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DRAFT

Newton Town Centre Land Use, Urban Design & Transportation Planning Study

Stage 2 Plan Decemb e r 20 0 9


Š AECOM Technical Services 2011 Orlando 150 North Orange Avenue, Orlando, FL 32801 T: 407 843 6552 F: 407 839 1789 This document has been prepared by AECOM on behalf of the City of Surrey and TransLink. Reproduction or distribution of this document and its contents is prohibited without the approval of AECOM. Date of Issue:

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City of Surrey

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TransLink

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Steer Davies Gleave

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Issued To:

Project No.

10332150.01

Client

City of Surrey and TransLink

AECOM Contact

Blake.Drury@AECOM.com


Table of Contents Introduction

5

Land Use Plan

6

Urban Design Concept

11

5.5 HA Southern City Property

14

Transit Exchange Concept Plan

16

Transit Exchange Catalyst Site Plan

18

TownShift Concepts

20

Design Guidelines Introduction

25

Public Realm Guidelines

26

Streetscape Guidelines

29

Public Open Space Guidelines

37

Private Realm Guidelines

41

Additional Building Guidelines

50

List of Figures Figure 1 Aerial Photo

4

Figure 2 Land Use Plan

7

Figure 3 Illustrative Master Plan

9

Figure 4 Illustrative Urban Design Concept - View Looking SE 10 Figure 5 Illustrative Urban Design Concept - View Looking NE 12 Figure 6 Indicative Property Land Allocation Plan

14

Figure 7 Proposed Park Illustrative

15

Figure 8 Proposed Transit Exchange Illustrative

17

Figure 9 Transit Exchange Concept Plan

18

Figure 10 Design Guideline Plan

24

Figure 11 Street Framework Plan

30

Figure 12 Public Open Space Framework Plan

36

Figure 13 Private Realm Development Framework

42

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 3


Figure 1 Aerial Photo 72 Avenue

71 Avenue

70 a Avenue

70 b Avenue

138 Street

137 Street

Newton Wave Pool

137 a Street

d

a Ro

Future Transit Exchange Site

136 b Street

ll

Ha

71 Avenue

King George Boulevard

Existing Transit Exchange

Senior Center

Library

70 Avenue

70 Avenue

13 8

St re e

t

135 Street

Additional Area Included in Stage 2 Plan

N

0

50

100

200

4 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

400m


Introduction The Newton Town Centre Land Use, Urban Design and

Stage 2 Plan Overview

Transportation Plan is intended to be an update to the City of

The plan on the following pages is the Stage 2 Plan. This plan

Surrey’s 1990 Newton Town Centre Plan. The key goal of this

builds on the adopted Stage 1 Plan and includes additional

study is “. . . to produce a land use and transportation plan that will guide the development of a mixed use, high-density, transit-oriented Newton Town Centre, fully integrating new and enhanced transit facilities into a high quality and sustainable urban centre”.

guidance on the following issues, which have been identified by Council for further review during this stage of work: 1.

Finalize the detailed land use breakdown for the 5.5 hectare (13.7 acre) City-owned triangular property at

This integrated design effort is intended to guide public policy

the south end of the Study area, between park/riparian

and infrastructure through an informed public engagement

enhancement, drainage detention, and multi-family

process. TransLink seeks to develop its land holding within the Newton Town Centre into a functional transit exchange

development; 2. Assess opportunities for land use changes for the

with compatible and integrated land uses. The land uses

cluster of properties along the east side of King George

recommended will achieve densities that support increased

Boulevard, south of the railway. These lands are

transit ridership and present an economic return on investment.

presently severed from the Town Centre by the railway;

Stage 1 Land Use Concept Plan

therefore they were not identified in the Study area. However, the introduction of two new road crossings

The Stage 1 Plan, adopted by Council on 3 May 2010, includes

in this area will mean that these properties are now

recommendations in the following categories:

connected with the Study area and will become the

The Illustrative Urban Design Plan – Outlines the redevelopment

southerly gateway to the Town Centre. As a result,

approach, land use recommendations and market study for the

opportunities for land use change will be assessed on

Newton Town Centre.

these lands during Stage 2 of the Plan;

The Street Framework – Guides the overall connectivity, street

3. Development of an operational and conceptual Transit

typology and potential ownership of new streets and pedestrian

Exchange design, including integration with the

connections.

surrounding network, transit routing, and incorporation

The Transit Exchange – Provides a detailed development

of Bus Rapid transit (BRT);

scenario and transit operations for the Newton Transit Exchange. Parks and Open Space – Outlines the proposed parks, plazas, open spaces and trails for the Newton Town Centre.

4. Development of Urban Design Guidelines, with an emphasis on: (a) Public gathering and detailed public space plan, (b) Detailed illustrative concepts for key catalyst sites,

Please see Corporate Report R093 for additional details.

(c) Public realm analysis, (d) Detailed building height and massing, (e) Off-street parking requirements related to proposed land uses, (f) Microclimate, energy conservation and weather protection considerations, (g) Urban landscape and streetscape design,

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 5


Land Use Plan (h) Incorporation of selected TownShift concepts and

Stage 1 Plan Recommendations

ideas, including, among others, development of a more

The Stage 1 Plan included a recommended land use strategy designed to encourage medium intensity mixed uses within the vicinity of the proposed transit exchange and foster a transition to less intense institutional and residential land uses adjacent to existing neighbourhoods.

prominent central green open space corridor and creation of a significant landmark at the southeast corner of 72 Avenue and King George Boulevard, and (i) Detailed green-street design; 5. Completion of the final servicing plan, financial and phasing strategy; 6. Determine amenities to serve the area, including

The Plan focused on several key land use elements: •

proposed 137th “Main Street” extension to create

ongoing park acquisition analysis, park development

a vibrant pedestrian environment through active

costs, fire and police protection and library needs. The

retail uses on the ground floor and residential uses

establishment of appropriate amenity contributions for the Study area will also be determined; and 7.

Completion of a detailed implementation strategy for

on upper floors. •

coordination of property exchanges and land acquisition,

neighbourhood. •

relocation plan.

space amenity in the community. •

completed by others under separate contract to the City of Surrey.

Facilitating, through land use entitlements, the transition of existing commercial properties along 72nd Avenue, between King George Boulevard and

The first four items in the above list are included in this report. Items five, six, and seven will be referenced as appendices

Focusing primarily residential development to areas adjacent to the proposed Newton Park, a key open

infrastructure phasing and funding, and development of a comprehensive transit exchange marketing and

Encouraging designated institutional land uses to remain and grow as anchors to the re-urbanized

the relocation and development of the Transit Exchange, which will require City involvement to facilitate a

Providing a mixed-use environment along the

138th Street, to mixed-use locations. •

Providing residential-only uses adjacent to existing institutional land uses.

