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Annual Report 2013


Thousands of Australians... thousands of stories.


Contents Welcome 5 Director’s Report

6

How We Work

10

A Face of Hope for the Vulnerable

11

Our Impact

14

Kicking off a Lifetime of Generosity

18

Appeals Report

24

A Legacy in Love

26

Income 32 Governance 33

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Our Board

33

A Living Bequest

34

How You Can Help

38

Contact Us

39

SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


Welcome As the fundraising arm of UnitingCare and the Uniting Church in Victoria and Tasmania, Share reveals the truth about poverty and disadvantage, holds before the community the work of our agencies and encourages a spirit of generosity that allows action to be taken in the areas of greatest need. Share is all about restoring life, joy and hope to the disadvantaged and those in crisis. We do this by raising funds to address urgent human need and to enhance the quality and scope of community services to the disadvantaged or vulnerable in Victoria, Tasmania and overseas. The funds we raise are distributed by providing grants to targeted community service agencies. We believe in work that transforms lives and strengthens communities. This is why we are committed to funding programs that each and every day are helping people without food or shelter; abused and neglected children; youth at-risk (because of family breakdown, drugs, unemployment and homelessness); refugees and asylum seekers, and families in crisis. The grants we provide impact individuals and communities from many regional and metro areas – from Gippsland to the Wimmera in Victoria and from the Tamar Valley to the Southern region of Tasmania. Through our extended network across Victoria, Tasmania and further afield, we are reaching more than 200,000 people in need each year. With one in eight Australians living in poverty, more people than ever before need vital assistance with the basics of life. Share has partners across Victoria and Tasmania providing vital services to people in crisis, which means gifts and donations will get to where they’re needed most.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

The agencies we partner with highlight projects addressing urgent and ongoing needs within local communities. We then distribute the generosity of the community towards urgent crisis care, as well as longterm transformative projects. We rely on the generosity of our donors and wouldn’t exist without them. Donors support us through regular donations, gifts in Wills, gifts in memory, pledges and workplace giving. Share donors are truly making a real and lasting difference. We have been enabling donors to transform lives and communities for more than 33 years. The very first Share appeal theme in 1980 was “This time called life was meant to Share”. This theme still rings true and now more than ever, we are passionate about restoring life, joy and hope to the disadvantaged and those in crisis.

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Director’s report As times change, people move on and new challenges arise and successes are met, one constant emotion among all of us at Share is our gratitude for the kindness of our faithful supporters. This generosity ensures that no matter what circumstances arise, we can continue to support the people in our communities who need us most. This is the core of our work and the most important aspect of our organisation. In August 2013 we said goodbye to David Hickey, who had been the Share Director since 2007. David’s passion for the UnitingCare network and his dedication to Share’s mission are greatly missed. We wish him all the very best for the future, and we know this sentiment is echoed throughout all of the UnitingCare agencies. At Share, we strive to be a contemporary fundraising organisation, raising and distributing donations as effectively as possible. In 2013, we overhauled our longrunning grants program with a sweeping raft of changes, upgrades and new opportunities to be implemented in the 2014 funding round. This complete revamp to the Share grants came about after an extensive consultation process involving our grant applicants, the Share Committee and staff, and other stakeholders within the Uniting Church. The new system represents a fresh way of thinking about the grants and also highlights our value of ensuring wise stewardship of resources as the grants will be more efficient, more transparent and will be much faster for agencies to access. We are very excited about the new possibilities this will open up for us and look forward to sharing more with you as it progresses.

Our Ambassador program has also continued to grow, with Ambassadors participating in a comprehensive agency tour last year. This was a great opportunity for them to see firsthand how people are positively impacted by the work we do through the generosity of our donors. We look forward to more Ambassadors coming on board and continuing to build Share’s profile in the church and wider community. We are all looking forward to seeing where the next year takes us as we continue to do our best every day to provide funding for these crucial programs across Victoria and Tasmania. As always, this letter would be incomplete if I did not express my heartfelt thanks to our wonderful staff and volunteers for their contributions to the Share team. Without them, none of this work would be possible.

Angela Goodwin Director of Operations and Development

Angela Goodwin

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SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


FACT Donors continue to fund vital work which provides not just services but solutions to people in need

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

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Every day people are in desperate need of food. We fund programs providing meals for people experiencing extreme disadvantage or homelessness.


