sheldon David Kacy Ruth Louise Robin C. Thomas Susan Paul Marion Iveson Christina Robert Anthony George Donald David J. Ralph

56

THE MISSIONER

Giles Gilmore Glasser Gordon Gorin Grace Episcopal Church Graves Gray Gray Green Gregory Griffiths Gudgel Gundacker Hammon Henry Herzog Hill Hinds Hoekstra Hogue Holsonbake Holy Trinity Episcopal Church Iding Ivans Jackson Kemper Foundation Jesus the Good Shepherd Anglican Church Johnson Kemp Kidd Kite Klauss Klukas Knee Larsen Lawson Lee Levy Li Livingston Love Love Lyford Cay Foundation Inc. Maciel Mann Mansfield Martin Martin Martins The Mary E. Davis Trust Matlak Matsen McDonell McGowan McHenry McKoy Metts Millard Minkin Mitchell Mitchell Moore Morgan Morical Myers Nash Newton Nichols Noland Norcross Nordberg Nunes Ott Parsons Pasino Patston NASHOTAH.EDU

Oxford, MA

Melbourne, FL Hawthorn Woods, IL Henderson, NV

Nassau, Bahamas


Ms. Dr. Mr. Ms. Mr. Mr. Mrs. Ms. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Canon Mr. Mr. Ms. Mr. Mr. Ms. Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Ms. Ms.

Sue Ann Vernon Michael Bridget Virgil James Jane Ann Mary Roger Dennis Harry Timothy David John Gregg Michael Paul Josephine David Richard Suzy Benjamin Edgardo Randal Geoffrey Charlotte Ann

Mr. Mr. Ms. Mr. Ms. Mr. Mrs. Mr. Mr.

Steven Robert Beverly James Catherine Robert Kay Gregory Daniel

Mr. The Rev. Mr. The Rev.

Doug William Warren Warren

The Rev. Mr.

Edgar Raymond

Mr. The Very Rev. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Mr. The Rt. Rev. Mr. The Reverend Mrs. Mr. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Ms. Capt. Mr.

John Gene Guy Leonard Timothy Scott James William Douglas Jane Marsha Bill Lonell Charles Alfred T. Lois Larry Murray

MICHAELMAS 2013

Peterson Pettigrew Pipkin Plauche Powell Prosser Quartel Ragle Raskopf Read Reis Revious Ridgeway Riegel Riley Robinson Robinson Roby Roeder Rogers Ruhe Rush Salandanan Savaglio Scanlon Schmotzer Schnapp Scholarship Foundation of Santa Barbara School District of Reedsburg Trust & Agency Scholarships Schoonderwoerd Schowalter Scott Siebenaler Siegel Sippel Skoglund Skoglund Smith St. John the Baptist Episcopal Church St. Margaret’s Episcopal Church St. Mary’s Episcopal Church St. Michael the Archangel Episcopal Church St. Michaels Anglican Church St. Paul’s Anglican Church St. Paul’s by-the-Lake Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Paul’s Episcopal Church St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church Stebbins Strickland Swaar Tanghe The Eagle Foundation The Episcopal Church of St. Gregory the Great The Episcopal Church of The Blessed Sacrament Thompson Trenum Trinity Episcopal Church Troy Tucker Usher Vaughn Wahl Walker Walker Wantland Webster Williams Williams Woolley Wright Wynn Zadig Zercher-Wynne Zinser Zislis NASHOTAH.EDU

Santa Barbara, CA Reedsburg, WI

Mount Carmel, IL Baton Rouge, LA Abingdon, MD Colorado Springs, CO Okauchee, WI Visalia, CA Chicago, IL Pekin, IL Greenwich, NY Fargo, ND

Eden Prairie, MN Mansfield, TX Placentia, CA Logansport, IN

THE MISSIONER

57


Sharing That Which is Good – the Alice Sabine McGee Legacy Society In 1859, Bishop Kemper, who understood the very young seminary’s real need for financial help and responsible financial management in order to build, continue, and expand its mission. “I now call upon all who have been baptized in the faith,” he said, “to exert your best efforts to contribute freely and largely.” Members of the Alice Sabine McGee Legacy Society consist of those who have established a planned gift to the House by including the House in their Will or have provided certain other planned gifts. Financial assistance to the House then becomes part of their ongoing legacy, assistance that has been graciously given to the House since Bishop Kemper first asked for support. Daily the students and faculty of Nashotah House remember alumni, fellow priests and parishes and families in their prayers. Reverend Canon John G.B. Andrew, DD, is retired rector of St. Thomas Church Fifth Avenue, NY. He encourages others to support the mission in a variety of ways, including prayer along with giving, “The support is met with tremendous gratitude for donors’ generosity.” By their careful planning and generous spirit, members of the Society ensure that the House’s future financial health is sound, overflowing with promise and possibilities. The House’s longterm sustainability rests on the generosity received from the members of the Alice Sabine McGee Legacy Society.