Allowing existing commercial uses to continue and re-orient west of King George Boulevard at 72nd.

King George Boulevard Properties In authorizing Stage 2 of the plan to proceed, Council directed the planning team to assess opportunities for land use changes for the cluster of properties along the east side of King George Boulevard, south of the railway. At the inception of the Study, these lands were severed from the Town Centre by the railway; therefore they were not identified in the Study area. However, as planning for the area has evolved, the planned introduction of two new road crossings in this area will mean that these properties may be better connected with the Study area and will become the southerly gateway to the Town Centre.

6 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011


Figure 2 Land Use Plan

72 Avenue

COM

137

Stre et

MXU

INST

PK

Newton Wave Pool

MXU

d

a Ro

MXU RES

INST

71 Avenue

MXU

RES

138 Street

ll

Ha

King George Boulevard

INST

71 Avenue

70 b Avenue

RES MXU

137 a Street

MXU / INST COM 70 Avenue

INST Senior Center

INST Library

70 Avenue

70 Avenue

135 Street

RES

13 8

St re e

t

PK

N

0 25 50

100

200m

INST - Institutional COM - Commercial (Max. 1.5 FAR) MXU - Mixed Use (Max. 2.5 FAR)

RES - Residential (Max 2.0 FAR) PK - Major Park Space

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 7


Recommendations on King George Boulevard Properties The properties along the east side of King George Boulevard, south of the railway are facing a new set of development influences, as two new intersections on King George Boulevard introduce a significantly upgraded connection to the primary growth area within the Town Centre. Physically and functionally, these properties are quite similar to those properties found in the triangle formed by King George Boulevard, 72 Avenue, and the railway. These parcels, with frontage along King George Boulevard, continue to have a primary orientation to commercial development. While a new cross street gives improved vehicular access, their configurations tend to be less than efficient, which limits their potential development intensity. However, they have the benefit of being situated adjacent to the proposed transit exchange, improving their viability for residential uses in the future. For these reasons, these parcels are recommended for a MIXEDUSE land use category, with a maximum FAR of 2.5.

KEY ELEMENTS of the MASTER PLAN

1 2

3

Extended 137 Street as new “green spine” for Town Centre with lateral public space links to other blocks New intersections along King George Boulevard to extend access to Town Centre and Transit Exchange Relocated Transit Exchange with mixed-use development

4

New gateways to announce Town Centre along edges

5

Public plaza for orientation and passenger exchange

6

Formal plaza along 72 Avenue to orient development

7

New park south of 70 Avenue - stormwater treatment

and link with new gateways

wetland with active park elements anchoring southern end of Town Centre

8 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

8

Formalized and expanded woodlot park adjacent to

9

“Fingers of Green” park and pedestrian connections

10

Future dedicated rapid transit along King George

11

Community garden as green corridor destination

Newton Wave Pool

from south to north

Boulevard


Figure 3 Illustrative Master Plan

72 Avenue 6

6 8

Newton Wave Pool

Ha

137

1

Stre et

4

ll

10

d

a Ro

71 Avenue

138 Street

1 9 2

70 b Avenue

135 Street

2

137 a Street

King George Boulevard

71 Avenue 5 3

1

11

Senior Center

Library

70 Avenue

4 70 Avenue

4

70 Avenue

13

8

St re e

t

7

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0

50

100

200

400m

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 9


Figure 4 Illustrative Urban Design Concept - View Looking Southeast

10 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011


Urban Design Concept The Illustrative Urban Design Plan The Illustrative Urban Design Plan included in the Stage 1 Plan

high quality public space. •

joint public-private investments in buildings at the

demonstrates how redevelopment within the Newton Town

Transit Exchange.

Centre should occur over time. The large drivers of change within the Study Area are the existing and proposed institutional

Highlighting existing and proposed institutional uses by fronting them with new streets.

facilities, TransLink’s future Transit Exchange and the addition of a significant park space. These drivers, largely in public hands,

Creating a site structure that enables efficient

Creating a series of “green fingers” connecting

are seen as catalysts for other private development initiatives in

open spaces within the community and including a

the Town Centre.

proposed pedestrian-only connection to formally link the Wave Pool and its future expansion to the Senior Centre, Library and future YWCA facility, and

The Plan focused on several key land use elements: •

new park facilities south of 70 Avenue.

Providing a mixed-use environment along the proposed 137 “Main Street” extension to create

Highlighting and enhancing the existing grove of

a vibrant pedestrian environment through active

trees east of the Wave Pool into a formal public

retail uses on the ground floor and residential uses

park and plaza.

on upper floors.

Realigning 70 Avenue and 71 Avenue to effectively service the future Transit Exchange and the

Redevelopment Approach

proposed park space south of 70 Avenue and to

This plan envisions the transformation of the Study Area into a

provide additional east-west connectivity for the

vibrant mixed-use transit-oriented community to take advantage of the benefits of increased transit accessibility. The overall scale

community. •

Facilitating the redevelopment of existing

of development, as vetted by the community and supported by

commercial nodes at the intersection of 72 Avenue

the future market assessment included in the Stage 1 Plan, is low

and King George, and 72 Avenue and 138 Street into

to mid-rise - meaning development generally between 3-stories

mixed-use blocks with the provision of additional

and 6-stories in height. The overall density for the Study Area

street connections to tie into the proposed network.

should not exceed a floor-area-ratio (FAR) of 2.5.

Park south of 70 Avenue designed as an amenity that will also serve as a stormwater retention area.

The Plan focused on several key land use elements: • •

Creating “eyes on the park” through the allocation

Creating a “Main Street” along the realigned 137

of a development plot in the park for development

Street.

of a scale similar to the adjacent neighbourhoods.

Fronting this new “Main Street” with entrances to commercial and institutional uses and anchoring it with the planned Transit Exchange at the intersection of 71 Avenue and 137 Street.