How we work 1. Appeal for donations throughout the year

2. Agencies highlight projects addressing needs within local communities

4. Grants distributed to agencies

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3.

Share committee targets projects addressing urgent human need to receive support

SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


STORY

A face of hope for the vulnerable UnitingCare Werribee Support & Housing relies upon its exceptional staff and volunteers to care for scores of people seeking all manner of care and emergency support services every day. Werribee is located in the City of Wyndham in Melbourne’s West and is the fastest-growing municipality in Australia, with 40 new families moving into Werribee each month. This rapid growth, combined with a lack of local infrastructure, means the homelessness issue is significant. The agency’s connection with the adjacent Op Shop and Uniting Church hall, along with its provision of support and referral services for all needs, have established UnitingCare Werribee Support & Housing as a community hub for all members of the region, both new and old. UnitingCare Werribee Support & Housing is made up of only 20 workers supported by 60 volunteers. These exceptional people are the face of the agency, providing all direct contact with clients. For many of the individuals experiencing poverty in the area, they are also the faces of help and hope. Sam Goodwin is a perfect example of the type of people who work at UnitingCare Werribee Support & Housing, offering a smile and some much-needed support each day to people who need it most. In addition to her role as the front-of-house for the agency, Sam also finds time to volunteer one day a week. Sam says her dedication was instilled in her by her parents, who brought young teenagers into the home and mentored youth when Sam was young. Now she herself is a foster parent, making it clear that – like many other workers in the agency—her commitment to others doesn’t end when it is time to go home for the night.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

Since beginning one year ago, Sam has seen a distinct increase in need in her community for the services provided. She attributes this to word-of-mouth within the community, which has raised the profile of the agency. People usually come in to receive food vouchers and food parcels, but in some cases, that’s not enough. Volunteers and workers have helped people who came in asking for a bed, a dining table, or even just a cup for their child to sip from. Sam has also seen cases where a family that is expecting a new baby is struggling to afford necessary furniture and baby supplies. In those instances, the agency can access their Op Shop and supply the family with furniture and second-hand goods that were donated by other members of the community. In one instance, a man in his 20s arrived with an 18-month-old child. He had no access to money, clothes, a crib or food for himself or his baby. The agency provided food vouchers and took him over to the Op Shop, where volunteers helped him pick out some appropriate clothes and supplies. In cases where further assistance is required, UnitingCare Werribee Support & Housing is able to provide referrals to services which address additional issues faced by clients.

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The impact of donations Donations to Share‌

Matt is 20 years old. He was unemployed and living in unstable accommodation. He was struggling financially and finding it hard to obtain secure and safe housing.

Funded the meals program at Matt’s local community agency, giving him access to hot nutritious meals when he could not afford to buy food.

Connected Matt to a case manager who provided him with guidance, access to counselling and longer term assistance.

He is from a broken family, had low selfesteem and previous drug and alcohol issues.

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SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


Supported an emergency accommodation program, which put an immediate roof over Matt’s head and secured a place for him in transitional youth accommodation.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

Matt is living in safe and secure housing and is happy and proud of his achievements. Helped Matt access an employment training program which empowered him to gain a position in an apprenticeship. program.

He is confident in his new job and excited about his future prospects.

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Our impact Share Distributions 2013 ›› Total distributed - $2,053,493 ›› Special grants - $914,011 ›› Earmarked: $1,068,640 ›› Community Care: $70,842

Share Grants Distribution 2013 ›› Total distributed - $904,010.60

Meals programs ›› Total distributed = $98,026 ›› Programs supported = 7 From Ballarat to Cranbourne, Sunshine to Narre Warren, meals programs, community cafés and food trucks provided meals for vulnerable individuals and families, and those experiencing homelessness or living with a mental illness. UnitingCare Ballarat ›› Breezeway Meals Program

$1,500

SecondBite ›› Victorian Food Program in Sunshine & Kilsyth

$41,026

Churches of Christ Community Care – Chelsea Careworks ›› Community Meals

$13,000

St Kilda UnitingCare ›› Meals Program

$15,000

UnitingCare Harrison ›› Cranbourne Food Truck

$5,000

Narre Warren Christian Church ›› Transit Soup Kitchen

$7,500

Prahran Mission ›› Winter Breakfast Program

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FACT Prahran Mission served 5000 meals to the disadvantaged during the harshest time of year