The Alice Sabine McGee Legacy Society Members of the Alice Sabine McGee Legacy Society are those men and women who have included Nashotah House in their Will or have established certain other planned gifts for the House. By their careful planning and generous spirit, members of the Society ensure that our future financial health is sound, overflowing with promise and possibilities. There is no better way to invest in the future of the Church than partnering with Nashotah House by becoming a member of the Alice Sabine McGee Legacy Society. Mr. The Rev. Mrs. The Rev. Canon

Gordon James Helen John G.

Mr. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Ms. Mr. The Rev. Canon The Rev. Mr. The Rev. Canon The Rev. The Rev. Dr.

Charles F. & Lillian David Jon John Robert Maurie Robert Robert Robert Kimsey Robert Richard Robert

The Rev. The Very Rev. Mrs. Mr. The Rev. Canon The Rev. Dr.

R. Michael Cornelis Gloria Don D. Joe J. Elizabeth

Mrs. Mr. The Rev. The Rev.

Kennon William Robert O. Martin

MICHAELMAS 2013

Agne Alby Allen Andrew Anne S. & John S. Brown Trust Appel Char. Trust Aronson Barsanti Berry Bosworth Brown Brown Brown Browning Carpenter Carroon Copeland Crafts Cynthia H. Schwab Trust Darrow de Rijk Deutl Dixon Dunlap Eddy Emil Ewald Foundation, Inc. Fricks Gagin Gearhart Goller NASHOTAH.EDU

San Antonio, TX

Joplin, MO

Oconomowoc, WI

THE MISSIONER

59


Mr. The Rev. The Rev. The Rev. Mrs. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Canon The Rev. Dr. Dr. Ms. The Rev. Deacon The Rev. Mrs. Mr. Mrs.

Michael John Harry John Jane Allan Craig James Christopher Bruce Sara James Henry Melvin Margaret James Ruth

Mr. Mr. Mr. The Rev. Mr. The Rev. The Rev. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Dr. The Rt. Rev. Ms. Mrs. The Rev. Mr. Ms. Ms. The Rev. Canon The Rev.

John James Theodore Virginia Forrest John Rex Marion Brian William Peter Jan Setsuko Robert W. Christopher David Lois Thelma James James

Mr. Mrs. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. The Rt. Rev. The Rev. Dr. Mrs. The Rev. The Rev. Mr. Mr. The Rev.

David Carolyn Dorothy Ralph Susan William Joseph Mildred John W.T. Ronald J. David Randy Alfred T.

Goodman Heschle Hill Himes Hoffman Iding Johnson Kaestner Keough Larson Leatherbury LeBatard Low Maple March Moore National Philanthropic Trust DAF Neal Nelson Nicou Noel Owen Pahls Perry Randall Reid Rhett Riola Robitscher Roddis Salisbury Seal Shanks Shawl Shoemaker Snell Steele The James W. & Betty K. Sneed Family Trust Underwood Viall Vredenburgh Wagner Waldron Wantland Webb Weidemann Weise White Wiggins Winn Zadig

Jenkintown, PA

Azle, TX

Bequests Nashotah House received legacy gifts from the following estates during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2013. As a policy, Nashotah House places all bequests in our permanently restricted endowment, ensuring the generous legacy we received provides years of support. Ms. Nancy J. Arnold Laverne L. Gage Gordon G. Gaul The Rev. Karl G. Layer The Very Rev. Donald W. Lloyd Dr. John M. Schroeder Mrs. Suzanne K. Talmage The Rev. Dr. Charles E. Whipple Mrs. Isabel E. White 60

THE MISSIONER

NASHOTAH.EDU



The Missioner Michaelmas 2013