Developing a transit plaza to serve both as an integral element of the on-street exchange and a

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 11


Figure 5 Illustrative Urban Design Concept - View Looking Northeast

8

6

9 1

11 5

10 3 2 4 2

12 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

7


KEY ELEMENTS of the MASTER PLAN

1 2

3

Extended 137 Street as new “green spine” for Town Centre with lateral public space links to other blocks New intersections along King George Boulevard to extend access to Town Centre and Transit Exchange Relocated Transit Exchange with mixed-use development

4

New gateways to announce Town Centre along edges

5

Public plaza for orientation and passenger exchange

6

Formal plaza along 72 Avenue to orient development

7

New park south of 70 Avenue - stormwater treatment

and link with new gateways

wetland with active park elements anchoring southern end of Town Centre

8

Formalized and expanded woodlot park adjacent to

9

“Fingers of Green” park and pedestrian connections

10

Future dedicated rapid transit along King George

11

Community garden as green corridor destination

Newton Wave Pool

from south to north

Boulevard

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 13


5.5 HA Southern City Property Figure 6 Indicative Property Land Allocation Plan

1

2

5 3

6 6

4

N

0

10 20

50

100m

14 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

7


Figure 7 Proposed Park Illustrative

7 3

6 4

2 1 5 KEY ELEMENTS of the PARK PLAN

1 2

Neighbourhood park elements (e.g. open lawn, courts, pavilions Development Plot (see Design Guidelines for more detail on building disposition

3

Passive play area

4

Circumferential trail

5

Stream area with rock edges (likely dry during summer)

6 7

Marshland with varying water levels (grass and shrubs on slopes) Open water - approximately __ HA Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 15


Transit Exchange Concept Plan Selected Alternative During the Stage 1 Plan development effort, the project working

Providing the ability to locate northbound Bus

team, including the City and TransLink and Consultants,

Rapid Transit stops on 71 Avenue across from the

developed a set of criteria to evaluate the various iterations

plaza and southbound stops on 137 Avenue adjacent

of Transit Exchange plans produced as part of the overall

to the plaza.

plan. These evaluation criteria, as well as the series of Transit

Offering a plan in which the development of the

Exchange design options, are located in the Stage 1 Plan

plot could be phased with the site prepared for

Appendix.

development as soon as access improvements to King George Boulevard and 137 Street are complete.

The plan described on the following pages represents a further

refinement to the preferred option. This option was initially

the Transit Exchange site and on the north side of

selected due to its balance between the transit-oriented development opportunities and efficient transit operation.

Creating the opportunity for joint development on 71 Avenue independent of the layover facility.

Requiring development on these sites to have active

The refinements have been subject to in-depth detailed traffic

ground floor retail fronting the street, consistent

modeling to fine tune the surrounding streets, intersections, and

with requirements for other development plots in

transit stops.

the Study Area. •

Key elements of the plan include: • •

railway for potential platform and auxiliary tracks.

from the exchange areas.

This reservation should preclude development of

Locating the layover facility such that it is less

permanent vertical structures on the site until the

visible from both 71 Avenue and 137 Street, though

settlement of future transit plans, but should not

it will be visible from King George Boulevard until

impact plans for the bus layover facility.

Developing a facilities building that is integrated into the proposed development and which provides kiosks for ticketing, facilities for the bus operators, and additional passenger waiting areas.

Facilitating passenger exchange in a triangular plaza, adjacent to both 71 Avenue and 137 Street, creating a major activity node along both streets that is functional for transit and beneficial for the street - “active, busy, interesting, streets”.

Transit through a reservation adjacent to the

Separating the transit layover function and facilities

adjacent development materialises. •

Allowing for the future provision of Light Rail

Utilizing on-street rather than off-street bus stops that could have independent shelters or integrated extended awnings built into the adjacent architecture.

16 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

Plan allows for flexibility in future design as the final rapid transit technology is not known.


Figure 8 Proposed Transit Exchange Illustrative

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 17


Transit Exchange Catalyst Site Plan Figure 9 Transit Exchange Concept Plan

NORTH PLOT 6

3

4 7

2 SOUTH PLOT 5

1

6

2

8

4 3

3

18 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011


1

Bus layover facility

2

Bus stops located on street to improve efficiency and create active and vibrant street environment

3

Bus-only ingress/egress point

4

Bus-only lane on street (see section on page 34)

5

Public plaza for orientation and passenger exchange

6 7 8

Potential mixed-use development (see standards on Design Guideline Plan page 24) Access to development parking and service (assumed to be below grade in this scenario) Reservation for future LRT facility - no permanent vertical building structures allowed in this area

BUILDING DATA

NORTH

SOUTH 8,155 m2

Plot Area

9,000 m

Gross Floor Area (GFA)

22,504 m2

14,865 m2

Ground Floor

4,736 m2

2,478 m2

Upper Floor

17,768 m

12,387 m2

Floor Area Ratio (FAR)

2.50

1.82

Parking Spaces Provided (structured)

510

270

2

2

N

0

10

20

50

100m

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 19


TownShift Concepts TownShift Concepts

Key TownShift Ideas for the Newton Town Centre

In late 2009, Council initiated “TownShift: Suburb Into City”,

TownShift concluded in March 2010, and culminated in the

an international ideas competition seeking innovative ideas

selection of two winning entries for the Newton Town Centre, as

for five of Surrey’s established town centres - Guildford,

follows:

Fleetwood, Cloverdale, Newton and Semiahmoo. The aim of the

1. “Connecting Density to Transit” - by Alan M James, Philip C

competition was to “shift” thinking and opportunities for each

Davis, Colin Weston, and Kim C Barnsley; and

of these “town” hubs towards more intense, public-minded and

2. “Newton Place” – by Richard Hulbert and Judy Tang.

productive urban futures. This competition was also intended to generate innovative new thinking about suburbs transforming

Based on the two winning submissions, as well as an evaluation

towards sustainability in an era of increasingly expensive energy.

of other key ideas and concepts from other submissions, the

TownShift established a number of overarching principles as a

following key concepts and ideas were identified for further

basis for the ideas generated forthe town centres, including:

consideration and incorporation into the Newton Town Centre

Emphasis on arrival and gateways, and development

Plan (Please see Corporate Report R093-Appendix V for further

of architecture and civic realm elements that serve

details):

as means of way-finding-imagining a sense of

• •

by an open space spine;

Creation of unique and shared places that are like no other;

The concept of developing “Quadrants” or land use precincts (commercial, civic, residential, etc.) linked

‘there’ to be there; •

Development of a vibrant public realm framed by

Integration of urban and cultural and social

private developments and connected to the existing

systems;

main street (137 Street), north of 72 Avenue;

Sustainability; and

Cultural, historical and social continuity.

Creation of a finer and more detailed road grid system with clearly defined spaces;

Linking of the urban forest (undeveloped Cityowned triangle of property at the south) with the central wooded lot;

The creation of a strong green pedestrian network connecting a series of public squares;

The development of a significant landmark and entry point at the southeast corner of the intersection of King George Boulevard and 72 Avenue as a launching point into the Town Centre; and

The development of a more substantial and stronger central green open space corridor.

Many of the concepts and ideas identified in TownShift are reflected in the proposed Stage 1 Land Use Concept; however, further evaluation and application of these important concepts was directed to be undertaken as part of the Stage 2 Plan to ensure appropriate implementation measures are incorporated.