$15,000

SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


Emergency relief ›› Total distributed = $405,100 ›› Programs supported = 15 Share funded emergency relief programs directly impact the lives of people struggling with the basic necessities of life, providing material aid, food vouchers and parcels, pharmacy and transport vouchers and assistance with rental costs and utility bills. Eastern Emergency Relief Network ›› Material Aid/Emergency Relief Provisions Combined Churches Caring Melton ›› Emergency Food Program

$25,000 $6,000

UnitingCare Ballarat ›› Emergency Relief Program

$25,000

South Port UnitingCare ›› Back on Track – Reducing Welfare

$21,000

UnitingCare Wodonga ›› Emergency Relief Coordination

$37,000

Healesville Interchurch Community Care Inc. ›› Emergency Relief and Practical Support Wesley Mission Victoria ›› Emergency Relief Connections UnitingCare (In partnership with Hampton Park Uniting Church) ›› Open UP – Food and Material Aid

John, recipient of UnitingCare Bendigo Emergency Relief Program

$8,000 $20,000

$7,100

Wimmera UnitingCare ›› Emergency Relief Fund

$10,000

UnitingCare Bendigo ›› Emergency Relief Program

$65,000

UnitingCare East Burwood Centre ›› ‘More than just a Band-Aid’ Program

$25,000

Lentara UnitingCare Asylum Seeker Project (formerly Hotham Mission) ›› Community Program

$47,000

Lentara UnitingCare ›› Asylum Seeker Emergency Relief

$17,000

UnitingCare Tasmania ›› Emergency Relief

$45,000

UnitingCare Harrison ›› Emergency Relief & Crisis Accommodation Program

$47,000

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

“I didn’t expect to have been here this Christmas – it’s down to you – thank you”.

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Child, youth and family services

FACT

›› Total distributed = $163,707 ›› Programs supported = 13 Donations supported education assistance programs, parenting assistance and specialised support services for disadvantaged and vulnerable children, youth and families. UnitingCare Geelong ›› Education Assistance Program

$22,000

South Port UnitingCare ›› Albert Park Homework Club

$5,207

South Port UnitingCare ›› Helping Youth through Positive Engagement

$8,500

Port Phillip Community Group ›› Back to School Program

$5,000

Open House Christian Involvement Centres ›› Well Being Children's Program Southern Cross Kids Camp ›› Specialised program for traumatised children

Education has the power to transform lives and break the cycle of poverty and disadvantage

$10,000 $5,000

Wesley Mission Victoria ›› Back to School Assistance program

$20,000

UnitingCare Tasmania ›› Grandparents Raising Grandchildren

$20,000

Lentara UnitingCare ›› KIDZ Unplugged Music & Movement Program

$11,500

Lentara UnitingCare ›› Together We Grow Parenting Program

$12,000

Lentara UnitingCare ›› Education Support

$10,000

Wimmera UnitingCare ›› Therapeutic Care for Youth

$16,000

Wimmera UnitingCare ›› Young Parents and Mentoring

$18,500

$20,000 UnitingCare Tasmania Grandparents Raising Grandchildren

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SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


Community support ›› Total distributed = $237,177.60 ›› Programs supported = 17 A range of programs from Carlton to Hamilton, and East Burwood across to the West Tamar district of Tasmania, provided assistance for Aboriginal and African families, low cost counselling services, Men’s Shed programs and community programs for those who are socially isolated. Connections UnitingCare ›› Emergency Recovery Team Training

$8,000

Creative Ministries Centre ›› Support for families bereaved by work-related deaths

$13,700

UnitingCare Cutting Edge ›› Horses For Hope Pre-release Prisoner Program

$13,000

Church of All Nations ›› African Family Learning Program

$15,000

Wimmera UnitingCare ›› Operation Engage UnitingCare Tasmania ›› Volunteer Coordination

$5,920 $15,000

Wimmera UnitingCare ›› Pastoral Community Worker

$8,000

Bendigo Family and Financial Services Inc. ›› Social Stitches Craft & Social Program

$5,000

UnitingCare East Burwood Centre ›› Counselling Support

$20,000

The Bridgewater Centre ›› Affordable counselling service

$5,000

Melbourne City Mission ›› Compass Clubhouse: rebuilding after brain injury

$20,000

Strathdevon Uniting Aged Care – Tasmania ›› Accessible transport for older people