20 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011


TOWNSHIFT CONCEPT

COMMENTARY AND STAGE 2 PLAN / DESIGN GUIDELINE RESPONSE

The concept of developing “Quadrants” or land use precincts (commercial, civic, residential, etc.) linked by an open space spine

The goal of the urban design plan is to create the framework for an integrated development model where uses are mixed to the greatest extent possible. As the plans are made far in advance of any actual land use programming by developers with an intended pro-forma, use allocations in this kind of environment are speculative at best. The Plan has developed a robust open space spine to connect the blocks of land, whatever their future use might be.

Development of a vibrant public realm framed by private developments and connected to the existing main street (137 Street), north of 72 Avenue

The idea of a vibrant public realm is threaded throughout the Plan. Efforts in Stage 2 focus on delineating guidelines to implement the ideas outlined in the Stage 1 Plan.

Creation of a finer and more detailed road grid system with clearly defined spaces

This concept permeates the Plan. Efforts in Stage 2 focus on delineating guidelines to implement the ideas outlined in the Stage 1 Plan through roadway and public realm design parameters.

Linking of the urban forest (undeveloped City-owned triangle of property at the south) with the central wooded lot

Note that the Illustrative Master Plan has incorporated the idea of “green fingers” connecting these significant open spaces.

The creation of a strong green pedestrian network connecting a series of public squares

Note that the Illustrative Master Plan and updated Urban Design Concept have built upon this idea to link a series of plazas within the public realm network to give a series of organizing features at a variety of scales throughout the community.

The development of a significant landmark and entry point at the southeast corner of the intersection of King George Boulevard and 72 Avenue as a launching point into the Town Centre

Note that the Illustrative Master Plan has included a series of gateways at the edges of the Town Centre to link with the major pedestrian connections to the spine of the new “Main Street”.

The development of a more substantial and stronger central green open space corridor

The original TownShift concept of a significant north-south median boulevard in the “Main Street” is untenable because of the impact on developable land, particularly on the Transit Exchange parcel, the impact on intimate pedestrian scale envisioned for the street, and the geometry of the existing buildings and rail crossings. In light of the desire for a stronger corridor, the Plan has augmented landscaping along “Main Street” and focused on the creation of more small green connections more in keeping with the Community’s desire for a more intimate pedestrian-scaled place.

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 21


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Design Guidelines


Figure 10 Design Guideline Plan

72 Avenue

Stre e

MU

137

MU

CB Newton Wave Pool

d

a Ro

MU MU

AB, TH

CB

71 Avenue

AB, TH

MU

71 Avenue

138 Street

ll

Ha

King George Boulevard

MU

t

CB

MU

70 b Avenue

MU

MU

137 a Street

AB, TH CB

Senior Center

CB Library

70 Avenue 70 Avenue

13 8

St re e

t

135 Street

AB, TH

Private Realm

King George Boulevard

AB, TH

Allowable Building Types

Main Street

Designated Right-of-Way

Transit Main Street

Potential Public Space

70 Avenue

Future Transit Reservation

Festival Street

Active Ground Floor Use Required

Standard Street

24 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011


Introduction These guidelines are intended to lay a regulatory framework

Design Guideline Coverage

that will foster the development of a vibrant community integrated with its surrounding neighbourhoods and the natural environment. Healthy communities, with a full complement of residential, retail, office, civic, and recreational uses, develop over the course of decades, not years. Development and redevelopment of a healthy community never stops, but remains in continuous flux, with the mix, amounts, and types of uses never remaining constant. However, certain community elements do remain more or less constant over the long term. The design of these elements - such as the arrangement of streets and public spaces - has lasting implications on the character of the community and on its ability to accommodate the changes that time will inevitably bring. It is the goal of these design guidelines, then, to more closely regulate the elements most important to creating a quality public realm - the elements that are slow-changing and more permanent - while allowing stylistic freedom for expressive architecture. The guidelines are broken into two categories. The Public Realm Design Guidelines lay out parameters and standards governing

Public Realm - Private Realm Integration

the design of streets, parks, and other open spaces accessible to the entire community. The Private Realm Design Guidelines guide development of areas outside the public realm, including individual buildings, service and loading areas, and parking. Frontage Zone

Where the Public Realm and Private Realm come together - at the edge of rights of way, the guidelines link together with a

Interface Zone

set of frontage requirements dictating the design of key details that are key to managing this transition in a way that promotes thoughtful urban design.

Private Plot Private Frontage Public Frontage Travelway Public Frontage Public Realm Private Realm

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 25


Public Realm Guidelines General Guidelines

Cycling Network and Amenities

Design of the public realm within Newton Town Centre will

Intent: The facilitation of cycling in Newton Town Centre is a key

be accomplished by both public agencies (City of Surrey and

strategy to reduce dependence on vehicles and to encourage

TransLink) and private developers of various plots within the

residents of the surrounding residential areas to patronize local

community. As such, this is a common set of instructions for

shops and services.

designing the elements accessible to everyone in the Town

Centre. - the streets and parks.

Clear signage and wayfinding elements shall be provided to direct cyclists to designated routes (onstreet greenways on 72 Avenue, 70 Avenue, and 138

The following general guidelines are applicable to all streets

Street and on-street routes on 136B Street and 68

and public realm areas within Newton Town Centre and set out

Avenue)

a unifying design direction to build a distinct character for the

area.

Bicycle parking shall be provided at key points along streetscapes to facilitate use of destinations by those arriving on bike.

Pedestrian Circulation Network

Consideration should be given to safe and secure

Intent: The existing pedestrian network is a combination of the

longer-term bike storage in lockers or through a

sidewalks within road rights-of-way, pedestrian paths through

“bike station” type service centre to encourage

public open spaces, and shortcuts made available on private

an effective interface between cycling and taking

commercial sites. Additional opportunities for pedestrian

transit from the Newton Exchange.

movement are desirable amenities to obtain as redevelopment

Landscape Materials and Character

occurs. • •

New pedestrian routes - open to public at all times -

Intent: These guidelines are common to all streets in the Town

shall be provided as shown on the Plan.

Centre. The City of Surrey’s standards identify appropriate

Overly large block sizes limit pedestrian routing

species, sizes, and spacing and specify planting methods to

options. As such, the maximum block sizes

ensure healthy growth and longevity for street trees in the Town

indicated on the Plan shall not be exceeded.

Centre. Additional common standards include:

Sidewalks shall be provided on both sides of all

and sidewalks unless noted otherwise.

anticipated pedestrian flows and adequate space for queuing areas at transit stops. • •

Natural colour concrete or exposed aggregate concrete shall be utilized for all pedestrian areas

streets, dimensioned for adequate space for •

The most pervious material possible shall be used

All new pedestrian facilities shall be designed for

for raised medians and wet strips along street

universal access.

edges. However, these areas should be paved

Street tree and furnishing placement shall be

and tree grates used where a significant level of

consistent with City of Surrey standards.

pedestrian traffic is anticipated across the median or wet strip, including where on-street parking is provided.

26 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011


Sustainable Design Practices

Low-Impact Stormwater Design

Intent: The development of a compact, walkable, and complete

Intent: The City of Surrey is an advocate of sustainable best

community in the Newton Town Centre is generally recognized

practices. Within the public realm, there is potential for surface

as a significant move towards sustainability for a number of

stormwater features to be integrated into the public and publicly

interconnected reasons including the reduction in the number

accessible open spaces within Newton Town Centre to feature the

of daily trips that require use of the automobile, increased

collection, detention, and remediation of stormwater within the

opportunities for people to live close to their place of work,

landscape design. Recommended sustainable guidelines for the

support for more efficient and frequent transit services,

public realm include:

improved health with opportunities for people to walk and cycle

Include areas of porous pavement into parking

to shopping, entertainment, and recreation, the efficient use of

spaces, both on-street and off-street, where surface

land, reducing pressures to develop regional green zone lands,

parking is not built over an underground parking

more efficient use of roads and servicing infrastructure with

structure

lower costs per person compared to low density, primarily single-

Include features to assist in the collection,

family development. The following sustainable practices are

percolation, and cleaning of stormwater into the

recommended in Newton Town Centre:

ground in surface parking lots that are not over

Low energy consuming and low water use buildings are encouraged.

The planter/furnishing zones of as many streets as possible should be pervious wherever the level of

with its benefits for air quality and temperature

anticipated pedestrian traffic is low enough to allow

moderation both from street trees in the public

lawn or groundcover plantings to grow successfully •

Medians should be planted with shrubs and

level courtyards and roof spaces, in the private

groundcovers as well as trees in a manner that

realm.

facilitates stormwater infiltration, including from

Encourage social interaction among people in the

adjacent paved surfaces

community through the design of engaging and •

Provide for intensification of green landscaping,

realm and landscaped open spaces, such as upper

structure.

Landscape in public open spaces and park

well-programmed public open spaces and amenities.

should feature a significant component of green

Ensure the provision of a diversity of housing types,

landscaping and minimize paved areas to those

including forms that suit families and that offer

places where the program of activities specifically

aging residents options to stay in their community

requires a hard surface. To the extent possible, all

as their need for care and health services change

stormwater in parks and green public open spaces

and for the disabled and low-income people.

should be collected and infiltrated on site. Design

Provide public art and heritage initiatives to

features should be considered that make use

enhance connections between community and

of rainwater in surface amenities as a means to

place.

animate and add interest to the space.

Integrate transit facilities into the core of the Town Centre through an effective Transit Exchange design to maximize convenience, safety, weather protection, and other factors that will attract users.

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 27


Public Art Placement Intent: Public art is an amenity in the public realm that adds interest and meaning to the experience of a place. Public art is a benefit that developers of projects can bestow on the community. Installations that advertise a commercial enterprise should not qualify as public art for locations within the public realm. Artistic excellence and high quality durable materials shall be sought. Multiple locations with potential for significant public art installations have been shown on the plan. •

Many forms of creative design can qualify as public art in addition to free standing sculptures including: water features and decorative fountains, special paving patterns or inserts, embellishments to vertical surfaces like planters, stair risers, and walls, and decorative treatments on street furnishings like benches and light poles. Pedestrian-oriented signage, weather protection and lights mounted on buildings can also have art embellishments.

While public art embellishment may occur anywhere that there is an opportunity, larger public art pieces should be sited to reinforce the urban design hierarchy of the Town Centre: at important nodes along key pedestrian movement routes and within public plazas where space is available for installations that do not interfere with the flow of pedestrians.

Public art shall be commissioned using the City of Surrey’s arts program process, including public consultation.

28 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011


Streetscape Guidelines The Plan’s vision for Newton Town Centre’s system of

Streets are a multi-faceted civic space shared among many

interconnected streets forming small blocks. The resulting

different types of users, and serving many different functions,

network manages all traffic in a superior manner by dispersing

including:

traffic and shortening travel distances.

Transportation

Community structure, identity, and pride

Streets must accommodate many types of users - pedestrians

Utilities, storm water management

(including children, the elderly, and the disabled), bicycles,

Landscaping

scooters, etc., transit (including school buses), neighbourhood

Access to private property

electric vehicles (NEV’s), automobiles, service trucks - delivery,

Connection to the open space network

garbage pickup, moving vans, etc., and emergency vehicles.

Social interaction

This means that more travel can be accomplished using these different modes, in descending priority:

The streetscape guidelines that follow address all the physical

Walking

elements that surround the street that should be designed

Transit

considering their influence on pedestrian and driver behaviour:

Bicycling

Carpooling

and other landscaping, sidewalks and crosswalks,

Single-occupant vehicle

signage, benches, streetlights, fences, railings,

Pavement and curbs, parked cars, street trees

outdoor dining areas, building frontages and Walking is the fundamental “mode” of transportation. This principle leads naturally to the most efficient multi-modal

facades •

system, and it requires an integrated approach to both land use

automobiles and emergency access by dispersing

and transportation planning. This approach is the heart of the Newton Town Centre Plan. To promote pedestrian trips streets

traffic and offering more route choices •

must be: •

Intersection design that promotes driver alertness and facilitates safe pedestrian crossing

Designed foremost for pedestrians: shade,

Design, Target, Operating and Posted speed should

sidewalks, crosswalks, interesting things to see,

be appropriate for the environment and the same

meaningful/useful destinations, protection from

on any given street

automobiles; •

An interconnected street network that benefits

Emergency, delivery and maintenance vehicles

Interconnected, offering meaningful and useful

must be carefully accommodated, but not by way of

destinations, and direct route options among all

wholesale street and intersection widening.

locations; and •

Designed to promote safety with appropriate traffic

Flexibility within guidelines is required to balance the sometimes

speed, and keep drivers alert to their surroundings

competing needs of different users and functions. These principles apply to all streets, and require extra care on the higher-order streets connecting through Newton Town Centre.