$10,000

Wesley Centre for Life Enrichment ›› Professional, Subsidised Counselling

$25,000

UnitingCare Goulburn North East ›› Aboriginal Homelessness and Liaison

$30,000

Prahran Mission ›› The World Hearing Voices Congress

$20,000

Prahran Mission ›› Mingles Drop-in Program

$15,000

UnitingCare Regen ›› Relapse Prevention Card

$8,557.60

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

$25,000 Wesley Centre for Life Enrichment Professional, Subsidised Counselling

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FEATURE

Kicking off a lifetime of generosit y Our wonderful Share donors come from all backgrounds and age groups, and every donation is unique and appreciated, no matter its size. Meet Nicholas Pyle, our youngest donor. Nicholas is six years old and the son of Adrian Pyle, Commission for Mission’s Director of Relationships Innovation. Nicholas received a special Christmas gift from his parents last year in the form of “The Giving Book” by Ellen Sabin. The activity book is meant to prepare children for a lifetime of giving and inspired Nicholas to think about the people who he might be able to help. Nicholas immediately began saving all his five-cent pieces and soon had enough money collected to make his first donation. Nicholas had previously spent some time with Catherine Robertson from the Share team, and she had explained Share’s work to him. So when it came time to give his donation, he knew exactly where he wanted the money to go. The photo on the opposite page is his donation letter to Catherine, along with his savings. Nicholas is now working to collect money for future donations and is absolute proof that anyone with the right mindset can make a positive difference.

“I want to help people feel safe, healthy and happy” – Nicholas Pyle PAGE 18

SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


STORY

Giving kids the right start In Victoria alone, it’s estimated that there are almost 6000 children with no home to go to after school lets out. Not only do these children have no guarantee of a proper school uniform, breakfast to give them energy, or textbooks to keep up with lessons, more importantly they don’t know where they will be sleeping each night. Wesley Mission Homelessness and Support Services Program Manager Janene Evans sees the effects of poverty and homelessness daily. She says, “The first day of school should be an exciting time for children and families, but it can be a great source of stress for many of the people we are supporting in suburban Melbourne. Knowing that 6000 children could be homeless the night before they start school this year should make us all ask, “what can I do to help improve the plight of these kids?” Wesley Mission in Footscray is using much-needed donations from Share to fund their emergency back to school project. This project supports many people in the local area, so that their children can continue to get a good education even in very difficult circumstances. One client is Karen*, a local woman with four children who was struggling to provide for her family. Four months of homelessness had taken their toll on Karen and her four children. Karen was evicted after her landlord increased the rent, making payments impossible on Karen’s stretched budget. When Karen and her family became homeless, Wesley Mission Victoria was able to place her in crisis accommodation.

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“The first day of school should be an exciting time for children and families, but it can be a great source of stress...” Once settled into new and stable housing, Karen had to enrol her twins in preschool and find a new primary school for her 10- and 12-year-old sons, both with learning disabilities. Finding a school close to home that catered for her sons’ educational needs was very difficult, and Karen was at a disadvantage because she could not afford to purchase uniforms and books to get her sons started. Share funds from the back to school grant enabled Karen to get all the supplies needed to ensure her children would be able to start school prepared to learn. Food donated through the Wesley Food for Families appeal was also provided to offset some of the costs associated with moving. This allowed Karen’s kids to have a nutritious breakfast before heading off to school. Wesley assisted Karen to investigate other accommodation options as well as deal with budgeting, financial debts and parenting support.

SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


FACT

Currently, Wesley is funding the crisis accommodation where Karen and her children are staying, and also providing practical case management support to find long term accommodation for Karen’s family. The Hon Bronwyn Pike, former Education Minister for Victoria, is a current Board Director at Wesley Mission Victoria and is all too familiar with children doing it tough in our state. “Parents want the best for their children, but we know at the beginning of the school year some families are not in the position to provide the things that other families take for granted, such as shoes and uniforms, food in their lunch boxes, and books in their backpacks,” says Ms. Pike.

Up to 6000 Victorian children have no home to go to after school finishes

*Name changed for privacy.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

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Share funded programs give families the tools to get back on their feet both physically and emotionally, providing hope for a better future.


Appeals report

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SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


Share Appeals Share runs four direct mail appeals which include two major appeals (Summer and Winter) and two newsletter mailings in Autumn and Spring. The appeal themes are based around the issues facing UnitingCare agencies in their work assisting disadvantaged and vulnerable members of our communities across Victoria and Tasmania.