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 29


Figure 11 Street Framework Plan

ll

Newton Wave Pool

d

a Ro

138 Street

137

Ha

King George Boulevard

Stre et

72 Avenue

71 Avenue

137 a Street

71 Avenue

70 b Avenue

Senior Center

70 Avenue

Library

70 Avenue

13

8

St re e

t

135 Street

70 Avenue

N

0 25 50

100

200m

30 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

King George Boulevard

Main Street

Transit Main Street

70 Avenue

Festival Street

Standard Street


70 Avenue

King George Boulevard

Dedication Width

Dedication Width

DESIGN PARAMETERS Road Classification Dedication Width (m) Standard Width Additional Width (each side) Pavement Width Number of Sidewalks Shoulders or Curbs

DESIGN PARAMETERS Collector 26.0

Travel Lane Width (m)

2 Barrier Curbs

Travel Lanes (each direction)

1

Left Turn Lanes

3.7

27.0 7.5 17.4 2 Barrier Curbs

Travel Lane Width (m)

2 1 3.7

TRANSITWAY 2.4

Width (m)

8.0

BIKE LANES 1.8

Bike Lane Width (m)

1.3

MEDIAN 3.8

PUBLIC FRONTAGE Planter Type

Shoulders or Curbs

42.0

TRAVELWAY

MEDIAN Median Width (m) (interchangeable with center turn lane)

Number of Sidewalks

2

BIKE LANES Bike Lane Width (m)

Additional Width (each side) Pavement Width

Arterial

KEY ELEMENTS

ON-STREET PARKING Parallel Parking Lane Width (m)

Standard Width

1.0 12.2

TRAVELWAY Left Turn Lanes

Dedication Width (m)

24.0

KEY ELEMENTS Travel Lanes (each direction)

Road Classification

Median Width (m) (each side of center transitway)

3.8

PUBLIC FRONTAGE Grass, Intermittent or Tree Well

Planter Type

Grass, Intermittent or Tree Well

Planter Width (m)

2.7

Planter Width (m)

1.7

Massing Category

Structured

Massing Category

Structured

Walkway Width (each side) (m)

2.4

Walkway Width (each side) (m)

3.0

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 31


Main Street

Transit Main Street

Dedication Width

Dedication Width

DESIGN PARAMETERS Road Classification

DESIGN PARAMETERS Collector

Dedication Width (m)

28.0

Standard Width

24.0

Additional Width (each side)

2.0

Pavement Width

15.4

Number of Sidewalks Shoulders or Curbs

2 Barrier Curbs

KEY ELEMENTS

Dedication Width (m) Standard Width Additional Width (each side) Pavement Width Number of Sidewalks Shoulders or Curbs

Collector 29.0 24.0 2.5 16.6 2 Barrier Curbs

KEY ELEMENTS

TRAVELWAY

TRAVELWAY

Travel Lanes (each direction) Left Turn Lanes Travel Lane Width (m)

1

Travel Lanes (each direction)

1

Left Turn Lanes

3.5

ON-STREET PARKING

Travel Lane Width (m)

1 1 3.4

TRANSITWAY

Parallel Parking Lane Width (m)

2.4

BIKE LANES

Width (m)

3.8

ON-STREET PARKING

Bike Lane Width (m)

1.8

PUBLIC FRONTAGE Planter Type

Road Classification

Parallel Parking Lane Width (m)

2.4

BIKE LANES Intermittent or Tree Well

Planter Width (m)

2.5

Massing Category

Urban

Walkway Width (each side) (m)

3.7

Bike Lane Width (m) PUBLIC FRONTAGE Planter Type

Intermittent or Tree Well

Planter Width (m)

2.5

Massing Category

Urban

Walkway Width (each side) (m)

32 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

1.8

3.7


Standard Street

Festival Street

Dedication Width

Dedication Width

DESIGN PARAMETERS

DESIGN PARAMETERS

Road Classification

Local

Road Classification

Dedication Width (m)

20.0

Dedication Width (m)

Standard Width

20.0

Additional Width (each side)

N/A

Pavement Width Number of Sidewalks Shoulders or Curbs

11.8 2 Barrier Curbs

KEY ELEMENTS

Left Turn Lanes Travel Lane Width (m)

Travel Lanes (each direction)

1

Left Turn Lanes

3.5

10.5 18.8 2 Ribbon Curbs

Travel Lane Width (m)

1 1 3.7

ON-STREET PARKING 2.4

Head Out Angled Parking Lane Width (m)

5.7

BIKE LANES

Bikes share the travel lane because of low volumes and speeds PUBLIC FRONTAGE

Bikes share the travel lane because of low volumes and speeds MEDIAN

Grass, Intermittent or Tree Well

Planter Width (m)

2.0

Massing Category

Urban

Walkway Width (each side) (m)

Shoulders or Curbs

20.0

TRAVELWAY

BIKE LANES

Planter Type

Number of Sidewalks

1

ON-STREET PARKING Parallel Parking Lane Width (m)

Additional Width (each side) Pavement Width

26.0

KEY ELEMENTS

TRAVELWAY Travel Lanes (each direction)

Standard Width

Limited Local

Median Width (m)

9.4

PUBLIC FRONTAGE Planter Type

2.1

Intermittent, Rain Garden or Tree Well

Planter Width (m)

3.4

Massing Category

Structured

Walkway Width (each side) (m)

3.0

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 33


General Street Tree Planting Design Standards • •

• • •

spacing should be reserved for right-of-way/open space interface

Street tree planting shall comply with City

zones.

Arborist’s recommended plant palette.

Spacing of individual trees or groupings - 12-18m on center or

Trees within 1.2m of a sidewalk or roadway will have

some fraction thereof.

a minimum of 1.8m height clear trunk at the time of

Woodlot

planting and a minimum of 2.4m straight trunk to

Clustered plantings with individual clusters occurring on more

accommodate future ‘limbing up’ of trees.

formally spaced pattern and with less species diversity than the

Canopy trees will be planted no closer than 3.7m

naturalistic category.

from any light standards, as measured from the

Spacing – Two canopy trees and two understory trees each side

trunk of the tree.

of the street per 30 linear meters of right-of-way.

All trees shall be staked to allow for reasonable

Naturalistic

maintenance, pedestrian, and vehicular passage.

Planted to approximate a natural forest canopy. Plantings occur

Trees shall be placed outside of vehicular clear

in informal clusters varying in quantity, species and spacing.

zones.

Spacing – Two canopy trees and two understory trees each side

Trees may be watered by means of low-volume

of the street per 30 linear meters of right-of-way.

bubbler at each tree. Hand-watering as a means

Planter Type

of irrigation is allowable only during a one year

Grass includes areas for sod, shrubs, or ground cover and

establishment period.

flowering or canopy trees.

Massing Categories

Intermittent planters are raised or flush areas for the planting of

Urban

shrubs or ground cover and flowering or canopy trees.

Individual tree plantings of the same species on a formal,

Tree Wells are used in more urban conditions where continuous

regimented spacing layout.

sidewalks are desired. This may include a tree grate, which may

Spacing - 6-12m on center or some fraction thereof. Opposite

be less than full planter width.

tree placement along opposite sides of the right-of-way.

Rain Gardens are landscaped areas intended to facilitate overland

Structured

conveyance and infiltration of stormwater parallel to a street

Loosely grouped and/or individual trees of the same species placed generally on a more formal layout. Loosely grouped tree

Urban

Infiltration wells may be used in all planter types.

Structured

Structured

(individual)

(groupings)

34 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

Wood Lot

Naturalistic


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Figure 12 Public Open Space Framework Plan

72 Avenue

C

ll

Stre et

B

137

Ha d

a Ro

King George Boulevard

Newton Wave Pool

138 Street

C G

E

71 Avenue

D 70 b Avenue

G

137 a Street

71 Avenue

F G

Senior Center

Library

70 Avenue

70 Avenue

70 Avenue

13

8

St re e

t

135 Street

A

Key

N

0 25 50

100

200m

36 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

Public Open Space Streetscape Right-of-Way


Public Open Space Guidelines The Public Open Space Guidelines describe the intent and key elements of the parks proposed to be part of Newton Town Centre. Open Spaces - parks, squares, plazas, conservation lands, paths, greenways, and public streets - are essential to a high quality of life. The benefits of a well-planned system of open spaces include increased property values, community identity, improved community aesthetics, opportunity for recreation and socializing, protection of natural resources, and multi-modal transportation linkages. Parks and open spaces are used by residents and the general public for many different functions, requiring a range of sizes and types. These spaces should be integrated into the fabric of the community along with other public infrastructure systems such as streets, utilities, and stormwater drainage. Therefore, a multitude of parks of different size and character is more

Newton Park

A

desirable than a small number of larger parks.

Intent Provide resource-based passive recreation and stormwater management area along with a small area for as-yet unprogrammed active recreation along 70 Avenue.

Key Elements •

Stormwater infiltration area serving runoff from Main Street’s extended infiltration trenches

Stormwater lake of approximately 2.2 HA

Public Art

Looping trails

Significant tree preservation

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 37


Forest Park

B

72 Avenue Plaza

C

Intent

Intent

Provide woodlot preservation and passive recreation in

Provide linear promenade connecting east and west gateways

the center of the park, a formal plaza on the south end for

along 72 Avenue to the “Main Street”.

gatherings associated with the “Festival Street” area to the west, and a square on the north end of the park as a terminus to the 70 Street Plaza.

Key Elements •

Significant tree preservation

Hardscape plaza with public art installation

Urban square

Playground associated with Wave Pool expansion

38 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

Key Elements •

Mixed landscape and hardscape plaza

Significant sidewalk width (> 4.0 m)

Public Frontage similar to requirements for “Main Street”

Link with Forest Park square on east


Main Street Plaza

D

Mews

E

Intent

Intent

Provide space for transit passenger exchange and orientation

Provide north-south pedestrian connection and low-impact

along Main Street spine.

stormwater management area as part of “green fingers” concept.

Key Elements

Key Elements

Primarily hardscape plaza

Significant sidewalk width (> 4.0 m)

Stormwater infiltration area serving runoff from

Public Frontage similar to requirements for “Main

Pervious paved or gravel pathway

Street”

Significant landscape

surrounding developments

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 39


Community Gardens

F

Gateways

G

Intent

Intent

Provide open space and location for residents to grow and harvest

Provide symbolic reference and beginning of sequence of entry

food.

into Town Centre.

Key Elements

Key Elements

• •

Located within lower density area to allow longer

Monumentation or public art

duration of sunlight during growing season

Primarily hardscape

Allowance for small, securable structures for storage of supplies

Multiple water sources

Parking provided by adjacent on-street spaces

Linked to pedestrian network

40 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011


Private Realm Guidelines Development of the Private Realm of Newton Town Centre is governed by the following set of guidelines. These guidelines applicable to all new developments and improvements to existing buildings located within the Newton Town Centre area and are intended to reinforce the overall design objectives of the Stage One Plan, creating a vibrant pedestrian environment through active ground floor uses, an orientation toward streets and public spaces, and densities that are supportive of transit. This is envisioned to occur by integrating residential uses into the redevelopment of sites in close proximity to the transit exchange along with commercial, institutional, and open space uses.

General Design Guidelines The urban design of the Newton Town Centre, meaning the building placement, massing, and articulation, will be key to achieving a strong and distinctive sense of place that will attract residents and visitors to the area. Recommended overall urban design guidelines include: •

Every building should be designed to contribute to the interest and enjoyment of the pedestrian experience along the adjacent public realm.

Where appropriate, especially in retail and office uses, a high proportion of glazing at the ground floor is recommended for this purpose. Blank walls facing streets are discouraged. Where they are unavoidable, a combination of spandrel glass and high quality landscaping is encouraged to mitigate the visual impact of the wall.

Buildings, outdoor spaces and landscaping are to be located and designed to maximize opportunities for informal surveillance.

The transitions between the public realm and the private realm should be designed in a way that clarifies the locations of public versus private uses. This can be done through changes in elevation between private uses and the public realm, low walls or fences, and small planters and landscaping, or through other means that achieve a similar

result.

Indicative examples of mixed-use buildings that reinforce the overall

Parking, including visitor spaces, should be

design objectives of the plan.

contained within the building envelope, either atSurrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 41


Figure 13 Private Realm Development Framework

ll

Stre e

Newton Wave Pool

d

a Ro

138 Street

137

Ha

King George Boulevard

t

72 Avenue

71 Avenue

137 a Street

71 Avenue

70 b Avenue

Senior Center

Library

70 Avenue

70 Avenue

13 8

St re e

t

135 Street

70 Avenue

42 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

Private Realm

Future Transit Reservation

Active Ground Floor Use Required


grade, underground, or in a structure. Access to parking access should be provided along a non-

streetscapes within the Town Centre. •

on the requirements of the plans

its visual impact on the adjacent public realm. •

To the greatest extent possible, services such as

floors above the fourth storey are set back from the

cabinets, gas metres, and storage or loading areas

adjacent front façade and where ground floor uses may be retail, office, or residential.

the public realm.