Thanks to the generosity of donors, appeals raised a total of $1,162,034

Appeals income for 2013 ›› Autumn $126,482 ›› Winter $396,934 ›› Spring $112,648 ›› Christmas $165,641 In addition to the regular appeals, Share runs special appeals during times of crisis and disaster. Over $360,000 was raised in response to disasters in 2013, with $170,892 forwarded to the Tasmanian Bushfire relief efforts and $189,437 to the Philippines Typhoon Appeal.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

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DONOR STORY

A legacy in love Kate Armbruster was a wonderful example of love and leadership, a woman who dedicated her life to helping others and being the best person she could be. She was an exceptional woman and member of the Uniting Church who found a way to be sure her good work and generosity could continue even after her passing. Kate had a very active mind and was always looking for a better way of doing something. It was her passion for youth work which attracted her to Warrnambool’s Uniting Church, where she was a very active member as the chief coordinator for Pancake Day and a leader of the Youth Program. The true altruistic spirit of Kate, which many experienced, was demonstrated during her illness where she found time and energy to contact Share in order to leave a bequest, selflessly thinking of others and providing hope for those in need, particularly for youth work in regional areas.

Kate’s bright light shines on not only in her legacy to Share but in the memories of friends and family.

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Kate conveyed her deep concern for the welfare of others by encouraging young people within the church to apply for apprenticeships with the objective to reach any profession they wanted. She led by example, telling each of them not to restrict themselves but always to work and to expand their interests. The impact of Kate’s profound influence in her church and community is mirrored by the support she received while she was unwell. Her friend Joy remarks: “As a church community we held impromptu worship in her hospital room complete with guitars, singing and praying, and we made a prayer shawl for Kate which was part of her thanksgiving service”. Kate had a loving family, diverse international friendships and a broad range of interests—from truck driving and youth work to medicine and music. Her interests and friendships took her around the world to France, Scotland and Indonesia, where she continued to develop her skills and expand her horizons. A talent for music runs in her family, and Kate had an eclectic taste, playing the piano, organ and guitar for pleasure and also for her church. Kate was keen on recycling and hated waste, ensuring her belongings were used by people who needed them.

SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


“Kate was a vibrant, spontaneous, forthright person who was active in the church and supported children’s ministry, social justice and environmental issues. She had strong values and was courageous in speaking her mind” – Joy Colson, a close friend of Kate Complete dedication and commitment were values that extended beyond Kate’s church and community life. They are qualities that Kate brought to everything in her life especially her working environment. She spent much of her working life in Victoria, working for Nestle as a Production Leader. Her job occasionally took her overseas as well, and she worked in New Zealand and New Caledonia for some time. Kate loved to be constantly learning and encouraging other employees in their work. Kate’s minister remarked that she burned the candle at both ends, doing 12-14 hour shifts. Though she enjoyed her career and progressed very well within her industry, her father John Armbruster said that her heart was always in developing people, not machinery. Before her illness, Kate was also training to be a Lay Preacher, as she had always been interested in religion. She was an acolyte in the Anglican Church, and she was the organ player at Tongala. Her father John said he would not have been at all surprised if she had eventually made a career shift into ministry and social work. Kate not only achieved much in her short life, but she enjoyed strong relationships and was loved and supported by all who knew her. She extended that love and support to her friends, family and community by leaving her bequest to Share. Kate’s bright light shines on not only in her legacy to Share but in the memories of friends and family. Share would like to thank Kate’s family and friends for allowing us to share her story and for supporting her final wishes to support the ongoing needs within regional communities.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

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STORY

Supporting Generations of Love UnitingCare Tasmania addresses a wide range of community needs through support from Share donations. The special program highlighted in this story serves as just one example of the variety of UnitingCare Tasmania’s work. Throughout Tasmania, there are an estimated 500 families in which grandparents are the primary child caregivers. UnitingCare Tasmania’s program, Grandparents Raising Grandchildren (GRG), was established to help these senior members of the community with the task of raising a child. Thanks to funding from Share, UnitingCare Tasmania is able to offer support to local grandparents like Betty*, a lady who unexpectedly received her granddaughter Alisha* into her care (*names changed).

The GRG worker advocated for Betty, allowing her to claim the Family Tax Benefit along with back payments. Due to Betty’s low literacy skills, the worker continued to speak on her behalf until a larger two-bedroom house was acquired. Brokerage funds were gained which provided clothing and bedding for Alisha. When Alisha reached school age, UnitingCare provided assistance with her enrolment and access to the Student Assistance Scheme for a school uniform. Through support from the organisation and Share donations, Betty now has stable accommodation and finances, allowing her to focus on helping Alisha. The GRG worker also arranged formal counselling for Betty, and she is re-engaging with her social network, from whom she had felt isolated during the initial stages of becoming an active caretaker.

Alisha is safe, comfortable and well-cared for by her grandmother, and she is In 2012, Betty attending school full-time. There The Grandparents Raising Grandchildren program assists over tragically lost is still a long road ahead, but 300 grandparents caring for 600 children. her daughter she continues to be supported by the (Alisha’s mother) UnitingCare network and by her school, as well as by to an overdose. Betty’s husband had passed away her grandmother. the previous year, so she became the sole caretaker Betty’s story highlights the need for initial and ongoing for Alisha. Betty approached UnitingCare Tasmania in support for grandparents coming into the care of their Launceston in July 2012 for emotional and practical grandchildren. It is Share donations which sustain and support. supplement these crucial programs, and the agency At the time, Betty lived in a one-bedroom unit-relies heavily and gratefully on Share’s generous support inadequate housing for the two of them-- and she to help families like Betty and Alisha. was not receiving the Family Tax Benefit for Alisha. In addition to these concerns, Betty was still suffering grief from the loss of her husband and daughter.

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

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Donations made to Share help communit y programs right across Victoria and Tasmania. Your dollar stays local, but goes a long way The heartfelt in helping thousands of people. gratitude we rece reminds us of the importance of eve single donation


eive e ery


Income Consolidated - Share Gift Fund REVENUE FROM ORDINARY ACTIVITES

31-Dec-13

31-Dec-12

$

$

1,224,256

826,892

70,610

115,136

Gifts ›› Earmarked ›› Community Care ›› Bequests ›› Gifts & Donations Interest on deposit Miscellaneous Income Gain on sale of assets

81,417

270,102

2,049,553

1,531,323

439,605

434,173

-

600

-

19,650

15,200

3,000

3,880,641

3,200,876

Labour & related costs

574,408

513,727

Administration & Rent

110,866

89,244

Grants from Synod funds TOTAL REVENUE

EXPENSES FROM ORDINARY ACTIVITIES

Printing & stationery

60,532

90,945

Advertising

93,496

84,599

Donor Acquisition & Renewal

42,831

24,703

1,437

-

742

133

80,908

79,591

5,758

7,127

30,251

32,223

789

474

Repairs & Maintenance Committee expenses General Expenses Financial Expenses Consulting/Legal Fees Library, Reference, Periodicals Motor vehicle & travel

28,022

17,741

Postage & telephone

53,377

69,032

TOTAL EXPENSES

1,083,417

1,009,539

OPERATING RESULT FROM ORDINARY ACTIVITIES

2,797,224

2,191,337

70,842

117,384

1,068,640

1,029,605

914,011

1,146,000

DEDUCT Grants Made ›› Community Care ›› Earmarked ›› Share Grants ›› Other TOTAL GRANTS OPERATING RESULT FOR THE YEAR

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382,080

153,137

2,435,573

2,446,126

361,651

(254,789)

This is an extract from the Share Gift Fund Financial Report. A full report is available upon request.


Governance Synod Standing Committee

UnitingCare Victoria and Tasmania

Executive Director

Share

Commission for Mission Board Justice and International Mission

Culture and Context Unit

Uniting Church Camping

Cross-Cultural Mission and Ministry

Our board ›› Greg Crowe (Chair)

›› Geoff Pryor

›› Rosemary Broadstock

›› John Rickard

›› David Pargeter

›› Alex Sangster

›› Cliff Peters

›› Paul Tonson (Retired November 2013)

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

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DONOR STORY

A living bequest “We’ve both had wonderful lives surrounded by some wonderful people. May the Christian spirit of sharing one’s talents with others foster and expand the work of organisations such as Share.” Russell and Marlene Hogg live according to both traditional philanthropic values and the desire to share their gifts while living, known as “living bequests”. They embody the legacy of their parents who taught them the spiritual value of family, friends, church and community. “During our lifetime we’ve been truly blessed and one of those blessings has been access to excellent education. This coupled with hard work, taking a few risks in the big wide uncompromising world and some very talented partners in a successful business venture, has meant that we’ve been able to build on, starting our marriage life with very little money to being in a financial position to share our talents of time, skills and money with others.” Community awareness and social responsibility have always played a significant part in Russell and Marlene’s lives, reinforced through their church backgrounds including schooling where Russell, at Wesley, and Marlene, at Shelford, were taught together the responsibilities owed in local community. From early childhood and through strong family Christian principles, they understood that service and sharing with others were benefits bestowed upon them.