Residential development is encouraged within the Town Centre

Design of exterior spaces should consider should

area above retail uses in the ground floor of buildings and above

respond to climactic conditions, providing for rain

office uses that may occur in the second floors of some buildings.

protection and shade structures, snow collection

The urban design considerations for mixed-use developments

and removal needs, and light access in winter.

must balance the desire for a continuous and animated retail

Buildings within the Town Centre should be

frontage along designated retail streetscapes with the need to

designed following contemporary architecture

provide identifiable and usable entries to upper-floor office and

styles and should favor materials that are high-

residential uses.

quality, durable, and easily maintained, such as

Recommended guidelines include:

concrete, brick, stone, tile, and glass. •

Entries and lobbies for upper floor residential

Materials with a high tactile interest, such as brick,

uses in mixed-use buildings should be located with

stone, or wood, should be used where people

a clear residential design expression featuring

are likely to come into physical contact with

such elements as: extensive glazing, high ceilings,

buildings such as at primary pedestrian facades, on balconies, and in entry and lobby areas. •

Three to six storey apartment buildings where

garbage collection, telephone, electric, and cable should be located to minimize their visibility from •

Two to four storey buildings where uses at ground level may be commercial or residential, depending

retail frontage and should be designed to minimize

seating for guests, and inviting lighting. •

Entries and lobbies for second-floor uses should be

Surface parking within the Town Centre is to

located on non-retail streets or if located on a retail

be limited the minimum required by governing

street, contain retail merchandise or interesting

code. Additional parking above code minimum is

displays that relate to the upper-floor uses.

permitted provided that it is contained below a building or in a parking structure. •

Buildings should be sited to maximize the length of façade along the street.

Buildings should be located close to the street frontage, at the minimum setback from property lines to create a strong architectural edge.

The massing, setbacks, and orientation of buildings should reinforce a pedestrian environment.

Guidelines for Residential Over Retail or Office Uses The Stage One Plan envisons a diversity of housing types within Newton Town Centre in order to serve a wide range of households. This housing is to be low to mid-rise construction, and will include a variety of building forms to create interesting

Indicative examples of residential mixed-use buildings Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 43


Guidelines for King George Boulevard Buildings Guidelines for Institutional Buildings

Development along King George Boulevard should be designed

Newton Town Centre contains a significant number of

to create a walkable environment to the greatest extent possible.

institutional uses, including the library and various recreational

To that end, the following guidelines should apply:

facilities. These uses play an important part in bringing the

Strong architectural edges should be created along

community to the Town Centre. As new institutional uses are

King George Boulevard. This can be accomplished

developed in the Town Centre, the following guidelines should

by locating principal buildings at the minimum

apply:

required front yard setback and including a high

Institutional uses should be located in non-retail

proportion of glazing as a major component of

fronting locations. If the use is located in a primary

facades facing King George Boulevard.

retail corridor, then provision for a “liner” of retail

Corner sites along King George Boulevard are to

uses on these streetscapes should be made. If

be anchored with buildings and a gateway plaza

a retail streetscape frontage is not achievable,

utilizing a combination of landscape, hardscape,

then the program for the institutional use should

and architectural elements. These anchor buildings

be assessed with the intent to locate one of the

should provide a visual landmark and be designed

most interesting and active components in view of

to be pedestrian accessible from abutting streets.

passing pedestrians (reception, café, children’s play

The use of abundant glazing and windows oriented

area, etc.).

toward the primary streets is encouraged.

Guidelines for the Transit Exchange Buildings Design of buildings at the Transit Exchange will be key to developing the standard of architecture for the Town Centre and should reflect the central role they will play in the community. The following standards should apply: •

Buildings are encouraged to be mixed-use, with residential or office uses above a retail ground floor.

At the Transit Exchange, principal buildings should anchor corners and be designed with due consideration to the visual prominence of these buildings as landmarks.

Site design should reflect the large numbers of pedestrians anticipated at the site, and prioritize pedestrian movements to the greatest extent possible.

Guidelines for Parking Area Design Parking should be designed to be safe and easily accessible and should not dominate the development of a site. The following guidelines should be followed in the design of parking areas: • Indicative examples of institutional buildings 44 Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011

Surface parking within the Town Centre is to be limited the minimum required by governing


code. Additional parking above code minimum is

Guidelines for Sustainable Development

permitted provided that it is contained below a

New development in the Town Centre is encouraged to

building or in a parking structure.

incorporate principles of sustainable development in the site

Pedestrian walkways through parking areas are

planning and building design using LEED (Leadership in Energy

strongly encouraged and should be carefully

and Environmental Design) or similar standards in the following

defined, particularly where pedestrian and vehicle

areas:

conflicts are unavoidable. •

space and areas planted with shrubs, ground cover,

areas minimized along King George Boulevard,

and trees, and keeping paved impermeable areas to

where parking areas should be located behind

a minimum.

buildings and be screened from direct view from

the street. •

Minimize storm water run-off by increasing green

Building exposure should be maximized and parking

Where parking areas cannot be located behind

and minimize site irrigation. •

buildings and are therefore adjacent to public streets, parking areas shall be screened using some

Design landscaping to reduce water consumption Rainwater and stormwater should be harvested for irrigation and other uses on site.

Maximize the quantity of native species including

combination of landscaping, colonnades, trellises,

planting material that is drought resistant and

pergolas, low transparent fences, low masonry or

trees that provide shade. Incorporate means of

concrete walls.

maximizing water efficiency within buildings.

CPTED Guidelines The City of Surrey is committed to creating a safe urban

or other high-efficiency lights. •

environment. This is particularly important in a highly visible and

Buildings should be designed to benefit from solar heat gain by orienting generally north south to

active area such as the Newton Town Centre, where the Transit Exchange attracts large numbers of people throughout the day.

Exterior lighting should utilize compact flourescent

maximize southern exposure. •

Design should consider alternative and renewable

Implementing “Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design”

energy production systems such as geothermal

(CPTED) principles and strategies at the concept and design

heat pumps, solar heating, biomass, and winds.

stage have proven to be a very effective and proactive means to

prevent crime. CPTED aims to minimize opportunities for crime

materials with recycled content should be used

by designing the physical environment to reduce opportunities for crime, the fear of crime, and nuisance behavior such as

where possible. •

loitering, littering, and vandalism. •

All new development within Newton Town Centre

Reused wood or reclaimed lumber and other

To the extent possible, construction should use locally-sourced building products.

Orient buildings to maximize daylight penetration

will be required to incorporate CPTED measures

and natural ventilation into working areas. Maximize

as contained the policies of the Surrey Official

windows on the exterior walls; incorporate skylights,

Community Plan.

interior courtyards or terrace the buildings for

CPTED principles should be considered at the

daylight penetration into the interior, etc.

site planning stage to coordinate and maintain continuity of buffering, landscaped strips, sidewalks and multi-use pathways from one development site to another.

Surrey Newton Town Centre Stage 2 Plan l July 2011 45


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