Longevity of their gift, family values and wide reach to those in need were important factors in their decision to give a major gift to Share.

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Russell and Marlene’s generosity not only exemplifies true Christian spirit, it also displays a sympathetic humanitarian approach. In addressing the challenge of who best to support with such a plethora of very worthwhile charities to choose from, Russell and Marlene decided to spread their gifts across several charities rather than support a single entity. However, by necessity they had to limit both the number and level of support. Profoundly influenced by their broad exposure to poverty in their travels, Russell and Marlene carefully considered the impact of their gifts, searching for a balance between overseas needs against those within Australia. Longevity of their gift, family values and wide reach to those in need were important factors in their decision to give a major gift to Share. “One of the major beneficiaries has always been Share. Through our close allegiance with the Uniting Church, we were well versed in the wonderful work of Share. We were especially attracted to Share where ‘seed’ capital was provided to so many volunteer groups to greatly strengthen the work of such volunteers in times of both crisis and ongoing assistance to the needy.” Russell and Marlene have successfully given away a significant part of their assets, and are in the process of further simplifying their lives and that of their Executors by implementing legacies in their wills as ‘living bequests’ whilst they’re alive. “By selling down assets which we no longer need, we are able to give the proceeds away before death and enjoy seeing such gifts make an impact to family, friends and charities including Share.”

SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


FACT Generosity has the power to transform lives and situations

ANNUAL REPORT 2013

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Imagine if you had to ask for the help with life’s basic necessities. Share helps people transform their lives by directing the generosit y of the communit y to programs that will benefit them most.


How you can help There are many different ways that you can make a difference in the lives of others through contributing to the work of Share. Give a donation: You can make a one-off gift or pledge your support on an on-going basis by making automatic donations from your credit card, bank account or through workplace giving. Share has partners right across Victoria and Tasmania providing vital services to people in crisis, ensuring that your gift gets to where it is needed most.

Make a bequest: Your support through bequests and legacies can make a significant difference to the lives of people supported by Share. Leaving a specific bequest or a proportion of your estate is a way of ensuring you make a lasting impact on the world through your will.

Remember a loved one: A memorial gift to Share is a special alternative to sending flowers in memory of a loved one. We acknowledge your gift by sending an ‘In Memory’ card to the person or family you nominate, and a tax deductible receipt to you.

Become a Share Ambassador: Our Ambassadors help build Share’s profile in the church and wider community through a variety of ways. If you would like to learn more about our Ambassador Program or wish to become involved please contact us.

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SHARE COMMUNITY APPEAL


Contact us Share 130 Little Collins Street Melbourne Victoria 3000

All Share staff are professional members of the Fundraising Institute of Australia and abide by the FIA Code of Ethics and Professional Conduct www.fia.org.au

PO Box 24154 Melbourne Victoria 3001 Telephone: Freecall: Facsimile:

03 9251 5251 1800 668 426 03 9251 5491

The Share Community Appeal is an associate member of Philanthropy Australia www.philanthropy.org.au

www.shareappeal.org.au shareinfo@victas.uca.org.au Like us on Facebook, search for Share Community Appeal Follow us on Twitter at twitter.com/Share_appeal

This annual report is printed on paper that consists of 100% certified recycled fibre, the paper was produced with a carbon neutral manufacturing process and has been made in a facility that operates under the ISO14001 Environmental Management System.

All funds held by Share are ethically invested through UCA Funds Management. www.ucafunds.com.au


Share 130 Little Collins Street Melbourne Victoria 3000 PO Box 24154 Melbourne Victoria 3001 Telephone: 03 9251 5251 Freecall: 1800 668 426 Facsimile: 03 9251 5491 www.shareappeal.org.au shareinfo@victas.uca.org.au


Share Community Appeal

Annual Report 2013

Share Annual Report 2013  
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